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Sample records for quark delocalization colour

  1. New results with colour-sextet quarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D. K.; Kogut, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    We study QCD with 2 and 3 flavours of colour-sextet quarks. The 2-flavour theory is a candidate Walking Technicolor theory. Since we are attempting to distinguish whether this theory is walking or conformal, we also study the 3-flavour theory, which is believed to be conformal, for comparison. We simulate lattice QCD with 2 and 3 flavours of colour-sextet staggered quarks at finite temperatures to determine the scales of confinement and chiral-symmetry breaking from the positions of the deconfinement and chiral-symmetry restoration transitions. Unlike the case with fundamental quarks, these transitions are far apart. For 2 flavours the values of {beta} = 6/g{sup 2} for both transitions increase as Ta is decreased from 1/4 to 1/6 to 1/8, as expected for a theory whose coupling runs to smaller values as the lattice spacing is decreased. However, for the chiral transition, the increase in {beta} between Ta = 1/4 and Ta = 1/6 is much larger than the increase between Ta = 1/6 and Ta = 1/8. This suggests that between Ta = 1/4 and Ta = 1/6 we are at strong coupling where the theory is effectively quenched, while between Ta = 1/6 and Ta = 1/8 we are emerging into the weak coupling regime. It will require even smaller Ta values to determine whether the running of the chiral-transition coupling is controlled by asymptotic freedom and the theory walks, or if it reaches a non-zero limit when the transition becomes a bulk transition and the theory is conformal. The 3 flavour case at Ta = 1/4 and Ta = 1/6 behaves similarly to the 2 flavour case. Since this theory is expected to be conformal, the interpretation that we are seeing strong-coupling behaviour, inaccessible from the weak-coupling limit (continuum) is the most likely interpretation.

  2. Quantum entanglement of quark colour states

    SciTech Connect

    Buividovich, P. V.; Kuvshinov, V. I.

    2010-03-24

    An analysis of quantum entanglement between the states of static colour charges in the vacuum of pure Yang-Mills theory is carried out. Hilbert space of physical states of the fields and the charges is endowed with a direct product structure by attaching an infinite Dirac string to each charge.

  3. Quantifying solvated electrons' delocalization.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2015-07-28

    Delocalized, solvated electrons are a topic of much recent interest. We apply the electron delocalization range EDR(r;u) (J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 144104) to quantify the extent to which a solvated electron at point r in a calculated wavefunction delocalizes over distance u. Calculations on electrons in one-dimensional model cavities illustrate fundamental properties of the EDR. Mean-field calculations on hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-) show that the density-matrix-based EDR reproduces existing molecular-orbital-based measures of delocalization. Correlated calculations on hydrated electrons and electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters illustrates how electron correlation tends to move surface- and cavity-bound electrons onto the cluster or cavity surface. Applications to multiple solvated electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters provide a novel perspective on the interplay of delocalization and strong correlation central to lithium-ammonia solutions' concentration-dependent insulator-to-metal transition. The results motivate continued application of the EDR to simulations of delocalized electrons.

  4. How far do electrons delocalize?

    SciTech Connect

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-10-14

    Electron delocalization is central to chemical bonding, but it is also a fundamentally nonclassical and nonintuitive quantum mechanical phenomenon. Tools to quantify and visualize electron delocalization help to understand, teach, and predict chemical reactivity. We develop a new approach to quantify and visualize electron delocalization in real space. Our electron delocalization range function EDR(r{sup -vector};u) quantifies the degree to which electrons at point r{sup -vector} in a calculated wavefunction delocalize over length scale u. Its predictions are physically reasonable. For example, EDR(r{sup -vector};u=0.25 bohr) is close to one at points r{sup -vector} in the cores of first-row atoms, consistent with the localization of core electrons to ∼0.25 bohr. EDR(r{sup -vector};u=1 bohr) is close to one at points r{sup -vector} in typical covalent bonds, consistent with electrons delocalizing over the length of the bond. Our approach provides a rich representation of atomic shell structure; covalent and ionic bonding; the delocalization of excited states, defects, and solvated electrons; metallic and insulating systems; and bond stretching and strong correlation.

  5. How far do electrons delocalize?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Electron delocalization is central to chemical bonding, but it is also a fundamentally nonclassical and nonintuitive quantum mechanical phenomenon. Tools to quantify and visualize electron delocalization help to understand, teach, and predict chemical reactivity. We develop a new approach to quantify and visualize electron delocalization in real space. Our electron delocalization range function {EDR}({r};u) quantifies the degree to which electrons at point {r} in a calculated wavefunction delocalize over length scale u. Its predictions are physically reasonable. For example, {EDR}({r};u=0.25 {bohr}) is close to one at points {r} in the cores of first-row atoms, consistent with the localization of core electrons to ˜0.25 bohr. {EDR}({r};u=1 {bohr}) is close to one at points {r} in typical covalent bonds, consistent with electrons delocalizing over the length of the bond. Our approach provides a rich representation of atomic shell structure; covalent and ionic bonding; the delocalization of excited states, defects, and solvated electrons; metallic and insulating systems; and bond stretching and strong correlation.

  6. How far do electrons delocalize?

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2014-10-14

    Electron delocalization is central to chemical bonding, but it is also a fundamentally nonclassical and nonintuitive quantum mechanical phenomenon. Tools to quantify and visualize electron delocalization help to understand, teach, and predict chemical reactivity. We develop a new approach to quantify and visualize electron delocalization in real space. Our electron delocalization range function EDR (r⃗;u) quantifies the degree to which electrons at point r⃗ in a calculated wavefunction delocalize over length scale u. Its predictions are physically reasonable. For example, EDR (r⃗;u=0.25 bohr ) is close to one at points r⃗ in the cores of first-row atoms, consistent with the localization of core electrons to ~0.25 bohr. EDR (r⃗;u=1 bohr ) is close to one at points r⃗ in typical covalent bonds, consistent with electrons delocalizing over the length of the bond. Our approach provides a rich representation of atomic shell structure; covalent and ionic bonding; the delocalization of excited states, defects, and solvated electrons; metallic and insulating systems; and bond stretching and strong correlation.

  7. Entanglement of two delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsak, A.; Sega, I.; Jefferson, J. H.

    2006-07-15

    Several convenient formulas for the entanglement of two indistinguishable delocalized spin-1/2 particles are introduced. These generalize the standard formula for concurrence, valid only in the limit of localized or distinguishable particles. Several illustrative examples are given.

  8. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  9. Paper Colouration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLow, Barry

    Of all the products added to paper, colour is often seen as the least important as, generally speaking, it adds nothing to the final properties of the paper. However, incorrect use of colour can turn paper, which would meet all the physical properties required of it, into paper which is unsuitable for sale, purely and simply because it is the wrong colour or shade. Correct use of colour, therefore, is of utmost importance to the papermaker.

  10. Applying colour science in colour design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming Ronnier

    2006-06-01

    Although colour science has been widely used in a variety of industries over the years, it has not been fully explored in the field of product design. This paper will initially introduce the three main application fields of colour science: colour specification, colour-difference evaluation and colour appearance modelling. By integrating these advanced colour technologies together with modern colour imaging devices such as display, camera, scanner and printer, some computer systems have been recently developed to assist designers for designing colour palettes through colour selection by means of a number of widely used colour order systems, for creating harmonised colour schemes via a categorical colour system, for generating emotion colours using various colour emotional scales and for facilitating colour naming via a colour-name library. All systems are also capable of providing accurate colour representation on displays and output to different imaging devices such as printers.

  11. Colour vision: colouring the dark.

    PubMed

    Land, Michael F; Osorio, Daniel C

    2003-02-01

    Humans lose colour vision at night and it has often been assumed that this happens to other animals as well. It is not true of nocturnal moths, however: a recent study has shown that the elephant hawk moth makes use of trichromatic colour vision when seeking flowers by starlight.

  12. Ideal fermion delocalization in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2005-07-01

    In this note we examine the properties of deconstructed Higgsless models for the case of a fermion whose SU(2) properties arise from delocalization over many sites of the deconstructed lattice. We derive expressions for the correlation functions and use these to establish a generalized consistency relation among correlation functions. We discuss the form of the W boson wavefunction and show that if the probability distribution of the delocalized fermions is appropriately related to the W wavefunction, then deviations in precision electroweak parameters are minimized. In particular, we show that this ''ideal fermion delocalization'' results in the vanishing of three of the four leading zero-momentum electroweak parameters defined by Barbieri et al. We then discuss ideal fermion delocalization in the context of two continuum Higgsless models, one in Anti-deSitter space and one in flat space. Our results may be applied to any Higgsless linear moose model with multiple SU(2) groups, including those with only a few extra vector bosons.

  13. Colour blindness.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N

    1998-03-01

    The physiology of colour vision is discussed; as is the way in which the human eye can detect various combinations of red, green and blue. Red-green colour blindness, with X-linked inheritance, is the most common, but other types are also considered. Methods of testing relating to the age of the child are reviewed. The use of colours in teaching is widespread, but there is controversy over the difficulties this may cause a colour blind child. A review of the literature does not reveal much information on this, and any problems that do arise are likely to be individual to the child, and to depend on such factors as overall intelligence, the attitude of the teacher, and the personality of the child. There is not doubt that it is essential to recognise colour vision defects when it comes to choosing a career, and that tests must be done during secondary schooling, but in order to avoid some affected children being disadvantaged there is enough evidence to support testing at school entry.

  14. [Delocalizing the mind. Peirce, James, Wittgenstein, Descombes].

    PubMed

    Chauviré, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive sciences have breathed fresh air into the old problem of localizing mental functions, which was often laughed off. Regarding the most philosophical form of the question on the localization of the mind, authors such as Peirce, James, Wittgenstein, and most recently Descombes have imagined delocalizing the mind in order to spread the conviction that the idea itself of a location of the mental is meaningless and to criticize the localisationism of today's cognitive scientists.

  15. Particles, Quarks, Leptons and Coloured Glue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Explains the current situation in particle physics by reviewing the three major periods in the development of atomic theory. Outlines the current picture of fundamental particles and identifies five major problems with this model. (GS)

  16. Covert colour processing in colour agnosia.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; de Haan, Edward H F

    2006-01-01

    Patients with colour agnosia can perceive colours and are able to match coloured patches on hue, but are unable to identify or categorise colours. It is a rare condition and there is as yet no agreement on the clinical definition or a generally accepted explanation. In line with observations from object agnosia and prosopagnosia, we hypothesised that (some of) these patients might still be able to process colour information at an implicit level. In this study, we investigated this possibility of implicit access to colour semantics and colour names in a man (MAH) who suffers from developmental colour agnosia. We designed two experimental computer tasks: an associative colour priming task with a lexical decision response and a reversed Stroop task. The results of these experiments suggest that there is indeed automatic processing of colour, although MAH was unable to explicitly use colour information.

  17. Harmonic Vibrational Analysis in Delocalized Internal Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Frank; Palmer, David S

    2011-01-11

    It is shown that a principal component analysis of a large set of internal coordinates can be used to define a nonredundant set of delocalized internal coordinates suitable for the calculation of harmonic vibrational normal modes. The selection of internal coordinates and the principal component analysis provide large degrees of freedom in extracting a nonredundant set of coordinates, and thus influence how the vibrational normal modes are described. It is shown that long-range coordinates may be especially suitable for describing low-frequency global deformation modes in proteins.

  18. Spin Delocalization Over Type Zero Copper

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Lancaster, Kyle M.; Richards, John H.; Gray, Harry B.; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    Hard-ligand, high-potential copper sites have been characterized in double mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin (C112D/M121X (X = L, F, I)). These sites feature a small Azz(Cu) splitting in the EPR spectrum together with enhanced electron transfer activity. Due to these unique properties these constructs have been called “type zero” copper sites. In contrast, the single mutant, C112D, features a large Azz(Cu) value characteristic of the typical type 2 CuII. In general, Azz(Cu) comprises contributions from Fermi contact, spin dipolar and orbital dipolar terms. In order to understand the origin of the low Azz(Cu) value of type zero CuII we explored in detail its degree of covalency, as manifested by spin delocalization over its ligands, that affects Azz(Cu) through the Fermi contact and spin dipolar contributions. This was achieved by the application of several complementary EPR hyperfine spectroscopic techniques at X- and W-band (~9.5 and 95 GHz, respectively) frequencies to map the ligand hyperfine couplings. Our results show that spin delocalization over the ligands in type zero CuII is different from that of type 2 CuII in the single C112D mutant; the 14N hyperfine couplings of the coordinated histidine nitrogens are smaller by about 25–40%, whereas that of the 13C carboxylate of D112 is about 50% larger. From this comparison we concluded that the spin delocalization of type zero copper over its ligands is not dramatically larger than in type 2 C112D. Therefore, the reduced Azz(Cu) values of type zero CuII are largely attributable to an increased orbital dipolar contribution that is related to its larger gzz value, as a consequence of the distorted tetrahedral geometry. The increased spin delocalization over the D112 carboxylate in type zero mutants compared to type 2 C112D suggests that electron transfer paths involving this residue are enhanced. PMID:22432748

  19. Does chaos assist localization or delocalization?

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jintao; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua; Lu, Gengbiao

    2014-12-01

    We aim at a long-standing contradiction between chaos-assisted tunneling and chaos-related localization study quantum transport of a single particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice. We find some near-resonant regions crossing chaotic and regular regions in the parameter space, and demonstrate that chaos can heighten velocity of delocalization in the chaos-resonance overlapping regions, while chaos may aid localization in the other chaotic regions. The degree of localization enhances with increasing the distance between parameter points and near-resonant regions. The results could be useful for experimentally manipulating chaos-assisted transport of single particles in optical or solid-state lattices.

  20. Perspective: Detecting and measuring exciton delocalization in photosynthetic light harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Scholes, Gregory D. Smyth, Cathal

    2014-03-21

    Photosynthetic units perform energy transfer remarkably well under a diverse range of demanding conditions. However, the mechanism of energy transfer, from excitation to conversion, is still not fully understood. Of particular interest is the possible role that coherence plays in this process. In this perspective, we overview photosynthetic light harvesting and discuss consequences of excitons for energy transfer and how delocalization can be assessed. We focus on challenges such as decoherence and nuclear-coordinate dependent delocalization. These approaches complement conventional spectroscopy and delocalization measurement techniques. New broadband transient absorption data may help uncover the difference between electronic and vibrational coherences present in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy data. We describe how multipartite entanglement from quantum information theory allows us to formulate measures that elucidate the delocalization length of excitation and the details of that delocalization even from highly averaged information such as the density matrix.

  1. Developmental colour agnosia.

    PubMed

    van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Nijboer, Tanja C W; de Haan, Edward

    2007-08-01

    Colour agnosia concerns the inability to recognise colours despite intact colour perception, semantic memory for colour information, and colour naming. Patients with selective colour agnosia have been described and the deficit is associated with left hemisphere damage. Here we report a case study of a 43-year-old man who was referred to us with a stroke in his right cerebellar hemisphere. During the standard assessment it transpired that he was unable to name coloured patches. Detailed assessment of his colour processing showed that he suffers from a selective colour agnosia. As he claimed to have had this problem all his life, and the fact that the infratentorial infarct that he had incurred was in an area far away from the brain structures that are known to be involved in colour processing, we suggest that he is the first reported case of developmental colour agnosia.

  2. Interactions between colour and synaesthetic colour: an effect of simultaneous colour contrast on synaesthetic colours.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; Gebuis, Titia; te Pas, Susan F; van der Smagt, Maarten J

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether simultaneous colour contrast affects the synaesthetic colour experience and normal colour percept in a similar manner. We simultaneously presented a target stimulus (i.e. grapheme) and a reference stimulus (i.e. hash). Either the grapheme or the hash was presented on a saturated background of the same or opposite colour category as the synaesthetic colour and the other stimulus on a grey background. In both conditions, grapheme-colour synaesthetes were asked to colour the hash in a colour similar to the synaesthetic colour of the grapheme. Controls that were pair-matched to the synaesthetes performed the same experiment, but for them, the grapheme was presented in the colour induced by the grapheme in synaesthetes. When graphemes were presented on a grey and the hash on a coloured background, a traditional simultaneous colour-contrast effect was found for controls as well as synaesthetes. When graphemes were presented on colour and the hash on grey, the controls again showed a traditional simultaneous colour-contrast effect, whereas the synaesthetes showed the opposite effect. Our results show that synaesthetic colour experiences differ from normal colour perception; both are susceptible to different surrounding colours, but not in a comparable manner.

  3. Synaesthesia and colour constancy.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Holly; Mattingley, Jason B; Arnold, Derek H

    2013-04-01

    Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is an atypical condition characterized by the perception of colours when reading achromatic text. We investigated the level of colour processing responsible for these experiences. To do so, we tapped a central characteristic of colour perception. In different lighting conditions the same wavelength of light can prompt the perception of different colours. This helps humans recognize distinctive coloured objects despite changes in illumination. We wanted to see if synaesthetic colours were generated at a neural locus that was susceptible to colour constancy analyses. We used colour matching and naming tasks to examine interactions between simulated coloured illuminants and synaesthetic colours. Neither synaesthetic colour matching or naming was impacted. This contrasted with non-synaesthetic control participants, who performed the colour-matching task with graphemes physically coloured to mimic synaesthesia. Our data suggest that synaesthetic colour signals are not generated at lower-levels of colour processing, but are introduced at higher levels of analysis and are therefore not impacted by the processes responsible for perceptual constancy.

  4. Colour Perception in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Ruppert, Sinje; Tannock, Rosemary; Albrecht, Bjorn; Becker, Andreas; Uebel, Henrik; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2006-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with unexplained impairments on speeded naming of coloured stimuli. These deficits may reflect hypofunctioning retinal dopaminergic mechanisms impairing particularly blue-yellow colour discrimination. Colour perception and rapid colour naming ability were investigated in 14 children…

  5. Four Preon Composite Quarks and Leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Samuel, Mark A.

    A model is presented in which quarks and leptons are composites of three spin-(1)/(2) preons and a scalar preon. The model is an extension of the rishon model and consists of two spin-(1)/(2) preons T, V and a scalar preon S as the fundamental building blocks of matter. Assuming distinguishability of states due to the order assigned to the preons in forming the quark and lepton states, the concepts of flavour, colour and generation number acquire meaning only at the level of compositeness. The model predicts four generations of conventional quarks and leptons.

  6. Enhanced Sensitivity of Delocalized Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Madu N; Mandal, Himadri S; Waldeck, David H

    2013-12-01

    This work reports on the observation of a delocalized surface plasmon resonance (DSPR) phenomenon in linear chains of square-shaped silver nanoparticles (NP) as a function of the chain length and the distance between the nanoparticles in the chain. Transmission spectra of the silver nanoparticle chains reveal the emergence of new, red-shifted extinction peaks that depend strongly on the spacing between the nanoparticles and the polarization of the exciting light with respect to the chain axis. As the spacing between the nanoparticles in the linear chain decreases and the number of nanoparticles in the linear chain increases, the strength of the new extinction features increase strongly. These changes can be described by a tight-binding model for the coupled chain, which indicates that the origin of the phenomenon is consistent with an increased coupling between the nanoparticles. FDTD calculations reveal that the electric field is strongly enhanced between the nanoparticles in the chain. The DSPR response is found to be much more sensitive to dielectric changes than the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR).

  7. Delocalization and new phase in Americium: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P

    1999-04-23

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the high pressure behavior of Am. At about 80 kbar (8 GPa) calculations reveal a monoclinic phase similar to the ground state structure of plutonium ({alpha}-Pu). The experimentally suggested {alpha}-U structure is found to be substantially higher in energy. The phase transition from fcc to the low symmetry structure is shown to originate from a drastic change in the nature of the electronic structure induced by the elevated pressure. A calculated volume collapse of about 25% is associated with the transition. For the low density phase, an orbital polarization correction to the local spin density (LSD) theory was applied. Gradient terms of the electron density were included in the calculation of the exchange/correlation energy and potential, according to the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The results are consistent with a Mott transition; the 5f electrons are delocalized and bonding on the high density side of the transition and chemically inert and non-bonding (localized) on the other. Theory compares rather well with recent experimental data which implies that electron correlation effects are reasonably modeled in our orbital polarization scheme.

  8. Enhanced Sensitivity of Delocalized Plasmonic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Madu N.; Mandal, Himadri S.; Waldeck, David H.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports on the observation of a delocalized surface plasmon resonance (DSPR) phenomenon in linear chains of square-shaped silver nanoparticles (NP) as a function of the chain length and the distance between the nanoparticles in the chain. Transmission spectra of the silver nanoparticle chains reveal the emergence of new, red-shifted extinction peaks that depend strongly on the spacing between the nanoparticles and the polarization of the exciting light with respect to the chain axis. As the spacing between the nanoparticles in the linear chain decreases and the number of nanoparticles in the linear chain increases, the strength of the new extinction features increase strongly. These changes can be described by a tight-binding model for the coupled chain, which indicates that the origin of the phenomenon is consistent with an increased coupling between the nanoparticles. FDTD calculations reveal that the electric field is strongly enhanced between the nanoparticles in the chain. The DSPR response is found to be much more sensitive to dielectric changes than the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). PMID:24470837

  9. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object.

  10. Rethinking Colour Constancy

    PubMed Central

    Logvinenko, Alexander D.; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching’s effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions—metamer mismatching and colour constancy—must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy’s false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object. PMID:26356217

  11. Glimpsing Colour in a World of Black and White

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Pennington

    2012-09-01

    The past 40 years have taught us that nucleons are built of constituents that carry colour charges with interactions governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). How experiments (past, present and future) at Jefferson Lab probe colourless nuclei to map out these internal colour degrees of freedom is presented. When combined with theoretical calculations, these will paint a picture of how the confinement of quarks and gluons, and the structure of the QCD vacuum, determine the properties of all (light) strongly interacting states.

  12. Resonant delocalization and Bloch oscillations in modulated lattices.

    PubMed

    El-Ganainy, R; Christodoulides, D N; Rüter, C E; Kip, D

    2011-04-15

    We study the propagation of light in Bloch waveguide arrays exhibiting periodic coupling interactions. Intriguing wave packet revival patterns as well as beating Bloch oscillations are demonstrated. A new resonant delocalization phase transition is also predicted.

  13. Electron Delocalization Range in Atoms and on Molecular Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Wiberg, Kenneth B; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2016-07-12

    The electron delocalization range function EDR(r⃗; d) (J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 144104) quantifies the extent to which an electron at point r⃗ in a calculated wave function delocalizes over distance d. This work illustrates how atomic averages of the EDR, and plots of the EDR on molecule surfaces, provide a chemically intuitive picture of the sizes of occupied orbital lobes in different regions. We show how the surface and atomic delocalization distinguish aminophosphine ligand's hard N and soft P lone pairs, distinguish the site preference for Ag(+) cation binding to conjugated oligomers, and provide information that is different from and complementary to conjugation lengths. Applications to strong correlation and the prototropic tautomerization of phosphinylidenes R1R2HPO illustrates how the surface and atomic delocalization can work with other tools to provide a nuanced picture of reactivity.

  14. Stabilization of a Strained Heteroradialene by Peripheral Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Mehr, S Hessam M; Patrick, Brian O; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2016-04-15

    Dimethylamine and 2,4,6-triformylphloroglucinol react to form a product with a highly contorted nonplanar geometry due to favorable electron delocalization. This new heteroradialene compound has been studied by X-ray diffraction, variable-temperature multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations. Electron delocalization throughout the periphery of the central ring leads to a structure that retains very little of the aromatic characteristics of the starting material. PMID:27031736

  15. Does Colour Preference Have a Role in Colour Term Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitchford, Nicola J.; Davis, Emma E.; Scerif, Gaia

    2009-01-01

    A developmental association exists between colour preference and emerging colour term acquisition in young children. Colour preference might influence colour term acquisition by directing attention towards or away from a particular colour, making it more or less memorable. To investigate the role that colour preference may have in the acquisition…

  16. A delocalized proton-binding site within a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    The role of protein-bound water molecules in protein function and catalysis is an emerging topic. Here, we studied the solvation of an excess proton by protein-bound water molecules and the contribution of the surrounding amino acid residues at the proton release site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. It hosts an excess proton within a protein-bound water cluster, which is hydrogen bonded to several surrounding amino acids. Indicative of delocalization is a broad continuum absorbance experimentally observed by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In combination with site-directed mutagenesis, the involvement of several amino acids (especially Glu-194 and Glu-204) in the delocalization was elaborated. Details regarding the contributions of the glutamates and water molecules to the delocalization mode in biomolecular simulations are controversial. We carried out quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding simulations for all amino acids that have been experimentally shown to be involved in solvation of the excess proton, and systematically investigated the influence of the quantum box size. We compared calculated theoretical infrared spectra with experimental ones as a measure for the correct description of excess proton delocalization. A continuum absorbance can only be observed for small quantum boxes containing few amino acids and/or water molecules. Larger quantum boxes, including all experimentally shown involved amino acids, resulted in narrow absorbance bands, indicating protonation of a single binding site in contradiction to experimental results. We conclude that small quantum boxes seem to reproduce representative extreme cases of proton delocalization modes: proton delocalization only on water molecules or only between Glu-194 and Glu-204. Extending the experimental spectral region to lower wave numbers, a water-delocalized proton reproduces the observed continuum

  17. Practical colour management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Susan

    2006-06-01

    Spectrophotometers have been successfully used for colour measurement. This paper addresses digital imaging as a complementary and alternative method of colour measurement and appearance and an effective communication tool as part of a practical colour management programme within the supply chain of a textile retailer. The specific needs—to measure and communicate textured dyed material and printed fabric—are discussed, as well as the colour specification and quality control (QC) of currently un-measurable fabrics and accessories. A unique method of using digital imaging for the assessment of colour fastness will also be discussed.

  18. Proof of a new colour decomposition for QCD amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Recently, Johansson and Ochirov conjectured the form of a new colour decom-position for QCD tree-level amplitudes. This note provides a proof of that conjecture. The proof is based on `Mario World' Feynman diagrams, which exhibit the hierarchical Dyck structure previously found to be very useful when dealing with multi-quark amplitudes.

  19. Colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  20. Is colour cognitive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorupski, Peter; Chittka, Lars

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, colour-vision abilities have been rather generously ascribed to various invertebrates and even bacteria. This uncertainty of when to diagnose colour vision stems in part from confusing what colour vision can do with what it is. What colour vision can do is discriminate wavelength independent of intensity. However, if we take this as a definition of what colour vision is, then we might be obliged to conclude that some plants and bacteria have colour vision. Moreover, there is a similar confusion of what are necessary and what are sufficient mechanisms and behavioural abilities for colour vision. To humans, seeing in colour means seeing an image in which objects/lights have chromatic attributes—in contrast to the sensation that we have when viewing monochrome movies, or our experience in dim light when only rod vision is possible. The necessary basic equipment for this is to have at least two types of photoreceptors that differ in spectral sensitivity, and at least one type of spectrally opponent cell to compare the signals from the photoreceptors. Clearly, however, a necessary additional prerequisite for colour vision is to have vision, which entails the identification of shapes, sizes and locations of objects in the world. Thus, if an animal has colour vision, it should see an image in which distinct objects/lights have colour attributes. This distinguishes colour vision from wavelength discrimination, but also from what has historically been called wavelength-specific behaviour: a type of behaviour triggered by fixed configurations of spectral receptor signals; however, we discuss difficulties in diagnosing wavelength-specific behaviour as an indicator of the absence of colour vision. Finally, we discuss whether colour vision, by definition, contains a cognitive dimension for ordering and classifying perceptual experience.

  1. Electron delocalization index based on bond order orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanik, Dariusz W.; Żak, Emil; Dyduch, Karol; Mrozek, Janusz

    2014-02-01

    A new index of electron delocalization in atomic rings is introduced and briefly discussed. The newly proposed delocalization descriptor is defined as an atom averaged measure of the effectiveness of forming linear combinations from two-center bond-order orbitals for a given sequence of bonded atomic triplets, and corresponds directly to electron population analysis; it allows one to get very compact and intuitive description of π-conjugation effects without additional parametrization and calibration to the reference molecular systems. The numerical results of illustrative calculations for several typical aromatic and homoaromatic compounds seem to validate the presented methodology and definitions.

  2. Colour constancy in insects.

    PubMed

    Chittka, Lars; Faruq, Samia; Skorupski, Peter; Werner, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Colour constancy is the perceptual phenomenon that the colour of an object appears largely unchanged, even if the spectral composition of the illuminating light changes. Colour constancy has been found in all insect species so far tested. Especially the pollinating insects offer a remarkable opportunity to study the ecological significance of colour constancy since they spend much of their adult lives identifying and choosing between colour targets (flowers) under continuously changing ambient lighting conditions. In bees, whose colour vision is best studied among the insects, the compensation provided by colour constancy is only partial and its efficiency depends on the area of colour space. There is no evidence for complete 'discounting' of the illuminant in bees, and the spectral composition of the light can itself be used as adaptive information. In patchy illumination, bees adjust their spatial foraging to minimise transitions between variously illuminated zones. Modelling allows the quantification of the adaptive benefits of various colour constancy mechanisms in the economy of nature. We also discuss the neural mechanisms and cognitive operations that might underpin colour constancy in insects.

  3. Colour harmony of two colour combinations in clothes matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, Sungging Haryo; Fu, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Liang-Ya; Hou, Chien-Yu; Ou, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    There are many definitions and theories about colour harmony. But no consistent rules and definitions can be determined. Some previous researches show that there are many factors that influence the colour harmony. Colour harmony is highly depends on the external factors, including the context of colour besides their colour combinations. In the current research an experiment conducted by observing two colour combinations which applied in shirt and trousers. Twenty observers involved in the experiment, consist of ten male and ten female. Each observer predict colour harmony score in 58 samples of shirt and trouser pairs, the colour combination then applied upside down. Based on the experimental results, male and female group has similar tendency in colour harmony score prediction in the same colour samples (correlation coefficient, r=0.84). Upside down colour combinations will change the impression of observer about colour harmony and yields a different value of colour harmony prediction score which indicated from correlation coefficient results of 0.53.

  4. The colour preference control based on two-colour combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ji Young; Kwak, Youngshin; Park, Du-Sik; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2008-02-01

    This paper proposes a framework of colour preference control to satisfy the consumer's colour related emotion. A colour harmony algorithm based on two-colour combinations is developed for displaying the images with several complementary colour pairs as the relationship of two-colour combination. The colours of pixels belonging to complementary colour areas in HSV colour space are shifted toward the target hue colours and there is no colour change for the other pixels. According to the developed technique, dynamic emotions by the proposed hue conversion can be improved and the controlled output image shows improved colour emotions in the preference of the human viewer. The psychophysical experiments are conducted to investigate the optimal model parameters to produce the most pleasant image to the users in the respect of colour emotions.

  5. Optimal shrinking of the distribution chain: the facilities delocation decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Pradip K.

    2010-03-01

    Closure of facilities is quite common among both business firms and public sector institutions like hospitals and schools. Although the facilities location problem has been studied extensively in the literature, not much attention has been paid to the closure of facilities. Unlike the location problem, the existing facilities and the corresponding network impose additional constraints on the closure or elimination of facilities and to highlight the difference between the two, we have called this the facilities delocation problem. In this article, we study a firm with an existing distribution network with known retailer and distributor locations that needs to downsize or shrink its distribution chain due to other business reasons. However, it is not a reallocation of demand nodes among the retained distributors. An important condition stipulates that all demand nodes must continue to get their supplies from their respective current distributors except when the current source itself is delocated, and only such uprooted demand nodes will be supplied by a different but one of the retained suppliers. We first describe the delocation problem and discuss its characteristics. We formulate the delocation problem as an integer linear programming problem and demonstrate its formulation and solution on a small problem. Finally, we discuss the solution and its implications for the distribution network.

  6. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  7. Calcium quarks.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  8. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians.

  9. Unconventional colour vision.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Justin; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2014-12-15

    Butterflies and stomatopods are certainly outliers in their unconventional colour sense and despite some similarities at first glance, in fact sample the world of colour very differently. In one way, butterflies are relatively conventional, possessing either tri-or tetrachromatic colour vision, then just adding one or several task-specific sub-mechanisms onto this. It is the stomatopods so far that have really pushed the boat out into a different colour vision mechanism. Over 400 million years of independent evolution they have arrived at a solution with more in common with the way a satellite sensor examines the colours of the earth than other animals. Remember, however, that unconventional colour vision is not just the realm of the serially polychromatic. Apparently waterfleas with four classes of spectral receptors living in ponds operate a task-specific spectral sense with no need, or indeed neural processing power, to construct a complex discriminatory mechanism. It seems they have the butterfly added-extra set without the more complex comparative chromatic mechanisms, although in truth, conclusive behavioural proof is lacking. Behavioural observation of colour vision in the ecological context of each animal is vital before making the distinction between conventional and unconventional. Just counting spectral sensitivities is never enough.

  10. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians. PMID:23664831

  11. Nonequilibrium quantum relaxation across a localization-delocalization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roósz, Gergő; Divakaran, Uma; Rieger, Heiko; Iglói, Ferenc

    2014-11-01

    We consider the one-dimensional X X model in a quasiperiodic transverse field described by the Harper potential, which is equivalent to a tight-binding model of spinless fermions with a quasiperiodic chemical potential. For weak transverse field (chemical potential), h delocalized, but become localized for h >hc . We study the nonequilibrium relaxation of the system by applying two protocols: a sudden change of h (quench dynamics) and a slow change of h in time (adiabatic dynamics). For a quench into the delocalized (localized) phase, the entanglement entropy grows linearly (saturates) and the order parameter decreases exponentially (has a finite limiting value). For a critical quench the entropy increases algebraically with time, whereas the order parameter decreases with a stretched exponential. The density of defects after an adiabatic field change through the critical point is shown to scale with a power of the rate of field change and a scaling relation for the exponent is derived.

  12. Localization-delocalization wavepacket transition in Pythagorean aperiodic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Changming; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Torner, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a composite optical lattice created by two mutually rotated square patterns and allowing observation of continuous transformation between incommensurate and completely periodic structures upon variation of the rotation angle θ. Such lattices acquire periodicity only for rotation angles cos θ = a/c, sin θ = b/c, set by Pythagorean triples of natural numbers (a, b, c). While linear eigenmodes supported by lattices associated with Pythagorean triples are always extended, composite patterns generated for intermediate rotation angles allow observation of the localization-delocalization transition of eigenmodes upon modification of the relative strength of two sublattices forming the composite pattern. Sharp delocalization of supported modes for certain θ values can be used for visualization of Pythagorean triples. The effects predicted here are general and also take place in composite structures generated by two rotated hexagonal lattices. PMID:27586011

  13. Localization-delocalization wavepacket transition in Pythagorean aperiodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changming; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Torner, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a composite optical lattice created by two mutually rotated square patterns and allowing observation of continuous transformation between incommensurate and completely periodic structures upon variation of the rotation angle θ. Such lattices acquire periodicity only for rotation angles cos θ = a/c, sin θ = b/c, set by Pythagorean triples of natural numbers (a, b, c). While linear eigenmodes supported by lattices associated with Pythagorean triples are always extended, composite patterns generated for intermediate rotation angles allow observation of the localization-delocalization transition of eigenmodes upon modification of the relative strength of two sublattices forming the composite pattern. Sharp delocalization of supported modes for certain θ values can be used for visualization of Pythagorean triples. The effects predicted here are general and also take place in composite structures generated by two rotated hexagonal lattices. PMID:27586011

  14. Object knowledge modulates colour appearance

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Christoph; Valkova, Hanna; Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the memory colour effect for colour diagnostic artificial objects. Since knowledge about these objects and their colours has been learned in everyday life, these stimuli allow the investigation of the influence of acquired object knowledge on colour appearance. These investigations are relevant for questions about how object and colour information in high-level vision interact as well as for research about the influence of learning and experience on perception in general. In order to identify suitable artificial objects, we developed a reaction time paradigm that measures (subjective) colour diagnosticity. In the main experiment, participants adjusted sixteen such objects to their typical colour as well as to grey. If the achromatic object appears in its typical colour, then participants should adjust it to the opponent colour in order to subjectively perceive it as grey. We found that knowledge about the typical colour influences the colour appearance of artificial objects. This effect was particularly strong along the daylight axis. PMID:23145224

  15. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  16. Top quark pair production at NNLO in the quark-antiquark channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelof, Gabriel; Ridder, Aude Gehrmann-De; Majer, Imre

    2015-12-01

    We present the derivation of the NNLO two-parton final state contributions to top pair production in the quark-antiquark channel proportionnal to the leading colour factor N c 2 . Together with the three and four-parton NNLO contributions presented in a previous publication, this enables us to complete the phenomenologically most important NNLO corrections to top pair hadro-production in this channel. We derive this two-parton contribution using the massive extension of the NNLO antenna subtraction formalism and implement those corrections in a parton-level event generator providing full kinematical information on all final state particles. In addition, we also derive the heavy quark contributions proportional to N h . Combining the new leading-colour and heavy quark contributions together with the light quark contributions derived previously, we present NNLO differential distributions for LHC and Tevatron. We also compute the differential top quark forward-backward asymmetry at Tevatron and find that our results are in good agreement with the measurements by the D0 collaboration.

  17. Exploration of exciton delocalization in organic crystalline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Kim; Manning, Lane; Rawat, Naveen; Ainsworth, Victoria; Furis, Madalina

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors play a crucial role in designing new materials for specific applications. Our group recently found evidence for a rotation of molecular planes in phthalocyanines that is responsible for the disappearance of a delocalized exciton in these systems for T >150K.................()().......1 In this study, we attempt to tune the exciton delocalization of small organic molecules using strain effects and alloying different molecules in the same family. The exciton behavior is monitored using time- and polarization resolved photolumniscence (PL) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. Specifically, organic crystalline thin films of octabutoxy phthalocyanine (H2OBPc), octyloxy phthalocyanines and H-bonded semiconductors such as the quinacridone and indigo derivatives are deposited on flexible substrates (i.e. Kapton and PEN) using an in-house developed pen-writing method.........2 that results in crystalline films with macroscopic long range order. The room temperature PL studies show redshift and changes in polarization upon bending of the film. Crystalline thin films of alloyed H2OBPc and octabutoxy naphthalocyanine with ratios ranging from 1:1 to 100:1 fabricated on both sapphire and flexible substrates are also explored using the same PL spectroscopy to elucidate the behaviors of delocalized excitons. .1N. Rawat, et al., J Phys Chem Lett 6, 1834 (2015). 2R. L. Headrick, et al., Applied Physics Letters 92, 063302 (2008). NSF DMR-1056589, NSF DMR-1062966.

  18. Colour Coding of Maps for Colour Deficient Observers.

    PubMed

    Røise, Anne Kari; Kvitle, Anne Kristin; Green, Phil

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the colour coding of a web map traffic information service based on profiles simulating colour vision deficiencies. Based on these simulations and principles for universal design, we propose adjustments of the existing colours creating more readable maps for the colour vision deficient observers. PMID:27534329

  19. Colour Coding of Maps for Colour Deficient Observers.

    PubMed

    Røise, Anne Kari; Kvitle, Anne Kristin; Green, Phil

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the colour coding of a web map traffic information service based on profiles simulating colour vision deficiencies. Based on these simulations and principles for universal design, we propose adjustments of the existing colours creating more readable maps for the colour vision deficient observers.

  20. Colour Mixing Based on Daylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Colour science is based on the sensation of monochromatic light. In contrast to that, surface colours are caused by reflection of wide sections of the daylight spectrum. Non-spectral colours like magenta and purple appear homologous to colours with spectral hue, if the approach of mixing monochromatic light is abandoned. It is shown that a large…

  1. Plasmonic colour laser printing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel. PMID:26657786

  2. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  3. Interplay between charge and vibrational delocalization in cationic helium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2011-09-01

    The stable structures and low temperature thermodynamics of cationic helium clusters are investigated theoretically using a diatomics-in-molecules model for the potential energy surfaces and a computational framework in which both electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom are treated on a quantum mechanical footing. While the charge is generally carried by two atoms, vibrational delocalization significantly spreads out the charge over multiple isomers for clusters containing five or more helium atoms. Our calculations indicate that large clusters are essentially fluid with a well-defined solvation shell around the charged core.

  4. Novel pseudo-delocalized anions for lithium battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Jónsson, Erlendur; Armand, Michel; Johansson, Patrik

    2012-05-01

    A novel anion concept of pseudo-delocalized anions, anions with distinct positive and negative charge regions, has been studied by a computer aided synthesis using DFT calculations. With the aim to find safer and better performing lithium salts for lithium battery electrolytes two factors have been evaluated: the cation-anion interaction strength via the dissociation reaction LiAn ⇌ Li(+) + An(-) and the anion oxidative stability via a vertical ionisation from anion to radical. Based on our computational results some of these anions have shown promise to perform well as lithium salts for modern lithium batteries and should be interesting synthetic targets for future research. PMID:22441354

  5. 4f electron delocalization and volume collapse in praseodymium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph A.; Moore, Kevin T.; Lipp, Magnus J.; Mattern, Brian A.; Pacold, Joseph I.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Chow, Paul; Rod, Eric; Xiao, Yuming; Evans, William J.

    2012-04-17

    We study the pressure evolution of the 4f electrons in elemental praseodymium metal compressed through several crystallographic phases, including the large volume-collapse transition at 20 GPa. Using resonant x-ray emission, we directly and quantitatively measure the development of multiple electronic configurations with differing 4f occupation numbers, the key quantum observable related to the delocalization of the strongly correlated 4f electrons. These results provide a high-fidelity test of prior predictions by dynamical mean-field theory, and support the hypothesis of a strong connection between electronic and structural degrees of freedom at the volume-collapse transition.

  6. [ALCHEMI formulated for delocalization and anti-site defects

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1994-06-01

    ALCHEMI (atom location by channeling enhanced microanalysis) provides a useful method for determining the site distributions of impurity atoms in crystals with multiple sublattices. Delocalization of low energy excitations and the dubious statistical confidence level of the technique are problems; a recent formulation of ALCHEMI analysis (Walls, 1992) addresses both problems. This paper extends this analysis for the distribution of atoms over two sublattices; expressions are derived for the fit parameters that are exact given the assumptions of the model, which allows for arbitrary localization constants, and for the possibility of anti-site defects.

  7. Quark-Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, R.; Dey, J.; Dey, M.

    2002-07-01

    We explore the scenario where the core of a neutron star (having experienced a transition to an up and down quark phase) shrinks into the equilibrated quark object after reaching strange quark matter saturation density (where a composition of up, down and strange quarks is the favored state of matter). The overlaying (envelope) material free-falls following the core contraction releasing upto 1053 ergs in energy as radiation, partly as a result of the conversion of envelope material to quarks. This phenomena, we named Quark-Nova, leads to a wide variety of ejectae ranging form the Newtonian, ``dirty" to the ultra-relativistic fireball. The mass range of the corresponding compact remnant (the quark star) ranges from less than 0.3 Msun up to a solar mass. We discuss the connection between Quark-Novae and Gamma ray bursts and suggest the recently studied GRB011211 event as a plausible Quark-Nova candidate.

  8. Colour in flux: describing and printing colour in art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2008-01-01

    This presentation will describe artists, practitioners and scientists, who were interested in developing a deeper psychological, emotional and practical understanding of the human visual system who were working with wavelength, paint and other materials. From a selection of prints at The Prints and Drawings Department at Tate London, the presentation will refer to artists who were motivated by issues relating to how colour pigment was mixed and printed, to interrogate and explain colour perception and colour science, and in art, how artists have used colour to challenge the viewer and how a viewer might describe their experience of colour. The title Colour in Flux refers, not only to the perceptual effect of the juxtaposition of one colour pigment with another, but also to the changes and challenges for the print industry. In the light of screenprinted examples from the 60s and 70s, the presentation will discuss 21 st century ideas on colour and how these notions have informed the Centre for Fine Print Research's (CFPR) practical research in colour printing. The latter part of this presentation will discuss the implications for the need to change methods in mixing inks that moves away from existing colour spaces, from non intuitive colour mixing to bespoke ink sets, colour mixing approaches and colour mixing methods that are not reliant on RGB or CMYK.

  9. 2-Colour photolithography.

    PubMed

    Fourkas, John T; Petersen, John S

    2014-05-21

    Photolithography is a crucial technology for both research and industry. The desire to be able to create ever finer features has fuelled a push towards lithographic methods that use electromagnetic radiation or charged particles with the shortest possible wavelength. At the same time, the physics and chemistry involved in employing light or particles with short wavelengths present great challenges. A new class of approaches to photolithography on the nanoscale involves the use of photoresists that can be activated with one colour of visible or near-ultraviolet light and deactivated with a second colour. Such methods hold the promise of attaining lithographic resolution that rivals or even exceeds that currently sought by industry, while at the same time using wavelengths of light that are inexpensive to produce and can be manipulated readily. The physical chemistry of 2-colour photolithography is a rich area of science that is only now beginning to be explored.

  10. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  11. Flower Colour: How Bumblebees Handle Colours with Perceptually Changing Hues.

    PubMed

    Lunau, Klaus

    2016-03-21

    Colours are floral signals enabling bees to detect, inspect and discriminate flowers in a multitasking world. Behavioural tests now show that trained bumblebees find iridescent coloured targets more quickly and that weak iridescence does not corrupt target identification. PMID:27003883

  12. Flower Colour: How Bumblebees Handle Colours with Perceptually Changing Hues.

    PubMed

    Lunau, Klaus

    2016-03-21

    Colours are floral signals enabling bees to detect, inspect and discriminate flowers in a multitasking world. Behavioural tests now show that trained bumblebees find iridescent coloured targets more quickly and that weak iridescence does not corrupt target identification.

  13. Orbital Delocalization and Enhancement of Magnetic Interactions in Perovskite Oxyhydrides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Hou, Yusheng; Gong, Xingao; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments showed that some perovskite oxyhydrides have surprisingly high magnetic-transition temperature. In order to unveil the origin of this interesting phenomenon, we investigate the magnetism in SrCrO2H and SrVO2H on the basis of first-principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. Our work indicates that the Cr-O-Cr superexchange interaction in SrCrO2H is unexpectedly strong. Different from the previous explanation in terms of the H− ion substitution induced increase of the Cr-O-Cr bond angle, we reveal instead that this is mainly because the 3d orbitals in perovskite oxyhydrides becomes more delocalized since H− ions have weaker electronegativity and less electrons than O2− ions. The delocalized 3d orbitals result in stronger Cr-O interactions and enhance the magnetic-transition temperature. This novel mechanism is also applicable to the case of SrVO2H. Furthermore, we predict that SrFeO2H will have unprecedented high Neel temperature because of the extraordinarily strong Fe-H-Fe σ-type interactions. Our work suggests the anion substitution can be used to effectively manipulate the magnetic properties of perovskite compounds. PMID:26804825

  14. Probing charge delocalization in a semi-crystalline supramolecular polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katrina; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Heeney, Martin; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Various doping methods have achieved metallic conductivity in π-conjugated polymer but most of them suffer from dopant-induced-disorder. We developed a simple and effective method of doping a high mobility semi-crystalline polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (pBTTT) by forming a bi-layer with a small-molecule acceptor, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ). The doping realizes an efficient charge-transfer between pBTTT and F4-TCNQ (conductivity over 150 S/cm), while preserving the structural order of a pristine pBTTT. The charges are discovered to be sufficiently delocalized to give rise to a nearly-ideal Hall effect, and therefore, a coherent transport in a wide temperature range, with a high Hall mobility of 1.8 cm2/Vs at room temperature. The combination of a Pauli magnetic susceptibility and magnetoconductance signatures strengthen the evidence of weak localization in the supramolecular system. Comparison with other amorphous conducting polymers elucidates the role of structural order as an indicator of the degree of charge delocalization.

  15. Why birds eat colourful grit: colour preferences revealed by the colour of gizzard stones.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Erritzøe, J

    2010-03-01

    Colour preferences from sexual or social contexts are assumed to have arisen owing to preferences for specific kinds of food, representing a sensory bias, but once colour preferences have evolved in a sexual context, they may also be expressed during foraging. We tested whether preferences for specific body colours (i.e. plumage and soft parts) were related to colour preferences for grit ingested by birds. Birds eat grit to facilitate break down of food by the gizzard, and this function is independent of the colour of grit, but depends on the physical properties of stones. Bird species were significantly consistent in colour of grit, and grit of different colours varied in prevalence among species, even when analyses were restricted to a sample from a single locality. There were positive correlations between presence of lilac and red grit in the gizzard and presence of sexually dichromatic lilac and red colour on the body. There was a positive correlation between red grit colour and red sexually monochromatic body colour. Bird species with many different sexual colours, but not sexually monochromatic colours on their body had many different colours of grit. Males had more lilac and red grit than females, with this effect differing among species, whereas that was not the case for grit of other colours. These findings are consistent with the sensory bias hypothesis that birds express preferences for grit of specific colours and a high diversity of colours related to sexual colouration of the body, even when the colour of such grit is only visible to the individual at the moment of ingestion.

  16. Colour detection thresholds in faces and colour patches.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Wei; Stephen, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    Human facial skin colour reflects individuals' underlying health (Stephen et al 2011 Evolution & Human Behavior 32 216-227); and enhanced facial skin CIELab b* (yellowness), a* (redness), and L* (lightness) are perceived as healthy (also Stephen et al 2009a International Journal of Primatology 30 845-857). Here, we examine Malaysian Chinese participants' detection thresholds for CIELab L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) colour changes in Asian, African, and Caucasian faces and skin coloured patches. Twelve face photos and three skin coloured patches were transformed to produce four pairs of images of each individual face and colour patch with different amounts of red, yellow, or lightness, from very subtle (deltaE = 1.2) to quite large differences (deltaE = 9.6). Participants were asked to decide which of sequentially displayed, paired same-face images or colour patches were lighter, redder, or yellower. Changes in facial redness, followed by changes in yellowness, were more easily discriminated than changes in luminance. However, visual sensitivity was not greater for redness and yellowness in nonface stimuli, suggesting red facial skin colour special salience. Participants were also significantly better at recognizing colour differences in own-race (Asian) and Caucasian faces than in African faces, suggesting the existence of cross-race effect in discriminating facial colours. Humans' colour vision may have been selected for skin colour signalling (Changizi et al 2006 Biology Letters 2 217-221), enabling individuals to perceive subtle changes in skin colour, reflecting health and emotional status.

  17. Fun with Colour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Curriculum: Science for Year 5 includes "recognising that the colour of an object depends on the properties of the object and the color of the light source". This article shows how much more can be done with color in the science laboratory. Activities include using a prism to explore white light, using a hand lens to…

  18. Colour vision in billfish.

    PubMed Central

    Fritsches, K A; Partridge, J C; Pettigrew, J D; Marshall, N J

    2000-01-01

    Members of the billfish family are highly visual predatory teleosts inhabiting the open ocean. Little is known about their visual abilities in detail, but past studies have indicated that these fishes were likely to be monochromats. This study, however, presents evidence of two anatomically distinct cone types in billfish. The cells are arranged in a regular mosaic pattern of single and twin cones as in many fishes, and this arrangement suggests that the different cone types also show different spectral sensitivity, which is the basis for colour vision. First measurements using microspectrophotometry (MSP) revealed a peak absorption of the rod pigment at 484 nm, indicating that MSP, despite technical difficulties, will be a decisive tool in proving colour vision in these offshore fishes. When hunting, billfish such as the sailfish flash bright blue bars on their sides. This colour reflects largely in ultraviolet (UV) light at 350 nm as revealed by spectrophotometric measurements. Billfish lenses block light of wavelengths below 400 nm, presumably rendering the animal blind to the UV component of its own body colour. Interestingly, at least two prey species of billfish have lenses transmitting light in the UV waveband and are therefore likely to perceive a large fraction of the UV peak found in the blue bar of the sailfish. The possible biological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:11079409

  19. Colour, vision and ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Cristina; da Silva, Fernando Moreira

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project - Visual Communication and Inclusive Design-Colour, Legibility and Aged Vision, developed at the Faculty of Architecture of Lisbon. The research has the aim of determining specific design principles to be applied to visual communication design (printed) objects, in order to be easily read and perceived by all. This study target group was composed by a selection of socially active individuals, between 55 and 80 years, and we used cultural events posters as objects of study and observation. The main objective is to overlap the study of areas such as colour, vision, older people's colour vision, ergonomics, chromatic contrasts, typography and legibility. In the end we will produce a manual with guidelines and information to apply scientific knowledge into the communication design projectual practice. Within the normal aging process, visual functions gradually decline; the quality of vision worsens, colour vision and contrast sensitivity are also affected. As people's needs change along with age, design should help people and communities, and improve life quality in the present. Applying principles of visually accessible design and ergonomics, the printed design objects, (or interior spaces, urban environments, products, signage and all kinds of visually information) will be effective, easier on everyone's eyes not only for visually impaired people but also for all of us as we age.

  20. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been found to be of great value in assessing blood flow in many clinical conditions. Although the method for obtaining the velocity information is in many ways similar to the method for obtaining the anatomical information, it is technically more demanding for a number of reasons. It also has a number of weaknesses, perhaps the greatest being that in conventional systems, the velocities measured and thus displayed are the components of the flow velocity directly towards or away from the transducer, while ideally the method would give information about the magnitude and direction of the three-dimensional flow vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new techniques that seek to overcome the vector problem mentioned above are described. Finally, some examples of vector velocity images are presented. PMID:22866227

  1. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  2. Observability of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive.

  3. False-colour palette generation using a reference colour gamut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Monochrome images are often converted to false-colour images, in which arbitrary colours are assigned to regions of the image to aid recognition of features within the image. Criteria for selection of colour palettes vary according to the application, but may include distinctiveness, extensibility, consistency, preference, meaningfulness and universality. A method for defining a palette from colours on the surface of a reference gamut is described, which ensures that all colours in the palette have the maximum chroma available for the given hue angle in the reference gamut. The palette can be re-targeted to a reproduction medium as needed using colour management, and this method ensures consistency between cross-media colour reproductions using the palette.

  4. Extreme electron polaron spatial delocalization in π-conjugated materials

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Jeff; Angiolillo, Paul J.; Therien, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The electron polaron, a spin-1/2 excitation, is the fundamental negative charge carrier in π-conjugated organic materials. Large polaron spatial dimensions result from weak electron-lattice coupling and thus identify materials with unusually low barriers for the charge transfer reactions that are central to electronic device applications. Here we demonstrate electron polarons in π-conjugated multiporphyrin arrays that feature vast areal delocalization. This finding is evidenced by concurrent optical and electron spin resonance measurements, coupled with electronic structure calculations that suggest atypically small reorganization energies for one-electron reduction of these materials. Because the electron polaron dimension can be linked to key performance metrics in organic photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, and a host of other devices, these findings identify conjugated materials with exceptional optical, electronic, and spintronic properties. PMID:26512097

  5. String localization and delocalization in the disordered toric code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouzdani, Pejman; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.

    2012-02-01

    Topological quantum memories based on the toric code model have the ability to protect quantum information by self correcting a large class of errors. However, excitations such as a string of spin flips, when allowed to perform a quantum walk, can change the logical state encoded in the system every time they wind around the torus. It has been proposed that by adding randomness to the local spin exchange couplings, one can localize these string excitations and avoid logical errors. In our work, we investigate this proposal numerically through the use of an efficient time-dependent numerical quantum evolution method. We determine the dependence of the winding time on the torus size and on the amount of randomness. We study the effect of dephasing in the quantum evolution of the string excitations and show that a transition to delocalization can occur.

  6. Ionization delocalization and ALCHEMI of B2-ordered alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1995-06-01

    Purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the major assumption underlying the ALCHEMI formulation is justified: that the degree of ionization localization of an elemental shell can be accounted for by a linear coefficient; and to introduce a potential method, which would be applicable to B2-ordered alloys, of independently extracting the ratio of coefficients L{sub jk} necessary for delocalization correction. A Cr-doped FeAl alloy and a series of Fe-doped NiAl alloys with 0.25-12 at. % Fe were analyzed. Excellent linearity of the data substantiates the use of linear coefficients to model ionization localization. It was investigated whether the L{sub jk} acquired at a (110) systematics orientation could be accurately applied to ALCHEMI data acquired at (200).

  7. Topology, delocalization via average symmetry and the symplectic Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Kane, C L

    2012-12-14

    A field theory of the Anderson transition in two-dimensional disordered systems with spin-orbit interactions and time-reversal symmetry is developed, in which the proliferation of vortexlike topological defects is essential for localization. The sign of vortex fugacity determines the Z(2) topological class of the localized phase. There are two distinct fixed points with the same critical exponents, corresponding to transitions from a metal to an insulator and a topological insulator, respectively. The critical conductivity and correlation length exponent of these transitions are computed in an N=1-[symbol: see text] expansion in the number of replicas, where for small [symbol: see text] the critical points are perturbatively connected to the Kosterlitz-Thouless critical point. Delocalized states, which arise at the surface of weak topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators, occur because vortex proliferation is forbidden due to the presence of symmetries that are violated by disorder, but are restored by disorder averaging.

  8. Hue-specific colour memory impairment in an individual with intact colour perception and colour naming.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, L S; Pearson, P M; Robertson, B

    2008-01-15

    Cases of hue-selective dyschomatopsias, together with the results of recent optical imaging studies [Xiao, Y., Casti, A. R. R., Xiao, J., & Kaplan, E. (2006). A spatially organized representation of colour in macaque primary visual cortex. Perception, 35, ECVP Abstract Supplement; Xiao, Y., Wang, Y., & Felleman, D. J. (2003). A spatially organized representation of colour in macaque cortical area V2. Nature, 421, 535-539], have provided support for the idea that different colours are processed in spatially distinct regions of extrastriate cortex. In the present report, we provide evidence suggesting that a similar, but distinct, map may exist for representations of colour in memory. This evidence comes from observations of a young woman (QP) who demonstrates an isolated deficit in colour memory secondary to a concussive episode. Despite having normal colour perception and colour naming skills, and above-average memory skills in other domains, QP's ability to recall visually encoded colour information over short retention intervals is dramatically impaired. Her long-term memory for colour and her colour imagery skills are also abnormal. Surprisingly, however, these impairments are not seen with all hues; specifically, her ability to remember or imagine blue shades is spared. This interesting case contributes to the literature suggesting that colour perception, naming, and memory can be clinically dissociated, and provides insights into the organization of colour information in memory.

  9. Evolution of vertebrate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H; Rowe, Mickey P

    2004-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in learning how colour vision has evolved. This trend has been fuelled by an enhanced understanding of the nature and extent of colour vision among contemporary species, by a deeper understanding of the paleontological record and by the application of new tools from molecular biology. This review provides an assessment of the progress in understanding the evolution of vertebrate colour vision. In so doing, we offer accounts of the evolution of three classes of mechanism important for colour vision--photopigment opsins, oil droplets and retinal organisation--and then examine details of how colour vision has evolved among mammals and, more specifically, among primates.

  10. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  11. Nocturnal colour vision in geckos.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Lina S V; Kelber, Almut

    2004-01-01

    Nocturnal animals are said to sacrifice colour vision in favour of increased absolute sensitivity. This is true for most vertebrates that possess a dual retina with a single type of rod for colour-blind night vision and multiple types of cone for diurnal colour vision. However, among the nocturnal vertebrates, geckos are unusual because they have no rods but three cone types. Here, we show that geckos use their cones for colour vision in dim light. Two specimens of the nocturnal helmet gecko Tarentola (formerly Geckonia) chazaliae were able to discriminate blue from grey patterns by colour alone. Experiments were performed at 0.002 cd m(-2), a light intensity similar to dim moonlight. We conclude that nocturnal geckos can use cone-based colour vision at very dim light levels when humans rely on colour-blind rod vision. PMID:15801611

  12. Hyperbolic geometry for colour metrics.

    PubMed

    Farup, Ivar

    2014-05-19

    It is well established from both colour difference and colour order perpectives that the colour space cannot be Euclidean. In spite of this, most colour spaces still in use today are Euclidean, and the best Euclidean colour metrics are performing comparably to state-of-the-art non-Euclidean metrics. In this paper, it is shown that a transformation from Euclidean to hyperbolic geometry (i.e., constant negative curvature) for the chromatic plane can significantly improve the performance of Euclidean colour metrics to the point where they are statistically significantly better than state-of-the-art non-Euclidean metrics on standard data sets. The resulting hyperbolic geometry nicely models both qualitatively and quantitatively the hue super-importance phenomenon observed in colour order systems.

  13. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2006-08-01

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and D0 collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass.

  14. Evidence of Delocalization in Charge-Transfer State Manifold for Donor:Acceptor Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhiqiang; Li, Ho-Wa; Zhang, Jinfeng; Cheng, Yuanhang; Yang, Qingdan; Lo, Ming-Fai; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Tsang, Sai-Wing; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-08-24

    How charge-transfer states (CTSs) assist charge separation of a Coulombically bound exciton in organic photovoltaics has been a hot topic. It is believed that the delocalization feature of a CTS plays a crucial role in the charge separation process. However, the delocalization of the "hot" and the "relaxed" CTSs is still under debate. Here, with a novel frequency dependent charge-modulated electroabsorption spectroscopy (CMEAS) technique, we elucidate clearly that both "hot" and "relaxed" CTSs are loosely bound and delocalized states. This is confirmed by comparing the CMEAS results of CTSs with those of localized polaron states. Our results reveal the role of CTS delocalization on charge separation and indicate that no substantial delocalization gradient exists in CTSs.

  15. Quark models of dibaryon resonances in nucleon-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, J. L.; Huang, H. X.; Pang, H. R.; Wang Fan; Wong, C. W.

    2009-02-15

    We look for {delta}{delta} and N{delta} resonances by calculating NN scattering phase shifts of two interacting baryon clusters of quarks with explicit coupling to these dibaryon channels. Two phenomenological nonrelativistic chiral quark models giving similar low-energy NN properties are found to give significantly different dibaryon resonance structures. In the chiral quark model (ChQM), the dibaryon system does not resonate in the NNS waves, in agreement with the experimental SP07 NN partial-wave scattering amplitudes. In the quark delocalization and color screening model (QDCSM), the S-wave NN resonances disappear when the nucleon size b falls below 0.53 fm. Both quark models give an IJ{sup P}=03{sup +}{delta}{delta} resonance. At b=0.52 fm, the value favored by the baryon spectrum, the resonance mass is 2390 (2420) MeV for the ChQM with quadratic (linear) confinement, and 2360 MeV for the QDCSM. Accessible from the {sup 3}D{sub 3}{sup NN} channel, this resonance is a promising candidate for the known isoscalar ABC structure seen more clearly in the pn{yields}d{pi}{pi} production cross section at 2410 MeV in the recent preliminary data reported by the CELSIUS-WASA Collaboration. In the isovector dibaryon sector, our quark models give a bound or almost bound {sup 5}S{sub 2}{sup {delta}}{sup {delta}} state that can give rise to a {sup 1}D{sub 2}{sup NN} resonance. None of the quark models used have bound N{delta}P states that might generate odd-parity resonances.

  16. Colour Terms Affect Detection of Colour and Colour-Associated Objects Suppressed from Visual Awareness.

    PubMed

    Forder, Lewis; Taylor, Olivia; Mankin, Helen; Scott, Ryan B; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The idea that language can affect how we see the world continues to create controversy. A potentially important study in this field has shown that when an object is suppressed from visual awareness using continuous flash suppression (a form of binocular rivalry), detection of the object is differently affected by a preceding word prime depending on whether the prime matches or does not match the object. This may suggest that language can affect early stages of vision. We replicated this paradigm and further investigated whether colour terms likewise influence the detection of colours or colour-associated object images suppressed from visual awareness by continuous flash suppression. This method presents rapidly changing visual noise to one eye while the target stimulus is presented to the other. It has been shown to delay conscious perception of a target for up to several minutes. In Experiment 1 we presented greyscale photos of objects. They were either preceded by a congruent object label, an incongruent label, or white noise. Detection sensitivity (d') and hit rates were significantly poorer for suppressed objects preceded by an incongruent label compared to a congruent label or noise. In Experiment 2, targets were coloured discs preceded by a colour term. Detection sensitivity was significantly worse for suppressed colour patches preceded by an incongruent colour term as compared to a congruent term or white noise. In Experiment 3 targets were suppressed greyscale object images preceded by an auditory presentation of a colour term. On congruent trials the colour term matched the object's stereotypical colour and on incongruent trials the colour term mismatched. Detection sensitivity was significantly poorer on incongruent trials than congruent trials. Overall, these findings suggest that colour terms affect awareness of coloured stimuli and colour- associated objects, and provide new evidence for language-perception interaction in the brain. PMID:27023274

  17. Colour Terms Affect Detection of Colour and Colour-Associated Objects Suppressed from Visual Awareness.

    PubMed

    Forder, Lewis; Taylor, Olivia; Mankin, Helen; Scott, Ryan B; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The idea that language can affect how we see the world continues to create controversy. A potentially important study in this field has shown that when an object is suppressed from visual awareness using continuous flash suppression (a form of binocular rivalry), detection of the object is differently affected by a preceding word prime depending on whether the prime matches or does not match the object. This may suggest that language can affect early stages of vision. We replicated this paradigm and further investigated whether colour terms likewise influence the detection of colours or colour-associated object images suppressed from visual awareness by continuous flash suppression. This method presents rapidly changing visual noise to one eye while the target stimulus is presented to the other. It has been shown to delay conscious perception of a target for up to several minutes. In Experiment 1 we presented greyscale photos of objects. They were either preceded by a congruent object label, an incongruent label, or white noise. Detection sensitivity (d') and hit rates were significantly poorer for suppressed objects preceded by an incongruent label compared to a congruent label or noise. In Experiment 2, targets were coloured discs preceded by a colour term. Detection sensitivity was significantly worse for suppressed colour patches preceded by an incongruent colour term as compared to a congruent term or white noise. In Experiment 3 targets were suppressed greyscale object images preceded by an auditory presentation of a colour term. On congruent trials the colour term matched the object's stereotypical colour and on incongruent trials the colour term mismatched. Detection sensitivity was significantly poorer on incongruent trials than congruent trials. Overall, these findings suggest that colour terms affect awareness of coloured stimuli and colour- associated objects, and provide new evidence for language-perception interaction in the brain.

  18. Colour Terms Affect Detection of Colour and Colour-Associated Objects Suppressed from Visual Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Forder, Lewis; Taylor, Olivia; Mankin, Helen; Scott, Ryan B.; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The idea that language can affect how we see the world continues to create controversy. A potentially important study in this field has shown that when an object is suppressed from visual awareness using continuous flash suppression (a form of binocular rivalry), detection of the object is differently affected by a preceding word prime depending on whether the prime matches or does not match the object. This may suggest that language can affect early stages of vision. We replicated this paradigm and further investigated whether colour terms likewise influence the detection of colours or colour-associated object images suppressed from visual awareness by continuous flash suppression. This method presents rapidly changing visual noise to one eye while the target stimulus is presented to the other. It has been shown to delay conscious perception of a target for up to several minutes. In Experiment 1 we presented greyscale photos of objects. They were either preceded by a congruent object label, an incongruent label, or white noise. Detection sensitivity (d’) and hit rates were significantly poorer for suppressed objects preceded by an incongruent label compared to a congruent label or noise. In Experiment 2, targets were coloured discs preceded by a colour term. Detection sensitivity was significantly worse for suppressed colour patches preceded by an incongruent colour term as compared to a congruent term or white noise. In Experiment 3 targets were suppressed greyscale object images preceded by an auditory presentation of a colour term. On congruent trials the colour term matched the object’s stereotypical colour and on incongruent trials the colour term mismatched. Detection sensitivity was significantly poorer on incongruent trials than congruent trials. Overall, these findings suggest that colour terms affect awareness of coloured stimuli and colour- associated objects, and provide new evidence for language-perception interaction in the brain. PMID:27023274

  19. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  20. Novel coloured flowers.

    PubMed

    Mol, J; Cornish, E; Mason, J; Koes, R

    1999-04-01

    The floricultural industry has focused its attention primarily on the development of novel coloured and longer living cut flowers. The basis for this was laid down some years ago through the isolation of 'blue' genes and ethylene biosynthesis genes. Recently, a novel 'blue' gene has been discovered and yellow pigments were produced in petunias by addition of a new branch to the phenylpropanoid pathway. More insight was obtained into the sequestration of anthocyanin pigments into storage vacuoles. Significant progress has been achieved in the commercialisation of genetically modified flower varieties.

  1. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  2. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context. PMID:21660323

  3. Communication: Spectroscopic consequences of proton delocalization in OCHCO⁺.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Yu, Qi; Mancini, John S; Bowman, Joel M; Lee, Timothy J; Crawford, T Daniel; Klemperer, William F; Francisco, Joseph S

    2015-08-21

    Even though quartic force fields (QFFs) and highly accurate coupled cluster computations describe the OCHCO(+) cation at equilibrium as a complex between carbon monoxide and the formyl cation, two notable and typical interstellar and atmospheric molecules, the prediction from the present study is that the equilibrium C(∞v) structure is less relevant to observables than the saddle-point D(∞h) structure. This is the conclusion from diffusion Monte Carlo and vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations utilizing a semi-global potential energy surface. These calculations demonstrate that the proton "rattle" motion (ν6) has centrosymmetric delocalization of the proton over the D(∞h) barrier lying only 393.6 cm(-1) above the double-well OCHCO(+) C(∞v) minima. As a result, this molecule will likely appear D∞h, and the rotational spectrum will be significantly dimmer than the computed equilibrium 2.975 D center-of-mass dipole moment indicates. However, the proton transfer fundamental, determined to be at roughly 300 cm(-1), has a very strong intensity. This prediction as well as those of other fundamentals should provide useful guides for laboratory detection of this cation. Finally, it is shown that the two highest energy QFF-determined modes are actually in good agreement with their vibrational configuration interaction counterparts. These high-level quantum chemical methods provide novel insights into this fascinating and potentially common interstellar molecule. PMID:26298107

  4. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context.

  5. Communication: Spectroscopic consequences of proton delocalization in OCHCO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Yu, Qi; Mancini, John S.; Bowman, Joel M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Crawford, T. Daniel; Klemperer, William F.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2015-08-01

    Even though quartic force fields (QFFs) and highly accurate coupled cluster computations describe the OCHCO+ cation at equilibrium as a complex between carbon monoxide and the formyl cation, two notable and typical interstellar and atmospheric molecules, the prediction from the present study is that the equilibrium C∞v structure is less relevant to observables than the saddle-point D∞h structure. This is the conclusion from diffusion Monte Carlo and vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations utilizing a semi-global potential energy surface. These calculations demonstrate that the proton "rattle" motion (ν6) has centrosymmetric delocalization of the proton over the D∞h barrier lying only 393.6 cm-1 above the double-well OCHCO+ C∞v minima. As a result, this molecule will likely appear D∞h, and the rotational spectrum will be significantly dimmer than the computed equilibrium 2.975 D center-of-mass dipole moment indicates. However, the proton transfer fundamental, determined to be at roughly 300 cm-1, has a very strong intensity. This prediction as well as those of other fundamentals should provide useful guides for laboratory detection of this cation. Finally, it is shown that the two highest energy QFF-determined modes are actually in good agreement with their vibrational configuration interaction counterparts. These high-level quantum chemical methods provide novel insights into this fascinating and potentially common interstellar molecule.

  6. Effects of interaction symmetry on delocalization and energy transport in one-dimensional disordered lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjin; He, Dahai; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    We study effects of interaction symmetry in one-dimensional, momentum-conserving disordered lattices. It is found that asymmetric and symmetric interparticle interactions may result in significant difference: localized modes can be delocalized by very weak asymmetric interactions but survive much stronger symmetric interactions. Moreover, in the delocalization regime, asymmetric and symmetric interactions also have qualitatively different effects on transport: the former (the latter) may lead to a fast decaying (slow power-law decaying) heat current correlation function and in turn a convergent (divergent) heat conductivity. A method for detecting delocalization in systems at a nonzero temperature is proposed as well.

  7. Recurrent Delocalization and Quasiequilibration of Photons in Coupled Systems in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Kim, M S; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2016-04-15

    We explore the photon population dynamics in two coupled circuit QED systems. For a sufficiently weak intercavity photon hopping, as the photon-cavity coupling increases, the dynamics undergoes double transitions first from a delocalized to a localized phase and then from the localized to another delocalized phase. The latter delocalized phase is distinguished from the former one; instead of oscillating between the two cavities, the photons rapidly quasiequilibrate over the two cavities. These intriguing features are attributed to an interplay between two qualitatively distinctive nonlinear behaviors of the circuit QED systems in the utrastrong coupling regime, whose distinction has been widely overlooked. PMID:27127967

  8. Recurrent Delocalization and Quasiequilibration of Photons in Coupled Systems in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Kim, M S; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2016-04-15

    We explore the photon population dynamics in two coupled circuit QED systems. For a sufficiently weak intercavity photon hopping, as the photon-cavity coupling increases, the dynamics undergoes double transitions first from a delocalized to a localized phase and then from the localized to another delocalized phase. The latter delocalized phase is distinguished from the former one; instead of oscillating between the two cavities, the photons rapidly quasiequilibrate over the two cavities. These intriguing features are attributed to an interplay between two qualitatively distinctive nonlinear behaviors of the circuit QED systems in the utrastrong coupling regime, whose distinction has been widely overlooked.

  9. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  10. Digital colour management system for colour parameters reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, Karol; Lasmanowicz, Piotr; Assis, Lucas M. N.; Pawlicka, Agnieszka; Januszko, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Digital Colour Management System (DCMS) and its application to new adaptive camouflage system are presented in this paper. The DCMS is a digital colour rendering method which would allow for transformation of a real image into a set of colour pixels displayed on a computer monitor. Consequently, it can analyse pixels' colour which comprise images of the environment such as desert, semi-desert, jungle, farmland or rocky mountain in order to prepare an adaptive camouflage pattern most suited for the terrain. This system is described in present work as well as the use the subtractive colours mixing method to construct the real time colour changing electrochromic window/pixel (ECD) for camouflage purpose. The ECD with glass/ITO/Prussian Blue(PB)/electrolyte/CeO2-TiO2/ITO/glass configuration was assembled and characterized. The ECD switched between green and yellow after +/-1.5 V application and the colours have been controlled by Digital Colour Management System and described by CIE LAB parameters.

  11. Linguistic determinants of word colouring in grapheme-colour synaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Simner, Julia; Glover, Louise; Mowat, Alice

    2006-02-01

    Previous studies of grapheme-colour synaesthesia have suggested that words tend to be coloured by their initial letter or initial vowel (e.g., Baron-Cohen et al., 1993; Ward et al., 2005). We examine this assumption in two ways. First, we show that letter position and syllable stress have been confounded, such that the initial letters of a word are often in stressed position (e.g., 'wo-man, 'ta-ble, 'ha-ppy). With participant JW, we separate these factors (e.g., with stress homographs such as 'con-vict vs. con-'vict) and show that the primary determinant of word colour is syllable stress, with only a secondary influence of letter position. We show that this effect derives from conceptual rather than perceptual stress, and that the effect is more prominent for synaesthetes whose words are coloured by vowels than by consonants. We examine, too, the time course of word colour generation. Slower colour naming occurs for spoken versus written stimuli, as we might expect from the additional requirement of grapheme conversion in the former. Reaction time data provide evidence, too, of incremental processing, since word colour is generated faster when the dominant grapheme is flagged early rather than late in the spoken word. Finally, we examine the role of non-dominant graphemes in word colouring and show faster colour naming when later graphemes match the dominant grapheme (e.g., ether) compared to when they do not (e.g., ethos). Taken together, our findings suggest that words are coloured incrementally by a process of competition between constituent graphemes, in which stressed graphemes and word-initial graphemes are disproportionately weighted. PMID:16683502

  12. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, V; Pranculis, V; Melianas, A; Inganäs, O; Gulbinas, V; Abramavicius, D

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  13. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-09-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces.

  14. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  15. Colourful Semantics: A Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolderson, Sarah; Dosanjh, Christine; Milligan, Claudine; Pring, Tim; Chiat, Shula

    2011-01-01

    Children with language difficulties often omit verbs and grammatical elements and fail to complete sentences. Bryan (1997) described "colourful semantics", a therapy she used to treat a 5-year-old boy. The therapy uses colour coding to highlight the predicate argument structure of sentences. This study further tested the therapy's effectiveness by…

  16. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  17. Reversible colour change in Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Fabricant, Scott A; Gawryszewski, Felipe M; Seago, Ainsley E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms and functions of reversible colour change in arthropods are highly diverse despite, or perhaps due to, the presence of an exoskeleton. Physiological colour changes, which have been recorded in 90 arthropod species, are rapid and are the result of changes in the positioning of microstructures or pigments, or in the refractive index of layers in the integument. By contrast, morphological colour changes, documented in 31 species, involve the anabolism or catabolism of components (e.g. pigments) directly related to the observable colour. In this review we highlight the diversity of mechanisms by which reversible colour change occurs and the evolutionary context and diversity of arthropod taxa in which it has been observed. Further, we discuss the functions of reversible colour change so far proposed, review the limited behavioural and ecological data, and argue that the field requires phylogenetically controlled approaches to understanding the evolution of reversible colour change. Finally, we encourage biologists to explore new model systems for colour change and to engage scientists from other disciplines; continued cross-disciplinary collaboration is the most promising approach to this nexus of biology, physics, and chemistry.

  18. Communication: Spectroscopic consequences of proton delocalization in OCHCO{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Yu, Qi; Mancini, John S.; Bowman, Joel M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Crawford, T. Daniel; Klemperer, William F.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2015-08-21

    Even though quartic force fields (QFFs) and highly accurate coupled cluster computations describe the OCHCO{sup +} cation at equilibrium as a complex between carbon monoxide and the formyl cation, two notable and typical interstellar and atmospheric molecules, the prediction from the present study is that the equilibrium C{sub ∞v} structure is less relevant to observables than the saddle-point D{sub ∞h} structure. This is the conclusion from diffusion Monte Carlo and vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations utilizing a semi-global potential energy surface. These calculations demonstrate that the proton “rattle” motion (ν{sub 6}) has centrosymmetric delocalization of the proton over the D{sub ∞h} barrier lying only 393.6 cm{sup −1} above the double-well OCHCO{sup +} C{sub ∞v} minima. As a result, this molecule will likely appear D{sub ∞h}, and the rotational spectrum will be significantly dimmer than the computed equilibrium 2.975 D center-of-mass dipole moment indicates. However, the proton transfer fundamental, determined to be at roughly 300 cm{sup −1}, has a very strong intensity. This prediction as well as those of other fundamentals should provide useful guides for laboratory detection of this cation. Finally, it is shown that the two highest energy QFF-determined modes are actually in good agreement with their vibrational configuration interaction counterparts. These high-level quantum chemical methods provide novel insights into this fascinating and potentially common interstellar molecule.

  19. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A. P.

    2006-11-17

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and DO collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico, May 2006, which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

  20. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  1. Heavy-Quark Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frixione, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * FIXED-TARGET PRODUCTION * Total cross sections * Single-inclusive distributions * Double-differential distributions * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION AT HERA * Photoproduction cross sections * Charm photoproduction * Bottom photoproduction * Deep-inelastic production * Future physics * Determination of f^{(p)}_{g} * Polarization asymmetries * HERA-B * HEAVY-QUARK PRODUCTION AT HADRON COLLIDERS * Inclusive bottom production * Preliminaries * The effect of higher-order corrections * Comparison with experimental results * boverline{b} correlations * Heavy-quark jets in perturbative QCD * Preliminaries * The structure of heavy-quark jets at the Tevatron * Associated production of heavy quarks with W or γ * Photon plus heavy quarks * W bosons plus heavy quarks * Production of top quarks * Total toverline{t} production cross sections * Top kinematical distributions * HIGHER ORDERS AND RESUMMATION * What are soft-gluon effects * Problems with the x-space resummation formula * Phenomenological applications * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION IN e+e- COLLISIONS * Preliminaries * Fragmentation function * Heavy-quark production via gluon splitting * Correlations * CONCLUSIONS AND OUTLOOK * Acknowledgements * REFERENCES

  2. Probing the Electron Delocalization in Liquid Water and Ice at Attosecond Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, D.; Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.; Bluhm, H.; Takahashi, O.; Odelius, M.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Nagasono, M.

    2007-11-23

    We determine electron delocalization rates in liquid water and ice using core-hole decay spectroscopy. The hydrogen-bonded network delocalizes the electrons in less than 500 as. Broken or weak hydrogen bonds--in the liquid or at the surface of ice--provide states where the electron remains localized longer than 20 fs. These asymmetrically bonded water species provide electron traps, acting as a strong precursor channel to the hydrated electron.

  3. The colour of gender stereotyping.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Sheila J; Macrae, C Neil

    2011-08-01

    Despite legislative attempts to eliminate gender stereotyping from society, the propensity to evaluate people on the basis of their sex remains a pernicious social problem. Noting the critical interplay between cultural and cognitive factors in the establishment of stereotypical beliefs, the current investigation explored the extent to which culturally transmitted colour-gender associations (i.e., pink is for girls, blue is for boys) set the stage for the automatic activation and expression of gender stereotypes. Across six experiments, the results demonstrated that (1) consumer choice for children's goods is dominated by gender-stereotyped colours (Experiment 1); (2) colour-based stereotypic associations guide young children's behaviour (Experiment 2); (3) colour-gender associations automatically activate associated stereotypes in adulthood (Experiments 3-5); and (4) colour-based stereotypic associations bias impressions of male and female targets (Experiment 6). These findings indicate that, despite prohibitions against stereotyping, seemingly innocuous societal practices may continue to promote this mode of thought.

  4. Colour categorization by domestic chicks.

    PubMed

    Jones, C D; Osorio, D; Baddeley, R J

    2001-10-22

    Spectral stimuli form a physical continuum, which humans divide into discrete non-overlapping regions or categories that are designated by colour names. Little is known about whether non-verbal animals form categories on stimulus continua, but work in psychology and artificial intelligence provides models for stimulus generalization and categorization. We compare predictions of such models to the way poultry chicks (Gallus gallus) generalize to novel stimuli following appetitive training to either one or two colours. If the two training colours are (to human eyes) red and greenish-yellow or green and blue, chicks prefer intermediates, i.e. orange rather than red or yellow and turquoise rather than green or blue. The level of preference for intermediate colours implies that the chicks interpolate between the training stimuli. However, they do not extrapolate beyond the limits set by the training stimuli, at least for red and yellow training colours. Similarly, chicks trained to red and blue generalize to purple, but they do not generalize across grey after training to the complementary colours yellow and blue. These results are consistent with a modified version of a Bayesian model of generalization from multiple examples that was proposed by Shepard and show similarities to human colour categorization.

  5. Colour thresholding in video imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, C D; Degraw, S

    1995-01-01

    The basic aspects of video imaging are reviewed as they relate to measurements of histological and anatomical features, with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of colour and black-and-white imaging modes. In black-and-white imaging, calculations are based on the manipulation of picture elements (pixels) that contain 0-255 levels of information. Black is represented by the absence of light (0) and white by 255 grades of light. In colour imaging, the pixels contain variation of hues for the primary (red, green and blue) and secondary (magenta, yellow, cyan, pink) colours. Manipulation of pixels with colour information is more computer intense than that for black-and-white pixels, because there are over 16 million possible combinations of colour in a system with a 24-bit resolution. The narrow 128 possible grades of separation in black and white often makes distinction between pixels with overlapping intensities difficult. Such difficulty is greatly reduced by colour thresholding of systems that base the representation of colour on a combination of hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) format. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:7559121

  6. Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, the top quark has undergone intensive studies. Besides the Tevatron experiments, with the start of the LHC in 2010 a top quark factory started its operation. It is now possible to measure top quark properties simultaneously at four different experiments, namely ATLAS and CMS at LHC and CDF and D0 at Tevatron. Having collected thousands of top quarks each, several top quark properties have been measured precisely, while others are being measured for the first time. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 are presented, using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Tevatron and 1.1 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, mass difference, foward backward charge asymmetry, t{bar t} spin correlations, the ratio of branching fractions, W helicity, anomalous couplings, color flow and the search for flavor changing neutral currents are discussed.

  7. Multi-coloured stereograms unveil two binocular colour mechanisms in human vision.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J; van Ee, Raymond

    2002-04-01

    Two different colours, one presented to one eye and the other presented to the other eye, often create the impression of a third colour. This percept is known as binocular colour mixture. Here we use coloured stereograms to study binocular colour appearance. Vivid pastel colours are induced in monocular, achromatic patches, if these are placed in stereograms whose left and right images differ in colour. The build-up of the colours is slow and takes tens of seconds or even minutes in certain individuals. The induced colours remain visible during monocular viewing of the patch and decay gradually. The same colours are induced irrespective of whether the patches are placed in fusible or rivalrous stereograms. We show that these colour effects cannot be induced by monocular colour mechanisms, either alone or in combination with binocular colour mixing. We suggest that the colours are induced by a binocular feedback mechanism, which reduces colour differences between the colour appearances of two monocular images. Induced colours are not observed if the achromatic patches are binocular. However, induced colours are apparent if one switches to monocular viewing after prolonged binocular viewing of the binocular patches. This aftereffect suggests that binocular colour induction acts on the monocular representations of binocular images. We suggest that during binocular viewing the fast process of binocular colour mixing masks the changes in colour appearance produced by the much slower process of binocular colour induction.

  8. Colour anomia resulting from weakened short-term colour memory. A case study.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, J B; Ostergaard, A L

    1984-06-01

    A patient exhibited marked colour anomia without object anomia, but was able to point to named colours. Five experiments were conducted to investigate his immediate colour memory. It was concluded that his colour anomia was the result of an impaired short-term memory deficit specific to colour. Temporary activation of specific entries in the colour lexicon enabled pointing and even naming to take place. A general model incorporating all forms of colour anomia is presented.

  9. Optoelectronics: Colour-selective photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Michael B.

    2015-10-01

    Perovskite semiconductors have altered the landscape of solar cell research. Now researchers show that these materials may also offer a flexible platform for colour imaging and wavelength-selective sensing.

  10. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  11. What Colour Is a Shadow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    What colour is a shadow? Black, grey, or some other colour? This article describes how to use a digital camera to test the hypothesis that a shadow under a clear blue sky has a blue tint. A white sheet of A4 paper was photographed in full sunlight and in shadow under a clear blue sky. The images were analysed using a shareware program called…

  12. Resurgence of natural colourants: a holistic view.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J K; Sinha, A K

    2004-02-01

    Today, natural colourants are emerging globally, leaving synthetic colourants behind in the race, due to the realisation that are safer and ecofriendly in nature. In this context, a brief review of natural colourant sources, their classification, chemical constituents responsible for producing different colours, its activities and effect of different mordants on the hue is discussed.

  13. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  14. A fuzzy-atom analysis of electron delocalization on hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Guillaumes, L; Salvador, P; Simon, S

    2014-02-13

    The extent of electron delocalization is quantified for set of cyclic complexes exhibiting two or more hydrogen bonds (HBs). In particular, the delocalization index (DI) between the atoms directly involved in the HB, and the ING (a normalized n-center delocalization index) have been evaluated using several fuzzy-atom schemes, namely Becke, Becke-ρ, Hirshfeld, and Hirshfeld-Iterative. The results have been compared with the widely used Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic definition. The DI values are found to correlate very well with geometrical or topological descriptors widely used in the literature to characterize HB systems. Among all fuzzy-atom methods, the ones that can better accommodate the different partial ionic character of the bonds perform particularly well. The best performing fuzzy-atom scheme for both pairwise and n-center electron delocalization is found to be the Becke-ρ method, for which similar results to QTAIM model are obtained with a much reduced computational cost. These results open up a wide range of applications of such electron delocalization descriptors based on fuzzy-atoms for noncovalent interactions in more complex and larger systems.

  15. A fuzzy-atom analysis of electron delocalization on hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Guillaumes, L; Salvador, P; Simon, S

    2014-02-13

    The extent of electron delocalization is quantified for set of cyclic complexes exhibiting two or more hydrogen bonds (HBs). In particular, the delocalization index (DI) between the atoms directly involved in the HB, and the ING (a normalized n-center delocalization index) have been evaluated using several fuzzy-atom schemes, namely Becke, Becke-ρ, Hirshfeld, and Hirshfeld-Iterative. The results have been compared with the widely used Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic definition. The DI values are found to correlate very well with geometrical or topological descriptors widely used in the literature to characterize HB systems. Among all fuzzy-atom methods, the ones that can better accommodate the different partial ionic character of the bonds perform particularly well. The best performing fuzzy-atom scheme for both pairwise and n-center electron delocalization is found to be the Becke-ρ method, for which similar results to QTAIM model are obtained with a much reduced computational cost. These results open up a wide range of applications of such electron delocalization descriptors based on fuzzy-atoms for noncovalent interactions in more complex and larger systems. PMID:24444143

  16. Functionalized Thiophene-Based [7]Helicene: Chirooptical Properties versus Electron Delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Pink, Maren; Xiao, Shuzhang; Miyasaka, Makoto; Rajca, Suchada; Das, Kausik; Plessel, Kristin

    2009-11-04

    The functionalized, enantiomerically pure [7]helicene 1 derived from bis(benzodithiophene) functionalized with four heptyl groups is prepared from 1,8-dibromo-4,5-diheptylbenzo[1,2-b:4,3-b']dithiophene building block 2. Such [7]helicene structure, functionalized with bromines at the terminal positions of the helicene inner rim and multiple solubilizing alkyl groups, is an attractive building block for long [n]helicenes and oligo[7]helicenes. Chirooptical properties and the degree of electron delocalization are determined and compared to those of analogous carbon-sulfur [7]helicene and [7]helicenes derived from benzodithiophene to provide a correlation between chirooptical properties and the degree of electron delocalization. [7]Helicene 1 possesses a moderately increased electron delocalization, but its chirooptical properties are similar to those for analogous [7]helicenes with relatively lower electron delocalization, indicating that chirooptical properties are not significantly affected by electron delocalization for this series of [7]helicenes. Molecular structures of racemic [7]helicene 1 and its benzodithiophene building block 2 are confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Crystals of 2 are chiral and adopt the shape of long, flexible, flat needles that can be readily bent.

  17. Delocalization of Weakly Interacting Bosons in a 1D Quasiperiodic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, V. P.; Altshuler, B. L.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2014-07-01

    We consider weakly interacting bosons in a 1D quasiperiodic potential (Aubry-Azbel-Harper model) in the regime where all single-particle states are localized. We show that the interparticle interaction may lead to the many-body delocalization and we obtain the finite-temperature phase diagram. Counterintuitively, in a wide range of parameters the delocalization requires stronger coupling as the temperature increases. This means that the system of bosons can undergo a transition from a fluid to insulator (glass) state under heating.

  18. Attosecond Electron Delocalization in the Conduction Band through the Phosphate Backbone of Genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2007-11-01

    Partial density of states in the empty conduction band of the phosphate backbone sites in DNA was probed using energy-dependent resonant Auger spectroscopy. Results show that genomic DNA with periodic backbones exhibits an extended state despite separation of each phosphate group by an insulating sugar group. In antisense DNA with an aperiodic backbone, the equivalent state is localized. Remarkably rapid electron delocalization occurs at ca. 740 attoseconds for wet DNA, as estimated using the core-hole clock method. Such delocalization is comparable to the Fermi velocity of carbon nanotubes.

  19. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  20. The colour of an avifauna: A quantitative analysis of the colour of Australian birds

    PubMed Central

    Delhey, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Animal coloration is a poorly-understood aspect of phenotypic variability. Here I expand initial studies of the colour gamut of birds by providing the first quantitative description of the colour variation of an entire avifauna: Australian landbirds (555 species). The colour of Australian birds occupies a small fraction (19%) of the entire possible colour space and colour variation is extremely uneven. Most colours are unsaturated, concentrated in the centre of colour space and based on the deposition of melanins. Other mechanisms of colour production are less common but account for larger portions of colour space and for most saturated colours. Male colours occupy 45–25% more colour space than female colours, indicating that sexual dichromatism translates into a broader range of male colours. Male-exclusive colours are often saturated, at the edge of chromatic space, and have most likely evolved for signalling. While most clades of birds occupy expected or lower-than-expected colour volumes, parrots and cockatoos (Order Psittaciformes) occupy a much larger volume than expected. This uneven distribution of colour variation across mechanisms of colour production, sexes and clades is probably shared by avifaunas in other parts of the world, but this remains to be tested with comparable data. PMID:26679370

  1. The colour of an avifauna: A quantitative analysis of the colour of Australian birds.

    PubMed

    Delhey, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Animal coloration is a poorly-understood aspect of phenotypic variability. Here I expand initial studies of the colour gamut of birds by providing the first quantitative description of the colour variation of an entire avifauna: Australian landbirds (555 species). The colour of Australian birds occupies a small fraction (19%) of the entire possible colour space and colour variation is extremely uneven. Most colours are unsaturated, concentrated in the centre of colour space and based on the deposition of melanins. Other mechanisms of colour production are less common but account for larger portions of colour space and for most saturated colours. Male colours occupy 45-25% more colour space than female colours, indicating that sexual dichromatism translates into a broader range of male colours. Male-exclusive colours are often saturated, at the edge of chromatic space, and have most likely evolved for signalling. While most clades of birds occupy expected or lower-than-expected colour volumes, parrots and cockatoos (Order Psittaciformes) occupy a much larger volume than expected. This uneven distribution of colour variation across mechanisms of colour production, sexes and clades is probably shared by avifaunas in other parts of the world, but this remains to be tested with comparable data. PMID:26679370

  2. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  3. Quark search at the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-03-13

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described. (WHK)

  4. Heavy quark physics in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, G.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The most recent results which concern the heavy quark hadrons done in the CMS experiment are reported. The searching area spans over the heavy quark spectroscopy, production cross sections, beauty meson decay properties, rare decays, and CP violation.

  5. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  6. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  7. Clustering in a quark gas

    SciTech Connect

    Welke, G.M.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    In an infinite one-dimensional quark gas it is shown that a static color force, which increases at large distance, leads to a density fluctuation in the ground state. A self-consistent mean field can only be found for an effectively attractive quark-quark interaction that increases less than linearly at large distances. For a fixed coupling constant, the clustering disappears at high quark density.

  8. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  9. Colour Vision: Understanding #TheDress.

    PubMed

    Brainard, David H; Hurlbert, Anya C

    2015-06-29

    A widely-viewed image of a dress elicits striking individual variation in colour perception. Experiments with multiple variants of the image suggest that the individual differences may arise through the action of visual mechanisms that normally stabilise object colour.

  10. Top Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Martijn

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the discovery of the top quark at the Tevatron collider in 1995 the measurement of its mass has been a high priority. As one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics, the precise value of the top quark mass together with other inputs provides a test for the self-consistency of the theory, and has consequences for the stability of the Higgs field that permeates the Universe. In this review I will briefly summarize the experimental techniques used at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments throughout the years to measure the top quark mass with ever improving accuracy, and highlight the recent progress in combining all measurements in a single world average combination. As experimental measurements became more precise, the question of their theoretical interpretation has become important. The difficulty of relating the measured quantity to the fundamental top mass parameter has inspired alternative measurement methods that extract the top mass in complementary ways. I will discuss the status of those techniques and their results, and present a brief outlook of further improvements in the experimental determination of the top quark mass to be expected at the LHC and beyond.

  11. Structural colour in Chondrus crispus.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Chris J; Wilts, Bodo D; Vignolini, Silvia; Brodie, Juliet; Steiner, Ullrich; Rudall, Paula J; Glover, Beverley J; Gregory, Thomas; Walker, Rachel H

    2015-01-01

    The marine world is incredibly rich in brilliant and intense colours. Photonic structures are found in many different species and provide extremely complex optical responses that cannot be achieved solely by pigments. In this study we examine the cuticular structure of the red alga Chondrus crispus (Irish Moss) using anatomical and optical approaches. We experimentally measure the optical response of the multilayer structure in the cuticle. Using finite-difference time-domain modelling, we demonstrate conclusively for the first time that the dimensions and organisation of lamellae are responsible for the blue structural colouration on the surface of the fronds. Comparison of material along the apical-basal axis of the frond demonstrates that structural colour is confined to the tips of the thalli and show definitively that a lack of structural colour elsewhere corresponds with a reduction in the number of lamellae and the regularity of their ordering. Moreover, by studying the optical response for different hydration conditions, we demonstrate that the cuticular structure is highly porous and that the presence of water plays a critical role in its ability to act as a structural light reflector. PMID:26139470

  12. The colour of fossil feathers.

    PubMed

    Vinther, Jakob; Briggs, Derek E G; Prum, Richard O; Saranathan, Vinodkumar

    2008-10-23

    Feathers are complex integumentary appendages of birds and some other theropod dinosaurs. They are frequently coloured and function in camouflage and display. Previous investigations have concluded that fossil feathers are preserved as carbonized traces composed of feather-degrading bacteria. Here, an investigation of a colour-banded feather from the Lower Cretaceous Crato Formation of Brazil revealed that the dark bands are preserved as elongate, oblate carbonaceous bodies 1-2 microm long, whereas the light bands retain only relief traces on the rock matrix. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed that the dark bands preserve a substantial amount of carbon, whereas the light bands show no carbon residue. Comparison of these oblate fossil bodies with the structure of black feathers from a living bird indicates that they are the eumelanin-containing melanosomes. We conclude that most fossil feathers are preserved as melanosomes, and that the distribution of these structures in fossil feathers can preserve the colour pattern in the original feather. The discovery of preserved melanosomes opens up the possibility of interpreting the colour of extinct birds and other dinosaurs.

  13. The static quark potential from the gauge independent Abelian decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cundy, Nigel; Cho, Y. M.; Lee, Weonjong; Leem, Jaehoon

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the relationship between colour confinement and the gauge independent Cho-Duan-Ge Abelian decomposition. The decomposition is defined in terms of a colour field n; the principle novelty of our study is that we have used a unique definition of this field in terms of the eigenvectors of the Wilson Loop. This allows us to establish an equivalence between the path-ordered integral of the non-Abelian gauge fields and an integral over an Abelian restricted gauge field which is tractable both theoretically and numerically in lattice QCD. We circumvent path ordering without requiring an additional path integral. By using Stokes' theorem, we can compute the Wilson Loop in terms of a surface integral over a restricted field strength, and show that the restricted field strength may be dominated by certain structures, which occur when one of the quantities parametrising the colour field n winds itself around a non-analyticity in the colour field. If they exist, these structures will lead to an area law scaling for the Wilson Loop and provide a mechanism for quark confinement. Unlike most studies of confinement using the Abelian decomposition, we do not rely on a dual-Meissner effect to create the inter-quark potential. We search for these structures in quenched lattice QCD. We perform the Abelian decomposition, and compare the electric and magnetic fields with the patterns expected theoretically. We find that the restricted field strength is dominated by objects which may be peaks of a single lattice spacing in size or extended string-like lines of electromagnetic flux. The objects are not isolated monopoles, as they generate electric fields in addition to magnetic fields, and the fields are not spherically symmetric, but may be either caused by a monopole/anti-monopole condensate, some other types of topological objects, or a combination of these. Removing these peaks removes the area law scaling of the string tension, suggesting that they are responsible for

  14. Colour Vision Deficiency and Physics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of "colourblindness" most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision…

  15. Biological Components of Colour Preference in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Anna; Bevis, Laura; Ling, Yazhu; Hurlbert, Anya

    2010-01-01

    Adult colour preference has been summarized quantitatively in terms of weights on the two fundamental neural processes that underlie early colour encoding: the S-(L+M) ("blue-yellow") and L-M ("red-green") cone-opponent contrast channels ( Ling, Hurlbert & Robinson, 2006; Hurlbert & Ling, 2007). Here, we investigate whether colour preference in…

  16. An RGB Approach to Prismatic Colours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilmann, Florian; Grusche, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Teaching prismatic colours usually boils down to establishing the take-home message that white light consists of "differently refrangible" coloured rays. This approach explains the classical spectrum of seven colours but has its limitations, e.g. in discussing spectra from setups with higher resolution or in understanding the well…

  17. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  18. Colour stability of tooth-coloured restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gaintantzopoulou, Marianna; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Vougiouklakis, Georgios

    2005-06-01

    The colour stability of the surface and in-depth (2 mm) layer of two resin composites, a laboratory second-generation resin composite and a compomer were evaluated after 24 and 360 hours of water aging under dark and UV light conditions. The influence of various polymerization techniques on color changes was also evaluated. Color differences (deltaE*) showed higher color changes under UV light exposure than under dark storage, both at 24- and 360-hour evaluations. Color changes were statistically higher at the 360-hour assessment, in both conditions of maintenance. Compomer was the least color stable of the materials tested. Additional polymerization significantly decreased the colour change of both composite resins.

  19. Colour annealing - a toy model of colour reconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhoff, Marisa; Skands, Peter; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    We present a simple toy model for colour reconnections at the nonperturbative level. The model resembles an annealing-type algorithm and is applicable to any collider and process type, though we argue for a possible enhancement of the effect in hadron-hadron collisions. We present a simple application and study of the consequences for semileptonic t{bar t} events at the Tevatron.

  20. A STANDARDIZED LANTERN FOR TESTING COLOUR VISION.

    PubMed

    Martin, L C

    1939-01-01

    A Lantern for lesting Colour-Vision is arranged to show test colours in pairs as in the Board of Trade Lantern. It is adapted to use electric light, and is standardized by stringent testing. The paper discusses the experiments and considerations which led to the formulation of the allowable tolerances in the transmission and colour co-ordinate specifications of the filters, the colour temperature of the lamps and so on. The results of tests on normal and colour-defective subjects are described.

  1. The neural correlate of colour distances revealed with competing synaesthetic and real colours.

    PubMed

    Laeng, Bruno; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Specht, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    Synaesthetes claim to perceive illusory colours when reading alphanumeric symbols so that two colours are said to be bound to the same letter or digit (i.e., the colour of the ink, e.g., black, and an additional, synaesthetic, colour). To explore the neural correlates of this phenomenon, we used a Stroop single-letter colour-naming task and found that distances in colour space between the illusory and real colours of a letter target (as computed from either the RGB or CIExyY coordinates of colours) systematically influenced the degree of neuronal activation in colour-processing brain regions. The synaesthetes also activated the same fronto-parietal network during the classic colour-word Stroop task and single-letter tasks. We conclude that the same neural substrate that supports the conscious experience of colour, as triggered by physical wavelength, supports the experience of synaesthetic colours. Thus, two colour attributes (one that is wavelength-dependent and one that is illusory) can be bound to the same stimulus position and simultaneously engage the colour areas in proportion to their similarity in colour space.

  2. Characterisation of the n-colour printing process using the spot colour overprint model.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Kiran; Green, Phil; Pointer, Michael R

    2014-12-29

    This paper is aimed at reproducing the solid spot colours using the n-colour separation. A simplified numerical method, called as the spot colour overprint (SCOP) model, was used for characterising the n-colour printing process. This model was originally developed for estimating the spot colour overprints. It was extended to be used as a generic forward characterisation model for the n-colour printing process. The inverse printer model based on the look-up table was implemented to obtain the colour separation for n-colour printing process. Finally the real-world spot colours were reproduced using 7-colour separation on lithographic offset printing process. The colours printed with 7 inks were compared against the original spot colours to evaluate the accuracy. The results show good accuracy with the mean CIEDE2000 value between the target colours and the printed colours of 2.06. The proposed method can be used successfully to reproduce the spot colours, which can potentially save significant time and cost in the printing and packaging industry.

  3. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF QUARKS IN THE QUARK-GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    KARSCH,F.; KITAZAWA, M.

    2007-07-30

    We analyze the spectral properties of the quark propagator above the critical temperature for the deconfinement phase transition in quenched lattice QCD using clover improved Wilson fermions. The bare quark mass dependence of the quark spectral function is analyzed by varying the hopping parameter {kappa} in Landau gauge. We assume a two-pole structure for the quark spectral function, which is numerically found to work quite well for any value of {kappa}. It is shown that in the chiral limit the quark spectral function has two collective modes that correspond to the normal and plasmino excitations, while it is dominated by a single-pole structure when the bare quark mass becomes large.

  4. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  5. Evolution of colour vision in mammals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2009-10-12

    Colour vision allows animals to reliably distinguish differences in the distributions of spectral energies reaching the eye. Although not universal, a capacity for colour vision is sufficiently widespread across the animal kingdom to provide prima facie evidence of its importance as a tool for analysing and interpreting the visual environment. The basic biological mechanisms on which vertebrate colour vision ultimately rests, the cone opsin genes and the photopigments they specify, are highly conserved. Within that constraint, however, the utilization of these basic elements varies in striking ways in that they appear, disappear and emerge in altered form during the course of evolution. These changes, along with other alterations in the visual system, have led to profound variations in the nature and salience of colour vision among the vertebrates. This article concerns the evolution of colour vision among the mammals, viewing that process in the context of relevant biological mechanisms, of variations in mammalian colour vision, and of the utility of colour vision.

  6. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farran, Emily K; Cranwell, Matthew B; Alvarez, James; Franklin, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample test and a colour naming task. A visual search task was also included as a measure of sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour difference. Results showed that individuals with WS have reduced colour discrimination relative to typically developing participants matched for chronological age; performance was commensurate with a typically developing group matched for non-verbal ability. In contrast, categorisation was typical in WS, although there was some evidence that sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour differences was reduced in this group.

  7. Colour dependence of zodiacal light models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Leinert, C.

    1973-01-01

    Colour models of the zodiacal light in the ecliptic have been calculated for both dielectric and metallic particles in the sub-micron and micron size range. Two colour ratios were computed, a blue ratio and a red ratio. The models with a size distribution proportional to s to the -2.5 power ds (where s is the particle radius) generally show a colour close to the solar colour and almost independent of elongation. Especially in the blue colour ratio there is generally no significant dependence on the lower cutoff size (0.1-1 micron). The main feature of absorbing particles is a reddening at small elongations. The models for size distributions proportional to s to the -4 power ds show larger departures from solar colour and more variation with model parameters. Colour measurements, including red and near infra-red, therefore are useful to distinguish between flat and steep size spectra and to verify the presence of slightly absorbing particles.

  8. Health & nutritional implications of food colours.

    PubMed

    Babu, S; Shenolikar, I S

    1995-11-01

    Colour is a vital constituent of food which imparts distinct appearance to the food product. Artificial colouring becomes a technological necessity as foods tend to lose their natural shade during processing and storage. Most of the food colours tested in the conventional toxicity experiments showed toxic effects at a very high level of intake i.e., 1-5 per cent in the diet. However, such levels of intake are not normally encountered. Human studies indicated that food colours, (natural or synthetic) can induce wide range of allergic reactions only in sensitive or atopic individuals. Most of the foodborne diseases reported are due to the consumption of non-permitted textile colours or abuse of colours. The Government is pressurised periodically to place a total ban on the use of food colours due to their possible ill effects. It should be realised that surveillance should go hand in hand with legal actions.

  9. My Life with Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glashow, Sheldon Lee

    2015-03-01

    This is a personal, anecdotal and autobiographical account of my early endeavors in particle physics, emphasizing how they interwove with the conception and eventual acceptance of the quark hypothesis. I focus on the years from 1958, when my doctoral work at Harvard was completed, to 1970, when John Iliopoulos, Luciano Maiani and I introduced the GIM mechanism, thereby extending the electroweak model to include all known particles, and some that were not then known. I have not described the profound advances in quantum field theory and the many difficult and ingenious experimental efforts that undergird my story which is not intended to be an inclusive record of this exciting decade of my discipline. My tale begins almost two years before I met Murray and over five years before the invention of quarks...

  10. The discovery of quarks.

    PubMed

    Riordan, M

    1992-05-29

    Quarks are widely recognized today as being among the elementary particles of which matter is composed. The key evidence for their existence came from a series of inelastic electron-nucleon scattering experiments conducted between 1967 and 1973 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Other theoretical and experimental advances of the 1970s confirmed this discovery, leading to the present standard model of elementary particle physics.

  11. Transversity quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transversity quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquark channels are included. Particular attention is paid to comparing our results with the recent experimental extraction of the transversity distributions by Anselmino et al. We also compare our transversity results with earlier spin-independent and helicity quark distributions calculated in the same approach.

  12. Heavy Quark Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2010-07-09

    Heavy hadrons containing heavy quarks (for example, {Upsilon} mesons) feature a scale separation between the heavy-quark mass and the QCD scale that controls the effective masses of lighter constituents. As in ordinary molecules, the deexcitation of the lighter, faster degrees of freedom leaves the velocity distribution of the heavy quarks unchanged, populating the available decay channels in qualitatively predictable ways. Automatically an application of the Franck-Condon principle of molecular physics explains several puzzling results of {Upsilon}(5S) decays as measured by the Belle Collaboration, such as the high rate of B{sub s}*B{sub s}* versus B{sub s}*B{sub s} production, the strength of three-body B{sup *}B{pi} decays, or the dip in B momentum shown in these decays. We argue that the data show the first Sturm-Liouville zero of the {Upsilon}(5S) quantum-mechanical squared wave function and provide evidence for a largely bb composition of this meson.

  13. Localization-delocalization transition in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We address the impact of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the localization-delocalization-transition (LDT) in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic potential. We find that SO coupling significantly alters the threshold depth of the one of sublattices above which the lowest eigenstates transform from delocalizated into localized. For some moderate coupling strengths the threshold is strongly reduced, which is explained by the SO coupling-induced band flattening in one of the sub-lattices. We explain why simultaneous Rabi and SO coupling are necessary ingredients for LDT threshold cancellation and show that strong SO coupling drives the system into the state where its evolution becomes similar to the evolution of a one-component system. We also find that defocusing nonlinearity can lead to localization of the states which are delocalized in the linear limit. PMID:27531120

  14. Electric-field-dependent charge delocalization from dopant atoms in silicon junctionless nanowire transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Han, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Song; Zhang, Wang; Lyu, Qi-Feng; Ma, Liu-Hong; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2016-10-01

    We study electric-field-dependent charge delocalization from dopant atoms in a silicon junctionless nanowire transistor by low-temperature electron transport measurement. The Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent conductance demonstrates the transport behaviors of variable-range hopping (below 30 K) and nearest-neighbor hopping (above 30 K). The activation energy for the charge delocalization gradually decreases due to the confinement potential of the conduction channel decreasing from the threshold voltage to the flatband voltage. With the increase of the source-drain bias, the activation energy increases in a temperature range from 30 K to 100 K at a fixed gate voltage, but decreases above the temperature of 100 K. Project supported partly by the National Key R & D Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFA02005003) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376096 and 61327813).

  15. Localization-delocalization transition in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We address the impact of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the localization-delocalization-transition (LDT) in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic potential. We find that SO coupling significantly alters the threshold depth of the one of sublattices above which the lowest eigenstates transform from delocalizated into localized. For some moderate coupling strengths the threshold is strongly reduced, which is explained by the SO coupling-induced band flattening in one of the sub-lattices. We explain why simultaneous Rabi and SO coupling are necessary ingredients for LDT threshold cancellation and show that strong SO coupling drives the system into the state where its evolution becomes similar to the evolution of a one-component system. We also find that defocusing nonlinearity can lead to localization of the states which are delocalized in the linear limit. PMID:27531120

  16. Localization-delocalization transition in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-08-17

    We address the impact of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the localization-delocalization-transition (LDT) in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic potential. We find that SO coupling significantly alters the threshold depth of the one of sublattices above which the lowest eigenstates transform from delocalizated into localized. For some moderate coupling strengths the threshold is strongly reduced, which is explained by the SO coupling-induced band flattening in one of the sub-lattices. We explain why simultaneous Rabi and SO coupling are necessary ingredients for LDT threshold cancellation and show that strong SO coupling drives the system into the state where its evolution becomes similar to the evolution of a one-component system. We also find that defocusing nonlinearity can lead to localization of the states which are delocalized in the linear limit.

  17. Localization-delocalization transition in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-08-01

    We address the impact of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the localization-delocalization-transition (LDT) in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic potential. We find that SO coupling significantly alters the threshold depth of the one of sublattices above which the lowest eigenstates transform from delocalizated into localized. For some moderate coupling strengths the threshold is strongly reduced, which is explained by the SO coupling-induced band flattening in one of the sub-lattices. We explain why simultaneous Rabi and SO coupling are necessary ingredients for LDT threshold cancellation and show that strong SO coupling drives the system into the state where its evolution becomes similar to the evolution of a one-component system. We also find that defocusing nonlinearity can lead to localization of the states which are delocalized in the linear limit.

  18. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  19. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  20. Charge Separation and Recombination at Polymer-Fullerene Heterojunctions: Delocalization and Hybridization Effects.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Gabriele; Muccioli, Luca; Olivier, Yoann; Beljonne, David

    2016-02-01

    We address charge separation and recombination in polymer/fullerene solar cells with a multiscale modeling built from accurate atomistic inputs and accounting for disorder, interface electrostatics and genuine quantum effects on equal footings. Our results show that bound localized charge transfer states at the interface coexist with a large majority of thermally accessible delocalized space-separated states that can be also reached by direct photoexcitation, thanks to their strong hybridization with singlet polymer excitons. These findings reconcile the recent experimental reports of ultrafast exciton separation ("hot" process) with the evidence that high quantum yields do not require excess electronic or vibrational energy ("cold" process), and show that delocalization, by shifting the density of charge transfer states toward larger effective electron-hole radii, may reduce energy losses through charge recombination. PMID:26785294

  1. Creating cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Gao, Fei; Sanders, Barry C.; Simon, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Cat states are coherent quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states and are useful for understanding the boundary between the classical and the quantum world. Due to their macroscopic nature, cat states are difficult to prepare in physical systems. We propose a method to create cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states of the walker. Since the quantum walks can be performed on any quantum system, our proposal enables a platform-independent realization of the cat states. We further show that the linear dispersion relation of the effective quantum walk Hamiltonian, which governs the dynamics of the delocalized states, is responsible for the formation of the cat states. We analyze the robustness of these states against environmental interactions and present methods to control and manipulate the cat states in the photonic implementation of quantum walks.

  2. Localization and delocalization errors in density functional theory and implications for band-gap prediction.

    PubMed

    Mori-Sánchez, Paula; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao

    2008-04-11

    The band-gap problem and other systematic failures of approximate exchange-correlation functionals are explained from an analysis of total energy for fractional charges. The deviation from the correct intrinsic linear behavior in finite systems leads to delocalization and localization errors in large and bulk systems. Functionals whose energy is convex for fractional charges such as the local density approximation display an incorrect apparent linearity in the bulk limit, due to the delocalization error. Concave functionals also have an incorrect apparent linearity in the bulk calculation, due to the localization error and imposed symmetry. This resolves an apparent paradox and identifies the physical nature of the error to be addressed to obtain accurate band gaps from density functional theory.

  3. NMR and dielectric studies of hydrated collagen and elastin: Evidence for a delocalized secondary relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusceac, Sorin A.; Rosenstihl, Markus; Vogel, Michael; Gainaru, Catalin; Fillmer, Ariane; Böhmer, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Using a combination of dielectric spectroscopy and solid-state deuteron NMR, the hydration water dynamics of connective tissue proteins is studied at sub-ambient temperatures. In this range, the water dynamics follows an Arrhenius law. A scaling analysis of dielectric losses, 'two-phase' NMR spectra, and spin-lattice relaxation times consistently yield evidence for a Gaussian distribution of energy barriers. With the dielectric data as input, random-walk simulations of a large-angle, quasi-isotropic water reorientation provide an approximate description of stimulated-echo data on hydrated elastin. This secondary process takes place in an essentially rigid energy landscape, but in contrast to typical {\\beta}-relaxations it is quasi-isotropic and delocalized. The delocalization is inferred from previous NMR diffusometry experiments. To emphasize the distinction from conventional {\\beta}-processes, for aqueous systems such a matrix-decoupled relaxation was termed a {\

  4. Triplet State Delocalization in a Conjugated Porphyrin Dimer Probed by Transient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The delocalization of the photoexcited triplet state in a linear butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimer is investigated by time-resolved and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with laser excitation. The transient EPR spectra of the photoexcited triplet states of the porphyrin monomer and dimer are characterized by significantly different spin polarizations and an increase of the zero-field splitting parameter D from monomer to dimer. The proton and nitrogen hyperfine couplings, determined using electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and X- and Q-band HYSCORE, are reduced to about half in the porphyrin dimer. These data unequivocally prove the delocalization of the triplet state over both porphyrin units, in contrast to the conclusions from previous studies on the triplet states of closely related porphyrin dimers. The results presented here demonstrate that the most accurate estimate of the extent of triplet state delocalization can be obtained from the hyperfine couplings, while interpretation of the zero-field splitting parameter D can lead to underestimation of the delocalization length, unless combined with quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, orientation-selective ENDOR and HYSCORE results, in combination with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowed determination of the orientations of the zero-field splitting tensors with respect to the molecular frame in both porphyrin monomer and dimer. The results provide evidence for a reorientation of the zero-field splitting tensor and a change in the sign of the zero-field splitting D value. The direction of maximum dipolar coupling shifts from the out-of-plane direction in the porphyrin monomer to the vector connecting the two porphyrin units in the dimer. This reorientation, leading to an alignment of the principal optical transition moment and the axis of maximum dipolar coupling, is also confirmed by magnetophotoselection experiments. PMID:25914154

  5. Put on that colour, it fits your emotion: Colour appropriateness as a function of expressed emotion.

    PubMed

    Dael, Nele; Perseguers, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Cynthia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mohr, Christine

    2016-01-01

    People associate affective meaning with colour, and this may influence decisions about colours. Hue is traditionally considered the most salient descriptor of colour and colour-affect associations, although colour brightness and saturation seem to have particularly strong affective connotations. To test whether colour choices can be driven by emotion, we investigated whether and how colour hue, brightness, and saturation are systematically associated with bodily expressions of positive (joy) and negative (fear) emotions. Twenty-five non-colour-blind participants viewed videos of these expressions and selected for each video the most appropriate colour using colour sliders providing values for hue, brightness, and saturation. The overall colour choices were congruent with the expressed emotion--that is, participants selected brighter and more saturated colours for joy expressions than for fear expressions. Also, colours along the red-yellow spectrum were deemed more appropriate for joy expressions and cyan-bluish hues for fear expressions. The current study adds further support to the role of emotion in colour choices by (a) showing that emotional information is spontaneously used in an unconstrained choice setting, (b) extending to ecologically valid stimuli occurring in everyday encounters (dressed bodies), and PMID:26339950

  6. Put on that colour, it fits your emotion: Colour appropriateness as a function of expressed emotion.

    PubMed

    Dael, Nele; Perseguers, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Cynthia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mohr, Christine

    2016-01-01

    People associate affective meaning with colour, and this may influence decisions about colours. Hue is traditionally considered the most salient descriptor of colour and colour-affect associations, although colour brightness and saturation seem to have particularly strong affective connotations. To test whether colour choices can be driven by emotion, we investigated whether and how colour hue, brightness, and saturation are systematically associated with bodily expressions of positive (joy) and negative (fear) emotions. Twenty-five non-colour-blind participants viewed videos of these expressions and selected for each video the most appropriate colour using colour sliders providing values for hue, brightness, and saturation. The overall colour choices were congruent with the expressed emotion--that is, participants selected brighter and more saturated colours for joy expressions than for fear expressions. Also, colours along the red-yellow spectrum were deemed more appropriate for joy expressions and cyan-bluish hues for fear expressions. The current study adds further support to the role of emotion in colour choices by (a) showing that emotional information is spontaneously used in an unconstrained choice setting, (b) extending to ecologically valid stimuli occurring in everyday encounters (dressed bodies), and

  7. Dissecting Proton Delocalization in an Enzyme's Hydrogen Bond Network with Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufan; Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Extended hydrogen bond networks are a common structural motif of enzymes. A recent analysis proposed quantum delocalization of protons as a feature present in the hydrogen bond network spanning a triad of tyrosines (Y(16), Y(32), and Y(57)) in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), contributing to its unusual acidity and large isotope shift. In this study, we utilized amber suppression to substitute each tyrosine residue with 3-chlorotyrosine to test the delocalization model and the proton affinity balance in the triad. X-ray crystal structures of each variant demonstrated that the structure, notably the O-O distances within the triad, was unaffected by 3-chlorotyrosine substitutions. The changes in the cluster's acidity and the acidity's isotope dependence in these variants were assessed via UV-vis spectroscopy and the proton sharing pattern among individual residues with (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Our data show pKa detuning at each triad residue alters the proton delocalization behavior in the H-bond network. The extra stabilization energy necessary for the unusual acidity mainly comes from the strong interactions between Y(57) and Y(16). This is further enabled by Y(32), which maintains the right geometry and matched proton affinity in the triad. This study provides a rich picture of the energetics of the hydrogen bond network in enzymes for further model refinement. PMID:26571340

  8. Delocalization of femtosecond laser radiation in crystalline Si in the mid-IR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavedeev, E. V.; Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The strong delocalization of the energy of femtosecond pulses in silicon appears to be an essential factor for preventing laser damage inside a crystal and seemingly excludes the possibility of direct laser writing in the bulk, at least in the one- and two-photon absorption (1 PA and 2 PA) wavelength regions. Previously, the prefocal depletion of the pulse energy and laser-induced free-carrier plasma defocusing of the light were considered to be the main causes of the unlocalized dissipation of light energy. Here, we consider whether the delocalization could be significantly reduced by using longer wavelengths, at which the role of 1 PA and 2 PA decreases and higher orders of nonlinearity come into play. We numerically simulate propagation of focused femtosecond pulses at a wavelength of 1.2-5.25 μm. Plasma defocusing was found to be the crucial delocalization mechanism that prevents the enhancement of material excitation, even in the five-photon absorption region.

  9. Quantum transport through disordered 1D wires: Conductance via localized and delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gopar, Víctor A.

    2014-01-14

    Coherent electronic transport through disordered systems, like quantum wires, is a topic of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, the exponential localization of electron wave functions-Anderson localization-due to the presence of disorder has been widely studied. In fact, Anderson localization, is not an phenomenon exclusive to electrons but it has been observed in microwave and acoustic experiments, photonic materials, cold atoms, etc. Nowadays, many properties of electronic transport of quantum wires have been successfully described within a scaling approach to Anderson localization. On the other hand, anomalous localization or delocalization is, in relation to the Anderson problem, a less studied phenomenon. Although one can find signatures of anomalous localization in very different systems in nature. In the problem of electronic transport, a source of delocalization may come from symmetries present in the system and particular disorder configurations, like the so-called Lévy-type disorder. We have developed a theoretical model to describe the statistical properties of transport when electron wave functions are delocalized. In particular, we show that only two physical parameters determine the complete conductance distribution.

  10. Dissecting Proton Delocalization in an Enzyme's Hydrogen Bond Network with Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufan; Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Extended hydrogen bond networks are a common structural motif of enzymes. A recent analysis proposed quantum delocalization of protons as a feature present in the hydrogen bond network spanning a triad of tyrosines (Y(16), Y(32), and Y(57)) in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), contributing to its unusual acidity and large isotope shift. In this study, we utilized amber suppression to substitute each tyrosine residue with 3-chlorotyrosine to test the delocalization model and the proton affinity balance in the triad. X-ray crystal structures of each variant demonstrated that the structure, notably the O-O distances within the triad, was unaffected by 3-chlorotyrosine substitutions. The changes in the cluster's acidity and the acidity's isotope dependence in these variants were assessed via UV-vis spectroscopy and the proton sharing pattern among individual residues with (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Our data show pKa detuning at each triad residue alters the proton delocalization behavior in the H-bond network. The extra stabilization energy necessary for the unusual acidity mainly comes from the strong interactions between Y(57) and Y(16). This is further enabled by Y(32), which maintains the right geometry and matched proton affinity in the triad. This study provides a rich picture of the energetics of the hydrogen bond network in enzymes for further model refinement.

  11. Quark matter or new particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  12. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model. (LEW)

  13. Excitation rates of heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, C. A.; Santangelo, E. M.; Ducati, M. B.

    1985-06-01

    We obtain the production rates for c, b, and t quarks in deep-inelastic neutrino- (antineutrino-) nucleon interactions, in the standard six-quark model with left-handed couplings. The results are obtained with the most recent mixing parameters and we include a comparison between quark parametrizations. The excitations are calculated separately for each flavor, allowing the understanding of the role of threshold effects when considered through different rescaling variables.

  14. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  15. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  16. Colorimetry and prime colours--a theorem.

    PubMed

    Hornaes, Hans Petter; Wold, Jan Henrik; Farup, Ivar

    2005-08-01

    Human colour vision is the result of a complex process involving topics ranging from physics of light to perception. Whereas the diversity of light entering the eye in principle span an infinite-dimensional vector space in terms of the spectral power distributions, the space of human colour perceptions is three dimensional. One important consequence of this is that a variety of colours can be visually matched by a mixture of only three adequately chosen reference lights. It has been observed that there exists one particular set of monochromatic reference lights that, according to a certain definition, is optimal for producing colour matches. These reference lights are commonly denoted prime colours. In the present paper, we intend to rigorously show that the existence of prime colours is not particular to the human visual system as sometimes stated, but rather an algebraic consequence of the manner in which a kind of colorimetric functions called colour-matching functions are defined and transformed. The solution is based on maximisation of a determinant determining the gamut size of the colour space spanned by the prime colours. Cramer's rule for solving a set of linear equations is an essential part of the proof. By means of examples, it is shown that mathematically the optimal set of reference lights is not unique in general, and that the existence of a maximum determinant is not a necessary condition for the existence of prime colours.

  17. The AMBEGUJAS phenomenon and colour constancy.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Sten Sture

    2004-01-01

    The AMBEGUJAS phenomenon is a reversible flat figure that is spontaneously shifting between two apparent 3-D shapes-'tile' and 'roof'. 2-D perceptions have very rarely been reported. Tied to the shifts between the tile and roof shapes are remarkable changes of perceived colour. In our example, the tile appears to have orange (top half) and blue-green (bottom half) surface colours in white light. The roof appears grey but in an orange illumination and with a blue-green shadow. This phenomenon appears whether a grey display is presented in two coloured illuminations, or a chromatic display with two surface colours (orange and blue-green) is presented in white light. In the coloured illuminations the tile is an example of non-constancy, since its colours are non-veridical colour perceptions. The centre stripe of the display appears to have the same orange and blue-green colours as the lateral stripes but in a shadow. This seems like a colour constancy in a non-constancy situation. An alternative to the classical definition of colour constancy is discussed.

  18. Measurement and prediction of pork colour.

    PubMed

    Van Oeckel, M J; Warnants, N; Boucqué, C V

    1999-08-01

    The extent to which instrumental colour determinations by FOPu (light scattering), Göfo (reflectance) and Labscan II (CIE L*, CIE a* and CIE b*, hue and chroma) are related to the Japanese colour grades was studied. Additionally, four on-line methods: pH1, FOP1, PQM1 (conductivity) and DDLT (Double Density Light Transmission, analogous to Capteur Gras/Maigre), were evaluated for their ability to predict subjectively and objectively colour. One hundred and twenty samples of m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum, from animals of different genotypes, were analysed. Of the instrumental colour determinations, CIE L* (r=-0.82), FOPu (r=-0.70) and Göfo (r=0.70) were best correlated with the Japanese colour scores. The Japanese colour grades could be predicted by the on-line instruments, pH1, FOP1, PQM1 and DDLT, with determination coefficients between 15 and 28%. Ultimate meat colour, determined by Japanese colour standards, FOPu, Göfo and CIE L*, was better predicted by DDLT than by the classic on-line instruments: FOP1, pH1 and PQM1, although the standard error of the estimate was similar for all instruments. This means that DDLT, although originally designed for estimating lean meat percentage, can additionally give information about meat quality, in particular colour. However, it must be stressed that the colour estimate by DDLT refers to a population of animals, rather than to individual pigs, because of the number of erroneously assigned samples.

  19. Automated colour identification in melanocytic lesions.

    PubMed

    Sabbaghi, S; Aldeen, M; Garnavi, R; Varigos, G; Doliantis, C; Nicolopoulos, J

    2015-08-01

    Colour information plays an important role in classifying skin lesion. However, colour identification by dermatologists can be very subjective, leading to cases of misdiagnosis. Therefore, a computer-assisted system for quantitative colour identification is highly desirable for dermatologists to use. Although numerous colour detection systems have been developed, few studies have focused on imitating the human visual perception of colours in melanoma application. In this paper we propose a new methodology based on QuadTree decomposition technique for automatic colour identification in dermoscopy images. Our approach mimics the human perception of lesion colours. The proposed method is trained on a set of 47 images from NIH dataset and applied to a test set of 190 skin lesions obtained from PH2 dataset. The results of our proposed method are compared with a recently reported colour identification method using the same dataset. The effectiveness of our method in detecting colours in dermoscopy images is vindicated by obtaining approximately 93% accuracy when the CIELab1 colour space is used. PMID:26736928

  20. True and false memory for colour names versus actual colours: support for the visual distinctiveness heuristic in memory for colour information.

    PubMed

    Eslick, Andrea N; Kostic, Bogdan; Cleary, Anne M

    2010-06-01

    In a colour variation of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, participants studied lists of words critically related to a nonstudied colour name (e.g., "blood, cherry, scarlet, rouge ... "); they later showed false memory for the critical colour name (e.g., "red"). Two additional experiments suggest that participants generate colour imagery in response to such colour-related DRM lists. First, participants claim to experience colour imagery more often following colour-related than standard non-colour-related DRM lists; they also rate their colour imagery as more vivid following colour-related lists. Second, participants exhibit facilitative priming for critical colours in a dot selection task that follows words in the colour-related DRM list, suggesting that colour-related DRM lists prime participants for the actual critical colours themselves. Despite these findings, false memory for critical colour names does not extend to the actual colours themselves (font colours). Rather than leading to source confusion about which colours were self-generated and which were studied, presenting the study lists in varied font colours actually worked to reduce false memory overall. Results are interpreted within the framework of the visual distinctiveness hypothesis.

  1. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  2. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  3. Differences between heavy and light quarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.

    1997-11-10

    The quark Dyson-Schwinger equation shows that there are distinct differences between light and heavy quarks. The dynamical mass function of the light quarks is characterized by a sharp increase below 1 GeV, whereas the mass function of the heavy quarks is approximately constant in this infrared region. As a consequence, the heavy meson masses increase linearly with the current quark masses, whereas the light pseudoscalar meson masses are proportional to the square root of the current quark masses.

  4. Fruit over sunbed: carotenoid skin colouration is found more attractive than melanin colouration.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Carmen E; Perrett, David I

    2015-01-01

    Skin colouration appears to play a pivotal part in facial attractiveness. Skin yellowness contributes to an attractive appearance and is influenced both by dietary carotenoids and by melanin. While both increased carotenoid colouration and increased melanin colouration enhance apparent health in Caucasian faces by increasing skin yellowness, it remains unclear, firstly, whether both pigments contribute to attractiveness judgements, secondly, whether one pigment is clearly preferred over the other, and thirdly, whether these effects depend on the sex of the face. Here, in three studies, we examine these questions using controlled facial stimuli transformed to be either high or low in (a) carotenoid colouration, or (b) melanin colouration. We show, firstly, that both increased carotenoid colouration and increased melanin colouration are found attractive compared to lower levels of these pigments. Secondly, we show that carotenoid colouration is consistently preferred over melanin colouration when levels of colouration are matched. In addition, we find an effect of the sex of stimuli with stronger preferences for carotenoids over melanin in female compared to male faces, irrespective of the sex of the observer. These results are interpreted as reflecting preferences for sex-typical skin colouration: men have darker skin than women and high melanization in male faces may further enhance this masculine trait, thus carotenoid colouration is not less desirable, but melanin colouration is relatively more desirable in males compared to females. Taken together, our findings provide further support for a carotenoid-linked health-signalling system that is highly important in mate choice.

  5. Quantifying Plant Colour and Colour Difference as Perceived by Humans Using Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Dave; Hauser, Cindy E.; Garrard, Georgia E.; Jellinek, Sacha; Giljohann, Katherine M.; Moore, Joslin L.

    2013-01-01

    Human perception of plant leaf and flower colour can influence species management. Colour and colour contrast may influence the detectability of invasive or rare species during surveys. Quantitative, repeatable measures of plant colour are required for comparison across studies and generalisation across species. We present a standard method for measuring plant leaf and flower colour traits using images taken with digital cameras. We demonstrate the method by quantifying the colour of and colour difference between the flowers of eleven grassland species near Falls Creek, Australia, as part of an invasive species detection experiment. The reliability of the method was tested by measuring the leaf colour of five residential garden shrub species in Ballarat, Australia using five different types of digital camera. Flowers and leaves had overlapping but distinct colour distributions. Calculated colour differences corresponded well with qualitative comparisons. Estimates of proportional cover of yellow flowers identified using colour measurements correlated well with estimates obtained by measuring and counting individual flowers. Digital SLR and mirrorless cameras were superior to phone cameras and point-and-shoot cameras for producing reliable measurements, particularly under variable lighting conditions. The analysis of digital images taken with digital cameras is a practicable method for quantifying plant flower and leaf colour in the field or lab. Quantitative, repeatable measurements allow for comparisons between species and generalisations across species and studies. This allows plant colour to be related to human perception and preferences and, ultimately, species management. PMID:23977275

  6. Quantifying plant colour and colour difference as perceived by humans using digital images.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Dave; Hauser, Cindy E; Garrard, Georgia E; Jellinek, Sacha; Giljohann, Katherine M; Moore, Joslin L

    2013-01-01

    Human perception of plant leaf and flower colour can influence species management. Colour and colour contrast may influence the detectability of invasive or rare species during surveys. Quantitative, repeatable measures of plant colour are required for comparison across studies and generalisation across species. We present a standard method for measuring plant leaf and flower colour traits using images taken with digital cameras. We demonstrate the method by quantifying the colour of and colour difference between the flowers of eleven grassland species near Falls Creek, Australia, as part of an invasive species detection experiment. The reliability of the method was tested by measuring the leaf colour of five residential garden shrub species in Ballarat, Australia using five different types of digital camera. Flowers and leaves had overlapping but distinct colour distributions. Calculated colour differences corresponded well with qualitative comparisons. Estimates of proportional cover of yellow flowers identified using colour measurements correlated well with estimates obtained by measuring and counting individual flowers. Digital SLR and mirrorless cameras were superior to phone cameras and point-and-shoot cameras for producing reliable measurements, particularly under variable lighting conditions. The analysis of digital images taken with digital cameras is a practicable method for quantifying plant flower and leaf colour in the field or lab. Quantitative, repeatable measurements allow for comparisons between species and generalisations across species and studies. This allows plant colour to be related to human perception and preferences and, ultimately, species management.

  7. Colour Consideration for Waiting areas in hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zraati, Parisa

    2012-08-01

    Colour is one the most important factors in the nature that can have some affects on human behaviour. Many years ago, it was proven that using colour in public place can have some affect on the users. Depend of the darkness and lightness; it can be vary from positive to negative. The research will mainly focus on the colour and psychological influences and physical factors. The statement of problem in this research is what is impact of colour usually applied to waiting area? The overall aim of the study is to explore the visual environment of hospitals and to manage the colour psychological effect of the hospital users in the waiting area by creating a comfortable, pleasant and cozy environment for users while spend their time in waiting areas. The analysisconcentrate on satisfaction and their interesting regarding applied colour in two private hospital waiting area in Malaysia.

  8. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  9. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium. PMID:27494468

  10. Quark Gluon Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  11. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  12. Colour Vision Impairment in Young Alcohol Consumers.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Alódia; Castro, Antônio José O; Martins, Isabelle Christine V S; Lacerda, Eliza Maria C B; Souza, Givago S; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Rosa, Alexandre Antônio M; Rodrigues, Anderson R; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption among young adults is widely accepted in modern society and may be the starting point for abusive use of alcohol at later stages of life. Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to visual function impairment. In the present study, we investigated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity, colour arrangement ability, and colour discrimination thresholds on young adults that weekly consume alcoholic beverages without clinical concerns. Twenty-four young adults were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and performed three psychophysical tests to evaluate their vision functions. We estimated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function at 11 spatial frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 30 cycles/degree. No difference in contrast sensitivity was observed comparing alcohol consumers and control subjects. For the evaluation of colour vision, we used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test (FM 100 test) to test subject's ability to perform a colour arrangement task and the Mollon-Reffin test (MR test) to measure subject's colour discrimination thresholds. Alcohol consumers made more mistakes than controls in the FM100 test, and their mistakes were diffusely distributed in the FM colour space without any colour axis preference. Alcohol consumers also performed worse than controls in the MR test and had higher colour discrimination thresholds compared to controls around three different reference points of a perceptually homogeneous colour space, the CIE 1976 chromaticity diagram. There was no colour axis preference in the threshold elevation observed among alcoholic subjects. Young adult weekly alcohol consumers showed subclinical colour vision losses with preservation of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity. Adolescence and young adult age are periods of important neurological development and alcohol exposure during this period of life might be responsible for deficits in visual functions, especially colour vision that is very sensitive to neurotoxicants. PMID

  13. Colour Vision Impairment in Young Alcohol Consumers.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Alódia; Castro, Antônio José O; Martins, Isabelle Christine V S; Lacerda, Eliza Maria C B; Souza, Givago S; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Rosa, Alexandre Antônio M; Rodrigues, Anderson R; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption among young adults is widely accepted in modern society and may be the starting point for abusive use of alcohol at later stages of life. Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to visual function impairment. In the present study, we investigated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity, colour arrangement ability, and colour discrimination thresholds on young adults that weekly consume alcoholic beverages without clinical concerns. Twenty-four young adults were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and performed three psychophysical tests to evaluate their vision functions. We estimated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function at 11 spatial frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 30 cycles/degree. No difference in contrast sensitivity was observed comparing alcohol consumers and control subjects. For the evaluation of colour vision, we used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test (FM 100 test) to test subject's ability to perform a colour arrangement task and the Mollon-Reffin test (MR test) to measure subject's colour discrimination thresholds. Alcohol consumers made more mistakes than controls in the FM100 test, and their mistakes were diffusely distributed in the FM colour space without any colour axis preference. Alcohol consumers also performed worse than controls in the MR test and had higher colour discrimination thresholds compared to controls around three different reference points of a perceptually homogeneous colour space, the CIE 1976 chromaticity diagram. There was no colour axis preference in the threshold elevation observed among alcoholic subjects. Young adult weekly alcohol consumers showed subclinical colour vision losses with preservation of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity. Adolescence and young adult age are periods of important neurological development and alcohol exposure during this period of life might be responsible for deficits in visual functions, especially colour vision that is very sensitive to neurotoxicants.

  14. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  15. Colour Vision Impairment in Young Alcohol Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Brasil, Alódia; Castro, Antônio José O.; Martins, Isabelle Christine V. S.; Lacerda, Eliza Maria C. B.; Souza, Givago S.; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Rosa, Alexandre Antônio M.; Rodrigues, Anderson R.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption among young adults is widely accepted in modern society and may be the starting point for abusive use of alcohol at later stages of life. Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to visual function impairment. In the present study, we investigated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity, colour arrangement ability, and colour discrimination thresholds on young adults that weekly consume alcoholic beverages without clinical concerns. Twenty-four young adults were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and performed three psychophysical tests to evaluate their vision functions. We estimated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function at 11 spatial frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 30 cycles/degree. No difference in contrast sensitivity was observed comparing alcohol consumers and control subjects. For the evaluation of colour vision, we used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test (FM 100 test) to test subject’s ability to perform a colour arrangement task and the Mollon-Reffin test (MR test) to measure subject’s colour discrimination thresholds. Alcohol consumers made more mistakes than controls in the FM100 test, and their mistakes were diffusely distributed in the FM colour space without any colour axis preference. Alcohol consumers also performed worse than controls in the MR test and had higher colour discrimination thresholds compared to controls around three different reference points of a perceptually homogeneous colour space, the CIE 1976 chromaticity diagram. There was no colour axis preference in the threshold elevation observed among alcoholic subjects. Young adult weekly alcohol consumers showed subclinical colour vision losses with preservation of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity. Adolescence and young adult age are periods of important neurological development and alcohol exposure during this period of life might be responsible for deficits in visual functions, especially colour vision that is very sensitive to neurotoxicants. PMID

  16. Colour assortative pairing in a colour polymorphic lizard is independent of population morph diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez i de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique; Carretero, Miguel Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Previous work with a colour polymorphic population of Podarcis muralis (Lacertidae) revealed that lizards pair by ventral colour, favouring the same colour (i.e. homomorphic) pairs. Such assortative pairing, which probably results in colour assortative mating, can have consequences for the genetic structure of the population and potentially promote speciation. The population previously studied, located in the Pyrenees, encompasses white, yellow and orange animals, as well as intermediate white-orange and yellow-orange morphs. However, other Pyrenean populations of P. muralis have less ventral colour morphs. Our aim in this study is to test the generality of the assortative colour pairing system, extending our previous analyses to populations with different morph compositions and frequencies. The results show that the assortative pattern of pairing is similar in all the populations analysed and, hence, independent of morph composition and not restricted to pentamorphic populations. This suggests that assortative pairing by colour is a general phenomenon for colour polymorphic populations of P. muralis.

  17. Colour assortative pairing in a colour polymorphic lizard is independent of population morph diversity.

    PubMed

    Pérez I de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique; Carretero, Miguel Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Previous work with a colour polymorphic population of Podarcis muralis (Lacertidae) revealed that lizards pair by ventral colour, favouring the same colour (i.e. homomorphic) pairs. Such assortative pairing, which probably results in colour assortative mating, can have consequences for the genetic structure of the population and potentially promote speciation. The population previously studied, located in the Pyrenees, encompasses white, yellow and orange animals, as well as intermediate white-orange and yellow-orange morphs. However, other Pyrenean populations of P. muralis have less ventral colour morphs. Our aim in this study is to test the generality of the assortative colour pairing system, extending our previous analyses to populations with different morph compositions and frequencies. The results show that the assortative pattern of pairing is similar in all the populations analysed and, hence, independent of morph composition and not restricted to pentamorphic populations. This suggests that assortative pairing by colour is a general phenomenon for colour polymorphic populations of P. muralis.

  18. Taste changing in staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Quentin Mason et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors present results from a systematic perturbative investigation of taste-changing in improved staggered quarks. They show one-loop taste-changing interactions can be removed perturbatively by an effective four-quark term and calculate the necessary coefficients.

  19. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  20. Colour thresholds in a coral reef fish

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, M.; Marshall, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reef fishes are among the most colourful animals in the world. Given the diversity of lifestyles and habitats on the reef, it is probable that in many instances coloration is a compromise between crypsis and communication. However, human observation of this coloration is biased by our primate visual system. Most animals have visual systems that are ‘tuned’ differently to humans; optimized for different parts of the visible spectrum. To understand reef fish colours, we need to reconstruct the appearance of colourful patterns and backgrounds as they are seen through the eyes of fish. Here, the coral reef associated triggerfish, Rhinecanthus aculeatus, was tested behaviourally to determine the limits of its colour vision. This is the first demonstration of behavioural colour discrimination thresholds in a coral reef species and is a critical step in our understanding of communication and speciation in this vibrant colourful habitat. Fish were trained to discriminate between a reward colour stimulus and series of non-reward colour stimuli and the discrimination thresholds were found to correspond well with predictions based on the receptor noise limited visual model and anatomy of the eye. Colour discrimination abilities of both reef fish and a variety of animals can therefore now be predicted using the parameters described here. PMID:27703704

  1. Calibrating screens for continuous colour displays.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A J

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on two issues that are important to those who use colour monitors for research in vision. One is concerned with the measurement and calibration of colour screens. To this end the luminance and chromaticity readings of a tri-filter colorimeter and a spectroradiometer are compared (both commonly used to calibrate screens). The second is concerned with screen interactions, whereby colours can be distorted from their expected or calculated values by the colours displayed in neighbouring areas. This issue is crucial for those who use measurements of the light emitted from the red, green and blue phosphors of a monitor in isolation to specify other colours on screen, particularly in the research areas of colour contrast and colour constancy, since the specified colours may not actually be displayed. Finally, an alternative calibration method is described that uses an iterative measurement procedure to obtain screen specifications that are accurate regardless of the display complexity, so that researchers can be confident that the required colours are actually displayed on the screen.

  2. STRANGE GOINGS ON IN QUARK MATTER.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    2001-06-05

    We review recent work on how the superfluid state of three flavor quark matter is affected by non-zero quark masses and chemical potentials. The study of hadronic matter at high baryon density has recently attracted a lot of interest. At zero baryon density chiral symmetry is broken by a quark-anti-quark condensate. At high density condensation in the quark-anti-quark channel is suppressed. Instead, attractive interactions in the color anti-symmetric quark-quark channel favor the formation of diquark condensates. As a consequence, cold dense quark matter is expected to be a color superconductor. The symmetry breaking pattern depends on the density, the number of quark flavors, and their masses. A particularly symmetric phase is the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of three flavor quark matter. This phase is believed to be the true ground state of ordinary matter at very large density.

  3. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Quark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. |; Fields, B.; Thomas, D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible implications of the quark-hadron transition for cosmology are explored. Possible surviving signatures are discussed. In particular, the possibility of generating a dark matter candidate such as strange nuggets or planetary mass black holes is noted. Much discussion is devoted to the possible role of the transition for cosmological nucleosynthesis. It is emphasized that even an optimized first order phase transition will not significantly alter the nucleosynthesis constraints on the cosmological baryon density nor on neutrino counting. However, it is noted that Be and B observations in old stars may eventually be able to be a signature of a cosmologically significant quark-hadron transition. It is pointed out that the critical point in this regard is whether the observed B/Be ratio can be produced by spallation processes or requires cosmological input. Spallation cannot produce a B/Be ratio below 7.6. A supporting signature would be Be and B ratios to oxygen that greatly exceed galactic values. At present, all data is still consistent with a spallagenic origin.

  5. The uses of colour vision: behavioural and physiological distinctiveness of colour stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Derrington, Andrew M; Parker, Amanda; Barraclough, Nick E; Easton, Alexander; Goodson, G R; Parker, Kris S; Tinsley, Chris J; Webb, Ben S

    2002-01-01

    Colour and greyscale (black and white) pictures look different to us, but it is not clear whether the difference in appearance is a consequence of the way our visual system uses colour signals or a by-product of our experience. In principle, colour images are qualitatively different from greyscale images because they make it possible to use different processing strategies. Colour signals provide important cues for segmenting the image into areas that represent different objects and for linking together areas that represent the same object. If this property of colour signals is exploited in visual processing we would expect colour stimuli to look different, as a class, from greyscale stimuli. We would also expect that adding colour signals to greyscale signals should change the way that those signals are processed. We have investigated these questions in behavioural and in physiological experiments. We find that male marmosets (all of which are dichromats) rapidly learn to distinguish between colour and greyscale copies of the same images. The discrimination transfers to new image pairs, to new colours and to image pairs in which the colour and greyscale images are spatially different. We find that, in a proportion of neurons recorded in the marmoset visual cortex, colour-shifts in opposite directions produce similar enhancements of the response to a luminance stimulus. We conclude that colour is, both behaviourally and physiologically, a distinctive property of images. PMID:12217169

  6. Robust colour calibration of an imaging system using a colour space transform and advanced regression modelling.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Patrick; Sun, Da-Wen; Elmasry, Gamal

    2012-08-01

    A new algorithm for the conversion of device dependent RGB colour data into device independent L*a*b* colour data without introducing noticeable error has been developed. By combining a linear colour space transform and advanced multiple regression methodologies it was possible to predict L*a*b* colour data with less than 2.2 colour units of error (CIE 1976). By transforming the red, green and blue colour components into new variables that better reflect the structure of the L*a*b* colour space, a low colour calibration error was immediately achieved (ΔE(CAL) = 14.1). Application of a range of regression models on the data further reduced the colour calibration error substantially (multilinear regression ΔE(CAL) = 5.4; response surface ΔE(CAL) = 2.9; PLSR ΔE(CAL) = 2.6; LASSO regression ΔE(CAL) = 2.1). Only the PLSR models deteriorated substantially under cross validation. The algorithm is adaptable and can be easily recalibrated to any working computer vision system. The algorithm was tested on a typical working laboratory computer vision system and delivered only a very marginal loss of colour information ΔE(CAL) = 2.35. Colour features derived on this system were able to safely discriminate between three classes of ham with 100% correct classification whereas colour features measured on a conventional colourimeter were not.

  7. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  8. Occupational colour vision requirements for police officers.

    PubMed

    Birch, Jennifer; Chisholm, Catharine M

    2008-11-01

    Inclusion of public service professions in the UK Disability Discrimination Act in 2004 prompted a review of occupational colour vision requirements for police officers. Changes in the regulations which existed prior to 2003 were proposed. The aim of this study was to obtain the views of serving police officers in Northern Ireland on the importance of good colour discrimination in everyday police work and on the recruitment regulations for patrol constables introduced in 2003 in mainland UK. These views were obtained by means of a questionnaire and informal discussions. More than 65% of police officers who responded to the questionnaire considered that good colour vision was very important for effective policing. Fewer than 2% considered that colour vision was unimportant. Experienced police officers agreed that the employment of colour-deficient patrol constables, as permitted in the new regulations, would lead to reduced efficiency and organisational difficulties at the local level. A number of everyday activities were described which showed the need for accurate colour discrimination. The change in recruitment policy and the lack of clarity in the new regulations show inadequate appreciation of the needs of the occupation, of different types of colour vision anomalies and of the diagnostic function of colour vision tests. Failure to provide guidance on appropriate colour vision tests, examination procedures and counselling services is likely to result in inconsistent employment policies in different police forces. It is recommended that the colour vision standard in place prior to 2003 is reinstated at the recruitment stage. The Ishihara test should be used for screening, and colour-deficient applicants further examined with the Farnsworth D15 test as a replacement for the City University Test 2nd edition. PMID:19076554

  9. Concurrent Effects of Delocalization and Internal Conversion Tune Charge Separation at Regioregular Polythiophene-Fullerene Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-01

    Quantum-dynamical simulations are used to investigate the interplay of exciton delocalization and vibronically induced internal conversion processes in the elementary charge separation steps at regioregular donor-acceptor heterojunctions. Ultrafast internal conversion leads to efficient deexcitation within the excitonic and charge transfer manifolds, thus modifying the charge separation dynamics. We address a model donor-acceptor junction representative of regioregular P3HT-PCBM, using high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations by multiconfigurational methods. While partial trapping into an interfacial charge separated state occurs, long-range charge-separated states are accessed as previously demonstrated in the work of Tamura and Burghardt [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 16364]. For an H-aggregate type, stacked donor species, the initial bright state undergoes ultrafast internal conversion within the excitonic manifold, creating multiple charge transfer pathways before reaching the lowest-energy dark exciton, which is uncoupled from the charge transfer manifold. This process profoundly affects the charge separation mechanism and efficiency. For small energetic offsets between the interfacial excitonic and charge transfer states, a delocalized initial bright state proves less prone to electron-hole capture by the interfacial trap than a localized, vibronic wavepacket close to the interface. For both delocalized and localized initial states, a comparable yield of free carriers is obtained, which is found to be optimal for energetic offsets of the order of the Coulomb barrier to charge separation. Interfacial trapping is significantly reduced as the barrier height decreases with fullerene aggregation. Despite the high-dimensional nature of the system, charge separation is an ultrafast coherent quantum process exhibiting oscillatory features as observed in recent experiments. PMID:26263337

  10. The degree of π electron delocalization and the formation of 3D-extensible sandwich structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Caixia; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Li, Jia-Jia; Li, Debao; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-04-28

    DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations were performed to examine the feasibility of graphene-like C42H18 and starbenzene C6(BeH)6 (SBz) polymers as ligands of 3D-extensible sandwich compounds (3D-ESCs) with uninterrupted sandwich arrays. The results revealed that sandwich compounds with three or more C42H18 ligands were not feasible. The possible reason may be the localization of π electrons on certain C6 hexagons due to π-metal interactions, which makes the whole ligand lose its electronic structure basis (higher degree of π electron delocalization) to maintain the planar structure. For comparison, with the aid of benzene (Bz) molecules, the SBz polymers can be feasible ligands for designing 3D-ESCs because the C-Be interactions in individual SBz are largely ionic, which will deter the π electrons on one C6 ring from connecting to those on neighbouring C6 rings. This means that high degree of π electron delocalization is not necessary for maintaining the planarity of SBz polymers. Such a locally delocalized π electron structure is desirable for the ligands of 3D-ESCs. Remarkably, the formation of a sandwich compound with SBz is thermodynamically more favourable than that found for bis(Bz)chromium. The assembly of 3D-ESCs is largely exothermic, which will facilitate future experimental synthesis. The different variation trends on the HOMO-LUMO gaps in different directions (relative to the sandwich axes) suggest that they can be developed to form directional conductors or semiconductors, which may be useful in the production of electronic devices. PMID:27004750

  11. A sodium atom in a large water cluster: Electron delocalization and infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwiklik, Lukasz; Buck, Udo; Kulig, Waldemar; Kubisiak, Piotr; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2008-04-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations modeling low-energy collisions of a sodium atom with a cluster with more than 30 water molecules are presented. We follow the dynamics of the atom-cluster interaction and the delocalization of the valence electron of sodium together with the changes in the electron binding energy. This electron tends to be shared by the nascent sodium cation and the water cluster. IR spectra of the sodium-water cluster are both computationally and experimentally obtained, with a good agreement between the two approaches.

  12. Manifestation of Strongly Delocalized Atomic States in the 5{ital s} Photoionization of Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoranzer, H.; Lauer, S.; Vollweiler, F.; Reichardt, G.; Schartner, K.; Mentzel, G.; Wilhelmi, O.; Sukhorukov, V.L.; Lagutin, B.M.; Petrov, I.D.

    1997-12-01

    The photoionization (PI) of the Xe atom was investigated in the vicinity of the 5s -shell threshold by photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The highest resolution so far attained of 2meV enabled us to observe a new series of resonance structures in the 5s -PI cross section closely above threshold. Calculations of the partial 5s - and 5p -PI cross sections were performed taking into account many-electron correlations. These structures were related with strongly delocalized f -resonances which affect the 5s -PI cross section due to their mixing with p -resonances. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. The Effect of Exciton-Delocalizing Thiols on Intrinsic Dual Emitting Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jethi, Lakshay; Mack, Timothy G; Krause, Michael M; Drake, Sebastian; Kambhampati, Patanjali

    2016-03-01

    The emissive properties of thiol-capped CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) with intrinsic dual emission are investigated through temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. We demonstrate the influence of thiols on the relative PL intensities of the core and surface emissive states, as well as on the observed Stokes shifts. A redshift of both the core and surface PL in comparison with phosphonate-capped NCs is consistent with recent work exploring the effect of thiols as excitonic hole-delocalizing ligands. This observation is consistent with prior reports suggesting that surface excitons originate from electrons bound to cadmium trap states. PMID:26752223

  14. Spatial delocalization and perfect tunneling of matter waves: electron perfect lens.

    PubMed

    Silveirinha, Mário G; Engheta, Nader

    2013-05-24

    It is theoretically demonstrated that electron states in semiconductors or graphene can be perfectly transmitted through a complementary material with dual properties, independent of the angle of incidence. It is shown that such complementary material may also provide a strong spatial delocalization of bounded electronic states, changing dramatically the confinement of the wave function, and acting effectively as a lens for the probability wave. The results are the electron analogue of a perfect lens for electromagnetic waves proposed in an earlier work. PMID:23745877

  15. Diamond chain with delocalized interstitial spins: Magnetization, thermal and entanglement properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaryan, Hrachya; Nalbandyan, Mikayel; Ananikian, Nerses

    2016-08-01

    We study physical properties of the symmetric diamond chain with delocalized interstitial spins. We derive an exact solution of the model and characterize the phases of the system at zero temperature. On the basis of this solution, we examine its magnetic and thermal properties as well. The case of nonconserved electron number is then considered. There are phases, which we term as nonclassical, for which electrons in Hubbard dimers are in quantum entangled states. We finally study quantum entanglement depending on Hamiltonian parameters and temperature.

  16. Excitation Localization/Delocalization Isomerism in a Strongly Coupled Covalent Dimer of 1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran.

    PubMed

    Schrauben, Joel N; Akdag, Akin; Wen, Jin; Havlas, Zdenek; Ryerson, Joseph L; Smith, Millie B; Michl, Josef; Johnson, Justin C

    2016-05-26

    Two isomers of both the lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) states of the directly para, para'-connected covalent dimer of the singlet-fission chromophore 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran have been observed. In one isomer, excitation is delocalized over both halves of the dimer, and in the other, it is localized on one or the other half. For a covalent dimer in solution, such "excitation isomerism" is extremely rare. The vibrationally relaxed isomers do not interconvert, and their photophysical properties, including singlet fission, differ significantly.

  17. Colour Mathematics: With Graphs and Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just…

  18. Colour Vision: Understanding #TheDress.

    PubMed

    Brainard, David H; Hurlbert, Anya C

    2015-06-29

    A widely-viewed image of a dress elicits striking individual variation in colour perception. Experiments with multiple variants of the image suggest that the individual differences may arise through the action of visual mechanisms that normally stabilise object colour. PMID:26126278

  19. Colour mathematics: with graphs and numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presto, Michael C.

    2009-07-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just attempting to memorize them.

  20. Brilliant Colours from a White Snow Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Shaw, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Surprisingly colourful views are possible from sparkling white snow. It is well known that similarly colourful features can exist in the sky whenever appropriate ice crystals are around. However, the transition of light reflection and refraction from ice crystals in the air to reflection and refraction from those in snow on the ground is not…

  1. Representing Object Colour in Language Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Embodied theories of cognition hold that mentally representing something "red" engages the neural subsystems that respond to environmental perception of that colour. This paper examines whether implicit perceptual information on object colour is represented during sentence comprehension even though doing so does not necessarily facilitate task…

  2. Prevalence of colour blindness in young Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqtum, M T; Al-Qawasmeh, M H

    2001-01-01

    Colour blindness is one of the common genetic disorders observed in all human populations. It is a sex-linked recessive trait. The genes are located on the X chromosome within the Xq28 band. 1,418 university students (1,200 female and 218 male) from Zarka Private University and the Hashemite University were randomly selected and tested for congenital red/green colour blindness, by using Ishihara pseudo-isochromatic colour plates. A total of 23 individuals were found to be colour blind. In females, 4 students (0.33%) were colour blind: 1 of them showed protanomalia, 1 protanopia and 2 deuteranomalia. In males, 19 students (8.72%) were colour blind: 4 showed protanomalia, 3 protanopia, 8 deuteranomalia and 4 deuteranopia. The allelic frequencies of the colour vision gene were found to be 0.087 in males, 0.003 in females and 0.016 in the total population. Studies on colour blindness in Jordan are very few; this population-based investigation is meant to fill a gap in this field.

  3. The coevolution theory of autumn colours.

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco; Brown, Sam P.

    2004-01-01

    According to the coevolution theory of autumn colours, the bright colours of leaves in autumn are a warning signal to insects that lay their eggs on the trees in that season. If the colour is linked to the level of defensive commitment of the tree and the insects learn to avoid bright colours, this may lead to a coevolutionary process in which bright trees reduce their parasite load and choosy insects locate the most profitable hosts for the winter. We try to clarify what the theory actually says and to correct some misunderstandings that have been put forward. We also review current research on autumn colours and discuss what needs to be done to test the theory. PMID:15306345

  4. Worldwide patterns of bird colouration on islands.

    PubMed

    Doutrelant, Claire; Paquet, Matthieu; Renoult, Julien P; Grégoire, Arnaud; Crochet, Pierre-André; Covas, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Island environments share distinctive characteristics that offer unique opportunities to investigate parallel evolution. Previous research has produced evidence of an island syndrome for morphological traits, life-history strategies and ecological niches, but little is known about the response to insularity of other important traits such as animal signals. Here, we tested whether birds' plumage colouration is part of the island syndrome. We analysed with spectrophotometry the colouration of 116 species endemic to islands and their 116 closest mainland relatives. We found a pattern of reduced brightness and colour intensity for both sexes on islands. In addition, we found a decrease in the number of colour patches on islands that, in males, was associated with a decrease in the number of same-family sympatric species. These results demonstrate a worldwide pattern of parallel colour changes on islands and suggest that a relaxation of selection on species recognition may be one of the mechanisms involved.

  5. Colour-grapheme synesthesia affects binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Paffen, Chris L E; van der Smagt, Maarten J; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2011-01-01

    In colour-grapheme synesthesia, non-coloured graphemes are perceived as being inherently coloured. In recent years, it is debated whether visual processing of synesthesia-inducing achromatic graphemes is similar to that of chromatic graphemes. Here, we exploit the phenomenon of binocular rivalry in which incompatible images presented dichoptically compete for conscious expression. Importantly, the competition only arises if the two images are sufficiently different; if the difference between the images is small, the images will fuse into a single mixed percept. We show that achromatic digits that induce synesthetic colour percepts increase the incidence of binocular rivalry compared to achromatic non-digits that do not evoke such percepts. That is, compared to achromatically perceived non-digits, synesthesia-inducing digits increase the predominance of binocular rivalry over binocular fusion. This finding shows that the synesthetic colour experience can provide the conditions for promoting binocular rivalry, much like stimulus features that induce rivalry in normal vision.

  6. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag {ital b} quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and D{null} collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  7. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  8. Colour in insect thermoregulation: empirical and theoretical tests in the colour-changing grasshopper, Kosciuscola tristis.

    PubMed

    Umbers, K D L; Herberstein, M E; Madin, J S

    2013-01-01

    Body colours can result in different internal body temperatures, but evidence for the biological significance of colour-induced temperature differences is inconsistent. We investigated the relationship between body colour and temperature in a model insect species that rapidly changes colour. We used an empirical approach and constructed a heat budget model to quantify whether a colour change from black to turquoise has a role in thermoregulation for the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis). Our study shows that colour change in K. tristis provides relatively small temperature differences that vary greatly with wind speed (0.55 °C at ms(-1) to 0.05 °C at 10 ms(-1)). The biological significance of this difference is unclear and we discuss the requirement for more studies that directly test hypotheses regarding the fitness effects of colour in manipulating body temperature.

  9. A vector model of colour contrast in a cone-excitation colour space.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A J

    1997-01-01

    A vector model of colour contrast is examined in a colour space that is a logarithmic transformation of the MacLeod-Boynton cone-excitation diagram. Observers set matches in a haploscopic display, in which one eye viewed a standard display (a neutral target square in a coloured surround) and the other viewed a matching display (a variable square in its own surround). Contrast colours are simply represented in this colour space: the vector connecting the right-eye surround and matched chromaticities is parallel to and to the same length and direction as the vector that connects the left-eye (standard) surround and square chromaticities. This describes observers' matches to the hues induced in a neutral square for a range of inducing surround colours, a range of right-eye (match) surround colours and four different luminance contrasts.

  10. Colour in insect thermoregulation: empirical and theoretical tests in the colour-changing grasshopper, Kosciuscola tristis.

    PubMed

    Umbers, K D L; Herberstein, M E; Madin, J S

    2013-01-01

    Body colours can result in different internal body temperatures, but evidence for the biological significance of colour-induced temperature differences is inconsistent. We investigated the relationship between body colour and temperature in a model insect species that rapidly changes colour. We used an empirical approach and constructed a heat budget model to quantify whether a colour change from black to turquoise has a role in thermoregulation for the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis). Our study shows that colour change in K. tristis provides relatively small temperature differences that vary greatly with wind speed (0.55 °C at ms(-1) to 0.05 °C at 10 ms(-1)). The biological significance of this difference is unclear and we discuss the requirement for more studies that directly test hypotheses regarding the fitness effects of colour in manipulating body temperature. PMID:23108152

  11. Top quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit; /Harvard U.

    2010-01-01

    The large data samples of top quark candidate events collected at the Tevatron CDF II experiment allow for a variety of measurements to analyze the production of the top quark. This article discusses recent results of top quark production at CDF presented at the SUSY09 conference, including updates to the top pair production cross section, forward-backward asymmetry in t{bar t} production, single top search, search for top resonances and a search for heavy top. The discussed measurements utilize up to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at CDF.

  12. Ideal quarks and mesons in the relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, K. )

    1994-05-01

    We propose a microscopic theory for interacting mesons and ideal quarks in the relativistic quark model using the time-dependent mean-field theory technique. For simplicity we examined the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. The dynamical chiral-symmetry breaking leads to a zero-frequency mode (pion) due to the restoration of chiral symmetry. The ideal quarks are represented as dressed particles independent of mean fields, and do not have the conventional properties of fermions. This is due to the constraints of eliminating the double counting of degrees of freedom between the mean fields and quarks. The small fluctuation around the static solution is then investigated. The pseudoscalar and scalar mesons are represented as the collective modes of the mean fields.

  13. Measurement and prediction of pork colour.

    PubMed

    Van Oeckel, M J; Warnants, N; Boucqué, C V

    1999-08-01

    The extent to which instrumental colour determinations by FOPu (light scattering), Göfo (reflectance) and Labscan II (CIE L*, CIE a* and CIE b*, hue and chroma) are related to the Japanese colour grades was studied. Additionally, four on-line methods: pH1, FOP1, PQM1 (conductivity) and DDLT (Double Density Light Transmission, analogous to Capteur Gras/Maigre), were evaluated for their ability to predict subjectively and objectively colour. One hundred and twenty samples of m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum, from animals of different genotypes, were analysed. Of the instrumental colour determinations, CIE L* (r=-0.82), FOPu (r=-0.70) and Göfo (r=0.70) were best correlated with the Japanese colour scores. The Japanese colour grades could be predicted by the on-line instruments, pH1, FOP1, PQM1 and DDLT, with determination coefficients between 15 and 28%. Ultimate meat colour, determined by Japanese colour standards, FOPu, Göfo and CIE L*, was better predicted by DDLT than by the classic on-line instruments: FOP1, pH1 and PQM1, although the standard error of the estimate was similar for all instruments. This means that DDLT, although originally designed for estimating lean meat percentage, can additionally give information about meat quality, in particular colour. However, it must be stressed that the colour estimate by DDLT refers to a population of animals, rather than to individual pigs, because of the number of erroneously assigned samples. PMID:22062695

  14. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  15. Heavy quarks and CP: Moriond 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The presentations at the Fifth Moriond Workshop on Heavy Quarks, Flavor Mixing, and CP Violation (La Plagne, France, January 13-19, 1985) are summarized. The following topics are reviewed. What's New (beyond the top, top quarks, bottom quarks, charm quarks, strange quarks, and others); why is all this being done (strong interactions and hadron structure, and electroweak properties); and what next (facilities and can one see CP violation in the B-anti B system). 64 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Fragment-based treatment of delocalization and static correlation errors in density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-12-01

    One of the most important open challenges in modern Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT) is the correct treatment of systems involving fractional electron charges and spins. Approximate exchange-correlation functionals struggle with such systems, leading to pervasive delocalization and static correlation errors. We demonstrate how these errors, which plague density-functional calculations of bond-stretching processes, can be avoided by employing the alternative framework of partition density-functional theory (PDFT) even using the local density approximation for the fragments. Our method is illustrated with explicit calculations on simple systems exhibiting delocalization and static-correlation errors, stretched H2+, H2, He2+, Li2+, and Li2. In all these cases, our method leads to greatly improved dissociation-energy curves. The effective KS potential corresponding to our self-consistent solutions displays key features around the bond midpoint; these are known to be present in the exact KS potential, but are absent from most approximate KS potentials and are essential for the correct description of electron dynamics.

  17. Fragment-based treatment of delocalization and static correlation errors in density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-12-21

    One of the most important open challenges in modern Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT) is the correct treatment of systems involving fractional electron charges and spins. Approximate exchange-correlation functionals struggle with such systems, leading to pervasive delocalization and static correlation errors. We demonstrate how these errors, which plague density-functional calculations of bond-stretching processes, can be avoided by employing the alternative framework of partition density-functional theory (PDFT) even using the local density approximation for the fragments. Our method is illustrated with explicit calculations on simple systems exhibiting delocalization and static-correlation errors, stretched H2 (+), H2, He2 (+), Li2 (+), and Li2. In all these cases, our method leads to greatly improved dissociation-energy curves. The effective KS potential corresponding to our self-consistent solutions displays key features around the bond midpoint; these are known to be present in the exact KS potential, but are absent from most approximate KS potentials and are essential for the correct description of electron dynamics. PMID:26696044

  18. Diradicals acting through diamagnetic phenylene vinylene bridges: Raman spectroscopy as a probe to characterize spin delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    González, Sandra Rodríguez; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; González Cano, Rafael C.; López Navarrete, Juan T. E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es Casado, Juan E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es; Novoa, Juan J.; Mota, Fernando; Corro, Elena del; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G.

    2014-04-28

    We present a complete Raman spectroscopic study in two structurally well-defined diradical species of different lengths incorporating oligo p-phenylene vinylene bridges between two polychlorinated triphenylmethyl radical units, a disposition that allows sizeable conjugation between the two radicals through and with the bridge. The spectroscopic data are interpreted and supported by quantum chemical calculations. We focus the attention on the Raman frequency changes, interpretable in terms of: (i) bridge length (conjugation length); (ii) bridge conformational structure; and (iii) electronic coupling between the terminal radical units with the bridge and through the bridge, which could delineate through-bond spin polarization, or spin delocalization. These items are addressed by using the “oligomer approach” in conjunction with pressure and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic data. In summary, we have attempted to translate the well-known strategy to study the electron (charge) structure of π−conjugated molecules by Raman spectroscopy to the case of electron (spin) interactions via the spin delocalization mechanism.

  19. Chain-length and mode-delocalization dependent amide-I anharmonicity in peptide oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2012-06-01

    The diagonal anharmonicities of the amide-I mode in the alanine oligomers are examined in the normal-mode basis by ab initio calculations. The selected oligomers range from dimer to heptamer, in either the α-helical or β-sheet conformations. It is found that the anharmonicity varies from mode to mode within the same oligomer. For a given amide-I mode, the anharmonicity is closely related to the delocalization extent of the mode: the less it delocalizes, the larger the anharmonicity it has. Thus, the single-mode potential energy distribution (PEDmax) can be used as an indicator of the magnitude of the anharmonicity. It is found that as the peptide chain length increases, the averaged diagonal anharmonicity generally decreases; however, the sum of the averaged diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities within a peptide roughly remains a constant for all the oligomers examined, indicating the excitonic characteristics of the amide-I modes. Excitonic coupling tends to decrease the diagonal anharmonicities in a coupled system with multiple chromophores, which explains the observed behavior of the anharmonicities. The excitonic nature of the amide-I band in peptide oligomers is thus verified by the anharmonic computations. Isotopic substitution effect on the anharmonicities and mode localizations of the amide-I modes in peptides is also discussed.

  20. Surface plasmon delocalization in silver nanoparticle aggregates revealed by subdiffraction supercontinuum hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Borys, Nicholas J.; Shafran, Eyal; Lupton, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmonic resonances of nanostructured silver films produce exceptional surface enhancement, enabling reproducible single-molecule Raman scattering measurements. Supporting a broad range of plasmonic resonances, these disordered systems are difficult to investigate with conventional far-field spectroscopy. Here, we use nonlinear excitation spectroscopy and polarization anisotropy of single optical hot spots of supercontinuum generation to track the transformation of these plasmon modes as the mesoscopic structure is tuned from a film of discrete nanoparticles to a semicontinuous layer of aggregated particles. We demonstrate how hot spot formation from diffractively-coupled nanoparticles with broad spectral resonances transitions to that from spatially delocalized surface plasmon excitations, exhibiting multiple excitation resonances as narrow as 13 meV. Photon-localization microscopy reveals that the delocalized plasmons are capable of focusing multiple narrow radiation bands over a broadband range to the same spatial region within 6 nm, underscoring the existence of novel plasmonic nanoresonators embedded in highly disordered systems. PMID:23807624

  1. Aromaticity of rings-in-molecules (RIMs) from electron localization-delocalization matrices (LDMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumar, Ismat; Cook, Ronald; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2016-01-01

    A new and powerful molecular descriptor termed the LDM (localization-delocalization matrix) has recently been proposed as a molecular fingerprinting tool and has been shown to yield robust quantitative-structure-to-activity/property-relationships (QSAR/QSPR). An LDM lists the average number of electrons localized within an atom in a molecule along its diagonal while the off-diagonal elements are the pair-wise average number of electrons shared between every pair of atoms in the molecule, bonded or not. Hence, the LDM is a representation of a fuzzy molecular graph that accounts for the whereabouts of all electron(s) in the molecule and can be expected to encode for several facets of its chemistry at once. We show that the LDM captures the aromatic character of a ring-in-a-molecule by comparing the aromaticity ranking based on the LDMs and their eigenvalues of 6-membered carbon rings within (polycyclic) benzenoid hydrocarbons with the ranking based on four well-established local aromaticity measures (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, acromatic fluctuation index, para delocalization index, and nucleus independent chemical shift(0)). This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Paul von Ragué Schleyer (1930-2014).

  2. Fragment-based treatment of delocalization and static correlation errors in density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-12-21

    One of the most important open challenges in modern Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT) is the correct treatment of systems involving fractional electron charges and spins. Approximate exchange-correlation functionals struggle with such systems, leading to pervasive delocalization and static correlation errors. We demonstrate how these errors, which plague density-functional calculations of bond-stretching processes, can be avoided by employing the alternative framework of partition density-functional theory (PDFT) even using the local density approximation for the fragments. Our method is illustrated with explicit calculations on simple systems exhibiting delocalization and static-correlation errors, stretched H2 (+), H2, He2 (+), Li2 (+), and Li2. In all these cases, our method leads to greatly improved dissociation-energy curves. The effective KS potential corresponding to our self-consistent solutions displays key features around the bond midpoint; these are known to be present in the exact KS potential, but are absent from most approximate KS potentials and are essential for the correct description of electron dynamics.

  3. Tests of quark mass textures

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-21

    The classic hints on the structure of the quark mass matrices are shortly reviewed and the possibility of obtaining further information through precise texture analysis is discussed with the aid of a specific example.

  4. Deconfinement and virtual quark loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, T.; Engels, J.; Satz, H.

    1983-12-01

    We calculate paer Monte Carlo evaluation on an 83 × 3 lattice the energy density ɛG of the gluon sector of QCD, including virtual quark loops up to the fourth power in the hopping parameter expansion. For light quarks of one flavour, we observe at T/ΛL 95 +/- 10 a rapid variation of ɛG in T, accompanied by strong fluctuations from iteration to iteration. as clear signal of the deconfinement transition.

  5. Unexpected manifestation of quark condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    A comparative analysis of some quark ensembles governed by a four-fermion interaction is performed. Arguments in support of the statement that the presence of a gas-liquid phase transition is a feature peculiar to them are adduced. The instability of small quark droplets is discussed and is attributed to the formation of a chiral soliton. The stability of baryon matter is due to a mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter.

  6. Stability of Quark Star Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.; Rehman, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of quark stars with four different types of inner matter configurations; isotropic, charged isotropic, anisotropic and charged anisotropic by using the concept of cracking. For this purpose, we have applied local density perturbations technique to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation as well as on physical parameters involved in the model. We conclude that quark stars become potentially unstable when inner matter configuration is changed and electromagnetic field is applied.

  7. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  8. Artificial selection for food colour preferences.

    PubMed

    Cole, Gemma L; Endler, John A

    2015-04-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection. PMID:25740894

  9. Artificial selection for food colour preferences

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Gemma L.; Endler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection. PMID:25740894

  10. Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Samo; Kreft, Marko

    2007-11-01

    Out of three perceptual characteristics of the colour of any substance, the hue depends mostly on the spectral properties of a substance, while the brightness and saturation depend also on the concentration of a substance and its thickness. Here, we report that evident change of the hue of the colour (i.e., from green to red) is due to a change in concentration or the thickness of a layer in some exceptional substances such as pumpkin seed oil or an aqueous solution of bromophenol blue. In some regions of Central Europe, salad dressing is made preferably with the pumpkin seed oil, which has a strong characteristic nut-like taste and remarkable properties of the colour: it appears red in a bottle, but green when served as a salad dressing. The colour of the pumpkin seed oil was previously described as brownish yellow, dark green, dark green to red ochre or dark reddish brown to light yellow green. We elucidated the physicochemical and physiological basis of such dichromatism by Beer-Lambert law and by the characteristics of human colour perception. Our concept was corroborated by the outcome of calculations of colour from spectral properties using colour matching functions. We found that dichromatism is observed if the absorption spectrum of any substance has at least two local minima: one wide but shallow and one narrow but deep local minimum.

  11. Artificial selection for food colour preferences.

    PubMed

    Cole, Gemma L; Endler, John A

    2015-04-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection.

  12. Evolution of colour vision in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Gerald H.

    2009-01-01

    Colour vision allows animals to reliably distinguish differences in the distributions of spectral energies reaching the eye. Although not universal, a capacity for colour vision is sufficiently widespread across the animal kingdom to provide prima facie evidence of its importance as a tool for analysing and interpreting the visual environment. The basic biological mechanisms on which vertebrate colour vision ultimately rests, the cone opsin genes and the photopigments they specify, are highly conserved. Within that constraint, however, the utilization of these basic elements varies in striking ways in that they appear, disappear and emerge in altered form during the course of evolution. These changes, along with other alterations in the visual system, have led to profound variations in the nature and salience of colour vision among the vertebrates. This article concerns the evolution of colour vision among the mammals, viewing that process in the context of relevant biological mechanisms, of variations in mammalian colour vision, and of the utility of colour vision. PMID:19720656

  13. Proposed signature of Anderson localization and correlation-induced delocalization in an N-leg optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakyan, T. A.; Kestner, J. P.; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-11-15

    We propose a realization of the one-dimensional random dimer model and certain N-leg generalizations using cold atoms in an optical lattice. We show that these models exhibit multiple delocalization energies that depend strongly on the symmetry properties of the corresponding Hamiltonian, and we provide analytical and numerical results for the localization length as a function of energy. We demonstrate that the N-leg systems possess similarities with their one-dimensional ancestors but are demonstrably distinct. The existence of critical delocalization energies leads to dips in the momentum distribution that serve as a clear signal of the localization-delocalization transition. These momentum distributions are different for models with different group symmetries and are identical for those with the same symmetry.

  14. Using students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights to design a hands-on coloured light mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak

    2009-06-01

    A surface mount typed multi-coloured Light-Emitting Diode (LED) is used as a light source for the hands-on coloured light mixer. The LED consists of red, green and blue tiny sources but the mixer is designed to have four switches corresponding to red, green, blue and yellow light. These colours correspond to students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights; they realize that the primary colours and the rules for lights mixing are the same as those of paints. To generate a yellow light, a microcontroller placed between four input switches and the LED operates both a red and green tiny sources. In addition, the microcontroller is employed to eliminate some combinations of coloured light mixing to simplify the experiment (basic mode) for non advanced students. If the mixer is used with more advanced students, a number of combinations will increase and students need more analytical skills to find out the primary coloured lights (the coloured lights that can not be produced by the mixing of any other coloured lights). Therefore, the mixer is able to use with more advanced and non advanced students depending on the program in the microcontroller and some modifications of the circuit. Furthermore, to introduce students an idea that other hues or shades can be generated by mixing of these three primary coloured lights of different intensities, a tuning circuit is integrated to vary an intensity of the green light source.

  15. Most and Least Preferred Colours Differ According to Object Context: New Insights from an Unrestricted Colour Range.

    PubMed

    Jonauskaite, Domicele; Mohr, Christine; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Spiers, Peter M; Althaus, Betty; Anil, Selin; Dael, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Humans like some colours and dislike others, but which particular colours and why remains to be understood. Empirical studies on colour preferences generally targeted most preferred colours, but rarely least preferred (disliked) colours. In addition, findings are often based on general colour preferences leaving open the question whether results generalise to specific objects. Here, 88 participants selected the colours they preferred most and least for three context conditions (general, interior walls, t-shirt) using a high-precision colour picker. Participants also indicated whether they associated their colour choice to a valenced object or concept. The chosen colours varied widely between individuals and contexts and so did the reasons for their choices. Consistent patterns also emerged, as most preferred colours in general were more chromatic, while for walls they were lighter and for t-shirts they were darker and less chromatic compared to least preferred colours. This meant that general colour preferences could not explain object specific colour preferences. Measures of the selection process further revealed that, compared to most preferred colours, least preferred colours were chosen more quickly and were less often linked to valenced objects or concepts. The high intra- and inter-individual variability in this and previous reports furthers our understanding that colour preferences are determined by subjective experiences and that most and least preferred colours are not processed equally.

  16. Most and Least Preferred Colours Differ According to Object Context: New Insights from an Unrestricted Colour Range

    PubMed Central

    Jonauskaite, Domicele; Mohr, Christine; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Spiers, Peter M.; Althaus, Betty; Anil, Selin; Dael, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Humans like some colours and dislike others, but which particular colours and why remains to be understood. Empirical studies on colour preferences generally targeted most preferred colours, but rarely least preferred (disliked) colours. In addition, findings are often based on general colour preferences leaving open the question whether results generalise to specific objects. Here, 88 participants selected the colours they preferred most and least for three context conditions (general, interior walls, t-shirt) using a high-precision colour picker. Participants also indicated whether they associated their colour choice to a valenced object or concept. The chosen colours varied widely between individuals and contexts and so did the reasons for their choices. Consistent patterns also emerged, as most preferred colours in general were more chromatic, while for walls they were lighter and for t-shirts they were darker and less chromatic compared to least preferred colours. This meant that general colour preferences could not explain object specific colour preferences. Measures of the selection process further revealed that, compared to most preferred colours, least preferred colours were chosen more quickly and were less often linked to valenced objects or concepts. The high intra- and inter-individual variability in this and previous reports furthers our understanding that colour preferences are determined by subjective experiences and that most and least preferred colours are not processed equally. PMID:27022909

  17. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  18. Individual colour patches as multicomponent signals.

    PubMed

    Grether, Gregory F; Kolluru, Gita R; Nersissian, Karen

    2004-08-01

    Colour patches are complex traits, the components of which may evolve independently through a variety of mechanisms. Although usually treated as simple, two-dimensional characters and classified as either structural or pigmentary, in reality colour patches are complicated, three-dimensional structures that often contain multiple pigment types and structural features. The basic dermal chromatophore unit of fishes, reptiles and amphibians consists of three contiguous cell layers. Xanthophores and erythrophores in the outermost layer contain carotenoid and pteridine pigments that absorb short-wave light; iridophores in the middle layer contain crystalline platelets that reflect light back through the xanthophores; and melanophores in the basal layer contain melanins that absorb light across the spectrum. Changes in any one component of a chromatophore unit can drastically alter the reflectance spectrum produced, and for any given adaptive outcome (e.g. an increase in visibility), there may be multiple biochemical or cellular routes that evolution could take, allowing for divergent responses by different populations or species to similar selection regimes. All of the mechanisms of signal evolution that previously have been applied to single ornaments (including whole colour patches) could potentially be applied to the individual components of colour patches. To reach a complete understanding of colour patch evolution, however, it may be necessary to take an explicitly multi-trait approach. Here, we review multiple trait evolution theory and the basic mechanisms of colour production in fishes, reptiles and amphibians, and use a combination of computer simulations and empirical examples to show how multiple trait evolution theory can be applied to the components of single colour patches. This integrative perspective on animal colouration opens up a host of new questions and hypotheses. We offer specific, testable functional hypotheses for the most common pigmentary

  19. The colour wheels of art, perception, science and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Nick

    2006-06-01

    Colour is not the domain of any one discipline be it art, philosophy, psychology or science. Each discipline has its own colour wheel and this presentation examines the origins and philosophies behind the colour circles of Art, Perception, Science and Physiology (after image) with reference to Aristotle, Robert Boyle, Leonardo da Vinci, Goethe, Ewald Hering and Albert Munsell. The paper analyses and discusses the differences between the four colour wheels using the Natural Colour System® notation as the reference for hue (the position of colours within each of the colour wheels). Examination of the colour wheels shows the dominance of blue in the wheels of art, science and physiology particularly at the expense of green. This paper does not consider the three-dimensionality of colour space its goal was to review the hue of a colour with regard to its position on the respective colour wheels.

  20. DFT Studies of the Extent of Hole Delocalization in One-electron Oxidized Adenine and Guanine base Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the extent of hole delocalization in one-electron oxidized adenine (A)- and guanine (G)-stacks and shows that new IR vibrational bands are predicted that are characteristic of hole delocalization within A-stacks. The geometries of A-stack (Ai; i = 2 – 8) and G-stack (GG and GGG) in their neutral and one-electron oxidized states were optimized with the bases in a B-DNA conformation using the M06-2X/6-31G* method. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) is localized on a single adenine in A-stacks and on a single guanine in GG and GGG stacks; located at the 5′-site of the stack. On one-electron oxidation (removal of an electron from the HOMO of the neutral A- and G-stacks) a “hole” is created. Mulliken charge analysis shows that these “holes” are delocalized over 2 – 3 adenine bases in the A-stack. The calculated spin density distribution of (Ai)•+ (i = 2 – 8), also, showed delocalization of the hole predominantly on two adenine bases with some delocalization on a neighboring base. For GG and GGG radical cations, the hole was found to be localized on a single G in the stack. The calculated HFCCs of GG and GGG are in good agreement with the experiment. Further, from the vibrational frequency analysis, it was found that IR spectra of neutral and the corresponding one-electron oxidized adenine stacks are quite different. The IR spectra of (A2)•+ has intense IR peaks between 900 – 1500 cm−1 which are not present in the neutral A2 stack. The presence of (A2)•+ in the adenine stack has a characteristic intense peak at ~1100 cm−1. Thus IR and Raman spectroscopy has potential for monitoring the extent of hole delocalization in A stacks. PMID:21417208

  1. Paths to colour in the retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B

    2004-07-01

    The description of colour pathways in the primate retina has become clearer within the past decade. This review summarises current views on the pathways subserving colour vision in the primate retina, beginning in the receptors and outer retina and leading to the mechanisms in the inner retina that add and subtract the receptor signals. Although the main features of colour pathways are now well-defined, there remains uncertainty about some of the wiring details. In particular, the question of how much connectional specificity is present is unresolved. Finally, means of isolating these pathways by psychophysical tests are considered; some current tests are likely to be less specific than hoped.

  2. Drug-induced hair colour changes.

    PubMed

    Bublin, J G; Thompson, D F

    1992-10-01

    Drug-induced hair colour changes are not a common adverse effect from medications. A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in causing hair colour changes but very few have data to support a true relationship. Of the drugs reported, chloroquine and cancer chemotherapeutic agents have the best evidence to support an association. Other drugs, such as p-aminobenzoic acid, calcium pantothenate, anthralin, chinoform, mephenesin, minoxidil, propofol, valproic acid, and verapamil await confirmatory data. Drug-induced causes should be considered in any patient with unexplained hair colour changes. PMID:1464633

  3. Natural ingredients for colouring and styling.

    PubMed

    Dweck, A C

    2002-10-01

    This paper examines some of the existing methods for colouring the hair and skin using natural material (such as henna) and proposes a parallel technology that exists in the dyeing of wool and fabrics to extend the colour range. Many of the listed plants and their derivatives are not found in Annex IV of the Cosmetic Directive and may not be used as colours; however, they do have other properties which may justify their inclusion into a product, for example, as astringent or anti-inflammatory agents. The paper concludes with some reported antigreying and hair styling preparations cited in the literature.

  4. Combined impact of entropy and carrier delocalization on charge transfer exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    Several models of the charge transfer exciton (CTE) have been proposed to explain its dissociation at the donor-acceptor (DA) interface. However, the underlying physics is still under debate. Here, we derive a temperature (T ) dependent tight-binding model for an electron-hole pair at the DA interface. The main finding is the existence of the localization-delocalization transition at a critical T , which can explain the CTE dissociation. The present study highlights the combined effect of entropy (finite T ) and carrier delocalization in the CTE dissociation.

  5. Why colour in subterranean vertebrates? Exploring the evolution of colour patterns in caecilian amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, K C; Measey, C John

    2009-05-01

    The proximate functions of animal skin colour are difficult to assign as they can result from natural selection, sexual selection or neutral evolution under genetic drift. Most often colour patterns are thought to signal visual stimuli; so,their presence in subterranean taxa is perplexing. We evaluate the adaptive nature of colour patterns in nearly a third of all known species of caecilians, an order of amphibians most of which live in tropical soils and leaf litter. We found that certain colour pattern elements in caecilians can be explained based on characteristics concerning above-ground movement. Our study implies that certain caecilian colour patterns have convergently evolved under selection and we hypothesize their function most likely to be a synergy of aposematism and crypsis, related to periods when individuals move overground. In a wider context, our results suggest that very little exposure to daylight is required to evolve and maintain a varied array of colour patterns in animal skin.

  6. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Galaxy colour gradients versus colour, structure, and luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Brough, Sarah; Holwerda, Benne; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-09-01

    Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multi-wavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall Sérsic index (n) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-n galaxies in all wavebands which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-n galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-n galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population which has properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.

  7. Why colour in subterranean vertebrates? Exploring the evolution of colour patterns in caecilian amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, K C; Measey, C John

    2009-05-01

    The proximate functions of animal skin colour are difficult to assign as they can result from natural selection, sexual selection or neutral evolution under genetic drift. Most often colour patterns are thought to signal visual stimuli; so,their presence in subterranean taxa is perplexing. We evaluate the adaptive nature of colour patterns in nearly a third of all known species of caecilians, an order of amphibians most of which live in tropical soils and leaf litter. We found that certain colour pattern elements in caecilians can be explained based on characteristics concerning above-ground movement. Our study implies that certain caecilian colour patterns have convergently evolved under selection and we hypothesize their function most likely to be a synergy of aposematism and crypsis, related to periods when individuals move overground. In a wider context, our results suggest that very little exposure to daylight is required to evolve and maintain a varied array of colour patterns in animal skin. PMID:21462404

  8. Colour vision: parallel pathways intersect in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Henze, Miriam J

    2013-12-01

    In the last one hundred years, colour vision has been demonstrated in bees and many other insects. But the underlying neural wiring remained elusive. A new study on Drosophila melanogaster combining behavioural and genetic tools yields surprising insights. PMID:24309280

  9. Edges, colour and awareness in blindsight.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Iona; Cowey, Alan

    2010-06-01

    It remains unclear what is being processed in blindsight in response to faces, colours, shapes, and patterns. This was investigated in two hemianopes with chromatic and achromatic stimuli with sharp or shallow luminance or chromatic contrast boundaries or temporal onsets. Performance was excellent only when stimuli had sharp spatial boundaries. When discrimination between isoluminant coloured Gaussians was good it declined to chance levels if stimulus onset was slow. The ability to discriminate between instantaneously presented colours in the hemianopic field depended on their luminance, indicating that wavelength discrimination totally independent of other stimulus qualities is absent. When presented with narrow-band colours the hemianopes detected a stimulus maximally effective for S-cones but invisible to M- and L-cones, indicating that blindsight is mediated not just by the mid-brain, which receives no S-cone input, or that the rods contribute to blindsight. The results show that only simple stimulus features are processed in blindsight.

  10. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  11. σ-Bond electron delocalization of branched oligogermanes and germanium containing oligosilanes

    PubMed Central

    Hlina, Johann; Zitz, Rainer; Wagner, Harald; Stella, Filippo; Baumgartner, Judith; Marschner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of germanium atoms in oligo- and polysilanes, a number of oligosilane compounds were prepared where two or more silicon atoms were replaced by germanium. While it can be expected that the structural features of thus altered molecules do not change much, the more interesting question is, whether this modification would have a profound influence on the electronic structure, in particular on the property of σ-bond electron delocalization. The UV-spectroscopic comparison of the oligosilanes with germanium enriched oligosilanes and also with oligogermanes showed a remarkable uniform picture. The expected bathochromic shift for oligogermanes and Ge-enriched oligosilanes was observed but its extent was very small. For the low energy absorption band the bathochromic shift from a hexasilane chain (256 nm) to a hexagermane chain with identical substituent patterns (259 nm) amounts to a mere 3 nm. PMID:25431502

  12. Delocalization of two interacting particles in the 2D Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in a two-dimensional quasiperiodic potential of the Harper model. We consider an amplitude of the quasiperiodic potential such that in absence of interactions all eigenstates are exponentially localized while the two interacting particles are delocalized showing anomalous subdiffusive spreading over the lattice with the spreading exponent b ≈ 0.5 instead of a usual diffusion with b = 1. This spreading is stronger than in the case of a correlated disorder potential with a one particle localization length as for the quasiperiodic potential. At the same time we do not find signatures of ballistic pairs existing for two interacting particles in the localized phase of the one-dimensional Harper model.

  13. Conjugated organic framework with three-dimensionally ordered stable structure and delocalized π clouds.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Xu, Yanhong; Jin, Shangbin; Chen, Long; Kaji, Toshihiko; Honsho, Yoshihito; Addicoat, Matthew A; Kim, Jangbae; Saeki, Akinori; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Seki, Shu; Irle, Stephan; Hiramoto, Masahiro; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2013-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a class of crystalline organic porous materials that can utilize π-π-stacking interactions as a driving force for the crystallization of polygonal sheets to form layered frameworks and ordered pores. However, typical examples are chemically unstable and lack intrasheet π-conjugation, thereby significantly limiting their applications. Here we report a chemically stable, electronically conjugated organic framework with topologically designed wire frameworks and open nanochannels, in which the π conjugation-spans the two-dimensional sheets. Our framework permits inborn periodic ordering of conjugated chains in all three dimensions and exhibits a striking combination of properties: chemical stability, extended π-delocalization, ability to host guest molecules and hole mobility. We show that the π-conjugated organic framework is useful for high on-off ratio photoswitches and photovoltaic cells. Therefore, this strategy may constitute a step towards realizing ordered semiconducting porous materials for innovations based on two-dimensionally extended π systems.

  14. Delocalization and dielectric screening of charge transfer states in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, B; Cheyns, D; Verreet, B; Schaller, R D; Rand, B P; Giebink, N C

    2014-01-01

    Charge transfer (CT) states at a donor-acceptor heterojunction have a key role in the charge photogeneration process of organic solar cells, however, the mechanism by which these states dissociate efficiently into free carriers remains unclear. Here we explore the nature of these states in small molecule-fullerene bulk heterojunction photovoltaics with varying fullerene fraction and find that the CT energy scales with dielectric constant at high fullerene loading but that there is a threshold C60 crystallite size of ~4 nm below which the spatial extent of these states is reduced. Electroabsorption measurements indicate an increase in CT polarizability when C60 crystallite size exceeds this threshold, and that this change is correlated with increased charge separation yield supported by CT photoluminescence transients. These results support a model of charge separation via delocalized CT states independent of excess heterojunction offset driving energy and indicate that local fullerene crystallinity is critical to the charge separation process.

  15. Direct observation of the collapse of the delocalized excess electron in water.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Janne; Uhlig, Frank; Ahmed, Saima; Hamm, Peter; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    It is generally assumed that the hydrated electron occupies a quasi-spherical cavity surrounded by only a few water molecules in its equilibrated state. However, in the very moment of its generation, before water has had time to respond to the extra charge, it is expected to be significantly larger in size. According to a particle-in-a-box picture, the frequency of its absorption spectrum is a sensitive measure of the initial size of the electronic wavefunction. Here, using transient terahertz spectroscopy, we show that the excess electron initially absorbs in the far-infrared at a frequency for which accompanying ab initio molecular dynamics simulations estimate an initial delocalization length of ≈ 40 Å. The electron subsequently shrinks due to solvation and thereby leaves the terahertz observation window very quickly, within ≈ 200 fs.

  16. Evolution of superclusters and delocalized states in GaAs1–xNx

    DOE PAGES

    Fluegel, B.; Alberi, K.; Beaton, D. A.; Crooker, S. A.; Ptak, A. J.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2012-11-21

    The evolution of individual nitrogen cluster bound states into an extended state infinite supercluster in dilute GaAs1–xNx was probed through temperature and intensity-dependent, time-resolved and magnetophotoluminescence (PL) measurements. Samples with compositions less than 0.23% N exhibit PL behavior that is consistent with emission from the extended states of the conduction band. Near a composition of 0.23% N, a discontinuity develops between the extended state PL peak energy and the photoluminescence excitation absorption edge. The existence of dual localized/delocalized state behavior near this composition signals the formation of an N supercluster just below the conduction band edge. The infinite supercluster ismore » fully developed by 0.32% N.« less

  17. Towards a Density Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functional able to describe localization/delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wills, John M.

    2013-03-01

    The inability to computationally describe the physics governing the properties of actinides and their alloys is the poster child of failure of existing Density Functional Theory exchange-correlation functionals. The intricate competition between localization and delocalization of the electrons, present in these materials, exposes the limitations of functionals only designed to properly describe one or the other situation. We will discuss the manifestation of this competition in real materials and propositions on how to construct a functional able to accurately describe properties of these materials. I addition we will discuss both the importance of using the Dirac equation to describe the relativistic effects in these materials, and the connection to the physics of transition metal oxides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Observation of coherent delocalized phonon-like modes in DNA under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, Mario; Ramakrishnan, Gopakumar; Harwood, Thomas; Lapthorn, Adrian J.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.; Wynne, Klaas

    2016-06-01

    Underdamped terahertz-frequency delocalized phonon-like modes have long been suggested to play a role in the biological function of DNA. Such phonon modes involve the collective motion of many atoms and are prerequisite to understanding the molecular nature of macroscopic conformational changes and related biochemical phenomena. Initial predictions were based on simple theoretical models of DNA. However, such models do not take into account strong interactions with the surrounding water, which is likely to cause phonon modes to be heavily damped and localized. Here we apply state-of-the-art femtosecond optical Kerr effect spectroscopy, which is currently the only technique capable of taking low-frequency (GHz to THz) vibrational spectra in solution. We are able to demonstrate that phonon modes involving the hydrogen bond network between the strands exist in DNA at physiologically relevant conditions. In addition, the dynamics of the solvating water molecules is slowed down by about a factor of 20 compared with the bulk.

  19. Optical studies of the charge localization and delocalization in conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngmin

    A systematic charge transport study on the thermochromism of polyaniline (PAN) doped with a plasticizing dopant, and on a field effect device using conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as its active material, was made at optical (20--45,000 cm-1) frequencies to probe the charge localization and delocalization phenomena and the insulator to metal transition (IMT) in the inhomogeneous conducting polymer system. Temperature dependent reflectance [20--8000 cm -1 (2.5 meV--1eV)] of the PAN sample, together with absorbance and do transport study done by Dr. Pron at the Laboratoire de Physique des Metaux Synthetiques in Grenoble, France, shows spectral weight loss in the infrared region but the reflectance in the very low frequency (below 100 cm-1) remains unaffected. There are two localization transitions. The origin of the 200 K localization transition that affect >˜15% of the electrons is the glass transition emanating from the dopants. The transition principally affects the IR response in the range of 200--8000 cm -1. The low temperature (<75K) localization transition affects the few electrons that provide the high conductivity. It is suggested that these electrons are localized by disorder at the lowest temperature and become delocalized through phonon induced delocalization as the temperature increases to 75K. It is noted that this temperature is typical of a Debye temperature in many organic materials. The thermocromism is attributed to the weak localization to strong localization transition through the glass transition temperature. Below the glass transition temperature (Tg), the lattice is "frozen" in configuration that reduces the charge delocalization and lead to cause increase of strongly localized polarons. Time variation of source-drain current, real-time IR reflectance [20--8000 cm-1 (2.5 meV--1eV)] modulation, and real-time UV/VIS/NIR absorbance [380--2400 nm (0.5--3.3 eV)] modulation were measured to investigate the field induced charge

  20. Delocalization-enhanced long-range energy transfer between cryptophyte algae PE545 antenna proteins.

    PubMed

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda; Curutchet, Carles; Kubica, Aleksander; Scholes, Gregory D

    2011-05-12

    We study the dynamics of interprotein energy transfer in a cluster, consisting of four units of phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) antenna proteins via a hybrid quantum-classical approach. Long-range exciton transport is viewed as a random walk in which the hopping probabilities are determined from a quantum theory. We apply two different formulations of the exciton transport problem to obtain the hopping probabilities, and find that a theory that regards energy transfer as relaxations among the excitonic eigenstates mediated by the vibrational bath, predicts the fastest dynamics. Our results indicate that persistent exciton delocalization is an important implication of the quantum nature of energy transfer on a multiprotein length scale, and that a hybrid quantum-classical approach is a viable starting point in studies of long-range energy transfer in condensed phase biological systems.

  1. QUANTUM SIMULATION. Localization-delocalization transition in the dynamics of dipolar-coupled nuclear spins.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter; Kaiser, Robin

    2015-08-21

    Nonequilibrium dynamics of many-body systems are important in many scientific fields. Here, we report the experimental observation of a phase transition of the quantum coherent dynamics of a three-dimensional many-spin system with dipolar interactions. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on a solid-state system of spins at room-temperature, we quench the interaction Hamiltonian to drive the evolution of the system. Depending on the quench strength, we then observe either localized or extended dynamics of the system coherence. We extract the critical exponents for the localized cluster size of correlated spins and diffusion coefficient around the phase transition separating the localized from the delocalized dynamical regime. These results show that NMR techniques are well suited to studying the nonequilibrium dynamics of complex many-body systems. PMID:26293957

  2. Delocalized single-photon Dicke states and the Leggett-Garg inequality in solid state systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Yin; Lambert, Neill; Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    We show how to realize a single-photon Dicke state in a large one-dimensional array of two-level systems, and discuss how to test its quantum properties. The realization of single-photon Dicke states relies on the cooperative nature of the interaction between a field reservoir and an array of two-level-emitters. The resulting dynamics of the delocalized state can display Rabi-like oscillations when the number of two-level emitters exceeds several hundred. In this case, the large array of emitters is essentially behaving like a “mirror-less cavity”. We outline how this might be realized using a multiple-quantum-well structure or a dc-SQUID array coupled to a transmission line, and discuss how the quantum nature of these oscillations could be tested with an extension of the Leggett-Garg inequality. PMID:23162693

  3. Suppression of Brewster delocalization anomalies in an alternating isotropic-birefringent random layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Partridge, J. C.; Roberts, N. W.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the polarization dependence of localization length in alternating isotropic-birefringent stacks with uncorrelated thickness disorder. The birefringent layers can be positive uniaxial, negative uniaxial, or a mixture of both. Stacks which contain a mixture are shown to suppress the Brewster delocalization anomalies and, over all incident angles, exhibit p-polarization localization length maxima that are of similar magnitude to normal incidence. Furthermore, we propose a parameter set that enables the p-polarization localization length to monotonically decrease with angle of incidence. This investigation was inspired by weakly polarizing mirrors on the sides of silvery fish and provides a generic means to produce polarization-insensitive, broadband reflections from a random, all-dielectric layered medium.

  4. Understanding WCAG2.0 Colour Contrast Requirements Through 3D Colour Space Visualisation.

    PubMed

    Sandnes, Frode Eika

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient contrast between text and background is needed to achieve sufficient readability. WCAG2.0 provides a specific definition of sufficient contrast on the web. However, the definition is hard to understand and most designers thus use contrast calculators to validate their colour choices. Often, such checks are performed after design and this may be too late. This paper proposes a colour selection approach based on three-dimensional visualisation of the colour space. The complex non-linear relationships between the colour components become comprehendible when viewed in 3D. The method visualises the available colours in an intuitive manner and allows designers to check a colour against the set of other valid colours. Unlike the contrast calculators, the proposed method is proactive and fun to use. A colour space builder was developed and the resulting models were viewed with a point cloud viewer. The technique can be used as both a design tool and a pedagogical aid to teach colour theory and design. PMID:27534328

  5. Not so colourful after all: eggshell pigments constrain avian eggshell colour space.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip; Hauber, Mark E

    2015-05-01

    Birds' eggshells are renowned for their striking colours and varied patterns. Although often considered exceptionally diverse, we report that avian eggshell coloration, sampled here across the full phylogenetic diversity of birds, occupies only 0.08-0.10% of the avian perceivable colour space. The concentrations of the two known tetrapyrrole eggshell pigments (protoporphyrin and biliverdin) are generally poor predictors of colour, both intra- and interspecifically. Here, we show that the constrained diversity of eggshell coloration can be accurately predicted by colour mixing models based on the relative contribution of both pigments and we demonstrate that the models' predictions can be improved by accounting for the reflectance of the eggshell's calcium carbonate matrix. The establishment of these proximate links between pigmentation and colour will enable future tests of hypotheses on the functions of perceived avian eggshell colours that depend on eggshell chemistry. More generally, colour mixing models are not limited to avian eggshell colours but apply to any natural colour. Our approach illustrates how modelling can aid the understanding of constraints on phenotypic diversity.

  6. Caramel colours--a historical introduction.

    PubMed

    Chappel, C I; Howell, J C

    1992-05-01

    Caramel colours used in the manufacture of a wide variety of foods and beverages have been an item of commerce for more than one hundred years. The regulatory history of these additives in the US, the UK, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and the EC is reviewed, and an introduction to the safety studies of caramel colours in this issue of Food and Chemical Toxicology is provided. PMID:1644375

  7. Plants and colour: Flowers and pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Renee; Owens, Simon J.; Rørslett, Bjørn

    2011-03-01

    While there is a range of colours found in plants the predominant colour is green. Pigments in plants have several roles e.g. photosynthesis and signalling. If colour is to be used as a signal then it must stand out from green. However, one should be aware that there are also coloured compounds where we have not yet fully investigated the role of colour in their functions—they may have roles in, for example, defence or heat exchange. In this paper, we will describe the basic chemistry of the major pigments found in plants and especially floral pigments. We will then discuss their locations in parts of the flower (such as sepals, petals, pollen and nectar), the cells in which they are found and their sub-cellular locations. Floral pigments have a large role to play in pollination of flowers by animals. They can and are modified in many ways during the development of flowers in nature, for example, at emergence and post-pollination. There are a range of biochemical mechanisms of colour change both within flowers and in isolated pigments. Some of the factors influencing colour are temperature, co-pigments, pH, metals, sugars, anthocyanin stacking and cell shape. There is a renewed interest in analysing floral pigments and how they are modified partly because of advances in recombinant DNA technologies, but also because of pollinators and their significance to biodiversity and for evolutionary studies. There is continued strong interest from the horticultural industry for the introduction of new colours e.g. the blue rose and for the exploitation of natural dyes. Funding in this area may impact future research in a potentially beneficial way but it must not deflect us from science-based conservation.

  8. Rockpool Gobies Change Colour for Camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Martin; Lown, Alice E.; Denton, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is found in a wide range of species living in numerous habitat types, offering protection from visually guided predators. This includes many species from the intertidal zone, which must cope with background types diverse in appearance and with multiple predator groups foraging at high and low tide. Many animals are capable of either relatively slow (hours, days, weeks) or rapid (seconds and minutes) colour change in order to better resemble the background against which they are found, but most work has been restricted to a few species or taxa. It is often suggested that many small intertidal fish are capable of colour change for camouflage, yet little experimental work has addressed this. Here, we test rock gobies (Gobius paganellus) for colour change abilities, and whether they can tune their appearance to match the background. In two experiments, we place gobies on backgrounds of different brightness (black or white), and of different colours (red and blue) and use digital image analysis and modelling of predator (avian) vision to quantify colour and luminance (perceived lightness) changes and camouflage. We find that gobies are capable of rapid colour change (occurring within one minute), and that they can change their luminance on lighter or darker backgrounds. When presented on backgrounds of different colours, gobies also change their colour (hue and saturation) while keeping luminance the same. These changes lead to predicted improvements in camouflage match to the background. Our study shows that small rockpool fish are capable of rapid visual change for concealment, and that this may be an important mechanism in many species to avoid predation, especially in complex heterogeneous environments. PMID:25333382

  9. THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    IANCU,E.; LEONIDOV,A.; MCLERRAN,L.

    2001-08-06

    In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory.

  10. Colour preferences of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Chi, Liang; Tian, Huiqin; Meng, Lingjie; Zheng, Jimeng; Gao, Xiaolong; Liu, Ying

    2016-03-15

    The background colour of aquaculture tanks is normally chosen based on practical experience and/or observations of fish behaviour and the growth rates achieved. However, some farmed species, including turbot, are sentient and can show a preference for a particular environment. In the current study, a self-referent colour preference device was developed and the self-referent colour preference of farmed fish investigated. In experiment 1, the background colour preference of juvenile turbot cultured under a grey background for >3months post-incubation was evaluated. Based on these results, in experiment 2, juvenile turbot were adapted to blue, pink, white, or black backgrounds for 50days and their preferences established. Meanwhile, the growth rates, feed intake, and metabolic rates (including oxygen consumption rate, and ammonia excretion rate) of the turbot were evaluated. The results showed that turbot farmed under a grey background, or after long-term white, blue, pink and black colour adaptation, always displayed a preference for a white background and a dislike for black, red, or brown backgrounds, although their body colour was greyish. Long-term adaptation influenced the frequency of juveniles selecting white, black, pink or blue backgrounds. They showed the highest growth rate, feed intake, and metabolic rates under blue and white backgrounds, and the lowest under a black background in accordance with their preferences shown in experiment 1. Although it is unclear how turbot determine their self-referent colour preferences over such a short period of time, these results indicate that dark colours are unsuitable for the aquaculture of turbot culture in terms of the welfare of the fish. PMID:26792527

  11. Mechanisms, functions and ecology of colour vision in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Hempel de Ibarra, N; Vorobyev, M; Menzel, R

    2014-06-01

    Research in the honeybee has laid the foundations for our understanding of insect colour vision. The trichromatic colour vision of honeybees shares fundamental properties with primate and human colour perception, such as colour constancy, colour opponency, segregation of colour and brightness coding. Laborious efforts to reconstruct the colour vision pathway in the honeybee have provided detailed descriptions of neural connectivity and the properties of photoreceptors and interneurons in the optic lobes of the bee brain. The modelling of colour perception advanced with the establishment of colour discrimination models that were based on experimental data, the Colour-Opponent Coding and Receptor Noise-Limited models, which are important tools for the quantitative assessment of bee colour vision and colour-guided behaviours. Major insights into the visual ecology of bees have been gained combining behavioural experiments and quantitative modelling, and asking how bee vision has influenced the evolution of flower colours and patterns. Recently research has focussed on the discrimination and categorisation of coloured patterns, colourful scenes and various other groupings of coloured stimuli, highlighting the bees' behavioural flexibility. The identification of perceptual mechanisms remains of fundamental importance for the interpretation of their learning strategies and performance in diverse experimental tasks. PMID:24828676

  12. Salience of Primary and Secondary Colours in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Anna; Pitchford, Nicola; Hart, Lynsey; Davies, Ian R. L.; Clausse, Samantha; Jennings, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    Primary colour terms ("black", "white", "red", "green", "yellow", and "blue") are more fundamental in colour language than secondary colour terms ("pink", "purple", "orange", "brown", and "grey"). Here, we assess whether this distinction exists in the absence of language, by investigating whether primary colours attract and sustain preverbal…

  13. Mechanisms, functions and ecology of colour vision in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Hempel de Ibarra, N; Vorobyev, M; Menzel, R

    2014-06-01

    Research in the honeybee has laid the foundations for our understanding of insect colour vision. The trichromatic colour vision of honeybees shares fundamental properties with primate and human colour perception, such as colour constancy, colour opponency, segregation of colour and brightness coding. Laborious efforts to reconstruct the colour vision pathway in the honeybee have provided detailed descriptions of neural connectivity and the properties of photoreceptors and interneurons in the optic lobes of the bee brain. The modelling of colour perception advanced with the establishment of colour discrimination models that were based on experimental data, the Colour-Opponent Coding and Receptor Noise-Limited models, which are important tools for the quantitative assessment of bee colour vision and colour-guided behaviours. Major insights into the visual ecology of bees have been gained combining behavioural experiments and quantitative modelling, and asking how bee vision has influenced the evolution of flower colours and patterns. Recently research has focussed on the discrimination and categorisation of coloured patterns, colourful scenes and various other groupings of coloured stimuli, highlighting the bees' behavioural flexibility. The identification of perceptual mechanisms remains of fundamental importance for the interpretation of their learning strategies and performance in diverse experimental tasks.

  14. Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment.

    PubMed

    Knipprath, Christian; Bond, Ian P; Trask, Richard S

    2012-04-01

    Biological materials possess unique and desirable energy-absorbing mechanisms and structural characteristics worthy of consideration by engineers. For example, high levels of energy dissipation at low strain rates via triggering of crack delocalization combined with interfacial hardening by platelet interlocking are observed in brittle materials such as nacre, the iridescent material in seashells. Such behaviours find no analogy in current engineering materials. The potential to mimic such toughening mechanisms on different length scales now exists, but the question concerning their suitability under dynamic loading conditions and whether these mechanisms retain their energy-absorbing potential is unclear. This paper investigates the kinematic behaviour of an 'engineered' nacre-like structure within a high strain-rate environment. A finite-element (FE) model was developed which incorporates the pertinent biological design features. A parametric study was carried out focusing on (i) the use of an overlapping discontinuous tile arrangement for crack delocalization and (ii) application of tile waviness (interfacial hardening) for improved post-damage behaviour. With respect to the material properties, the model allows the permutation and combination of a variety of different material datasets. The advantage of such a discontinuous material shows notable improvements in sustaining high strain-rate deformation relative to an equivalent continuous morphology. In the case of the continuous material, the shockwaves propagating through the material lead to localized failure while complex shockwave patterns are observed in the discontinuous flat tile arrangement, arising from platelet interlocking. The influence of the matrix properties on impact performance is investigated by varying the dominant material parameters. The results indicate a deceleration of the impactor velocity, thus delaying back face nodal displacement. A final series of FE models considered the

  15. Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment

    PubMed Central

    Knipprath, Christian; Bond, Ian P.; Trask, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Biological materials possess unique and desirable energy-absorbing mechanisms and structural characteristics worthy of consideration by engineers. For example, high levels of energy dissipation at low strain rates via triggering of crack delocalization combined with interfacial hardening by platelet interlocking are observed in brittle materials such as nacre, the iridescent material in seashells. Such behaviours find no analogy in current engineering materials. The potential to mimic such toughening mechanisms on different length scales now exists, but the question concerning their suitability under dynamic loading conditions and whether these mechanisms retain their energy-absorbing potential is unclear. This paper investigates the kinematic behaviour of an ‘engineered’ nacre-like structure within a high strain-rate environment. A finite-element (FE) model was developed which incorporates the pertinent biological design features. A parametric study was carried out focusing on (i) the use of an overlapping discontinuous tile arrangement for crack delocalization and (ii) application of tile waviness (interfacial hardening) for improved post-damage behaviour. With respect to the material properties, the model allows the permutation and combination of a variety of different material datasets. The advantage of such a discontinuous material shows notable improvements in sustaining high strain-rate deformation relative to an equivalent continuous morphology. In the case of the continuous material, the shockwaves propagating through the material lead to localized failure while complex shockwave patterns are observed in the discontinuous flat tile arrangement, arising from platelet interlocking. The influence of the matrix properties on impact performance is investigated by varying the dominant material parameters. The results indicate a deceleration of the impactor velocity, thus delaying back face nodal displacement. A final series of FE models considered the

  16. Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment.

    PubMed

    Knipprath, Christian; Bond, Ian P; Trask, Richard S

    2012-04-01

    Biological materials possess unique and desirable energy-absorbing mechanisms and structural characteristics worthy of consideration by engineers. For example, high levels of energy dissipation at low strain rates via triggering of crack delocalization combined with interfacial hardening by platelet interlocking are observed in brittle materials such as nacre, the iridescent material in seashells. Such behaviours find no analogy in current engineering materials. The potential to mimic such toughening mechanisms on different length scales now exists, but the question concerning their suitability under dynamic loading conditions and whether these mechanisms retain their energy-absorbing potential is unclear. This paper investigates the kinematic behaviour of an 'engineered' nacre-like structure within a high strain-rate environment. A finite-element (FE) model was developed which incorporates the pertinent biological design features. A parametric study was carried out focusing on (i) the use of an overlapping discontinuous tile arrangement for crack delocalization and (ii) application of tile waviness (interfacial hardening) for improved post-damage behaviour. With respect to the material properties, the model allows the permutation and combination of a variety of different material datasets. The advantage of such a discontinuous material shows notable improvements in sustaining high strain-rate deformation relative to an equivalent continuous morphology. In the case of the continuous material, the shockwaves propagating through the material lead to localized failure while complex shockwave patterns are observed in the discontinuous flat tile arrangement, arising from platelet interlocking. The influence of the matrix properties on impact performance is investigated by varying the dominant material parameters. The results indicate a deceleration of the impactor velocity, thus delaying back face nodal displacement. A final series of FE models considered the

  17. Colour in the eyes of insects.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, D G

    2002-06-01

    Many insect species have darkly coloured eyes, but distinct colours or patterns are frequently featured. A number of exemplary cases of flies and butterflies are discussed to illustrate our present knowledge of the physical basis of eye colours, their functional background, and the implications for insect colour vision. The screening pigments in the pigment cells commonly determine the eye colour. The red screening pigments of fly eyes and the dorsal eye regions of dragonflies allow stray light to photochemically restore photoconverted visual pigments. A similar role is played by yellow pigment granules inside the photoreceptor cells which function as a light-controlling pupil. Most insect eyes contain black screening pigments which prevent stray light to produce background noise in the photoreceptors. The eyes of tabanid flies are marked by strong metallic colours, due to multilayers in the corneal facet lenses. The corneal multilayers in the gold-green eyes of the deer fly Chrysops relictus reduce the lens transmission in the orange-green, thus narrowing the sensitivity spectrum of photoreceptors having a green absorbing rhodopsin. The tapetum in the eyes of butterflies probably enhances the spectral sensitivity of proximal long-wavelength photoreceptors. Pigment granules lining the rhabdom fine-tune the sensitivity spectra. PMID:12073079

  18. Ecology and evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Misha

    2004-07-01

    More than one hundred years ago, Grant Allen suggested that colour vision in primates, birds and insects evolved as an adaptation for foraging on colourful advertisements of plants--fruits and flowers. Recent studies have shown that well developed colour vision appeared long before fruits and flowers evolved. Thus, colour vision is generally beneficial for many animals, not only for those eating colourful food. Primates are the only placental mammals that have trichromatic colour vision. This may indicate either that trichromacy is particularly useful for primates or that primates are unique among placental mammals in their ability to utilise the signals of three spectrally distinct types of cones or both. Because fruits are an important component of the primate diet, primate trichromacy could have evolved as a specific adaptation for foraging on fruits. Alternatively, primate trichromacy could have evolved as an adaptation for many visual tasks. Comparative studies of mammalian eyes indicate that primates are the only placental mammals that have in their retina a pre-existing neural machinery capable of utilising the signals of an additional spectral type of cone. Thus, the failure of non-primate placental mammals to evolve trichromacy can be explained by constraints imposed on the wiring of retinal neurones. PMID:15312027

  19. Ecology and evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Misha

    2004-07-01

    More than one hundred years ago, Grant Allen suggested that colour vision in primates, birds and insects evolved as an adaptation for foraging on colourful advertisements of plants--fruits and flowers. Recent studies have shown that well developed colour vision appeared long before fruits and flowers evolved. Thus, colour vision is generally beneficial for many animals, not only for those eating colourful food. Primates are the only placental mammals that have trichromatic colour vision. This may indicate either that trichromacy is particularly useful for primates or that primates are unique among placental mammals in their ability to utilise the signals of three spectrally distinct types of cones or both. Because fruits are an important component of the primate diet, primate trichromacy could have evolved as a specific adaptation for foraging on fruits. Alternatively, primate trichromacy could have evolved as an adaptation for many visual tasks. Comparative studies of mammalian eyes indicate that primates are the only placental mammals that have in their retina a pre-existing neural machinery capable of utilising the signals of an additional spectral type of cone. Thus, the failure of non-primate placental mammals to evolve trichromacy can be explained by constraints imposed on the wiring of retinal neurones.

  20. Colourful parrot feathers resist bacterial degradation.

    PubMed

    Burtt, Edward H; Schroeder, Max R; Smith, Lauren A; Sroka, Jenna E; McGraw, Kevin J

    2011-04-23

    The brilliant red, orange and yellow colours of parrot feathers are the product of psittacofulvins, which are synthetic pigments known only from parrots. Recent evidence suggests that some pigments in bird feathers function not just as colour generators, but also preserve plumage integrity by increasing the resistance of feather keratin to bacterial degradation. We exposed a variety of colourful parrot feathers to feather-degrading Bacillus licheniformis and found that feathers with red psittacofulvins degraded at about the same rate as those with melanin and more slowly than white feathers, which lack pigments. Blue feathers, in which colour is based on the microstructural arrangement of keratin, air and melanin granules, and green feathers, which combine structural blue with yellow psittacofulvins, degraded at a rate similar to that of red and black feathers. These differences in resistance to bacterial degradation of differently coloured feathers suggest that colour patterns within the Psittaciformes may have evolved to resist bacterial degradation, in addition to their role in communication and camouflage.

  1. The many colours of 'the dress'.

    PubMed

    Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Bloj, Marina; Toscani, Matteo

    2015-06-29

    There has been an intense discussion among the public about the colour of a dress, shown in a picture posted originally on Tumblr (http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and; accessed on 10:56 am GMT on Tue 24 Mar 2015). Some people argue that they see a white dress with golden lace, while others describe the dress as blue with black lace. Here we show that the question "what colour is the dress?" has more than two answers. In fact, there is a continuum of colour percepts across different observers. We measured colour matches on a calibrated screen for two groups of observers who had reported different percepts of the dress. Surprisingly, differences between the two groups arose mainly from differences in lightness, rather than chromaticity of the colours they adjusted to match the dress. We speculate that the ambiguity arises in the case of this particular image because the distribution of colours within the dress closely matches the distribution of natural daylights. This makes it more difficult to disambiguate illumination changes from those in reflectance. PMID:25981790

  2. Flower colour adaptation in a mimetic orchid

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Ethan; Anderson, Bruce; Johnson, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Although the tremendous variability in floral colour among angiosperms is often attributed to divergent selection by pollinators, it is usually difficult to preclude the possibility that floral colour shifts were driven by non-pollinator processes. Here, we examine the adaptive significance of flower colour in Disa ferruginea, a non-rewarding orchid that is thought to attract its butterfly pollinator by mimicking the flowers of sympatric nectar-producing species. Disa ferruginea has red flowers in the western part of its range and orange flowers in the eastern part—a colour shift that we hypothesized to be the outcome of selection for resemblance to different local nectar-producing plants. Using reciprocal translocations of red and orange phenotypes as well as arrays of artificial flowers, we found that the butterfly Aeropetes tulbaghia, the only pollinator of the orchid, preferred both the red phenotype and red artificial flowers in the west where its main nectar plant also has red flowers, and both the orange phenotype and orange artificial flowers in the east, where its main nectar plant has orange flowers. This phenotype by environment interaction demonstrates that the flower colour shift in D. ferruginea is adaptive and driven by local colour preference in its pollinator. PMID:22298842

  3. Flower colour adaptation in a mimetic orchid.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ethan; Anderson, Bruce; Johnson, Steven D

    2012-06-22

    Although the tremendous variability in floral colour among angiosperms is often attributed to divergent selection by pollinators, it is usually difficult to preclude the possibility that floral colour shifts were driven by non-pollinator processes. Here, we examine the adaptive significance of flower colour in Disa ferruginea, a non-rewarding orchid that is thought to attract its butterfly pollinator by mimicking the flowers of sympatric nectar-producing species. Disa ferruginea has red flowers in the western part of its range and orange flowers in the eastern part--a colour shift that we hypothesized to be the outcome of selection for resemblance to different local nectar-producing plants. Using reciprocal translocations of red and orange phenotypes as well as arrays of artificial flowers, we found that the butterfly Aeropetes tulbaghia, the only pollinator of the orchid, preferred both the red phenotype and red artificial flowers in the west where its main nectar plant also has red flowers, and both the orange phenotype and orange artificial flowers in the east, where its main nectar plant has orange flowers. This phenotype by environment interaction demonstrates that the flower colour shift in D. ferruginea is adaptive and driven by local colour preference in its pollinator.

  4. Accelerated speciation in colour-polymorphic birds.

    PubMed

    Hugall, Andrew F; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2012-05-09

    Colour polymorphism exemplifies extreme morphological diversity within populations. It is taxonomically widespread but generally rare. Theory suggests that where colour polymorphism does occur, processes generating and maintaining it can promote speciation but the generality of this claim is unclear. Here we confirm, using species-level molecular phylogenies for five families of non-passerine birds, that colour polymorphism is associated with accelerated speciation rates in the three groups in which polymorphism is most prevalent. In all five groups, colour polymorphism is lost at a significantly greater rate than it is gained. Thus, the general rarity and phylogenetic dispersion of colour polymorphism is accounted for by a combination of higher speciation rate and higher transition rate from polymorphism to monomorphism, consistent with theoretical models where speciation is driven by fixation of one or more morphs. This is corroborated by evidence from a species-level molecular phylogeny of passerines, incorporating 4,128 (66.5%) extant species, that polymorphic species tend to be younger than monomorphic species. Our results provide empirical support for the general proposition, dating from classical evolutionary theory, that colour polymorphism can increase speciation rates.

  5. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  6. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces. PMID:25541769

  7. Seasonal colour and antipredator behaviour in Etheostoma (Percidae).

    PubMed

    Moran, R L; von Ende, C N; King, B H

    2014-04-01

    This study examined how colour varies across season and sex in the fantail darter Etheostoma flabellare and the banded darter Etheostoma zonale. Etheostoma flabellare has male-only parental care and exhibited slight sexual dimorphism in overall colour, with no discernible effect of season on colour; whereas E. zonale does not have parental care and exhibited substantial sexual dimorphism in colour, but only in the breeding season. Additionally, antipredator behaviour of E. zonale was compared between males that were fully coloured during the breeding season and males that were partially coloured at that time, but the effects of colour and season were not consistent across males.

  8. A Handheld LED Coloured-Light Mixer for Students to Learn Collaboratively the Primary Colours of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny…

  9. The role of delocalization error in non-covalent interactions from dispersion-corrected density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero de La Roza, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Extensive benchmarking of dispersion-corrected density functional theory (dcDFT) methods has shown that it is nowadays feasible to calculate, with great accuracy, binding energies of small dimers and lattice energies of molecular crystals. However, there are many outstanding questions that can only be answered by a proper understanding of the interplay between base functional and dispersion correction. In this talk, I explore how delocalization error from the exchange-correlation functional impacts the calculation of non-covalent donor-acceptor interactions. Delocalization error arises from the failure of most functionals to model the long-range behavior of the exchange-correlation hole. Its primary consequence for non-covalent interactions is that the stability of donor-acceptor interactions is overestimated. Errors caused by delocalization error are particularly harmful in systems with strong and extensive hydrogen-bonded networks (water clusters and ice) or strong donor-acceptor interactions (halogen bonding), and can not be corrected using a pairwise dispersion correction. In addition, I present how delocalization error affects real-life applications of dcDFT, such as molecular adsorption on iron-oxide nanoparticles and surfaces.

  10. Seasonal Changes in Colour: A Comparison of Structural, Melanin- and Carotenoid-Based Plumage Colours

    PubMed Central

    Delhey, Kaspar; Burger, Claudia; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Peters, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background Plumage coloration is important for bird communication, most notably in sexual signalling. Colour is often considered a good quality indicator, and the expression of exaggerated colours may depend on individual condition during moult. After moult, plumage coloration has been deemed fixed due to the fact that feathers are dead structures. Still, many plumage colours change after moult, although whether this affects signalling has not been sufficiently assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied changes in coloration after moult in four passerine birds (robin, Erithacus rubecula; blackbird, Turdus merula; blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus; and great tit, Parus major) displaying various coloration types (melanin-, carotenoid-based and structural). Birds were caught regularly during three years to measure plumage reflectance. We used models of avian colour vision to derive two variables, one describing chromatic and the other achromatic variation over the year that can be compared in magnitude among different colour types. All studied plumage patches but one (yellow breast of the blue tit) showed significant chromatic changes over the year, although these were smaller than for a typical dynamic trait (bill colour). Overall, structural colours showed a reduction in relative reflectance at shorter wavelengths, carotenoid-based colours the opposite pattern, while no general pattern was found for melanin-based colours. Achromatic changes were also common, but there were no consistent patterns of change for the different types of colours. Conclusions/Significance Changes of plumage coloration independent of moult are probably widespread; they should be perceivable by birds and have the potential to affect colour signalling. PMID:20644723

  11. A handheld LED coloured-light mixer for students to learn collaboratively the primary colours of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-03-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) producing primary colours are combined with green intensity varying circuitry to generate the standard colour-triangle secondary colours and various shades ranging from yellow to orange and pale blue to cyan. In the laboratory, students worked collaboratively, predicting, observing and explaining, and finally discussing until there was a consensus.

  12. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  14. Top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich W.; /Arizona U.

    2010-09-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has, until recently, been the only accelerator with sufficient energy to produce top quarks. The CDF and D0 experiments have collected large samples of top quarks. We report on recent top quark production measurements of the single top and t{bar t} production cross sections, as well as studies of the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution and a search for highly boosted top quarks.

  15. Ligand Field Strength Mediates Electron Delocalization in Octahedral [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) Clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of terminal ligand binding on a variety of cluster properties (redox delocalization, ground-state stabilization, and breadth of redox state accessibility), we prepared three electron-transfer series based on the hexanuclear iron cluster [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) in which the terminal ligand field strength was modulated from weak to strong (L' = DMF, MeCN, CN). The extent of intracore M-M interactions is gauged by M-M distances, spin ground state persistence, and preference for mixed-valence states as determined by electrochemical comproportionation constants. Coordination of DMF to the [((H)L)2Fe6] core leads to weaker Fe-Fe interactions, as manifested by the observation of ground states populated only at lower temperatures (<100 K) and by the greater evidence of valence trapping within the mixed-valence states. Comproportionation constants determined electrochemically (Kc = 10(4)-10(8)) indicate that the redox series exhibits electronic delocalization (class II-III), yet no intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands are observable in the near-IR spectra. Ligation of the stronger σ donor acetonitrile results in stabilization of spin ground states to higher temperatures (∼300 K) and a high degree of valence delocalization (Kc = 10(2)-10(8)) with observable IVCT bands. Finally, the anionic cyanide-bound series reveals the highest degree of valence delocalization with the most intense IVCT bands (Kc = 10(12)-10(20)) and spin ground state population beyond room temperature. Across the series, at a given formal oxidation level, the capping ligand on the hexairon cluster dictates the overall properties of the aggregate, modulating the redox delocalization and the persistence of the intracore coupling of the metal sites.

  16. Rare top-quark decays to Higgs boson in MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, A.; Paraskevas, M.; Rosiek, J.; Suxho, K.; Tamvakis, K.

    2014-11-01

    In full one-loop generality and in next-to-leading order in QCD, we study rare top to Higgs boson flavour changing decay processes t → qh with q = u, c quarks, in the general MSSM with R-parity conservation. Our primary goal is to search for enhanced effects on that could be visible at current and high luminosity LHC running. To this end, we perform an analytical expansion of the amplitude in terms of flavour changing squark mass insertions that treats both cases of hierarchical and degenerate squark masses in a unified way. We identify two enhanced effects allowed by various constraints: one from holomorphic trilinear soft SUSY breaking terms and/or right handed up squark mass insertions and another from non-holomorphic trilinear soft SUSY breaking terms and light Higgs boson masses. Interestingly, even with flavour violating effects in the, presently unconstrained, up-squark sector, SUSY effects on come out to be unobservable at LHC mainly due to leading order cancellations between penguin and self energy diagrams and the constraints from charge- and colour-breaking minima (CCB) of the MSSM vacuum. An exception to this conclusion may be effects arising from non-holomorphic soft SUSY breaking terms in the region where the CP-odd Higgs mass is smaller than the top-quark mass but this scenario is disfavoured by recent LHC searches. Our calculations for t → qh decay are made available in SUSY FLAVOUR numerical library.

  17. Flower colour and cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Brugliera, Filippa

    2013-02-19

    Cytochromes P450 play important roles in biosynthesis of flavonoids and their coloured class of compounds, anthocyanins, both of which are major floral pigments. The number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of anthocyanidins (the chromophores and precursors of anthocyanins) impact the anthocyanin colour, the more the bluer. The hydroxylation pattern is determined by two cytochromes P450, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) and thus they play a crucial role in the determination of flower colour. F3'H and F3'5'H mostly belong to CYP75B and CYP75A, respectively, except for the F3'5'Hs in Compositae that were derived from gene duplication of CYP75B and neofunctionalization. Roses and carnations lack blue/violet flower colours owing to the deficiency of F3'5'H and therefore lack the B-ring-trihydroxylated anthocyanins based upon delphinidin. Successful redirection of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway to delphinidin was achieved by expressing F3'5'H coding regions resulting in carnations and roses with novel blue hues that have been commercialized. Suppression of F3'5'H and F3'H in delphinidin-producing plants reduced the number of hydroxyl groups on the anthocyanidin B-ring resulting in the production of monohydroxylated anthocyanins based on pelargonidin with a shift in flower colour to orange/red. Pelargonidin biosynthesis is enhanced by additional expression of a dihydroflavonol 4-reductase that can use the monohydroxylated dihydrokaempferol (the pelargonidin precursor). Flavone synthase II (FNSII)-catalysing flavone biosynthesis from flavanones is also a P450 (CYP93B) and contributes to flower colour, because flavones act as co-pigments to anthocyanins and can cause blueing and darkening of colour. However, transgenic plants expression of a FNSII gene yielded paler flowers owing to a reduction of anthocyanins because flavanones are precursors of anthocyanins and flavones.

  18. Searches for monopoles and quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, H.S.

    1986-07-01

    Within the last year, several sensitive searches for monopoles and quarks have been done. Recent experiments at the Tevatron and at the CERN p anti p collider have detected no evidence for free fractional charge. An experiment in a iron refinery, which searched for GUT monopoles trapped in iron ore with two SQUID detectors, found no monopole candidate. However, an experiment looking for monopoles in cosmic rays has measured an interesting event which could be interpreted as a monopole. Several detectors are being built to achieve significant improvements in sensitivity for detection of quarks and monopoles. 21 refs.

  19. Colour assortative pairing in a colour polymorphic lizard is independent of population morph diversity.

    PubMed

    Pérez I de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique; Carretero, Miguel Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Previous work with a colour polymorphic population of Podarcis muralis (Lacertidae) revealed that lizards pair by ventral colour, favouring the same colour (i.e. homomorphic) pairs. Such assortative pairing, which probably results in colour assortative mating, can have consequences for the genetic structure of the population and potentially promote speciation. The population previously studied, located in the Pyrenees, encompasses white, yellow and orange animals, as well as intermediate white-orange and yellow-orange morphs. However, other Pyrenean populations of P. muralis have less ventral colour morphs. Our aim in this study is to test the generality of the assortative colour pairing system, extending our previous analyses to populations with different morph compositions and frequencies. The results show that the assortative pattern of pairing is similar in all the populations analysed and, hence, independent of morph composition and not restricted to pentamorphic populations. This suggests that assortative pairing by colour is a general phenomenon for colour polymorphic populations of P. muralis. PMID:27649703

  20. Why quarks cannot be fundamental particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, C. S.

    2005-05-01

    Many reasons why quarks should be considered composite particles are found in the book Preons by D'Souza and Kalman. One reason not found in the book is that all the quarks except for the u quark decay. The electron and the electron neutrino do not decay. A model of fundamental particles based upon the weak charge is presented.

  1. The Unquenching of the Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, Elena; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-05-24

    We present an unquenched quark model for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pair creation (uu-bar, dd and ss-bar) are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. As an application we discuss the flavor content of octet baryons.

  2. A four-colour optical detector circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohannes, Israel; Assaad, Maher

    2013-02-01

    In this article, a new architecture for a four-colour optical detector circuit is presented. The proposed detector uses a photodiode as its basic light transducing element and a mixed signal readout circuit for signal processing and decision making. The readout circuit requires only two comparators, two multiplexers and a few logic gates to produce a digital 4 bit output that represents the right colour detected. The proposed detector is advantageous because the number of required components is fixed even if the number of detected colours is increased. The feature of having a fixed number of elements while increasing the number of detected colours is important especially in component count (i.e. low cost) and low power consumption. The proposed detector can be used as an autonomous and portable real-time pH monitoring applications. The objective of this article is to present a validation of a novel four colour sensor architecture using simulation and experiment as a proof of concept for a future implementation as a CMOS integrated circuit using the Austria Microsystems 350 nm technology.

  3. Pseudoisochromatic test plate colour representation dependence on printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luse, K.; Fomins, S.; Ozolinsh, M.

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study is to determine best printing technology for creation of colour vision deficiency tests. Valid tests for protanopia and deuteranopia were created from perceived colour matching experiments from printed colour samples by colour deficient individuals. Calibrated EpsonStylus Pro 7800 printer for ink prints and Noritsu HD 3701 digital printer for photographic prints were used. Multispectral imagery (by tunable liquid crystal filters system CRI Nuance Vis 07) data analysis show that in case of ink prints, the measured pixel colour coordinate dispersion (in the CIExy colour diagram) of similar colour arrays is smaller than in case of photographic printing. The print quality in terms of colour coordinate dispersion for printing methods used is much higher than in case of commercially available colour vision deficiency tests.

  4. Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jiancai; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Wei, Zhiqiang; Su, Rongbin; Lai, Juan; Li, Juntao; Li, Chao; Zhang, Tengwei; Wang, Xue-Hua

    2015-11-16

    Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization.

  5. Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiancai; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Wei, Zhiqiang; Su, Rongbin; Lai, Juan; Li, Juntao; Li, Chao; Zhang, Tengwei; Wang, Xue-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization.

  6. Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jiancai; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Wei, Zhiqiang; Su, Rongbin; Lai, Juan; Li, Juntao; Li, Chao; Zhang, Tengwei; Wang, Xue-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization. PMID:26567803

  7. Colour preferences in nest-building zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Muth, Felicity; Steele, Matthew; Healy, Susan D

    2013-10-01

    Some bird species are selective in the materials they choose for nest building, preferring, for example, materials of one colour to others. However, in many cases the cause of these preferences is not clear. One of those species is the zebra finch, which exhibits strong preferences for particular colours of nest material. In an attempt to determine why these birds strongly prefer one colour of material over another, we compared the preferences of paired male zebra finches for nest material colour with their preferences for food of the same colours. We found that birds did indeed prefer particular colours of nest material (in most cases blue) but that they did not generally prefer food of one colour over the other colours. It appears, then, that a preference for one colour or another of nest material is specific to the nest-building context. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  8. Quark Matter '87: Concluding remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1988-03-01

    This year marked the beginning of the experimental program at BNL and CERN to probe the properties of ultra dense hadronic matter and to search for the quark-gluon plasma phase of matter. Possible implications of the preliminary findings are discussed. Problems needing further theoretical and experimental study are pointed out. 50 refs.

  9. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  10. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  11. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  12. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  13. Triminimal parametrization of quark mixing matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Shi-Wen; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2008-12-01

    Starting from a new zeroth order basis for quark mixing (CKM) matrix based on the quark-lepton complementarity and the tribimaximal pattern of lepton mixing, we derive a triminimal parametrization of a CKM matrix with three small angles and a CP-violating phase as its parameters. This new triminimal parametrization has the merits of fast convergence and simplicity in application. With the quark-lepton complementary relations, we derive relations between the two unified triminimal parametrizations for quark mixing obtained in this work and for lepton mixing obtained by Pakvasa-Rodejohann-Weiler. Parametrization deviating from quark-lepton complementarity is also discussed.

  14. Top Quark Studies at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-26

    Years after its discovery in 1995 by CDF and D0, the top quark still undergoes intense investigations at the Tevatron. Using up to the full Run II data sample, new measurements of top quark production and properties by the D0 Collaboration are presented. In particular, the first observation of single top quark s-channel production, the measurement of differential tbar t distributions, forward-backward tbar t asymmetry, a new measurement of the top quark mass, and a measurement of the top quark charge are discussed.

  15. Confining quark condensate model of the nucleon.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Michael; Tandy, Peter

    1992-07-01

    We obtain a mean-field solution for the nucleon as a quark-meson soliton obtained from the action of the global color-symmetry model of QCD. All dynamics is generated from an effective interaction of quark currents. At the quark-meson level there are two novel features: (1) absolute confinement is produced from the space-time structure of the dynamical self-energy in the vacuum quark propagator; and (2) the related scalar meson field is an extended q-barq composite that couples nonlocally to quarks. The influence of these features upon the nucleon mass contributions and other nucleon properties is presented.

  16. Measurements of top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-11-01

    The top quark with its mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2} is the most massive fundamental particle observed by experiment. In this talk they highlight the most recent measurements of several top quark properties performed with the CDF detector based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities up to 1 fb{sup -1}. These results include a search for top quark pair production via new massive resonances, measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top-quark decay, and a direct limit on the lifetime of the top quark.

  17. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Deliot, Frederic; Glenzinski, Douglas A.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    The authors review the field of top-quark physics with an emphasis on experimental techniques. The role of the top quark in the Standard Model of particle physics is summarized and the basic phenomenology of top-quark production and decay is introduced. They discuss how contributions from physics beyond the Standard model could affect the top-quark properties or event samples. The many measurements made at the Fermilab Tevatron, which test the Standard model predictions or probe for direct evidence of new physics using the top-quark event samples, are reviewed here.

  18. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  19. Are all the coloured galaxias the same?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.; Miranda-Pérez, B. E.; Vega-Acevedo, I.; Castañeda, H.; Saviane, I.

    2016-06-01

    The coloured galaxies were recently discovered in the data-base of the SDSS. They are all compact and show unsual colours in the gri composite image. The most studied so far are those called "green peas" because of their green colour but there are bright blue, purple, red, orange, grey and pink. The green, purple and blue also share a large equivalent width in the oxygen forbbiden line [OIII]5007, larger than 200 Å, being more intense than Hα. This is quite unsual even for star forming galaxies. Although some authors have concluded that all three are the same kind of galaxies, we have studied them carefully and found out that there are important differences among the properties, including the scaling relations.

  20. Colour vision experimental studies in teaching of optometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozolinsh, Maris; Ikaunieks, Gatis; Fomins, Sergejs

    2005-10-01

    Following aspects related to human colour vision are included in experimental lessons for optometry students of University of Latvia. Characteristics of coloured stimuli (emitting and reflective), determination their coordinates in different colour spaces. Objective characteristics of transmitting of colour stimuli through the optical system of eye together with various types of appliances (lenses, prisms, Fresnel prisms). Psychophysical determination of mono- and polychromatic stimuli perception taking into account physiology of eye, retinal colour photoreceptor topography and spectral sensitivity, spatial and temporal characteristics of retinal receptive fields. Ergonomics of visual perception, influence of illumination and glare effects, testing of colour vision deficiencies.

  1. Coloured marking inside glass by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligbado, Grace; Horn, Alexander; Kreutz, Ernst W.; Krauss, Manfred M.; Siedow, Norbert; Hensel, Hartmut

    2005-11-01

    Laser labelling inside glass induces micro-cracks by high energy densities in the focus. The micro-cracks reduce the mechanical stability of glass. Light scattering allows the observer to perceive the cracks as white pixels. Coloured marking of glass in this manner is not possible. Coloured marking inside glass by changing the oxidation state of the metal ions locally in the focus does not weaken the mechanical properties of the glass. Two kind of glass systems, lime-natron-silicate and borosilicate with 0.5 % mass-content of doping are investigated. The simultaneous presence of donators and acceptors allows a transition of electrons between polyvalent ions, and can lead to permanent colour-centres inside the glass, due to the fact that the absorption of the polyvalent ions is changed by the laser-induced conversion process. For this purpose a 3 ω Nd:YAG (wavelength λL = 355 nm, pulse duration t = 10 to 80 ns) and a Ti:Sapphire solid-state laser (wavelength λL = 810 nm, pulse duration t = 200 fs) are used. The radiation parameters and the chemical composition of the glass (mainly doping) are the dominant factors to generate coloured marking. The transmittance as a function of the fluence and the change of the absorption coefficient is measured and gives a statement of the colourshade. Further the difference between lime-natron-silicate and borosilicate glass (same doping variety) is examined. Actually mauve, yellow, red-brown an grey colouring can be produced. Cracks in the microstructure of glass can also be the cause for brown colour-centres generating.

  2. Measuring the colour of rendering mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves; Meulebroeck, Wendy; Verdonck, Ann; de Bouw, Michael

    2014-05-01

    When restoring decorative mortar layers on historic façades, professionals need to determine the colour of these finishes in order to select an appropriate repair mortar. Currently, the appearance of these renders is only assessed from a subjective point of view. To match with the aesthetic aspects of the façade, contractors must constantly adjust their repair mortar composition to avoid a patchwork of different colours, which is detrimental for heritage. This time-consuming (trial-and-error) methodology can be excluded by evaluating `colour' with an objective numerical approach. The challenge of the research was to define and evaluate optimal material dependent boundary conditions for measuring the colour of nonhomogeneous mortars. Four samples with different scale of heterogeneity were measured by two spectrocolorimeters, both with a diffuse illumination geometry. The results were plotted in CIE-L*a*b* colour space. By calculating the colour difference (ΔE*), the influence of measuring with or without specular component was evaluated. We discovered the minimal number of measuring points depends on the scale of heterogeneity and the aperture area. The less homogeneous the mortar sample is and the smaller the aperture area, the more unique measuring points are required. Therefore, it is recommended to choose an aperture head of 25 mm or more to reduce the number of measurements, making your work time-efficient. However, in order to obtain accurate measurements on site, a portable optical spectrum analyser can be used with a 6 mm-diameter aperture, a viewing angle of 10°, SCI mode, illumination source D65, considering a minimum of 15 unique measuring points.

  3. Quark number fluctuations at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky, P.; Hegde, P.; Velytsky, A.

    2009-11-01

    We calculate the second, fourth and sixth order quark number fluctuations in the deconfined phase of 2+1 flavor QCD using lattices with temporal extent N{sub t} = 4,6,8 and 12. We consider light, strange and charm quarks. We use p4 action for valence quarks and gauge configurations generated with p4 action with physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark mass m{sub q} = 0.1 m{sub s} generated by the RBC-Bielefeld collaboration. We observe that for all quark masses the quark number fluctuations rapidly get close to the corresponding ideal gas limits. We compare our results to predictions of a quasi-particle model and resummed high temperature perturbative calculations. We also investigate correlations among different flavor channels.

  4. Group theoretical construction of nucleon operators using all-to-all quark propagators.

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Edwards; G.T. Fleming; B. Joo; K.J. Juge; A. Lichtl; C.J. Morningstar; D.G. Richards; S.J. Wallace

    2007-10-01

    We describe a method to construct irreducible baryon operators using all-to-all quark propagators. It was demonstrated earlier that a large basis of extended baryon operators on anisotropic, quenched lattices can be used to reliably extract the masses of 5 or more excited states in the nucleon channel. All-to-all quark propagators are expected to be needed when studying these excited states on light, dynamical configurations because contributions from multi-particle states are expected to be significant. The dilution method is used to approximate the all-to-all quark propagators. Low-lying eigenmodes can also be used if necessary. For efficient computation of matrix elements of the interpolating operators, the algorithms should exploit the fact that many extended baryon operators can be obtained from the different linear combinations of three-quark colour-singlet operators. The sparseness of the diluted noise vectors also afford several computation simplifications. Some preliminary results are presented for nucleon effective masses.

  5. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  6. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  7. Colour-coded waste disposal explained.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel

    2007-08-01

    The long-awaited guidance document from the Department of Health is colourful in more ways then one. Health Technical Memorandum (HTM) 07-01: Safe Management of Healthcare Waste was published in December 2006 and replaced the old "purple book" (The Safe Management of Clinical Waste). Was it a sign of things to come that the old guidance had a purple cover, a colour which is now used to indicate cytotoxic and cytostatic wastes? Catalyst Waste Solutions' managing director Nigel Turner explains the new legislation. PMID:17847877

  8. Colour and stellar population gradients in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Cardone, V. F.; Capaccioli, M.; Jetzer, P.; Molinaro, R.

    We discuss the colour, age and metallicity gradients in a wide sample of local SDSS early- and late-type galaxies. From the fitting of stellar population models we find that metallicity is the main driver of colour gradients and the age in the central regions is a dominant parameter which rules the scatter in both metallicity and age gradients. We find a consistency with independent observations and a set of simulations. From the comparison with simulations and theoretical considerations we are able to depict a general picture of a formation scenario.

  9. Consumer exposures to anthocyanins from colour additives, colouring foodstuffs and from natural occurrence in foods.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R; Klingenberg, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Anthocyanins are responsible for the red/blue colour of grapes, currants, and other fruits and vegetables. They may also be extracted for use as colour additives (E163) or concentrated for use as colouring foods. Consumer exposures have been assessed using data on natural occurrence, use levels and frequencies from food manufacturers and European food consumption data. Intakes from natural occurrence can be up to 4 mg kg bw(-1) day(-1) at the mean and up to 17 mg kg bw(-1) day(-1) for children who are high level consumers of red/black berries and small fruits. High-level intakes for children from food colour and colouring food applications lie in the range 0.3-6.3 mg kg bw(-1) day(-1) and for adults at 0.6-2.8 mg kg bw(-1) day(-1). Exposures from food colour use and colouring foods separately or combined are therefore lower than those from natural occurrence in foods.

  10. Colour-temperature correspondences: when reactions to thermal stimuli are influenced by colour.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Ni; Van Doorn, George H; Kawabe, Takahiro; Watanabe, Junji; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In our daily lives, information concerning temperature is often provided by means of colour cues, with red typically being associated with warm/hot, and blue with cold. While such correspondences have been known about for many years, they have primarily been studied using subjective report measures. Here we examined this correspondence using two more objective response measures. First, we used the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a test designed to assess the strength of automatic associations between different concepts in a given individual. Second, we used a priming task that involved speeded target discrimination in order to assess whether priming colour or thermal information could invoke the crossmodal association. The results of the IAT confirmed that the association exists at the level of response selection, thus indicating that a participant's responses to colour or thermal stimuli are influenced by the colour-temperature correspondence. The results of the priming experiment revealed that priming a colour affected thermal discrimination reaction times (RTs), but thermal cues did not influence colour discrimination responses. These results may therefore provide important clues as to the level of processing at which such colour-temperature correspondences are represented.

  11. Colour-Temperature Correspondences: When Reactions to Thermal Stimuli Are Influenced by Colour

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsin-Ni; Van Doorn, George H.; Kawabe, Takahiro; Watanabe, Junji; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In our daily lives, information concerning temperature is often provided by means of colour cues, with red typically being associated with warm/hot, and blue with cold. While such correspondences have been known about for many years, they have primarily been studied using subjective report measures. Here we examined this correspondence using two more objective response measures. First, we used the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a test designed to assess the strength of automatic associations between different concepts in a given individual. Second, we used a priming task that involved speeded target discrimination in order to assess whether priming colour or thermal information could invoke the crossmodal association. The results of the IAT confirmed that the association exists at the level of response selection, thus indicating that a participant’s responses to colour or thermal stimuli are influenced by the colour-temperature correspondence. The results of the priming experiment revealed that priming a colour affected thermal discrimination reaction times (RTs), but thermal cues did not influence colour discrimination responses. These results may therefore provide important clues as to the level of processing at which such colour-temperature correspondences are represented. PMID:24618675

  12. Colour-temperature correspondences: when reactions to thermal stimuli are influenced by colour.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Ni; Van Doorn, George H; Kawabe, Takahiro; Watanabe, Junji; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In our daily lives, information concerning temperature is often provided by means of colour cues, with red typically being associated with warm/hot, and blue with cold. While such correspondences have been known about for many years, they have primarily been studied using subjective report measures. Here we examined this correspondence using two more objective response measures. First, we used the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a test designed to assess the strength of automatic associations between different concepts in a given individual. Second, we used a priming task that involved speeded target discrimination in order to assess whether priming colour or thermal information could invoke the crossmodal association. The results of the IAT confirmed that the association exists at the level of response selection, thus indicating that a participant's responses to colour or thermal stimuli are influenced by the colour-temperature correspondence. The results of the priming experiment revealed that priming a colour affected thermal discrimination reaction times (RTs), but thermal cues did not influence colour discrimination responses. These results may therefore provide important clues as to the level of processing at which such colour-temperature correspondences are represented. PMID:24618675

  13. Energy change of a heavy quark in a viscous quark-gluon plasma with fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-09-01

    When a heavy quark travels through the quark-gluon plasma, the polarization and fluctuating chromoelectric fields will be produced simultaneously in the plasma. The drag force due to those fields exerting in return on the moving heavy quark will cause energy change to it. Based on the dielectric functions derived from the viscous chromohydrodynamics, we have studied the collisional energy change of a heavy quark traversing the viscous quark-gluon plasma including fluctuations of chromoelectric field. Numerical results indicate that the chromoelectric field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the moving heavy quark. Shear viscosity suppresses the fluctuation-induced energy gain and the viscous suppression effect for the charm quark is much more remarkable than that for the bottom quark. While, the fluctuation energy gain is much smaller than the polarization energy loss in magnitude and the net energy change for the heavy quark is at loss.

  14. Delocalization of Two-Dimensional Random Surfaces with Hard-Core Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miłoś, Piotr; Peled, Ron

    2015-11-01

    We study the fluctuations of random surfaces on a two-dimensional discrete torus. The random surfaces we consider are defined via a nearest-neighbor pair potential, which we require to be twice continuously differentiable on a (possibly infinite) interval and infinity outside of this interval. No convexity assumption is made and we include the case of the so-called hammock potential, when the random surface is uniformly chosen from the set of all surfaces satisfying a Lipschitz constraint. Our main result is that these surfaces delocalize, having fluctuations whose variance is at least of order log n, where n is the side length of the torus. We also show that the expected maximum of such surfaces is of order at least log n. The main tool in our analysis is an adaptation to the lattice setting of an algorithm of Richthammer, who developed a variant of a Mermin-Wagner-type argument applicable to hard-core constraints. We rely also on the reflection positivity of the random surface model. The result answers a question mentioned by Brascamp et al. on the hammock potential and a question of Velenik.

  15. Exploring Fragility: Industrial Delocalization, Occupational and Environmental Risks, and Non-Governmental Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Rigotto, Raquel Maria

    2009-01-01

    What is the role of non-governmental organizations – NGOs – in the process of industrial delocalization and socio-spatial redistribution of occupational and environmental risks? In an attempt to contribute to this debate, this study approaches the issue in a very specific socio-historical context, marked by recent accelerated industrialization in a small town in Northeast Brazil. Based on semi-structured interviews with leaders of four local NGOs, the way they perceive and value the risks introduced into the area and relations between industrialization and local development are analyzed. Findings show a strong adherence to the industrial plan by workers’ trade unions, whilst other NGOs are highly critical with regard thereto, but undertake no social or political activity regarding the issues they identify. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of the modus operandi of ideology and its strategies for symbolic construction, enabling a comprehensive reinterpretation of how capital also benefits, in its mobility, from local society’s fragility in organizing and protecting quality of life and public health. PMID:19440428

  16. The screening of 4f moments and delocalization in the compressed light rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, A K; Scalettar, R T; Jarrell, M

    2009-08-19

    Spin and charge susceptibilities and the 4f{sup n}, 4f{sup n{+-}1} configuration weights are calculated for compressed Ce (n=1), Pr (n=2), and Nd (n=3) metals using dynamical mean field theory combined with the local-density approximation. At ambient and larger volumes these trivalent rare earths are pinned at sharp 4f{sup n} configurations, their 4f moments assume atomic-limiting values, are unscreened, and the 4f charge fluctuations are small indicating little f state density near the Fermi level. Under compresssion there is dramatic screening of the moments and an associated increase in both the 4f charge fluctuations and static charge susceptibility. These changes are coincident with growing weights of the 4f{sup n-1} configurations, which it is argued are better measures of delocalization than the 4f{sup n+1} weights which are compromised by an increase in the number of 4f electrons caused by rising 6s, 6p bands. This process is continuous and prolonged as a function of volume, with strikingly similarity among the three rare earths, aside from the effects moderating and shifting to smaller volumes for the heavier members. The observed {alpha}-{gamma} collapse in Ce occurs over the large-volume half of this evolution, the Pr analog at smaller volumes, and Nd has no collapse.

  17. Localization-Delocalization Transition in a System of Quantum Kicked Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, C.E.; Hur, G.; Monteiro, T.S.

    2006-01-20

    The quantum dynamics of atoms subjected to pairs of closely spaced {delta} kicks from optical potentials are shown to be quite different from the well-known paradigm of quantum chaos, the single {delta}-kick system. We find the unitary matrix has a new oscillating band structure corresponding to a cellular structure of phase space and observe a spectral signature of a localization-delocalization transition from one cell to several. We find that the eigenstates have localization lengths which scale with a fractional power L{approx}({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup -0.75} and obtain a regime of near-linear spectral variances which approximate the 'critical statistics' relation {sigma}{sub 2}(L){approx_equal}{chi}L{approx_equal}(1/2)(1-{nu})L, where {nu}{approx_equal}0.75 is related to the fractal classical phase-space structure. The origin of the {nu}{approx_equal}0.75 exponent is analyzed.

  18. Observation of coherent delocalized phonon-like modes in DNA under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    González-Jiménez, Mario; Ramakrishnan, Gopakumar; Harwood, Thomas; Lapthorn, Adrian J.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.; Wynne, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Underdamped terahertz-frequency delocalized phonon-like modes have long been suggested to play a role in the biological function of DNA. Such phonon modes involve the collective motion of many atoms and are prerequisite to understanding the molecular nature of macroscopic conformational changes and related biochemical phenomena. Initial predictions were based on simple theoretical models of DNA. However, such models do not take into account strong interactions with the surrounding water, which is likely to cause phonon modes to be heavily damped and localized. Here we apply state-of-the-art femtosecond optical Kerr effect spectroscopy, which is currently the only technique capable of taking low-frequency (GHz to THz) vibrational spectra in solution. We are able to demonstrate that phonon modes involving the hydrogen bond network between the strands exist in DNA at physiologically relevant conditions. In addition, the dynamics of the solvating water molecules is slowed down by about a factor of 20 compared with the bulk. PMID:27248361

  19. Delocalization effects, entanglement entropy and spectral collapse of boson mixtures in a double well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingua, F.; Mazzarella, G.; Penna, V.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the ground-state properties of a two-species condensate of interacting bosons in a double-well potential. Each atomic species is described by a two-space-mode Bose–Hubbard model. The coupling of the two species is controlled by the interspecies interaction W. To analyze the ground state when W is varied in both the repulsive (W\\gt 0) and the attractive (W\\lt 0) regime, we apply two different approaches. First we solve the problem numerically (i) to obtain an exact description of the ground-state structure and (ii) to characterize its correlation properties by studying (the appropriate extensions to the present case of) the quantum Fisher information, the coherence visibility and the entanglement entropy as functions of W. Then we approach analytically the description of the low-energy scenario by means of the Bogoliubov scheme. In this framework the ground-state transition from delocalized to localized species (with space separation for W\\gt 0, and mixing for W\\lt 0) is well reproduced. These predictions are qualitatively corroborated by our numerical results. We show that such a transition features a spectral collapse reflecting the dramatic change of the dynamical algebra of the four-mode model Hamiltonian.

  20. Relation between elastic modulus and glass softening temperature in the delocalized atom model

    SciTech Connect

    Sanditov, B. D.; Sangadiev, S. Sh.; Sanditov, D. S.

    2012-09-15

    The ratio of softening temperature (glass transition temperature) to elastic modulus (T{sub g}/E) is mainly determined by the limiting elastic deformation of an interatomic bond, which characterizes the transition of a structural microregion from an elastic into a viscous-flow state. In silicate glasses, this transition is caused by the limiting deformation of directed ionic-covalent Si-O-Si bonds. In the case of amorphous hydrocarbons, it is related to the relatively weak intermolecular bonds between regions in chain macromolecules, and the T{sub g}/E ratio is significantly higher than in inorganic glasses. In glassy systems of one class, this ratio turns out to be constant (T{sub g}/E Almost-Equal-To const), and a linear correlation is detected between softening temperature and elastic modulus, which can be explained in terms of the delocalized atom model. The values of T{sub g}/E can be used to classify glasses similarly to the well-known Angell classification according to so-called fragility.

  1. Short Hydrogen Bonds and Proton Delocalization in Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP).

    PubMed

    Oltrogge, Luke M; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-06-24

    Short hydrogen bonds and specifically low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) have been the focus of much attention and controversy for their possible role in enzymatic catalysis. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) mutant S65T, H148D has been found to form a very short hydrogen bond between Asp148 and the chromophore resulting in significant spectral perturbations. Leveraging the unique autocatalytically formed chromophore and its sensitivity to this interaction we explore the consequences of proton affinity matching across this putative LBHB. Through the use of noncanonical amino acids introduced through nonsense suppression or global incorporation, we systematically modify the acidity of the GFP chromophore with halogen substituents. X-ray crystal structures indicated that the length of the interaction with Asp148 is unchanged at ∼2.45 Å while the absorbance spectra demonstrate an unprecedented degree of color tuning with increasing acidity. We utilized spectral isotope effects, isotope fractionation factors, and a simple 1D model of the hydrogen bond coordinate in order to gain insight into the potential energy surface and particularly the role that proton delocalization may play in this putative short hydrogen bond. The data and model suggest that even with the short donor-acceptor distance (∼2.45 Å) and near perfect affinity matching there is not a LBHB, that is, the barrier to proton transfer exceeds the H zero-point energy. PMID:27162964

  2. Single Spin Asymmetry in Strongly Correlated Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Musulmanbekov, G.

    2007-06-13

    The Single Transverse - Spin Asymmetry (SSA) is analysed in the framework of the Strongly Correlated Quark Model proposed by author, where the proton spin emerges from the orbital momenta of quark and qluon condensates circulating around the valence quarks. It is shown that dominating factors of appearance of SSA are the orbiting around the valence quarks sea quark and qluon condensates and spin dependent quark-quark cross sections.

  3. Chromatic VEP in children with congenital colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tekavčič Pompe, Manca; Stirn Kranjc, Branka; Brecelj, Jelka

    2010-09-01

    Visual evoked potentials to chromatic stimulus (cVEP) are believed to selectively test the parvocellular visual pathway which is responsible for processing information about colour. The aim was to evaluate cVEP in children with red-green congenital colour vision deficiency. VEP responses of 15 colour deficient children were compared to 31 children with normal colour vision. An isoluminant red-green stimulus composed of horizontal gratings was presented in an onset-offset manner. The shape of the waveform was studied, as well as the latency and amplitude of positive (P) and negative (N) waves. cVEP response did not change much with increased age in colour deficient children, whereas normative data showed changes from a predominantly positive to a negative response with increased age. A P wave was present in 87% of colour deficient children (and in 100% of children with normal colour vision), whereas the N wave was absent in a great majority of colour deficient children and was present in 80% of children with normal colour vision. Therefore, the amplitude of the whole response (N-P) decreased linearly with age in colour deficient children, whereas in children with normal colour vision it increased linearly. P wave latency shortened with increased age in both groups. cVEP responses differ in children with congenital colour vision deficiency compared to children with normal colour vision.

  4. Delocalization in one-dimensional tight-binding models with fractal disorder II: existence of mobility edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroaki S.

    2016-06-01

    In the previous work, we investigated the correlation-induced localization-delocalization transition (LDT) of the wavefunction at the band center (E = 0) in the one-dimensional tight-binding model with fractal disorder [H.S. Yamada, Eur. Phys. J. B 88, 264 (2015)]. In the present work, we study the energy (E ≠ 0) dependence of the normalized localization length (NLL) and the delocalization of the wavefunction at different energy in the same system. The mobility edges in the LDT arise when the fractal dimension of the potential landscape is larger than the critical value depending on the disorder strength, which is consistent with the previous result. In addition, we present the distribution of individual NLL and Lyapunov exponents in the system with LDT.

  5. Exchange interaction mediated ferroelectricity in multiferroic MnTiO{sub 3} with anisotropic orbital hybridization and hole delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. W.; Fu, S. W.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, J. F.; Pao, C. W.; Ishii, H.; Tsuei, K. D.; Hiraoka, N.; Lu, K. T.; Chen, J. M. E-mail: xiaolin@uow.edu.au; Lin, P. A.; Jeng, H. T. E-mail: xiaolin@uow.edu.au; Chen, D. P.; Dou, S. X.; Wang, X. L. E-mail: xiaolin@uow.edu.au

    2014-02-24

    We present the orbital structure of MnTiO{sub 3} with polarization dependent x-ray absorption and resonant x-ray emission spectra accompanied with electronic structure calculations. The results clearly indicate a strongly anisotropic O 2p-Mn 3d orbital hybridization whereas the Mn 3d hole state shows a highly delocalized characteristic ascribed to the 3d-4p mixing. The extended Mn 4p orbital could enhance the exchange interaction between Mn (3d)-O (2p)-Mn (3d) leading to an asymmetric charge distribution in Mn-O bonds. The delocalized characteristic of Mn 3d holes is indispensable to the mechanism of spin-dependent-metal-ligand hybridization to explain magnetically induced ferroelectricity.

  6. Delocalized Surface State in Epitaxial Si(111) Film with Spontaneous √3 × √3 Superstructure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Du, Yi; Li, Zhi; Li, Wenbin; Feng, Baojie; Qiu, Jinlan; Cheng, Peng; Xue Dou, Shi; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2015-01-01

    The “multilayer silicene” films were grown on Ag(111), with increasing thickness above 30 monolayers (ML). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations suggest that the “multilayer silicene” is indeed a bulk-like Si(111) film with a (√3 × √3)R30° honeycomb superstructure on surface. The possibility for formation of Si(111)(√3 × √3)R30°-Ag reconstruction on the surface can be distinctively ruled out by peeling off the surface layer with the STM tip. On this surface, delocalized surface state as well as linear energy-momentum dispersion was observed from quasiparticle interference patterns. Our results indicate that a bulklike silicon film with diamondlike structure can also host delocalized surface state, which is even more attractive for potential applications, such as new generation of nanodevices based on Si. PMID:26316281

  7. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV.

  8. Flavor asymmetry of sea quarks in the unquenched quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2010-12-15

    The flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea is studied in the framework of the unquenched quark model in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs (uu-bar, dd-bar, and ss-bar) are taken into account via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The inclusion of the qq-bar pairs leads to an excess of d-bar over u-bar, in agreement with the experimental data for the proton. In addition, the results for the flavor asymmetry of all ground-state octet and decuplet baryons are presented. The isospin symmetry leads to simple relations among the flavor asymmetries of octet and decuplet baryons. The flavor asymmetry of the {Sigma}{sup +} hyperon is predicted to be very similar to that of the proton and much larger than that for the {Xi}{sup 0} hyperon. A comparison with other approaches shows large differences in the predictions for the flavor asymmetries of the hyperons.

  9. Transient EPR Reveals Triplet State Delocalization in a Series of Cyclic and Linear π-Conjugated Porphyrin Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tait, Claudia E; Neuhaus, Patrik; Peeks, Martin D; Anderson, Harry L; Timmel, Christiane R

    2015-07-01

    The photoexcited triplet states of a series of linear and cyclic butadiyne-linked porphyrin oligomers were investigated by transient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR). The spatial delocalization of the triplet state wave function in systems with different numbers of porphyrin units and different geometries was analyzed in terms of zero-field splitting parameters and proton hyperfine couplings. Even though no significant change in the zero-field splitting parameters (D and E) is observed for linear oligomers with two to six porphyrin units, the spin polarization of the transient EPR spectra is particularly sensitive to the number of porphyrin units, implying a change of the mechanism of intersystem crossing. Analysis of the proton hyperfine couplings in linear oligomers with more than two porphyrin units, in combination with density functional theory calculations, indicates that the spin density is localized mainly on two to three porphyrin units rather than being distributed evenly over the whole π-system. The sensitivity of the zero-field splitting parameters to changes in geometry was investigated by comparing free linear oligomers with oligomers bound to a hexapyridyl template. Significant changes in the zero-field splitting parameter D were observed, while the proton hyperfine couplings show no change in the extent of triplet state delocalization. The triplet state of the cyclic porphyrin hexamer has a much decreased zero-field splitting parameter D and much smaller proton hyperfine couplings with respect to the monomeric unit, indicating complete delocalization over six porphyrin units in this symmetric system. This surprising result provides the first evidence for extensive triplet state delocalization in an artificial supramolecular assembly of porphyrins. PMID:26035477

  10. Observation of suppressed Auger mechanism in type-I quantum well structures with delocalized electron-hole wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hassani Nia, Iman; Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-15

    We report the first observation of non-threshold Auger mechanism for a quantum well structure with Type-I band alignment. Excitation-dependent photoluminescence measurements were used to extract the Auger recombination coefficients from 77 K up to room temperature. The results verify the role of interface mediated momentum exchange as well as suppression of Auger recombination for delocalized electron-hole wavefunctions.

  11. Colour preferences influences odour learning in the hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkenius, Anna; Kelber, Almut

    2006-05-01

    The hummingbird hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum, learns colour fast and reliably. It has earlier been shown to spontaneously feed from odourless artificial flowers. Now, we have studied odour learning. The moths were trained to discriminate feeders of the same colour but marked with different odours. They did not learn to discriminate two natural flower odours when they were presented with the innately preferred colour blue, but they did learn this discrimination combined with yellow or green colours that are less attractive to the moth. The yellow colour could be trained to become as attractive as the innately preferred blue colour and the blue colour could be trained to become less attractive. This is the first proof of odour learning in a diurnal moth. The results show that M. stellatarum can use more than one modality in their foraging behaviour and that the system is plastic. By manipulating the preferences for the different colours, their influence on odour learning could be changed.

  12. The influence of colour on oculomotor behaviour during image perception.

    PubMed

    von Wartburg, Roman; Ouerhani, Nabil; Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nyffeler, Thomas; Wurtz, Pascal; Hügli, Heinz; Müri, René M

    2005-09-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate how oculomotor behaviour depends on the availability of colour information in pictorial stimuli. Forty study participants viewed complex images in colour or grey-scale, while their eye movements were recorded. We found two major effects of colour. First, although colour increases the complexity of an image, fixations on colour images were shorter than on their grey-scale versions. This suggests that colour enhances discriminability and thus affects low-level perceptual processing. Second, colour decreases the similarity of spatial fixation patterns between participants. The role of colour on visual attention seems to be more important than previously assumed, in theoretical as well as methodological terms.

  13. Whorfian effects on colour memory are not reliable.

    PubMed

    Wright, Oliver; Davies, Ian R L; Franklin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The Whorfian hypothesis suggests that differences between languages cause differences in cognitive processes. Support for this idea comes from studies that find that patterns of colour memory errors made by speakers of different languages align with differences in colour lexicons. The current study provides a large-scale investigation of the relationship between colour language and colour memory, adopting a cross-linguistic and developmental approach. Colour memory on a delayed matching-to-sample (XAB) task was investigated in 2 language groups with differing colour lexicons, for 3 developmental stages and 2 regions of colour space. Analyses used a Bayesian technique to provide simultaneous assessment of two competing hypotheses (H1-Whorfian effect present, H0-Whorfian effect absent). Results of the analyses consistently favoured H0. The findings suggest that Whorfian effects on colour memory are not reliable and that the importance of such effects should not be overestimated.

  14. Testing the AUDI2000 colour-difference formula for solid colours using some visual datasets with usefulness to automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Juan; Melgosa, Manuel; Gómez-Robledo, Luis; Li, Changjun; Huang, Min; Liu, Haoxue; Cui, Guihua; Luo, M. Ronnier; Dauser, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Colour-difference formulas are tools employed in colour industries for objective pass/fail decisions of manufactured products. These objective decisions are based on instrumental colour measurements which must reliably predict the subjective colour-difference evaluations performed by observers' panels. In a previous paper we have tested the performance of different colour-difference formulas using the datasets employed at the development of the last CIErecommended colour-difference formula CIEDE2000, and we found that the AUDI2000 colour-difference formula for solid (homogeneous) colours performed reasonably well, despite the colour pairs in these datasets were not similar to those typically employed in the automotive industry (CIE Publication x038:2013, 465-469). Here we have tested again AUDI2000 together with 11 advanced colour-difference formulas (CIELUV, CIELAB, CMC, BFD, CIE94, CIEDE2000, CAM02-UCS, CAM02-SCD, DIN99d, DIN99b, OSA-GP-Euclidean) for three visual datasets we may consider particularly useful to the automotive industry because of different reasons: 1) 828 metallic colour pairs used to develop the highly reliable RIT-DuPont dataset (Color Res. Appl. 35, 274-283, 2010); 2) printed samples conforming 893 colour pairs with threshold colour differences (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29, 883-891, 2012); 3) 150 colour pairs in a tolerance dataset proposed by AUDI. To measure the relative merits of the different tested colour-difference formulas, we employed the STRESS index (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 1823-1829, 2007), assuming a 95% confidence level. For datasets 1) and 2), AUDI2000 was in the group of the best colour-difference formulas with no significant differences with respect to CIE94, CIEDE2000, CAM02-UCS, DIN99b and DIN99d formulas. For dataset 3) AUDI2000 provided the best results, being statistically significantly better than all other tested colour-difference formulas.

  15. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  16. Colour octet extension of 2HDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, German

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider some aspects of the Manohar-Wise extension of the SM with a colour-octet electroweak-doublet scalar applied to 2HDM. We present theoretical constraints on the parameters of this extension to both the SM and the 2HDM and discuss related phenomenology at LHC.

  17. New Evidence for Infant Colour Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Anna; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2004-01-01

    Bornstein, Kessen, and Weiskopf (1976) reported that pre-linguistic infants perceive colour categorically for primary boundaries: Following habituation, dishabituation only occurred if the test stimulus was from a different adult category to the original. Here, we replicated this important study and extended it to include secondary boundaries,…

  18. Demonstration of the Colour Range of Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, G. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a box that is filled with indicator of a particular concentration. A little acid is added to one side and a little alkali to the other so that the complete colour range of the indicator is observable. (GS)

  19. Colour is more than hue: preferences for compiled colour traits in the stingless bees Melipona mondury and M. quadrifasciata.

    PubMed

    Koethe, Sebastian; Bossems, Jessica; Dyer, Adrian G; Lunau, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    The colour vision of bees has been extensively analysed in honeybees and bumblebees, but few studies consider the visual perception of stingless bees (Meliponini). In a five-stage experiment the preference for colour intensity and purity, and the preference for the dominant wavelength were tested by presenting four colour stimuli in each test to freely flying experienced workers of two stingless bee species, Melipona mondury and Melipona quadrifasciata. The results with bee-blue, bee-UV-blue and bee-green colours offered in four combinations of varying colour intensity and purity suggest a complex interaction between these colour traits for the determination of colour choice. Specifically, M. mondury preferred bee-UV-blue colours over bee-green, bee-blue and bee-blue-green colours while M. quadrifasciata preferred bee-green colour stimuli. Moreover in M. mondury the preferences were different if the background colour was changed from grey to green. There was a significant difference between species where M. mondury preferred UV-reflecting over UV-absorbing bee-blue-green colour stimuli, whereas M. quadrifasciata showed an opposite preference. The different colour preferences of the free flying bees in identical conditions may be caused by the bees' experience with natural flowers precedent to the choice tests, suggesting reward partitioning between species. PMID:27480640

  20. Colour is more than hue: preferences for compiled colour traits in the stingless bees Melipona mondury and M. quadrifasciata.

    PubMed

    Koethe, Sebastian; Bossems, Jessica; Dyer, Adrian G; Lunau, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    The colour vision of bees has been extensively analysed in honeybees and bumblebees, but few studies consider the visual perception of stingless bees (Meliponini). In a five-stage experiment the preference for colour intensity and purity, and the preference for the dominant wavelength were tested by presenting four colour stimuli in each test to freely flying experienced workers of two stingless bee species, Melipona mondury and Melipona quadrifasciata. The results with bee-blue, bee-UV-blue and bee-green colours offered in four combinations of varying colour intensity and purity suggest a complex interaction between these colour traits for the determination of colour choice. Specifically, M. mondury preferred bee-UV-blue colours over bee-green, bee-blue and bee-blue-green colours while M. quadrifasciata preferred bee-green colour stimuli. Moreover in M. mondury the preferences were different if the background colour was changed from grey to green. There was a significant difference between species where M. mondury preferred UV-reflecting over UV-absorbing bee-blue-green colour stimuli, whereas M. quadrifasciata showed an opposite preference. The different colour preferences of the free flying bees in identical conditions may be caused by the bees' experience with natural flowers precedent to the choice tests, suggesting reward partitioning between species.

  1. Observation of a charge delocalization from Se vacancies in Bi2Se3 : A positron annihilation study of native defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzueta, I.; Zabala, N.; Marín-Borrás, V.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.; García, J. A.; Plazaola, F.

    2016-07-01

    By means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, we have investigated the native defects present in Bi2Se3 , which belongs to the family of topological insulators. We experimentally demonstrate that selenium vacancy defects (VSe1) are present in Bi2Se3 as-grown samples, and that their charge is delocalized as temperature increases. At least from 100 K up to room temperature both VSe10 and VSe1+ charge states coexist. The observed charge delocalization determines the contribution of VSe1 defects to the n -type conductivity of Bi2Se3 . These findings are supported by theoretical calculations, which show that vacancies of nonequivalent Se1 and Se2 selenium atoms are clearly differentiated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, enabling us to directly detect and quantify the most favorable type of selenium vacancy. In addition to open-volume defects, experimental data indicate the presence of defects that act as shallow traps, suggesting that more than one type of native defects coexist in Bi2Se3 . As will be discussed, the presence of a dislocation density around 1010cm-2 could be the source of the detected shallow traps. Understanding the one-dimensional defects and the origin of the charge delocalization that leads Bi2Se3 to be an n -type semiconductor will help in the development of high-quality topological insulators based on this material.

  2. Flower colour and cytochromes P450†

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Brugliera, Filippa

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 play important roles in biosynthesis of flavonoids and their coloured class of compounds, anthocyanins, both of which are major floral pigments. The number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of anthocyanidins (the chromophores and precursors of anthocyanins) impact the anthocyanin colour, the more the bluer. The hydroxylation pattern is determined by two cytochromes P450, flavonoid 3′-hydroxylase (F3′H) and flavonoid 3′,5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H) and thus they play a crucial role in the determination of flower colour. F3′H and F3′5′H mostly belong to CYP75B and CYP75A, respectively, except for the F3′5′Hs in Compositae that were derived from gene duplication of CYP75B and neofunctionalization. Roses and carnations lack blue/violet flower colours owing to the deficiency of F3′5′H and therefore lack the B-ring-trihydroxylated anthocyanins based upon delphinidin. Successful redirection of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway to delphinidin was achieved by expressing F3′5′H coding regions resulting in carnations and roses with novel blue hues that have been commercialized. Suppression of F3′5′H and F3′H in delphinidin-producing plants reduced the number of hydroxyl groups on the anthocyanidin B-ring resulting in the production of monohydroxylated anthocyanins based on pelargonidin with a shift in flower colour to orange/red. Pelargonidin biosynthesis is enhanced by additional expression of a dihydroflavonol 4-reductase that can use the monohydroxylated dihydrokaempferol (the pelargonidin precursor). Flavone synthase II (FNSII)-catalysing flavone biosynthesis from flavanones is also a P450 (CYP93B) and contributes to flower colour, because flavones act as co-pigments to anthocyanins and can cause blueing and darkening of colour. However, transgenic plants expression of a FNSII gene yielded paler flowers owing to a reduction of anthocyanins because flavanones are precursors of anthocyanins and flavones. PMID:23297355

  3. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered—and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  4. Fluctuation Probes of Quark Deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Masayuki; Heinz, Ulrich; Mueller, Berndt

    2000-09-04

    The size of the average fluctuations of net baryon number and electric charge in a finite volume of hadronic matter differs widely between the confined and deconfined phases. These differences may be exploited as indicators of the formation of a quark-gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, because fluctuations created in the initial state survive until freeze-out due to the rapid expansion of the hot fireball. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Top quark results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We briefly describe the candidate events selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. The study of two new decay channels (all hadronic and ``tau dilepton``) is also reported.

  6. Teaching the Absorption of Light Colours Using an Artificial Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan; Arikan, Gizem; Kabay, Gozde

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental activity based on the absorption of light colours by pigments. The activity is constructed using a stepwise design and offers an opportunity for students and teachers to compare and generalize the interactions between light and pigment colours. The light colours composing an artificial rainbow produced in the…

  7. From spectral information to animal colour vision: experiments and concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kelber, Almut; Osorio, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many animals use the spectral distribution of light to guide behaviour, but whether they have colour vision has been debated for over a century. Our strong subjective experience of colour and the fact that human vision is the paradigm for colour science inevitably raises the question of how we compare with other species. This article outlines four grades of ‘colour vision’ that can be related to the behavioural uses of spectral information, and perhaps to the underlying mechanisms. In the first, even without an (image-forming) eye, simple organisms can compare photoreceptor signals to locate a desired light environment. At the next grade, chromatic mechanisms along with spatial vision guide innate preferences for objects such as food or mates; this is sometimes described as wavelength-specific behaviour. Here, we compare the capabilities of di- and trichromatic vision, and ask why some animals have more than three spectral types of receptors. Behaviours guided by innate preferences are then distinguished from a grade that allows learning, in part because the ability to learn an arbitrary colour is evidence for a neural representation of colour. The fourth grade concerns colour appearance rather than colour difference: for instance, the distinction between hue and saturation, and colour categorization. These higher-level phenomena are essential to human colour perception but poorly known in animals, and we suggest how they can be studied. Finally, we observe that awareness of colour and colour qualia cannot be easily tested in animals. PMID:20164101

  8. From spectral information to animal colour vision: experiments and concepts.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Osorio, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Many animals use the spectral distribution of light to guide behaviour, but whether they have colour vision has been debated for over a century. Our strong subjective experience of colour and the fact that human vision is the paradigm for colour science inevitably raises the question of how we compare with other species. This article outlines four grades of 'colour vision' that can be related to the behavioural uses of spectral information, and perhaps to the underlying mechanisms. In the first, even without an (image-forming) eye, simple organisms can compare photoreceptor signals to locate a desired light environment. At the next grade, chromatic mechanisms along with spatial vision guide innate preferences for objects such as food or mates; this is sometimes described as wavelength-specific behaviour. Here, we compare the capabilities of di- and trichromatic vision, and ask why some animals have more than three spectral types of receptors. Behaviours guided by innate preferences are then distinguished from a grade that allows learning, in part because the ability to learn an arbitrary colour is evidence for a neural representation of colour. The fourth grade concerns colour appearance rather than colour difference: for instance, the distinction between hue and saturation, and colour categorization. These higher-level phenomena are essential to human colour perception but poorly known in animals, and we suggest how they can be studied. Finally, we observe that awareness of colour and colour qualia cannot be easily tested in animals. PMID:20164101

  9. Measurements of Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2009-05-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of four selected properties of the top quark are presented. The relative fraction of t{bar t} production through gluon fusion has been measured in the t{bar t} dilepton decay channel by the CDF Collaboration as F{sub gg} = 0.53{sub -0.38}{sup +0.36}. Using an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, we also determine the t{bar t} differential cross section with respect to values up to {approx}1 TeV of the t{bar t} invariant mass. We present a model-independent measurement of the helicity of W bosons produced in top quark decays, using an integrated luminosity of up to 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector, and find the fraction of longitudinal W bosons f{sub 0} = 0.49 {+-} 0.14, and the fraction of right-handed W bosons f{sub +} = 0.11 {+-} 0.08. Finally, we measure the parton level forward-backward asymmetry of pair produced top quarks using an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, and find A{sub FB} = 0.19 {+-} 0.07. All results are consistent with the predictions of the standard model.

  10. Quark masses and their hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, M.

    1987-12-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is attributed to dynamical generation of quark masses. Quarks q (and leptons l) are assumed to be produced by hypercolor confinement of preons at an intermediate scale Λ hc. Hierarchies observed in the q mass spectra can be explained by a BCS mechanism if the color interaction is enough asymptotically free and if residual ones emerging by the confinement are medium strong. The former assumption claims that N≦4, where N is the family number of q and l. Dynamical equations to determine q masses and mixings are given, but they require knowledge on the physics at Λ hc. A phenomenological approach is also made on the basis of an SU(7)× SU(7) chiral preon model with N=4. The mass ratio m t/ mb is related to ( m c/ m s)ηB with η B≃1.1 and m t'/ mb' to ( m u/ m d)ηA with η A≃1.4. In this scheme the fourth down quark is the heaviest (˜ 110 GeV) and contributes dominantly to F 2, where F is the Fermi scale.

  11. Lifetimes and heavy quark expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Kolya Uraltsev was one of the inventors of the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), that describes inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks and in particular lifetimes. Besides giving a pedagogic introduction to the subject, we review the development and the current status of the HQE, which just recently passed several non-trivial experimental tests with an unprecedented precision. In view of many new experimental results for lifetimes of heavy hadrons, we also update several theory predictions: τ (B+)/τ (Bd) = 1.04+0.05-0.01 ± 0.02 ± 0.01, τ(Bs)/τ(Bd) = 1.001 ±0.002, τ(Λb)/τ(Bd) = 0.935 ±0.054 and \\bar {τ } (Ξ b0)/\\bar {τ } (Ξ b+) = 0.95 ± 0.06. The theoretical precision is currently strongly limited by the unknown size of the non-perturbative matrix elements of four-quark operators, which could be determined with lattice simulations.

  12. Protonated thiophene-based oligomers as formed within zeolites: understanding their electron delocalization and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Diego; Whiting, Gareth T; Bulo, Rosa E; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-21

    In an earlier work, protonated thiophene-based oligomers were identified inside ZSM-5 zeolites. The novel compounds exhibited π-π* absorption wavelengths deep within the visible region, earmarking them for possible use as chromophores in a variety of applications. In this computational study, we determine the factors that cause such low-energy transitions, and describe the electronic structure of these remarkable compounds. DFT calculations of conjugated thiophene-based oligomers with up to five monomer units reveal that the main absorption band of each protonated oligomer is strongly red-shifted compared to the unprotonated form. This effect is counterintuitive, since protonation is expected to diminish aromaticity, and thereby increase the HOMO-LUMO gap. We find that upon protonation the π-electrons remain delocalized over the entire π-conjugated molecule, but the positive charge is localized predominantly on the protonated side of the molecule. A possible explanation for this ground-state charge localization is the participation of the C-H bond in the π-system of the protonated ring, locally providing aromatic stabilization for the positive charge. The addition of the proton stabilizes all electronic orbitals, but due to the ground state π-electron distribution away from the added nucleus, the HOMO is stabilized less than the LUMO. The main absorption peak upon protonation corresponds to the charge transfer excitation involving the frontier orbitals, and the small band gap explains the observed red shift. Analogue calculations on thiophene within a ZSM-5 zeolite cluster model confirm the same trends upon protonation as observed in the non-interacting compounds. Understanding the electronic structure of these compounds is very relevant to correlate UV-Vis bands with acidic strength and possibly environment in zeolites and to improve their performance in catalytic and energy related applications. PMID:26685895

  13. Correlation between Photovoltaic Performance and Interchain Ordering Induced Delocalization of Electronics States in Conjugated Polymer Blends.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Naresh; Gann, Eliot; Jain, Nakul; Kumar, Anshu; Gopinathan, Sreelekha; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Kumar, Anil; McNeill, Christopher R; Kabra, Dinesh

    2016-08-10

    In this paper we correlate the solar cell performance with bimolecular packing of donor:acceptor bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs), where interchain ordering of the donor molecule and its influence on morphology, optical properties, and charge carrier dynamics of BHJ solar cells are studied in detail. Solar cells that are fabricated using more ordered defect free 100% regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (DF-P3HT) as the donor polymer show ca. 10% increase in the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) when compared to that of the solar cell fabricated using 92% regioregularity P3HT, referred to as rr-P3HT. EQE and UV-vis absorption spectrum show a clear increase in the 607 nm vibronic shoulder of the DF-P3HT blend suggesting better interchain ordering which was also reflected in the less Urbach energy (Eu) value for this system. The increase in ordering inside the blend has enhanced the hole-mobility which is calculated from the single carrier device J-V characteristics. Electroluminance (EL) studies on the DF-P3HT system showed a red-shifted peak when compared to rr-P3HT-based devices suggesting low CT energy states in DF-P3HT. The morphologies of the blend films are studied using AFM and grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) suggesting increase in the roughness and phase segregation which could enhance the internal scattering of the light inside the device and improvement in the crystallinity along alkyl and π-stacking direction. Hence, higher PCE, lower Eu, red-shifted EL emission, high hole-mobility, and better crystallinity suggest improved interchain ordering has facilitated a more delocalized HOMO state in DF-P3HT-based BHJ solar cells. PMID:27415029

  14. Physic of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However, recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that overlineu < overlined in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  15. Physics of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-03-10

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However,recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that (bar u) < (bar d) in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  16. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  17. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. The coding of uniform colour figures in monkey visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Howard S; Zhou, Hong; von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    2003-01-01

    Psychophysical studies indicate that perception of the colour and brightness of a surface depends on neural signals evoked by the borders of the surface rather than its interior. The visual cortex emphasizes contrast borders, but it is unclear whether colour surface signals also exist, whether colour border signals are orientation selective or mainly non-oriented, and whether cortical processing tends to separate colour and form information. To address these questions we examined the representation of uniform colour figures by recording single neuron activity from areas V1 and V2 in alert macaque monkeys during behaviourally induced fixation. Three aspects of coding were quantified: colour, orientation and edge selectivity. The occurrence of colour selectivity was not correlated with orientation or edge selectivity. The fraction of colour-selective cells was the same (64 % in layers 2 and 3 of V1, 45 % in V2) for oriented and non-oriented cells, and for edge-selective and surface-responsive cells. Oriented cells were often highly selective in colour space, and about 40 % of them were selective for edge polarity or border ownership. Thus, contrary to the idea of feature maps, colour, orientation and edge polarity are multiplexed in cortical signals. The results from V2 were similar to those from upper-layer V1, indicating that cortical processing does not strive to separate form and colour information. Oriented cells were five times more frequent than non-oriented cells. Thus, the vast majority of colour-coded cells are orientation tuned. Based on response profiles across a 4 deg square figure, and the relative frequency of oriented and non-oriented cells, we estimate that the cortical colour signal is 5–6 times stronger for the edges than for the surface of the figure. The frequency of oriented colour cells and their ability to code edge polarity indicate that these cells play a major role in the representation of surface colour. PMID:12611925

  19. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  20. Genetic analyses of the human eye colours using a novel objective method for eye colour classification.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jeppe D; Johansen, Peter; Harder, Stine; Christoffersen, Susanne R; Delgado, Mikaela C; Henriksen, Sarah T; Nielsen, Mette M; Sørensen, Erik; Ullum, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas; Dahl, Anders L; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we present a new objective method for measuring the eye colour on a continuous scale that allows researchers to associate genetic markers with different shades of eye colour. With the use of the custom designed software Digital Iris Analysis Tool (DIAT), the iris was automatically identified and extracted from high resolution digital images. DIAT was made user friendly with a graphical user interface. The software counted the number of blue and brown pixels in the iris image and calculated a Pixel Index of the Eye (PIE-score) that described the eye colour quantitatively. The PIE-score ranged from -1 to 1 (brown to blue). The software eliminated the need for user based interpretation and qualitative eye colour categories. In 94% (570) of 605 analyzed eye images, the iris region was successfully extracted and a PIE-score was calculated. A very high correlation between the PIE-score and the human perception of eye colour was observed. The correlations between the PIE-scores and the six IrisPlex SNPs (HERC2 rs12913832, OCA2 rs1800407, SLC24A4 rs12896399, TYR rs1393350, SLC45A2 rs16891982 and IRF4 rs12203592) were analyzed in 570 individuals. Significant differences (p<10(-6)) in the PIE-scores of the individuals typed as HERC2 rs12913832 G (PIE=0.99) and rs12913832 GA (PIE=-0.71) or A (PIE=-0.87) were observed. We adjusted for the effect of HERC2 rs12913832 and showed that the quantitative PIE-scores were significantly associated with SNPs with minor effects (OCA2 rs1800407, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and TYR rs1393350) on the eye colour. We evaluated the two published prediction models for eye colour (IrisPlex [1] and Snipper[2]) and compared the predictions with the PIE-scores. We found good concordance with the prediction from individuals typed as HERC2 rs12913832 G. However, both methods had difficulties in categorizing individuals typed as HERC2 rs12913832 GA because of the large variation in eye colour in HERC2 rs12913832 GA individuals. With the use of

  1. Quarks and gluons at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    Data from proton-antiproton collisions at high energy provide important information on constraining the quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon and place limits on quark substructure. The S asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass. Drell-Yan data at high invariant mass provides strong limits on quark substructure. Information on {alpha}{sub s} and the gluon distributions can be extracted from high P{sub T} jet data and direct photons.

  2. Top Quark Physics at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2010-07-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator is recently performing at record luminosities that enables a program systematically addressing the physics of top quarks. The CDF collaboration has analyzed up to 5 fb{sup -1} of proton anti-proton collisions from the Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The large datasets available allow to push top quark measurements to higher and higher precision and have lead to the recent observation of electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron. This article reviews recent results on top quark physics from the CDF experiment.

  3. Analytic structure of heavy quark propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    The renormalized quark Dyson-Schwinger equation is studied in the limit of the renormalized current heavy quark mass m{sub R}{r_arrow}{infinity}. We are particularly interested in the analytic pole structure of the heavy quark propagator in the complex momentum plane. Approximations in which the quark-gluon vertex is modelled by either the bare vertex or the Ball-Chiu {ital Ansatz} and the Landau gauge gluon propagator takes either a Gaussian form or a Gaussian form with an ultraviolet asymptotic tail are used. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  5. Hydrodynamics of anisotropic quark and gluon fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Radoslaw; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The recently developed framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is generalized to describe the dynamics of coupled quark and gluon fluids. The quark and gluon components of the fluids are characterized by different dynamical anisotropy parameters. The dynamical equations describing such mixtures are derived from kinetic theory, with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation, allowing for different relaxation times for quarks and gluons. Baryon number conservation is enforced in the quark and antiquark components of the fluid, but overall parton number nonconservation is allowed in the system. The resulting equations are solved numerically in the (0+1)-dimensional boost-invariant case at zero and finite baryon density.

  6. Static quark potential in three flavor QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; Sugar, Bob

    2000-08-01

    We study the effects of dynamical quarks on the static quark potential at distances shorter than those where string breaking is expected. Quenched calculations and calculations with three flavors of dynamical quarks are done on sets of lattices with the lattice spacings matched within about one percent. The effect of the sea quarks on the shape of the potential is clearly visible. We investigate the consequences of these effects in a very crude model, namely solving Schroedinger's equation in the resulting potential. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGES

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  8. Measurements and searches with top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2008-08-01

    In 1995 the last missing member of the known families of quarks, the top quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab near Chicago. Until today, the Tevatron is the only place where top quarks can be produced. The determination of top quark production and properties is crucial to understand the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. The most striking property of the top quark is its mass--of the order of the mass of a gold atom and close to the electroweak scale--making the top quark not only interesting in itself but also as a window to new physics. Due to the high mass, much higher than of any other known fermion, it is expected that the top quark plays an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which is the most prominent candidate to explain the mass of particles. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by one Higgs field, producing one additional physical particle, the Higgs boson. Although various searches have been performed, for example at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), no evidence for the Higgs boson could yet be found in any experiment. At the Tevatron, multiple searches for the last missing particle of the Standard Model are ongoing with ever higher statistics and improved analysis techniques. The exclusion or verification of the Higgs boson can only be achieved by combining many techniques and many final states and production mechanisms. As part of this thesis, the search for Higgs bosons produced in association with a top quark pair (t$\\bar{t}$H) has been performed. This channel is especially interesting for the understanding of the coupling between Higgs and the top quark. Even though the Standard Model Higgs boson is an attractive candidate, there is no reason to believe that the electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by only one Higgs field. In many models more than one Higgs boson are expected to exist, opening even more

  9. Quark Physics without Quarks: A Review of Recent Developments in S-Matrix Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capra, Fritjof

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the developments in S-matrix theory over the past five years which have made it possible to derive results characteristic of quark models without any need to postulate the existence of physical quarks. In the new approach, the quark patterns emerge as a consequence of combining the general S-matrix principles with the concept of order.…

  10. The quark revolution and the ZGS - new quarks physics since the ZGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J. |

    1994-12-31

    Overwhelming experimental evidence for quarks as real physical constituents of hadrons along with the QCD analogs of the Balmer Formula, Bohr Atom and Schroedinger Equation already existed in 1966 but was dismissed as heresy. ZGS experiments played an important role in the quark revolution. This role is briefly reviewed and subsequent progress in quark physics is described.

  11. Gluon radiation off hard quarks in a nuclear environment: opacity expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2000-11-01

    We study the relation between the Baier-Dokshitzer-Mueller-Peigné-Schiff (BDMPS) and Zakharov formalisms for medium-induced gluon radiation off hard quarks, and the radiation off very few scattering centers. Based on the non-abelian Furry approximation for the motion of hard partons in a spatially extended colour field, we derive a compact diagrammatic and explicitly colour trivial expression for the N th order term of the k⊥ -differential gluon radiation cross section in an expansion in the opacity of the medium. Resumming this quantity to all orders in opacity, we obtain Zakharov's path-integral expression (supplemented with a regularization prescription). This provides a new proof of the equivalence of the BDMPS and Zakharov formalisms which extends previous arguments to the k⊥ -differential cross section. We give explicit analytical results up to third order in opacity for both the gluon radiation cross section of free incoming and of in-medium produced quarks. The N th order term in the opacity expansion of the radiation cross section is found to be a convolution of the radiation associated to N -fold rescattering and a readjustment of the probabilities that rescattering occurs with less than N scattering centers. Both informations can be disentangled by factorizing out of the radiation cross section a term which depends only on the mean free path of the projectile. This allows to infer analytical expressions for the totally coherent and totally incoherent limits of the radiation cross section to arbitrary orders in opacity.

  12. Review of meson spectroscopy: quark states and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A group of three lectures on hadron spectroscopy are presented. Topics covered include: light L = 0 mesons, light L = 1 mesons, antiquark antiquark quark quark exotics, a catalogue of higher quark antiquark excitations, heavy quarkonium, and glueballs. (GHT)

  13. The Colour of the Young Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    VLT study gives insight on the evolution of the star formation rate Summary An international team of astronomers [1] has determined the colour of the Universe when it was very young. While the Universe is now kind of beige, it was much bluer in the distant past , at a time when it was only 2,500 million years old. This is the outcome of an extensive and thorough analysis of more than 300 galaxies seen within a small southern sky area, the so-called Hubble Deep Field South. The main goal of this advanced study was to understand how the stellar content of the Universe was assembled and has changed over time. Dutch astronomer Marijn Franx , a team member from the Leiden Observatory (The Netherlands), explains: "The blue colour of the early Universe is caused by the predominantly blue light from young stars in the galaxies. The redder colour of the Universe today is caused by the relatively larger number of older, redder stars." The team leader, Gregory Rudnick from the Max-Planck Institut für Astrophysics (Garching, Germany) adds: "Since the total amount of light in the Universe in the past was about the same as today and a young blue star emits much more light than an old red star, there must have been significantly fewer stars in the young Universe than there is now. Our new findings imply that the majority of stars in the Universe were formed comparatively late, not so long before our Sun was born, at a moment when the Universe was around 7,000 million years old." These new results are based on unique data collected during more than 100 hours of observations with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), as part of a major research project, the Faint InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (FIRES) . The distances to the galaxies were estimated from their brightness in different optical near-infrared wavelength bands. PR Photo 34/03 : The Evolving Colour of the Universe . Observing the early Universe It is now well known that the Sun was formed

  14. Uropygial gland and bib colouration in the house sparrow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Birds frequently signal different qualities by plumage colouration, mainly during mating. However, plumage colouration is determined during the moult, and therefore it would indicate the quality of individual birds during the moult, not its current quality. Recent studies, however, suggest that birds could modify plumage colouration by using cosmetic preen oil produced by the uropygial gland. In this study, I show that bib colouration is related to uropygial gland size and body condition in male house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Moreover, I conducted an experiment in which a group of sparrows were inoculated with an antigen, mimicking an illness. In control birds, short-term changes in bib colouration were related to both body condition and change in uropygial gland size. Therefore, birds that reduced uropygial gland size showed a greater colouration change. However, bib colouration did not change with the change in uropygial gland size in experimental birds inoculated with the antigen. Given that the experiment did not affect preen oil production or consumption, this finding tentatively suggests that the immune challenge provoked a change in the composition of preen oil, affecting its cosmetic properties. In short, the results of this study suggest that (1) male house sparrows produce cosmetic preen oil that alters the colouration of their bibs; (2) the more change in uropygial gland size, the more change in bib colouration; and (3) in this way, bib colouration has the potential to signal current health status, since less healthy birds showed less capacity to change bib colouration. PMID:27280079

  15. Uropygial gland and bib colouration in the house sparrow.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2016-01-01

    Birds frequently signal different qualities by plumage colouration, mainly during mating. However, plumage colouration is determined during the moult, and therefore it would indicate the quality of individual birds during the moult, not its current quality. Recent studies, however, suggest that birds could modify plumage colouration by using cosmetic preen oil produced by the uropygial gland. In this study, I show that bib colouration is related to uropygial gland size and body condition in male house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Moreover, I conducted an experiment in which a group of sparrows were inoculated with an antigen, mimicking an illness. In control birds, short-term changes in bib colouration were related to both body condition and change in uropygial gland size. Therefore, birds that reduced uropygial gland size showed a greater colouration change. However, bib colouration did not change with the change in uropygial gland size in experimental birds inoculated with the antigen. Given that the experiment did not affect preen oil production or consumption, this finding tentatively suggests that the immune challenge provoked a change in the composition of preen oil, affecting its cosmetic properties. In short, the results of this study suggest that (1) male house sparrows produce cosmetic preen oil that alters the colouration of their bibs; (2) the more change in uropygial gland size, the more change in bib colouration; and (3) in this way, bib colouration has the potential to signal current health status, since less healthy birds showed less capacity to change bib colouration.

  16. Colour appearance descriptors for image browsing and retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Aniza; Martinez, Kirk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the development of whole-scene colour appearance descriptors for classification to be used in browsing applications. The descriptors can classify a whole-scene image into various categories of semantically-based colour appearance. Colour appearance is an important feature and has been extensively used in image-analysis, retrieval and classification. By using pre-existing global CIELAB colour histograms, firstly, we try to develop metrics for whole-scene colour appearance: "colour strength", "high/low lightness" and "multicoloured". Secondly we propose methods using these metrics either alone or combined to classify whole-scene images into five categories of appearance: strong, pastel, dark, pale and multicoloured. Experiments show positive results and that the global colour histogram is actually useful and can be used for whole-scene colour appearance classification. We have also conducted a small-scale human evaluation test on whole-scene colour appearance. The results show, with suitable threshold settings, the proposed methods can describe the whole-scene colour appearance of images close to human classification. The descriptors were tested on thousands of images from various scenes: paintings, natural scenes, objects, photographs and documents. The colour appearance classifications are being integrated into an image browsing system which allows them to also be used to refine browsing.

  17. Diagnosing synaesthesia with online colour pickers: maximising sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Rothen, Nicolas; Seth, Anil K; Witzel, Christoph; Ward, Jamie

    2013-04-30

    The most commonly used method for formally assessing grapheme-colour synaesthesia (i.e., experiencing colours in response to letter and/or number stimuli) involves selecting colours from a large colour palette on several occasions and measuring consistency of the colours selected. However, the ability to diagnose synaesthesia using this method depends on several factors that have not been directly contrasted. These include the type of colour space used (e.g., RGB, HSV, CIELUV, CIELAB) and different measures of consistency (e.g., city block and Euclidean distance in colour space). This study aims to find the most reliable way of diagnosing grapheme-colour synaesthesia based on maximising sensitivity (i.e., ability of a test to identify true synaesthetes) and specificity (i.e., ability of a test to identify true non-synaesthetes). We show, applying ROC (receiver operating characteristics) to binary classification of a large sample of self-declared synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes, that the consistency criterion (i.e., cut-off value) for diagnosing synaesthesia is considerably higher than the current standard in the field. We also show that methods based on perceptual CIELUV and CIELAB colour models (rather than RGB and HSV colour representations) and Euclidean distances offer an even greater sensitivity and specificity than most currently used measures. Together, these findings offer improved heuristics for the behavioural assessment of grapheme-colour synaesthesia.

  18. Uropygial gland and bib colouration in the house sparrow.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2016-01-01

    Birds frequently signal different qualities by plumage colouration, mainly during mating. However, plumage colouration is determined during the moult, and therefore it would indicate the quality of individual birds during the moult, not its current quality. Recent studies, however, suggest that birds could modify plumage colouration by using cosmetic preen oil produced by the uropygial gland. In this study, I show that bib colouration is related to uropygial gland size and body condition in male house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Moreover, I conducted an experiment in which a group of sparrows were inoculated with an antigen, mimicking an illness. In control birds, short-term changes in bib colouration were related to both body condition and change in uropygial gland size. Therefore, birds that reduced uropygial gland size showed a greater colouration change. However, bib colouration did not change with the change in uropygial gland size in experimental birds inoculated with the antigen. Given that the experiment did not affect preen oil production or consumption, this finding tentatively suggests that the immune challenge provoked a change in the composition of preen oil, affecting its cosmetic properties. In short, the results of this study suggest that (1) male house sparrows produce cosmetic preen oil that alters the colouration of their bibs; (2) the more change in uropygial gland size, the more change in bib colouration; and (3) in this way, bib colouration has the potential to signal current health status, since less healthy birds showed less capacity to change bib colouration. PMID:27280079

  19. Bird colour vision: behavioural thresholds reveal receptor noise.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Lind, Olle; Kelber, Almut

    2015-01-15

    Birds have impressive physiological adaptations for colour vision, including tetrachromacy and coloured oil droplets, yet it is not clear exactly how well birds can discriminate the reflecting object colours that they encounter in nature. With behavioural experiments, we determined colour discrimination thresholds of chickens in bright and dim light. We performed the experiments with two colour series, orange and green, covering two parts of chicken colour space. These experiments allowed us to compare behavioural results with model expectations and determine how different noise types limit colour discrimination. At intensities ranging from bright light to those corresponding to early dusk (250-10 cd m(-2)), we describe thresholds accurately by assuming a constant signal-to-noise ratio, in agreement with an invariant Weber fraction of Weber's law. Below this intensity, signal-to-noise ratio decreases and Weber's law is violated because photon-shot noise limits colour discrimination. In very dim light (below 0.05 cd m(-2) for the orange series or 0.2 cd m(-2) for the green series) colour discrimination is possibly constrained by dark noise, and the lowest intensity at which chickens can discriminate colours is 0.025 and 0.08 cd m(-2) for the orange and green series, respectively. Our results suggest that chickens use spatial pooling of cone outputs to mitigate photon-shot noise. Surprisingly, we found no difference between colour discrimination of chickens and humans tested with the same test in bright light. PMID:25609782

  20. Bird colour vision: behavioural thresholds reveal receptor noise.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Lind, Olle; Kelber, Almut

    2015-01-15

    Birds have impressive physiological adaptations for colour vision, including tetrachromacy and coloured oil droplets, yet it is not clear exactly how well birds can discriminate the reflecting object colours that they encounter in nature. With behavioural experiments, we determined colour discrimination thresholds of chickens in bright and dim light. We performed the experiments with two colour series, orange and green, covering two parts of chicken colour space. These experiments allowed us to compare behavioural results with model expectations and determine how different noise types limit colour discrimination. At intensities ranging from bright light to those corresponding to early dusk (250-10 cd m(-2)), we describe thresholds accurately by assuming a constant signal-to-noise ratio, in agreement with an invariant Weber fraction of Weber's law. Below this intensity, signal-to-noise ratio decreases and Weber's law is violated because photon-shot noise limits colour discrimination. In very dim light (below 0.05 cd m(-2) for the orange series or 0.2 cd m(-2) for the green series) colour discrimination is possibly constrained by dark noise, and the lowest intensity at which chickens can discriminate colours is 0.025 and 0.08 cd m(-2) for the orange and green series, respectively. Our results suggest that chickens use spatial pooling of cone outputs to mitigate photon-shot noise. Surprisingly, we found no difference between colour discrimination of chickens and humans tested with the same test in bright light.

  1. Synaesthetic Colour in the Brain: Beyond Colour Areas. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Synaesthetes and Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Tessa M.; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background In synaesthesia, sensations in a particular modality cause additional experiences in a second, unstimulated modality (e.g., letters elicit colour). Understanding how synaesthesia is mediated in the brain can help to understand normal processes of perceptual awareness and multisensory integration. In several neuroimaging studies, enhanced brain activity for grapheme-colour synaesthesia has been found in ventral-occipital areas that are also involved in real colour processing. Our question was whether the neural correlates of synaesthetically induced colour and real colour experience are truly shared. Methodology/Principal Findings First, in a free viewing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, we located main effects of synaesthesia in left superior parietal lobule and in colour related areas. In the left superior parietal lobe, individual differences between synaesthetes (projector-associator distinction) also influenced brain activity, confirming the importance of the left superior parietal lobe for synaesthesia. Next, we applied a repetition suppression paradigm in fMRI, in which a decrease in the BOLD (blood-oxygenated-level-dependent) response is generally observed for repeated stimuli. We hypothesized that synaesthetically induced colours would lead to a reduction in BOLD response for subsequently presented real colours, if the neural correlates were overlapping. We did find BOLD suppression effects induced by synaesthesia, but not within the colour areas. Conclusions/Significance Because synaesthetically induced colours were not able to suppress BOLD effects for real colour, we conclude that the neural correlates of synaesthetic colour experience and real colour experience are not fully shared. We propose that synaesthetic colour experiences are mediated by higher-order visual pathways that lie beyond the scope of classical, ventral-occipital visual areas. Feedback from these areas, in which the left parietal cortex is likely to

  2. Simulating Colour Vision Deficiency from a Spectral Image.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Raju

    2016-01-01

    People with colour vision deficiency (CVD) have difficulty seeing full colour contrast and can miss some of the features in a scene. As a part of universal design, researcher have been working on how to modify and enhance the colour of images in order to make them see the scene with good contrast. For this, it is important to know how the original colour image is seen by different individuals with CVD. This paper proposes a methodology to simulate accurate colour deficient images from a spectral image using cone sensitivity of different cases of deficiency. As the method enables generation of accurate colour deficient image, the methodology is believed to help better understand the limitations of colour vision deficiency and that in turn leads to the design and development of more effective imaging technologies for better and wider accessibility in the context of universal design. PMID:27534332

  3. The colour of domestication and the designer chicken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppy, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Colour is an important feature of most living organisms. In the wild, colour has great significance affecting the survival and reproductive success of the species. The environmental constraints which lead to the specific colours of birds and animals are very strong and individuals of novel colours tend not to survive. Under domestication, mankind has transformed all the species involved which have thus been freed from environmental pressures to a large extent. Early colour variants were mostly selected for utility reasons or religious practices. In more recent centuries colour varieties have been created purely for ornament and pleasure, fashion playing a surprisingly large part in their development. A bewildering array of colours and patterns can now be found in all our commensal species, especially the Domestic Fowl ( Gallus gallus domesticus).

  4. Three-dimensional plasmonic stereoscopic prints in full colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Xiao Ming; Zheng, Yihan; Tan, Shawn J.; Zhang, Lei; Kumar, Karthik; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Yang, Joel K. W.

    2014-11-01

    Metal nanostructures can be designed to scatter different colours depending on the polarization of the incident light. Such spectral control is attractive for applications such as high-density optical storage, but challenges remain in creating microprints with a single-layer architecture that simultaneously enables full-spectral and polarization control of the scattered light. Here we demonstrate independently tunable biaxial colour pixels composed of isolated nanoellipses or nanosquare dimers that can exhibit a full range of colours in reflection mode with linear polarization dependence. Effective polarization-sensitive full-colour prints are realized. With this, we encoded two colour images within the same area and further use this to achieve depth perception by realizing three-dimensional stereoscopic colour microprint. Coupled with the low cost and durability of aluminium as the functional material in our pixel design, such polarization-sensitive encoding can realize a wide spectrum of applications in colour displays, data storage and anti-counterfeiting technologies.

  5. Three-dimensional plasmonic stereoscopic prints in full colour.

    PubMed

    Goh, Xiao Ming; Zheng, Yihan; Tan, Shawn J; Zhang, Lei; Kumar, Karthik; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Yang, Joel K W

    2014-11-04

    Metal nanostructures can be designed to scatter different colours depending on the polarization of the incident light. Such spectral control is attractive for applications such as high-density optical storage, but challenges remain in creating microprints with a single-layer architecture that simultaneously enables full-spectral and polarization control of the scattered light. Here we demonstrate independently tunable biaxial colour pixels composed of isolated nanoellipses or nanosquare dimers that can exhibit a full range of colours in reflection mode with linear polarization dependence. Effective polarization-sensitive full-colour prints are realized. With this, we encoded two colour images within the same area and further use this to achieve depth perception by realizing three-dimensional stereoscopic colour microprint. Coupled with the low cost and durability of aluminium as the functional material in our pixel design, such polarization-sensitive encoding can realize a wide spectrum of applications in colour displays, data storage and anti-counterfeiting technologies.

  6. Testing of Nonlinear Filters For Coloured Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, Wieslaw M.; Redaelli, Stefano; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    We focus on nonlinearity and deterministic behaviour of classical model systems cor- rupted by white or coloured noise. Therefore, we use nonlinear filters to give a faith- ful representation of nonlinear behaviour of the systems. We also analyse time series of a real system, namely, we study velocities of of the solar wind plasma including Alfvénic fluctuations measured in situ by the Helios spacecraft in the inner helio- sphere. We demonstrate that the influence of white and coloured noise in the data records can be efficiently reduced by a nonlinear filter. We show that due to this non- linear noise reduction we get with much reliability estimates of the largest Lyapunov exponent and the Kolmogorov entropy.

  7. How to Calculate Colourful Cross Sections Efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoeche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank

    2008-09-03

    Different methods for the calculation of cross sections with many QCD particles are compared. To this end, CSW vertex rules, Berends-Giele recursion and Feynman-diagram based techniques are implemented as well as various methods for the treatment of colours and phase space integration. We find that typically there is only a small window of jet multiplicities, where the CSW technique has efficiencies comparable or better than both of the other two methods.

  8. Constraining RRc candidates using SDSS colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyai, E.; Plachy, E.; Molnar, L.; Dobos, L.; Szabo, R.

    2016-05-01

    The light variations of first-overtone RR Lyrae stars and contact eclipsing binaries can be difficult to distinguish. The Catalina Periodic Variable Star catalog contains several misclassified objects, despite the classification efforts by Drake et al. (2014). They used metallicity and surface gravity derived from spectroscopic data (from the SDSS database) to rule out binaries. Our aim is to further constrain the catalog using SDSS colours to estimate physical parameters for stars that did not have spectroscopic data.

  9. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  10. Background complexity affects colour preference in bumblebees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Jessica; Thomson, James D.

    2009-08-01

    Flowers adapted for hummingbird pollination are typically red. This correlation is usually explained by the assertion that nectar- or pollen-stealing bees are “blind” to red flowers. However, laboratory studies have shown that bees are capable of locating artificial red flowers and often show no innate preference for blue over red. We hypothesised that these findings might be artefacts of the simplified laboratory environment. Using bumblebees ( Bombus impatiens) that had been trained to visit red and blue artificial flowers, we tested whether colour preference was influenced by complexity of the background on which they were foraging. Many bees were indifferent to flower colour when tested using a uniform green background like those commonly used in laboratory studies, but all bees showed strong colour preferences (usually for blue) when flowers were presented against a photograph of real foliage. Overall, preference for blue flowers was significantly greater on the more realistic, complex background. These results support the notion that the red of “hummingbird syndrome” flowers can function to reduce bee visits despite the ability of bees to detect red and highlight the need to consider context when drawing inferences about pollinator preferences from laboratory data.

  11. Material and lighting hues of object colour.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Rumi; Logvinenko, Alexander D

    2010-09-01

    Observers can easily differentiate between a pigmented stain and the white surface that it lies on. The same applies for a colour shadow cast upon the same surface. Although the difference between these two kinds of colour appearance (referred to as material and lighting hues) is self-evident even for inexperienced observers, it is not one that has been captured by any colour appearance model thus far. We report here on an experiment supplying evidence for the dissociation of these two types of hue in the perceptual space. The stimulus display consisted of two identical sets of Munsell papers illuminated independently by yellow, neutral, and blue lights. Dissimilarities between all the paper/light pairs were ranked by five trichromatic observers, and then analysed by using non-metric multidimensional scaling (MDS). In the MDS output configuration, the Munsell papers lit by the same light made a closed configuration retaining the same order as in the Munsell book. The paper configurations for the yellow and blue lights were displaced transversally and in parallel to each other, with that of the neutral light located in between. The direction of the shift is interpreted as the yellow-blue lighting dimension. We show that the yellow-blue lighting dimension cannot be reduced to that of the reflected light. PMID:20928959

  12. Evolution of colour vision in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, J K

    1998-01-01

    The expression of five major families of visual pigments occurred early in vertebrae evolution, probably about 350-400 million years ago, before the separation of the major vertebrate classes. Phylogenetic analysis of opsin gene sequences suggests that the ancestral pigments were cone pigments, with rod pigments evolving last. Modern teleosts, reptiles and birds have genera that possess rods and four spectral classes of cone each representing one of the five visual pigment families. The complement of four spectrally distinct cone classes endows these species with the potential for tetrachromatic colour vision. In contrast, probably because of their nocturnal ancestry, mammals have rod-dominated retinas with colour vision reduced to a basic dichromatic system subserved by only two spectral classes of cone. It is only within primates, about 35 millions years ago, that mammals 're-evolved' a higher level of colour vision: trichromacy. This was achieved by a gene duplication within the longer-wave cone class to produce two spectrally distinct members of the same visual pigment family which, in conjunction with a short-wavelength pigment, provide the three spectral classes of cone necessary to subserve trichromacy.

  13. The origins of colour vision in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Collin, Shaun P; Trezise, Ann E O

    2004-07-01

    The capacity for colour vision is mediated by the comparison of the signal intensities from photoreceptors of two or more types that differ in spectral sensitivity. Morphological, physiological and molecular analyses of the retina in an agnathan (jawless) fish, the lamprey Geotria australis, may hold important clues to the origins of colour vision in vertebrates. Lampreys are extant representatives of an ancient group of vertebrates, the origins of which are thought to date back to at least the early Cambrian, approximately 540 million years ago. G. australis possesses five photoreceptor types, each with cone-like ultrastructural features and different spectral sensitivities. Recent molecular genetic studies have also revealed that five visual pigment (opsin) genes are expressed in the retina, each of which is orthologous to the major classes of vertebrate opsin genes. These findings reveal that multiple opsin genes originated very early in vertebrate evolution, prior to the separation of the jawed and jawless vertebrate lineages, thereby providing the genetic basis for colour vision in all vertebrates.

  14. Hadronic physics of q anti q light quark mesons, quark molecules and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    A brief introduction reviews the development of QCD and defines quark molecules and glueballs. This review is concerned primarily with u, d, and s quarks, which provide practically all of the cross section connected with hadronic interactions. The following topics form the bulk of the paper: status of quark model classification for conventional u, d, s quark meson states; status of multiquark or quark molecule state predictions and experiments; glueballs and how to find them; and the OZI rule in decay and production and how glueballs might affect it. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  15. NICE: A Computational Solution to Close the Gap from Colour Perception to Colour Categorization.

    PubMed

    Parraga, C Alejandro; Akbarinia, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The segmentation of visible electromagnetic radiation into chromatic categories by the human visual system has been extensively studied from a perceptual point of view, resulting in several colour appearance models. However, there is currently a void when it comes to relate these results to the physiological mechanisms that are known to shape the pre-cortical and cortical visual pathway. This work intends to begin to fill this void by proposing a new physiologically plausible model of colour categorization based on Neural Isoresponsive Colour Ellipsoids (NICE) in the cone-contrast space defined by the main directions of the visual signals entering the visual cortex. The model was adjusted to fit psychophysical measures that concentrate on the categorical boundaries and are consistent with the ellipsoidal isoresponse surfaces of visual cortical neurons. By revealing the shape of such categorical colour regions, our measures allow for a more precise and parsimonious description, connecting well-known early visual processing mechanisms to the less understood phenomenon of colour categorization. To test the feasibility of our method we applied it to exemplary images and a popular ground-truth chart obtaining labelling results that are better than those of current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  16. NICE: A Computational Solution to Close the Gap from Colour Perception to Colour Categorization

    PubMed Central

    Parraga, C. Alejandro; Akbarinia, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The segmentation of visible electromagnetic radiation into chromatic categories by the human visual system has been extensively studied from a perceptual point of view, resulting in several colour appearance models. However, there is currently a void when it comes to relate these results to the physiological mechanisms that are known to shape the pre-cortical and cortical visual pathway. This work intends to begin to fill this void by proposing a new physiologically plausible model of colour categorization based on Neural Isoresponsive Colour Ellipsoids (NICE) in the cone-contrast space defined by the main directions of the visual signals entering the visual cortex. The model was adjusted to fit psychophysical measures that concentrate on the categorical boundaries and are consistent with the ellipsoidal isoresponse surfaces of visual cortical neurons. By revealing the shape of such categorical colour regions, our measures allow for a more precise and parsimonious description, connecting well-known early visual processing mechanisms to the less understood phenomenon of colour categorization. To test the feasibility of our method we applied it to exemplary images and a popular ground-truth chart obtaining labelling results that are better than those of current state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:26954691

  17. Colour fluctuations in grapheme-colour synaesthesia: The effect of clinical and non-clinical mood changes.

    PubMed

    Kay, Collette L; Carmichael, Duncan A; Ruffell, Henry E; Simner, Julia

    2015-08-01

    Synaesthesia is a condition that gives rise to unusual secondary sensations (e.g., colours are perceived when listening to music). These unusual sensations tend to be reported as being stable throughout adulthood (e.g., Simner & Logie, 2007, Neurocase, 13, 358) and the consistency of these experiences over time is taken as the behavioural hallmark of genuineness. Our study looked at the influence of mood states on synaesthetic colours. In Experiment 1, we recruited grapheme-colour synaesthetes (who experience colours from letters/digits) and elicited their synaesthetic colours, as well as their mood and depression states, in two different testing sessions. In each session, participants completed the PANAS-X (Watson & Clark, 1999) and the BDI-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996, Manual for Beck Depression Inventory-II), and chose their synaesthetic colours for letters A-Z from an interactive colour palette. We found that negative mood significantly decreased the luminance of synaesthetic colours. In Experiment 2, we showed that synaesthetic colours were also less luminant for synaesthetes with anxiety disorder, versus those without. Additional evidence suggests that colour saturation, too, may inversely correlate with depressive symptoms. These results show that fluctuations in mood within both a normal and clinical range influence synaesthetic colours over time. This has implications for our understanding about the longitudinal stability of synaesthetic experiences, and of how mood may interact with the visual (imagery) systems. PMID:25413977

  18. Colour fluctuations in grapheme-colour synaesthesia: The effect of clinical and non-clinical mood changes.

    PubMed

    Kay, Collette L; Carmichael, Duncan A; Ruffell, Henry E; Simner, Julia

    2015-08-01

    Synaesthesia is a condition that gives rise to unusual secondary sensations (e.g., colours are perceived when listening to music). These unusual sensations tend to be reported as being stable throughout adulthood (e.g., Simner & Logie, 2007, Neurocase, 13, 358) and the consistency of these experiences over time is taken as the behavioural hallmark of genuineness. Our study looked at the influence of mood states on synaesthetic colours. In Experiment 1, we recruited grapheme-colour synaesthetes (who experience colours from letters/digits) and elicited their synaesthetic colours, as well as their mood and depression states, in two different testing sessions. In each session, participants completed the PANAS-X (Watson & Clark, 1999) and the BDI-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996, Manual for Beck Depression Inventory-II), and chose their synaesthetic colours for letters A-Z from an interactive colour palette. We found that negative mood significantly decreased the luminance of synaesthetic colours. In Experiment 2, we showed that synaesthetic colours were also less luminant for synaesthetes with anxiety disorder, versus those without. Additional evidence suggests that colour saturation, too, may inversely correlate with depressive symptoms. These results show that fluctuations in mood within both a normal and clinical range influence synaesthetic colours over time. This has implications for our understanding about the longitudinal stability of synaesthetic experiences, and of how mood may interact with the visual (imagery) systems.

  19. Tevatron Top-Quark Combinations and World Top-Quark Mass Combination

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-04

    Almost 20 years after its discovery, the top quark is still an interesting particle, undergoing precise investigation of its properties. For many years, the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab was the only place to study top quarks in detail, while with the recent start of the LHC proton proton collider a top quark factory has opened. An important ingredient for the full understanding of the top quark is the combination of measurements from the individual experiments. In particular, the Tevaton combinations of single top-quark cross sections, the ttbar production cross section, the W helicity in top-quark decays as well as the Tevatron and the world combination of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  20. Polygon Pictures in QuarkXPress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity where students draw and fill simple and complex shapes by utilizing the polygon tool in QuarkXPress to create graphics. Explains that this activity enables students to learn how to use a variety of functions in the QuarkXPress program. (CMK)

  1. Quark Model in the Quantum Mechanics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussar, P. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses in detail the totally symmetric three-quark karyonic wave functions. The two-body mesonic states are also discussed. A brief review of the experimental efforts to identify the quark model multiplets is given. (Author/SK)

  2. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, A.F.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  3. THE TOP QUARK, QCD, AND NEW PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON,S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup +}e{sup -} + t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup +}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  4. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  5. Quark core impact on hybrid star cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo; Dexheimer, V. A.; Schramm, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal evolution of hybrid stars, objects composed of a quark matter core, enveloped by ordinary hadronic matter. Our purpose is to investigate how important the microscopic properties of the quark core are to the thermal evolution of the star. In order to do that we use a simple Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model for the quark core and a relativistic-mean-field model for the hadronic envelope. By choosing different values for the microscopic parameters (bag constant, strange quark mass, strong coupling constant), we obtain hybrid stars with different quark core properties. We also consider the possibility of color superconductivity in the quark core. With this simple approach, we have found a set of microscopic parameters that lead to a good agreement with those of observed cooling neutron stars. Our results can be used to obtain clues regarding the properties of the quark core in hybrid stars and to refine more sophisticated models for the equation of state of quark matter.

  6. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  7. Hyperon polarization and multiple quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Szwed, J.; Wit, R.

    1988-10-01

    The quark scattering off external gluonic field, calculated to second order, and the quark recombination model are used to describe both the ..lambda.. inclusive production cross-section and the ..lambda.. polarization. The model gives good agreement with experimental data. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, P.L.; Quack, E.; Ruuskanen, P.V. |

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  10. Quark screening lengths in finite temperature QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gocksch, A. California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA . Inst. for Theoretical Physics)

    1990-11-01

    We have computed Landau gauge quark propagators in both the confined and deconfined phase of QCD. I discuss the magnitude of the resulting screening lengths as well as aspects of chiral symmetry relevant to the quark propagator. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Composite Models of Quarks and Leptons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chaoqiang

    1987-09-01

    We review the various constraints on composite models of quarks and leptons. Some dynamical mechanisms for chiral symmetry breaking in chiral preon models are discussed. We have constructed several "realistic candidate" chiral preon models satisfying complementarity between the Higgs and confining phases. The models predict three to four generations of ordinary quarks and leptons.

  12. Quark catalysis of exothermal nuclear reactions.

    PubMed

    Zweig, G

    1978-09-15

    This article discusses circumstances under which free quarks catalyze exothermal nuclear reactions. It also presents possible methods for removing quarks sequestered by nuclear reaction products. Stable quarks that are negatively charged and significantly heavier than electrons attract positively charged nuclei to form new states of matter. The nuclei and quarks are closely bound, and presumably interact through both electromagnetic and nuclear forces. Nuclear fusion and fission are possible, as well as a new class of plural reactions in which either a quark isobar, isotope, or isotone is created in each individual reaction, with catalysis resulting in the overall system because the net transfer of charge, neutrons, or protons to the quarks is zero. The quark with quantum numbers of üü is a promising catalytic candidate. A satisfactory understanding of which reactions are or are not possible awaits the isolation of free quarks and a description of their strong interactions with matter. Finally, other kinds of stable negatively charged particles (such as heavy leptons), if discovered, can catalyze deuterium fusion reactions if thermal neutrons are used to liberate He(3)-bound catalytic particles. PMID:17743618

  13. Review of Top Quark Physics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, R.; Narain, M.; Kumar, A.

    2007-12-01

    As the heaviest known fundamental particle, the top quark has taken a central role in the study of fundamental interactions. Production of top quarks in pairs provides an important probe of strong interactions. The top quark mass is a key fundamental parameter which places a valuable constraint on the Higgs boson mass and electroweak symmetry breaking. Observations of the relative rates and kinematics of top quark final states constrain potential new physics. In many cases, the tests available with study of the top quark are both critical and unique. Large increases in data samples from the Fermilab Tevatron have been coupled with major improvements in experimental techniques to produce many new precision measurements of the top quark. The first direct evidence for electroweak production of top quarks has been obtained, with a resulting direct determination of V{sub tb}. Several of the properties of the top quark have been measured. Progress has also been made in obtaining improved limits on potential anomalous production and decay mechanisms. This review presents an overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments in this field. We also provide a brief discussion of the implications for further efforts.

  14. The Top Quark, QCD, And New Physics.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dawson, S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup+}e{sup -}+ t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup+}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  15. Recent advances in heavy quark theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.

    1997-01-01

    Some recent developments in heavy quark theory are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing a b quark. The isospin violating hadronic decay D{sub s}* {yields} D{sub s}{sup pi}{sup 0} is also discussed.

  16. Effect of electron (de)localization and pairing in the electrochemistry of polyoxometalates: study of Wells-Dawson molybdotungstophosphate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Parent, Loïc; Aparicio, Pablo A; de Oliveira, Pedro; Teillout, Anne-Lucie; Poblet, Josep M; López, Xavier; Mbomekallé, Israël M

    2014-06-16

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic entities featuring extensive and sometimes unusual redox properties. In this work, several experimental techniques as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been applied to identify and assess the relevance of factors influencing the redox potentials of POMs. First, the position of the Mo substituent atom in the Wells-Dawson structure, α1- or α2-P2W17Mo, determines the potential of the first 1e(-) reduction wave. For P2W(18-x)Mox systems containing more than one Mo atom, reduction takes place at successively more positive potentials. We attribute this fact to the higher electron delocalization when some Mo oxidizing atoms are connected. After having analyzed the experimental and theoretical data for the monosubstituted α1- and α2-P2W17Mo anions, some relevant facts arise that may help to rationalize the redox behavior of POMs in general. Three aspects concern the stability of systems: (i) the favorable electron delocalization, (ii) the unfavorable e(-)-e(-) electrostatic repulsion, and (iii) the favorable electron pairing. They explain trends such as the second reduction wave occurring at more positive potentials in α1- than in α2-P2W17Mo, and also the third electron reduction taking place at a less negative potential in the case of α2, reversing the observed behavior for the first and the second waves. In P2W17V derivatives, the nature of the first "d" electron is more localized because of the stronger oxidant character of V(V). Thus, the reduction potentials as well as the computed reduction energies (REs) for the second reduction of either isomer are closer to each other than in Mo-substituted POMs. This may be explained by the lack of electron delocalization in monoreduced P2W17V(IV) systems. PMID:24892769

  17. v-Src causes delocalization of Mklp1, Aurora B, and INCENP from the spindle midzone during cytokinesis failure

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Shuhei; Nakayama, Yuji; Honda, Takuya; Aoki, Azumi; Tamura, Naoki; Abe, Kohei; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2013-06-10

    Src-family tyrosine kinases are aberrantly activated in cancers, and this activation is associated with malignant tumor progression. v-Src, encoded by the v-src transforming gene of the Rous sarcoma virus, is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src. Although investigations with temperature sensitive mutants of v-Src have shown that v-Src induces many oncogenic processes, the effects on cell division are unknown. Here, we show that v-Src inhibits cellular proliferation of HCT116, HeLa S3 and NIH3T3 cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that inducible expression of v-Src results in an accumulation of 4N cells. Time-lapse analysis revealed that binucleation is induced through the inhibition of cytokinesis, a final step of cell division. The localization of Mklp1, which is essential for cytokinesis, to the spindle midzone is inhibited in v-Src-expressing cells. Intriguingly, Aurora B, which regulates Mklp1 localization at the midzone, is delocalized from the spindle midzone and the midbody but not from the metaphase chromosomes upon v-Src expression. Mklp2, which is responsible for the relocation of Aurora B from the metaphase chromosomes to the spindle midzone, is also lost from the spindle midzone. These results suggest that v-Src inhibits cytokinesis through the delocalization of Mklp1 and Aurora B from the spindle midzone, resulting in binucleation. -- Highlights: • v-Src inhibits cell proliferation of HCT116, HeLa S3 and NIH3T3 cells. • v-Src induces binucleation together with cytokinesis failure. • v-Src causes delocalization of Mklp1, Aurora B and INCENP from the spindle midzone.

  18. Colour learning when foraging for nectar and pollen: bees learn two colours at once.

    PubMed

    Muth, Felicity; Papaj, Daniel R; Leonard, Anne S

    2015-09-01

    Bees are model organisms for the study of learning and memory, yet nearly all such research to date has used a single reward, nectar. Many bees collect both nectar (carbohydrates) and pollen (protein) on a single foraging bout, sometimes from different plant species. We tested whether individual bumblebees could learn colour associations with nectar and pollen rewards simultaneously in a foraging scenario where one floral type offered only nectar and the other only pollen. We found that bees readily learned multiple reward-colour associations, and when presented with novel floral targets generalized to colours similar to those trained for each reward type. These results expand the ecological significance of work on bee learning and raise new questions regarding the cognitive ecology of pollination.

  19. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations.

  20. On the role of delocalization in benzene: Theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of strained ring fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, R.

    1993-04-01

    When an important compound`s discovery dates back as far as 1825, one would imagine that every facet of its chemical and physical properties has been illuminated in the meantime. Benzene, however, has not ceased to challenge the chemist`s notion of structure and bonding since its first isolation by Michael Faraday. This report is divided into the following six chapters: 1. Aromaticity -- Criteria, manifestations, structural limitations; 2. The role of delocalization in benzene; 3. The thermochemical properties of benzocyclobutadienologs; 4. Ab initio study of benzenes fused to four-membered rings; 5. Non-planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and 6. Experimental details and input decks. 210 Refs.

  1. Sexual selection and genetic colour polymorphisms in animals.

    PubMed

    Wellenreuther, Maren; Svensson, Erik I; Hansson, Bengt

    2014-11-01

    Genetic colour polymorphisms are widespread across animals and often subjected to complex selection regimes. Traditionally, colour morphs were used as simple visual markers to measure allele frequency changes in nature, selection, population divergence and speciation. With advances in sequencing technology and analysis methods, several model systems are emerging where the molecular targets of selection are being described. Here, we discuss recent studies on the genetics of sexually selected colour polymorphisms, aiming at (i) reviewing the evidence of sexual selection on colour polymorphisms, (ii) highlighting the genetic architecture, molecular and developmental basis underlying phenotypic colour diversification and (iii) discuss how the maintenance of such polymorphisms might be facilitated or constrained by these. Studies of the genetic architecture of colour polymorphism point towards the importance of tight clustering of colour loci with other trait loci, such as in the case of inversions and supergene structures. Other interesting findings include linkage between colour loci and mate preferences or sex determination, and the role of introgression and regulatory variation in fuelling polymorphisms. We highlight that more studies are needed that explicitly integrate fitness consequences of sexual selection on colour with the underlying molecular targets of colour to gain insights into the evolutionary consequences of sexual selection on polymorphism maintenance.

  2. Minimum Perceptible Differences in the Colour Reproduction of Photographic Prints.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Carol Ann

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Electronic simulations of the Macbeth Color Checker Chart were prepared such that each of the eighteen colour patches could be varied independently from the rest of the chart. The output was in the form of photographic colour prints which comprised a ring-around set of 168 prints for each of the colour patches, where each print was a colour perturbation from a standard print. Twelve observers, with normal colour vision, judged the prints in each set to be perceptibly different or not perceptibly different from the standard print, for each patch. The experimental results, in the form of hue-orientated and non hue-orientated ellipses, were compared with MacAdam type ellipses, CIELAB unit ellipses and ellipses derived from the CMC(1:c) colour difference formula: the comparisons were made in the 1976 CIELAB colour space. Colour reproduction indices were calculated for the end points of the semi-major and semi-minor axes of the CMC ellipses, for each of the eighteen colour patches. The coefficient of variation was very small for the combined hue index, the combined chroma index and the overall combined index, indicating that the mean values for these indices could be assigned to any of the ellipses as a measure of the minimum perceptible difference in terms of colour appearance.

  3. IRIS COLOUR CLASSIFICATION SCALES--THEN AND NOW.

    PubMed

    Grigore, Mariana; Avram, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Eye colour is one of the most obvious phenotypic traits of an individual. Since the first documented classification scale developed in 1843, there have been numerous attempts to classify the iris colour. In the past centuries, iris colour classification scales has had various colour categories and mostly relied on comparison of an individual's eye with painted glass eyes. Once photography techniques were refined, standard iris photographs replaced painted eyes, but this did not solve the problem of painted/ printed colour variability in time. Early clinical scales were easy to use, but lacked objectivity and were not standardised or statistically tested for reproducibility. The era of automated iris colour classification systems came with the technological development. Spectrophotometry, digital analysis of high-resolution iris images, hyper spectral analysis of the human real iris and the dedicated iris colour analysis software, all accomplished an objective, accurate iris colour classification, but are quite expensive and limited in use to research environment. Iris colour classification systems evolved continuously due to their use in a wide range of studies, especially in the fields of anthropology, epidemiology and genetics. Despite the wide range of the existing scales, up until present there has been no generally accepted iris colour classification scale.

  4. Impairment of colour vision in workers exposed to organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Semple, S; Dick, F; Osborne, A; Cherrie, J; Soutar, A; Seaton, A; Haites, N

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate loss of colour vision related to exposure to solvents and the role of three enzyme polymorphisms in modifying the risk in exposed workers.
METHODS—A sample was studied of 68 male dockyard workers and 42 male community controls with and without neuropsychological symptoms from a previous cross sectional study. Indices of cumulative and intensity based exposure to solvents were calculated for all subjects. Alcohol, drug, and smoking histories were obtained. Colour vision was tested by Lanthony D15d colour vision test. Genotype of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 and N-acetyltransferase 2 polymorphisms were determined.
RESULTS—The relation between impairment of colour vision and exposure to solvents was investigated with multiple regression techniques. Increasing annual exposure to solvents was significantly associated with reduced colour vision (p=0.029). Impairment of colour vision was not associated with neuropsychological symptoms as measured by the Q16 solvent symptom questionnaire. No significant association was found between acquired impairment of colour vision and genetic polymorphisms when GSTM1, GSTT1 or NAT2 phenotypes were included in the analyses.
CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to mixed solvents is associated with impairment in colour vision, the risk increases with increasing exposure. The risk of impairment of colour vision was not altered in this study by the presence of different GSTM1, GSTT1 or NAT2 polymorphisms.


Keywords: colour vision; organic solvents; genetic polymorphisms PMID:10935938

  5. QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Datta, Saumen; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Sugar, Robert

    2001-09-01

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks -- two light and one strange -- and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a by-product we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0{sup ++} (a{sub 0}) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  6. On meson melting in the quark medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadafan, K. Bitaghsir; Azimfard, E.

    2012-10-01

    We consider a heavy quark-antiquark (qq¯) pair as a heavy meson in the medium composed of light quarks and gluons. By using the AdS/CFT correspondence, the properties of this system are investigated. In particular, we study the inter-quark distance and it is shown that the mechanism of melting in the quark-gluon plasma and in the hadronic phase is the same. It is found that by considering finite-coupling corrections, the inter-quark distance of a heavy meson decreases. As a result a heavy meson like J/ψ will melt at higher temperatures. By considering rotating heavy mesons, we discuss melting of exited states like χc and ψ'.

  7. Possible evidence that pulsars are quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Renxin

    2008-01-10

    It is a pity that the real state of matter in pulsar-like stars is still not determined confidently because of the uncertainty about cold matter at supranuclear density, even 40 years after the discovery of pulsar. Nuclear matter (related to neutron stars) is one of the speculations for the inner constitution of pulsars even from the Landau's time more than 70 years ago, but quark matter (related to quark stars) is an alternative due to the fact of asymptotic freedom of interaction between quarks as the standard model of particle physics develops since 1960s. Therefore, one has to focus on astrophysical observations in order to answer what the nature of pulsars is. In this presentation, I would like to summarize possible observational evidence/hints that pulsar-like stars could be quark stars, and to address achievable clear evidence for quark stars in the future experiments.

  8. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  9. Symmetries of nonrelativistic phase space and the structure of quark-lepton generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Źenczykowski, Piotr

    2009-06-01

    According to the Hamiltonian formalism, nonrelativistic phase space may be considered as an arena of physics, with momentum and position treated as independent variables. Invariance of x2 + p2 constitutes then a natural generalization of ordinary rotational invariance. We consider Dirac-like linearization of this form, with position and momentum satisfying standard commutation relations. This leads to the identification of a quantum-level structure from which some phase space properties might emerge. Genuine rotations and reflections in phase space are tied to the existence of new quantum numbers, unrelated to ordinary 3D space. Their properties allow their identification with the internal quantum numbers characterising the structure of a single quark-lepton generation in the Standard Model. In particular, the algebraic structure of the Harari-Shupe preon model of fundamental particles is reproduced exactly and without invoking any subparticles. Analysis of the Clifford algebra of nonrelativistic phase space singles out an element which might be associated with the concept of lepton mass. This element is transformed into a corresponding element for a single coloured quark, leading to a generalization of the concept of mass and a different starting point for the discussion of quark unobservability.

  10. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  11. A universal ultraviolet-optical colour-colour-magnitude relation of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor V.; Zolotukhin, Ivan Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The bimodal galaxy distribution in the optical colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) comprises a narrow 'red sequence' populated mostly by early-type galaxies and a broad 'blue cloud' dominated by star-forming systems. Although the optical CMD allows one to select red sequence objects, neither can it be used for galaxy classification without additional observational data such as spectra or high-resolution images, nor to identify blue galaxies at unknown redshifts. We show that adding the near ultraviolet (NUV) colour [Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) NUV λeff= 227 nm] to the optical (g - r versus Mr) CMD reveals a tight relation in the 3D colour-colour-magnitude space smoothly continuing from the 'blue cloud' to the 'red sequence'. We found that 98 per cent of 225 000 low-redshift (Z < 0.27) galaxies follow a smooth surface ? with a standard deviation of 0.03-0.07 mag making it the tightest known galaxy photometric relation, given the ˜0.9 mag range of k-corrected g - r colours. Similar relations exist in other NUV-optical colours. There is a strong correlation between morphological types and integrated ? colours of galaxies, while the connection with g - r is ambiguous. Rare galaxy classes such as E+A or tidally stripped systems become outliers that occupy distinct regions in the 3D parameter space. Using stellar population models for galaxies with different star formation histories, we show that (a) the (?) distribution at a given luminosity is formed by objects having constant and exponentially declining star formation rates with different characteristic time-scales with the red sequence part consistent also with simple stellar population; (b) colour evolution for exponentially declining models goes along the relation suggesting a weak evolution of its shape up to a redshift of 0.9; (c) galaxies with truncated star formation histories have very short transition phase offset from the relation thus explaining the rareness of E+A galaxies. This relation can be used as

  12. Colour-rendition properties of solid-state lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Shur, M. S.

    2010-09-01

    The applicability of colour-quality metrics to solid-state light sources is validated and the results of the assessment of colour-rendition characteristics of various lamps are presented. The standard colour-rendering index metric or a refined colour-quality scale metric fails to distinguish between two principle colour-rendition properties of illumination: the ability to render object colours with high fidelity and the ability to increase chromatic contrast, especially when the spectra of light sources contain a few narrow-band electroluminescence components. Supplementing these metrics by the known figures of merit that measure the gamut area of a small number of test colour samples does not completely resolve this issue. In contrast, the statistical approach, which is based on sorting a very large number of test colour samples in respect of just-perceivable colour distortions of several kinds, offers a comprehensive assessment of colour-rendition properties of solid-state light sources. In particular, two statistical indices, colour-fidelity index (CFI) and colour-saturation index (CSI), which are the relative numbers of object colours rendered with high fidelity and increased saturation, respectively, are sufficient to reveal and assess three distinct types of solid-state light sources. These are (i) high-fidelity lamps, which cover the entire spectrum with the spectral components present in the wavelength ranges of both 530-610 nm and beyond 610 nm (e.g. trichromatic warm white phosphor-converted (pc) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), red-amber-green-blue LED clusters, complementary clusters of white and coloured LEDs); (ii) colour-saturating lamps, which lack power in the 530-610 nm wavelength range (e.g. red-green-blue or red-cyan-blue LED clusters) and (iii) colour-dulling lamps, which lack power for wavelengths longer than 610 nm (dichromatic daylight pc LEDs and amber-green-blue LED clusters). Owing to a single statistical format, CSI and CFI can be used for

  13. Formation of automatic letter-colour associations in non-synaesthetes through likelihood manipulation of letter-colour pairings.

    PubMed

    Kusnir, Flor; Thut, Gregor

    2012-12-01

    Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is a well-characterized phenomenon in which achromatic letters and/or digits automatically and systematically trigger specific colour sensations. Models of its underlying mechanisms diverge on a central question: whether triggered sensations reflect (1) an overdeveloped capacity in normal cross-modal processing (i.e., sharing characteristics with the general population), or rather (2) qualitatively deviant processing (i.e., unique to a few individuals). To test to what extent synaesthesia-like (automatic) letter-colour associations may be learned by non-synaesthetes into adulthood, implied by (1), we developed a learning paradigm that aimed to implicitly train such associations via a visual search task that employed statistical probability learning of specific letter-colour pairs. In contrast to previous synaesthesia-training studies (Cohen Kadosh, Henik, Catena, Walsh, & Fuentes, 2009; Meier & Rothen, 2009), here all participants were naïve as to the end-goal of the experiment (i.e., the formation of letter-colour associations), mimicking the learning conditions of acquired grapheme-colour synaesthesia (Hancock, 2006; Witthoft & Winawer, 2006). In two experiments, we found evidence for significant binding of colours to letters by non-synaesthetes. These newly-formed associations showed synaesthesia-like characteristics, because they correlated in strength with performance on individual synaesthetic Stroop-tasks (experiment 1), and because interference between the learned (associated) colour and the real colour during letter processing depended on their relative positions in colour space (opponent vs. non-opponent colours, experiment 2) suggesting automatic formation on a perceptual rather than conceptual level, analogous to synaesthesia. Although not evoking conscious colour percepts, these learned, synaesthesia-like associations in non-synaesthetes support that common mechanisms may underlie letter-colour associations in synaesthetes

  14. The colour analysis method applied to homogeneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halász, Amadé; Halmai, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    Computer-aided colour analysis can facilitate cyclostratigraphic studies. Here we report on a case study involving the development of a digital colour analysis method for examination of the Boda Claystone Formation which is the most suitable in Hungary for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Rock type colours are reddish brown or brownish red, or any shade between brown and red. The method presented here could be used to differentiate similar colours and to identify gradual transitions between these; the latter are of great importance in a cyclostratigraphic analysis of the succession. Geophysical well-logging has demonstrated the existence of characteristic cyclic units, as detected by colour and natural gamma. Based on our research, colour, natural gamma and lithology correlate well. For core Ib-4, these features reveal the presence of orderly cycles with thicknesses of roughly 0.64 to 13 metres. Once the core has been scanned, this is a time- and cost-effective method.

  15. Coat colour changes associated with cabergoline administration in bitches.

    PubMed

    Gobello, C; Castex, G; Broglia, G; Corrada, Y

    2003-08-01

    Cabergoline or bromocriptine were administered orally to 60 bitches at doses of 5 microg/kg and 15 microg/kg daily, respectively, for two to 45 days for the treatment of pseudopregnancy or for oestrus induction. Seven of the dogs which received cabergoline for more than 14 days developed coat colour changes from the second week of administration to the next coat shedding. Of these, fawn-coloured bitches developed a yellowish coat colour while Argentine boar hounds became black spotted, mainly on their extremities. In previous untreated oestrous periods, these bitches had shown no coat colour changes. It is concluded that a colour shift in certain haircoats of particular breeds could be mediated through the inhibition of the secretion of melanocyte-stimulating hormone by the administration of the dopaminergic agonist cabergoline for more than two weeks. Transient coat colour changes should be considered a possible side effect when planning long-term treatment with dopaminergic agonists in dogs.

  16. Conspicuous, ultraviolet-rich mouth colours in begging chicks.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sarah; Kilner, Rebecca M; Langmore, Naomi E; Bennett, Andrew T D

    2003-01-01

    There is as yet no clear consensus on the function of vivid mouth colours in begging chicks. A major obstacle to our understanding has been that no studies have measured gape colours independently of human colour perception. Here, we present the first study, to our knowledge, to use UV-VIS spectrometry to quantify the gape colour, background nest colour and nest light environment of eight European passerines. Both mouths and the surrounding flanges show striking and previously unreported peaks of reflectance in the ultraviolet, coupled with high long-wavelength reflectance responsible for the human-visible appearance of the gape. High ultraviolet reflectance is likely to have an important effect on the conspicuousness of nestling mouths, since contrast with the nest background is maximal in the ultraviolet. Furthermore, the dual-peak nature of the spectra suggests that gapes are avian non-spectral colours analogous to human purple. PMID:12952627

  17. Temperature dependent electron delocalization in CdSe/CdS type-I core-shell systems: An insight from scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Biswajit; Chakrabarti, Sudipto; Pal, Amlan J.

    2016-03-01

    Core-shell nanocrystals having a type-I band-alignment confine charge carriers to the core. In this work, we choose CdSe/CdS core-shell nano-heterostructures that evidence confinement of holes only. Such a selective confinement occurs in the core-shell nanocrystals due to a low energy-offset of conduction band (CB) edges resulting in delocalization of electrons and thus a decrease in the conduction band-edge. Since the delocalization occurs through a thermal assistance, we study temperature dependence of selective delocalization process through scanning tunneling spectroscopy. From the density of states (DOS), we observe that the electrons are confined to the core at low temperatures. Above a certain temperature, they become delocalized up to the shell leading to a decrease in the CB of the core-shell system due to widening of quantum confinement effect. With holes remaining confined to the core due to a large offset in the valence band (VB), we record the topography of the core-shell nanocrystals by probing their CB and VB edges separately. The topographies recorded at different temperatures representing wave-functions of electrons and holes corresponded to the results obtained from the DOS spectra. The results evidence temperature-dependent wave-function delocalization of one-type of carriers up to the shell layer in core-shell nano-heterostructures.

  18. High Pressure Study of Delocalized Polarons in 2-D Lamellar Structure of Regio-Regular Poly(3-alkylthiophene) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, C. P.; Jiang, X. M.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2001-03-01

    The long-lived photoexcitations in poly(3-alkylthiophene) [P3AT] having a high head-to-tail ratio, the so called regio-regular (RR) P3AT, have been extensively studied by the photoinduced absorption (PA) spectroscopy using a FTIR spectrometer. In particular, delocalized polarons with DP1 (low energy) and DP2 (high energy) PA bands were observed in the self-assembled two-dimensional lamellar structure of RR P3AT films.(R. Osterbacka et al, Science, 287), p839 (2000) DP1 with a peak at ~0.1 eV is expected to red-shift as the interlayer distance decreases. This was indirectly confirmed before in the experiments by observing a red-shift in DP1 band as the aklyl sidegroup of the P3AT polymer decreases from dodecyl to hexyl.^2 In the present work we have succeeded, for the first time, to measure infrared PA spectra down to 400 cm-1 under high hydrostatic pressure up to 50 kbar with a diamond anvil cell. This technique was applied to RR P3AT in order to test the effect of the change in the interlayer distance for the same alkyl sidegroup, which is induced by the high pressure. We found that the first moment of the DP1 band red-shifts as the pressure increases. This result is in agreement with the delocalized polaron model in the lamellar structure.

  19. New localized/delocalized emitting state of Eu2+ in orange-emitting hexagonal EuAl2O4

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Feng; Meltzer, Richard S.; Li, Xufan; Budai, John D.; Chen, Yu -Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2014-11-18

    Eu2+-activated phosphors are being widely used in illuminations and displays. Some of these phosphors feature an extremely broad and red-shifted Eu2+ emission band; however, convincing explanation of this phenomenon is lacking. Here we report a new localized/delocalized emitting state of Eu2+ ions in a new hexagonal EuAl2O4 phosphor whose Eu2+ luminescence exhibits a very large bandwidth and an extremely large Stokes shift. At 77 K, two luminescent sites responsible for 550 nm and 645 nm broadband emissions are recognized, while at room temperature only the 645 nm emission band emits. The 645 nm emission exhibits a typical radiative lifetime ofmore » 1.27 μs and an unusually large Stokes shift of 0.92 eV. We identify the 645 nm emission as originating from a new type of emitting state whose composition is predominantly that of localized 4f65d character but which also contains a complementary component with delocalized conduction-band-like character. This investigation gives new insights into a unique type of Eu2+ luminescence in solids whose emission exhibits both a very large bandwidth and an extremely large Stokes shift.« less

  20. High-spin ground states via electron delocalization in mixed-valence imidazolate-bridged divanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    Bechlars, Bettina; D'Alessandro, Deanna M; Jenkins, David M; Iavarone, Anthony T; Glover, Starla D; Kubiak, Clifford P; Long, Jeffrey R

    2010-05-01

    The field of molecular magnetism has grown tremendously since the discovery of single-molecule magnets, but it remains centred around the superexchange mechanism. The possibility of instead using a double-exchange mechanism (based on electron delocalization rather than Heisenberg exchange through a non-magnetic bridge) presents a tantalizing prospect for synthesizing molecules with high-spin ground states that are well isolated in energy. We now demonstrate that magnetic double exchange can be sustained by simple imidazolate bridging ligands, known to be well suited for the construction of coordination clusters and solids. A series of mixed-valence molecules of the type [(PY5Me(2))V(II)(micro-L(br)) V(III)(PY5Me(2))](4+) were synthesized and their electron delocalization probed through cyclic voltammetry and spectroelectrochemistry. Magnetic susceptibility data reveal a well-isolated S = 5/2 ground state arising from double exchange for [(PY5Me(2))(2)V(2)(micro-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolate)](4+). Combined modelling of the magnetic data and spectral analysis leads to an estimate of the double-exchange parameter of B = 220 cm(-1) when vibronic coupling is taken into account.