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Sample records for quark rest energy

  1. Photon plus heavy-quark production in high-energy collisions within the target rest frame formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2010-11-01

    We apply the target rest frame formalism to photon+heavy quark production cross section in hadronic collisions at high energies. We investigate the dependence of the production cross section on the photon and quark rapidities and transverse momenta. It is shown that the photon transverse momentum spectrum is a sensitive probe of color dipole scattering amplitude. The theoretical results are compared to Tevatron measurements of the differential {gamma}+c+X and {gamma}+b+X production cross sections at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. An analysis for proton-proton and proton-lead collisions at the LHC regime is also performed.

  2. Resting energy expenditure among Japanese.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, N; Mitsuhashi, F; Sugiyama, M

    2002-10-01

    1. Resting energy expenditure (REE) provides appropriate basic data for the calculation of energy requirements. 2. The REE of 6498 subjects according to sex and age (1 year stratification), with a minimum of 10 subjects per group, was measured systematically using the easy portable calorimeter (Metavine; Vine, Tokyo, Japan). 3. The REE or the REE/kg according to age and sex was observed to obtain the amount of standard deviation (20-25%). 4. The REE/kg for male and female subjects was maintained at a steady level after the age of 15 years and was estimated to be around 29 kcal/kg.

  3. Energy loss of fast quarks in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M B; Kopeliovich, B Z; Potashnikova, I K; McGaughey, P L; Moss, J M; Peng, J C; Garvey, G T; Leitch, M J; Adams, M R; Alde, D M; Baer, H W; Barlett, M L; Brown, C N; Cooper, W E; Carey, T A; Danner, G; Hoffmann, G W; Hsiung, Y B; Kaplan, D M; Klein, A; Lee, C; Lillberg, J W; McCarthy, R L; Mishra, C S; Wang, M J

    2001-05-14

    We report an analysis of the nuclear dependence of the yield of Drell-Yan dimuons from the 800 GeV/c proton bombardment of 2H, C, Ca, Fe, and W targets. Employing a new formulation of the Drell-Yan process in the rest frame of the nucleus, this analysis examines the effect of initial-state energy loss and shadowing on the nuclear-dependence ratios versus the incident proton's momentum fraction and dimuon effective mass. The resulting energy loss per unit path length is -dE/dz = 2.32+/-0.52+/-0.5 GeV/fm. This is the first observation of a nonzero energy loss of partons traveling in a nuclear environment.

  4. Squeezed states, time-energy uncertainty relation, and Feynman's rest of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1992-01-01

    Two illustrative examples are given for Feynman's rest of the universe. The first example is the two-mode squeezed state of light where no measurement is taken for one of the modes. The second example is the relativistic quark model where no measurement is possible for the time-like separation fo quarks confined in a hadron. It is possible to illustrate these examples using the covariant oscillator formalism. It is shown that the lack of symmetry between the position-momentum and time-energy uncertainty relations leads to an increase in entropy when the system is different Lorentz frames.

  5. Vacuum polarization corrections to low energy quark effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Ademar; Braghin, Fabio L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work corrections to low energy punctual effective quark couplings up to the eighth order are calculated by considering vacuum polarization effects with the scalar quark-antiquark condensate. The departing point is a QCD-based Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. By separating the quark field into two components, one that condenses and another one for interacting quarks, the former is integrated out with the help of usual auxiliary fields and an effective action in terms of interacting quark fields is found. The scalar auxiliary field reduces to the quark-antiquark condensate in the vacuum and the determinant is expanded in powers of the quark-antiquark bilinears generating chiral invariant effective 2N-quark interactions (N =2,3…). The corresponding coupling constants and effective masses are estimated, and the general trend is that for increasing the effective gluon mass the values of the effective coupling constants decrease. All the values are in good agreement with phenomenological fits.

  6. Dark matter and dark energy from quark bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: maxim.eingorn@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the present expansion of our Universe endowed with relict colored objects — quarks and gluons — that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon ''nuggets'' or spread uniformly in the Universe. In the first scenario, the QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, we demonstrate that uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  7. Effects of heavy sea quarks at low energies.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mattia; Finkenrath, Jacob; Knechtli, Francesco; Leder, Björn; Sommer, Rainer

    2015-03-13

    We present a factorization formula for the dependence of light hadron masses and low energy hadronic scales on the mass M of a heavy quark: apart from an overall mass-independent factor Q, ratios such as r_{0}(M)/r_{0}(0) are computable in perturbation theory at large M. The perturbation theory part is stable concerning different loop orders. Our nonperturbative Monte Carlo results obtained in a model calculation, where a doublet of heavy quarks is decoupled, match quantitatively to the perturbative prediction. Upon taking ratios of different hadronic scales at the same mass, the perturbative function drops out and the ratios are given by the decoupled theory up to M^{-2} corrections. We verify-in the continuum limit-that the sea quark effects of quarks with masses around the charm mass are very small in such ratios.

  8. Interactions of quarks and gluons with nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.H.

    1994-04-01

    Some processes involving the interaction of medium energy quarks and gluons with nuclear matter are described. Possible mechanisms for the A-dependence of the energy loss of leading protons produced in proton-nucleus collisions are given, and an experiment which may help to distinguish these mechanisms is described. A possible color transparency experiment at CEBAF is described. Experiments to measure energy loss of quarks in nuclear matter and the formation time of hadrons are discussed along with the possibilities of measuring {sigma}{sub J}/{psi} and {sigma}{sub {psi}{prime}} at CEBAF.

  9. High energy cosmic ray signature of quark nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audouze, J.; Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that dark matter in the Universe might consist of nuggets of quarks which populate the nuclear desert between nucleons and neutron star matter. It is further suggested that the Centauro events which could be the signature of particles with atomic mass A approx. 100 and energy E approx. 10 to 15th power eV might also be related to debris produced in the encounter of two neutron stars. A further consequence of the former proposal is examined, and it is shown that the production of relativistic quark nuggets is accompanied by a substantial flux of potentially observable high energy neutrinos.

  10. Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, M.

    In these lectures I want to speak about at least two interpretations of the concept of quarks for hadrons and the possible relations between them. First I want to talk about quarks as "constituent quarks". These were used especially by G. Zweig (1964) who referred to them as aces. One has a sort of a simple model by which one gets elementary results about the low-lying bound and resonant states of mesons and baryons, and certain crude symmetry properties of these states, by saying that the hadrons act as if they were made up of subunits, the constituent quarks q. These quarks are arranged in an isotopic spin doublet u, d and an isotopic spin singlet s, which has the same charge as d and acts as if it had a slightly higher mass…

  11. Quark-Novae Ia in the Hubble diagram: implications for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Koning, Nico; Leahy, Denis; Staff, Jan E.; Cassidy, Daniel T.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated expansion of the Universe was proposed through the use of Type-Ia supernovae (SNe) as standard candles. The standardization depends on an empirical correlation between the stretch/color and peak luminosity of the light curves. The use of Type-Ia SNe as standard candles rests on the assumption that their properties (and this correlation) do not vary with redshift. We consider the possibility that the majority of Type-Ia SNe are in fact caused by a Quark-Nova detonation in a tight neutron-star-CO-white-dwarf binary system, which forms a Quark-Nova Ia (QN-Ia). The spin-down energy injected by the Quark-Nova remnant (the quark star) contributes to the post-peak light curve and neatly explains the observed correlation between peak luminosity and light curve shape. We demonstrate that the parameters describing QN-Ia are NOT constant in redshift. Simulated QN-Ia light curves provide a test of the stretch/color correlation by comparing the true distance modulus with that determined using SN light curve fitters. We determine a correction between the true and fitted distance moduli, which when applied to Type-Ia SNe in the Hubble diagram recovers the ΩM = 1 cosmology. We conclude that Type-Ia SNe observations do not necessitate the need for an accelerating expansion of the Universe (if the observed SNe Ia are dominated by QNe Ia) and by association the need for dark energy.

  12. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. VII. Energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungtae; Zahed, Ismail

    2010-12-15

    We use linear response analysis and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to derive the energy loss of a heavy quark in the SU(2) classical Coulomb plasma in terms of the l=1 monopole and nonstatic structure factor. The result is valid for all Coulomb couplings {Gamma}=V/K, the ratio of the mean potential to kinetic energy. We use the Liouville equation in the collisionless limit to assess the SU(2) nonstatic structure factor. We find the energy loss to be strongly dependent on {Gamma}. In the liquid phase with {Gamma}{approx_equal}4, the energy loss is mostly metallic and soundless with neither a Cerenkov nor a Mach cone. Our analytical results compare favorably with the SU(2) molecular dynamics simulations at large momentum and for heavy quark masses.

  13. Resting energy expenditure is not influenced by classical music

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Ebba; Helgegren, Hannah; Slinde, Frode

    2005-01-01

    Obesity shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and a decrease in energy expenditure has been suggested to be one of the risk factors for developing obesity. An increase in resting energy expenditure would have a great impact on total energy expenditure. This study shows that classical music do not influence resting energy expenditure compared to complete silence. Further studies should be performed including other genres of music and other types of stress-inductors than music. PMID:16135245

  14. Drag of heavy quarks in quark gluon plasma at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Payal

    2010-07-15

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of charm and bottom quarks propagating through quark gluon plasma (QGP) have been evaluated for conditions relevant to nuclear collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The dead cone and Landau-Pomeronchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects on radiative energy loss of heavy quarks have been considered. Both radiative and collisional processes of energy loss are included in the effective drag and diffusion coefficients. With these effective transport coefficients, we solve the Fokker-Plank (FP) equation for the heavy quarks executing Brownian motion in the QGP. The solution of the FP equation has been used to evaluate the nuclear suppression factor, R{sub AA}, for the nonphotonic single-electron spectra resulting from the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks. The effects of mass on R{sub AA} have also been highlighted.

  15. Rest

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rest is a health-related phenomenon. Researchers have explored the phenomenon of rest, but further concept development is recommended. The aim of my study was to develop and describe a concept of rest, from interviews with a total of 63 participants about their lived experiences of rest. I performed the developing process in two stages: first with descriptive phenomenology and second with a hermeneutic approach. The concept of rest is comprised of the essences of both rest and “non-rest,” and there is a current movement between these two conditions in peoples’ lives. The essence of rest is being in harmony in motivation, feeling, and action. The essence of non-rest is being in disharmony in motivation, feeling, and action. The essences reveal some meaning constituents. Health care professionals and researchers can use the concept as a frame of reference in health care praxis and in applied research. PMID:28462307

  16. Heavy quark photoproduction in coherent interactions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.; Meneses, A. R.

    2009-08-01

    We calculate the inclusive and diffractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at Tevatron and CERN LHC energies, where the photon reaches energies larger than those ones accessible at DESY-HERA. The integrated cross section and the rapidity distributions for charm and bottom production are computed within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyses of these reactions are feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  17. RESTING ENERGY EXPENDITURE IN SUBJECTS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Montgomery, Polly S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Subjects with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication have ischemia of the lower extremities, but little is known how this influences resting energy expenditure. Objective To compare the resting energy expenditure of subjects with and without intermittent claudication. Design One hundred six subjects limited by intermittent claudication and 77 controls who did not have PAD and intermittent claudication participated in this study. Subjects were assessed on resting energy expenditure, body composition, ankle/brachial index (ABI), and calf blood flow. Results Subjects with intermittent claudication had a lower resting energy expenditure (1585 ± 251 kcal/day vs. 1716 ± 277 kcal/day; p = 0.019), higher body fat percentage (33.4 ± 10.7% vs. 29.6 ± 7.7%; p = 0.016), higher fat mass (29.6 ± 10.6 kg vs. 24.2 ± 8.9 kg; p = 0.011, and lower ABI (0.66 ± 0.20 vs. 1.19 ± 0.12; p < 0.001). Resting energy expenditure was predicted by fat free mass (p < 0.001), ABI (p = 0.027), and calf blood flow (p = 0.040). Resting energy expenditure remained lower in the subjects with intermittent claudication after adjusting for clinical characteristics plus fat free mass (1611 ± 171 kcal/day vs. 1685 ± 209 kcal/day; p = 0.035), but was no longer different between groups after further adjustment for ABI and calf blood flow (1622 ± 165 kcal/day vs. 1633 ± 185 kcal/day; p = 0.500). Conclusion Subjects with intermittent claudication have lower resting energy expenditure than controls, which is partially explained by ABI and calf blood flow. PMID:19394975

  18. Measuring top-quark polarization in top-pair + missing-energy events.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-10-12

    The polarization of a top quark can be sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. Since the charged lepton from top-quark decay is maximally correlated with the top-quark spin, it is common to measure the polarization from the distribution in the angle between the charged lepton and the top-quark directions. We propose a novel method based on the charged lepton energy fraction and illustrate the method with a detailed simulation of top-quark pairs produced in supersymmetric top squark pair production. We show that the lepton energy ratio distribution that we define is very sensitive to the top-quark polarization but insensitive to the precise measurement of the top-quark energy.

  19. Heavy quark energy loss in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sascha; Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Werner, Klaus; Aichelin, Jörg

    2011-07-15

    One of the most promising probes to study deconfined matter created in high energy nuclear collisions is the energy loss of (heavy) quarks. It has been shown in experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that even charm and bottom quarks, despite their high mass, experience a remarkable medium suppression in the quark gluon plasma. In this exploratory investigation we study the energy loss of heavy quarks in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at LHC energies. Although the colliding systems are smaller than compared to those at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (p+p vs Au+Au), the higher energy might lead to multiplicities comparable to Cu+Cu collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The interaction of charm quarks with this environment gives rise to a non-negligible suppression of high momentum heavy quarks in elementary collisions.

  20. Association between uncoupling protein 2, adiponectin and resting energy expenditure in obese women with normal and low resting energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Taghadomi Masoumi, Zahra; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Hedayati, Mahdi; Pishva, Hamideh

    2017-10-10

    Obesity is recognized as the most prevalent metabolic disease worldwide. Decreases in energy expenditure may increase risk of obesity. One of the key regulators of energy balance is uncoupling protein2 (UCP2), a transporter protein presents in mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, adiponectin is the most abundant adipocytokine, it may play a role in energy metabolism and gene expression of UCP2. The aim of this study was to investigate potential associations between the level of uncoupling protein 2 and adiponectin and their relationship with REE (Resting Energy Expenditure) in obese women with normal and low resting energy expenditure. A total of 49 subjects (women, 25-50 years old), were included in current study, 16 subjects with BMI > 30 and low resting energy expenditure, 17 subjects with BMI > 30 and normal resting energy expenditure and 16 non-obese subjects as a control group. Anthropometric, body composition parameters and resting energy expenditure were measured. Plasma adiponectin, UCP2 protein and total protein in PBMC were determined. Measured resting energy expenditure in obese subjects with low REE was significantly lower than other groups. Plasma adiponectin in the obese subjects with low REE was significantly lower compared to normal weight group. There was a significant relationship between 'UCP2 protein/Total protein' ratio and plasma adiponectin in obese group with low REE and in three groups when we pooled. There was a significant association between REE and plasma adiponectin in three groups when we pooled. There was a significant association between plasma adiponectin and REE. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between UCP2 and REE.

  1. Energy loss for heavy quarks in relation to light partons: is radiative energy loss for heavy quarks anomalous?

    PubMed

    Lacey, Roy A; Wei, R; Ajitanand, N N; Alexander, J M; Gong, X; Jia, J; Mawi, A; Mohapatra, S; Reynolds, D; Salnikov, S; Taranenko, A

    2009-10-02

    The scaling properties of jet-suppression measurements are compared for nonphotonic electrons (e+/-) and neutral pions (pi(0)) in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV. For a broad range of transverse momenta and collision centralities, the comparison is consistent with jet quenching dominated by radiative energy loss for both heavy and light partons. Less quenching is indicated for heavy quarks via e+/-; this gives an independent estimate of the transport coefficient q that agrees with its magnitude obtained from quenching of light partons via pi(0)'s.

  2. Resting Energy Expenditure of Rats Acclimated to Hyper-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moran, Megan M.; Oyama, Jiro; Schwenke, David; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To determine the influence of body mass and age on resting energy expenditure (EE) following acclimation to hyper-gravity, oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were measured to calculate resting energy expenditure (EE), in male rats, ages 40 to 400 days, acclimated to 1.23 or 4.1 G for a minimum of two weeks. Animals were maintained on a centrifuge to produce the hyper-gravity environment. Measurements were made over three hours in hyper-gravity during the period when the lights were on, the inactive period of rats. In rats matched for body mass (approximately 400 g) hyper-gravity increased VO2 by 18% and VCO2 by 27% compared to controls, resulting in an increase in RER, 0.80 to 0.87. There were increases in resting EE with an increase in gravity. This increase was greater when the mass of the rat was larger. Rating EE for 400g animals were increased from 47 +/- 1 kcal/kg/day at 1 G, to 57 +/- 1.5 and 5.8 +/- 2.2 kcal/kg/day at 2,3 and 4.1 G, respectively. There was no difference between the two hyper-gravity environments. When differences in age of the animals were accounted for, the increase in resting EE adjusted for body mass was increased by over 36% in older animals due to exposure to hyper-gravity. Acclimation to hyper-gravity increases the resting EE of rats, dependent upon body mass and age, and appears to alter substrate metabolism. Increasing the level of hyper-gravity, from 2.3 to 4.1 G, produced no further changes raising questions as to a dose effect of gravity level on resting metabolism.

  3. Resting energy expenditure, substrate use, and video tapes.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, B. G.; Matthews, J. N.; Alberti, K. G.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the effect of watching different types of video on energy expenditure. DESIGN--Randomised study assessing a "pleasant," an "amusing," an "exciting," and no video film clips. SUBJECTS--12 volunteers who did not know the purpose of the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in energy expenditure, substrate use, heart rate, and aural temperature during each film clip. RESULTS--Energy expenditure was raised slightly (0.21 kJ/day) during the "exciting" film. Individual responses varied greatly. CONCLUSION--Watching different types of video seems to have little effect on resting metabolic rate. Images p1664-a PMID:8541750

  4. Quantitative study of the violation of kperpendicular factorization in hadroproduction of quarks at collider energies.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Gelis, François; Venugopalan, Raju

    2005-10-14

    We demonstrate the violation of kperpendicular factorization for quark production in high energy hadronic collisions. This violation is quantified in the color glass condensate framework and studied as a function of the quark mass, the quark transverse momentum, and the saturation scale Q(s), which is a measure of large parton densities. At x values where parton densities are large but leading twist shadowing effects are still small, violations of kperpendicularkfactorization can be significant--especially for lighter quarks. At very small x, where leading twist shadowing is large, we show that violations of kperpendicular factorization are relatively weaker.

  5. Energy density of light quark jet using AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morad, R.; Horowitz, W. A.

    2017-01-01

    We study the energy loss rate of light quarks via the AdS/CFT correspondence in both a static and an expanding plasma. Unlike heavy quarks, light quark energy loss in AdS/CFT is surprisingly dependent on both the string initial conditions and the very definition of the jet itself in the gravity theory. We aim to more closely match the string initial conditions to those expected from perturbative quantum chromodyanics (pQCD)-the theory known to describe the physics of high-momentum particles at early times in heavy ion collisions-by computing the energy-momentum tensor associated with the propagation of the classical string solution. The jet energy-momentum tensor in a strongly-coupled calculation can be found by a superposition of contributions from a collection of point particles whose paths approximate the evolution of the string world-sheet. My results show that some times after creation the pair of quark-anti quark, the energy density is not time dependent. This means that the corresponding jet does not lose energy and the associated nuclear modification factor would be one as expected. Also, the results reveal the virtuality dependency of energy density distribution over space. As expected, the energy of a more virtual jet is spread over wider angles.

  6. Application of Fixed Scale Approach to Static Quark Free Energies in Quenched and 2+1 Flavor Lattice QCD with Improved Wilson Quark Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Y.; Umeda, T.; Aoki, S.; Ejiri, S.; Hatsuda, T.; Kanaya, K.; Ohno, H.; WHOT-QCD Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The free energies of static quarks and the Debye screening masses in the quark gluon plasma are studied using Polyakov-line correlation functions in lattice QCD adopting the fixed-scale approach in which temperature is varied without changing the spatial volume and the renormalization factors. We calculate static-quark free energies in various color channels in the high temperature phase up to about 3.5 times the (pseudo-)critical temperature, performing lattice simulations both in quenched and 2 + 1 flavor QCD. For the quenched simulations, we adopt the plaquette gauge action on anisotropic 20^3 × N_t lattices with N_t = 8-26 at the renormalized anisotropy a_s / a_t ≃ 4. For 2 + 1 flavor QCD, we adopt the renormalization-group improved Iwasaki gluon action and the non-perturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson quark action on isotropic 32^3 × N_t lattices with N_t = 4-12 at m_{PS}/m_{V} = 0.63 (0.74) for the light (strange) flavors. We find that the color-singlet free energies at high temperatures converge to the zero-temperature static-quark potential evaluated from the Wilson-loop at short distances. This is in accordance with the theoretical expectation that the short distance physics is insensitive to the temperature. At long distances, the free energies approach twice the single-quark free energies, implying that the interaction between static quarks is fully screened. We find that the static-quark free energies for various color channels turn out to be well described by the screened Coulomb form, and the color-channel dependence of the inter-quark interaction can be described by the kinetic Casimir factor inspired from the lowest order perturbation theory. We also discuss comparison with a prediction of the thermal perturbation theory and flavor dependence of the screening masses.

  7. Resting Energy Expenditure Is Decreased in Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Danzig, Jennifer; Groleau, Veronique; McCormack, Shana; Casella, Alex; Harrington, Jennifer; Sochett, Etienne; Tershakovec, Andrew; Zemel, Babette S.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Levine, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1A (PHP1A) is caused by loss-of-function mutations on the maternally inherited GNAS allele and is associated with early-onset obesity, neurocognitive defects, and resistance to multiple hormones. The role of energy intake vs central regulation of energy expenditure in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate resting energy expenditure (REE) in participants with PHP1A. Design: We assessed REE, biochemical, endocrine, and auxological status of 12 participants with PHP1A who had normal or elevated body mass index; controls were a cohort of 156 obese participants. Setting: This study took place at Children's Hospital in Philadelphia and Sick Children's Hospital in Toronto. Main Outcome Measures: REE as a percent of predicted REE was the outcome measure. Results: PHP1A participants had normal endocrine status while receiving appropriate hormone replacement therapy, but had significantly decreased REE as a percent of predicted REE (using the modified Schofield equation). Conclusion: Our results are consistent with REE being the principal cause of obesity in PHP1A rather than it being caused by excessive energy intake or endocrine dysfunction. PMID:26709970

  8. Energy and thermal regulation during bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents data available from bed-rest and flight studies on the energy metabolism and thermoregulatory parameters and their changes during long-duration space missions which may influence requirements of astronauts for food and water. It is calculated, on the basis of 3100 kcal and 2.2 l water a day, with 1 h/day moderate exercise, that the requirements for a 2-yr flight would be 2,263,000 kcal and 1606 l water for each astronaut. One daily 5-h-long extravehicular sortie would require an additional 529,250 kcal and 1,095 l of water per year. Changes in the efficiency of work or metabolism would affect these nutritional requirements for long spaceflights. Factors that would increase food and water requirements are discussed.

  9. Resting energy expenditure of rats acclimated to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moran, Megan M.; Oyama, Jiro

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of centrifugation at 1 G has been advocated as a control condition during spaceflight and as a countermeasure to compensate for the adverse effects of spaceflight. Rodents are the primary animal model for the study of the effects of spaceflight and will be used in the evaluation of centrifugation as a countermeasure and means of control at 1 G during flight. HYPOTHESIS: The present study was designed to assess whether resting energy expenditure (EER) of male rats was increased in relation to the magnitude of the level of gravity to which the animals were exposed. The influence of body mass and age on resting energy expenditure (EER) of male rats (n = 42, age 40-400 d) was determined following 2 wk of acclimation to 1, 2.3, or 4.1 G. Hypergravity environments were created by centrifugation. Measurements were made at the gravity level to which the animal was acclimated and during the lights-on period. RESULTS: In rats matched for body mass (approximately 400 g), mean O2 consumption and CO2 production were higher (18% and 27%, respectively) in the 2.3- and 4.1 -G groups than controls. Mean respiratory exchange ratio (RER) increased from 0.80 to 0.87. EER was increased from 47 +/- 0.1 kcal x d(-1) at 1 G, to 57 +/- 1.5 and 58 +/- 2.2 kcal x d(-1) at 2.3 and 4.1 G, respectively. There was no difference in EER between the hypergravity groups. When age differences were considered, EER (kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1)) with increased gravity was 40% higher than at 1 G. The increase in EER was not proportional over gravity levels. CONCLUSION: Acclimation of rats to hypergravity increases their EER, dependent on body mass and age, and may alter substrate metabolism. The increase in EER was not related to the level of gravity increase.

  10. Resting energy expenditure of rats acclimated to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moran, Megan M.; Oyama, Jiro

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of centrifugation at 1 G has been advocated as a control condition during spaceflight and as a countermeasure to compensate for the adverse effects of spaceflight. Rodents are the primary animal model for the study of the effects of spaceflight and will be used in the evaluation of centrifugation as a countermeasure and means of control at 1 G during flight. HYPOTHESIS: The present study was designed to assess whether resting energy expenditure (EER) of male rats was increased in relation to the magnitude of the level of gravity to which the animals were exposed. The influence of body mass and age on resting energy expenditure (EER) of male rats (n = 42, age 40-400 d) was determined following 2 wk of acclimation to 1, 2.3, or 4.1 G. Hypergravity environments were created by centrifugation. Measurements were made at the gravity level to which the animal was acclimated and during the lights-on period. RESULTS: In rats matched for body mass (approximately 400 g), mean O2 consumption and CO2 production were higher (18% and 27%, respectively) in the 2.3- and 4.1 -G groups than controls. Mean respiratory exchange ratio (RER) increased from 0.80 to 0.87. EER was increased from 47 +/- 0.1 kcal x d(-1) at 1 G, to 57 +/- 1.5 and 58 +/- 2.2 kcal x d(-1) at 2.3 and 4.1 G, respectively. There was no difference in EER between the hypergravity groups. When age differences were considered, EER (kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1)) with increased gravity was 40% higher than at 1 G. The increase in EER was not proportional over gravity levels. CONCLUSION: Acclimation of rats to hypergravity increases their EER, dependent on body mass and age, and may alter substrate metabolism. The increase in EER was not related to the level of gravity increase.

  11. Top-Quark Mass Measurement Using Events with Missing Transverse Energy and Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Brucken, E.; Devoto, F.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Casal, B.; Cuevas, J.; Gomez, G.; Palencia, E.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Amerio, S.; Dorigo, T.; Totaro, P.; Amidei, D.

    2011-12-02

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass using a sample of tt events in 5.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet tagged as coming from a b quark, and reject events with identified charged leptons. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons. The measurement is based on a multidimensional template method. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of M{sub top}=172.32{+-}2.4(stat){+-}1.0(syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    DOE PAGES

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    RHIC introduced the method of hard scattering of partons as an in-situ probe of the the medium produced in A+A collisions. A suppression, RAA ≈ 0.2 relative to binary-scaling, was discovered for π⁰ production in the range 5 < ρT < 20 GeV/c in central Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, and surprisingly also for single-electrons from the decay of heavy quarks. Both these results have been confirmed in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. Interestingly, in this ρT range the LHC results for pions nearly overlap the RHIC results. Thus, due to the flattermore » spectrum, the energy loss in the medium at LHC in this ρT range must be ~ 40% larger than at RHIC. Unique at the LHC are the beautiful measurements of the fractional transverse momentum imbalance 1 – (ρ-carotT2/ρ-carotT1) of di-jets in Pb+Pb collisions. At the Utrecht meeting in 2011, I corrected for the fractional imbalance of di-jets with the same cuts in p-p collisions and showed that the relative fractional jet imbalance in Pb+Pb/p-p is ≈ 15% for jets with 120 < ρ-carotT1 < 360 GeV/c. CMS later confirmed this much smaller imbalance compared to the same quantity derived from two-particle correlations of di-jet fragments at RHIC corresponding to ρ-carotT jet ≈ 10 – 20 GeV/c, which appear to show a much larger fractional jet imbalance ≈ 45% in this lower ρ-carotT range. The variation of apparent energy loss in the medium as a function of both ρT and √sNN is striking and presents a challenge to both theory and experiment for improved understanding. There are many other such unresolved issues, for instance, the absence of evidence for a q-carot effect, due to momentum transferred to the medium by outgoing partons, which would widen the away-side di-jet and di-hadron correlations in a similar fashion as the kT-effect. Another issue well known from experiments at the CERN ISR, SpS and SpS collider is that parton-parton hard-collisions make negligible contribution to

  13. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    RHIC introduced the method of hard scattering of partons as an in-situ probe of the the medium produced in A+A collisions. A suppression, RAA ≈ 0.2 relative to binary-scaling, was discovered for π⁰ production in the range 5 < ρT < 20 GeV/c in central Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, and surprisingly also for single-electrons from the decay of heavy quarks. Both these results have been confirmed in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. Interestingly, in this ρT range the LHC results for pions nearly overlap the RHIC results. Thus, due to the flatter spectrum, the energy loss in the medium at LHC in this ρT range must be ~ 40% larger than at RHIC. Unique at the LHC are the beautiful measurements of the fractional transverse momentum imbalance 1 – (ρ-carotT2/ρ-carotT1) of di-jets in Pb+Pb collisions. At the Utrecht meeting in 2011, I corrected for the fractional imbalance of di-jets with the same cuts in p-p collisions and showed that the relative fractional jet imbalance in Pb+Pb/p-p is ≈ 15% for jets with 120 < ρ-carotT1 < 360 GeV/c. CMS later confirmed this much smaller imbalance compared to the same quantity derived from two-particle correlations of di-jet fragments at RHIC corresponding to ρ-carotT jet ≈ 10 – 20 GeV/c, which appear to show a much larger fractional jet imbalance ≈ 45% in this lower ρ-carotT range. The variation of apparent energy loss in the medium as a function of both ρT and √sNN is striking and presents a challenge to both theory and experiment for improved understanding. There are many other such unresolved issues, for instance, the absence of evidence for a q-carot effect, due to momentum transferred to the medium by outgoing partons, which would widen the away-side di-jet and di-hadron correlations in a similar fashion as the

  14. Measurement of the top-quark mass from the b jet energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Daniel; Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A first measurement of the top-quark mass using only two body decay kinematics is presented. Based on a recent theoretical proposal, the mass extraction is carried out using the peak position of the energy distribution of b jets produced from top-quark decays. This analysis is performed selecting top-antitop events with electron-muon final states in proton-proton collision data at √{ s} = 8TeV with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . The energy peak position is obtained by fitting the observed energy spectrum. Consequently, this observable is calibrated using simulated events, and translated to a top-quark mass estimation using relativistic kinematics. The measurement yields a value of mt = 172 . 29 +/- 1 . 17 (stat .) +/- 2 . 66 (syst .) GeV .

  15. Energy loss of heavy quarks and B and D meson spectra in PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Kapil; Shukla, Prashant; Kumar, Vineet; Singh, Venktesh

    2017-05-01

    We study the production and evolution of charm and bottom quarks in hot partonic medium produced in heavy ion collisions. The heavy quarks loose energy in the medium which is reflected in the transverse momentum spectra of heavy mesons. The collisional energy loss of heavy quarks has been calculated using QCD calculations. The radiative energy loss is obtained using two models namely reaction operator formalism and generalized dead cone approach. The nuclear modification factors, RAA as a function of transverse momentum by including shadowing and energy loss are calculated for D0 and B+ mesons in PbPb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV and for D0 mesons at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV and are compared with the recent measurements. The radiative energy loss from generalized dead cone approach alone is sufficient to produce measured D0 meson RAA at both the LHC energies. The radiative energy loss from reaction operator formalism plus collisional energy loss gives good description of D0 meson RAA. For the case of B+ meson, the radiative energy loss from generalized dead cone approach plus collisional energy loss gives good description of the CMS data. The radiative process is dominant for charm quarks while for the bottom, both the radiative process and the elastic collisions are important.

  16. Changes in Resting Energy Expenditure Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yimin; Kintner, Jennifer; Rifkin, Sam K; Keim, Kathryn S; Tangney, Christy C

    2016-08-01

    There is no consensus whether resting energy expenditure (REE) following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is altered. The objectives of this investigation were to describe changes in measured REE (mREE) using indirect calorimetry in 25 OLT patients on days 5, 10, and 15 after baseline (within 72 hours following OLT) and compare mREE changes with those calculated with 2 predicted equations for energy expenditure (pREE): the Harris-Benedict and Schofield equations. Patients were 57 ± 5.4 years of age, 44% were male, 36% were black, and 72% had liver disease of viral etiology. Measured REE (at baseline and days 5, 10, and 15, per kcal/d: 1832 ± 952, 1565 ± 383, 1538 ± 345, 1578 ± 418) and kcal per kilogram of body weight (22.7 ± 12.8, 18.4 ± 4, 18.7 ± 3.8, 21 ± 6.5) did not change over time. In contrast, changes in pREE based on either the Harris-Benedict (P < .001) or Schofield (P = .006) equation using measured weights at each corresponding time point and lowest body weight during the study to estimate dry weight were significant. Wide ranges in both mREE and mREE expressed per kilogram of body weight at each study time point were observed in contrast to pREE, which declined by day 15. The observed differences in mREE over time suggest indirect calorimetry is indicated if available following OLT. Additional research is warranted to determine the most appropriate predictive equation with suitable stress factors to use when indirect calorimetry is not available. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  17. Resting energy expenditure in girls with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Binder, Gerhard; Frank, Laura; Ziegler, Julian; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Schweizer, Roland

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge concerning energy metabolism in Turner syndrome (TS) is lacking. We compared the resting energy expenditure per fat-free mass (REE/FFM) in TS with other girls with short stature treated with growth hormone (GH) and age-related controls. We measured prospectively REE by spirometry under fasting conditions in the morning in 85 short prepubertal girls at the start of GH treatment. Diagnoses were TS (n=20), GH deficiency (GHD) (n=38) and small for gestational age (SGA) short stature (n=27). Additionally, 20 age-related controls were studied. Mean ages were 8.3 (TS), 7.1 (GHD), 6.9 (SGA) and 8.5 years (controls). Mean heights were -2.90 (TS), -3.32 (GHD), -3.69 (SGA) and -0.03 standard deviation scores (SDS) (controls). FFM was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). At the start of GH girls with TS showed insignificantly higher REE per FFM (REE/FFM) (mean±SD; 65±9 kcal/kg×day) than did the other female patients (62±9 kcal/kg×day) (p>0.23). The healthy controls had significantly lower REE/FFM (35±4 kcal/kg×day) (p<0.001). Follow-up examination of the patients after 6 or 12 months revealed decreasing REE/FFM in TS (62±9 kcal/kg×day) resulting in comparable REE/FFM in all three patient groups. At baseline short girls with TS had insignificantly higher REE/FFM than short children with SGA or GHD, but in follow-up this difference was not detectable any more. Future studies are necessary to understand this observation.

  18. Measurement of Quark Energy Loss in Cold Nuclear Matter at Fermilab E906/SeaQuest

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Po-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Parton energy loss is a process within QCD that draws considerable interest. The measurement of parton energy loss can provide valuable information for other hard-scattering processes in nuclei, and also serves as an important tool for exploring the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Quantifying the energy loss in cold nuclear matter will help to set a baseline relative to energy loss in the QGP. With the Drell-Yan process, the energy loss of incoming quarks in cold nuclear matter can be ideally investigated since the final state interaction is expected to be minimal. E906/SeaQuest is a fixed-target experiment using the 120 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Main Injector and has been collecting data from p+p, p+d, p+C, p+Fe, and p+W collisions. Within the E906 kinematic coverage of Drell-Yan production via the dimuon channel, the quark energy loss can be measured in a regime where other nuclear effects are expected to be small. In this thesis, the study of quark ener gy loss from different cold nuclear targets is presented.

  19. Nuclear symmetry energy in a modified quark-meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. N.; Sahoo, H. S.; Panda, P. K.; Barik, N.; Frederico, T.

    2015-10-01

    We study nuclear symmetry energy and the thermodynamic instabilities of asymmetric nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark-meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically averaged potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ ,ω , and ρ mesons through mean-field approximations. We find an analytic expression for the symmetry energy Esym as a function of its slope L . Our result establishes a linear correlation between L and Esym. We also analyze the constraint on neutron star radii in (p n ) matter with β equilibrium.

  20. Convergence of the self-energy in a relativistic chiral quark model: excited nucleon and Δ sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunov, E. M.

    2010-10-01

    A convergence of the valence quark self-energies in the 1S, 2S, 1P1/2, 1P3/2 orbits induced by pion- and gluon-field configurations is shown in the frame of a relativistic chiral quark model. It is shown that in order to reach a convergence, one needs to include the contribution of the intermediate quark and anti-quark states with the total momentum up to j = 25/2. It is argued that a restriction to the lowest mode when estimating the self-energy is not a good approximation.

  1. High Vegetable Fats Intake Is Associated with High Resting Energy Expenditure in Vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Montalcini, Tiziana; De Bonis, Daniele; Ferro, Yvelise; Carè, Ilaria; Mazza, Elisa; Accattato, Francesca; Greco, Marta; Foti, Daniela; Romeo, Stefano; Gulletta, Elio; Pujia, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a vegetarian diet may be effective in reducing body weight, however, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. We investigated whether there is a difference in resting energy expenditure between 26 vegetarians and 26 non-vegetarians and the correlation between some nutritional factors and inflammatory markers with resting energy expenditure. In this cross-sectional study, vegetarians and non-vegetarians were matched by age, body mass index and gender. All underwent instrumental examinations to assess the difference in body composition, nutrient intake and resting energy expenditure. Biochemical analyses and 12 different cytokines and growth factors were measured as an index of inflammatory state. A higher resting energy expenditure was found in vegetarians than in non-vegetarians (p = 0.008). Furthermore, a higher energy from diet, fibre, vegetable fats intake and interleukin-β (IL-1β) was found between the groups. In the univariate and multivariable analysis, resting energy expenditure was associated with vegetarian diet, free-fat mass and vegetable fats (p < 0.001; Slope in statistic (B) = 4.8; β = 0.42). After adjustment for cytokines, log10 interleukin-10 (IL-10) still correlated with resting energy expenditure (p = 0.02). Resting energy expenditure was positively correlated with a specific component of the vegetarian’s diet, i.e., vegetable fats. Furthermore, we showed that IL-10 was positively associated with resting energy expenditure in this population. PMID:26193314

  2. High Vegetable Fats Intake Is Associated with High Resting Energy Expenditure in Vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Montalcini, Tiziana; De Bonis, Daniele; Ferro, Yvelise; Carè, Ilaria; Mazza, Elisa; Accattato, Francesca; Greco, Marta; Foti, Daniela; Romeo, Stefano; Gulletta, Elio; Pujia, Arturo

    2015-07-17

    It has been demonstrated that a vegetarian diet may be effective in reducing body weight, however, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. We investigated whether there is a difference in resting energy expenditure between 26 vegetarians and 26 non-vegetarians and the correlation between some nutritional factors and inflammatory markers with resting energy expenditure. In this cross-sectional study, vegetarians and non-vegetarians were matched by age, body mass index and gender. All underwent instrumental examinations to assess the difference in body composition, nutrient intake and resting energy expenditure. Biochemical analyses and 12 different cytokines and growth factors were measured as an index of inflammatory state. A higher resting energy expenditure was found in vegetarians than in non-vegetarians (p = 0.008). Furthermore, a higher energy from diet, fibre, vegetable fats intake and interleukin-β (IL-1β) was found between the groups. In the univariate and multivariable analysis, resting energy expenditure was associated with vegetarian diet, free-fat mass and vegetable fats (p < 0.001; Slope in statistic (B) = 4.8; β = 0.42). After adjustment for cytokines, log10 interleukin-10 (IL-10) still correlated with resting energy expenditure (p = 0.02). Resting energy expenditure was positively correlated with a specific component of the vegetarian's diet, i.e., vegetable fats. Furthermore, we showed that IL-10 was positively associated with resting energy expenditure in this population.

  3. Low energy supergravity: R-parity breaking and the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela S.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    1987-03-01

    We study the process of spontaneous R-parity breaking in minimal low energy supergravity models. We show that it is very hard to obtain models with heavy top quarks if one wants to preserve the radiative breaking of SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y without breaking R-parity. Fellow of Consejo National de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas.

  4. Quark anomalous chromomagnetic moment bounds -- Projection to higher luminosities and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, K.; Silverman, D.

    1998-12-31

    The statistical limits on detectability of an anomalous chromomagnetic moment of a quark coupling to a gluon are projected to higher luminosities at the Tevatron at Fermilab, and to the LHC. They roughly scale as the energy, and are not strongly improved with increasing luminosity.

  5. Curvature energy effects on strange quark matter nucleation at finite density

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Department of Space Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251 )

    1994-05-15

    We consider the effects of the curvature energy term on thermal strange quark matter nucleation in dense neutron matter. Lower bounds on the temperature at which this process can take place are given and compared to those without the curvature term.

  6. Resting and Energy Reserves of Aedes albopictus Collected in Common Landscaping Vegetation in St. Augustine, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Dayana M.; Qualls, Whitney A.; Roque, Deborah; Naranjo, Diana P.; Alimi, Temitope; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Müller, Günter C.; Beier, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The resting behavior of Aedes albopictus was evaluated by aspirating diurnal resting mosquitoes from common landscape vegetation in residential communities in St. Augustine, FL. Energy reserves of the resting mosquitoes were analyzed to determine if there was a correlation between mosquito resting habitat and energy accumulation. Six species of plants were selected and 9 collections of resting mosquitoes were aspirated from each plant using a modified John W. Hock backpack aspirator during June and July 2012. Eight mosquito species were collected, with Ae. albopictus representing 74% of the overall collection. The number of Ae. albopictus collected varied significantly with the species of vegetation. When comparing the vegetation and abundance of resting mosquitoes, the highest percentages of Ae. albopictus were collected resting on Ruellia brittoniana (Mexican petunia), Asplenium platyneuron (fern), Gibasis geniculate (Tahitian bridal veil), followed by Plumba goauriculata (plumbago), Setcreasea pallida (purple heart), and Hibiscus tiliaceus (hibiscus). There were significant differences in lipid and glycogen accumulation based on type of vegetation Ae. albopictus was found resting in. Resting mosquitoes' sugar reserves were not influenced by species of vegetation. However, there was an overall correlation between vegetation that serves as a resting habitat and energy reserve accumulation. The results of our study demonstrate the potential to target specific vegetation for control of diurnal resting mosquitoes. PMID:24199497

  7. Precise predictions for top-quark-plus-missing-energy signatures at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Boughezal, Radja; Schulze, Markus

    2013-05-10

    We study the pair production of scalar top-quark partners decaying to a top-quark pair plus large missing energy at the LHC, a signature which appears in numerous models that address outstanding problems at the TeV scale. The severe experimental search cuts require a description which combines higher-order corrections to both production and decay dynamics for a realistic final state. We do this at next-to-leading order in QCD. We find large, kinematic-dependent QCD corrections that differ dramatically depending upon the observable under consideration, potentially impacting the search for and interpretation of these states.

  8. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included inmore » the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  9. Symmetry energy effects on the mixed hadron-quark phase at high baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Liu, B.; Greco, V.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Plumari, S.

    2011-01-01

    The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Relativistic mean-field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Due to the different symmetry term in the two phases, isospin effects appear to be rather significant. With increasing isospin asymmetry the binodal transition line of the (T,ρB) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities (e.g., the FAIR/NICA projects). Some observable effects are suggested, in particular an isospin distillation mechanism with a more isospin asymmetric quark phase, to be seen in charged meson yield ratios, and an onset of quark number scaling of the meson-baryon elliptic flows. The presented isospin effects on the mixed phase appear to be robust with respect to even large variations of the poorly known symmetry term at high baryon density in the hadron phase. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of isospin contributions in effective QCD Lagrangian approaches, at the level of explicit isovector parts and/or quark condensates, is discussed.

  10. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  11. Symmetry energy effects on the mixed hadron-quark phase at high baryon density

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, M.; Greco, V.; Plumari, S.; Liu, B.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.

    2011-01-15

    The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Relativistic mean-field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Due to the different symmetry term in the two phases, isospin effects appear to be rather significant. With increasing isospin asymmetry the binodal transition line of the (T,{rho}{sub B}) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities (e.g., the FAIR/NICA projects). Some observable effects are suggested, in particular an isospin distillation mechanism with a more isospin asymmetric quark phase, to be seen in charged meson yield ratios, and an onset of quark number scaling of the meson-baryon elliptic flows. The presented isospin effects on the mixed phase appear to be robust with respect to even large variations of the poorly known symmetry term at high baryon density in the hadron phase. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of isospin contributions in effective QCD Lagrangian approaches, at the level of explicit isovector parts and/or quark condensates, is discussed.

  12. Born term for high-energy meson-hadron collisions from QCD and chiral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Wolfgang; Shimada, Tokuzo

    1988-12-01

    Various experimental observations reveal a sizeable hard component in the high-energy ``soft'' hadronic collisions. For primary meson beams we propose a QCD Born term which describes the dissociation of the primary meson into a quark-antiquark pair in the gluon field of the target. A pointlike effective pion-quark coupling is assumed as in the chiral quark model by Manohar and Georgi. We derive the total cross sections which for pion beams, for example, are given in terms of ƒ;-2π and some properties of the hadronic final states. In particular, we stress the importance of studying three-jet events in meson-nucleon scattering and discuss the seagull effect. On leave of absence from Meiji University, Izumi Campus, Eifuku 1-9-1, Suginami, Tokyo 168, Japan.

  13. Top quark mass determination from the energy peaks of b-jets and B-hadrons at NLO QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Schulze, Markus

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the energy spectra of single b-jets and B-hadrons resulting from the production and decay of top quarks within the SM at the LHC at the NLO QCD. For both hadrons and jets, we calculate the correlation of the peak of the spectrum with the top quark mass, considering the "energy peak" as an observable to determine the top quark mass. Such a method is motivated by our previous work where we argued that this approach can have reduced sensitivity to the details of the production mechanism of the top quark, whether it concerns higher-order QCD effects or new physics contributions. For a 1% jet energy scale uncertainty, the top quark mass can then be extracted using the energy peak of b-jets with an error ± (1.2 ({exp}) + 0.6({th})) { GeV}. In view of the dominant jet energy scale uncertainty in the measurement using b-jets, we also investigate the extraction of the top quark mass from the energy peak of the corresponding B-hadrons which, in principle, can be measured without this uncertainty. The calculation of the B-hadron energy spectrum is carried out using fragmentation functions at NLO. The dependence on the fragmentation scale turns out to be the largest theoretical uncertainty in this extraction of top quark mass.

  14. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-12-02

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass using a sample of t ̄t events in 5.7 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity from p ̄p collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s=1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet tagged as coming from a b quark, and reject events with identified charged leptons. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic t ̄t decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons. The measurement is based on a multidimensional template method. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of M(top)=172.32±2.4(stat)±1.0(syst)  GeV/c(2).

  15. Heavy quark production in photon-Pomeron interactions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, M. M.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2013-03-25

    The diffractive heavy quark cross sections are estimated considering photon-Pomeron interactions in hadron - hadron at RHIC, Tevatron, and CERN LHC energies. We assume the validity of the hard diffractive factorization and calculate the charm and bottom total cross sections and rapidity distributions using the diffractive parton distribution functions of the Pomeron obtained by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. Such processes are sensitive to the gluon content of the Pomeron at high energies and are a good place to constrain the behavior of this distribution. We also compare our predictions with those obtained using the dipole model, and verify that these processes are a good test of the different mechanisms for heavy quarks diffractive production at hadron colliders.

  16. Energy release from hadron-quark phase transition in neutron stars and the axial w mode of gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Weikang; Li Baoan; Xu Jun; Ko Cheming; Wen Dehua

    2011-04-15

    Describing the hyperonic and quark phases of neutron stars with an isospin- and momentum-dependent effective interaction for the baryon octet and the MIT bag model, respectively, and using the Gibbs conditions to construct the mixed phase, we study the energy release from a neutron star owing to the hadron-quark phase transition. Moreover, the frequency and damping time of the first axial w mode of gravitational waves are studied for both hyperonic and hybrid stars. We find that the energy release is much more sensitive to the bag constant than the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Also, the frequency of the w mode is found to be significantly different with or without the hadron-quark phase transition and depends strongly on the value of the bag constant. Effects of the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy become, however, important for large values of the bag constant that lead to higher hadron-quark transition densities.

  17. Top quark mass determination from the energy peaks of b-jets and B-hadrons at NLO QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; ...

    2016-11-21

    Here, we analyze the energy spectra of single b-jets and B-hadrons resulting from the production and decay of top quarks within the SM at the LHC at the NLO QCD. For both hadrons and jets, we calculate the correlation of the peak of the spectrum with the top quark mass, considering the “energy peak” as an observable to determine the top quarkmass. Such a method is motivated by our previous work where we argued that this approach can have reduced sensitivity to the details of the production mechanism of the top quark, whether it concerns higher-order QCD effects or newmore » physics contributions. For a 1% jet energy scale uncertainty, the top quark mass can then be extracted using the energy peak of b-jets with an error ±(1.2(exp) + 0.6(th)) GeV. In view of the dominant jet energy scale uncertainty in the measurement using b-jets, we also investigate the extraction of the top quark mass from the energy peak of the corresponding B-hadrons which, in principle, can be measured without this uncertainty. The calculation of the B-hadron energy spectrum is carried out using fragmentation functions at NLO. The dependence on the fragmentation scale turns out to be the largest theoretical uncertainty in this extraction of top quark mass.« less

  18. Quark confinement potential examined by excitation energy of the Λc and Λb baryons in a quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jido, Daisuke; Sakashita, Minori

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of having a diquark configuration in heavy baryons, such as Λ and Λ, is examined by a nonrelativistic potential model with a heavy quark and a light scalar diquark. Assuming that the Λ and Λ baryons are composed of the heavy quark and the point-like scalar-isoscalar ud diquark, we solve the two-body Schrödinger equation with the Coulomb plus linear potential and obtain the energy spectra for the heavy baryons. Contrary to our expectation, it is found that the potential determined by the quarkonium spectra fails to reproduce the excitation spectra of the Λ and Λ in the quark-diquark picture, while the Λ and Λ spectra are reproduced with half the strength of the confinement string tension than for the quarkonium. The finite size effect of the diquark is also examined and it is found that the introduction of a finite size diquark would resolve the failure of the spectrum reproduction. The Ξ excitation energy is also calculated and is found to be smaller than Λ in the quark-diquark model. This is not consistent with experimental observations.

  19. US energy for the rest of the century, 1984 edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustaferro, J. F.

    1984-07-01

    The U.S. energy consumption and supply for two years 1983 and 2000 is presented. In 1983 the United States consumed about 70.5 quadrillion British thermal units of energy. A U.S. energy consumption of about 84 quadrillion British thermal units in the year 2000 is projected. The 84 quadrillion British thermal units consists of 13 million barrels per day of petroleum, 18 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 3.5 trillion kilowatt hours of electricity. Coal production is projected at 1,405 million tons which includes exports. The data presented in the 1984 forecast over the spectrum of U.S. energy requirements and focus on the end use of energy operational purposes, e.g., highway transportation, space heating, lighting, and construction. Data on fuel consumption by types and energy content for 1983 and as projected for the year 2000 is provided. End users of energy in the United States currently spend $441 billion annually for energy. This includes direct taxes.

  20. Jet Tomography of Quark Gluon Plasmas in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulassy, Miklos

    2015-04-01

    The attenuation pattern of high energy jet fragments in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions provides information on the space-time evolution and dynamical properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) phase of matter discovered at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and observed at higher densities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First I review our jet tomography theory of quark and gluon energy loss in a weakly coupled picture of the QGP. While the average attenuation pattern of light and heavy quark jets were well accounted for in that picture, the predicted azimuthal elliptic asymmetry of jets was underestimated when realistic bulk collective flow effects were taken into account. I then show that the elliptic asymmetry of jet fragments can also be quantitatively understood when nonperturbative lattice QCD constraints on the suppression of color electric fluctuations and the enhancement of color magnetic fluctuations near the critical QCD confinement temperature, Tc ~ 160 MeV, are incorporated into the theory. Our analysis provides a novel quantitative connection between the jet transport properties controlling the hard jet quenching observables and the bulk viscous transport properties controlling the remarkable ``perfect fluidity'' of QGP observed at RHIC and LHC.

  1. Perturbative renormalization and mixing of quark and glue energy-momentum tensors on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, Michael J.; Liu, Keh-Fei; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2017-04-01

    We report the renormalization and mixing constants to one-loop order for the quark and gluon energy-momentum (EM) tensor operators on the lattice. A unique aspect of this mixing calculation is the definition of the glue EM tensor operator. The glue operator is comprised of gauge-field tensors constructed from the overlap Dirac operator. The resulting perturbative calculations are performed using methods similar to the Kawai approach using the Wilson fermion and gauge actions for all QCD vertices and the overlap Dirac operator to define the glue EM tensor. Our results are used to connect the lattice QCD results of quark and glue momenta and angular momenta to the MS ¯ scheme at input scale μ .

  2. Determination of Resting Energy Expenditure After Severe Burn

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    equation. In a recent survey of 65 burn centers, Graves et al10 discovered that the most commonly used for- mulas include the Harris -Benedict formula11...accuracy by Table 1. Equations for estimating daily energy expenditure for subjects with burns Predictive Equations for Energy Expenditure Harris -Benedict...predicted by using nine pre- dictive equations including 30 kcal/kg, 35 kcal/kg, 40 kcal/kg, the Harris -Benedict equation multiplied by an injury factor

  3. Variations in resting energy expenditure: impact on gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Berggren, E K; O'Tierney-Ginn, P; Lewis, S; Presley, L; De-Mouzon, S Hauguel; Catalano, P M

    2017-10-01

    There are significant variations in gestational weight gain, with many women gaining in excess of the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Unfortunately, efforts to improve appropriate gestational weight gain have had only limited success. To date, interventions have focused primarily on decreasing energy intake and/or increasing physical activity. Maternal resting energy expenditure, which comprises ∼60% of total energy expenditure compared with the ∼20% that comes from physical activity, may be an important consideration in understanding variations in gestational weight gain. Our objective was to quantify the changes in resting energy expenditure during pregnancy and their relationship to gestational weight gain and body composition changes among healthy women. We hypothesized that greater gestational weight gain, and fat mass accrual in particular, are inversely related to variations in resting energy expenditure. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort studied before conception and late pregnancy (34-36 weeks). Body composition (estimated using hydrodensitometry) and resting energy expenditure (estimated using indirect calorimetry) were measured. The relationship between the changes in resting energy expenditure and gestational weight gain and the change in fat mass and fat-free mass were quantified. Resting energy expenditure was expressed as kilocalories per kilogram of fat-free mass per day (kilocalories per kilogram of fat-free mass(-1)/day(-1)) and kilocalories per day. Correlations are reported as r. Among 51 women, preconception body mass index was 23.0 (4.7) kg/m(2); gestational weight gain was 12.8 (4.7) kg. Preconception and late pregnancy resting energy expenditure (kilocalories per day) correlated positively with the change in fat-free mass (r = 0.37, P = .008; r = 0.51, P = .001). Late-pregnancy resting energy expenditure (kilocalories per kilogram of fat-free mass(-1)/day(-1)) was inversely associated with the change in fat

  4. RESTING ENERGY EXPENDITURE IN PATIENTS WITH INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION AND CRITICAL LIMB ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Montgomery, Polly S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim was to compare the resting energy expenditure of patients with intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. A secondary aim was to identify predictors of resting energy expenditure, Design One hundred patients limited by intermittent claudication and 40 patients with critical limb ischemia participated in this study. Patients were assessed on resting energy expenditure, body composition, ankle/brachial index (ABI), and calf blood flow. Results Patients with critical limb ischemia had a lower resting energy expenditure than patients with intermittent claudication (1429 ± 190 kcal/day vs. 1563 ± 229 kcal/day; p = 0.004), as well as higher body fat percentage (34.8 ± 7.8% vs. 31.5 ± 7.8%; p = 0.037), higher fat mass (30.0 ± 9.3 kg vs. 26.2 ± 8.9 kg; p = 0.016), and lower ABI (0.31 ± 0.11 vs. 0.79 ± 0.23; p < 0.001). Resting energy expenditure was predicted by fat free mass (p < 0.0001), age (p < 0.0001), ABI (p < 0.0001), ethnicity (p < 0.0001), calf blood flow (p = 0.005), and diabetes (p = 0.008). Resting energy expenditure remained lower in the patients with critical limb ischemia after adjusting for clinical characteristics plus fat free mass (1473 ± 27.8 kcal/day [mean ± SEM] vs. 1527 ± 19.3 kcal/day; p = 0.031), but was no longer different between groups after further adjustment for ABI and calf blood flow (1494 ± 25.2 kcal/day vs. 1505 ± 17.7 kcal/day (p = 0.269). Conclusion Resting energy expenditure is decreased with a progression in PAD symptoms from intermittent claudication to critical limb ischemia. Furthermore, patients with critical limb ischemia who are most susceptible for decline in resting energy expenditure are older, African-American patients with diabetes. The lower resting energy expenditure of patients with critical limb ischemia, combined with their sedentary lifestyle, suggests that they are at high risk for long-term positive energy balance and weight gain. PMID:20382493

  5. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  6. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  7. Gluons and the Quark Sea at High Energies: Distributions, Polarization, Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Daniel; Diehl, Markus; Milner, Richard; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner; Kaplan, David; Montgomery, Hugh; Vigdor, Steven; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Li, Ying-chuan; Marciano, W.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; /more authors..

    2012-06-07

    This report on the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is the result of a ten-week program at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle (from September 13-November 19, 2010), motivated by the need to develop a strong case for the continued study of the QCD description of hadron structure in the coming decades. Hadron structure in the valence quark region will be studied extensively with the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV science program, the subject of an INT program the previous year. The focus of the INT program was on understanding the role of gluons and sea quarks, the important dynamical degrees of freedom describing hadron structure at high energies. Experimentally, the most direct and precise way to access the dynamical structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies is with a high luminosity lepton probe in collider mode. An EIC with optimized detectors offers enormous potential as the next generation accelerator to address many of the most important, open questions about the fundamental structure of matter. The goal of the INT program, as captured in the writeups in this report, was to articulate these questions and to identify golden experiments that have the greatest potential to provide definitive answers to these questions. At resolution scales where quarks and gluons become manifest as degrees of freedom, the structure of the nucleon and of nuclei is intimately connected with unique features of QCD dynamics, such as confinement and the self-coupling of gluons. Information on hadron sub-structure in DIS is obtained in the form of 'snapshots' by the 'lepton microscope' of the dynamical many-body hadron system, over different momentum resolutions and energy scales. These femtoscopic snapshots, at the simplest level, provide distribution functions which are extracted over the largest accessible kinematic range to assemble fundamental dynamical insight into hadron and nuclear sub-structure. For the proton, the EIC would be the brightest

  8. Holography, heavy-quark free energy, and the QCD phase diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Pietro; Giannuzzi, Floriana; Nicotri, Stefano

    2011-02-01

    We use gauge/string duality to investigate the free energy of two static color sources (a heavy-quark-antiquark pair) in a Yang-Mills theory in strongly interacting matter, varying temperature and chemical potential. The dual space geometry is anti-de Sitter with a charged black hole to describe finite temperature and density in the boundary theory, and we also include a background warp factor to generate confinement. The resulting deconfinement line in the {mu}-T plane is similar to the one obtained by lattice and effective models of QCD.

  9. Single top quark production in heavy ion collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskakov, A. V.; Boos, E. E.; Dudko, L. V.; Lokhtin, I. P.; Snigirev, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    The article presents analysis of the single top quark production in PbPb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at center-of-mass energy 5.5 TeV per nucleon pair. The analysis is performed with CompHEP and PYQUEN event generators. The neutron and proton content in the nuclei is taken into account. NLO precision has been implemented to simulate kinematic properties and rate of single top production. The modification of different characteristics of single top quark decay products due to interactions of jet partons in quark-gluon medium, and the specific charge asymmetry of top/antitop quark yields due to the isospin effect are evaluated.

  10. Heavy quark-antiquark free energy and thermodynamics of string-hadron avoided crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.; Salcedo, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    The correlation function between two Polyakov loops encodes the free-energy shift due to a pair of separated color-conjugated sources in the hot QCD medium. This is analyzed in terms of a novel Källén-Lehmann spectral representation for the separating distance, implying an increasing and concave free-energy at all temperatures. We express the heavy Q ¯ Q free-energy shift below the phase transition in QCD in terms of color-neutral purely hadronic states with no explicit reference to quarks and gluons. Good agreement with lattice data is achieved when considering the avoided crossing mechanism underlying string breaking and with standard quenched values of the string tension known from charmonium and bottomonium phenomenology. We also address the role of the corresponding entropy shift and its renormalization group properties.

  11. Resummation of threshold, low- and high-energy expansions for heavy-quark correlators

    SciTech Connect

    Greynat, David; Peris, Santiago

    2010-08-01

    With the help of the Mellin-Barnes transform, we show how to simultaneously resum the expansion of a heavy-quark correlator around q{sup 2}=0 (low-energy), q{sup 2}=4m{sup 2} (threshold, where m is the quark mass), and q{sup 2}{yields}-{infinity} (high-energy) in a systematic way. We exemplify the method for the perturbative vector correlator at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) and O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). We show that the coefficients, {Omega}(n), of the Taylor expansion of the vacuum polarization function in terms of the conformal variable {omega} admit, for large n, an expansion in powers of 1/n (up to logarithms of n) that we can calculate exactly. This large-n expansion has a sign-alternating component given by the logarithms of the operator-product expansion, and a fixed-sign component given by the logarithms of the threshold expansion in the external momentum q{sup 2}.

  12. Energy landscape analysis of the subcortical brain network unravels system properties beneath resting state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiyoung; Pae, Chongwon; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-04-01

    The configuration of the human brain system at rest, which is in a transitory phase among multistable states, remains unknown. To investigate the dynamic systems properties of the human brain at rest, we constructed an energy landscape for the state dynamics of the subcortical brain network, a critical center that modulates whole brain states, using resting state fMRI. We evaluated alterations in energy landscapes following perturbation in network parameters, which revealed characteristics of the state dynamics in the subcortical brain system, such as maximal number of attractors, unequal temporal occupations, and readiness for reconfiguration of the system. Perturbation in the network parameters, even those as small as the ones in individual nodes or edges, caused a significant shift in the energy landscape of brain systems. The effect of the perturbation on the energy landscape depended on the network properties of the perturbed nodes and edges, with greater effects on hub nodes and hubs-connecting edges in the subcortical brain system. Two simultaneously perturbed nodes produced perturbation effects showing low sensitivity in the interhemispheric homologous nodes and strong dependency on the more primary node among the two. This study demonstrated that energy landscape analysis could be an important tool to investigate alterations in brain networks that may underlie certain brain diseases, or diverse brain functions that may emerge due to the reconfiguration of the default brain network at rest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y…

  14. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y…

  15. Long–term effects of caloric restriction on total and resting energy expenditure in healthy adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of long-term caloric restriction (CR) on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) in humans is uncertain. Objective To examine the effects of a 30% CR regimen on TEE and RMR. Methods One year randomized controlled trial of 30% CR in 29 healthy overweight adults (me...

  16. Heavy quark free energy in QCD and in gauge theories with gravity duals

    SciTech Connect

    Noronha, Jorge

    2010-09-15

    Recent lattice results in pure glue SU(3) theory at high temperatures have shown that the expectation value of the renormalized Polyakov loop approaches its asymptotic limit at high temperatures from above. We show that this implies that the 'heavy quark free energy' obtained from the renormalized loop computed on the lattice does not behave like a true thermodynamic free energy. While this should be expected to occur in asymptotically free gauge theories such as QCD, we use the gauge/string duality to show that in a large class of strongly coupled gauge theories with nontrivial UV fixed points the Polyakov loop reaches its asymptotic value from above only if the dimension of the relevant operator used to deform the conformal field theory is greater than or equal to 3.

  17. Resting and exercise energy metabolism in weight-reduced adults with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Hames, Kazanna C; Coen, Paul M; King, Wendy C; Anthony, Steven J; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G S; Lowery, Jolene B; Helbling, Nicole L; Dubé, John J; DeLany, James P; Jakicic, John M; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2016-06-01

    To determine effects of physical activity (PA) with diet-induced weight loss on energy metabolism in adults with severe obesity. Adults with severe obesity (n = 11) were studied across 6 months of intervention, then compared with controls with less severe obesity (n = 7) or normal weight (n = 9). Indirect calorimetry measured energy metabolism during exercise and rest. Markers of muscle oxidation were determined by immunohistochemistry. Data were presented as medians. The intervention induced 7% weight loss (P = 0.001) and increased vigorous PA by 24 min/wk (P = 0.02). During exercise, energy expenditure decreased, efficiency increased (P ≤ 0.03), and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) did not change. Succinate dehydrogenase increased (P = 0.001), but fiber type remained the same. Post-intervention subjects' resting metabolism remained similar to controls. Efficiency was lower in post-intervention subjects compared with normal-weight controls exercising at 25 W (P ≤ 0.002) and compared with all controls exercising at 60% VO2peak (P ≤ 0.019). Resting and exercise FAO of post-intervention subjects remained similar to adults with less severe obesity. Succinate dehydrogenase and fiber type were similar across all body weight statuses. While metabolic adaptations to PA during weight loss occur in adults with severe obesity, FAO does not change. Resulting FAO during rest and exercise remains similar to adults with less severe obesity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  18. Resting Energy Expenditure and Systolic Blood Pressure Relationships in Women Across 4.5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Neeraj; Hunter, Gary R.; Fisher, Gordon; Brock, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a strong association between blood pressure (BP) and resting energy expenditure (REE). However, it is not known if this relationship persists over time. Therefore, we examined the temporal relationship between REE and systolic BP. Additionally, we examined the impact of sympathetic tone and anthropometric variables on this relationship. All testing was performed on healthy, overweight African American and European American women aged 25 – 45 years over 4.5 years in the UAB General Clinical Research Center. Repeated measures mixed-models revealed REE as a significant determinant of systolic BP (β=0.0155, P<0.0001), independent of catecholamines, leg fat, visceral fat, fat free mass, fat mass, height, RSMI, and resting heart rate. Observations that REE is predictive of systolic BP across 4.5 years support previous findings that REE may potentially mediate resting BP, independent of anthropometric variables and a marker for sympathetic tone. PMID:24548382

  19. A review: exercise and its influence on resting energy metabolism in man.

    PubMed

    Poehlman, E T

    1989-10-01

    Daily energy expenditure is composed of three major components: 1) resting metabolic rate (RMR); 2) the thermic effect of feeding (TEF); and 3) the thermic effect of activity (TEA). RMR constitutes 60 to 75% of daily energy expenditure and is the energy associated with the maintenance of major body functions. TEF is the cumulative increase in energy expenditure after several meals and constitutes approximately 10% of daily energy expenditure. Most investigators, however, have examined the thermic effect of a single meal test (TEM). TEA is the most variable component of daily energy expenditure and can constitute 15 to 30% of 24-h energy expenditure. This component includes energy expenditure due to physical work, muscular activity, including shivering and fidgeting, as well as purposeful physical exercise. Participation in purposeful exercise (both acute and chronic) is a subcomponent of TEA and has been found to influence resting energy expenditure (RMR and TEM). Reports in the literature, however, are discrepant regarding the direction and magnitude of the effects of exercise and exercise training on RMR and TEM. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that have examined the effects of exercise on RMR and TEM are reviewed. Possible explanations for divergent results in the literature are discussed. The major focus of this review is directed to human studies, although pertinent animal work is included. The role of genetic variation, gender specific responses, and methodological considerations for future studies examining the relation among RMR, TEA, and TEM are considered. Although still controversial, purposeful physical exercise appears to influence resting energy expenditure in man.

  20. Thyroid hormones correlate with resting metabolic rate, not daily energy expenditure, in two charadriiform seabirds.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kyle H; Welcker, Jorg; Gaston, Anthony J; Hatch, Scott A; Palace, Vince; Hare, James F; Speakman, John R; Anderson, W Gary

    2013-06-15

    Thyroid hormones affect in vitro metabolic intensity, increase basal metabolic rate (BMR) in the lab, and are sometimes correlated with basal and/or resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a field environment. Given the difficulty of measuring metabolic rate in the field-and the likelihood that capture and long-term restraint necessary to measure metabolic rate in the field jeopardizes other measurements-we examined the possibility that circulating thyroid hormone levels were correlated with RMR in two free-ranging bird species with high levels of energy expenditure (the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, and thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia). Because BMR and daily energy expenditure (DEE) are purported to be linked, we also tested for a correlation between thyroid hormones and DEE. We examined the relationships between free and bound levels of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) with DEE and with 4-hour long measurements of post-absorptive and thermoneutral resting metabolism (resting metabolic rate; RMR). RMR but not DEE increased with T3 in both species; both metabolic rates were independent of T4. T3 and T4 were not correlated with one another. DEE correlated with body mass in kittiwakes but not in murres, presumably owing to the larger coefficient of variation in body mass during chick rearing for the more sexually dimorphic kittiwakes. We suggest T3 provides a good proxy for resting metabolism but not DEE in these seabird species.

  1. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with In Situ Jet Energy Scale Calibration Using Hadronic W Boson Decays at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Arguin, Jean-Francois

    2006-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass with the upgraded collider detector at Fermilab (CDF-II). The top quarks are produced in pairs (tt) in proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  2. Reading and listening to music increase resting energy expenditure during an indirect calorimetry test.

    PubMed

    Snell, Blaire; Fullmer, Susan; Eggett, Dennis L

    2014-12-01

    Indirect calorimetry is often done early in the morning in a fasting state, with the subject unshowered and abstained from caffeine or other stimulants. Subjects often fall asleep, resulting in measurement of a sleeping metabolic rate rather than a resting metabolic rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether listening to self-selected relaxing music or reading an electronic device or magazine affects resting energy expenditure (REE) during measurement in healthy adults. A randomized trial comparing three different conditions (ie, resting, reading, and listening to music) was performed. Sixty-five subjects (36 female and 29 male) were used in final data analysis. Inclusion criteria included healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50 years with a stable weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnant or lactating women or use of medications known to affect metabolism. Results showed that reading either a magazine or an electronic device significantly increased REE by 102.7 kcal/day when compared with resting (P<0.0001); however, there was no difference in REE between the electronic device and magazine. Listening to self-selected relaxing music increased REE by 27.6 kcal/day compared with rest (P=0.0072). Based on our results, we recommend subjects refrain from reading a magazine or electronic device during an indirect calorimetry test. Whether or not the smaller difference found while listening to music is practically significant would be a decision for the indirect calorimetry test administrator. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Muscle function and resting energy expenditure in female athletes with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, Hiran C; Allen, Jane; Sachinwalla, Toos; Macauley, James; Blimkie, Cameron J; Van Asperen, Peter P

    2003-12-15

    The pathophysiology of impaired exercise tolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to compare exercise ability (at clinical and cellular levels) and resting energy expenditure in female athletes with CF compared with matched control subjects. Sixteen subjects and matched control subjects participated in the study. The girls with CF not only had a significantly greater resting energy expenditure (7.6% higher; p<0.05), their habitual daily activity was also significantly greater than that of control subjects (15% greater; p<0.01). Peak aerobic capacity was similar in both groups. However, peak anaerobic power was 20% less (p<0.05) in girls with CF. The 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies demonstrated that there were no differences between the groups at rest, but at 25% total work output the girls with CF were less acidotic (CF, pH 6.99 [0.06]; control subjects, 6.90 [0.05]) and had a significantly lower inorganic phosphorus-to-phosphocreatine ratio (CF, 0.34 [0.07]; control subjects, 0.41 [0.08]). These differences continued to increase to maximal exercise. This study demonstrates that in spite of normal lung function and good nutritional status, females athletes with CF still had significant deficiencies in some measures of fitness and muscle metabolism compared with healthy athletes.

  4. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method and in situ jet energy calibration.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Siegrist, J; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m(t) is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m(t) and a parameter Δ(JES) used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, a value of m(t)=173.0 ± 1.2 GeV/c(2) is measured.

  5. Complex suppression patterns distinguish between major energy loss effects in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Interactions of high momentum partons with Quark-Gluon Plasma created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions provide an excellent tomography tool for this new form of matter. Recent measurements for charged hadrons and unidentified jets at the LHC show an unexpected flattening of the suppression curves at high momentum, exhibited when either momentum or the collision centrality is changed. Furthermore, a limited data available for B probes indicate a qualitatively different pattern, as nearly the same flattening is exhibited for the curves corresponding to two opposite momentum ranges. We here show that the experimentally measured suppression curves are well reproduced by our theoretical predictions, and that the complex suppression patterns are due to an interplay of collisional, radiative energy loss and the dead-cone effect. Furthermore, for B mesons, we predict that the uniform flattening of the suppression indicated by the limited dataset is in fact valid across the entire span of the momentum ranges, which will be tested by the upcoming experiments. Overall, the study presented here, provides a rare opportunity for pQCD theory to qualitatively distinguish between the major energy loss mechanisms at the same (nonintuitive) dataset.

  6. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, D.; Venugopalan, R.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Vogelsang, W.; et al.

    2011-09-30

    This report is based on a ten-week program on Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies, which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This report is organized around the following four major themes: (i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, (ii) three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, (iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and (iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.

  7. Role of resting metabolic rate and energy expenditure in hunger and appetite control: a new formulation.

    PubMed

    Blundell, John E; Caudwell, Phillipa; Gibbons, Catherine; Hopkins, Mark; Naslund, Erik; King, Neil; Finlayson, Graham

    2012-09-01

    A long-running issue in appetite research concerns the influence of energy expenditure on energy intake. More than 50 years ago, Otto G. Edholm proposed that "the differences between the intakes of food [of individuals] must originate in differences in the expenditure of energy". However, a relationship between energy expenditure and energy intake within any one day could not be found, although there was a correlation over 2 weeks. This issue was never resolved before interest in integrative biology was replaced by molecular biochemistry. Using a psychobiological approach, we have studied appetite control in an energy balance framework using a multi-level experimental system on a single cohort of overweight and obese human subjects. This has disclosed relationships between variables in the domains of body composition [fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM)], metabolism, gastrointestinal hormones, hunger and energy intake. In this Commentary, we review our own and other data, and discuss a new formulation whereby appetite control and energy intake are regulated by energy expenditure. Specifically, we propose that FFM (the largest contributor to resting metabolic rate), but not body mass index or FM, is closely associated with self-determined meal size and daily energy intake. This formulation has implications for understanding weight regulation and the management of obesity.

  8. Resting and Exercise Energy Metabolism After Liver Transplantation for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, Josh; Singhvi, Ajay; Sadowsky, H Steven; Cohen, Ayelet; Demzik, Alysen; VanWagner, Lisa; Rinella, Mary

    2017-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a leading indication for liver transplantation (LT). We hypothesized that weight gain after LT may be exacerbated by reduced metabolic rates due to the LT procedure, particularly during exercise. We aimed to compare resting and exercise energy expenditure between patients transplanted for NASH and nontransplant nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) subjects. NASH LT recipients (>1-year post, n = 14) and NAFLD controls (n = 13) underwent analysis of body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), and exercise energy expenditure (VO2max), the latter using a ramped-Bruce protocol assessed by expired gas analysis and peak heart rate. Participants were mean 61.5 ± 7.9 years, 48.1% men, and 66.7% white. Baseline comorbidities were similar between groups. Among men, mean REE adjusted for total (17.7 vs 18.8, P = 0.87) and lean body mass (23.5 vs 26.9, P = 0.26), as well as VO2 (20.1 vs 23.9, P = 0.29), was lower in NASH LT recipients compared with NAFLD controls, respectively, although not statistically significant. However, female NASH LT recipients had significantly lower mean REE than NAFLD controls when adjusted for total (14.2 vs 18.9, P = 0.01) and lean body mass (19.3 vs 26.5, P = 0.002), as well as significantly lower VO2max (14.4 vs 20.6, P = 0.017). NASH LT recipients, particularly women, have lower REE and exercise energy expenditure compared with nontransplant NAFLD patients. More aggressive diet and exercise programs for post-LT NASH recipients to account for reduced resting and exercise metabolic rates may attenuate weight gain in this vulnerable population.

  9. Role of resting metabolic rate and energy expenditure in hunger and appetite control: a new formulation

    PubMed Central

    Blundell, John E.; Caudwell, Phillipa; Gibbons, Catherine; Hopkins, Mark; Naslund, Erik; King, Neil; Finlayson, Graham

    2012-01-01

    A long-running issue in appetite research concerns the influence of energy expenditure on energy intake. More than 50 years ago, Otto G. Edholm proposed that “the differences between the intakes of food [of individuals] must originate in differences in the expenditure of energy”. However, a relationship between energy expenditure and energy intake within any one day could not be found, although there was a correlation over 2 weeks. This issue was never resolved before interest in integrative biology was replaced by molecular biochemistry. Using a psychobiological approach, we have studied appetite control in an energy balance framework using a multi-level experimental system on a single cohort of overweight and obese human subjects. This has disclosed relationships between variables in the domains of body composition [fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM)], metabolism, gastrointestinal hormones, hunger and energy intake. In this Commentary, we review our own and other data, and discuss a new formulation whereby appetite control and energy intake are regulated by energy expenditure. Specifically, we propose that FFM (the largest contributor to resting metabolic rate), but not body mass index or FM, is closely associated with self-determined meal size and daily energy intake. This formulation has implications for understanding weight regulation and the management of obesity. PMID:22915022

  10. Constraining in-medium heavy-quark energy-loss mechanisms via angular correlations between heavy and light mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmoser, M.; Gossiaux, P.-B.; Gousset, T.; Aichelin, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two-particle correlations obtained from parton showers that pass the hot and dense medium of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) can be used as an alternative observable, in addition to the combination of the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v 2, to study the mechanisms of in-medium heavy quark energy-loss. In particular, angular correlations represent a promising tool to distinguish between energy loss due to collisional and radiative interactions of jet and medium particles. To this end, parton cascades were created in Monte-Carlo simulations, where individual particles can undergo both parton splitting as well as an effective jet-medium interaction. A first model simulates the effects of induced radiations on parton cascades. Its consequences on angular correlations of partons within jets were studied in detail, with particular focus on angular broadening. The results can be compared to a second model that effectively describes elastic scatterings of jet and medium particles.

  11. Basking hamsters reduce resting metabolism, body temperature and energy costs during rewarming from torpor.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Fritz; Gasch, Kristina; Bieber, Claudia; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Gerritsmann, Hanno; Ruf, Thomas

    2016-07-15

    Basking can substantially reduce thermoregulatory energy expenditure of mammals. We tested the hypothesis that the largely white winter fur of hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), originating from Asian steppes, may be related to camouflage to permit sun basking on or near snow. Winter-acclimated hamsters in our study were largely white and had a high proclivity to bask when resting and torpid. Resting hamsters reduced metabolic rate (MR) significantly (>30%) when basking at ambient temperatures (Ta) of ∼15 and 0°C. Interestingly, body temperature (Tb) also was significantly reduced from 34.7±0.6°C (Ta 15°C, not basking) to 30.4±2.0°C (Ta 0°C, basking), which resulted in an extremely low (<50% of predicted) apparent thermal conductance. Induced torpor (food withheld) during respirometry at Ta 15°C occurred on 83.3±36.0% of days and the minimum torpor MR was 36% of basal MR at an average Tb of 22.0±2.6°C; movement to the basking lamp occurred at Tb<20.0°C. Energy expenditure for rewarming was significantly reduced (by >50%) during radiant heat-assisted rewarming; however, radiant heat per se without an endogenous contribution by animals did not strongly affect metabolism and Tb during torpor. Our data show that basking substantially modifies thermal energetics in hamsters, with a drop of resting Tb and MR not previously observed and a reduction of rewarming costs. The energy savings afforded by basking in hamsters suggest that this behaviour is of energetic significance not only for mammals living in deserts, where basking is common, but also for P. sungorus and probably other cold-climate mammals. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Resting energy expenditure and gut microbiota in obese and normal weight subjects.

    PubMed

    Kocełak, P; Zak-Gołąb, A; Zahorska-Markiewicz, B; Aptekorz, M; Zientara, M; Martirosian, G; Chudek, J; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, M

    2013-10-01

    It is suggested that gut microbiota play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity enhancing energy utilization from digested food. The influence of gut microbiota on resting energy expenditure (REE) has not been evaluated yet. The aim of the study is to assess the composition on gut microbiota and its association with REE in obese and normal weight subjects. REE measurement and semi-quantitative analysis of gut microbiota composition in aerobic and anaerobic conditions were performed in 50 obese and 30 normal weight subjects without concomitant diseases. A count of bacterial colony was greater in obese than in normal weight subjects. However, the proportion of Bacteroides spp. and Firmicutes was similar in both study groups. A positive correlation between REE (kcal/d) and total bacterial count (r = 0.26, p < 0.05), as well as between REE and the percentage of Firmicutes (r = -0.24, p < 0.05) was found. The multiple regression analysis did not prove an independent impact of total bacterial as well as Bacteroides spp. and Firmicutes counts on REE. The composition of gut microbiota is not associated with the level of resting energy expenditure. The proportion of Bacteroides and Firmicutes in gut microbiota is not related to body mass.

  13. Resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient in adolescents following spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    McMulkin, Mark L; Ferguson, Ron L

    2004-08-15

    Prospective, 2-factor design. The first factor was the group with 2 levels, spine surgery and control. The second factor was timing with 3 levels, baseline, 1-week follow-up, and 6-week follow-up. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in caloric requirements and the body's nutritional substrate utilization following spinal surgery in adolescents. In an effort to optimize recovery from and assure best possible outcomes after spinal surgery in adolescents, the nutritional requirements of spine surgery patients were evaluated. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure resting energy expenditure, a measure of caloric requirements, and respiratory quotient, an indication of percentages of fat, protein, and carbohydrate utilization. Twenty-three patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery were evaluated immediately before surgery, at an average of 4.8 days after surgery, and at an average 53 days follow-up. A control group of 15 patients completed the same series of 3 tests: baseline, 1-week later, and 6-weeks later. Resting energy expenditure increased significantly by 150 kcal/day (2.7 kcal/kg/day) following spinal fusion surgery in adolescents. By 6 weeks postoperation, patient's caloric requirements returned to baseline level. No changes in resting energy expenditure occurred in the control group between the 3 test periods. Anterior/posterior surgeries and single surgeries had similar kcal/kg/day requirements after surgery. Respiratory quotient decreased significantly following surgery (0.79 to 0.70), indicating a shift to fat oxidation after surgery. At 6 weeks postoperation, the respiratory quotient returned to baseline level. The control group demonstrated no change in the respiratory quotient during the 3 testing periods. Substrate utilization shifts to fat oxidation in adolescents following spinal surgery, indicating lipids would be the alimentation of choice immediately after surgery. Caloric requirements increase 9% above the baseline measurements

  14. Top quark mass determination from the energy peaks of b-jets and B-hadrons at NLO QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Schulze, Markus

    2016-11-21

    Here, we analyze the energy spectra of single b-jets and B-hadrons resulting from the production and decay of top quarks within the SM at the LHC at the NLO QCD. For both hadrons and jets, we calculate the correlation of the peak of the spectrum with the top quark mass, considering the “energy peak” as an observable to determine the top quarkmass. Such a method is motivated by our previous work where we argued that this approach can have reduced sensitivity to the details of the production mechanism of the top quark, whether it concerns higher-order QCD effects or new physics contributions. For a 1% jet energy scale uncertainty, the top quark mass can then be extracted using the energy peak of b-jets with an error ±(1.2(exp) + 0.6(th)) GeV. In view of the dominant jet energy scale uncertainty in the measurement using b-jets, we also investigate the extraction of the top quark mass from the energy peak of the corresponding B-hadrons which, in principle, can be measured without this uncertainty. The calculation of the B-hadron energy spectrum is carried out using fragmentation functions at NLO. The dependence on the fragmentation scale turns out to be the largest theoretical uncertainty in this extraction of top quark mass.

  15. Measuring energy expenditure in the intensive care unit: a comparison of indirect calorimetry by E-sCOVX and Quark RMR with Deltatrac II in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Rehal, Martin Sundström; Fiskaare, Erik; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-03-05

    Indirect calorimetry allows the determination of energy expenditure in critically ill patients by measuring oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2). Recent studies have demonstrated variable performance of "breath-by-breath" instruments compared to mixing chamber technology. The aim of this study was to validate two modern devices (E-sCOVX and Quark RMR) against a reference method (Deltatrac II). Measurements of VO2/VCO2 with the test and reference devices were performed simultaneously over a 20-min period in mechanically ventilated adult intensive care unit patients. Accuracy and precision of instruments were analyzed using Bland-Altman plots. Forty-eight measurements in 22 patients were included for analysis. Both E-sCOVX and Quark RMR overestimated VO2 and VCO2 compared to Deltatrac II, corresponding to a 10% higher mean resting energy expenditure. Limits of agreement of resting energy expenditure within ± 2 standard deviations were ± 461 kcal/24 h (± 21% expressed as percentage error) for ΔE-sCOVX-Deltatrac II and ± 465 kcal/24 h (± 22%) for ΔQuark RMR-Deltatrac II. Both test devices overestimate VO2 and VCO2 compared to Deltatrac II. The observed limits of agreement are comparable to those commonly accepted in evaluations of circulatory monitoring, and significantly less than results from predictive equations. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between methods is due to patient/ventilator-related factors that affect the synchronization of gas and spirometry waveforms. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, Trial ID ACTRN12615000205538. Date registered 3 March 2015.

  16. Differences between observed and predicted energy costs at rest and during exercise in three subsistence-level populations.

    PubMed

    Katzmarzyk, P T; Leonard, W R; Stephen, M A; Berti, P R; Ross, A G

    1996-04-01

    Estimates of daily energy expenditure are important for many areas of research in human ecology and adaptability. The most common technique for estimating human energy expenditure under field conditions, the factorial method, generally relies on activity-specific energy costs derived from published sources, based largely on North American and European subjects. There is concern that such data may not be appropriate for non-Western populations because of differences in metabolic costs. The present study addresses this concern by comparing measured vs. predicted energy costs at rest and during sub-maximal exercise in 83 subjects (52 males, 31 females) from three subsistence-level populations (Siberian herders and highland and coastal Ecuadorian farmers). Energy costs at rest (i.e., lying, sitting and standing) and while performing a standard stepping exercise did not significantly differ among the three groups. However, resting energy costs were significantly elevated over predicted levels (+ 16% in men, + 11% in women), whereas exercising costs were comparable to predicted values (-6% in men, + 3% in women). Elevations in resting energy needs appear to reflect responses to thermal stress. These results indicate that temperature adjustments of resting energy costs are critical for accurately predicting daily energy needs among traditionally living populations.

  17. Using low-energy neutrinos from pion decay at rest to probe the proton strangeness.

    PubMed

    Pagliaroli, G; Lujan-Peschard, C; Mitra, M; Vissani, F

    2013-07-12

    The study of the neutral current elastic scattering of neutrinos on protons at lower energies can be used as a compelling probe to improve our knowledge of the strangeness of the proton. We consider a neutrino beam generated from pion decay at rest, as provided by a cyclotron or a spallation neutron source and a 1 kton scintillating detector with a potential similar to the Borexino detector. Despite several backgrounds from solar and radioactive sources, it is possible to estimate two optimal energy windows for the analysis, one between 0.65 and 1.1 MeV and another between 1.73 and 2.2 MeV. The expected number of neutral current events in these two regions, for an exposure of 1 yr, is enough to obtain an error on the strange axial charge 10 times smaller than available at present.

  18. Supernovae, neutrino rest mass, and the middle-energy neutrino background in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Seidov, Z. F.

    Neutrinos emitted during the formation of the neutron stars and black holes form, together with relict microwave radiation and relict neutrinos, a background for the present universe. The energy of the kind of neutrino emitted in neutron star formation, at 3-30 MeV, is much greater than that of relict neutrinos and much smaller than that of the cosmic ray neutrinos; they are accordingly designated 'middle energy neutrinos' (MENs). It is presently shown that the MEN background's density, at 2-10 x 10 to the -33rd gm/cu cm, is greater than the density of relict microwave radiation and less than the density of matter. The MEN spectra presently calculated yield 0.002 to 0.008 solar neutrino units in the solar chlorine-argon detector. Possible neutrino rest mass effects are discussed for the cases of expanding universe propagation and MEN background spatial structure.

  19. Effects of commercially available dietary supplements on resting energy expenditure: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roger A; Conn, Carole A; Mermier, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available dietary products advertised to promote weight loss are an underresearched but heavily purchased commodity in the United States. Despite only limited evidence, interest in dietary supplements continues to increase. This work uniquely summarizes the current evidence evaluating the efficacy of several over-the-counter thermogenic products for their effects on resting energy expenditure. Currently, there is some evidence suggesting dietary products containing select ingredients can increase energy expenditure in healthy young people immediately following consumption (within 6 hours). It is unclear if supplement-induced increases in metabolic rate provide additional benefit beyond that provided by dietary constituents that contain similar ingredients. It is also unclear if dietary supplements are effective for weight loss in humans.

  20. Effects of Commercially Available Dietary Supplements on Resting Energy Expenditure: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Roger A.; Conn, Carole A.; Mermier, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available dietary products advertised to promote weight loss are an underresearched but heavily purchased commodity in the United States. Despite only limited evidence, interest in dietary supplements continues to increase. This work uniquely summarizes the current evidence evaluating the efficacy of several over-the-counter thermogenic products for their effects on resting energy expenditure. Currently, there is some evidence suggesting dietary products containing select ingredients can increase energy expenditure in healthy young people immediately following consumption (within 6 hours). It is unclear if supplement-induced increases in metabolic rate provide additional benefit beyond that provided by dietary constituents that contain similar ingredients. It is also unclear if dietary supplements are effective for weight loss in humans. PMID:24967272

  1. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in jets and missing transverse energy channel with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, Mansoora

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation describes a search for the pair production of scalar top quarks, $\\tilde{t}$1, using a luminosity of 995 pb-1 of data collected in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Both scalar top quarks are assumed to decay into a charm quark and a neutralino, $\\tilde{X}$10, where $\\tilde{X}$10 is the lightest supersymmetric particle. This leads to a final state with two acoplanar charm jets and missing transverse energy. The yield of such events in data is found to be consistent with the expectations from known standard model processes. Sets of $\\tilde{X}$1 and $\\tilde{X}$10 masses are excluded at the 95% confidence level that substantially extend the domain excluded by previous searches. With the theoretical uncertainty on the $\\tilde{t}$1 pair production cross section taken into account, the largest limit for m$\\tilde{t}$1 is m$\\tilde{t}$1 > 150 GeV, for m$\\tilde{X}$10 = 65 GeV.

  2. Quark-novae Occurring in Massive Binaries : A Universal Energy Source in Superluminous Supernovae with Double-peaked Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-01

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 1052 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  3. QUARK-NOVAE OCCURRING IN MASSIVE BINARIES: A UNIVERSAL ENERGY SOURCE IN SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-10

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 10{sup 52} erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  4. Insight from elliptic flow of open charm mesons using quark coalescence model at RHIC and LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esha, Roli; Nasim, Md.; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A study of elliptic flow of open charm mesons, D 0 and using quark coalescence as the mechanism of hadronization of heavy quarks will be presented. The coalescing partons are taken from a multi-phase transport model. The transverse momentum dependence of the elliptic flow parameter at mid-rapidity (|y| < 1.0) for minimum bias Au+Au collisions at > = 200 GeV (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions = 2.76 TeV (LHC) for different values of partonic interaction cross-section and QCD coupling constant will be discussed. We have compared our calculations with the experimentally measured data at the LHC energy. We will also present the effect of specific viscosity on elliptic flow of open charm mesons within the transport model approach. Our study indicates that the elliptic flow of open charmed mesons is more sensitive to viscous properties of QGP medium compared to light hadrons.

  5. {rho}-{omega} mixing self-energy and model quark-gluon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Mitchell, K.L.; Tandy, P.C.; Cahill, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    The u-d quark-loop vacuum polarization process that mixes the {omega} and {rho} mesons and its contribution to the Charge-Symmetry-Breaking (CSB) piece of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction has been studied in a QCD-based, model field theory: the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), using a confining quark propagator obtained in earlier studies. In fitting NN phase shifts it was found necessary to include a term in the NN potential that has, conventionally, been attributed to the mixing between {omega} and {rho} mesons that arises because of isospin asymmetry at the quark level, as manifest in the small u-d current-quark-mass difference. To the present, this term was modeled and assumed to be momentum independent. It is important to understand this term in the context of QCD. The results of this study indicate that the modification of the meson propagators produced by the quark loop is alone not sufficient to account for the observed charge symmetry breaking effects in the NN interaction. We are exploring other possible mechanisms which may describe the origin of CSB in the NN interaction.

  6. The influence of physical characteristics on the resting energy expenditure of youth: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Stephen D; McMurray, Robert G; Kim, Youngdeok; Willis, Erik A; Kang, Minsoo; McCurdy, Thomas

    2017-05-06

    To examine the literature on resting energy expenditure (REE) of youth and determine the influence of age, sex, BMI, and body composition on REE. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, BIOSIS Previews, NTIS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Pascal databases for studies with data on resting metabolic rate, REE, resting oxygen uptake (or VO2 ) in healthy children, youth, or adolescents (age = 1-18 years). Over 200 publications were identified; sixty-one publications met criteria and were included in the meta-analyses, resulting in 142 study population estimates (totaling 5,397 youth) of REE. Pooled mean was 1414 kcal·day(-1) with a significant and moderate-to-high between-study heterogeneity [Q(140) = 7912.42, P < 0.001; I(2)  = 98.97%]. A significantly greater (P < 0.001) pooled mean kcal·day(-1) was estimated for studies with male participants (1519 kcal·day(-1) ) comparing to studies with female participants (1338 kcal·day(-1) ). Age, height, and body mass resulted in the highest R(2) of 86.4 for males and 83.9% for females. Fat free mass and body mass index (BMI) did not improve total R(2) . These data suggest that using a linear equation including age, height, and body mass to estimate REE based on kcal·day(-1) is more accurate than estimates based on body mass kcal·kg(-1) ·h(-1) . Further, if kcal·kg(-1) ·h(-1) is used, including a quadratic component for the physical characteristics improves the predictive ability of the equation. Regardless of the metric, separate equations should be used for each sex. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  8. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  9. Association between resting energy expenditure, psychopathology and HPA-axis in eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellini, Giovanni; Castellani, Walter; Lelli, Lorenzo; Sauro, Carolina Lo; Dini, Carla; Lazzeretti, Lisa; Bencini, Lorenza; Mannucci, Edoardo; Ricca, Valdo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the complex relationships between resting energy expenditure (REE), eating psychopathology, and Hypothalamus Pituitary Adrenal axis functioning in patients with eating disorders. METHODS: The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey, and it was planned by the Clinic for Eating Disorders of the University of Florence (Italy). The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Institution. Twenty two anorexia nervosa and twenty one Bulimia Nervosa patients were assessed by means of a clinical interview and the structured clinical interview for diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition. Eating attitudes and behaviour were specifically investigated by means of the eating disorder examination questionnaire (EDE-Q). Patients were also evaluated by means of the symptom checklist (SCL 90-R), REE was measured by means of indirect calorimetry, and blood cortisol morning levels were evaluated. RESULTS: Both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa patients showed a reduced REE as compared with predicted REE. Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with resting energy expenditure in Bulimics, whereas a strong, negative association between BMI and REE was observed in Anorectics. The pattern of associations between variables supported a mediation model, where shape concern accounted for variations in REE and cortisol levels (mediator), and variations in the mediator significantly accounted for variations in REE. When these associations where taken into account together, the relationship between shape concern and REE was no longer significant, whereas the association between cortisol levels and REE retained its significance, showing strong evidence for a single, dominant mediator. Anorectics and Bulimics showed an opposite pattern of association between BMI and REE. In Anorectics only, a higher REE was associated with a more severe eating disorder specific psychopathology, and cortisol levels represent a possible

  10. Estimation of resting energy expenditure in children with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Patt, Pamela L; Agena, Sarah M; Vogel, Lawrence C; Foley, Sharon; Anderson, Caroline J

    2007-01-01

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) is the amount of energy needed to maintain energy balance. Prediction equations exist to estimate REE for adults. Recommended dietary allowances (RDA) can be used to estimate energy needs for children but may not be suitable for children with spinal cord injury (SCI). Limited information is available on energy expenditure of children with SCI. Research is needed to determine a method to estimate energy needs for children with SCI. This research project was designed to determine REE in children with SCI who attended an SCI clinic at a children's hospital, determine variables that are correlated to REE in children with SCI, and determine a regression equation to estimate REE in children with SCI. A sample of convenience was obtained from children attending the SCI clinic at Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago. The REE was measured after a 4-hour fast using a portable hand-held MedGem device to perform indirect calorimetry. Data including height, weight, age, months since injury, level of injury, gender, race, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Motor Score, ASIA Impairment Score, and body mass index were obtained as covariates. Regression equations to predict REE were developed for boys and girls. The REE varied significantly from results obtained using both RDA and the Harris-Benedict equation. Height and level of injury were the only variables that correlated with REE in this sample. Measured REE was lower than the results of prediction equations. A regression equation was developed to estimate REE in children with SCI based on height and level of injury. Further validation studies are needed.

  11. Dietary intake, resting energy expenditure, and eating behavior in women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ingrid; Hulthén, Lena; Landén, Mikael; Pålsson, Erik; Janson, PerOlof; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2016-02-01

    Data on dietary intake, meal patterns, and eating attitudes from women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is limited despite the fact that PCOS is associated with obesity. We aimed to test the hypothesis that women with PCOS display altered dietary intakes and eating behaviors compared to controls. Women with PCOS (n = 72) as defined according to the modified Rotterdam criteria were compared with healthy controls (n = 30). Anthropometry included measurement of waist circumference and determination of the resting metabolic rate via indirect calorimetry. All women completed questionnaires regarding eating behavior; Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-R21) and eating attitudes; Eating Attitudes Test (EAT). Group comparisons were done by Mann-Whitney U test and logistic regression analysis was used for adjustments of age and BMI in a non-parametric way. BMI was higher in women with PCOS compared to controls. Resting metabolic rate did not differ between women with women with and without PCOS after adjustment for age and BMI [1411 ± 229 kcal/day versus 1325 ± 193 kcal per day (P = 0.07)], whereas the respiratory exchange ratio was higher in women with PCOS than in controls [0.83 ± 0.07 versus 0.78 ± 0.08 (P = 0.02 after adjustments for age and BMI)]. Energy percent (E%) carbohydrates was higher in women with PCOS compared to controls (P = 0.017), but E% alcohol was lower (P = 0.036) after adjustment for age and BMI. The average total EAT scores and EAT dieting subscale scores were higher in women with PCOS compared with controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.024, respectively) after adjustment for age and BMI. No difference was found for previous or current symptoms of bulimia nervosa. Independent of BMI and age, the resting metabolic rate did not differ between women with and without PCOS indicating that women with PCOS should have equal abilities in terms of energy metabolism to lose weight as women without PCOS. Women with PCOS showed greater concerns about their

  12. Exploiting Third Generation Quarks for New Physics Discoveries at the Energy Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Andrew G.

    2013-10-15

    The K-State group's effort is top quark physics and searches for beyond-standard-model physics in t{anti }t final states. The KSU team performed the most precise measurement of the t {anti t} cross section in the lepton + jets channel, and for the first time excluded the fourth generation of the standard model in the perturbative regime.

  13. Associations among calcium intake, resting energy expenditure, and body fat in a multiethnic sample of children

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Lynae J.; Casazza, Krista; Willig, Amanda L.; Cardel, Michelle I.; Beasley, T. Mark; Fernandez, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The objective was to determine if calcium intake was associated with resting energy expenditure (REE) and body fat in children, after accounting for ancestral genetic background. Study design Participants included 315 children. REE, body composition, and dietary calcium were assessed by indirect calorimetry, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and 24-hour recalls, respectively. Structural equations modeling assessed the relationships among REE, calcium intake and body fat. Results There were positive associations between calcium intake and REE (p<0.01) and between REE and total body fat (p<0.0001). There was indirect effect of calcium intake on total body fat (p<0.01). There were positive associations between calcium intake and REE (p<0.01), and a trend towards an association of calcium intake and total body fat (p=0.065) among males only; whereas, the only significant relationship among females was an association of REE on total body fat (p<0.0001). Conclusions REE was associated with calcium intake and mediated a relationship between calcium intake and total body fat. These findings suggest calcium intake may play a role in fat accumulation and energy balance through its effects on REE, especially in males. PMID:20400090

  14. Resting energy expenditure (REE) in an old-old population: implications for metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Noreik, Michaela; Maurmann, Mareike; Meier, Veronika; Becker, Ingrid; Röhrig, Gabriele; Polidori, Maria Cristina; Schulz, Ralf-Joachim

    2014-11-01

    The basis of nutritional therapy and thus an adequate nutrient intake is the assessment of energy need. On the other end, the assessment of individual energy requirements based on the gold standard, indirect calorimetry, is associated with feasibility difficulties in geriatric settings. To identify the most accurate predictive equations for resting energy expenditure (REE) in older subjects with overweight, 17 predictive equations were compared to indirect calorimetry measurement in a study population of 20 obese older subjects (mean BMI 33.7±4.5kg/m(2); mean age 79.8±8.1 years; gender 5 males and 15 females) and 20 age-matched controls with a normal body weight (mean BMI 24.9±2.5 kg/m(2); mean age 82.1±6.6 years; gender 9 males and 11 females). The comparison led to two significant observations: the predictive equations used led to a much better estimation of the REE in the control group than in the obese older subjects. In addition, the most accurate equation for estimating the REE in the obese older subjects has been shown to be that by Lührmann et al. Further studies are needed to assess the feasibility of using this equation in a routine geriatric setting. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Isometric thermogenesis at rest and during movement: a neglected variable in energy expenditure and obesity predisposition.

    PubMed

    Dulloo, A G; Miles-Chan, J L; Montani, J-P; Schutz, Y

    2017-02-01

    Isometric thermogenesis as applied to human energy expenditure refers to heat production resulting from increased muscle tension. While most physical activities consist of both dynamic and static (isometric) muscle actions, the isometric component is very often essential for the optimal performance of dynamic work given its role in coordinating posture during standing, walking and most physical activities of everyday life. Over the past 75 years, there has been sporadic interest into the relevance of isometric work to thermoregulatory thermogenesis and to adaptive thermogenesis pertaining to body-weight regulation. This has been in relation to (i) a role for skeletal muscle minor tremor or microvibration - nowadays referred to as 'resting muscle mechanical activity' - in maintaining body temperature in response to mild cooling; (ii) a role for slowed skeletal muscle isometric contraction-relaxation cycle as a mechanism for energy conservation in response to caloric restriction and weight loss and (iii) a role for spontaneous physical activity (which is contributed importantly by isometric work for posture maintenance and fidgeting behaviours) in adaptive thermogenesis pertaining to weight regulation. This paper reviews the evidence underlying these proposed roles for isometric work in adaptive thermogenesis and highlights the contention that variability in this neglected component of energy expenditure could contribute to human predisposition to obesity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  16. Weight-adjusted resting energy expenditure is not constant in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Zauner, Alexandra; Schneeweiss, Bruno; Kneidinger, Nikolaus; Lindner, Gregor; Zauner, Christian

    2006-03-01

    In critically ill patients, energy requirements are frequently calculated as a multiple of total body weight presuming a linear relationship between total body weight and resting energy expenditure (REE); however, it is doubtful if this estimation of energy needs should be applied to all patients, particularly to overweight patients, since adipose tissue has a low contribution to REE. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that REE adjusted for total body weight decreases with increasing body mass index in critically ill patients. Additionally, measured REE was compared with three predictive equations. Clinical study in a university hospital intensive care unit. One hundred critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Patients were included into four groups according to their body mass index (normal weight, pre-obese, obese, and morbidly obese). Measured REE was assessed using indirect calorimetry. Energy needs were calculated using the basal metabolic rate, the Consensus Statement of the American College of Chest Physicians (REEacs), and 25[Symbol: see text]kcal/kg of ideal body weight (REEibw). Adjusted REE was 24.8 +/- 5.5 kcal/kg in normal weight, 22.0 +/- 3.7 kcal/kg in pre-obese, 20.4 +/- 2.6 kcal/kg in obese, and 16.3 +/- 2.3 kcal/kg in morbidly obese patients (p < 0.01). Basal metabolic rate underestimated measured REE in normal weight and pre-obese patients. REEacs and REEibw over- and underestimated measured REE in overweight patients, respectively. Predictive equations were not able to estimate measured REE adequately in all the patients. Adjusted REE decreased with increasing body mass index; thus, a body mass index group-specific adaptation for the estimation of energy needs should be applied.

  17. Comparison between measured and predicted resting energy expenditure in mechanically ventilated patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Rao, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Mao-Yun; Hu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare resting energy expenditure (REE) obtained by indirect calorimetry (IC) and Harris-Benedict (H-B) equations, and to examine whether hypocaloric nutrition support could improve protein nutritional status in mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thirtythree COPD patients (20 males, 13 females) were recruited and REE was measured by IC. Measured REE (REEm) was compared to predictive REE by H-B equations (REEH-B) and its corrected values. Correlation between REEm and APACHE II score was also analyzed. Patients were randomly divided into hypocaloric energy group (50%-90% of REEm, En-low) and general energy group (90%-130% of REEm, En-gen) for nutrition support. The differences of albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, hemoglobin, and lymphocyte count before and after 7 days nutrition support were observed. Results show that REEH-B and REEH-B×1.2 were significantly lower than REEm (p<0.01). REEm positively correlated with APACHE II score (p<0.05 or p<0.01). After nutrition support, hemoglobin decreased significantly in En-gen group (p<0.05); lymphocyte count in both groups, and transferrin and prealbumin in the En-low group increased significantly (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Our data suggest that 1) these patients' REE were increased; 2) since IC is the best method to determine REE, in the absence of IC, H-B equations (with standard body weight) can be used to calculate REE, but the value should be adjusted by correction coefficients derived from APACHE II; 3) low energy nutrition support during mechanical ventilation in COPD patients might have better effects on improving protein nutritional status than high energy support.

  18. Smoking is associated with increased resting energy expenditure in the general population: The NEO study.

    PubMed

    Blauw, Lisanne L; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rosendaal, Frits R; de Mutsert, Renée; Gast, Karin B; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Rensen, Patrick C N; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2015-11-01

    Animal studies and human studies in small selected populations have shown a positive association between nicotine smoking and resting energy expenditure (REE), but data in large cohorts are lacking. We aimed to investigate the association between smoking behavior and REE in a large, population-based study. Population-based cross-sectional study. In this cross-sectional analysis of baseline measurements from the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study (n=6673), we included participants with REE measurement by indirect calorimetry who were not using lipid or glucose lowering drugs (n=1189). We used linear regression analysis to examine the association of smoking status (never, former, occasional, current smoker) and smoking quantity (pack years) with REE per kilogram (kg) fat free mass (FFM) and with REE adjusted for FFM. Models were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, educational level, physical activity, energy intake and body mass index (BMI). Mean (standard deviation, SD) age was 55.2 (5.9) years and BMI was 26.3 (4.4) kg/m(2). 60% of the participants were women. Mean (SD) REE/FFM (kcal/day/kg FFM) was for male never smokers 25.1 (2.0), male current smokers 26.4 (2.8), female never smokers 28.9 (2.5) and female current smokers 30.1 (3.7). After adjustment, only current smokers had a higher REE/FFM (mean difference 1.28, 95% CI 0.64, 1.92), and a higher REE adjusted for FFM (mean difference 60.3 kcal/day, 95% CI 29.1, 91.5), compared with never smokers. There was no association between pack years and REE/FFM (mean difference -0.01, 95% CI -0.06, 0.04) or REE adjusted for FFM (mean difference 0.2, 95% CI -2.4, 2.8) in current smokers. Current smoking is associated with a higher resting energy expenditure compared with never smoking in a large population-based cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Search for anomalous production of events with a photon, jet, b-quark jet, and missing transverse energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H. J.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a signature-based search for the anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy (E̸T). The search uses data corresponding to 2.0fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of s=1.96TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. From 6.69747×106 events with a photon candidate with transverse energy ET>25GeV, we find 617 events with E̸T>25GeV and two or more jets with ET>15GeV, at least one identified as originating from a b quark, versus an expectation of 607±113 events. Increasing the requirement on E̸T to 50 GeV, we find 28 events versus an expectation of 30±11 events. We find no indications of non-standard-model phenomena.

  20. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with a Photon, Jet, b-quark Jet, and Missing Transverse Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The CDF

    2009-05-01

    We present a signature-based search for anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy (/E{sub T}). The search uses data corresponding to 2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. From 6,697,466 events with a photon candidate with transverse energy ET > 25 GeV, we find 617 events with /E{sub T} > 25 GeV and two or more jets with E{sub T} > 15 GeV, at least one identified as originating from a b quark, versus an expectation of 607 {+-} 113 events. Increasing the requirement on /E{sub T} to 50 GeV, we find 28 events versus an expectation of 30 {+-} 11 events. We find no indications of non-standard-model phenomena.

  1. Evolving Concepts on Adjusting Human Resting Energy Expenditure Measurements for Body Size

    PubMed Central

    Heymsfield, Steven B.; Thomas, Diana; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Shen, Wei; Peterson, Courtney M.; Müller, Manfred J.

    2012-01-01

    Establishing if an adult’s resting energy expenditure (REE) is high or low for their body size is a pervasive question in nutrition research. Early workers applied body mass and height as size measures and formulated the Surface Law and Kleiber’s Law, although each has limitations when adjusting REE. Body composition methods introduced during the mid-twentieth century provided a new opportunity to identify metabolically homogeneous “active” compartments. These compartments all show improved correlations with REE estimates over body mass-height approaches, but collectively share a common limitation: REE-body composition ratios are not “constant” but vary across men and women and with race, age, and body size. The now-accepted alternative to ratio-based norms is to adjust for predictors by applying regression models to calculate “residuals” that establish if a REE is relatively high or low. The distinguishing feature of statistical REE-body composition models is a “non-zero” intercept of unknown origin. The recent introduction of imaging methods has allowed development of physiological tissue-organ based REE prediction models. Herein we apply these imaging methods to provide a mechanistic explanation, supported by experimental data, for the non-zero intercept phenomenon and in that context propose future research directions for establishing between subject differences in relative energy metabolism. PMID:22863371

  2. Evolving concepts on adjusting human resting energy expenditure measurements for body size.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; Thomas, D; Bosy-Westphal, A; Shen, W; Peterson, C M; Müller, M J

    2012-11-01

    Establishing if an adult's resting energy expenditure (REE) is high or low for their body size is a pervasive question in nutrition research. Early workers applied body mass and height as size measures and formulated the Surface Law and Kleiber's Law, although each has limitations when adjusting REE. Body composition methods introduced during the mid-20th century provided a new opportunity to identify metabolically homogeneous 'active' compartments. These compartments all show improved correlations with REE estimates over body mass-height approaches, but collectively share a common limitation: REE-body composition ratios are not 'constant' but vary across men and women and with race, age and body size. The now-accepted alternative to ratio-based norms is to adjust for predictors by applying regression models to calculate 'residuals' that establish if an REE is relatively high or low. The distinguishing feature of statistical REE-body composition models is a 'non-zero' intercept of unknown origin. The recent introduction of imaging methods has allowed development of physiological tissue-organ-based REE prediction models. Herein, we apply these imaging methods to provide a mechanistic explanation, supported by experimental data, for the non-zero intercept phenomenon and, in that context, propose future research directions for establishing between-subject differences in relative energy metabolism.

  3. Low resting energy expenditure in Asians can be attributed to body composition.

    PubMed

    Wouters-Adriaens, Mirjam P E; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2008-10-01

    To compare resting energy expenditure (REE) between Asians and whites after adjusting for fat-free mass measured with a two- or more-compartment model. Participants were 10 white men (28 +/- 3 years), 10 Asian men (30 +/- 4 years), 10 white women (22 +/- 4 years), and 11 Asian women (31 +/- 7 years). REE was measured with a ventilated hood system under strictly controlled conditions. Body composition was measured with a two-compartment model based on body mass (BM) and body volume (hydrodensitometry), a three-compartment model adding total body water (TBW) (deuterium dilution), and a four-compartment model incorporating bone mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) as well. Lean BM in the trunk and in the extremities was assessed with DXA. All measurements were performed at Maastricht University. Measurements on Asian subjects were performed within 3 months after their arrival in the Netherlands. Absolute REE was lower in Asians (5.87 +/- 0.91 MJ/day) than in whites (7.00 +/- 1.11 MJ/day). There was no significant difference in REE between the two races after adjustment for fat-free mass. There were no significant differences in REE between Asians and whites after adjustment for differences in body composition based on a two- or more-compartment model.

  4. Predictive equations underestimate resting energy expenditure in female adolescents with phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Meghan E.; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Singh, Rani H.

    2010-01-01

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) is often used to estimate total energy needs. The Schofield equation based on weight and height has been reported to underestimate REE in female children with phenylketonuria (PKU). The objective of this observational, cross-sectional study was to evaluate the agreement of measured REE with predicted REE for female adolescents with PKU. A total of 36 females (aged 11.5-18.7 years) with PKU attending Emory University’s Metabolic Camp (June 2002 – June 2008) underwent indirect calorimetry. Measured REE was compared to six predictive equations using paired Student’s t-tests, regression-based analysis, and assessment of clinical accuracy. The differences between measured and predicted REE were modeled against clinical parameters to determine to if a relationship existed. All six selected equations significantly under predicted measured REE (P< 0.005). The Schofield equation based on weight had the greatest level of agreement, with the lowest mean prediction bias (144 kcal) and highest concordance correlation coefficient (0.626). However, the Schofield equation based on weight lacked clinical accuracy, predicting measured REE within ±10% in only 14 of 36 participants. Clinical parameters were not associated with bias for any of the equations. Predictive equations underestimated measured REE in this group of female adolescents with PKU. Currently, there is no accurate and precise alternative for indirect calorimetry in this population. PMID:20497783

  5. Resting energy expenditure and body composition following cerebro-vascular accident.

    PubMed

    Weekes, E; Elia, M

    1992-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure resting energy expenditure (REE) in patients routinely admitted to hospital following a cerebro-vascular accident (CVA). The REE of 15 patients (8 female; 7 male) was measured using indirect calorimetry 24-72 hours after the CVA; 11 patients (7 female; 4 male) were measured again 10-14 days later. Body composition was assessed using skin-fold thickness, near infra-red interactance and bioelectrical impedance techniques. Initial REE in females was 1133 kcal/day (+/-67) and in males 1526 kcal/day (+/-111). There was little or no difference in REE or body composition between the first and second measurements. REE was between 95%-107% of the values predicted by 10 reference tables and equations and up to 118% of that predicted by another. We conclude that the total energy requirements of patients following a stroke are not high, probably because of decreased physical activity and changes in muscular tone subsequent to CVA.

  6. Applicability of predictive equations for resting energy expenditure in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Del Re, Mariana Pantaleão; Melo, Camila Maria de; Santos, Marcus Vinicius Dos; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Marco Túlio de

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of predictive equations for resting energy expenditure (REE) in obese individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the effects of OSA severity on REE. Twenty-nine obese men, 41.5 ± 7 years old, with moderate and severe OSA were recruited. All subjects were submitted to a clinical polysomnography, body composition, and indirect calorimetry measurements. REE was also predicted by three different equations: Harris and Benedict (1919), Cunningham (1990), and DRI (2002). No effects of OSA severity on REE were found. The measured REE (2416.0 ± 447.1 kcal/day) and the REE predicted by equations were different from each other (F = 2713.88; p < 0.05): Harris and Benedict (2128.0 ± 245.8 kcal/day), Cunningham (1789.1 ± 167.8 kcal/day) and DRI (2011.1 ± 181.4 kcal/day). Pearson correlations showed a moderate positive correlation between the REE measured and predicted by all equations. Our findings suggest that predictive equations for REE underestimate the energy expenditure in obese patients with sleep apnea. Also, no effects of OSA severity on REE were found.

  7. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Runaway quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gurarie, V.

    1995-08-01

    When heavy nuclei collide, a quark-gluon plasma is formed. The plasma is subject to a strong electric field due to the charge of the colliding nuclei. The electric field can influence the behavior of the quark-gluon plasma. In particular, we might observe an increased number of quarks moving in the direction of that field, as we do in the standard electron-ion plasma. In this paper we show that this phenomenon, called the runaway quarks, does not exist.

  9. b quark production at a cener-of-mass energy of 13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Matthew; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross-section for producing b quarks in the reaction pp -> bbX and B hadron production fractions as a function of η and transverse momentum are reported in 13 TeV collisions at the LHC with data taken by the LHCb detector. The measurements are done using semileptonic decays of b-flavored hadrons decaying into a ground-state charmed hadron in association with a muon.

  10. Does endogenous GLP-1 affect resting energy expenditure and fuel selection in overweight and obese adults?

    PubMed

    Poggiogalle, E; Donini, L M; Chiesa, C; Pacifico, L; Lenzi, A; Perna, S; Faliva, M; Naso, M; Rondanelli, M

    2017-10-03

    To investigate the association between fasting glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels and resting energy expenditure (REE), and respiratory quotient (RQ) in overweight and obese adults. Study participants were enrolled at the Dietetic and Metabolic Unit, University of Pavia, Italy. Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 25 and ≤ 45 years, and body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 and ≤ 35 kg/m(2). Diabetic subjects were excluded. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. REE was evaluated using indirect calorimetry, and RQ was calculated from respiratory gas exchanges. Fasting GLP-1, glucose, insulin and free fatty acid (FFA) levels, and 24-h norepinephrine urinary excretion were measured. Homeostasis model assessments of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA-β) were calculated. Thirty-seven participants were included (age 43.4 ± 1.6 years; BMI 30.6 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)). REE was not associated with fasting GLP-1 levels (p = 0.98) after adjustment for age, sex, fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass (FM). Similarly, no association was observed between RQ and GLP-1 levels (p = 0.95), after adjustment for age, sex, and body fat. In adults subjects with increased adiposity fasting, GLP-1 levels do not seem to play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism and in fuel selection.

  11. Effect of diet composition and weight loss on resting energy expenditure in the POUNDS LOST study.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Lilian; Bray, George A; Smith, Steven R; Ryan, Donna H; de Souza, Russell J; Loria, Catherine M; Champagne, Catherine M; Williamson, Donald A; Sacks, Frank M

    2012-12-01

    Weight loss reduces energy expenditure, but it is unclear whether dietary macronutrient composition affects this reduction. We hypothesized that energy expenditure might be modulated by macronutrient composition of the diet. The Prevention of Obesity Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS) LOST study, a prospective, randomized controlled trial in 811 overweight/obese people who were randomized in a 2 × 2 design to diets containing 20en% or 40en% fat and 15en% or 25en% protein (diets with 65%, 55%, 45%, and 35% carbohydrate) provided the data to test this hypothesis. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured at baseline, 6, and 24 months using a ventilated hood. REE declined at 6 months by 99.5 ± 8.0 kcal/day in men and 55.2 ± 10.6 kcal/day in women during the first 6 months. This decline was related to the weight loss, and there was no difference between the diets. REE had returned to baseline by 24 months, but body weight was still 60% below baseline. Measured REE at 6 months was significantly lower than the predicted (-18.2 ± 6.7 kcal/day) and was the result of significant reductions from baseline in the low-fat diets (65% or 55% carbohydrate), but not in the high fat diet groups. By 24 months the difference had reversed with measured REE being slightly but significantly higher than predicted (21.8 ± 10.1 kcal/day). In conclusion, we found that REE fell significantly after weight loss but was not related to diet composition. Adaptive thermogenesis was evident at 6 months, but not at 24 months.

  12. Effect of diet composition and weight loss on resting energy expenditure in the POUNDS LOST study

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Lilian; Bray, George A.; Smith, Steven R.; Ryan, Donna H.; de Souza, Russell; Loria, Catherine M.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Williamson, Donald; Sacks, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Weight loss reduces energy expenditure, but it is unclear whether dietary macronutrient composition affects this reduction. We hypothesized that energy expenditure might be modulated by macronutrient composition of the diet. The POUNDS LOST study, a prospective, randomized controlled trial in 811 overweight/obese people who were randomized in a 2×2 design to diets containing 20en% or 40en% fat and 15en% or 25en% (diets with 65%, 55%, 45% and 35% carbohydrate) provided the data to test this hypothesis. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured at baseline, 6 and 24 months using a ventilated hood. REE declined at 6 months by 99.5±8.0 kcal/d in men and 55.2±10.6 kcal/d in women during the first 6 months. This decline was related to the weight loss, and there was no difference between the diets. REE had returned to baseline by 24 months, but body weight was still 60% below baseline. Measured REE at 6 months was significantly lower than the predicted (−18.2±6.7 kcal/d) and was the result of significant reductions from baseline in the low fat diets (65% or 55% carbohydrate), but not in the high fat diet groups. By 24 months the difference had reversed with measured REE being slightly but significantly higher than predicted (21.8±10.1 kcal/d). In conclusion, we found that REE fell significantly after weight loss but was not related to diet composition. Adaptive thermogenesis was evident at 6 months, but not at 24 months. PMID:22627912

  13. Chronic starvation secondary to anorexia nervosa is associated with an adaptive suppression of resting energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Kosmiski, Lisa; Schmiege, Sarah J; Mascolo, Margherita; Gaudiani, Jennifer; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic starvation is accompanied by a reduction in resting energy expenditure (REE). It is not clear whether this is due mainly to a reduction in body mass or also involves a significant reduction in the cellular metabolic rate of the fat-free mass (FFM). The main goal was to compare measured REE (REEm) with REE predicted by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry modeling of organ-tissue mass (REEp) in malnourished patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) and in healthy lean control subjects. REE adjusted for FFM and fat mass was also compared between the groups. This was a cross-sectional study of 30 patients with AN and 25 lean control subjects. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Body composition was modeled using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and REE was predicted for each group based on organ-tissue mass. REEm was significantly lower than REEp in subjects with AN (854 ± 41 vs 1080 ± 25 kcal/d, P < .001), but not in control subjects. In addition, REE adjusted for both FFM and fat mass was significantly lower in the subjects with AN (1031 ± 37 vs 1178 ± 32 kcal/d, P < .01). Finally, compared with the lean control subjects, both organ and skeletal muscle mass were approximately 20% smaller in subjects with AN. Chronic starvation is accompanied by a significant reduction in the metabolic rate of the FFM. The organs and/or tissues accounting for this are unknown. In addition, this study suggests that protein is mobilized proportionately from organs and skeletal muscle during starvation. This too may be an adaptive response to chronic starvation.

  14. Einstein's Gravitational Field Approach to Dark Matter and Dark Energy-Geometric Particle Decay into the Vacuum Energy Generating Higgs Boson and Heavy Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Walter James

    2015-08-01

    During an interview at the Niels Bohr Institute David Bohm stated, "according to Einstein, particles should eventually emerge as singularities, or very strong regions of stable pulses of (the gravitational) field" [1]. Starting from this premise, we show spacetime, indeed, manifests stable pulses (n-valued gravitons) that decay into the vacuum energy to generate all three boson masses (including Higgs), as well as heavy-quark mass; and all in precise agreement with the 2010 CODATA report on fundamental constants. Furthermore, our relativized quantum physics approach (RQP) answers to the mystery surrounding dark energy, dark matter, accelerated spacetime, and why ordinary matter dominates over antimatter.

  15. The combination of short rest and energy drink consumption as fatigue countermeasures during a prolonged drive of professional truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Adi; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Gershon, Pnina

    2014-06-01

    One of the major concerns for professional drivers is fatigue. Many studies evaluated specific fatigue countermeasures, in many cases comparing the efficiency of each method separately. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of rest areas combined with consumption of energy drinks on professional truck drivers during a prolonged simulated drive. Fifteen professional truck drivers participated in three experimental sessions: control-drivers were asked to drink 500 ml of a placebo drink prior to the beginning of the drive. Energy drink-drivers were asked to drink 500 ml of an energy drink containing 160 mg of caffeine prior to the beginning of the drive, and an Energy drink+Rest session--where the drivers were asked to drink 500 ml of an energy drink prior to driving, and rest for 10 min at a designated rest area zone 100 min into the drive. For all sessions, driving duration was approximately 150 min and consisted of driving on a monotonous, two-way rural road. In addition to driving performance measures, subjective measures, and heart rate variability were obtained. Results indicated that consumption of an energy drink (in both sessions) facilitated lower lane position deviations and reduced steering wheel deviations during the first 80-100 min of the drive relative to the control sessions. Resting after 100 min of driving, in addition to the energy drink that was consumed before the drive, enabled the drivers to maintain these abilities throughout the remainder of the driving session. Practical applications: Practical applications arising from the results of this research may give indication on the possible added value of combining fatigue counter measures methods during a prolonged drive and the importance of the timing of the use for each method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Energy Lossand Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au+Au Collisions at root-s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Klay, J; Enokizono, A; Newby, J; Heffner, M; Hartouni, E

    2007-02-26

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3 < p{sub rmT} < 9 GeV/c at midrapidity (|y| < 0.35) from heavy flavor (charm and bottom) decays in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC energies. A large azimuthal anisotropy, v{sub 2}, with respect to the reaction plane is observed for 0.5 < p{sub rmT} < 5 GeV/c indicating non-zero heavy flavor elliptic flow. A simultaneous description of R{sub AA}(p{sub rmT}) and v{sub 2}(p{sub rmT}) constrains the existing models of heavy-quark rescattering in strongly interacting matter and provides information on the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound, i.e. near a perfect fluid, is suggested.

  17. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    DOE PAGES

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; ...

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W',more » is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.« less

  18. Measurement of the single top quark production cross section and |Vtb| in events with one charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and jets at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-12-31

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV using a data set corresponding to 7.5  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the single top quark decay process t→Wb→ℓνb by requiring the presence of an electron or muon, a large imbalance of transverse momentum indicating the presence of a neutrino, and two or three jets including at least one originating from a bottom quark. An artificial neural network is used to discriminate the signal from backgrounds. We measure a single top quark production cross section of 3.04(-0.53)(+0.57)  pb and set a lower limit on the magnitude of the coupling between the top quark and bottom quark |Vtb|>0.78 at the 95% credibility level.

  19. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  20. Bach music in preterm infants: no 'Mozart effect' on resting energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Keidar, H Rosenfeld; Mandel, D; Mimouni, F B; Lubetzky, R

    2014-02-01

    To study whether Johan Sebastian Bach music has a lowering effect on resting energy expenditure (REE) similar to that of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart music. Prospective, randomized clinical trial with cross-over in 12 healthy, appropriate weights for gestational age (GA), gavage fed, metabolically stable, preterm infants. Infants were randomized to a 30-min period of either Mozart or Bach music or no music over 3 consecutive days. REE was measured every minute by indirect calorimetry. Three REE measurements were performed in each of 12 infants at age 20±15.8 days. Mean GA was 30.17±2.44 weeks and mean birthweight was 1246±239 g. REE was similar during the first 10-min of all three randomization periods. During the next 10-min period, infants exposed to music by Mozart had a trend toward lower REE than when not exposed to music. This trend became significant during the third 10-min period. In contrast, music by Bach or no music did not affect significantly REE during the whole study. On average, the effect size of Mozart music upon REE was a reduction of 7.7% from baseline. Mozart music significantly lowers REE in preterm infants, whereas Bach music has no similar effect. We speculate that 'Mozart effect' must be taken into account when incorporating music in the therapy of preterm infants, as not all types of music may have similar effects upon REE and growth.

  1. Variation of resting energy expenditure after the first chemotherapy cycle in acute leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Galati, Paula Cristina; Chiarello, Paula Garcia; Simões, Belinda Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Changes in resting energy expenditure (REE) of cancer patients vary depending on type of tumor, treatment time point and kind of treatment. Little is known about REE of acute leukemia adult patients after treatment, especially with results related to body weight or fat free mass (FFM). This study aimed to assess changes in REE of acute leukemia adult patients before and after the first remission induction. Evaluation of REE was performed by indirect calorimetry and predicted REE was calculated by Harris-Benedict equation. Weight and height were measured and compared to a control group of healthy individuals. FFM was assessed by bioelectrical impedance for adjusting REE values. We evaluated 18 patients and 26 healthy individuals. At diagnosis, patients presented REE, REE/weight, and REE/FFM higher than the controls. Reductions of REE, REE/weight, and REE/FFM were also observed in patients after the first cycle of chemotherapy. The predicted REE for the patients group showed significant lower value compared with measured REE. Before the first cycle of chemotherapy REE was increased but undergoes a reduction after treatment, reaching values similar to the controls. For predictive Harris-Benedict equation, stress factors should be added to avoid underestimation of REE before and after chemotherapy.

  2. Validation of predictive equations for resting energy expenditure in Japanese pediatric Crohn's disease patients: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Arai, Katsuhiro; Funayama, Rie; Takahashi, Mieko; Sakai, Rie; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Obayashi, Naho; Matsui, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Predictive equations are often used to estimate resting energy expenditure (REE). Determining the appropriate equation for different patient types, however, remains inconclusive, as in the case of Japanese children with Crohn's disease (CD). The aim of this study was to identify an appropriate predictive equation for measuring REE in Japanese children with CD. Twelve Japanese children with CD managed at the National Center for Child Health and Development in Tokyo, Japan, were studied. REE (kcal/day) was measured using indirect calorimetry. The predictive equations used were the Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (2010), the Schofield equation, the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations University (FAO/WHO/UNU) equation and the Cunningham equation. Difference between predicted and measured REE was analyzed on Bland-Altman plot. Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (2010) had the smallest difference between predicted and measured REE. Weight was the primary predictor of REE on multiple regression analysis. As well, Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (2010) had the highest ratio of weight to predicted REE (98.5%). Of the four equations, Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (2010) appeared to be the most practical and accurate predictive equation for REE in Japanese children with CD. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Comparison of Resting Energy Expenditure Between Cancer Subjects and Healthy Controls: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Yen Vi; Batterham, Marijka J; Edwards, Cheree

    2016-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence surrounding the extent of changes in resting energy expenditure (REE) in cancer. This meta-analysis aimed to establish the mean difference in REE, as kilojoules per kilogram fat-free mass, among cancer patients when compared to healthy control subjects. The secondary aim was to determine differences among different cancer types. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, and ProQuest Central were searched from the earliest records until March 2014. Studies were included if measured REE was reported as kilojoules or kilocalories per kilogram fat-free mass (FFM) in adult subjects with cancer. Twenty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Fourteen studies included both cancer (n = 1453) and control (n = 1145) groups. The meta-analysis shows an average increase in REE of 9.66 (95% confidence interval: 3.34, 15.98) kJ/kgFFM/day in cancer patients when compared to control subjects. Heterogeneity was detected (P < 0.001) which suggest variations in REE among cancer types. Elevations are most noticeable in patients with cancers of metabolically demanding organs.

  4. Accuracy of Prediction Formulae for the Assessment of Resting Energy Expenditure in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Carlo; Edefonti, Alberto; Calderini, Edoardo; Fossali, Emilio; Colombo, Carla; Battezzati, Alberto; Bertoli, Simona; Milani, Gregorio; Bisogno, Arianna; Perrone, Michela; Bettocchi, Silvia; De Cosmi, Valentina; Mazzocchi, Alessandra; Bedogni, Giorgio

    2016-12-01

    The resting energy expenditure (REE) of ill children is commonly estimated from prediction formulae developed in healthy children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of commonly employed REE prediction formulae versus indirect calorimetry in hospitalized children. We performed a cross-sectional study of 236 infants, children, and adolescents consecutively admitted to the Intermediate Care, Nephrology, Intensive Care, Emergency, and Cystic Fibrosis Units of the De Marchi Pediatric Hospital (Milan, Italy) between September 2013 and March 2015. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and estimated using the World Health Organization (WHO), Harris-Benedict, Schofield, and Oxford formulae. The mean (standard deviation) difference between the estimated and measured REE was: -1 (234) kcal/day for the WHO formula; 82 (286) kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict formula; 2 (215) kcal/day for the Schofield-weight formula; -2 (214) kcal/day for the Schofield-weight and height formula; and -5 (221) kcal/day for the Oxford formula. Even though the WHO, Schofield, and Oxford formulae gave accurate estimates of REE at the population level (small mean bias), all the formulae were not accurate enough to be employed at the individual level (large SD of bias). The WHO, Harris-Benedict, Schofield, and Oxford formulae should not be used to estimate REE in hospitalized children.

  5. Validation of predictive equations for resting energy expenditure in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hofsteenge, Geesje H; Chinapaw, Mai J M; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A; Weijs, Peter J M

    2010-05-01

    When the resting energy expenditure (REE) of overweight and obese adolescents cannot be measured by indirect calorimetry, it has to be predicted with an equation. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of published equations for REE compared with indirect calorimetry in overweight and obese adolescents. Predictive equations based on weight, height, sex, age, fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass were compared with measured REE. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry, and body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The accuracy of the REE equations was evaluated on the basis of the percentage of adolescents predicted within 10% of REE measured, the mean percentage difference between predicted and measured values (bias), and the root mean squared prediction error (RMSE). Forty-three predictive equations (of which 12 were based on FFM) were included. Validation was based on 70 girls and 51 boys with a mean age of 14.5 y and a mean (+/-SD) body mass index SD score of 2.93 +/- 0.45. The percentage of adolescents with accurate predictions ranged from 74% to 12% depending on the equation used. The most accurate and precise equation for these adolescents was the Molnar equation (accurate predictions: 74%; bias: -1.2%; RMSE: 174 kcal/d). The often-used Schofield-weight equation for age 10-18 y was not accurate (accurate predictions: 50%; bias: +10.7%; RMSE: 276 kcal/d). Indirect calorimetry remains the method of choice for REE in overweight and obese adolescents. However, the sex-specific Molnar REE prediction equation appears to be the most accurate for overweight and obese adolescents aged 12-18 y. This trial was registered at www.trialregister.nl with the Netherlands Trial Register as ISRCTN27626398.

  6. Resting energy expenditure in obese women: comparison between measured and estimated values.

    PubMed

    Poli, Vanessa Fadanelli Schoenardie; Sanches, Ricardo Badan; Moraes, Amanda Dos Santos; Fidalgo, João Pedro Novo; Nascimento, Maythe Amaral; Andrade-Silva, Stephan Garcia; Clemente, José Carlos; Yi, Liu Chiao; Caranti, Danielle Arisa

    2016-10-01

    Assessing energy requirements is a fundamental activity in clinical dietetic practice. The aim of this study was to investigate which resting energy expenditure (REE) predictive equations are the best alternatives to indirect calorimetry before and after an interdisciplinary therapy in Brazilian obese women. In all, twelve equations based on weight, height, sex, age, fat-free mass and fat mass were tested. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. The interdisciplinary therapy consisted of nutritional, physical exercise, psychological and physiotherapy support during the course of 1 year. The average differences between measured and predicted REE, as well as the accuracy at the ±10 % level, were evaluated. Statistical analysis included paired t tests, intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots. Validation was based on forty obese women (BMI 30-39·9 kg/m2). Our major findings demonstrated a wide variation in the accuracy of REE predictive equations before and after weight loss in non-morbid, obese women. The equations reported by Harris-Benedict and FAO/WHO/United Nations University (UNU) were the only ones that did not show significant differences compared with indirect calorimetry and presented a bias <5 %. The Harris-Benedict equation provided 40 and 47·5 % accurate predictions before and after therapy, respectively. The FAO equation provided 35 and 47·5 % accurate predictions. However, the Bland-Altman analysis did not show good agreement between these equations and indirect calorimetry. Therefore, the Harris-Benedict and FAO/WHO/UNU equations should be used with caution for obese women. The need to critically re-assess REE data and generate regional and more homogeneous REE databases for the target population is reinforced.

  7. Limits on quark compositeness from high energy jets in p¯p collisions at 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Akimov, V.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bean, A.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Doulas, S.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lu, J. G.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Meng, X. C.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sculli, J.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, X. F.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2000-08-01

    Events in p¯p collisions at s=1.8 TeV with total transverse energy exceeding 500 GeV are used to set limits on quark substructure. The data are consistent with next-to-leading order QCD calculations. We set a lower limit of 2.0 TeV at 95% confidence on the energy scale ΛLL for compositeness in quarks, assuming a model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction term. The limits on ΛLL are found to be insensitive to the sign of the interference term in the Lagrangian.

  8. A new device for measuring resting energy expenditure (REE) in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Malavolti, Marcella; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Dugoni, Manfredo; Poli, Marco; Romagnoli, Elisa; De Cristofaro, Paolo; Battistini, Nino C

    2007-06-01

    Lifestyle change targeted towards increasing daily resting energy expenditure (REE) is one of the cornerstones of obesity treatment. Measurements of energy expenditure and substrate utilization are essential to understanding the metabolic basis of obesity, and the physiological responses to perturbations in habitual food intake. REE is the largest part of human energy expenditure (60-70%) and an increase or decrease in REE would have a large impact on total energy. Accurate and easy-to-use methods for measuring REE are needed, to be applied by clinicians in daily clinical settings to assess the validity of a new instrument to estimate REE in normal weight, healthy adults. Ninety-nine subjects (52 females and 47 males) (mean+/-SD, age 38+/-14 years; body mass index (BMI) 23+/-3 kg/m(2)) were tested. REE was assessed using a Sensor Medics Vmax metabolic cart with a ventilated canopy and with the SenseWear armband. Body composition, percentage fat mass (%FM) and percentage fat free mass (%FFM) were assessed by skinfold thickness measurements (SF), bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA) and air displacement plethysmography (BOD-POD). No significant difference was found among measurements of FFM using the three different techniques. Both SenseWear and Sensor Medics Vmax showed a high correlation, r=0.42 and r=0.40 (p<0.0001) respectively, with BMI. No significant difference was found in mean REE between SenseWear (1540+/-280 kcal/day) and Sensor Medics Vmax (1700+/-330 kcal/day) (p=ns) and the correlation between REE measured by SenseWear and Sensor Medics Vmax was high (r=0.86, p<0.0001). Bland-Altman plot showed no difference in REE determination between SenseWear and Sensor Medics Vmax. %FFM determined by BOD-POD correlated with SenseWear (r=0.42, p<0.0001) as well as Sensor Medics Vmax (r=0.38, p<0.001). SF, BIA and BOD-POD provide valid and reliable measurements of FFM. Our results suggest that the SenseWear armband is an acceptable device to accurately measure

  9. Beta2-adrenergic stimulation increases energy expenditure at rest, but not during submaximal exercise in active overweight men.

    PubMed

    Onslev, Johan; Jacobson, Glenn; Narkowicz, Christian; Backer, Vibeke; Kalsen, Anders; Kreiberg, Michael; Jessen, Søren; Bangsbo, Jens; Hostrup, Morten

    2017-07-12

    β2-Agonists have been proposed as weight-loss treatment, because they elevate energy expenditure. However, it is unknown what effect β2-agonists have on energy expenditure in overweight individuals. Furthermore, the influence of β2-agonist R- and S-enantiomer ratio for the increased energy expenditure is insufficiently explored. Nineteen males were included in the study of which 14 completed. Subjects were 31.6 (±3.5) years [mean (±95% CI)] and had a fat percentage of 22.7 (±2.1)%. On separate days, subjects received either placebo or inhaled racemic (rac-) formoterol (2 × 27 µg). After an overnight fast, energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were estimated by indirect calorimetry at rest and during submaximal exercise. Plasma (R,R)- and (S,S)-formoterol enantiomer levels were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometry. At rest, energy expenditure and fat oxidation were 12% (P ≤ 0.001) and 38% (P = 0.006) higher for rac-formoterol than placebo. Systemic (R,R):(S,S) formoterol ratio was correlated with change in energy expenditure at rest in response to rac-formoterol (r = 0.63, P = 0.028), whereas no association was observed between fat percentage and rac-formoterol-induced change in energy expenditure. During exercise, energy expenditure was not different between treatments, although carbohydrate oxidation was 15% higher (P = 0.021) for rac-formoterol than placebo. Rac-formoterol-induced shift in substrate choice from rest to exercise was related to plasma ln-rac-formoterol concentrations (r = 0.75, P = 0.005). Selective β2-adrenoceptor agonism effectively increases metabolic rate and fat oxidation in overweight individuals. The potential for weight loss induced by β2-agonists may be greater for R-enantiopure formulations.

  10. Search for supersymmetric partner of bottom quark at d0 at Tevatron. Studies on missing transverse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Calvet, Samuel Pierre

    2007-09-21

    Supersymmetry, extension of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM), is searched for by trying to observe the supersymmetric partner of bottom quark ($\\tilde{b}$). This search is performed using events with a final state comprising two acoplanar b-quark jets and missing transverse energy (MET) and coming from a sample of 992 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, the Fermilab p$\\bar{p}$ collider. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to MS expectations leads to exclude sb masses up to 201 GeV, neutralino masses up to 94 GeV. The MET has been studied under two points of view, because of its fundamental role in this search. First, at the level of the trigger system which allows the online selection candidate events, and then, within the framework of the ALPGEN generator, the simulation of the Z boson transverse momentum which appears as MET when the Z boson decays into neutrino.

  11. Insight from elliptic flow of open charm mesons using quark coalescence model at RHIC and LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esha, Roli; Nasim, Md; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2017-04-01

    A study of elliptic flow of open charm mesons, D 0 and {D}S+/- , using quark coalescence as a mechanism of hadronization of heavy quarks implemented in conjunction with A Multi-Phase Transport model has been presented. We have studied the transverse momentum dependence of the elliptic flow parameter at mid-rapidity (| y| < 1.0) for Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{{s}{{NN}}}=200 {GeV} (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}{{NN}}}=2.76 TeV (LHC) for different values of partonic interaction cross-section and QCD coupling constant. We have compared our calculations with the experimentally measured data at the LHC energy. We have also studied the effect of shear viscosity on elliptic flow of open charm mesons within the transport model approach. Our study indicates that the elliptic flow of open charmed mesons is more sensitive to the viscous properties of the quark–gluon plasma medium as compared to light charged hadrons.

  12. Heavy-quark energy loss observed via muon spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN}=5.5\\, TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. C.; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Dainese, A.; Ding, H.-T.; García, G. Martínez

    2009-06-01

    Based on Conesa del Valle et al (2008 Phys. Lett. B 663 202), we present the results for the nuclear modification factors RAA and RCP of the high transverse momentum (5 < pt < 60 GeV/c) distribution of muons in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies, in which two pseudo-rapidity ranges covered by the LHC experiments, |η| < 2.5 and 2.5 < η < 4, are investigated. Heavy-quark energy loss is taken into account by mass-dependent BDMPS quenching weights. Muons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (c and b) and from leptonic decays of weak gauge bosons (W and Z) are the main contributions to the muon pt distribution above a few GeV/c. The muons from W and Z, that dominates the high pt, can be used as a medium-blind reference to observe the medium-induced suppression of beauty quarks.

  13. What are the right values of overlineΛ and the heavy quark kinetic energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Victor

    1996-02-01

    The values of two important parameters of the heavy quark effective theory, overlineΛ and μπ2 (the mean value of the heavy quark three momentum squared), have been determined recently by Gremm et al. [M. Gremm, A. Kapustin, Z. Ligeti, M. Wise, CALT-68-2043, hep-ph/9603314 (original and revised versions)] from the precise CLEO data on the shape of the electron spectrum in semileptonic B meson decays. The values obtained by Gremm et al.: overlineΛ = (0.55 ± 0.05) GeV, μπ2 = (0.35 ± 0.05) GeV 2, disagree with the result obtained earlier by Chernyak [Nucl. Phys. B 457 (1995) 961] from the D meson semileptonic width. The purpose of this note is to show that the main reason for a disagreement is the secondary electron background present in the data, which influences strongly the extracted values of overlineΛ and μπ2. We determine the amount of this background from the selfconsistency conditions, and subtract it out. As a result, the values of overlineΛ and μπ2 become a factor two smaller and agree with Chernyak (q.v.).

  14. Imposed rate and extent of weight loss in obese men and adaptive changes in resting and total energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Siervo, Mario; Faber, Peter; Lara, Jose; Gibney, Eileen R; Milne, Eric; Ritz, Patrick; Lobley, Gerald E; Elia, Marinos; Stubbs, R James; Johnstone, Alexandra M

    2015-08-01

    Weight loss (WL) is associated with a decrease in total and resting energy expenditure (EE). We aimed to investigate whether (1) diets with different rate and extent of WL determined different changes in total and resting EE and if (2) they influenced the level of adaptive thermogenesis, defined as the decline in total or resting EE not accounted by changes in body composition. Three groups of six, obese men participated in a total fast for 6 days to achieve a 5% WL and a very low calorie (VLCD, 2.5 MJ/day) for 3 weeks or a low calorie (LCD, 5.2 MJ/day) diet for 6 weeks to achieve a 10% WL. A four-component model was used to measure body composition. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure resting EE. Total EE was measured by doubly labelled water (VLCD, LCD) and 24-hour whole-body calorimetry (fasting). VLCD and LCD showed a similar degree of metabolic adaptation for total EE (VLCD = -6.2%; LCD = -6.8%). Metabolic adaptation for resting EE was greater in the LCD (-0.4 MJ/day, -5.3%) compared to the VLCD (-0.1 MJ/day, -1.4%) group. Resting EE did not decrease after short-term fasting and no evidence of adaptive thermogenesis (+0.4 MJ/day) was found after 5% WL. The rate of WL was inversely associated with changes in resting EE (n = 30, r = 0.-42, p=0.01). The rate of WL did not appear to influence the decline in total EE in obese men after 10% WL. Approximately 6% of this decline in total EE was explained by mechanisms of adaptive thermogenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Resting energy expenditure: a valuable predictor for KT/Vurea in peritoneal dialysis patients
.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian; Xie, Jingyuan; Wang, Weiming; Ren, Hong; Chen, Nan

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify an effective method for predicting small-molecule solute removal at the commencement of or before peritoneal dialysis (PD). The PD patients with a dialysis delivery of 8 L/d and a residual kidney function (RKF) ≤ 5 mL/min were enrolled in the study. Fat-free lean body mass (FFM) and resting energy expenditure (REE) were measured using bioelectrical impedance (BIA). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the threshold value for REE. The patients were divided into two groups, group A (lower REE) and group B (higher REE), based on their REE value. In total, 164 PD patients were enrolled between April 2013 and February 2015. REE was positively correlated with serum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), blood uric acid (UA), body mass index (BMI), and body surface area (BSA) and negatively correlated with total KT/Vurea (KT/V) and hemoglobin (Hb). REE (HR = 0.987, 95% CI = 0.975 - 1.000, p = 0.044) was the only predictor for KT/V. When REE was less than 1469.2 kal/d, it was easier to achieve the target KT/V. The patients in group B had significantly larger body size than those in group A; however, Hb level and total KT/V for group B were significantly lower than those for group A. REE may be a helpful indicator for choosing a suitable dialysis modality for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and for improving the prognosis after PD.
.

  16. Greater than predicted decrease in resting energy expenditure with age: cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence.

    PubMed

    Alfonzo-González, G; Doucet, E; Bouchard, C; Tremblay, A

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether the age-related decrease in resting energy expenditure (REE) is explained by variations in body composition. In Study 1, adult subjects (20-70 years) from the Quebec Family Study were classified into five different age groups. Body composition was measured by hydrodensitometry to determine fat mass and fat-free mass as predictors of REE. In the youngest group of individuals these predictors were used to plot a reference regression that was then used to predict REE in the other age groups. In Study 2, this issue was investigated in a longitudinal design (6-year follow-up). Subjects were subdivided into three groups and a reference regression was plotted at the beginning of the follow-up and was then used to predict REE 6 years later in the three age groups. In Study 1, 627 adults (288 men and 339 women), aged between 20 and 70 years. In Study 2, 191 adults (93 men and 98 women). In Study 1, measured REE was 329, 302, 528 and 636 kJ/day (P < 0.0001) below predicted REE at 34, 44, 54 and 64 years, respectively. In Study 2 the most marked deviation from predicted REE in response to the 6-year follow-up in men was observed in young adults (-548 kJ/day, P < 0.001) while in women, the largest deviation occurred later in life (-720 kj/day, P < 0.001). Aging is accompanied by a decrease in REE that is significantly greater than what is predicted by variations in body composition. This decrease may reach a mean level of about 500-800 kj/day.

  17. Effects of exercise training on resting energy expenditure and lean mass during pediatric burn rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Williams, Felicia N.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Severe burns cause profound hormonal and metabolic disturbances resulting in hypermetabolism, reflected in extreme elevation of resting energy expenditure (REE) and extensive skeletal muscle catabolism. Aerobic and resistive exercise programs during rehabilitation have shown substantial benefits, although whether such training potentially exacerbates basal metabolism is unknown. We therefore examined the effects of exercise training upon REE during the rehabilitation of severely burned pediatric patients. Methods Children with 40% total body surface area (TBSA) burns and greater were enrolled on admission to our burn intensive-care unit to participate in a twelve-week, hospital-based exercise program (EX), or a home-based standard of care program (SOC), commencing six months post-injury. Results Twenty-one patients (7–17 years) were enrolled and randomized to SOC (n=10) or EX (n=11). Age, gender, and TBSA burned were similar. Mean change (± sd) in REE, normalized to individual lean body mass (LBM), was almost negligible between SOC and EX group patients (0.03 ± 17.40%, SOC vs. 0.01 ± 26.38%, EX). A significant increase in LBM was found for EX patients (2.06 ± 3.17%, SOC vs. 8.75 ± 5.65%, EX; p=0.004), which persisted when normalized to height (0.70 ± 2.39%, SOC vs. 6.14 ± 6.46%, EX; p=0.02). Peak torque also improved significantly more in EX patients (12.29 ± 16.49%, SOC vs. 54.31 ± 44.25%, EX; p=0.02), reflecting improved strength. Conclusion Exercise training significantly enhanced lean mass and strength, without observed exacerbation of post-burn hypermetabolism. We therefore advocate use of exercise conditioning as a safe and effective component of pediatric burn rehabilitation. PMID:20354445

  18. Daily variability of resting energy expenditure in acute kidney injury patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Góes, Cassiana Regina de; Sanches, Ana Claudia Soncini; Balbi, André; Ponce, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    It is needed for nutrition prescription correct estimate of resting energy expenditure (REE), which is a challenge given the possible daily variation in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). To evaluate the daily variability of REE measured by indirect calorimetry (IC) in patients with AKI and dialysis indication and identify clinical variables associated with REE. The REE was measured on the time of dialysis indication and the subsequent four days. We also evaluated parameters that can influence the REE. The daily differences were analyzed by generalized linear model for repeated measures. We also used Spearman correlation and multiple linear regression. There were 301 IC measurements in 114 patients, mean age of 60.65 ± 16.9 years and 68.4% were male. The average REE was 2081 ± 645 kcal, rising on day 5 (2270 ± 556 kcal) compared to the days 2 and 3 (2022 ± 754; 2022 ± 660 kcal, respectively, p = 0,04). When normalized to weight, there was no significant difference in REE (kcal/kg/day) during follow-up. REE was positively correlated with total leukocyte count, C-reactive protein, minute volume (MV), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) urea nitrogen appearance (UNA), weight and height and inversely with age. After multiple regression, MV, FiO2, weight and age are correlated independently with REE. Patients with AKI have REE stable. The REE was associated independently with FiO2, MV, body weight and age. Thus, ventilatory parameters should be evaluated each day for the necessary dietary changes may be made.

  19. Relationship of Insulin Dynamics to Body Composition and Resting Energy Expenditure following Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hron, Bridget M.; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Feldman, Henry A.; Ludwig, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of baseline insulin dynamics with changes in body composition and resting energy expenditure (REE) following weight loss. Methods Twenty-one participants with overweight or obesity achieved 10-15% weight loss and then received 3 weight-loss maintenance diets (high-carbohydrate, moderate-carbohydrate, low-carbohydrate) in random order, each for 4 weeks. Body composition was measured at baseline and after weight loss. Insulin 30 minutes after glucose consumption (insulin-30; insulin response), C-peptide deconvolution analysis, HOMA, hepatic insulin sensitivity (IS), and REE were assessed at baseline and after each maintenance diet. Results Insulin-30, but not maximal insulin secretion, hepatic IS or HOMA, predicted changes in fat mass (standardized β=0.385, 1.7 kg difference between 10th-90th centile of insulin-30, P=0.04) after weight loss. Insulin-30 (β=−0.341, −312 kcal/d, P=0.008), maximal insulin secretion (β=−0.216, −95 kcal/d, P=0.0002), HOMA (β=−0.394,−350 kcal/d, P=0.002) and hepatic IS (β=0.217, 225 kcal/d, P=0.0003) predicted change in REE during weight-loss maintenance, independent of changes in body composition. The inverse relationship between insulin-30 and REE was substantially attenuated when the low-carbohydrate diet was consumed first. Conclusions These findings distinguish a novel phenotype, characterized by high insulin response, at risk for weight regain, and identify a dietary approach to ameliorate this risk. PMID:26373701

  20. Contribution of structural brain phenotypes to the variance in resting energy expenditure in healthy Caucasian subjects.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Corinna; Hübers, Mark; Granert, Oliver; Muller, Manfred James

    2017-09-21

    Brain gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes are related to weight changes. The impact of structural variations in GM and WM on the variance in resting energy expenditure (REE) and the REE on fat free mass (FFM) association is unknown. The aim of this study was to address this in healthy Caucasian subjects. Cross-sectional data analysis of 493 healthy Caucasian subjects (age range 6 to 80 years; three age groups) with comprehensive information on FFM, organ and tissue masses and detailed brain composition as assessed by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and REE (assessed by indirect calorimetry). REE was calculated (REEc) using organ and tissue masses times their specific metabolic rates. FFM was the major determinant of REE (70.6%), individual masses of liver, total brain and heart explained further 2.1% of the variance in REE. Replacing total brain by GM and WM did not change the total R². Nevertheless, GM added more to the variance in REE (5.6%) and corresponding residuals (12.5%) than total brain. Additionally, up to 12% were explained by age and sex (<2%). There was a systematic bias between REE and REEc with positive values in younger subjects but negative values in the older ones. This bias remained after substituting the specific metabolic rate of brain by the specific metabolic rates of GM and WM. In healthy Caucasian subjects, GM and WM contributed to the variance in REE. Detailed brain structures do not explain the bias between REE and REEc. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  1. Effects of exercise training on resting energy expenditure and lean mass during pediatric burn rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Williams, Felicia N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2010-01-01

    Severe burns cause profound hormonal and metabolic disturbances resulting in hypermetabolism, reflected in extreme elevation of resting energy expenditure (REE) and extensive skeletal muscle catabolism. Aerobic and resistive exercise programs during rehabilitation have shown substantial benefits, although whether such training potentially exacerbates basal metabolism is unknown. Therefore, the effects of exercise training on REE during the rehabilitation of severely burned pediatric patients were examined. Children with 40% total body surface area burns and greater were enrolled at admission to the burn intensive care unit to participate in a 12-week, hospital-based exercise program (EX) or a home-based standard of care program (SOC), commencing 6 months after injury. Twenty-one patients (aged 7-17 years) were enrolled and randomized to SOC (n = 10) or EX (n = 11). Age, sex, and total body surface area burned were similar. Mean change (+/-standard deviation) in REE, normalized to individual lean body mass, was almost negligible between SOC and EX group patients (SOC, 0.03 +/- 17.40% vs EX, 0.01 +/- 26.38%). A significant increase in lean body mass was found for EX patients (SOC, 2.06 +/- 3.17% vs EX, 8.75 +/- 5.65%; P = .004), which persisted when normalized to height (SOC, 0.70 +/- 2.39% vs EX, 6.14 +/- 6.46%; P = .02). Peak torque also improved significantly more in EX patients (SOC, 12.29 +/- 16.49% vs EX, 54.31 +/- 44.25%; P = .02), reflecting improved strength. Exercise training significantly enhanced lean mass and strength, without observed exacerbation of postburn hypermetabolism. Therefore, the use of exercise conditioning as a safe and effective component of pediatric burn rehabilitation is advocated.

  2. Issues in characterizing resting energy expenditure in obesity and after weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Braun, Wiebke; Schautz, Britta; Müller, Manfred J.

    2013-01-01

    Limitations of current methods: Normalization of resting energy expenditure (REE) for body composition using the 2-compartment model fat mass (FM), and fat-free mass (FFM) has inherent limitations for the interpretation of REE and may lead to erroneous conclusions when comparing people with a wide range of adiposity as well as before and after substantial weight loss. Experimental objectives: We compared different methods of REE normalization: (1) for FFM and FM (2) by the inclusion of %FM as a measure of adiposity and (3) based on organ and tissue masses. Results were compared between healthy subjects with different degrees of adiposity as well as within subject before and after weight loss. Results: Normalizing REE from an “REE vs. FFM and FM equation” that (1) was derived in obese participants and applied to lean people or (2) was derived before weight loss and applied after weight loss leads to the erroneous conclusion of a lower metabolic rate (i) in lean persons and (ii) after weight loss. This is revealed by the normalization of REE for organ and tissue masses that was not significantly different between lean and obese or between baseline and after weight loss. There is evidence for an increasing specific metabolic rate of FFM with increasing %FM that could be explained by a higher contribution of liver, kidney and heart mass to FFM in obesity. Using “REE vs. FFM and FM equations” specific for different levels of adiposity (%FM) eliminated differences in REE before and after weight loss in women. Conclusion: The most established method for normalization of REE based on FFM and FM may lead to spurious conclusions about metabolic rate in obesity and the phenomenon of weight loss-associated adaptive thermogenesis. Using %FM-specific REE prediction from FFM and FM in kg may improve the normalization of REE when subjects with wide differences in %FM are investigated. PMID:23532370

  3. Relationship of insulin dynamics to body composition and resting energy expenditure following weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hron, Bridget M; Ebbeling, Cara B; Feldman, Henry A; Ludwig, David S

    2015-11-01

    To examine associations of baseline insulin dynamics with changes in body composition and resting energy expenditure (REE) following weight loss. Twenty-one participants with overweight or obesity achieved 10-15% weight loss and then received 3 weight loss maintenance diets (high-carbohydrate, moderate-carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate) in random order, each for 4 weeks. Body composition was measured at baseline and after weight loss. Insulin 30 min after glucose consumption (insulin-30; insulin response), C-peptide deconvolution analysis, HOMA, hepatic insulin sensitivity (IS), and REE were assessed at baseline and after each maintenance diet. Insulin-30, but not maximal insulin secretion, hepatic IS, or HOMA, predicted changes in fat mass (standardized β = 0.385, 1.7 kg difference between 10th and 90th centile of insulin-30, P = 0.04) after weight loss. Insulin-30 (β = -0.341, -312 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.008), maximal insulin secretion (β = -0.216, -95 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.0002), HOMA (β = -0.394, -350 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.002), and hepatic IS (β = 0.217, 225 kcal day(-1) , P = 0.0003) predicted change in REE during weight loss maintenance, independent of changes in body composition. The inverse relationship between insulin-30 and REE was substantially attenuated when the low-carbohydrate diet was consumed first. These findings distinguish a novel phenotype, characterized by high insulin response, at risk for weight regain, and identify a dietary approach to ameliorate this risk. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  4. A preliminary evaluation of the correlation between regional energy phosphates and resting state functional connectivity in depression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chun S; Lin, Pan; Vitaliano, Gordana; Wang, Kristina; Villafuerte, Rosemond; Lukas, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Impaired brain energy metabolism is among the leading hypotheses in the pathogenesis of affective disorders and linking energy phosphates with states of tissue-function activity is a novel and non-invasive approach to differentiate healthy from unhealthy states. Resting state functional MRI (fMRI) has been established as an important tool for mapping cerebral regional activity and phosphorous chemical shift imaging ((31)P CSI) has been applied to measure levels of energy phosphates and phospholipids non-invasively in order to gain insight into the possible etiology of affective disorders. This is an initial attempt to identify the existence of a correlation between regional energy phosphates and connectivity at nodes of the posterior default mode network (DMN). Resting state fMRI in conjunction with (31)P 2D CSI was applied to 11 healthy controls and 11 depressed patients at 3 T. We found that differences between the two groups exist in correlation of lateral posterior parietal cortex functional connectivity and regional Pi/PCr. Results of this study indicate that resting-state-fMRI-guided (31)P CSI can provide new insight into depression via regional energy phosphates and functional connectivity.

  5. Influence of water drinking on resting energy expenditure in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Dubnov-Raz, G; Constantini, N W; Yariv, H; Nice, S; Shapira, N

    2011-10-01

    It was previously demonstrated that drinking water significantly elevates the resting energy expenditure (REE) in adults, and that low water intake is associated with obesity and lesser success in weight reduction. This study addressed the potential of water drinking to increase the REE in children, as an additional tool for weight management. To examine the effect of drinking water on the REE of overweight children. A total of 21 overweight, otherwise-healthy children (age 9.9±1.4 years, 11 males) drank 10 ml kg(-1) cold water (4 °C). REE was measured before and after water ingestion, for 66 min. The main outcome measure was the change in mean REE from baseline values. Immediately after drinking water, there was a transient decrease in REE, from a baseline value of 3.32±1.15 kilojoule (kJ) per min to 2.56±0.66 kJ per min at minute 3 (P=0.005). A subsequent rise in REE was then observed, which was significantly higher than baseline after 24 min (3.89±0.78 kJ/min (P=0.021)), and at most time points thereafter. Maximal mean REE values were seen at 57 min after water drinking (4.16±1.43 kJ per min (P=0.004)), which were 25% higher than baseline. REE was significantly correlated with age, height, weight and fat-free mass; the correlations with maximal REE values after water drinking were stronger than with baseline REE values. This study demonstrated an increase of up to 25% in REE following the drinking of 10 ml kg(-1) of cold water in overweight children, lasting for over 40 min. Consuming the recommended daily amount of water for children could result in an energy expenditure equivalent to an additional weight loss of about 1.2 kg per year. These findings reinforce the concept of water-induced REE elevation shown in adults, suggesting that water drinking could assist overweight children in weight loss or maintenance, and may warrant emphasis in dietary guidelines against the obesity epidemic.

  6. Investigating predictors of eating: is resting metabolic rate really the strongest proxy of energy intake?

    PubMed

    McNeil, Jessica; Lamothe, Gilles; Cameron, Jameason D; Riou, Marie-Ève; Cadieux, Sébastien; Lafrenière, Jacynthe; Goldfield, Gary; Willbond, Stephanie; Prud'homme, Denis; Doucet, Éric

    2017-09-06

    Background: Evidence suggests that fat-free mass and resting metabolic rate (RMR), but not fat mass, are strong predictors of energy intake (EI). However, body composition and RMR do not explain the entire variance in EI, suggesting that other factors may contribute to this variance.Objective: We aimed to investigate the associations between body mass index (in kg/m(2)), fat mass, fat-free mass, and RMR with acute (1 meal) and daily (24-h) EI and between fasting appetite ratings and certain eating behavior traits with daily EI. We also evaluated whether RMR is a predictor of the error variance in acute and daily EI.Design: Data collected during the control condition of 7 studies conducted in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, were included in these analyses (n = 191 and 55 for acute and daily EI, respectively). These data include RMR (indirect calorimetry), body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), fasting appetite ratings (visual analog scales), eating behavior traits (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire), and EI (food buffet or menu).Results: Fat-free mass was the best predictor of acute EI (R(2) = 0.46; P < 0.0001). The combination of fasting prospective food consumption ratings and RMR was the best predictor of daily EI (R(2) = 0.44; P < 0.0001). RMR was a statistically significant positive predictor of the error variance for acute (R(2) = 0.20; P < 0.0001) and daily (R(2) = 0.23; P < 0.0001) EI. RMR did, however, remain a statistically significant predictor of acute (R(2) = 0.32; P < 0.0001) and daily (R(2) = 0.30; P < 0.0001) EI after controlling for this error variance.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that combined measurements of appetite ratings and RMR could be used to estimate EI in weight-stable individuals. However, greater error variance in acute and daily EI with increasing RMR values was observed. Future studies are needed to identify whether greater fluctuations in daily EI over time occur with increasing RMR values. This trial was registered at

  7. Reduced resting skeletal muscle protein synthesis is rescued by resistance exercise and protein ingestion following short-term energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Areta, José L; Burke, Louise M; Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Crawshay, Siobhan; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2014-04-15

    The myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) response to resistance exercise (REX) and protein ingestion during energy deficit (ED) is unknown. In young men (n = 8) and women (n = 7), we determined protein signaling and resting postabsorptive MPS during energy balance [EB; 45 kcal·kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1)·day(-1)] and after 5 days of ED (30 kcal·kg FFM(-1)·day(-1)) as well as MPS while in ED after acute REX in the fasted state and with the ingestion of whey protein (15 and 30 g). Postabsorptive rates of MPS were 27% lower in ED than EB (P < 0.001), but REX stimulated MPS to rates equal to EB. Ingestion of 15 and 30 g of protein after REX in ED increased MPS ~16 and ~34% above resting EB (P < 0.02). p70 S6K Thr(389) phosphorylation increased above EB only with combined exercise and protein intake (~2-7 fold, P < 0.05). In conclusion, short-term ED reduces postabsorptive MPS; however, a bout of REX in ED restores MPS to values observed at rest in EB. The ingestion of protein after REX further increases MPS above resting EB in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that combining REX with increased protein availability after exercise enhances rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis during short-term ED and could in the long term preserve muscle mass.

  8. Pion mass dependence of the nucleon form factors of the energy-momentum tensor in the chiral quark-soliton model

    SciTech Connect

    Goeke, K.; Grabis, J.; Ossmann, J.; Schweitzer, P.; Silva, A.; Urbano, D.

    2007-05-15

    The nucleon form factors of the energy-momentum tensor are studied in the large-N{sub c} limit in the framework of the chiral quark-soliton model for model parameters that simulate physical situations in which pions are heavy. This allows for a direct comparison to lattice quantum chromodynamics results.

  9. Nuclear modification of electron spectra and implications for heavy quark energy loss in Au+Au collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT].

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity ([FORMULA: SEE TEXT]) transverse momentum spectra ([FORMULA: SEE TEXT]) of electrons as a function of centrality in Au+Au collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT]. Contributions from photon conversions and from light hadron decays, mainly Dalitz decays of pi0 and eta mesons, were removed. The resulting nonphotonic electron spectra are primarily due to the semileptonic decays of hadrons carrying heavy quarks. Nuclear modification factors were determined by comparison to nonphotonic electrons in p+p collisions. A significant suppression of electrons at high pT is observed in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks.

  10. Little impact of resting energy expenditure on childhood weight and body composition: a longitudinal study (EarlyBird 47).

    PubMed

    Hosking, Joanne; Metcalf, Brad S; Jeffery, Alison N; Voss, Linda D; Wilkin, Terence J

    2011-01-01

    The role of resting energy expenditure (REE) in the development of obesity in children is controversial. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that REE has a meaningful impact on change in weight or body composition in healthy children. Resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry and body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry were measured in 236 children (131 boys) on 7 annual occasions (7-13 years). The effect of REE at 7 years on change in weight and body composition was analyzed using linear mixed effects models. In neither sex was there an interaction between REE at 7 years and change in weight (P > .9). There were weak associations between REE at 7 years and change in body composition in boys but not in girls: for a 418 kJ (100 kcal) lower REE at 7 years, an increase in rate of change in fat mass of approximately 0.1 kg/y and in percentage of fat of 0.2% per year and a decrease in fat-free mass of 0.1 kg/y. Change in REE during follow-up was not significantly associated with body composition changes in either sex (P > .06). Thus, REE has little impact on the wide variation in weight gain at this age; although in boys, some fat was simply exchanged for lean, the effect was small. Resting energy expenditure does not appear to provide an explanation for childhood obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Search for single top quark production in pbar p collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in the missing transverse energy plus jets topology

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for single top quark production with the CDF II detector using 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data selected consist of events characterized by large energy imbalance in the transverse plane and hadronic jets, and no identified electrons and muons, so the sample is enriched in W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays. In order to suppress backgrounds, additional kinematic and topological requirements are imposed through a neural network, and at least one of the jets must be identified as a b quark jet. We measure an excess of signal-like events in agreement with the standard model prediction, but inconsistent with a model without single top quark production by 2.1 standard deviations ({sigma}), with a median expected sensitivity of 1.4 {sigma}. Assuming a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2} and ascribing the excess to single top quark production, the cross section is measured to be 4.9{sub -2.2}{sup +2.5} (stat+syst) pb, consistent with measurements performed in independent datasets and with the standard model prediction.

  12. Search for single top quark production in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV in the missing transverse energy plus jets topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    We report a search for single top quark production with the CDF II detector using 2.1fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV. The data selected consist of events characterized by large energy imbalance in the transverse plane and hadronic jets, and no identified electrons and muons, so the sample is enriched in W→τν decays. In order to suppress backgrounds, additional kinematic and topological requirements are imposed through a neural network, and at least one of the jets must be identified as a b quark jet. We measure an excess of signal-like events in agreement with the standard model prediction, but inconsistent with a model without single top quark production by 2.1 standard deviations (σ), with a median expected sensitivity of 1.4σ. Assuming a top quark mass of 175GeV/c2 and ascribing the excess to single top quark production, the cross section is measured to be 4.9-2.2+2.5(stat+syst)pb, consistent with measurements performed in independent data sets and with the standard model prediction.

  13. General relativistic ray-tracing algorithm for the determination of the electron-positron energy deposition rate from neutrino pair annihilation around rotating neutron and quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Z.; Harko, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present a full general relativistic numerical code for estimating the energy-momentum deposition rate (EMDR) from neutrino pair annihilation (?). The source of the neutrinos is assumed to be a neutrino-cooled accretion disc around neutron and quark stars. We calculate the neutrino trajectories by using a ray-tracing algorithm with the general relativistic Hamilton's equations for neutrinos and derive the spatial distribution of the EMDR due to the annihilations of neutrinos and antineutrinos around rotating neutron and quark stars. We obtain the EMDR for several classes of rotating neutron stars, described by different equations of state of the neutron matter, and for quark stars, described by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model equation of state and in the colour-flavour-locked (CFL) phase. The distribution of the total annihilation rate of the neutrino-antineutrino pairs around rotating neutron and quark stars is studied for isothermal discs and accretion discs in thermodynamical equilibrium. We demonstrate both the differences in the equations of state for neutron and quark matter and rotation with the general relativistic effects significantly modify the EMDR of the electrons and positrons generated by the neutrino-antineutrino pair annihilation around compact stellar objects, as measured at infinity.

  14. Resting Energy Expenditure in Adults with Becker’s Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Matthew F.; Orme, Paul; Smith, Jonathon; Morse, Christopher I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was: 1) To compare Resting energy expenditure (REE) in adult males with Becker’s Muscular Dystrophy (BeMD, n = 21, 39 ±12 years) and healthy controls (CTRL, n = 12, 37 ±12 years) 2) Determine whether other physiological parameters correlate with REE in BeMD, and 3) Compare current prediction methods of REE with measured REE. Methods REE was calculated via indirect calorimetry using continuous, expired gas analysis following an overnight fast. Fat free mass (FFM) and fat mass were measured by bioelectrical impedance. B-mode ultrasound measured Tibialis Anterior (TA) and Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM) anatomical cross sectional area (ACSA). The Bone Specific Physical Activity Questionnaire measured physical activity. Results No difference in REE was found between CTRL and BeMD groups (1913 ±203 & 1786 ±324 Kcal respectively). Other physiological comparisons showed increased fat mass (+54%), decreased TA ACSA (-42%), increased GM ACSA (+25%) as well as reduced respiratory function (FVC -28%; FEV1−27%) in BeMD adults compared to controls. REE estimated from prediction equations (Schofield’s) in Muscular Dystrophy were different from measured REE (P<0.05, bias = -728kcal), while the Mifflin equation was no different from measured REE (r2 = 0.58, Bias = -8kcal). Within the present BeMD, REE predicted from FFM (REE = FFM x 34.57–270; r2 = 0.85) and body mass (REE = BM x 15.65 + 421.5; r2 = 0.66), were not different from measured REE (bias equals 0 and 0.2kcals, respectively) Conclusions Despite no differences in REE between CTRL and BeMD adults, increased fat masses highlights the requirement for explicit nutritional guidelines, as well as maintenance of physical activity levels, where possible. Prediction equations are frequently used in clinical settings, however these have been shown to be less accurate in BeMD; therefore, the equations proposed here should be used where possible. PMID:28060911

  15. Approximate Time to Steady-state Resting Energy Expenditure Using Indirect Calorimetry in Young, Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Collin J.; Tisch, Jocelyn J.; Sakarcan, Kenan E.; Bridges, William C.; Jesch, Elliot D.

    2016-01-01

    Indirect calorimetry (IC) measurements to estimate resting energy expenditure (REE) necessitate a stable measurement period or steady state (SS). There is limited evidence when assessing the time to reach SS in young, healthy adults. The aims of this prospective study are to determine the approximate time to necessary reach SS using open-circuit IC and to establish the appropriate duration of SS needed to estimate REE. One hundred young, healthy participants (54 males and 46 females; age = 20.6 ± 2.1 years; body weight = 73.6 ± 16.3 kg; height 172.5 ± 9.3 cm; BMI = 24.5 ± 3.8 kg/m2) completed IC measurement for approximately 30 min while the volume of oxygen (VO2) and volume of carbon dioxide (VCO2) were collected. SS was defined by variations in the VO2 and VCO2 of ≤10% coefficient of variation (%CV) over a period of five consecutive minutes. The 30-min IC measurement was divided into six 5-min segments, such as S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, and S6. The results show that SS was achieved during S2 (%CV = 6.81 ± 3.2%), and the %CV continued to met the SS criteria for the duration of the IC measurement (S3 = 8.07 ± 4.4%, S4 = 7.93 ± 3.7%, S5 = 7.75 ± 4.1%, and S6 = 8.60 ± 4.6%). The current study found that in a population of young, healthy adults the duration of the IC measurement period could be a minimum of 10 min. The first 5-min segment was discarded, while SS occurred by the second 5-min segment. PMID:27857943

  16. Resting energy expenditure in OSAS: the impact of a single CPAP application.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Katalin; Boutou, Afroditi K; Pitsiou, Georgia; Chavouzis, Nikolaos; Pataka, Athanasia; Athanasiou, Ioanna; Ilonidis, Georgios; Kontakiotis, Theodoros; Argyropoulou, Paraskevi; Kioumis, Ioannis

    2016-03-01

    Data on the impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and its treatment on resting energy expenditure (REE) are currently few and conflicting. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of OSAS on REE, as measured before and after sleep, and the changes in REE after a single continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) application, for the first time in literature. This is a nested case-control study. From the initial study population, two groups were formed, based on the results of nocturnal polysomnography: a group of male OSAS patients and a group of male, age-matched non-OSAS controls. REE was measured in both groups before and after sleep by indirect calorimetry, while patients repeated REE measurements before and after a single nasal CPAP application. Ninety-two male OSAS patients (45.3 ± 12.8 years old) and 19 male non-OSAS controls (50.8 ± 11.7 years old) were studied. REE/lean body mass (LBM) was higher among patients compared to controls both pre- (29.6 ± 12 vs 22.9 ± 7.9 kcal/kg; p = 0.022, correspondingly) and post-sleep (26.4 ± 9.6 vs 21.6 ± 9 kcal/kg; p = 0.047 correspondingly). REE/LBM decreased significantly after sleep in OSAS patients (p = 0.002), but not in controls; this difference was most evident among patients with more severe disease and higher desaturation. A single nasal CPAP application diminished the pre-post REE/LBM difference (30.3 ± 8.2 vs 28.3 ± 10.3 kcal/kg; p = 0.265), but only among responders. In OSAS patients, REE values are high and vary significantly before and after sleep. A single nasal CPAP application diminishes this difference among responders, possibly through reversal of nocturnal desaturation.

  17. An artificial neural network to predict resting energy expenditure in obesity.

    PubMed

    Disse, Emmanuel; Ledoux, Séverine; Bétry, Cécile; Caussy, Cyrielle; Maitrepierre, Christine; Coupaye, Muriel; Laville, Martine; Simon, Chantal

    2017-09-01

    The resting energy expenditure (REE) determination is important in nutrition for adequate dietary prescription. The gold standard i.e. indirect calorimetry is not available in clinical settings. Thus, several predictive equations have been developed, but they lack of accuracy in subjects with extreme weight including obese populations. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are useful predictive tools in the area of artificial intelligence, used in numerous clinical fields. The aim of this study was to determine the relevance of ANN in predicting REE in obesity. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) feed-forward neural network with a back propagation algorithm was created and cross-validated in a cohort of 565 obese subjects (BMI within 30-50 kg m(-2)) with weight, height, sex and age as clinical inputs and REE measured by indirect calorimetry as output. The predictive performances of ANN were compared to those of 23 predictive REE equations in the training set and in two independent sets of 100 and 237 obese subjects for external validation. Among the 23 established prediction equations for REE evaluated, the Harris & Benedict equations recalculated by Roza were the most accurate for the obese population, followed by the USA DRI, Müller and the original Harris & Benedict equations. The final 5-fold cross-validated three-layer 4-3-1 feed-forward back propagation ANN model developed in that study improved precision and accuracy of REE prediction over linear equations (precision = 68.1%, MAPE = 8.6% and RMSPE = 210 kcal/d), independently from BMI subgroups within 30-50 kg m(-2). External validation confirmed the better predictive performances of ANN model (precision = 73% and 65%, MAPE = 7.7% and 8.6%, RMSPE = 187 kcal/d and 200 kcal/d in the 2 independent datasets) for the prediction of REE in obese subjects. We developed and validated an ANN model for the prediction of REE in obese subjects that is more precise and accurate than established REE predictive

  18. Energy absorption, lean body mass, and total body fat changes during 5 weeks of continuous bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Jean M.; Evans, Harlan; Kuo, Mike C.; Schneider, Victor S.; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the body composition changes due to inactivity was examined together with the question of whether these changes are secondary to changes in energy absorption. Volunteers were 15 healthy males who lived on a metabolic research ward under close staff supervision for 11 weeks. Subjects were ambulatory during the first six weeks and remained in continuous bed rest for the last five weeks of the study. Six male volunteers (age 24-61 years) were selected for body composition measurements. Nine different male volunteers (age 21-50 years) were selected for energy absorption measurements. The volunteers were fed weighed conventional foods on a constant 7-d rotation menu. The average daily caloric content was 2,592 kcal. Comparing the five weeks of continuous bed rest with the previous six weeks of ambulation, it was observed that there was no change in energy absorption or total body weight during bed rest, but a significant decrease in lean body mass and a significant increase in total body fat (p less than 0.05).

  19. Energy absorption, lean body mass, and total body fat changes during 5 weeks of continuous bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Jean M.; Evans, Harlan; Kuo, Mike C.; Schneider, Victor S.; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the body composition changes due to inactivity was examined together with the question of whether these changes are secondary to changes in energy absorption. Volunteers were 15 healthy males who lived on a metabolic research ward under close staff supervision for 11 weeks. Subjects were ambulatory during the first six weeks and remained in continuous bed rest for the last five weeks of the study. Six male volunteers (age 24-61 years) were selected for body composition measurements. Nine different male volunteers (age 21-50 years) were selected for energy absorption measurements. The volunteers were fed weighed conventional foods on a constant 7-d rotation menu. The average daily caloric content was 2,592 kcal. Comparing the five weeks of continuous bed rest with the previous six weeks of ambulation, it was observed that there was no change in energy absorption or total body weight during bed rest, but a significant decrease in lean body mass and a significant increase in total body fat (p less than 0.05).

  20. Low and high energy phenomenology of quark-lepton complementarity scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Rodejohann, Werner

    2007-04-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the phenomenology of two predictive seesaw scenarios leading to quark-lepton complementarity. In both cases we discuss the neutrino mixing observables and their correlations, neutrinoless double beta decay and lepton flavor violating decays such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We also comment on leptogenesis. The first scenario is disfavored on the level of one to two standard deviations, in particular, due to its prediction for |U{sub e3}|. There can be resonant leptogenesis with quasidegenerate heavy and light neutrinos, which would imply sizable cancellations in neutrinoless double beta decay. The decays {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} are typically observable unless the SUSY masses approach the TeV scale. In the second scenario leptogenesis is impossible. It is, however, in perfect agreement with all oscillation data. The prediction for {mu}{yields}e{gamma} is in general too large, unless the SUSY masses are in the range of several TeV. In this case {tau}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} are unobservable.

  1. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  2. Long-term green tea extract supplementation does not affect fat absorption, resting energy expenditure, and body composition in adults.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Pilou L H R; Hursel, Rick; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2015-05-01

    Green tea (GT) extract may play a role in body weight regulation. Suggested mechanisms are decreased fat absorption and increased energy expenditure. We examined whether GT supplementation for 12 wk has beneficial effects on weight control via a reduction in dietary lipid absorption as well as an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE). Sixty Caucasian men and women [BMI (in kg/m²): 18-25 or >25; age: 18-50 y] were included in a randomized placebo-controlled study in which fecal energy content (FEC), fecal fat content (FFC), resting energy expenditure, respiratory quotient (RQ), body composition, and physical activity were measured twice (baseline vs. week 12). For 12 wk, subjects consumed either GT (>0.56 g/d epigallocatechin gallate + 0.28-0.45 g/d caffeine) or placebo capsules. Before the measurements, subjects recorded energy intake for 4 consecutive days and collected feces for 3 consecutive days. No significant differences between groups and no significant changes over time were observed for the measured variables. Overall means ± SDs were 7.2 ± 3.8 g/d, 6.1 ± 1.2 MJ/d, 67.3 ± 14.3 kg, and 29.8 ± 8.6% for FFC, REE, body weight, and body fat percentage, respectively. GT supplementation for 12 wk in 60 men and women did not have a significant effect on FEC, FFC, REE, RQ, and body composition. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Size dependence in non-sperm ejaculate production is reflected in daily energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Christopher R; Powers, Donald R; Copenhaver, Paige E; Mason, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    The non-sperm components of an ejaculate, such as copulatory plugs, can be essential to male reproductive success. But the costs of these ejaculate components are often considered trivial. In polyandrous species, males are predicted to increase energy allocation to the production of non-sperm components, but this allocation is often condition dependent and the energetic costs of their production have never been quantified. Red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) are an excellent model with which to quantify the energetic costs of non-sperm components of the ejaculate as they exhibit a dissociated reproductive pattern in which sperm production is temporally disjunct from copulatory plug production, mating and plug deposition. We estimated the daily energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate of males after courtship and mating, and used bomb calorimetry to estimate the energy content of copulatory plugs. We found that both daily energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate were significantly higher in small mating males than in courting males, and a single copulatory plug without sperm constitutes 5-18% of daily energy expenditure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify the energetic expense of size-dependent ejaculate strategies in any species. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Increased resting energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and food intake in patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy-associated lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Jussi; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2007-03-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with metabolic adverse events such as lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of HAART-associated lipodystrophy on resting energy expenditure and caloric intake. In this cross-sectional study we compared resting energy expenditure (REE) and energy intake in 30 HAART-treated patients with lipodystrophy (HAART+LD+) with 13 HAART-treated patients without lipodystrophy (HAART+LD-). REE was measured using indirect calorimetry, and energy intake was recorded as a 3-day diary of food intake. REE (5,180+/-160 vs. 4,260+/-150 J/min, P<0.01) and also REE expressed per fat-free mass (86+/-1 vs. 78+/-2 J.kg fat-free mass-1.min-1, P<0.01) were significantly higher in the HAART+LD+ than the HAART+LD- group. Rate of lipid oxidation was significantly higher in the HAART+LD+ than the HAART+LD- group. Total energy and fat intakes were significantly increased in the HAART+LD+ compared with the HAART+LD- group. These results imply that HAART-associated lipodystrophy is associated with increased REE and lipid oxidation and with increased caloric and fat intake.

  5. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Brucken, E.; Devoto, F.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Casal, B.; Gomez, G.; Palencia, E.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Amerio, S.; Dorigo, T.; Gresele, A.; Lazzizzera, I.; Amidei, D.; Campbell, M.

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a value of m{sub t}=173.0{+-}1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  6. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Siegrist, J.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Volobouev, I.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2010-12-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass mt is obtained using a sample of tt¯ events from pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of mt and a parameter ΔJES used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6fb-1 of integrated luminosity, a value of mt=173.0±1.2GeV/c2 is measured.

  7. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and \\textit{in situ} Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-10-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m{sub t} = 173.0 {+-} 1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  8. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; Baker, O. K.; Benmouna, N.; Bertoncini, C.; Blok, H. P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Bosted, P. E.; Breuer, H.; Christy, M. E.; Connell, S. H.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; El Khayari, N.; Fenker, H. C.; Frolov, V. V.; Gan, L.; Gaskell, D.; Hafidi, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; Hungerford, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelly, J. J.; Keppel, C. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mack, D.; Malace, S. P.; Markowitz, P.; McGrath, E.; McKee, P.; Meekins, D. G.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Moziak, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Opper, A. K.; Ostapenko, T.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Rock, S. E.; Schulte, E.; Segbefia, E.; Smith, C.; Smith, G. R.; Stoler, P.; Tang, L.; Ungaro, M.; Uzzle, A.; Vidakovic, S.; Villano, A.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wang, M.; Warren, G.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yuan, L.; Zheng, X.

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W', is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  9. LATTICE QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH WILSON QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    EJIRI,S.

    2007-11-20

    We review studies of QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with dynamical Wilson quarks. After explaining the basic properties of QCD with Wilson quarks at finite temperature including the phase structure and the scaling properties around the chiral phase transition, we discuss the critical temperature, the equation of state and heavy-quark free energies.

  10. Study of weak corrections to Drell-Yan, top-quark pair, and dijet production at high energies with MCFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-11-01

    Electroweak (EW) corrections can be enhanced at high energies due to the soft or collinear radiation of virtual and real W and Z bosons that result in Sudakov-like corrections of the form αWllogn(Q2/MW,Z 2) , where αW=α /(4 π sin2θW) and n ≤2 l -1 . The inclusion of EW corrections in predictions for hadron colliders is, therefore, especially important when searching for signals of possible new physics in distributions probing the kinematic regime Q2≫MV2. Next-to-leading order (NLO) EW corrections should also be taken into account when their size [O (α )] is comparable to that of QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) [O (αs2)]. To this end, we have implemented the NLO weak corrections to the neutral-current Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and dijet production in the parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding QCD corrections at NLO and NNLO. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their Sudakov approximation since the latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects at high energies and can be extended to higher orders. With both the exact and approximate results at hand, the validity of the Sudakov approximation can be readily quantified.

  11. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  12. Baryons as Fock states of 3,5,... Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov; Victor Petrov

    2004-09-01

    We present a generating functional producing quark wave functions of all Fock states in the octet, decuplet and antidecuplet baryons in the mean field approximation, both in the rest and infinite momentum frames. In particular, for the usual octet and decuplet baryons we get the SU(6)-symmetric wave functions for their 3-quark component but with specific corrections from relativism and from additional quark-antiquark pairs. For the exotic antidecuplet baryons we obtain the 5-quark wave function.

  13. Capsaicin and evodiamine ingestion does not augment energy expenditure and fat oxidation at rest or after moderately-intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Neil A; Spillane, Mike; La Bounty, Paul; Grandjean, Peter W; Leutholtz, Brian; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2013-12-01

    Capsaicin and evodiamine are 2 thermogenic agents recognized for their ability to stimulate the sympathetic nervous system. We hypothesized that both capsaicin and evodiamine would be effective at increasing thermogenesis and lipid oxidation during rest and exercise. In a randomized, cross-over design, 11 men ingested 500 mg of cayenne pepper (1.25 mg capsaicin), 500 mg evodiamine, or placebo at rest following 30 minutes of energy expenditure assessment using open-circuit spirometry. Energy expenditure was assessed again prior to commencing approximately 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 65% peak oxygen consumption. Energy expenditure was assessed for another 30 minutes of the post-exercise period. Heart rate, blood pressure, core temperature, and venous blood samples were obtained 30 minutes before supplement ingestion, 1 hour after supplement ingestion, immediately post-exercise, and 45 minutes post-exercise. Serum markers of lipid oxidation (glycerol, free fatty acids, glucose, epinephrine, and norepinephrine) were determined spectrophotometrically with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-way analyses of variance with repeated measures were performed for each dependent variable (P ≤ .05) with Supplement and Test as main effects. Statistical analyses revealed significant main effects for Test for hemodynamics, energy expenditure, serum catecholamines, and markers of fat oxidation immediately post-exercise (P < .05). No significant interactions between Supplement and Test were noted for any criterion variable (P > .05). These results suggest that acute ingestion of 500 mg of cayenne (1.25 mg capsaicin) or evodiamine is not effective at inducing thermogenesis and increasing fat oxidation at rest or during exercise in men.

  14. Influence of resting energy expenditure on blood pressure is independent of body mass and a marker of sympathetic tone.

    PubMed

    Brock, David W; Tompkins, Connie L; Fisher, Gordon; Hunter, Gary R

    2012-02-01

    Two recent examinations reported a strong association between blood pressure (BP) and resting energy expenditure (REE), independent of body mass and body composition. Both reports postulate that neurohumoral processes that contribute to variation in REE may partly mediate the body mass effect on BP. Therefore, we examined the relationship of REE and BP in 108 asymptomatic women (a) to confirm previous findings in a novel population and (b) to examine the impact of a marker of sympathetic tone on this relationship, as this was indicated as a potentially salient intermediary in previous reports. All testing was performed during a 4-day admission to the General Clinical Research Center. Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry, body composition was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and 24-hour fractionated urinary norepinephrine was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Multiple linear regression revealed REE as a significant predictor of systolic BP (β = 0.30, P = .04), independent of race (β = 0. 28, P = .01), age (β = -0.02, P = .80), height (β = -0.38, P = .08), fat mass (β = 0.22, P = .20), fat-free mass (β = 0.08, P = .65), and 24-hour fractionated urinary norepinephrine (β = 0.06, P = .57); and the same model using diastolic BP as the dependent variable approached significance (β = 0.24, P = .09). This study affirms previous findings that REE may be a potential mediator in resting BP, independent of many well-cited factors and, additionally, a marker of sympathetic tone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy-based stochastic control of neural mass models suggests time-varying effective connectivity in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Sotero, Roberto C; Shmuel, Amir

    2012-06-01

    Several studies posit energy as a constraint on the coding and processing of information in the brain due to the high cost of resting and evoked cortical activity. This suggestion has been addressed theoretically with models of a single neuron and two coupled neurons. Neural mass models (NMMs) address mean-field based modeling of the activity and interactions between populations of neurons rather than a few neurons. NMMs have been widely employed for studying the generation of EEG rhythms, and more recently as frameworks for integrated models of neurophysiology and functional MRI (fMRI) responses. To date, the consequences of energy constraints on the activity and interactions of ensembles of neurons have not been addressed. Here we aim to study the impact of constraining energy consumption during the resting-state on NMM parameters. To this end, we first linearized the model, then used stochastic control theory by introducing a quadratic cost function, which transforms the NMM into a stochastic linear quadratic regulator (LQR). Solving the LQR problem introduces a regime in which the NMM parameters, specifically the effective connectivities between neuronal populations, must vary with time. This is in contrast to current NMMs, which assume a constant parameter set for a given condition or task. We further simulated energy-constrained stochastic control of a specific NMM, the Wilson and Cowan model of two coupled neuronal populations, one of which is excitatory and the other inhibitory. These simulations demonstrate that with varying weights of the energy-cost function, the NMM parameters show different time-varying behavior. We conclude that constraining NMMs according to energy consumption may create more realistic models. We further propose to employ linear NMMs with time-varying parameters as an alternative to traditional nonlinear NMMs with constant parameters.

  16. Unified description of charmonium suppression in a quark-gluon plasma medium at RHIC and LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R., Captain; Srivastava, P. K.; Ganesh, S.; Mishra, M.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the quarkonium suppression in a thermal QCD medium created in heavy ion collisions is a complex interplay of various physical processes. In this article we put together most of these processes in a unified way to calculate the charmonium survival probability (nuclear modification factor) at energies available at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. We include shadowing as the dominant cold-nuclear-matter effect. Further, gluonic dissociation and collision damping are included, which provide width to the spectral function of charmonia in a thermal medium and cause the dissociation of charmonium along with the usual color screening. We include color screening by using our recently proposed modified Chu-Matsui model. Furthermore, we incorporate the recombination of uncorrelated charm and anticharm quarks for the regeneration of charmonium over the entire temporal evolution of the QGP medium. Finally, we do a feed-down correction from the excited states to calculate the survival probability of charmonium. We find that our unified model suitably and simultaneously describes the experimental nuclear modification data of J /ψ at RHIC and LHC.

  17. Transverse-energy production and fluctuations over centrality and acceptance in relativistic heavy-ion and nucleon-nucleon collisions: Quark versus nucleon interactions and a search for the quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz, Raul L.

    Measuring energy produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a way to investigate if a model of quark participants, or nucleon participants better describes the internal dynamics of the collision. The energy produced is proportional to the energy density in the interaction region; changes in fluctuations of energy production could be a signature for a phase transition between ordinary hadronic matter to a liberated quark-gluon plasma phase, QGP, thought to have existed one millionth of a second after the Big Bang creation of the Universe and before protons and neutrons had formed. Three experimental nuclear physics data-analyses were conducted using the sum energy of all particles produced in the direction transverse to the beam, ET, when nuclei collide in a 2.4 mile long circular atom smasher. The nuclei are accelerated in opposite directions at 99.995% the speed of light, and center-of-mass energies available for new particle production of sNN = 62.4 GeV, and 200 GeV per colliding nucleon pair were studied. The ET was recorded by the lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter detectors of the Pioneering High Energy Interactions Experiment (PHENIX), at the Relativistic heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collision systems studied were 200 GeV protons with protons ( p + p), deuterons with Au ions (d+Au), and 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV gold ions with gold ions (Au+Au). The first analysis, mean ET in collision centrality, explores whether a model of nucleon participants, or quark participants, better describes energy production with collision impact. The second analysis, ET fluctuations in collision centrality, looks for non-random fluctuations in ET distributions when the density of colliding partons becomes high. The third analysis, ET fluctuations in geometric acceptance, examines fluctuations as a function of detector fiducial volume in a search for correlated energy distribution in space (correlations ), known to occur in

  18. Boosted top quarks and jet structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätzel, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the first particle accelerator that provides high enough energy to produce large numbers of boosted top quarks. The decay products of these top quarks are confined to a cone in the top quark flight direction and can be clustered into a single jet. Top quark reconstruction then amounts to analysing the structure of the jet and looking for subjets that are kinematically compatible with top quark decay. Many techniques have been developed in this context to identify top quarks in a large background of non-top jets. This article reviews the results obtained using data recorded in the years 2010-2012 by the experiments ATLAS and CMS. Studies of Standard Model top quark production and searches for new massive particles that decay to top quarks are presented.

  19. Next-to-leading order corrections to the spin-dependent energy spectrum of hadrons from polarized top quark decay in the general two Higgs doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. Mohammad; Abbaspour, S.

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, searches for the light and heavy charged Higgs bosons have been done by the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collision. Nevertheless, a definitive search is a program that still has to be carried out at the LHC. The experimental observation of charged Higgs bosons would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. In the present work, we study the scaled-energy distribution of bottom-flavored mesons (B) inclusively produced in polarized top quark decays into a light charged Higgs boson and a massless bottom quark at next-to-leading order in the two-Higgs-doublet model; t (↑) → bH+ → BH+ + X. This spin-dependent energy distribution is studied in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization vector of the top quark is measured with respect to the direction of the Higgs momentum. The study of these energy distributions could be considered as a new channel to search for the charged Higgs bosons at the LHC. For our numerical analysis and phenomenological predictions, we restrict ourselves to the unexcluded regions of the MSSM mH+ - tan ⁡ β parameter space determined by the recent results of the CMS [13] and ATLAS [14] collaborations.

  20. To ingest or rest? Specialized roles of lateral hypothalamic area neurons in coordinating energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliette A.; Woodworth, Hillary L.; Leinninger, Gina M.

    2015-01-01

    Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or orexins/hypocretins (OX) are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts) has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders. PMID:25741247

  1. Influence of Resting Energy Expenditure on Blood Pressure is Independent of Body Mass and a Marker of Sympathetic Tone

    PubMed Central

    Brock, David W.; Tompkins, Connie L.; Fisher, Gordon; Hunter, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction two recent examinations reported a strong association between blood pressure (BP) and resting energy expenditure (REE), independent of body mass and body composition. Both reports postulate that neuro-humoral processes that contribute to variation in REE may partly mediate the body mass effect on BP. Therefore, we examined the relationship of REE and BP in 108 asymptomatic women to (a) confirm previous findings in a novel population, and (b) to examine the impact of a marker of sympathetic tone on this relationship, as this was indicated as a potentially salient intermediary in previous reports. Methods all testing was performed during a 4-day admission to the General Clinical Research Center. Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry; body composition was determined by DEXA; and 24-hour fractionated urinary norepinephrine was determined by HPLC. Results multiple linear regression revealed REE as a significant predictor of SBP (β = 0.30, P = 0.04), independent of race (β = 0. 28, P = 0.01), age (β = − 0.02, P = 0.80), height (β = − 0.38, P = 0.08), fat mass (β = 0.22, P = 0.20), fat free mass (β = 0.08, P = 0.65), and 24-hour fractionated urinary norepinephrine (β = 0.06, P = 0.57); and the same model using DBP as the dependent variable approached significance (β = 0.24, P = 0.09). Discussion this study affirms previous findings that REE may be a potential mediator in resting BP, independent of many well-cited factors and, additionally, a marker of sympathetic tone. PMID:21820136

  2. Dynamical energy loss as a novel Quark-Gluon Plasma tomographic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    High momentum suppression of light and heavy flavor observables is considered to be an excellent probe of jet-medium interactions in QCD matter created at RHIC and LHC. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. With this goal, we developed the dynamical energy loss formalism towards generating predictions for non-central collisions; the formalism takes into account both radiative and collisional energy loss computed within the same theoretical framework, dynamical (as opposed to static) scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Within this formalism, we provided predictions, and a systematic comparison with experimental data, for a diverse set of suppression data: all available light and heavy flavor probes, lower and high momentum ranges, various centrality ranges and various collision energies at RHIC and LHC. We here also provide clear qualitative and quantitative predictions for soon to become available LHC experimental data. Comprehensive agreement between our predictions and experimental results provides a good deal of confidence that our dynamical energy loss formalism can well explain the jet-medium interactions in QGP, which will be further tested by the obtained predictions for the upcoming data. Application of this model, as a novel high-precision tomographic tool of QGP medium, are also discussed.

  3. Study of weak corrections to Drell-Yan, top-quark pair, and dijet production at high energies with MCFM

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-11-29

    Electroweak (EW) corrections can be enhanced at high energies due to the soft or collinear radiation of virtual and real W and Z bosons that result in Sudakov-like corrections of the form α$l\\atop{W}$logn(Q2/M2$\\atop{W,Z}$), where αW=α/(4π sin2θW) and n ≤ 2l-1. The inclusion of EW corrections in predictions for hadron colliders is, therefore, especially important when searching for signals of possible new physics in distributions probing the kinematic regime Q2>>M$2\\atop{V}$. Next-to-leading order (NLO) EW corrections should also be taken into account when their size [O(α)] is comparable to that of QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) [O(α$2\\atop{s}$)]. To this end, we have implemented the NLO weak corrections to the neutral-current Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and dijet production in the parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding QCD corrections at NLO and NNLO. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their Sudakov approximation since the latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects at high energies and can be extended to higher orders. Finally, with both the exact and approximate results at hand, the validity of the Sudakov approximation can be readily quantified.

  4. Study of weak corrections to Drell-Yan, top-quark pair, and dijet production at high energies with MCFM

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-11-29

    Electroweak (EW) corrections can be enhanced at high energies due to the soft or collinear radiation of virtual and real W and Z bosons that result in Sudakov-like corrections of the form αmore » $$l\\atop{W}$$logn(Q2/M2$$\\atop{W,Z}$$), where αW=α/(4π sin2θW) and n ≤ 2l-1. The inclusion of EW corrections in predictions for hadron colliders is, therefore, especially important when searching for signals of possible new physics in distributions probing the kinematic regime Q2>>M$$2\\atop{V}$$. Next-to-leading order (NLO) EW corrections should also be taken into account when their size [O(α)] is comparable to that of QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) [O(α$$2\\atop{s}$$)]. To this end, we have implemented the NLO weak corrections to the neutral-current Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and dijet production in the parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding QCD corrections at NLO and NNLO. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their Sudakov approximation since the latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects at high energies and can be extended to higher orders. Finally, with both the exact and approximate results at hand, the validity of the Sudakov approximation can be readily quantified.« less

  5. Resting energy expenditure and carbohydrate oxidation are higher in elderly patients with COPD: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually have a compromised nutritional status which is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality. To know the Resting Energy Expenditure (REE) and the substrate oxidation measurement is essential to prevent these complications. This study aimed to compare the REE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and body composition between patients with and without COPD. Methods This case–control study assessed 20 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending a pulmonary rehabilitation program. The group of subjects without COPD (control group) consisted of 20 elderly patients attending a university gym, patients of a private service and a public healthy care. Consumption of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) was determined by indirect calorimetry and used for calculating the resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were also measured. Percentage of body fat (%BF), lean mass (kg) and muscle mass (kg) were determined by bioimpedance. The fat free mass index (FFMI) and muscle mass index (MMI) were then calculated. Results The COPD group had lower BMI than control (p = 0.02). However, WC, % BF, FFMI and MM-I did not differ between the groups. The COPD group had greater RQ (p = 0.01), REE (p = 0.009) and carbohydrate oxidation (p = 0.002). Conclusions Elderly patients with COPD had higher REE, RQ and carbohydrate oxidation than controls. PMID:22672689

  6. Postoperative effects of anesthesia and surgery on resting energy expenditure in horses as measured by indirect calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Antonio M.; Coté, Nathalie; McDonell, Wayne N.; Geor, Raymond J.; Wilson, Brian A.; Monteith, Gabrielle; Li, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to define the effects of anesthesia and surgery on the resting energy expenditure of horses in experimental conditions. Six horses were used in a longitudinal study with 2 study periods: before and after anesthesia and surgery. Every horse underwent a standard 90-min ventral midline exploratory laparotomy. Oxygen uptake ( ) and carbon dioxide output ( ) were measured, with the use of a closed-circuit spirometry system, on 5 consecutive days immediately before and after the surgery. In 3 consecutive 5-min periods each day, the expired air was collected in a Collins spirometer. Samples of the expired gas were drawn from the spirometer through a drying column into O2 and CO2 analyzers. Resting energy expenditure was calculated as [( *3.94) + ( *1.11)]*1.44. This study showed that anesthesia and ventral midline exploratory laparotomy in experimental conditions increase the postoperative caloric demand in horses by an average of 1.0 Mcal/d, which represents approximately a 10% increase (P = 0.03). Additional studies in critically ill horses after surgery are needed to determine their caloric needs and to optimize their nutritional management. PMID:17042377

  7. Resting energy expenditure and carbohydrate oxidation are higher in elderly patients with COPD: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Ramires, Bruna Rubi; de Oliveira, Erick Prado; Pimentel, Gustavo Duarte; McLellan, Kátia Cristina Portero; Nakato, Darlan Muller; Faganello, Márcia Maria; Galhardo, Maurício Longo; Venâncio, Luciene de Souza

    2012-06-06

    Elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually have a compromised nutritional status which is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality. To know the Resting Energy Expenditure (REE) and the substrate oxidation measurement is essential to prevent these complications. This study aimed to compare the REE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and body composition between patients with and without COPD. This case-control study assessed 20 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending a pulmonary rehabilitation program. The group of subjects without COPD (control group) consisted of 20 elderly patients attending a university gym, patients of a private service and a public healthy care. Consumption of oxygen (O₂) and carbon dioxide (CO₂) was determined by indirect calorimetry and used for calculating the resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were also measured. Percentage of body fat (%BF), lean mass (kg) and muscle mass (kg) were determined by bioimpedance. The fat free mass index (FFMI) and muscle mass index (MMI) were then calculated. The COPD group had lower BMI than control (p = 0.02). However, WC, % BF, FFMI and MM-I did not differ between the groups. The COPD group had greater RQ (p = 0.01), REE (p = 0.009) and carbohydrate oxidation (p = 0.002). Elderly patients with COPD had higher REE, RQ and carbohydrate oxidation than controls.

  8. Changes in Resting Energy Expenditure in Relation to Body Weight and Composition Following Gastric Restriction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Browning, Matthew G; Franco, Robert L; Cyrus, John C; Celi, Francesco; Evans, Ronald K

    2016-07-01

    In comparison to gastric bypass surgery, gastric restriction without malabsorption more closely simulates dietary adherence while still producing durable weight loss. The latter is achieved despite considerable reductions in resting energy expenditure (REE), and whether REE is adjusted for body weight/composition using ratio- or regression-based methods could influence understanding of how these procedures affect energy balance. This systematic review identified studies that reported REE before and after gastric restriction in order to compare changes using each method. Ratio assessments revealed increases and decreases when REE was expressed per kilogram of body weight and per kilogram of fat-free mass, respectively. In comparison, measured REE tended to be less than predicted from linear regression after surgery. Explanations for these seemingly disparate findings and future directions are discussed.

  9. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    scientific program of the conference began with an overview of high energy nuclear physics in China by Professor Wenqing Shen, vice president of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Professor Shen highlighted many contributions made by the Chinese scientists in both theory and experiment. Dr Nick Samios, former director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), gave a vivid account of the early years of RHIC and recent accomplishments. Highlights of the conference include new results from RHIC at BNL and SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Many experimental results reported at the conference support the notion that the quark-gluon matter at RHIC behaves like a perfect liquid with minimum viscosity to entropy ratio. There were 15 plenary sessions which covered 54 plenary talks, 12 parallel sessions and 1 poster session. A total of 320 abstracts were submitted to the conference out of which 124 were selected for oral presentation and the rest were assigned to the poster session. Talks and posters in the conference covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical progress in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, which includes new evidence of sQGP, jet quenching and heavy quark energy loss, heavy-ion collision phenomenology, quantum field theory at finite temperature and/or density, and relevant areas of astrophysics and plasma physics. The Quark Matter 2006 conference coincided with the 80th birthday of Professor T D Lee. A special reception was held in the banquet hall of the Shanghai Grand Theatre to celebrate Professor Lee's birthday and to honor his great contributions to physics, in particular, to the development of high energy nuclear physics research in China. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee for providing valuable advice on a variety of matters, from the general structure of the conference to the selection of the plenary speakers and selection of abstracts for

  10. Search for supersymmetry in events with b-quark jets and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins, M., Junior; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L., Júnior; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.

    2012-10-01

    Results are presented from a search for physics beyond the standard model based on events with large missing transverse energy, at least three jets, and at least one, two, or three b-quark jets. The study is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at s=7TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2011. The integrated luminosity of the sample is 4.98fb-1. The observed number of events is found to be consistent with the standard model expectation, which is evaluated using control samples in the data. The results are used to constrain cross sections for the production of supersymmetric particles decaying to b-quark-enriched final states in the context of simplified model spectra.

  11. Orthostatic Hypotension and Elevated Resting Heart Rate Predict Low-Energy Fractures in the Population: The Malmö Preventive Project

    PubMed Central

    Hamrefors, Viktor; Härstedt, Maria; Holmberg, Anna; Rogmark, Cecilia; Sutton, Richard; Melander, Olle; Fedorowski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Background Autonomic disorders of the cardiovascular system, such as orthostatic hypotension and elevated resting heart rate, predict mortality and cardiovascular events in the population. Low-energy-fractures constitute a substantial clinical problem that may represent an additional risk related to such autonomic dysfunction. Aims To test the association between orthostatic hypotension, resting heart rate and incidence of low-energy-fractures in the general population. Methods and Results Using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models we investigated the association between orthostatic blood pressure response, resting heart rate and first incident low-energy-fracture in a population-based, middle-aged cohort of 33 000 individuals over 25 years follow-up. The median follow-up time from baseline to first incident fracture among the subjects that experienced a low energy fracture was 15.0 years. A 10 mmHg orthostatic decrease in systolic blood pressure at baseline was associated with 5% increased risk of low-energy-fractures (95% confidence interval 1.01–1.10) during follow-up, whereas the resting heart rate predicted low-energy-fractures with an effect size of 8% increased risk per 10 beats-per-minute (1.05–1.12), independently of the orthostatic response. Subjects with a resting heart rate exceeding 68 beats-per-minute had 18% (1.10–1.26) increased risk of low-energy-fractures during follow-up compared with subjects with a resting heart rate below 68 beats-per-minute. When combining the orthostatic response and resting heart rate, there was a 30% risk increase (1.08–1.57) of low-energy-fractures between the extremes, i.e. between subjects in the fourth compared with the first quartiles of both resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure-decrease. Conclusion Orthostatic blood pressure decline and elevated resting heart rate independently predict low-energy fractures in a middle-aged population. These two measures of subclinical cardiovascular

  12. Energy loss at NLO in a high-temperature Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo

    2016-12-01

    We present an extension of the Arnold-Moore-Yaffe kinetic equations for jet energy loss to NLO in the strong coupling constant. A novel aspect of the NLO analysis is a consistent description of wider-angle bremsstrahlung (semi-collinear emissions), which smoothly interpolates between 2 ↔ 2 scattering and collinear bremsstrahlung. We describe how many of the ingredients of the NLO transport equations (such as the drag coefficient) can be expressed in terms of Wilson line operators and can be computed using a Euclidean formalism or sum rules, both motivated by the analytic properties of amplitudes at light-like separations. We conclude with an outlook on the computation of the shear viscosity at NLO.

  13. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    scientific program of the conference began with an overview of high energy nuclear physics in China by Professor Wenqing Shen, vice president of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Professor Shen highlighted many contributions made by the Chinese scientists in both theory and experiment. Dr Nick Samios, former director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), gave a vivid account of the early years of RHIC and recent accomplishments. Highlights of the conference include new results from RHIC at BNL and SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Many experimental results reported at the conference support the notion that the quark-gluon matter at RHIC behaves like a perfect liquid with minimum viscosity to entropy ratio. There were 15 plenary sessions which covered 54 plenary talks, 12 parallel sessions and 1 poster session. A total of 320 abstracts were submitted to the conference out of which 124 were selected for oral presentation and the rest were assigned to the poster session. Talks and posters in the conference covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical progress in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, which includes new evidence of sQGP, jet quenching and heavy quark energy loss, heavy-ion collision phenomenology, quantum field theory at finite temperature and/or density, and relevant areas of astrophysics and plasma physics. The Quark Matter 2006 conference coincided with the 80th birthday of Professor T D Lee. A special reception was held in the banquet hall of the Shanghai Grand Theatre to celebrate Professor Lee's birthday and to honor his great contributions to physics, in particular, to the development of high energy nuclear physics research in China. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee for providing valuable advice on a variety of matters, from the general structure of the conference to the selection of the plenary speakers and selection of abstracts for

  14. Moderate-to-high levels of exercise are associated with higher resting energy expenditure in community-dwelling postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Froehle, Andrew W.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Natarajan, Loki; Schoeninger, Margaret J.

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal women experience an age-related decline in resting energy expenditure (REE), which is a risk factor for energy imbalance and metabolic disease. Exercise, by association with greater lean tissue mass and other factors, has the potential to mediate REE decline, but the relationship between exercise and REE in postmenopausal women is not well characterized. This study tests the hypothesis that exercise energy expenditure (EEE) is positively associated with REE, opposing the effects of age and menopause. The study tests this hypothesis in a cross-sectional sample of healthy postmenopausal women (N = 31, aged 49 - 72 years) with habitual exercise volumes at or above levels consistent with current clinical recommendations. Subjects kept four weeks of exercise diaries quantifying exercise activity, and were measured for body composition, maximal oxygen uptake, and REE. Multiple regression analysis was used to test for relationships between EEE, age, body composition, and REE. EEE and lean tissue mass (fat-free mass: FFM; and fat-free mass index: FFMI) exhibited significant, positive relationships with REE. The relationship between REE and EEE remained significant even after controlling for lean tissue mass. These results support the hypothesis that exercise is positively associated with REE, counter to the negative effects of age and menopause, and indicate a continuous relationship between exercise and REE across the moderate-to-high exercise range. Exercise at levels at and above current clinical guidelines may, in part, ameliorate risk for energy imbalance and metabolic disease through a positive relationship with REE. PMID:24053522

  15. The biology of appetite control: Do resting metabolic rate and fat-free mass drive energy intake?

    PubMed

    Blundell, J E; Finlayson, G; Gibbons, C; Caudwell, P; Hopkins, M

    2015-12-01

    The prevailing model of homeostatic appetite control envisages two major inputs; signals from adipose tissue and from peptide hormones in the gastrointestinal tract. This model is based on the presumed major influence of adipose tissue on food intake. However, recent studies have indicated that in obese people fat-free mass (FFM) is strongly positively associated with daily energy intake and with meal size. This effect has been replicated in several independent groups varying in cultural and ethnic backgrounds, and appears to be a robust phenomenon. In contrast fat mass (FM) is weakly, or mildly negatively associated with food intake in obese people. In addition resting metabolic rate (RMR), a major component of total daily energy expenditure, is also associated with food intake. This effect has been replicated in different groups and is robust. This action is consistent with the proposal that energy requirements — reflected in RMR (and other aspects of energy expenditure) constitute a biological drive to eat. Consistent with its storage function, FM has a strong inhibitory effect on food intake in lean subjects, but this effect appears to weaken dramatically as adipose tissue increases. This formulation can account for several features of the development and maintenance of obesity and provides an alternative, and transparent, approach to the biology of appetite control.

  16. Nonextensive statistical effects in the quark-gluon plasma formation at relativistic heavy-ion collisions energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, Gianpiero; Lavagno, Andrea; Pigato, Daniele

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the relativistic equation of state of hadronic matter and quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon density in the framework of the non-extensive statistical mechanics, characterized by power-law quantum distributions. We impose the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge and strangeness number. For the hadronic phase, we study an extended relativistic mean-field theoretical model with the inclusion of strange particles (hyperons and mesons). For the quark sector, we employ an extended MIT-Bag model. In this context we focus on the relevance of non-extensive effects in the presence of strange matter.

  17. Conservative options in the management of spinal disorders, Part I. Bed rest, mechanical and energy-transfer therapies.

    PubMed

    Reitman, C; Esses, S I

    1995-02-01

    Current literature does not support the efficacy of solitary use of energy-transfer therapies, such as ice or heat treatments, or electrotherapy, for the treatment of idiopathic back pain. Bed rest does not alter the natural history of back pain, and in fact can be detrimental to optimal recovery. Mechanical therapies, such as traction and orthoses, have limited usefulness. Although orthoses do not appear to weaken the trunk, they also do not appear to alter posture out of the brace, do not consistently diminish back muscle action during activities, and do not immobilize the spine. There have been no conclusive studies to substantiate the solitary use of any of these forms of treatment, although some may be beneficial at times in an adjunctive role.

  18. Comparison of resting and total energy expenditure in peritoneal dialysis patients and body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    El-Kateb, S; Sridharan, S; Farrington, K; Davenport, A

    2016-11-01

    Under basal resting conditions muscle metabolism is reduced, whereas metabolism increases with physical activity. We wished to determine whether there was an association between resting energy expenditure (REE) and total energy expenditure (TEE) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and lean body mass (LBM). We determined REE and TEE by recently validated equations, using doubly labelled isotopic water, and LBM by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. We studied 87 patients, 50 male (57.4%), 25 diabetic (28.7%), mean age 60.3±17.6 years, with a median PD treatment of 11.4 (4.7-29.5) months. The mean weight was 70.1±17.7 kg with a REE of 1509±245 kcal/day and TEE 1947±378 kcal/day. REE was associated with body size (weight r=0.78 and body mass index (BMI) r=0.72) and body composition (LBM r=0.77, lean body mass index (LBMI) r=0.76, r=0.62), all P<0.001). For TEE, there was an association with weight r=0.58, BMI r=0.49 and body composition (LBM r=0.64, LBMI (r=0.54), all P<0.001). We compared LBMI measured by DXA and that estimated by the Boer equation using anthropomorphic measurements, which overestimated and underestimated LBM for smaller patients and heavier patients, respectively. Muscle metabolism is reduced at rest and increases with physical activity. Whereas previous reports based on REE did not show any association with LBM, we found an association between both REE and TEE, using a recently validated equation derived from dialysis patients, and LBM measured by DXA scanning. Estimation of muscle mass from anthropomorphic measurements systematically overestimated LBM for small patients and conversely underestimated for heavier patients.

  19. Effects of ingestion of a commercially available thermogenic dietary supplement on resting energy expenditure, mood state and cardiovascular measures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing metabolism is a primary focus of many commercially available dietary supplements marketed to support weight management. Caffeine (e.g. anhydrous and herbal) and green tea are key ingredients in such products, augmenting resting energy expenditure (REE) and improving reported mood states (alertness, fatigue, focus, etc.). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a thermogenic dietary supplement (DBX) on REE, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), reported measures of alertness, focus, energy, concentration, fatigue, and hunger, as well as the general safety of the product based on electrocardiogram (ECG) and hemodynamic responses in habitual caffeine consumers. Methods Six male and six female subjects (mean ± SD; 22.50 ± 3.22 years; 76.94 ± 14.78 kg; 22.7 ± 9.5% body fat), physically active (≥12 months), and moderate habitual caffeine consumers (<200 mg/day) received either two capsules of DBX containing 340 mg of total caffeine plus green tea extract, yerba mate extract, carnitine tartrate and other active ingredients or a placebo (PLC) in a double-blinded, crossover design. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), REE, RER and perceived mood states were measured at baseline and then hourly for four hours after ingesting either treatment. Results Resting energy expenditure was significantly increased at all four time points and significant increases were determined for perceived alertness (p = 0.026) and focus (p = 0.05) at hour 1 and for energy at 1 and 2 hours after treatment for the DBX group (p = 0.008 and p = 0.017, respectively). Additionally, perceived fatigue was decreased at the hour 1 assessment (p = 0.010). No significant differences were seen between DBX and placebo for hunger, anxiety, HR, BP, ECG patterns or RER. Conclusions The results of this investigation support that the proprietary blend of this thermogenic aid is capable of increasing REE for four hours post-ingestion while

  20. Electrostatic free energies in translational GTPases: Classic allostery and the rest.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Satpati, Priyadarshi

    2015-05-01

    GTPases typically switch between an inactive, OFF conformation and an active, ON conformation when a GDP ligand is replaced by GTP. Their ON/OFF populations and activity thus depend on the stabilities of four protein complexes, two apo-protein forms, and GTP/GDP in solution. A complete characterization is usually not possible experimentally and poses major challenges for simulations. We review the most important methodological challenges and we review thermodynamic data for two GTPases involved in translation of the genetic code: archaeal Initiation Factors 2 and 5B (aIF2, aIF5B). One main challenge is the multiplicity of states and conformations, including those of GTP/GDP in solution. Another is force field accuracy, especially for interactions of GTP/GDP with co-bound divalent Mg(2+) ions. The calculation of electrostatic free energies also poses specific challenges, and requires careful protocols. For aIF2, experiments and earlier simulations showed that it is a "classic" GTPase, with distinct ON/OFF conformations that prefer to bind GTP and GDP, respectively. For aIF5B, we recently proposed a non-classic mechanism, where the ON/OFF states differ only in the protonation state of Glu81 in the nucleotide binding pocket. This model is characterized here using free energy simulations. The methodological analysis should help future studies, while the aIF2, aIF5B examples illustrate the diversity of ATPase/GTPase mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics.

  1. Top quark mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula

    2008-03-18

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parametrized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parametrized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector.

  2. Is Overweight in Stunted Preschool Children in Cameroon Related to Reductions in Fat Oxidation, Resting Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Said-Mohamed, Rihlat; Bernard, Jonathan Y.; Ndzana, Anne-Christine; Pasquet, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that early modifications in metabolic pathways and behaviour, leading to energy conservation and reduced linear growth, could represent adaptations to nutritional constraints during foetal life and infancy. Impaired fat oxidation, low resting energy expenditure and reduced physical activity, resulting from these adaptations, could facilitate fat storage and development of overweight in growth-retarded children that consume more energy-dense food. This study aims at assessing whether: (1) dual-burden preschool children (simultaneously stunted and overweight) of Yaounde (Cameroon) have low birth-weight (indicator of foetal undernutrition) and reductions in fat oxidation, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity, (2) fat oxidation, REE and physical activity are associated with foetal growth. Methodology/Principal Findings 162 children (24–72 months) were considered: 22 stunted-overweight (SO), 40 stunted (S), 41 overweight (O), and 59 non stunted-non overweight (NSNO). Nutritional status and body composition were assessed using anthropometry and multifrequency bioimpedance analysis. Fasting respiratory quotient (RQ) and REE were measured by indirect calorimetry. Physical activity was determined using accelerometers, food questionnaires were used for diet assessment and birth-weight was noted. Mean RQs and REE (weight adjusted) did not differ between stunted children (SO and S) and non-stunted children (O and NSNO). SO and S children spent more time in sedentary activities than O children (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively) and less time in moderate-to-vigorous activities than NSNO children (p = 0.05 and p = 0.04, respectively). SO children’s diet was less diverse (p = 0.01) with less animal products (p = 0.006). Multiple linear regressions model revealed that birth-weight is predictive of RQ (β = 0.237, p<0.01, R2 = 0.08). Conclusions/Significance This study showed that growth

  3. Is overweight in stunted preschool children in Cameroon related to reductions in fat oxidation, resting energy expenditure and physical activity?

    PubMed

    Said-Mohamed, Rihlat; Bernard, Jonathan Y; Ndzana, Anne-Christine; Pasquet, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that early modifications in metabolic pathways and behaviour, leading to energy conservation and reduced linear growth, could represent adaptations to nutritional constraints during foetal life and infancy. Impaired fat oxidation, low resting energy expenditure and reduced physical activity, resulting from these adaptations, could facilitate fat storage and development of overweight in growth-retarded children that consume more energy-dense food. This study aims at assessing whether: (1) dual-burden preschool children (simultaneously stunted and overweight) of Yaounde (Cameroon) have low birth-weight (indicator of foetal undernutrition) and reductions in fat oxidation, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity, (2) fat oxidation, REE and physical activity are associated with foetal growth. 162 children (24-72 months) were considered: 22 stunted-overweight (SO), 40 stunted (S), 41 overweight (O), and 59 non stunted-non overweight (NSNO). Nutritional status and body composition were assessed using anthropometry and multifrequency bioimpedance analysis. Fasting respiratory quotient (RQ) and REE were measured by indirect calorimetry. Physical activity was determined using accelerometers, food questionnaires were used for diet assessment and birth-weight was noted. Mean RQs and REE (weight adjusted) did not differ between stunted children (SO and S) and non-stunted children (O and NSNO). SO and S children spent more time in sedentary activities than O children (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively) and less time in moderate-to-vigorous activities than NSNO children (p = 0.05 and p = 0.04, respectively). SO children's diet was less diverse (p = 0.01) with less animal products (p = 0.006). Multiple linear regressions model revealed that birth-weight is predictive of RQ (β = 0.237, p<0.01, R(2) = 0.08). This study showed that growth retardation in stunted-overweight children could be associated with

  4. Energy loss of a nonaccelerating quark moving through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills vacuum or plasma in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.

    2016-08-01

    Using AdS /CFT correspondence, we find that a massless quark moving at the speed of light v =1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) vacuum at T =0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B , loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/} 6 π B . We also show that a heavy quark of mass M ≠0 moving at near the speed of light v2=v*2=1 -4/π2T2 B ≃1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 SYM plasma at finite temperature T ≠0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B ≫T2, loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/}6 π B v*2≃-√{λ/}6 π B . Moreover, we argue that, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD theories (when the adjoint QCD theory has four flavors of Weyl fermions and is at its conformal IR fixed point λ =λ*) have the same microscopic degrees of freedom (i.e., gluons and lowest Landau levels of Weyl fermions) even though they have quite different microscopic degrees of freedom in the UV when we consider higher Landau levels. Therefore, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties of N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD plasmas, as well as the rates of energy loss of a quark moving through the plasmas, should be the same.

  5. Effects of fructose-containing caloric sweeteners on resting energy expenditure and energy efficiency: a review of human trials.

    PubMed

    Tappy, Luc; Egli, Leonie; Lecoultre, Virgile; Schneider, Pascal

    2013-08-13

    Epidemiological studies indicate that the consumption of fructose-containing caloric sweeteners (FCCS: mainly sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup) is associated with obesity. The hypothesis that FCCS plays a causal role in the development of obesity however implies that they would impair energy balance to a larger extent than other nutrients, either by increasing food intake, or by decreasing energy expenditure. We therefore reviewed the literature comparing a) diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) after ingestion of isocaloric FCCS vs glucose meals, and b) basal metabolic rate (BMR) or c) post-prandial energy expenditure after consuming a high FCCS diet for > 3 days vs basal,weight-maintenance low FCCS diet. Nine studies compared the effects of single isocaloric FCCS and glucose meals on DIT; of them, six studies reported that DIT was significantly higher with FCCS than with glucose, 2 reported a non-significant increase with FCCS, and one reported no difference. The higher DIT with fructose than glucose can be explained by the low energy efficiency associated with fructose metabolism. Five studies compared BMR after consumption of a high FCCS vs a low FCCS diet for > 3 days. Four studies reported no change after 4-7 day on a high FCCS diet, and only one study reported a 7% decrease after 12 week on a high FCCS diet. Three studies compared post-prandial EE after consumption of a high FCCS vs a low FCCS diet for > 3 days, and did not report any significant difference. One study compared 24-EE in subjects fed a weight-maintenance diet and hypercaloric diets with 50% excess energy as fructose, sucrose and glucose during 4 days: 24-EE was increased with all 3 hypercaloric diets, but there was no difference between fructose, sucrose and glucose. We conclude that fructose has lower energy efficiency than glucose. Based on available studies, there is presently no hint that dietary FCCS may decrease EE. Larger, well controlled studies are however needed to assess the longer

  6. Effects of fructose-containing caloric sweeteners on resting energy expenditure and energy efficiency: a review of human trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that the consumption of fructose-containing caloric sweeteners (FCCS: mainly sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup) is associated with obesity. The hypothesis that FCCS plays a causal role in the development of obesity however implies that they would impair energy balance to a larger extent than other nutrients, either by increasing food intake, or by decreasing energy expenditure. We therefore reviewed the literature comparing a) diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) after ingestion of isocaloric FCCS vs glucose meals, and b) basal metabolic rate (BMR) or c) post-prandial energy expenditure after consuming a high FCCS diet for > 3 days vs basal,weight-maintenance low FCCS diet. Nine studies compared the effects of single isocaloric FCCS and glucose meals on DIT; of them, six studies reported that DIT was significantly higher with FCCS than with glucose, 2 reported a non-significant increase with FCCS, and one reported no difference. The higher DIT with fructose than glucose can be explained by the low energy efficiency associated with fructose metabolism. Five studies compared BMR after consumption of a high FCCS vs a low FCCS diet for > 3 days. Four studies reported no change after 4–7 day on a high FCCS diet, and only one study reported a 7% decrease after 12 week on a high FCCS diet. Three studies compared post-prandial EE after consumption of a high FCCS vs a low FCCS diet for > 3 days, and did not report any significant difference. One study compared 24-EE in subjects fed a weight-maintenance diet and hypercaloric diets with 50% excess energy as fructose, sucrose and glucose during 4 days: 24-EE was increased with all 3 hypercaloric diets, but there was no difference between fructose, sucrose and glucose. We conclude that fructose has lower energy efficiency than glucose. Based on available studies, there is presently no hint that dietary FCCS may decrease EE. Larger, well controlled studies are however needed to assess the longer

  7. Moderate to high levels of exercise are associated with higher resting energy expenditure in community-dwelling postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Froehle, Andrew W; Hopkins, Susan R; Natarajan, Loki; Schoeninger, Margaret J

    2013-11-01

    Postmenopausal women experience an age-related decline in resting energy expenditure (REE), which is a risk factor for energy imbalance and metabolic disease. Exercise, because of its association with greater lean tissue mass and other factors, has the potential to mediate REE decline, but the relation between exercise and REE in postmenopausal women is not well characterized. This study tests the hypothesis that exercise energy expenditure (EEE) is positively associated with REE and can counter the effects of age and menopause. It involves a cross-sectional sample of 31 healthy postmenopausal women (aged 49-72 years) with habitual exercise volumes at or above levels consistent with current clinical recommendations. Subjects kept exercise diaries for 4 weeks that quantified exercise activity and were measured for body composition, maximal oxygen uptake, and REE. Multiple regression analysis was used to test for associations between EEE, age, body composition, and REE. There was a significant positive relation between EEE and lean tissue mass (fat-free mass and fat-free mass index). The relation between REE and EEE remained significant even after controlling for lean tissue mass. These results support the hypothesis that exercise is positively associated with REE and can counter the negative effects of age and menopause. They also indicate a continuous relation between exercise and REE across ranges of exercise, from moderate to high. Exercise at levels that are at or above current clinical guidelines might, in part, ameliorate the risk for energy imbalance and metabolic disease because of its positive relation with REE.

  8. Vitamin D and Calcium-Sensing Receptor polymorphisms differentially associate with resting energy expenditure in peri-pubertal children

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Lynae J.; Casazza, Krista; Ashraf, Ambika P.; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Ard, Jamy; Bray, Molly S.; Beasley, T. Mark; Fernandez, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Given that calcium metabolism is influenced by genes and is tightly linked to energy-utilizing pathways, this study evaluated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) with resting energy expenditure (REE). In 273 boys and girls, 7-12y, cross-sectional REE was measured via indirect calorimetry, body composition by DXA, and dietary measures by 24-hour recall. SNPs for VDR Cdx-2 (rs11568820) and CASR A986S (rs1801725) were genotyped using the Illumina Golden Gate assay. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the association between SNPs and REE. African American carriers of the ‘A’ VDR Cdx2 allele had increased levels of REE in the overall sample and this association was apparent among participants with an adiposity level of <25% and 30% body fat in males and females, respectively. For CASR, an association between carriers of the ‘A’ allele and REE was observed only in those in the upper median of calcium intake. VDR and CASR variants are associated with REE in children, and are influenced by levels of calcium intake and adiposity. Our results bring awareness to mechanisms underlying the regulation of REE and biological and dietary influential factors. PMID:23546818

  9. Quark matter and quark stars at finite temperature in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Min; Jia, Yu-Yue; Wang, Shu-Mei; Ma, Hong-Yang

    2017-08-01

    We extend the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model to include two types of vector interaction. Using these two types of vector interaction in NJL model, we study the quark symmetry free energy in asymmetric quark matter, the constituent quark mass, the quark fraction, the equation of state (EOS) for β -equilibrium quark matter, the maximum mass of QSs at finite temperature, the maximum mass of proto-quark stars (PQSs) along the star evolution, and the effects of the vector interaction on the QCD phase diagram. We find that comparing zero temperature case, the values of quark matter symmetry free energy get larger with temperature increasing, which will reduce the difference between the fraction of u, d and s quarks and stiffen the EoS for β -equilibrium quark matter. In particular, our results indicate that the maximum masses of the quark stars increase with temperature because of the effects of the quark matter symmetry free energy, and we find that the heating(cooling) process for PQSs will increase (decrease) the maximum mass within NJL model.

  10. Superconducting quark matter in the Chromodielectric Model

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, L.; Malheiro, M.; Fiolhais, M.; Taurines, A.R.

    2004-12-02

    In this work we study the strange quark matter in an extended version of the Chromodielectric Model (CDM) with a BCS quark pairing implemented, and analyze the superconducting color flavor locked (CFL) phase. We compare the equation of state and the stability of the strange quark matter from QCD in the CFL phase with the superconducting version of the CDM. In the CDM there is a confining potential which originates a dynamical bag constant in the sense that its value depends on the density. Our results indicate that the inclusion in the energy density of the pairing quark interaction allows for an absolutely stable quark matter state even for large potential energies, preventing the metastability of quark matter found in the CDM at high densities.

  11. Estimation of Activity Related Energy Expenditure and Resting Metabolic Rate in Freely Moving Mice from Indirect Calorimetry Data

    PubMed Central

    Van Klinken, Jan Bert; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Willems Van Dijk, Ko

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a main determinant of total energy expenditure (TEE) and has been suggested to play a key role in body weight regulation. However, thus far it has been challenging to determine what part of the expended energy is due to activity in freely moving subjects. We developed a computational method to estimate activity related energy expenditure (AEE) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in mice from activity and indirect calorimetry data. The method is based on penalised spline regression and takes the time dependency of the RMR into account. In addition, estimates of AEE and RMR are corrected for the regression dilution bias that results from inaccurate PA measurements. We evaluated the performance of our method based on 500 simulated metabolic chamber datasets and compared it to that of conventional methods. It was found that for a sample time of 10 minutes the penalised spline model estimated the time-dependent RMR with 1.7 times higher accuracy than the Kalman filter and with 2.7 times higher accuracy than linear regression. We assessed the applicability of our method on experimental data in a case study involving high fat diet fed male and female C57Bl/6J mice. We found that TEE in male mice was higher due to a difference in RMR while AEE levels were similar in both groups, even though female mice were more active. Interestingly, the higher activity did not result in a difference in AEE because female mice had a lower caloric cost of activity, which was likely due to their lower body weight. In conclusion, TEE decomposition by means of penalised spline regression provides robust estimates of the time-dependent AEE and RMR and can be applied to data generated with generic metabolic chamber and indirect calorimetry set-ups. PMID:22574139

  12. Resting Energy Expenditure and Body Composition of Women with Weight Regain 24 Months After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Daniela Lopes; de Almeida Oliveira, Dyanara; Dutra, Eliane Said; Pizato, Nathalia; de Carvalho, Kênia Mara Baiocchi

    2016-07-01

    Weight regain 24 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and low protein intake in patients without protein supplementation can favor fat-free mass loss and reduce resting energy expenditure (REE). We aimed to assess REE and its association with the body composition of women with weight regain and no protein supplementation in the late postoperative period of RYGB. We determined the body mass index (BMI), REE by indirect calorimetry, body composition by tetrapolar bioelectrical impedance analysis, and energy intake by two 24-h recalls of 34 patients with at least 5 % of weight regain and no protein supplementation. The software SPSS v.17 analyzed the data calculating measures of central tendency and dispersion and using Pearson's correlation to test the association between the variables and the multivariate linear regression model at a p < 0.05 significance level. Postoperative period was positively associated with weight regain (r = 0.39; p = 0.023). The mean percentages of fat and fat-free masses were 45.1 ± 8.3 % and 54.3 ± 8.1 %, respectively. The mean REE was 1424.7 ± 187.2 kcal (14 kcal/kg of the current weight), mean energy intake was 1258.6 ± 454.3 kcal, and mean protein intake was 0.9 g/kg of the ideal weight ± 0.3. Fat-free mass was positively associated with REE regardless of protein intake and postoperative period. Female bariatric patients with weight regain and no protein supplementation lose fat-free mass, lowering their REE. Health practices that promote maintenance of BMI and body composition may lead to improved outcomes of bariatric surgery.

  13. Strange quark suppression and strange hadron production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Long Haiyan; Feng Shengqin; Zhou Daimei; Yan Yuliang; Ma Hailiang; Sa Benhao

    2011-09-15

    The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE based on PYTHIA is utilized to systematically investigate strange particle production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Globally speaking, the PACIAE results of the strange particle rapidity density at midrapidity and the transverse momentum distribution are better than those of PYTHIA (default) in comparison with STAR and ALICE experimental data. This may represent the importance of the parton and hadron rescatterings, as well as the reduction mechanism of strange quark suppression, added in the PACIAE model. The K/{pi} ratios as a function of reaction energy in pp collisions from CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) to LHC energies are also analyzed in this paper.

  14. Calcium quarks.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  15. Search for Scalar Bottom Quarks from Gluino Decays in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at a Center-of-Mass Energy of 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Carsten

    2004-12-01

    The authors have performed a search for the scalar bottom quark ($\\tilde{b}$1) from gluino ($\\tilde{g}$) decays in an R-parity conserving SUSY scenario with m$\\tilde{g}$ > m$\\tilde{b}1$, by investigating a final state of large missing transverse energy, with three or more jets, and some of them from the hadronization of b-quarks. A data sample of 156 pb-1 collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV was used. For the final selection, jets containing secondary displaced vertices were required. This analysis has been performed ''blind'', in that the inspection of the signal region was only made after the Standard Model prediction was finalized. Comparing data with SUSY predictions, they can exclude masses of the gluino and sbottom of up to 280 and 240 GeV/c2 respectively.

  16. Modelling the associations between fat-free mass, resting metabolic rate and energy intake in the context of total energy balance.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, M; Finlayson, G; Duarte, C; Whybrow, S; Ritz, P; Horgan, G W; Blundell, J E; Stubbs, R J

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between body composition, energy expenditure and ad libitum energy intake (EI) has rarely been examined under conditions that allow any interplay between these variables to be disclosed. The present study examined the relationships between body composition, energy expenditure and EI under controlled laboratory conditions in which the energy density and macronutrient content of the diet varied freely as a function of food choice. Fifty-nine subjects (30 men: mean body mass index=26.7±4.0 kg m(-2); 29 women: mean body mass index=25.4±3.5 kg m(-)(2)) completed a 14-day stay in a residential feeding behaviour suite. During days 1 and 2, subjects consumed a fixed diet designed to maintain energy balance. On days 3-14, food intake was covertly measured in subjects who had ad libitum access to a wide variety of foods typical of their normal diets. Resting metabolic rate (RMR; respiratory exchange), total daily energy expenditure (doubly labelled water) and body composition (total body water estimated from deuterium dilution) were measured on days 3-14. Hierarchical multiple regression indicated that after controlling for age and sex, both fat-free mass (FFM; P<0.001) and RMR (P<0.001) predicted daily EI. However, a mediation model using path analysis indicated that the effect of FFM (and fat mass) on EI was fully mediated by RMR (P<0.001). These data indicate that RMR is a strong determinant of EI under controlled laboratory conditions where food choice is allowed to freely vary and subjects are close to energy balance. Therefore, the conventional adipocentric model of appetite control should be revised to reflect the influence of RMR.

  17. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  18. Influence of different dialysis modalities in the measurement of resting energy expenditure in patients with acute kidney injury in ICU.

    PubMed

    Góes, Cassiana R de; Vogt, Barbara Perez; Sanches, Ana Claudia S; Balbi, André L; Ponce, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Currently, the execution of indirect calorimetry, which is considered the gold standard for measuring energy expenditure, is not indicate during dialysis, and it may interfere on nutritional therapy of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) in patients with severe acute kidney injury treated by different modalities of dialysis and to identify whether dialysis influences on REE. This was a prospective cohort study that evaluated patients admitted in intensive care units with diagnosis of acute kidney injury AKIN-3, mechanically ventilated, and submitted to conventional hemodialysis (CHD), extended hemodialysis (EHD) or high volume peritoneal dialysis (HVPD). Indirect calorimetry was performed at pre dialysis time and during the dialysis procedure. Parameters that could change REE were also evaluated. One-hundred patients undergoing 290 dialysis sessions were evaluated, with mean age 60.3 ± 17 years, 69% were male and 74% have died. There was no significant difference between REE of predialysis time and during dialysis time (2156 ± 659 kcal vs. 2100 ± 634 kcal, respectively, p = 0.15). No difference was observed in the REE before and during dialysis of different modalities. There were no differences between parameters pre and during dialysis of each modality. There was only a difference in norepinephrine dose, which was higher in pre dialysis time in HVPD and EHD modalities, compared with CHD modality. Moreover, during dialysis time, EHD modality had significantly higher VAD compared to other dialysis modalities. The three evaluated modalities did not change REE. Indirect calorimetry can be performed during dialysis procedures and there was no difference between ventilation parameters, sedatives use, body temperature and VAD in both moments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Age-related changes in resting energy expenditure in normal weight, overweight and obese men and women.

    PubMed

    Siervo, Mario; Oggioni, Clio; Lara, Jose; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Mathers, John C; Battezzati, Alberto; Leone, Alessandro; Tagliabue, Anna; Spadafranca, Angela; Bertoli, Simona

    2015-04-01

    Aging is associated with changes in resting energy expenditure (REE) and body composition. We investigated the association between age and changes in REE in men and women stratified by body mass index (BMI) categories (normal weight, overweight and obesity). We also examined whether the age-related decline in REE was explained by concomitant changes in body composition and lifestyle factors. Cross-sectional. 3442 adult participants (age range: 18-81 y; men/women: 977/2465) were included. The BMI range was 18.5-60.2 kg/m(2). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry in fasting conditions and body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Regression models were used to evaluate age-related changes in REE in subjects stratified by sex and BMI. Models were adjusted for body composition (fat mass, fat free mass), smoking, disease count and physical activity. In unadjusted models, the rate of decline in REE was highest in obese men (slope=-8.7±0.8 kcal/day/year) whereas the lowest rate of decline was observed in normal weight women (-2.9±0.3 kcal/day/year). Gender differences were observed for the age of onset of REE adaptive changes (i.e., not accounted by age related changes in body composition and lifestyle factors). In women, adaptive changes appeared to occur in middle-age (∼47 y) across all BMI groups whereas changes seemed to be delayed in obese men (∼54 y) compared to overweight (∼43 y) and normal weight (∼39 y) men. Sex and BMI influenced the rate and degree of the age-related decline in REE. Critical age windows have been identified for the onset of putative mechanisms of energy adaptation. These findings require confirmation in prospective studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Top Quark Physics at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2010-07-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator is recently performing at record luminosities that enables a program systematically addressing the physics of top quarks. The CDF collaboration has analyzed up to 5 fb{sup -1} of proton anti-proton collisions from the Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The large datasets available allow to push top quark measurements to higher and higher precision and have lead to the recent observation of electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron. This article reviews recent results on top quark physics from the CDF experiment.

  1. Quarks and gluons at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    Data from proton-antiproton collisions at high energy provide important information on constraining the quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon and place limits on quark substructure. The S asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass. Drell-Yan data at high invariant mass provides strong limits on quark substructure. Information on {alpha}{sub s} and the gluon distributions can be extracted from high P{sub T} jet data and direct photons.

  2. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, P.L.; Quack, E.; Ruuskanen, P.V. |

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  3. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  4. The relation between the fundamental scale controlling high-energy interactions of quarks and the proton mass

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2015-04-06

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) provides a fundamental description of the physics binding quarks into protons, neutrons, and other hadrons. QCD is well understood at short distances where perturbative calculations are feasible. Establishing an explicit relation between this regime and the large-distance physics of quark confinement has been a long-sought goal. A major challenge is to relate the parameter Λs, which controls the predictions of perturbative QCD (pQCD) at short distances, to the masses of hadrons. Here we show how new theoretical insights into QCD's behavior at large and small distances lead to an analytical relation between hadronic masses and Λs. The resulting prediction, Λs = 0.341 ± 0.024 GeV agrees well with the experimental value 0.339 ± 0.016 GeV. Conversely, the experimental value of Λs can be used to predict the masses of hadrons, a task which had so far only been accomplished through intensive numerical lattice calculations, requiring several phenomenological input parameters.

  5. Resting Metabolic Rate Among Old-Old Women With and Without Frailty: Variability and Estimation of Energy Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Carlos O.; Cappola, Anne R.; Varadhan, Ravi; Fried, Linda P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Resting metabolic rate (RMR) is the largest component of total energy expenditure. It has not been studied in old-old adults living in the community, though abnormalities in RMR may play a critical role in the development of the clinical syndrome of frailty. The objective was to measure RMR and examine the association of measured RMR with frailty status and compare it to expected RMR generated by a predictive equation. Design Physiologic sub-study conducted as a home visit within an observational cohort study. Setting Baltimore City and County, Maryland. Participants 77 women age 83–93 years enrolled in the Women’s Health and Aging Study II. Measurements RMR with indirect calorimetry; frailty status; fat-free mass; ambient and body temperature; expected RMR via the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation. Results Average RMR was 1119 kcal/d (s.d.± 205; range 595–1560). Agreement between observed and expected RMR was biased and very poor (between-subject coefficient of variation 38.0%, 95%CI: 35.1–40.8). Variability of RMR was increased in frail subjects (heteroscedasticity F test P value=0.02). Both low and high RMR were associated with being frail (Odds Ratio 5.4, P value=0.04) and slower self-selected walking speed (P value<0.001) after adjustment for covariates. Conclusion Equations to predict RMR that are not validated in old-old adults appear to correlate poorly with measured RMR. RMR values are highly variable among old-old women, with deviations from the mean predicting clinical frailty. These exploratory findings suggest a pathway to clinical frailty through either high or low RMR. PMID:22985142

  6. Impact of body composition during weight change on resting energy expenditure and homeostasis model assessment index in overweight nonsmoking adults.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Maryam; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Schautz, Britta; Braun, Wiebke; Glüer, Claus-C; Müller, Manfred J

    2014-04-01

    Weight change affects resting energy expenditure (REE) and metabolic risk factors. The impact of changes in individual body components on metabolism is unclear. We investigated changes in detailed body composition to assess their impacts on REE and insulin resistance. Eighty-three healthy subjects [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m²) range: 20.2-46.8; 50% obese] were investigated at 2 occasions with weight changes between -11.2 and +6.5 kg (follow-up periods between 23.5 and 43.5 mo). Detailed body composition was measured by using the 4-component model and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging. REE, plasma thyroid hormone concentrations, and insulin resistance were measured by using standard methods. Weight loss was associated with decreases in fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) by 72.0% and 28.0%, respectively. A total of 87.9% of weight gain was attributed to FM. With weight loss, sizes of skeletal muscle, kidneys, heart, and all fat depots decreased. With weight gain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney masses, and several adipose tissue depots increased except for visceral adipose tissue (VAT). After adjustments for FM and FFM, REE decreased with weight loss (by 0.22 MJ/d) and increased with weight gain (by 0.11 MJ/d). In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, changes in skeletal muscle, plasma triiodothyronine, and kidney masses explained 34.9%, 5.3%, and 4.5%, respectively, of the variance in changes in REE. A reduction in subcutaneous adipose tissue rather than VAT was associated with the improvement of insulin sensitivity with weight loss. Weight gain had no effect on insulin resistance. Beyond a 2-compartment model, detailed changes in organ and tissue masses further add to explain changes in REE and insulin resistance.

  7. Long-term impact of the ketogenic diet on growth and resting energy expenditure in children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    GROLEAU, VERONIQUE; SCHALL, JOAN I; STALLINGS, VIRGINIA A; BERGQVIST, CHRISTINA A

    2014-01-01

    AIM The long-term effects of the ketogenic diet, a high fat diet for treating intractable epilepsy, on resting energy expenditure (REE) are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 15 months of ketogenic diet treatment on growth and REE in children with intractable epilepsy. METHOD Growth, body composition and REE were assessed at baseline, 3 and 15 months in 24 children (14 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 6mo (SD 26mo), range 7mo–6y 5mo), 10 with cerebral palsy [CP]). Fifteen were identified as ketogenic diet responders at 3 months and continued on the ketogenic diet until 15 months. These were compared to 75 healthy children (43 males, 32 females; mean age 6y 3mo [SD 21mo] age range 2–9y). REE was expressed as percentage predicted, growth as height (HAz) and weight (WAz) z-scores, and body composition as fat and fat free mass (FFM). RESULTS HAz declined −0.2 and −0.6 from baseline to 3 and 15 months, respectively (p=0.001), while WAz was unchanged. In ketogenic diet responders, FFM, age and CP diagnosis predicted REE (overall R2=0.76, p<0.001) and REE did not change. REE adjusted for FFM was lower (p<0.01) in children with CP at baseline (mean [standard error], −143[51] kcals/d) and 15 months (−198[53] kcals/d) compared to the healthy children. INTERPRETATION After 15 months of the ketogenic diet, linear growth status declined while weight status and REE were unchanged. REE remained reduced in children with CP. PMID:24749520

  8. Long-term impact of the ketogenic diet on growth and resting energy expenditure in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Groleau, Veronique; Schall, Joan I; Stallings, Virginia A; Bergqvist, Christina A

    2014-09-01

    The long-term effects of the ketogenic diet, a high fat diet for treating intractable epilepsy, on resting energy expenditure (REE) are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 15 months of ketogenic diet treatment on growth and REE in children with intractable epilepsy. Growth, body composition, and REE were assessed at baseline, 3 months and 15 months in 24 children (14 males, 10 females; mean age 5 y 6 mo [SD 26 mo], range 7 mo-6 y 5 mo), 10 with cerebral palsy [CP]). Fifteen were identified as ketogenic diet responders at 3 months and continued on the ketogenic diet until 15 months. These were compared to 75 healthy children (43 males, 32 females; mean age 6 y 3 mo [SD 21 mo] age range 2-9 y). REE was expressed as percentage predicted, growth as height (HAz) and weight (WAz) z-scores, and body composition as fat and fat free mass (FFM). HAz declined -0.2 and -0.6 from baseline to 3 months and 15 months respectively (p = 0.001), while WAz was unchanged. In ketogenic diet responders, FFM, age and CP diagnosis predicted REE (overall R(2) = 0.76, p<0.001) and REE did not change. REE adjusted for FFM was lower (p<0.01) in children with CP at baseline (mean [standard error], -143[51] kcals/d) and 15 months (-198[53] kcals/d) compared to the healthy children. After 15 months of the ketogenic diet, linear growth status declined while weight status and REE were unchanged. REE remained reduced in children with CP. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Low validity of predictive equations for calculating resting energy expenditure in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A M Dos S; Costa, A B P; Campos, D L; Silva, M P S; Cândido, A L; Santos, L C Dos; Ferreira, A V M

    2017-08-08

    Predictive equations are the main clinical tools for determining resting energy expenditure (REE). However, their adequate use in overweight and obese individuals is unclear. Thus, we investigated the best predictive equations for estimating REE in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Eleven analyses were performed with prediction equations (pREE) based on anthropometric parameters in 30 overweight or obese women with PCOS without other chronic diseases. The measured REE (mREE) was calculated by indirect calorimetry. The validity of the equations was investigated by comparison, accuracy and agreement tests between pREE and mREE at both the individual and group level. Four analyses were similar to those of mREE, and smallest mean differences were observed for the World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/United Nations University (WHO/FAO/UNU) considering weight (W) [0.07 (1.13) MJ (16 [270] kcal)]. Individual accuracy was greater than 50% for Harris and Benedict, Müller and Lazzer equations. The percentage of REE underestimation ranged between 16.7% and 73.3%, whereas higher rates of overestimation were observed in the De Luis (66.7%) and Ireton-Jones (43.3%) equations. Mean bias at the group level was lowest in the WHO/FAO/UNU W and WHO/FAO/UNU considering weight and height (WH), Müller and Lazzer equations (-2.8 to 0.5). The WHO/FAO/UNU W and WHO/FAO/UNU WH formulas were optimal in individual agreement (33.3%). FAO/WHO/UNU W equations may estimate the REE in overweight and obese women with PCOS. However, the low individual accuracy and agreement in relation to mREE suggest caution regarding when to use the formula to perform an individual nutritional plan. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Larger mass of high-metabolic-rate organs does not explain higher resting energy expenditure in children.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Amy; Heshka, Stanley; Janumala, Isaac; Song, Mi-Yeon; Horlick, Mary; Krasnow, Norman; Gallagher, Dympna

    2003-06-01

    Children have a high resting energy expenditure (REE) relative to their body weight. The decline in REE during growth may be due to changes in body composition or to changes in the metabolic rate of individual organs and tissues. The goals were to quantify body-composition components in children at the organ-tissue level in vivo and to determine whether the observed masses 1) account for the elevated REE in children and 2) account, when combined with specific organ-tissue metabolic constants, for children's REE. This was a cross-sectional evaluation of 15 children (aged 9.3 +/- 1.7 y) and 13 young adults (aged 26.0 +/- 1.8 y) with body mass indexes (in kg/m(2)) < 30. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived in vivo measures of brain, liver, kidney, heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue were acquired. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry (REE(m)). Previously published organ-tissue metabolic rate constants were used to calculate whole-body REE (REE(c)). The proportion of adipose-tissue-free mass as liver (3.7 +/- 0.5% compared with 3.1 +/- 0.5%; P < 0.01) and brain (6.2 +/- 1.2% compared with 3.3 +/- 0.9%; P < 0.001) was significantly greater in children than in young adults. The addition of brain and liver mass significantly improved the model but did not eliminate the role of age. REE(c) with published metabolic coefficients underestimated REE(m) (REE(c) = 3869 +/- 615 kJ/d; REE(m) = 5119 +/- 769 kJ/d; P < 0.001) in children. The decline in REE during growth is likely due to both a decrease in the proportion of some of the more metabolically active organs and tissues and changes in the metabolic rate of individual organs and tissues.

  11. Acute effects of ingesting Java Fit™ energy extreme functional coffee on resting energy expenditure and hemodynamic responses in male and female coffee drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lemuel W; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Wismann, Jennifer; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a functional coffee beverage containing additional caffeine, green tea extracts, niacin and garcinia cambogia to regular coffee to determine the effects on resting energy expenditure (REE) and hemodynamic variables. Methods Subjects included five male (26 ± 2.1 y, 97.16 ± 10.05 kg, 183.89 ± 6.60 cm) and five female (28.8 ± 5.3 y, 142.2 ± 12.6 lbs) regular coffee drinkers. Subjects fasted for 10 hours and were assessed for 1 hour prior (PRE) and 3 hours following 1.5 cups of coffee ingestion [JavaFit™ Energy Extreme (JF) ~400 mg total caffeine; Folgers (F) ~200 mg total caffeine] in a double-blind, crossover design. REE, resting heart rate (RHR), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure was assessed at PRE and 1, 2, and 3-hours post coffee ingestion. Data were analyzed by three-factor repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05). Results JF trial resulted in a significant main effect for REE (p < 0.01), SBP (p < 0.01), RER (p < 0.01), and VO2 (p < 0.01) compared to F, with no difference between trials on the RHR and DBP variables. A significant interaction for trial and time point (p < 0.05) was observed for the variable REE. The JF trial resulted in a significant overall mean increase in REE of 14.4% (males = 12.1%, females = 17.9%) over the observation period (p < 0.05), while the F trial produced an overall decrease in REE of 5.7%. SBP was significantly higher in the JF trial; however, there was no significant increase from PRE to 3-hours post. Conclusion Results from this study suggest that JavaFit™ Energy Extreme coffee is more effective than Folgers regular caffeinated coffee at increasing REE in regular coffee drinkers for up to 3 hours following ingestion without any adverse hemodynamic effects. PMID:17919327

  12. Quark description of hadronic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, T.; Wilczek, F.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our proposal that major universality classes of hadronic matter can be understood, and in favorable cases calculated, directly in the microscopic quark variables, to allow for a splitting between strange and light quark masses. A surprisingly simple but apparently viable picture emerges, featuring essentially three phases, distinguished by whether strangeness is conserved (standard nuclear matter), conserved modulo 2 (hypernuclear matter), or locked to color (color flavor locking). These are separated by sharp phase transitions. There is also, potentially, a quark phase matching hadronic {ital K} condensation. The smallness of the secondary gap in two-flavor color superconductivity corresponds to the disparity between the primary dynamical energy scales of QCD and the much smaller energy scales of nuclear physics. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Smaller size of high metabolic rate organs explains lower resting energy expenditure in Asian-Indian Than Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Song, L L T; Venkataraman, K; Gluckman, P; Chong, Y S; Chee, M-W L; Khoo, C M; Leow, M-Ks; Lee, Y S; Tai, E S; Khoo, E Y H

    2016-04-01

    In Singapore, the obesity prevalence is disproportionately higher in the Asian-Indians and Malays than the Chinese. Lower resting energy expenditure (REE) may be a contributory factor. We explored the association between ethnicity and REE in Chinese, Asian-Indian and Malay men living in Singapore and determined the influence of body composition, mass/volume of high metabolic rate organs, represented by brain volume and trunk fat-free mass (FFM), and physical activity on ethnic differences. Two hundred and forty-four men from Singapore (n=100 Chinese, 70 Asian-Indians and 74 Malays), aged 21-40 years and body mass index of 18.5-30.0 kg m(-2), were recruited in this cross-sectional study. REE was assessed by indirect calorimetry and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Brain volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Physical activity was assessed by the Singapore Prospective Study Program Physical Activity Questionnaire. REE was significantly lower in Asian-Indians compared with that in Chinese after adjusting for body weight. FFM (total, trunk and limb) and total fat mass were important predictors of REE across all ethnic groups. Brain volume was positively associated with REE only in Malays. Moderate and vigorous physical activity was positively associated with REE only in Asian-Indians and Malays. The difference in REE between Asian-Indians and Chinese was attenuated but remained statistically significant after adjustment for total FFM (59±20 kcal per day), fat mass (67±20 kcal per day) and brain volume (54±22 kcal per day). The association between REE and ethnicity was no longer statistically significant after total FFM was replaced by trunk FFM (which includes heart, liver, kidney and spleen) but not when it was replaced by limb FFM (skeletal muscle). We have demonstrated a lower REE in Asian-Indians compared with Chinese who may contribute to the higher rates of obesity in the former. This difference could be accounted for

  14. Search for gluinos and scalar quarks in pp collisions at square root[s] = 1.8 TeV using the missing energy plus multijets signature.

    PubMed

    Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Frisch, H J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thompson, A S; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, A; Tonelli, D; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; de Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yao, W; Yagil, A; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2002-01-28

    We have performed a search for gluinos (g) and scalar quarks (q) in a data sample of 84 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root[s] = 1.8 TeV, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We investigate the final state of large missing transverse energy and three or more jets, a characteristic signature in R-parity-conserving supersymmetric models. The analysis has been performed "blind," in that the inspection of the signal region is made only after the predictions from standard model backgrounds have been calculated. Comparing the data with predictions of constrained supersymmetric models, we exclude gluino masses below 195 GeV/c2 (95% C.L.), independent of the squark mass. For the case m(q) approximately m(g), gluino masses below 300 GeV/c2 are excluded.

  15. Active women before/after an intervention designed to restore menstrual function: resting metabolic rate and comparison of four methods to quantify energy expenditure and energy availability.

    PubMed

    Guebels, Charlotte P; Kam, Lynn C; Maddalozzo, Gianni F; Manore, Melinda M

    2014-02-01

    It is hypothesized that exercise-related menstrual dysfunction (ExMD) results from low energy availability (EA), defined as energy intake (EI)--exercise energy expenditure (EEE). When EI is too low, resting metabolic rate (RMR) may be reduced to conserve energy. To measure changes in RMR and EA, using four methods to quantify EEE, before/after a 6-month diet intervention aimed at restoring menses in women with ExMD; eumenorrheic (Eumen) active controls (n = 9) were also measured. Active women with ExMD (n = 8) consumed +360 kcal/d (supplement) for 6 months; RMR was measured 2 times at 0 months/6 months. EI and total energy expenditure (TEE) were estimated using 7-day diet/activity records, with EA assessed using four methods to quantify EEE. At baseline, groups did not differ for age, gynecological age, body weight, lean/fat mass, VO₂max, EI and EA, but mean TEE was higher in ExMD (58.3 ± 4.4 kcal/ kgFFM/d; Eumen = 50.6 ± 2.4; p < .001) and energy balance (EB) more negative (-10.3 ± 6.9 kcal/kgFFM/d; Eumen=-3.0 ± 9.7; p = .049). RMR was higher in ExMD (31.3 ± 1.8 kcal/kgFFM/d) vs. Eumen (29.1 ± 1.9; p < .02). The intervention increased weight (1.6 ± 2.0 kg; p = .029), but there were no significant changes in EA (0-month range = 28.2-36.7 kcal/kgFFM/d; 6-month range = 30.0-45.4; p > .05), EB (6 months = -0.7 ± 15.1 kcal/kgFFM/d) or RMR (0 months = 1515 ± 142; 6 months = 1522 ± 134 kcal/d). Assessment of EA varied dramatically (~30%) by method used. For the ExMD group, EI and weight increased with +360 kcal/d for 6 months, but there were no significant changes in EB, EA or RMR. No threshold EA value was associated with ExMD. Future research should include TEE, EB and clearly quantifying EEE (e.g.,>4 MET) if EA is measured.

  16. Comparison of resting energy equations and total energy expenditure in haemodialysis patients and body composition measured by multi-frequency bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ben; Sridharan, Sivakumar; Farrington, Ken; Davenport, Andrew

    2017-07-13

    Waste products of metabolism are retained in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Cellular metabolism generates energy, and patients with greater energy expenditure may therefore require more dialysis. To determine the amount of dialysis required, equations estimating resting and total energy expenditure (REE,TEE) are required. We compared estimates of REE in HD patients using established equations with a novel equation recently validated in HD patients (HD equation). TEE was derived from REE (HD equation) and estimates of physical activity obtained by questionnaire. REE and TEE relationships with bioimpedance measured body composition were then determined. We studied 317 HD patients; 195 males (61.5%), 123 diabetic (38.9%), mean age 65.0 ± 15.3 and weight 73.1 ± 16.8 kg. REE from HD Equation was 1509 ± 241 kcal/day, which was greater than for Mifflin St Joer 1384 ± 259, Harris-Benedict 1437 ± 244, Katch-McArdle 1345 ± 232 (all p < 0.05 vs HD Equation), but less than Cunningham 1557 ± 236 kcal/day. Bland Altman mean bias ranged from -263 to 55 kcal/day. TEE was 1727 (1558-1976) kcal/day, and on multi-variable analysis was positively associated with skeletal muscle mass (β 23.3, p < 0.001), employment (β 406.5, p < 0.001), low co-morbidity (β 105.1, p = 0.006), and protein nitrogen appearance (β 2.7, p = 0.015), and negatively with age (β -7.9, p < 0.001), and dialysis vintage (β -121.2, p = 0.002). Most standard equations underestimate REE in HD patients compared to the HD Equation. TEE was greater in those with higher skeletal muscle mass and protein nitrogen appearance, lower co-morbidity, age, and dialysis vintage, and the employed. More metabolically active patients may require greater dialytic clearances. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear Matter from Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Fukukawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  18. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  19. Measurement of the single top quark production cross section and |Vt b| in 1.96 TeV p p ¯ collisions with missing transverse energy and jets and final CDF combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    An updated measurement of the single top quark production cross section is presented using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponding to 9.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. The events selected contain an imbalance in the total transverse momentum, jets identified as containing b quarks, and no identified leptons. The sum of the s - and t -channel single top quark cross sections is measured to be 3.5 3-1.16+1.25 pb and a lower limit on the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling, |Vt b| of 0.63, is obtained at the 95% credibility level. These measurements are combined with previously reported CDF results obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, jets identified as originating from b quarks, and one identified lepton. The combined cross section is measured to be 3.0 2-0.48+0.49 pb and a lower limit on |Vt b| of 0.84 is obtained at the 95% credibility level.

  20. Measurement of the single top quark production cross section and |Vtb| in 1.96 TeV pp¯ collisions with missing transverse energy and jets and final CDF combination

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-02-26

    An updated measurement of the single top quark production cross section is presented using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponding to 9.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. The events selected contain an imbalance in the total transverse momentum, jets identified as containing b quarks, and no identified leptons. The sum of the s- and t-channel single top quark cross sections is measured to be 3.53-1.16+1.25 pb and a lower limit on the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling, |Vtb| of 0.63, is obtained at the 95% credibilitymore » level. These measurements are combined with previously reported CDF results obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, jets identified as originating from b quarks, and one identified lepton. Furthermore, the combined cross section is measured to be 3.02-0.48+0.49 pb and a lower limit on |Vtb| of 0.84 is obtained at the 95% credibility level.« less

  1. Spinal Muscular Atrophy, types I and II: What are the differences in body composition and resting energy expenditure?

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Simona; De Amicis, Ramona; Mastella, Chiara; Pieri, Giulia; Giaquinto, Ester; Battezzati, Alberto; Leone, Alessandro; Baranello, Giovanni

    2016-11-16

    Different neuromuscular functional domains in types I and II Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMAI and SMAII) could lead to differences in body composition (BC) and resting energy expenditure (REE). Their identification could provide the key to defining appropriate strategies in clinical dietary management, but data comparing SMAI and SMAII in terms of BC and REE are not yet available. We measured total and regional fat (FM), lean (LBM), mineral (BMC) masses, body water (total, intra- and extra-cellular, TBW, ICW, ECW) and REE in a sample of SMAI and II children, matched for age and sex, and also adjusting for body size to compare these features of the two SMA phenotypes. 15 SMAI and 15 SMAII children, (M/F = 9/6 vs 9/6, age 3.6 ± 1.9 vs 3.5 ± 1.8 years, p = 0.99), confirmed genetically, were measured as follows: Anthropometric measurements [Body Weight (BW), Supine Length (SL), Arm Length (AL), Femur Length (FL), Tibia Length (TL)], Dual x-ray Energy Absorptiometry (DEXA) [total and segmental FM, LBM, FFM, and BMC], Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) [TBW, ICW, ECW] and Indirect Calorimetry (REE, respiratory quotients) were collected by the same trained dietician. BW, SL and Body Mass Index (BMI) Z-scores were calculated according to CDC Growth Charts (2000). SMA children had high percentages of FM and a lower percentage of TBW and ECW compared to the respective reference values for sex and age, whereas the BMC percentages did not differ, even splitting the two phenotypes. SMA I children had a lower BW and BMI-Z score compared to children with SMA II, but similar total and segmental FM. On the contrary, total FFM and LBM were significantly lower in SMAI (7290.0 ± 1729.1 g vs 8410.1 ± 1508.4 g; 6971.8 ± 1637.1 g vs 8041.7 ± 1427.7 g, p = 0.039, p = 0.037, respectively), particularly at the trunk level. Arm BMC also resulted significantly lower in SMAI. The measured REE values were similar (684 ± 143 kcal/day vs 703 ± 122 Kcal/day p = 0

  2. Effects of quark-gluon plasma and hadron gas on charmonium production at energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baoyi

    2016-04-01

    The production of charmonium in heavy ion collisions is investigated based on the Boltzmann-type transport model for charmonium evolution and the Langevin equation for charm quark evolution. Charmonium suppression and regeneration in both quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and hadron phase are considered. Charm quarks are far from thermalization, and regeneration of charmonium in QGP and hadron gas is negligible at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). At peripheral collisions, charmonium suppression with hadron gas explains the experimental data well. But at central collisions, additional suppression from deconfined matter (QGP) is necessary for the data. This means there should be QGP produced at central collisions, and no QGP produced at peripheral collisions at SPS energy. Predictions are also made at FAIR √{sN N}=7.7 GeV Au+Au collisions.

  3. Lipomatosis-associated inflammation and excess collagen may contribute to lower relative resting energy expenditure in women with adiposis dolorosa

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, KL; Coviello, AD; Chang, A; Boyle, DL

    2010-01-01

    Background Adiposis dolorosa (AD) is a syndrome of obese and non-obese individuals whose hallmark is lipomatosis: unencapsulated painful fatty masses in subcutaneous fat. Lipomatosis may contain excess collagen and multi-nucleated giant (MNG) cells. Case reports suggest metabolic defects in AD. Objectives (1) To determine whether women with AD have altered relative resting energy expenditure (REE per total body mass) compared with controls; and (2) to quantitate lipomatosis-associated collagen, MNGs and tissue and blood cytokines that may influence REE. Methods A total of 10 women with AD were compared with age, body mass index, fat and weight-matched control women. Adipose tissue was obtained from five women with AD and five controls and evaluated for collagen and macrophages/MNGs. Fat mass and fat-free mass were identified by dual X-ray absorptiometry. REE was by determined indirect calorimetry and related to mass. Adipokines and cytokines were evaluated in blood and tissue. Results Relative REE (REE per total body mass) was lower in women with AD compared with controls (P=0.007). Only lipomatosis (group) and total body mass were significant predictors of REE in forward stepwise regression (P<0.0001). Adipose interleukin (IL)-6 levels were elevated (P=0.03) and connective tissue was increased fourfold in lipomatosis compared with control tissue (P<0.0001). There was no difference in adipose tissue macrophages between groups; 30% of women with AD had MNG cells. Anti-inflammatory IL-13 levels were elevated (P=0.03), and cytokines important in the recruitment of monocytes, Fraktalkine (P=0.04) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (P=0.009), were significantly lower in the blood of women with AD compared with controls. Conclusions The lower relative REE in women with AD compared with controls was associated with increased connective (non-metabolic) tissue in the lipomatosis, and inflammation, although underlying metabolic defects may be important as well

  4. Lower resting energy expenditure and fat oxidation in Native American and Hispanic infants born to mothers with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Short, Kevin R; Teague, April M; Fields, David A; Lyons, Timothy; Chernausek, Steven D

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether exposure to diabetes in utero affects resting energy expenditure (REE) and fuel oxidation in infants. At 35 ± 5 days after birth, body composition and REE were measured in full-term offspring of Native American and Hispanic women with either well-controlled diabetes (13 girls, 11 boys) or normal healthy pregnancies (18 girls, 17 boys). Control of dysglycemia during gestation in the women with diabetes mellitus met current clinical standards, shown by average glycated hemoglobin (5.9 ± 0.2%; 40.6 ± 2.3 mmol/mol). Infant body mass (offspring of women with diabetes: 4.78 ± 0.13, control offspring: 4.56 ± 0.08 kg) and body fatness (offspring of women with diabetes: 25.2 ± 0.6, control offspring: 24.2 ± 0.5 %) did not differ between groups. REE, adjusted for lean body mass, was 14% lower in offspring of women with diabetes (41.7 ± 2.3 kJ/h) than control offspring (48.6 ± 2.0, P = .025). Fat oxidation was 26% lower in offspring of women with diabetes (0.54 ± 0.05 g/h) than control offspring (0.76 ± 0.04, P < .01) but carbohydrate oxidation did not differ. Thus, fat oxidation accounted for a lower fraction of REE in the offspring of women with diabetes (49 ± 4%) than control offspring (60 ± 3%, P = .022). Mothers with diabetes were older and had higher prepregnancy body mass index than control mothers. Well-controlled maternal diabetes did not significantly affect body mass or composition of offspring at 1-month old. However, infants with mothers with diabetes had reduced REE and fat oxidation, which could contribute to adiposity and future disease risk. Further studies are needed to assess the impact differences in age and higher prepregnancy body mass index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lower resting energy expenditure and fat oxidation in Native American and Hispanic infants born to mothers with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kevin R.; Teague, April M.; Fields, David A.; Lyons, Timothy; Chernausek, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether exposure to diabetes in utero affects resting energy expenditure (REE) and fuel oxidation in infants. Study design At 35 ± 5 days after birth, body composition and REE were measured in full-term offspring of Native American and Hispanic women with either well-controlled diabetes (13 girls, 11 boys) or normal healthy pregnancies (18 girls, 17 boys). Results Control of dysglycemia during gestation in the women with diabetes mellitus met current clinical standards shown by average glycated hemoglobin (5.9 ± 0.2%; 40.6 ± 2.3 mmol/mol). Infant body mass (offspring of women with diabetes: 4.78 ± 0.13, control offspring: 4.56 ± 0.08 kg) and body fatness (offspring of women with diabetes: 25.2 ± 0.6, control offspring: 24.2 ± 0.5 %) did not differ between groups. REE, adjusted for lean body mass, was 14% lower in offspring of women with diabetes (41.7 ± 2.3 kJ/h) than control offspring (48.6 ± 2.0, p=0.025). Fat oxidation was 26% lower in offspring of women with diabetes (0.54 ± 0.05 g/h) than control offspring (0.76 ± 0.04, p < 0.01) but carbohydrate oxidation did not differ. Thus, fat oxidation accounted for a lower fraction of REE in the offspring of women with diabetes (49 ± 4%) than control offspring (60 ± 3%, p = 0.022). Mothers with diabetes were older and had higher pre-pregnancy BMI than control mothers. Conclusion Well-controlled maternal diabetes did not significantly affect body mass or composition of offspring at 1-month old. However, infants with diabetic mothers had reduced REE and fat oxidation, which could contribute to adiposity, and future disease risk. Further studies are needed to assess the impact differences in age and higher prepregnancy BMI. PMID:25648295

  6. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-01

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  7. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  8. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  9. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  10. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.

  11. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is usedmore » to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.« less

  12. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-04-01

    A first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. A differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03(stat) ± 0.10(syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Benchmark cross sections for bottom quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1988-01-07

    A summary is presented of theoretical expectations for the total cross sections for bottom quark production, for longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions, and for b, /bar b/ momentum correlations at Fermilab fixed target and collider energies.

  14. Onset of quark-hadron duality in pion electroproduction.

    PubMed

    Navasardyan, T; Adams, G S; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Bertoncini, C; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W U; Bosted, P E; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Cui, Y; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kubarovski, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McGrath, E; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Moziak, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Ostapenko, T; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zhu, H

    2007-01-12

    A large data set of charged-pion (pi+/-) electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets has been obtained spanning the low-energy residual-mass region. These data conclusively show the onset of the quark-hadron duality phenomenon, as predicted for high-energy hadron electroproduction. We construct several ratios from these data to exhibit the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark-->pion production mechanisms.

  15. The Onset of Quark-Hadron Duality in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tigran Navasardyan; Gary Adams; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Tatiana Angelescu; John Arrington; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Nawal Benmouna; Crystal Bertoncini; Henk Blok; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Herbert Breuer; Michael Christy; Simon Connell; Yonggang Cui; Mark Dalton; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Dodario; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Najib Elkhayari; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; Valera Frolov; Liping Gan; David Gaskell; Kawtar Hafidi; Wendy Hinton; Roy Holt; Tanja Horn; Garth Huber; Ed Hungerford; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; V. Kubarovski; Ya Li; Yongguang Liang; Simona Malace; Pete Markowitz; Erin McGrath; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Brian Moziak; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Allena Opper; Tanya Ostapenko; Paul Reimer; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Stephen Rock; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C. Smith; G.R. Smith; Paul Stoler; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Maurizio Ungaro; Alicia Uzzle; Sandra Vidakovic; Anthony Villano; William Vulcan; Miao Wang; Glen Warren; Frank Wesselmann; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Stephen Wood; Chuncheng Xu; Lulin Yuan; Xiaochao Zheng; Hong Guo Zhu

    2006-08-29

    A large data set of charged-pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets has been obtained spanning the low-energy residual-mass region. These data conclusively show the onset of the quark-hadron duality phenomenon, as predicted for high-energy hadron electroproduction. We construct several ratios from these data to exhibit the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark-to- pion production mechanisms.

  16. Free fatty acid kinetics in the late phase of postexercise recovery: importance of resting fatty acid metabolism and exercise-induced energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Mohammed, B Selma; Patterson, Bruce W; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2009-09-01

    Free fatty acid (FFA) availability increases several-fold during exercise and remains significantly elevated for at least 3 to 6 hours after exercise cessation. Little, however, is known regarding the duration of the postexercise rise in FFA flux. In the present study, we used stable isotope-labeled palmitate infusion to examine fatty acid metabolism in 27 healthy untrained men and women (age, 29 +/- 7 years; body mass index, 25 +/- 4 kg/m2) between 13 to 16 hours and 21 to 24 hours after a single bout of moderate-intensity endurance exercise (1-2 hours at 60% of peak oxygen consumption), performed in the evening, and after a time-matched resting trial. Postabsorptive FFA rate of appearance (Ra) and FFA concentration in plasma were significantly greater after exercise than rest throughout the recovery period (P < .015), but the exercise-induced increases declined from approximately 40% at 13 to 16 hours to approximately 10% at 21 to 24 hours postexercise (P = .001). The magnitude of the exercise-induced increase in plasma FFA concentration was proportional to the increase in FFA Ra. Correlation analysis demonstrated that exercise-induced changes in plasma FFA Ra at 13 to 16 hours are (1) negatively associated with resting plasma FFA Ra and (2) positively associated with the net energy expenditure of exercise and the exercise-induced changes in whole-body fat oxidation rate (all P values < .05). In multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis, baseline plasma FFA Ra (P < or = .008) and net energy expenditure of exercise (P < or = .005) independently predicted the exercise-induced change in plasma FFA Ra at 13 to 16 hours. We conclude that the exercise-induced increase in FFA mobilization is (1) long-lived, persisting for 12 to 24 hours after exercise, with a progressive decline with time; (2) greater in subjects with low than high resting plasma FFA availability; and (3) greater after exercise with high than low energy demand.

  17. Heavy quark dynamics in QCD matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Scardina, F.; Plumari, S.; Greco, V.

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous description of heavy quark nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v 2 is a top challenge for all the existing models. We highlight how the temperature dependence of the energy loss/transport coefficients is responsible for addressing a large part of such a puzzle along with the full solution of the Boltzmann collision integral for the momentum evolution of heavy quarks in the medium. We consider four different models to evaluate the temperature dependence of drag coefficients of the heavy quark in the QGP. We have also highlighted the heavy quark dynamics in the presence of an external electromagnetic field which induces a sizable heavy quark directed flow, v 1(y), that can be measurable at LHC.

  18. Validity of COSMED's quark CPET mixing chamber system in evaluating energy metabolism during aerobic exercise in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Austin, Melanie D; Dew, Dustin; Utter, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    This study validated the accuracy of COSMED's Quark cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) metabolic mixing chamber system in measuring metabolic factors during maximal, graded exercise testing. Subjects included 32 physically active men between the ages of 18 and 34 years. During the first test session, subjects were measured for maximal oxygen consumption twice (15 min separation) with the CPET and Douglas bag systems (random order). During the second test session, subjects exercised through four stages of the Bruce treadmill protocol with measurement by the CPET and Douglas bag systems (random order) during steady state at the end of each 3-minute stage. Statistical analysis using a 2 (systems) x 5 (time) repeated measures ANOVA showed that the pattern of change in VO2, VCO2, VE, FeO2, FeCO2, and RER did not differ significantly between CPET and Douglas bag systems. This validation study indicates that the CPET mixing chamber system provides valid metabolic measurements that compare closely with the Douglas bag system during aerobic exercise.

  19. Topology and stability of the Kondo phase in quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro; Suzuki, Kei; Itakura, Kazunori

    2017-07-01

    We investigate properties of the ground state of a light-quark matter with heavy-quark impurities. This system exhibits the "QCD Kondo effect" where the interaction strength between a light quark near the Fermi surface and a heavy quark increases with decreasing energy of the light quark toward the Fermi energy and diverges at some scale near the Fermi energy, called the Kondo scale. Around and below the Kondo scale, we must treat the dynamics nonperturbatively. As a typical nonperturbative method to treat the strong coupling regime, we adopt a mean-field approach where we introduce a condensate, the Kondo condensate, representing a mixing between a light quark and a heavy quark, and determine the ground state in the presence of the Kondo condensate. We show that the ground state is a topologically nontrivial state and the heavy-quark spin forms the hedgehog configuration in the momentum space. We can define the Berry phase for the ground-state wave function in the momentum space, which is associated with a monopole at the position of a heavy quark. We also investigate fluctuations around the mean field in the random-phase approximation and show the existence of (excitonlike) collective excitations made of a hole h of a light quark and a heavy quark Q .

  20. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  1. Observability of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive.

  2. Quark Stars and Magnetic Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Martinez, A.; Perez Rojas, H.; Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.; Boligan, M.

    2005-09-28

    Quark matter is expected to exist in the interior of compact stellar objects as neutron stars or even the more exotic strange stars, based on the Bodmer-Witten conjecture. Bare strange quark stars and (normal) strange quark-matter stars, those possessing a baryon (electron) crust, are hypothesized as good candidates to explain the properties of a set of peculiar stellar sources as the enigmatic X-ray source RX J1856.5-3754, some pulsars as PSR B1828-11 and PSR B1642-03 (Xu 2003), and the anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters (Zhang et al. 2000). In the MIT bag model, quarks are treated as a degenerate Fermi gas confined to a region of space having a vacuum energy density Bbag (the Bag constant). In this note, we modified the MIT Bag Model by including the electromagnetic interaction. We also show that this version of the MIT model implies the anisotropy of the Bag pressure due to the presence of the magnetic field. The equations of state of degenerate quarks gases are studied in the presence of ultra strong magnetic fields. The behavior of a system made-up of quarks having (or not) an anomalous magnetic moment is reviewed. A structural instability is found, which is related to the anisotropic nature of the pressures in this highly magnetized matter. The conditions for the collapse of this system are obtained and compared to a previous model of neutron stars build-up on a neutron gas having anomalous magnetic moment.

  3. A Study of Weak Corrections to Drell-Yan, Top-quark pair and Di-jet Production at High Energies with MCFM

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-08-10

    Electroweak (EW) corrections can be enhanced at high energies due to the soft or collinear radiation of virtual and real $W$ and $Z$ bosons that result in Sudakov-like corrections of the form $\\alpha_W^l\\log^n(Q^2/M_{W,Z}^2)$, where $\\alpha_W =\\alpha/(4\\pi\\sin^2\\theta_W)$ and $n\\le 2l-1$. The inclusion of EW corrections in predictions for hadron colliders is therefore especially important when searching for signals of possible new physics in distributions probing the kinematic regime $Q^2 \\gg M_V^2$. Next-to-leading order (NLO) EW corrections should also be taken into account when their size ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$) is comparable to that of QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$). To this end we have implemented the NLO weak corrections to the Neutral-Current Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and di-jet production in the parton-level Monte-Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding QCD corrections at NLO and NNLO. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their Sudakov approximation since the latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects at high energies and can be extended to higher orders. With both the exact and approximate results at hand, the validity of the Sudakov approximation can be readily quantified.

  4. Mass of heavy-light mesons in a constituent quark picture with partially restored chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Aaron; Gubler, Philipp; Harada, Masayasu; Lee, Su Houng; Nonaka, Chiho; Park, Woosung

    2016-03-01

    We probe effects of the partial chiral symmetry restoration to the mass of heavy-light mesons in a constituent quark model by changing the constituent quark mass of the light quark. Due to the competing effect between the quark mass and the linearly rising potential, whose contribution to the energy increases as the quark mass decreases, the heavy-light meson mass has a minimum value near the constituent quark mass typically used in the vacuum. Hence, the meson mass increases as one decreases the constituent quark mass consistent with recent QCD sum rule analyses, which show an increasing D meson mass as the chiral order parameter decreases.

  5. Study of hadronization using energy flow from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation into quarks and gluons at. sqrt. s of 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, L.J.

    1985-11-01

    We have made a high statistics study of QCD jets produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at ..sqrt..s of 29 GeV and observed in the MAC detector located at the PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector uses calorimetry and provides a homogeneous response over much of its 98% . 4..pi.. sr instrumented solid angle. A data sample of well reconstructed hadronic events was selected by requiring that E/sub vis/ in the calorimeters be near ..sqrt..s, and almost all the energy be deposited in the central calorimeters. Fits of the jet transverse energy flow are made to the data using String (STR) model and several types of Independent Jet (IJM) model hypotheses, where ..alpha../sub s/, the strong coupling constant, and sigma/sub q/, the width of the secondary quark P/sub perpendicular/ distribution, are free parameters. The fits to O(..alpha../sub s//sup 2/ using MS-bar renormalization yield ..alpha../sub s/ approx.0.17 with the STR hypothesis, and ..alpha../sub s/ approx.0.12 with the various IJM hypotheses. The correlations between ..alpha../sub s/ and sigma/sub q/ are examined. Detailed comparisons were made with other experimental results. The energy flow projected onto the event plane of 3-jet events selected from the above data sample was studied. The data shows an asymmetric energy flow around the thin jet. Such an asymmetry was predicted by the STR model, and a cluster model (Webber) incorporating soft gluon interference. The various IJM models show no such asymmetry. We associate this asymmetry with coherence effects during hadronization. 106 refs., 58 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  7. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhenbin

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator POWHEG is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include s-channel, t-channel, and Wt-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53} (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})$ pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\ ± 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.78$ at the 95% credibility level.

  8. Recent results in light-quark meson spectroscopy from Fermilab experiment E-760

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Church, M.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Hsueh, S.; Marsh, W.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.

    1994-09-01

    Fermilab experiment E-760 light-quark meson spectroscopy data for proton-antiproton annihilation to 3{pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup 0}{eta}, {pi}{sup 0}2{eta}, and 3{eta} in-flight have confirmed the 1500 MeV state at rest seen previously at CERN. Structures above this energy are complex, and preliminary results of amplitude analysis, in progress, for extracting spin quantum numbers show the possibility of nearly degenerate states for some of these structures. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. The contribution of fat-free mass to resting energy expenditure: implications for weight loss strategies in the treatment of adolescent obesity.

    PubMed

    Browning, Matthew G; Evans, Ronald K

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the strong relationship between fat-free mass (FFM) and resting energy expenditure (REE), the preservation of FFM is often emphasized in the treatment of adolescent obesity. Typical treatment regimens including an increased dietary consumption of protein and participation in resistance training are common components of adolescent weight management programs, despite limited evidence of a positive influence of FFM on weight loss outcomes in adolescents. Given the larger volume of FFM in obese relative to normal weight adolescents and the common treatment goals of both maximizing weight loss and attenuating the loss of FFM, a better understanding of the influence of FFM on energy balance is needed to determine whether strategies to preserve lean tissue or maximize absolute weight loss should be most emphasized. We review the associations among FFM, REE, and weight loss outcomes, focusing on how these relationships might influence energy balance in obese adolescents.

  10. Two Theoretical Studies in Particle Physics: I. Calculability in Quark Flavor Mixing. I. Forward Proton Proton and Proton Antiproton Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjitheodoridis, Stilianos

    I. We consider the origin of the flavor mixings and calculability of mixing parameters in the quark sector of the standard model. The Fritzsch type quark mass matrices are analysed and the results are tested against experiments, predicting the mass of the t-quark as large as 80.8 GeV. II. In connection with the recent UA4 experiment on p| p scattering we reexamine the existence of the odderon and we speculate on the opening of a new threshold.

  11. Prompt quark production by exploding sphalerons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuryak, Edward; Zahed, Ismail

    2003-01-01

    Following recent works on the production and subsequent explosive decay of QCD sphaleronlike clusters, we discuss the mechanism of quark pair production in this process. We first show how the gauge field explosive solution of Luscher and Schechter can be achieved by noncentral conformal mapping from the O(4)-symmetric solution. Our main result is a new solution to the Dirac equation in real time in this configuration, obtained by the same inversion of the fermion O(4) zero mode. It explicitly shows how the quark acceleration occurs, starting from the spherically O(3)-symmetric zero energy chiral quark state to the final spectrum of nonzero energies. The sphaleronlike clusters with any Chern-Simons number always produce NFL¯R quarks, and the antisphaleron-like clusters the opposite chirality. The result are relevant for hadron-hadron and nucleus-nucleus collisions at large (s), wherein such clusters can be produced.

  12. Malate-Aspartate Shuttle Inhibitor Aminooxyacetate Acid Induces Apoptosis and Impairs Energy Metabolism of Both Resting Microglia and LPS-Activated Microglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Caixia; Wei, Xunbin; Ding, Xianting; Ying, Weihai

    2015-06-01

    NADH shuttles mediate the transfer of the reducing equivalents of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria. Cumulating evidence has suggested that malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), one of the two types of NADH shuttles, plays significant roles in such biological processes as glutamate synthesis in neurons. However, there has been no information regarding the roles of NADH shuttle in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia. In current study, using microglial BV2 cells as a cellular model, we determined the roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia by using aminooxyacetate acid (AOAA)-a widely used MAS inhibitor. Our study has suggested that AOAA can effectively inhibit the MAS activity of the cells. We also found that AOAA can induce both early- and late-stage apoptosis of resting microglia and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-activated microglia. AOAA also induced mitochondrial depolarization, increases in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, and decreases in the intracellular ATP levels. Moreover, our study has excluded the possibility that the major nonspecific effect of AOAA-inhibition of GABA transaminase-is involved in theses effects of AOAA. Collectively, our study has provided first information suggesting significant roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism in both resting microglia and LPS-activated microglia.

  13. Effects of resistance exercise combined with essential amino acid supplementation and energy deficit on markers of skeletal muscle atrophy and regeneration during bed rest and active recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi E.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Vannier, Edouard; Cloutier, Gregory; Carambula, Silvia; Myburgh, Kathryn H.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Space flight and bed rest (BR) lead to muscle atrophy. This study assessed the effect of essential amino acid supplementation (EAA) and resistance training with decreased energy intake on molecular changes in skeletal muscle after 28d BR and 14d recovery. METHODS Thirty-one men (31–55yr) subjected to an 8±6% energy deficit were randomized to receive EAA without resistance training (AA, n=7), EAA 3 h after (RT, n=12), or 5 min before (AART, n=12) resistance training. RESULTS During BR, myostatin transcript levels increased 2-fold in the AA group. During recovery, IGF1 mRNA increased in all groups while Pax7, MyoD, myogenin and MRF4 transcripts increased in AA only (all p<0.05). MAFbx transcripts decreased 2-fold with AA and RT. Satellite cells did not change during BR or recovery. DISCUSSION This suggests that EAA alone is the least protective countermeasure to muscle loss, and several molecular mechanisms are proposed by which exercise attenuates muscle atrophy during bed rest with energy deficit. PMID:20928906

  14. Simple kcal/kg formula is comparable to prediction equations for estimating resting energy expenditure in older cognitively impaired long term care residents.

    PubMed

    Silver, H J; Wall, R; Hollingsworth, E; Pruitt, A; Shotwell, M; Simmons, S

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of energy needs is a critical step in developing the nutrition care plan, especially for individuals unable to modulate their own energy intakes. The purpose of this study was to assess precision and accuracy of commonly used prediction equations in comparison to measured resting energy expenditure in a sample of "oldest old" adults residing in long term care (LTC). Resting energy expenditure (mREE) was measured by indirect calorimetry in 45 residents aged 86.1 ± 7.3 years, and compared to frequently used prediction equations (pREE): Mifflin St.Jeor, Harris Benedict, World Health Organization and Owen. Precision and accuracy were determined by concordance correlation coefficients and number of individuals within ± 10% of mREE. Bland Altman plots with linear dependence trends were constructed to visualize agreement. To complete analyses, the common 25 kcal/kg formula was assessed and alternative formulas were determined for best fit by regressing adjusted mREE on body weight. mREE averaged 976.2 ± 190.3 kcal/day for females and 1260.0 ± 275.9 kcal/d for males. The strength of the relationships between pREE and mREE were only moderate (r = 0.41 - 0.72). In examining linear trends in the Bland Altman plots, significant systematic deviation from mREE was detected for all pREE. Two kcal/kg formulas were generated: 20.6 kcal/kg for females and 22.7 kcal/kg for males, which were not significantly different. None of the prediction equations adequately estimated energy needs in this sample of the "oldest old." A simple formula using 21-23 kcal/kg may be a more practical and reliable method to determine energy needs in the LTC setting.

  15. Search for top quark at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    There is a vast theoretical and experimental support for idea that op quark as a weak isospin partner to b-quark should exist. Production cross section is steeply falling function of top quark mass. Therefore realistically at present only Tevatron p[anti p] collider at FNAL, with total energy 1.8 TeV in CMS system, still has a chance of top quark discovery. Dominant production mechanism for top quarks at Tevatron is pair production of t[anti t]. With almost 100% probability t ([anti t]) decays in mode t [yields] W[sup +]b. Distinct features of this decay provide very good signatures of top quark production which helps to reduce otherwise very high level of background. Based on simple combinatorial arguments one can show that W should decay in 1/9 cases into W [yields] l + [nu] where l stands for lepton (e,[mu],[tau]). Very clean signature represents case when both W's from t and [anti t] decay into e ([mu]) + [nu]. In this case experimental observation will be two isolated leptons characterized by large transverse momentum, large missing transverse energy E[sub T] and 2 b quark jets. Jets originated from b quarks can be quite frequently recognized by presence of secondary vertices associated with jets. Another feature of b-jets which can be used for their identification is frequent association of so called soft leptons with jets. Two experimental setups CDF and D0 are able to take advantage of Tevatron for top quark discovery. Recently CDF collaboration presented evidence for direct observation of t[anti t] production in 19.3 pb[sup [minus]1] of p[anti p] collisions at [radical](s) = 1.8TeV. Very brief account of these results is presented here.

  16. Search for supersymmetry in final states with a single lepton, b-quark jets, and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.

    2013-03-01

    A search motivated by supersymmetric models with light top squarks is presented using proton-proton collision data recorded with the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of s=7TeV during 2011, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98fb-1. The analysis is based on final states with a single lepton, b-quark jets, and missing transverse energy. Standard model yields are predicted from data using two different approaches. The observed event numbers are found to be compatible with these predictions. Results are interpreted in the context of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model and of a simplified model with four top quarks in the final state.

  17. Discovery of single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Gillberg, Dag

    2009-04-01

    The top quark is by far the heaviest known fundamental particle with a mass nearing that of a gold atom. Because of this strikingly high mass, the top quark has several unique properties and might play an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking - the mechanism that gives all elementary particles mass. Creating top quarks requires access to very high energy collisions, and at present only the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is capable of reaching these energies. Until now, top quarks have only been observed produced in pairs via the strong interaction. At hadron colliders, it should also be possible to produce single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. Studies of single top quark production provide opportunities to measure the top quark spin, how top quarks mix with other quarks, and to look for new physics beyond the standard model. Because of these interesting properties, scientists have been looking for single top quarks for more than 15 years. This thesis presents the first discovery of single top quark production. An analysis is performed using 2.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Boosted decision trees are used to isolate the single top signal from background, and the single top cross section is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb. Using the same analysis, a measurement of the amplitude of the CKM matrix element Vtb, governing how top and b quarks mix, is also performed. The measurement yields: |V{sub tb}|f1L| = 1.05 -0.12+0.13, where f1L is the left-handed Wtb coupling. The separation of signal from background is improved by combining the boosted decision trees with two other multivariate techniques. A new cross section measurement is performed, and the significance for the excess over the predicted background exceeds 5

  18. Radiatively corrected lepton energy distributions in top quark decays t→ bW +→ b( ℓ + ν ℓ ) and t→ bH +→ b( τ + ν τ ) and single-charged prong energy distributions from subsequent τ + decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Kuraev, Eduard A.; Bystritskiy, Yury M.

    2010-06-01

    We calculate the QED and QCD radiative corrections to the charged lepton energy distributions in the dominant semileptonic decays of the top quark t→ bW +→ b( ℓ + ν ℓ ) ( ℓ= e, μ, τ) in the standard model (SM), and for the decay t→ bH +→ b( τ + ν τ ) in an extension of the SM having a charged Higgs boson H ± with m_{H^{±}}quark decays. As the τ + leptons arising from the decays W +→ τ + ν τ and H +→ τ + ν τ are predominantly left- and right-polarised, respectively, influencing the energy distributions of the decay products in the subsequent decays of the τ +, we work out the effect of the radiative corrections on such distributions in the dominant (one-charged prong) decay channels tau+toπ+bar{ν}_{tau},ρ+bar{ν}_{tau},a1+bar{ν}_{tau} and ell+ν_{ell}bar{ν}_{tau}. The inclusive π + energy spectra in the decay chains tto b(W+,H+)to b(tau+ν_{tau})to b(π+bar{ν}_{tau}ν_{tau}+X) are calculated, which can help in searching for the induced H ± effects at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  19. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Institute (Kolkata) Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton) Danfysik, Department of Science and Technology (New Delhi) Elsevier B V (Amsterdam) Government of Rajasthan European Organization for Nuclear Research (Geneva) Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt) Hewlett-Packard Indian Institute of Astrophysics (Bangalore) Institute of Physics (Bhubaneswar) IOP Publishing (Bristol) Merint Infrastructure Ltd. Rajasthan Travel service (Jaipur) RIKEN-BNL Research Centre (Upton) Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kolkata) Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (Mumbai) The Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Chennai) Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (Kolkata) Without the generous support of these organizations it would not have been possible to organize the conference successfully. Jaipur is a city of valour, of battles won and lost, of the vanquished and the victors; Jaipur is a city of legends and romance. Now Jaipur is also a city of carnival; carnival in the world of quarks and gluons with the beautiful maiden ALICE gracing the quarkland.

  20. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jan-e.; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Nayak, Tapan; Sinha, Bikash; Viyogi, Yogendra P.

    2008-10-01

    Institute (Kolkata) Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton) Danfysik, Department of Science and Technology (New Delhi) Elsevier B V (Amsterdam) Government of Rajasthan European Organization for Nuclear Research (Geneva) Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt) Hewlett-Packard Indian Institute of Astrophysics (Bangalore) Institute of Physics (Bhubaneswar) IOP Publishing (Bristol) Merint Infrastructure Ltd. Rajasthan Travel service (Jaipur) RIKEN-BNL Research Centre (Upton) Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kolkata) Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (Mumbai) The Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Chennai) Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (Kolkata) Without the generous support of these organizations it would not have been possible to organize the conference successfully. Jaipur is a city of valour, of battles won and lost, of the vanquished and the victors; Jaipur is a city of legends and romance. Now Jaipur is also a city of carnival; carnival in the world of quarks and gluons with the beautiful maiden ALICE gracing the quarkland.

  1. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  2. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  3. Measurement of the top quark-antitop quark differential cross section, dsigma/dM(tt), in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy = 1.96 TEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgeman, Alice Patricia

    I present a measurement of the tt¯ differential cross section, dsigma/dMtt¯, in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.96 TeV using 2.7 fb-1 of CDF II data. I find that dsigma/dMtt¯ is consistent with the Standard Model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions. I set limits on the ratio kappa/M Pl in the Randall-Sundrum model by looking for Kaluza Klein gravitons which decay to top quarks. I find kappa/MPl > 0.16 at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Complex singularities in the quark propagator

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator is being studied in the rainbow approximation using a gluon propagator that incorporates asymptotic freedom and is an entire function. The gluon propagator has a number of parameters that may be varied in order to obtain a good description of low-energy pion observables; such as f{sub {pi}} and the {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths. This provides a direct means of relating hadronic observables to the form of the quark-quark interaction in the infrared and serves as an adjunct and extension of the separable Ansatz approach discussed above. It also provides a means of examining the pole structure of the quark propagator, which may hold the key to understanding quark confinement. The preliminary results are encouraging. It was demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a good description of pion observables in this approach. Further, when the strength of the quark-quark interaction in the infrared becomes larger than a given critical value, the pole in the quark propagator bifurcates into a pair of complex conjugate poles: m{sub q} = m{sub q}{sup R} {plus_minus} im{sub q}{sup I}, which is a signal of confinement. The interpretation in this case is of 1/m{sub q}{sup I} as the distance over which a quark may propagate before fragmenting. Further, there are indications from these studies that T{sub c}{sup D} < T{sub c}{sup {chi}}, where T{sub c}{sup D} is the critical temperature for deconfinement and T{sub c}{sup {chi}} is the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration; i.e., indications that deconfinement occurs at a lower temperature than chiral symmetry restoration. Available results from this work will be presented at the Washington meeting of the APS.

  5. Changes in resting energy expenditure and their relationship to insulin resistance and weight gain: a longitudinal study in pre-pubertal children (EarlyBird 17).

    PubMed

    Hosking, Joanne; Henley, William; Metcalf, Brad S; Jeffery, Alison N; Voss, Linda D; Wilkin, Terence J

    2010-08-01

    In adults, adjustments in resting energy expenditure (REE) are used to defend energy balance against disturbance caused by over-and under-nutrition, and may be linked to changes in insulin resistance and leptin. Little is known of these associations in children. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that long-term weight gain in children is met with adaptive changes in resting energy expenditure, mediated by insulin resistance and/or leptin. REE by indirect calorimetry, anthropometry, body composition by DEXA, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and serum leptin were measured annually in 232 children from the age of 7-10 y. REE rose from 7 to 10 y, and the rise exceeded that predicted by the concurrent rise in fat and fat-free mass by 184 kcal/day in the boys and by 160 kcal/day in the girls. However, there were no significant relationships in either gender between this 'excess' rise in REE and change in body composition (r < or = 0.08, p > or = 0.42). The rise in both boys and girls was associated with, but not explained by, a rise in insulin resistance (p < or = 0.002). There was no association with serum leptin (p > or = 0.32). The data do not support the hypothesis of adaptive changes in REE in pre-pubertal children, and insulin resistance explains very little of the pre-pubertal rise in REE. The rise in REE beyond that explained by changes in body composition may reflect an increase in energy requirements prior to puberty. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  7. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  8. QuarkNet and Chicago State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jamall; Rangel, Melissa; Onihale, Sharif; Garcia, Edmundo

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of our contribution to QuarkNet is involving high school teachers and students in the field of high-energy nuclear physics. Using detectors at the participating high schools, we are able to make measurements related to the muons that reach the Earth's surface from the outer atmosphere. Using the QuarkNet detectors, we measure lifetime, speed, and overall flux of the muons. Using computers connected to the detectors, we are able to analyze the data from the muons. Finally we are able to compare the data from other high schools and QuarkNet centers with the information from a GPS connected to the detector. In this talk we will present the measurements we have gathered with the detectors and we will review the QuarkNet program at CSU. )

  9. Early neutron stars and quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-chen; Kong, Xiao-jun; Wei, Cheng-wen; Ge, Yun-zhao

    1988-03-01

    There may exist quark matter inside early hot neutron stars. Using the general method of Baym and Chin, we evaluated the pressure and density at neutron matter — quark matter phase transition for different temperatures and compared the values for stable hot neutron stars. We found (1) that whenever the neutron star temperature exceeds (+10)K, there will be a core of quark matter; (2) that the bag constant B is the most important determining factor of the quark core size. For a given temperature, the core is the larger, the smaller B is; (3) that by the conservation of baryon number, the total energy released by a star during its cooling is about (+53) ergs.

  10. Quark ensembles with the infinite correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Zinov’ev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-01-15

    A number of exactly integrable (quark) models of quantum field theory with the infinite correlation length have been considered. It has been shown that the standard vacuum quark ensemble—Dirac sea (in the case of the space-time dimension higher than three)—is unstable because of the strong degeneracy of a state, which is due to the character of the energy distribution. When the momentum cutoff parameter tends to infinity, the distribution becomes infinitely narrow, leading to large (unlimited) fluctuations. Various vacuum ensembles—Dirac sea, neutral ensemble, color superconductor, and BCS state—have been compared. In the case of the color interaction between quarks, the BCS state has been certainly chosen as the ground state of the quark ensemble.

  11. Effect of Novel Nanoscale Energy Patches on Spectral and Nonlinear Dynamic Features of Heart Rate Variability Signals in Healthy Individuals during Rest and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Nazeran, Homer; Chatlapalli, Surya; Krishnam, Rohit

    2005-01-01

    LifeWave energy patches are novel nanoscale semiconducting biomolecular antennas, that when placed in the oscillating bioelectromagnetic field of the body, resonate at frequencies in unison with certain biomolecules in the cells and signal specific metabolic pathways to accelerate fat metabolism. As a consequence of accelerated fat burning more cellular energy becomes readily available to support all bodily energy-consuming functions. Heart rate variability refers to the beat-to-beat variation in heart rate (HR) and is modulated largely by the autonomic nervous system via changes in the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic influences. Since short-term variations in HR reflect sympathetic nervous activity, they provide useful non-invasive markers for assessing autonomic control under various physiologic states and conditions. To evaluate the effect of LifeWave energy patches on HRV signals, pilot data from healthy volunteers were collected under three different conditions during rest and exercise using a BIOPAC system. The HRV signal was derived from preprocessed ECG signals using an Enhanced Hilbert Transform (EHT) algorithm with built-in missing beat detection capability for reliable QRS detection. Autoregressive (AR) modeling of the HRV signal power spectrum was achieved and different parameters from power spectrum as well as approximate entropy were calculated for comparison. Poincaré plots were then used as a visualization tool to highlight the variations in HRV signals before and after exercise under normal conditions and under the influence of placebo and energy patches.

  12. Search for s-channel single-top-quark production in events with missing energy plus jets in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Vázquez, F; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-13

    The first search for single-top-quark production from the exchange of an s-channel virtual W boson using events with an imbalance in the total transverse energy, b-tagged jets, and no identified leptons is presented. Assuming the electroweak production of top quarks of mass 172.5 GeV/c(2) in the s channel, a cross section of 1.12(-0.57)(+0.61) (stat+syst) pb with a significance of 1.9 standard deviations is measured. This measurement is combined with the result obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, b-tagged jets, and exactly one identified lepton, yielding a cross section of 1.36(-0.32)(+0.37) (stat+syst) pb, with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations.

  13. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p - p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in the ell + tau channel with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, Jacob

    The measurement of the cross section of top quark pair production in proton--proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is reported. The data sample used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb-1. Events with an isolated electron or muon and a tau lepton decaying hadronically are used. In addition, a large missing transverse momentum and two or more energetic jets are required. At least one of the jets must be identified as originating from a b-quark. The measured cross section, sigma tt¯ = 178 +/- 12 stat. +/- 18 sys. +/- 7 lumi. pb, is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction.

  14. Mesure de la section efficace de production de paires de quarks top dans le canal μ + jets + τ + b-jet(s) + Energie transverse manquante auprès de l'expérience DØ du Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Jerome

    2011-09-09

    The purpose of high energy physics is to improve our knowledge about the fundamental structure of matter, in particular about particles that constitute the world. One of these is the top quark, that was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron protons-antiprotons collider. One of the primary aim of the Tevatron has been then the fine study of the top quark properties, in particular the top-antitop production cross section. Different analysis have been performed in the leptons (μ,e,τ) + jets, dileptons, and all hadronic channels to determine accurately the values of these parameters, and thus to test the validity of the Standard Model. The main goal of this thesis is to verify one of the theoretical predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics, the top-antitop production cross section, at the Tevatron collider.

  15. Adipose Tissue Resting Energy Expenditure and Expression of Genes Involved in Mitochondrial Function Are Higher in Women than in Men

    PubMed Central

    Nookaew, Intawat; Jacobson, Peter; Jernås, Margareta; Taube, Magdalena; Larsson, Ingrid; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C.; Sjöström, Lars; Froguel, Philippe; Walley, Andrew; Nielsen, Jens; Carlsson, Lena M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Men and women differ in body fat distribution and adipose tissue metabolism as well as in obesity comorbidities and their response to obesity treatment. Objective: The objective of the study was a search for sex differences in adipose tissue function. Design and Setting: This was an exploratory study performed at a university hospital. Participants and Main Outcome Measures: Resting metabolic rate (RMR), body composition, and sc adipose tissue genome-wide expression were measured in the SOS Sib Pair study (n = 732). Results: The relative contribution of fat mass to RMR and the metabolic rate per kilogram adipose tissue was higher in women than in men (P value for sex by fat mass interaction = .0019). Women had increased expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function, here referred to as a mitochondrial gene signature. Analysis of liver, muscle, and blood showed that the pronounced mitochondrial gene signature in women was specific for adipose tissue. Brown adipocytes are dense in mitochondria, and the expression of the brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 was 5-fold higher in women compared with men in the SOS Sib Pair Study (P = 7.43 × 10−7), and this was confirmed in a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 83, 6-fold higher in women, P = .00256). Conclusions: The increased expression of the brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 in women indicates that the higher relative contribution of the fat mass to RMR in women is in part explained by an increased number of brown adipocytes. PMID:23264395

  16. A measurement of top anti-top quark pair production cross section in proton anti-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jongyoung

    2003-01-01

    A measurement of the top anti-top quark pair production cross section in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented. The measurement is made using data with integrated luminosity of 109.4 pb-1, obtained at the Collider Detector at Fermilab between August 2002 and May 2003. A search is made for the dilepton decay channel of top anti-top production, t$\\bar{t}$→l+νbl-νl$\\bar{b}$. The Standard Model dilepton decay channel of the top anti-top quark pair production involves two high transverse momentum leptons, a large missing energy from the undetected neutrinos, two jets from the b and b¯ quark fragmentations. Various Standard Model processes can mimic t$\\bar{t}$ production in this decay channel. These backgrounds are estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.13 events in an integrated luminosity of 109.4 pb-1. In the data, one ee, three μμ, and two eμ dilepton candidates were observed. From these data, the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section of σ t$\\bar{t}$ =11.4 $+6.2\\atop{-4.6}$ pb has been measured. This measurement is consistent with the theoretical prediction of the Standard Model, σ t$\\bar{t}$ =6.70 $+71\\atop{0.88}$ pb assuming a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2.

  17. Debye mass and heavy quark potential in a PNJL quark plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, J. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    We calculate the Debye mass for the screening of the heavy quark potential in a plasma of massless quarks coupled to the temporal gluon background governed by the Polyakov loop potential within the PNJL model in RPA approximation. We give a physical motivation for a recent phenomenological fit of lattice data by applying the calculated Debye mass with its suppression in the confined phase due to the Polyakov loop to a description of the temperature dependence of the singlet free energy for QCD with a heavy quark pair at infinite separation. We compare the result to lattice data.

  18. Evolution of low-grade systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, anthropometrics, resting energy expenditure and metabolic syndrome after bariatric surgery: a comparative study between gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, A; Anty, R; Schneck, A S; Tran, A; Hébuterne, X; Gugenheim, J

    2013-09-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) for morbid obesity is gaining in popularity as it offers several advantages over laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP), but comparative data between these two procedures have rarely been reported. This case control study compared the incidence of low-grade systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, anthropometrics, resting energy expenditure and metabolic syndrome in 30 patients undergoing LRYGBP and 30 patients undergoing LSG, matched for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). At 1-year after surgery, the percent of excess weight loss was 67.8 ± 20.9 for LRYGBP and 61.6 ± 19.4 for LSG. Patients undergoing LRYGBP showed significantly lower plasma levels of C-reactive protein (3.3 ± 2.7 mg/dL vs. 5.3 ± 3.9 mg/dL; P < 0.05), waist circumference (97.4 ± 16.0 vs. 105.5 ± 14.7 cm; P < 0.05), total cholesterol (4.6 ± 1.0 vs. 5.7 ± 0.9 mmol/L; P < 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (2.6 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.8 mmol/L; P < 0.01). Insulin resistance (HOMA index 1.6 ± 1.0 after LRYGBP vs. 2.3 ± 2.4 after LSG), resting energy expenditure (1666.7 ± 320.5 after LRYGBP vs. 1600.4 ± 427.3 Kcal after LSG) and remission of metabolic syndrome (92.9% after LRYGBP vs. 80% after LSG) were not different between the two groups. In this study, patients undergoing LRYGBP demonstrated significantly improved lipid profiles, decreased systemic low-grade inflammation compared with those undergoing LSG at 1-year follow-up. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Association of irisin with fat mass, resting energy expenditure, and daily activity in conditions of extreme body mass index.

    PubMed

    Pardo, María; Crujeiras, Ana B; Amil, María; Aguera, Zaida; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Baños, Rosa; Botella, Cristina; de la Torre, Rafael; Estivill, Xavier; Fagundo, Ana B; Fernández-Real, Jose M; Fernández-García, José C; Fruhbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Roser; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2014-01-01

    FNDC5/irisin has been recently postulated as beneficial in the treatment of obesity and diabetes because it is induced in muscle by exercise, increasing energy expenditure. However, recent reports have shown that WAT also secretes irisin and that circulating irisin is elevated in obese subjects. The aim of this study was to evaluate irisin levels in conditions of extreme BMI and its correlation with basal metabolism and daily activity. The study involved 145 female patients, including 96 with extreme BMIs (30 anorexic (AN) and 66 obese (OB)) and 49 healthy normal weight (NW). The plasma irisin levels were significantly elevated in the OB patients compared with the AN and NW patients. Irisin also correlated positively with body weight, BMI, and fat mass. The OB patients exhibited the highest REE and higher daily physical activity compared with the AN patients but lower activity compared with the NW patients. The irisin levels were inversely correlated with daily physical activity and directly correlated with REE. Fat mass contributed to most of the variability of the irisin plasma levels independently of the other studied parameters. Conclusion. Irisin levels are influenced by energy expenditure independently of daily physical activity but fat mass is the main contributing factor.

  20. Self-Consistent Pushing and Cranking Corrections to the Meson Fields of the Chiral Quark-Loop Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleif, M.; Wünsch, R.; Maissner, T.

    We study translational and spin-isospin symmetry restoration for the two-flavor chiral quark-loop soliton. Instead of a static soliton at rest we consider a boosted and rotating hedgehog soliton. Corrected classical meson fields are obtained by minimizing a corrected energy functional which has been derived by semi-classical methods (variation after projection). We evaluate corrected meson fields in the region 300 MeV ≤ M≤ 600 MeV of constituent quark masses M and compare them with the uncorrected fields. We study the effect of the corrections on various expectation values of nuclear observables such as the root-mean square radius, the axial-vector coupling constant, magnetic moments and the delta-nucleon mass splitting.

  1. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  2. The emergence of a heavy quark family on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preparata, Giuliano; Xue, She-Sheng

    1996-02-01

    Within the framework of the “Rome approach” for a lattice chiral gauge theory, the four-quark interaction with flavour symmetry is included. We analyse spontaneous symmetry breaking and compute composite modes and their contributions to the ground state energy. As a result, it is shown that the emergence of a heavy quark family is the energetically favoured solution.

  3. The Emergence of a Heavy Quark Family on a Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    1996-03-01

    Within the framework of the "Rome approach" for a lattice chiral gauge theory, the four-quark interaction with flavour symmetry is included. We analyse spontaneous symmetry breaking and compute composite modes and their contributions to the ground state energy. As a result, it is shown that the emergence of a heavy quark family is the energetically favoured solution.

  4. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  5. Resting energy expenditure and thermal balance during isothermic and thermoneutral haemodialysis--heat production does not explain increased body temperature during haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Horácek, Jirí; Sulková, Sylvie Dusilová; Fortová, Magdalena; Lopot, Frantisek; Kalousová, Marta; Sobotka, Lubos; Chaloupka, Jirí; Tesar, Vladimír; Zák, Ales; Zima, Tomás

    2007-12-01

    During routine haemodialysis (HD) body temperature increases, which contributes to haemodynamic instability. The relative roles of increased heat production and/or incomplete heat transfer are not fully elucidated. Concomitant measurement of heat production and heat transfer may help to assess the factors determining thermal balance during HD. Thirteen stable non-diabetic maintenance HD patients were investigated during two HD procedures (isothermic, dT = 0, no change of body temperature; thermoneutral, dE = 0, no energy transfer between blood and dialysate), using a blood temperature monitor (BTM) in active mode. Energy transfer, blood and dialysate temperature, and relative blood volume change (dBV) were continuously recorded, and resting energy expenditure (REE; Deltatrac Datex) was measured repeatedly during each procedure. Fourteen healthy persons served as controls for REE comparison. In isothermic HD, median energy removal was 218 kJ/4 h HD (= heat flow -15.1 W). This cooling correlated with dBV induced by ultrafiltration (rho = 0.731, P < 0.01). There was no difference in dBV between isothermic (7.7%) and thermoneutral (8.1%) HD. Predialysis REE was 82.8 W/1.73 m(2), not different from controls. No variation in REE during HD was observed, except a small and transient increase after a light meal (5 and 4%). In the time course of REE, no difference between the procedures was found. Our findings suggest that stable maintenance HD patients have REE not different from healthy controls, that HD procedure per se does not significantly increase REE and that neither isothermic nor thermoneutral regimen has any influence on metabolic rate. Therefore, body temperature elevation during routine HD may rather be due to decreased heat removal. With the use of BTM in active mode, body temperature can be kept stable (isothermic HD), which requires active cooling. This negative energy transfer is proportional to decrease in blood volume induced by ultrafiltration.

  6. Evidence of a link between resting energy expenditure and bone remodelling, glucose homeostasis and adipokine variations in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Maïmoun, L; Guillaume, S; Lefebvre, P; Philibert, P; Bertet, H; Picot, M-C; Gaspari, L; Paris, F; Seneque, M; Dupuys, A-M; Courtet, P; Thomas, E; Mariano-Goulart, D; Bringer, J; Renard, E; Sultan, C

    2016-01-01

    Low bone mass is a consequence of anorexia nervosa (AN). This study assessed the effects of energy deficiency on various bone and hormonal parameters. The interrelationships between energy deficiency and bone remodelling, glucose homeostasis and adipokines underscore the importance of preventing energy deficiency to limit demineralisation and hormonal alterations in AN patients. Low areal bone mineral density (aBMD) is a well-known consequence of AN. However, the impact of reduced energy expenditure on bone metabolism is unknown. This study assessed the effects of energy deficiency on bone remodelling and its potential interactions with glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue-derived hormones in AN, a clinical model for reduced energy expenditure. Fifty women with AN and 50 age-matched controls (mean age 18.1 ± 2.7 and 18.0 ± 2.1 years, respectively) were enrolled. aBMD was determined with DXA. Resting energy expenditure (REEm), a marker of energy status, was indirectly assessed by calorimetry. Bone turnover markers, undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC), parameters of glucose homeostasis, adipokines and growth factors were concomitantly evaluated. AN patients presented low aBMD at all bone sites. REEm, bone formation markers, ucOC, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, leptin and IGF-1 were significantly reduced, whereas the bone resorption marker, leptin receptor (sOB-R) and adiponectin were elevated in AN compared with CON. In AN patients, REEm was positively correlated with weight, BMI, whole body (WB) fat mass, WB fat-free soft tissue, markers of bone formation, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, leptin and IGF-1 and negatively correlated with the bone resorption marker and sOB-R. Biological parameters, aBMD excepted, appeared more affected by the weight variation in the last 6 months than by the disease duration. The strong interrelationships between REEm and bone remodelling, glucose homeostasis and adipokines underscore the importance of preventing energy deficiency

  7. Expression of microRNA-34a in Alzheimer's disease brain targets genes linked to synaptic plasticity, energy metabolism, and resting state network activity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Jun, S; Rellick, S; Quintana, D D; Cavendish, J Z; Simpkins, J W

    2016-09-01

    Polygenetic risk factors and reduced expression of many genes in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) impedes identification of a target(s) for disease-modifying therapies. We identified a single microRNA, miR-34a that is over expressed in specific brain regions of AD patients as well as in the 3xTg-AD mouse model. Specifically, increased miR-34a expression in the temporal cortex region compared to age matched healthy control correlates with severity of AD pathology. miR-34a over expression in patient's tissue and forced expression in primary neuronal culture correlates with concurrent repression of its target genes involved in synaptic plasticity, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis. The repression of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis related proteins correlates with reduced ATP production and glycolytic capacity, respectively. We also found that miR-34a overexpressed neurons secrete miR-34a containing exosomes that are taken up by neighboring neurons. Furthermore, miR-34a targets dozens of genes whose expressions are known to be correlated with synchronous activity in resting state functional networks. Our analysis of human genomic sequences from the tentative promoter of miR-34a gene shows the presence of NFκB, STAT1, c-Fos, CREB and p53 response elements. Together, our results raise the possibilities that pathophysiology-induced activation of specific transcription factor may lead to increased expression of miR-34a gene and miR-34a mediated concurrent repression of its target genes in neural networks may result in dysfunction of synaptic plasticity, energy metabolism, and resting state network activity. Thus, our results provide insights into polygenetic AD mechanisms and disclose miR-34a as a potential therapeutic target for AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Weight loss and low body cell mass in males with lung cancer: relationship with systemic inflammation, acute-phase response, resting energy expenditure, and catabolic and anabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    Simons, J P; Schols, A M; Buurman, W A; Wouters, E F

    1999-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate, in human lung cancer, the relationship between weight loss and the existence of a low body cell mass (BCM) on the one hand, and the putative presence of systemic inflammation, an increased acute-phase response, anorexia, hypermetabolism and changes in circulating levels of several anabolic and catabolic hormones on the other. In 20 male lung cancer patients, pre-stratified by weight loss of >/=10% (n=10) or of <10% (n=10), the following measurements were performed: BCM (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry/bromide dilution), circulating levels of sTNF-R55 and sTNF-R75 (soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors of molecular masses 55 and 75 kDa respectively), interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, albumin, appetite (scale of 0-10), resting energy expenditure (by indirect calorimetry) and circulating levels of catabolic (cortisol) and anabolic [testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)] hormones. Compared with the patients with a weight loss of <10%, those with a weight loss of >/=10% were characterized by higher levels of sTNF-R55 (trend towards significance; P=0.06), and lower levels of albumin (27.4 compared with 34.4 mmol/l; P=0.02), testosterone (13.2 compared with 21.5 nmol/l; P=0.01) and IGF-I (119 compared with 184 ng/ml; P=0.004). In the patient group as a whole, the percentage weight loss was significantly correlated with sTNF-R55 (r=0.59, P=0.02), albumin (r=-0.63, P=0.006) and IGF-I (r=-0.50, P=0.02) levels. Height-adjusted BCM was significantly correlated with sTNF-R55 (r=-0.57, P=0.03), sTNF-R75 (r=-0.50, P=0. 04), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (r=-0.50, P=0.04), albumin (r=0.56, P=0.02) and resting energy expenditure/BCM (r=-0.54, P=0. 03), and there was a trend towards a correlation with IGF-I concentration (r=0.44, P=0.06). We conclude that, in human lung cancer, weight loss and the presence of a low BCM are associated with systemic inflammation, an increased acute

  9. New State of Nuclear Matter: Nearly Perfect Fluid of Quarks and Gluons in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies From Charged Particle Density to Jet Quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-28

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic ow; followed by hard probe measurements: high-pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy favor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly-interacting medium is created in central Au + Au collisions at p sNN = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental ow results from Au + Au at p sNN = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, =s 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p + A, d + Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both facilities RHIC and the LHC

  10. New State of Nuclear Matter: Nearly Perfect Fluid of Quarks and Gluons in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies From Charged Particle Density to Jet Quenching

    DOE PAGES

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-28

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic ow; followed by hard probe measurements: high-pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy favor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species asmore » a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly-interacting medium is created in central Au + Au collisions at p sNN = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental ow results from Au + Au at p sNN = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, =s 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p + A, d + Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both facilities RHIC and

  11. New state of nuclear matter: Nearly perfect fluid of quarks and gluons in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. From charged particle density to jet quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic flow; followed by hard probe measurements: high- pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy-flavor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly interacting medium is created in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental flow results from Au+Au at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s≈ 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p+A, d+ Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both

  12. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yudong |

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  13. Resting energy expenditure: a stronger marker than body weight for bone mineral density in white women but not men? The Rancho Bernardo study.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Afrooz; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the association between resting energy expenditure (REE) and bone mineral density (BMD) in white adults. Cross-sectional study. White, middle-class to upper middle-class community-dwelling adults. Women (n = 996) and men (n = 686) aged 36 to 97 years. REE calculated using the Harris-Benedict equation. BMD of the lumbar spine (L1 to L4), total hip, and total body measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. REE was lower in women than in men (1220 versus 1566 kcal/day, P < 0.0001); women also had lower BMI. After adjusting for lean body mass (LBM), REE was higher in women than men (1407 versus 1296 kcal/kg LBM/d, P < 0.0001). In stepwise multiple linear regression models, REE explained 13% of variance in spine BMD in women and 6% in men, 33% of variance in hip BMD in women and 22% in men, and 32% of variance in total body BMD in women and 22% in men. In women, weight explained 10% less of the hip BMD variance and 6% less of the total body BMD variance than REE. In men, weight explained 4% more of the spine BMD variance and 1% more of the total body BMD variance than REE. REE explained more of the BMD variance than weight in women, and the reverse was true in men. These sex differences were largely explained by sex differences in LBM or weight.

  14. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  15. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry and same-sign top quark pairs.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E. L.; Cao, Q.-H.; Chen, C.-R.; Li, C. S.; Zhang, H.

    2011-05-20

    The top quark forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron collider shows a large deviation from standard model expectations. Among possible interpretations, a nonuniversal Z{prime} model is of particular interest as it naturally predicts a top quark in the forward region of large rapidity. To reproduce the size of the asymmetry, the couplings of the Z{prime} to standard model quarks must be large, inevitably leading to copious production of same-sign top quark pairs at the energies of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We explore the discovery potential for tt and ttj production in early LHC experiments at 7-8 TeV and conclude that if no tt signal is observed with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, then a nonuniversal Z{prime} alone cannot explain the Tevatron forward-backward asymmetry.

  16. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry and same-sign top quark pairs.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Li, Chong Sheng; Zhang, Hao

    2011-05-20

    The top quark forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron collider shows a large deviation from standard model expectations. Among possible interpretations, a nonuniversal Z' model is of particular interest as it naturally predicts a top quark in the forward region of large rapidity. To reproduce the size of the asymmetry, the couplings of the Z' to standard model quarks must be large, inevitably leading to copious production of same-sign top quark pairs at the energies of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We explore the discovery potential for tt and ttj production in early LHC experiments at 7-8 TeV and conclude that if no tt signal is observed with 1 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity, then a nonuniversal Z' alone cannot explain the Tevatron forward-backward asymmetry.

  17. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  18. Accuracy of predictive equations for resting metabolic rates and daily energy expenditures of police officials doing shift work by type of work.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the accuracy of predictive equations for resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy expenditure in policemen on a rotating shift. Subjects were 28 healthy policemen on a rotating shift (males) age of 23-46 years. The participants' RMR was measured by using indirect calorimetry (TrueOne2400) and also calculated from various predicted equations of RMR (Harris-Benedict, Schofield(W)/(WH), FAO/WHO/UNU(W)/(W/H), Cunningham, Mifflin, Liu, Owen, IMNA and Henry(W)/(WH)). The accuracy of these equations were evaluated on basis of accurate prediction (the percentage of subjects whose RMR was predicted within 90% to 110% of the RMR measured), mean difference, root mean squared prediction error, mean % difference, limits of agreement of Bland-Altman method between predicted and measured RMR. The measured RMR value of subjects was 1748 ± 205.9 kcal. Of the predictive equations tested, the Harris-Benedict equation (mean difference: -14.8 kcal/day, RMSPE: 195.8 kcal/day, mean % difference: 0.1%) was the most accurate and precise, but accuracy in prediction of the equation were only 35.7%. The daily energy expenditure at night-duty was 3062 kcal calculated as multiplying RMR by its physical activity level. Subsequently, daily energy expenditure of day-duty was 2647 kcal and the lowest daily energy expenditure was, 2310 kcal at holiday duty. Daily energy intake of all study participants was 2351 kcal at day-duty, 1959 kcal at night-duty and 1796 kcal at holiday-duty in order. The estimated energy requirements for policemen on a rotating shift on day shift, night shift and holiday came to 2743.6 kcal/day, 2998.6 kcal/day and 2576.9 kcal/day, respectively. These results suggest that estimated energy requirements (EER) of policemen on a rotating shift should be differently proposed by a proper equation which can closely reflect their metabolic status at each time shift.

  19. Production of doubly charmed baryons nearly at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groote, Stefan; Koshkarev, Sergey

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the production cross sections, momentum distributions and rapidity distributions for doubly charmed baryons which according to the intrinsic heavy quark mechanism are produced nearly at rest. These events should be measurable at fixed-target experiments like STAR@RHIC and AFTER@LHC.

  20. Measurement of the W-boson helicity fractions in top-quark decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chwalek, Thorsten; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-05-01

    We present a measurement of the fractions F{sub 0} and F{sub +} of longitudinally polarized and right-handed W bosons in top-quark decays using data collected with the CDF II detector. The data set used in the analysis corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 955 pb{sup -1}. We select t{bar t} candidate events with one lepton, at least four jets, and missing transverse energy. Our helicity measurement uses the decay angle {theta}*, which is defined as the angle between the momentum of the charged lepton in the W boson rest-frame and the W momentum in the top-quark rest-frame. The cos{theta}* distribution in the data is determined by full kinematic reconstruction of the t{bar t} candidates. We find F{sub 0}= 0.59 {+-} 0.12(stat){sup +0.07}{sub -0.06}(syst) and F{sub +}=-0.03 {+-} 0.06(stat){sup +0.04}{sub -0.03}(syst), which is consistent with the standard model prediction. We set an upper limit on the fraction of right-handed W bosons of F{sub +} {le} 0.10 at the 95% confidence level.

  1. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  2. The effects of two nights of sleep deprivation with or without energy restriction on immune indices at rest and in response to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo J S; Smith, Adam Harper; Oliver, Samuel J; Walters, Robert; Maassen, Norbert; Bilzon, James L J; Walsh, Neil Peter

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of two nights of sleep deprivation with or without energy restriction on immune indices at rest and in response to cold exposure. On three randomised occasions ten males slept normally [mean (SD): 436 (21) min night(-1); CON], were totally sleep-deprived (SDEP), or were totally sleep-deprived and 90% energy-restricted (SDEP + ER) for 53 h. After 53 h (1200 h) participants performed a seated cold air test (CAT) at 0.0 degrees C until T (re) decreased to 36.0 degrees C. Circulating leucocyte counts, neutrophil degranulation, stress hormones and saliva secretory IgA (S-IgA) were determined at 0 h, 24 h, 48 h, pre-CAT, post-CAT, 1-h and 2-h post-CAT. One night on SDEP increased bacterially stimulated neutrophil degranulation (21%, P < 0.05), and two nights on SDEP and SDEP + ER increased S-IgA concentration (40 and 44%; P < 0.01). No other significant effects were observed for immuno-endocrine measures prior to CAT. CAT duration was not different between trials [mean (SD): 133 (53) min] and T (re) decreased to 35.9 (0.3) degrees C. Modest whole-body cooling decreased circulating lymphocyte counts (25%; P < 0.01), S-IgA concentration (36%; P < 0.01) and secretion rate (24%; P < 0.05). A neutrophilia occurred post-CAT on CON and SDEP and 2-h post-CAT on SDEP + ER (P < 0.01). Modest whole-body cooling also decreased neutrophil degranulation on CON (22%) and SDEP (18%; P < 0.05). Plasma cortisol and norepinephrine increased post-CAT (31 and 346%, P < 0.05), but modest whole-body cooling did not alter plasma epinephrine. In conclusion, two nights of SDEP or SDEP + ER did not compromise resting immune indices. However, modest whole-body cooling (T(re) 35.9 degrees C) decreased circulating lymphocytes, neutrophil degranulation and S-IgA, but responses were not amplified by prior SDEP or SDEP + ER.

  3. Effects of quark matter and color superconductivity in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Grigorian, H.; Aguilera, D. N.; Yasui, S.; Toki, H.

    2003-04-01

    The equation of state for quark matter is derived for a nonlocal, chiral quark model within the mean field approximation. We investigate the effects of a variation of the form factors of the interaction on the phase diagram of quark matter under the condition of β- equilibrium and charge neutrality. Special emphasis is on the occurrence of a diquark condensate which signals a phase transition to color superconductivity and its effects on the equation of state. We calculate the quark star configurations by solving the Tolman- Oppenheimer- Volkoff equations and obtain for the transition from a hot, normal quark matter core of a protoneutron star to a cool diquark condensed one a release of binding energy of the order of ΔMc2 ~ 1053 erg. We study the consequences of antineutrino trapping in hot quark matter for quark star configurations with possible diquark condensation and discuss the claim that this energy could serve as an engine for explosive phenomena. A ``phase diagram'' for rotating compact stars (angular velocity-baryon mass plane) is suggested as a heuristic tool for obtaining constraints on the equation of state of QCD at high densities. It has a critical line dividing hadronic from quark core stars which is correlated with a local maximum of the moment of inertia and can thus be subject to experimental verification by observation of the rotational behavior of accreting compact stars.

  4. Single Top Quark Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzani, Manfredi

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the most recent measurements of single top quark production performed by CDF and D0 collaborations in proton-antiproton collisions at Tevatron. Events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. The small single top signal in s-channel, t-channel and inclusive s+t channel is separated from the large background by using different multivariate techniques. We also present the most recent results on extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the single top quark cross section.

  5. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  6. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  7. Early neutron stars and quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-Chen; Kong, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Cheng-Wen; Ge, Yun-Zhao

    1988-03-01

    The existence of quark matter (QM) in hot early neutron stars is considered theoretically, using the method of Baym and Chin (1976) to calculate the pressure and density at the phase transition between neutron and quark matter for various temperatures. The results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that QM cores can exist whenever the temperature exceeds 10 to the 10th K, and that their radii increase with decreasing QM bag constant. The total energy emitted by a star during cooling is estimated as 10 to the 53rd erg, assuming conservation of baryon number.

  8. Comparison of equations of resting and total energy expenditure in peritoneal dialysis patients using body composition measurements determined by multi-frequency bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    El-Kateb, Sally; Sridharan, Sivakumar; Farrington, Ken; Fan, Stanley; Davenport, Andrew

    2017-02-17

    Waste products of metabolism accumulate in patients with kidney failure and it has been proposed that the amount of dialysis treatment patients require be adjusted for energy expenditure. This requires validation of methods to estimate energy expenditure in dialysis patients. We compared values of resting energy expenditure (REE) estimated in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using a selection of available equations with estimates derived using a novel equation recently validated in chronic kidney disease patients (CKD equation). We also determined the relationship of these estimates of REE and of total energy expenditure (TEE - which is REE plus physical activity associated energy expenditure (PAEE) estimated using the Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire) - to bioimpedance-derived parameters of body composition. We studied 118 adult PD patients; 75 male (63.6%), 33 diabetic (28.5%), Caucasoid (42.4%), mean age 59.3 ± 18.2 years and weight 73.1 ± 16.6 kg. REE with the CKD equation was 1532 ± 237 kcal/day, which was more than that for Mifflin-St. Joer 1425 ± 254, Harris-Benedict 1489 ± 267, Katch-McArdle 1492 ± 243, but less than Cunningham 1648 ± 248 kcal/day. Bland Altman mean bias ranged from -107 to 111 kcal/day. TEE was 1924 (1700-2262) kcal/day, and on multi-variate analysis was associated with appendicular muscle mass and nitrogen appearance rate (β 34.3, p < 0.001 and β 5.6, p = 0.002, respectively). With reference to the CKD equation, the majority of standard equations underestimate REE in PD patients. Whereas the Cunningham equation overestimates REE. TEE was associated with appendicular muscle mass and estimated dietary protein intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. Single quark polarization in quantum chromodynamics subprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaratna, W.G.; Goldstein, G.R.

    1996-02-01

    It is well known that the single-polarization asymmetries vanish in QCD with massless quarks. But, heavy quarks with a nonzero mass should be transversely polarized due to the breakdown of the helicity conservation. In this paper we give the exact fourth-order perturbative QCD predictions for the transverse polarization from all QCD subprocesses, {ital q}+{ital q}{prime}{r_arrow}{ital q}+{ital q}{prime}, {ital q}+{ital g}{r_arrow}{ital q}+{ital g}, {ital g}+{ital g}{r_arrow}{ital q}+{bar {ital q}}, and {ital q}+{bar {ital q}}{r_arrow}{ital q}{prime}+{bar {ital q}}{prime}, which are significant for heavy quark production, with a description of the method of calculation. The kinematical dependence of the polarization is discussed. Top quark polarization from gluon fusion and quark annihilation processes, which are the important subprocesses at high energies, is estimated and its significance is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Agreements between Indirect Calorimetry and Prediction Equations of Resting Energy Expenditure in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoung Woo; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kwon, Hei Kyung; Son, Sook Mee; Song, Joon Ho

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Equations are frequently used to estimate resting energy expenditure (REE) in a clinical setting. However, few studies have examined their accuracy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Materials and Methods To investigate agreement between indirect calorimetry and several REE estimating equations in 38 ESRD patients on peritoneal dialysis, we performed indirect calorimetry and compared the results with REEs estimated using 5 equations [Harris-Benedict (HBE), Mifflin, WHO, Schofield, and Cunningham]. Results Measured REE was 1393.2 ± 238.7 kcal/day. There were no significant differences between measured and estimated REEs except Mifflin (1264.9 ± 224.8 kcal/day). Root mean square errors were smallest for HBE, followed by Schofield, Cunningham, and WHO, and largest for Mifflin (171.3, 171.9, 174.6, 175.3, and 224.6, respectively). In Bland-Altman plot, correlation coefficients between mean values and differences were significant for HBE (r = 0.412, p = 0.012) and tended to be significant for Cunningham (r = 0.283, p = 0.086). In DM patients and patients with overhydration, HBE showed significant underestimation when REE increased. Conclusion In ESRD patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), REE-estimating equations have no significant differences from indirect calorimetry, except Mifflin. However, HBE showed greater bias than others when REE was high. PMID:18452263

  11. Resting Energy Expenditure Prediction in Recreational Athletes of 18–35 Years: Confirmation of Cunningham Equation and an Improved Weight-Based Alternative

    PubMed Central

    ten Haaf, Twan; Weijs, Peter J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Resting energy expenditure (REE) is expected to be higher in athletes because of their relatively high fat free mass (FFM). Therefore, REE predictive equation for recreational athletes may be required. The aim of this study was to validate existing REE predictive equations and to develop a new recreational athlete specific equation. Methods 90 (53M, 37F) adult athletes, exercising on average 9.1±5.0 hours a week and 5.0±1.8 times a week, were included. REE was measured using indirect calorimetry (Vmax Encore n29), FFM and FM were measured using air displacement plethysmography. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to develop a new FFM-based and weight-based REE predictive equation. The percentage accurate predictions (within 10% of measured REE), percentage bias, root mean square error and limits of agreement were calculated. Results The Cunningham equation and the new weight-based equation and the new FFM-based equation performed equally well. De Lorenzo's equation predicted REE less accurate, but better than the other generally used REE predictive equations. Harris-Benedict, WHO, Schofield, Mifflin and Owen all showed less than 50% accuracy. Conclusion For a population of (Dutch) recreational athletes, the REE can accurately be predicted with the existing Cunningham equation. Since body composition measurement is not always possible, and other generally used equations fail, the new weight-based equation is advised for use in sports nutrition. PMID:25275434

  12. Anisotropic structure equations in magnetized quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manreza Paret, D.; Horvath, J. E.; Perez Martinez, A.

    2015-11-01

    It is well-known that a magnetic field in a fermion system breaks the SO(3) symmetry, giving rise to an anisotropy in the energy-momentum tensor and consequently in the equation of state (EoS). Thus, the stellar structure equations of magnetized quark stars (QS) demand to be derived from a more appropriate cylindrical metric. In this work we obtain these equations considering the magnetized quark matter in two phases: Magnetized Strange Quark Matter (MSQM) and Magnetized Color Flavor Locked Phase (MCFL). The main outcome of our work is the value of the maximum magnetic field that an star can hold, i.e. 1018 G. This upper bound is closely related to the violation of the virial relations and also with the instability associated with parity-violation weak processes during the collapse of supernovae.

  13. Top quark kinematics and mass determination

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.H.

    1994-10-01

    An analysis is presented of 10 W + {ge} 3 jet events, each with evidence for the presence of a b quark, that were recently observed by the CDF collaboration. Seven of these events include a fourth jet and can be explicitly reconstructed as t{bar t} production. The best estimate of the top quark mass is M{sub t} = 174 {+-} 10{sub {minus}12}{sup +13} GeV/c{sup 2}. A study has also been performed to see if the kinematical properties of events with W + {ge} 3 jets gives evidence for top production. An excess of events with large jet energies, compared to that expected from direct production of W + {ge} 3 jets, is observed. A large fraction of these events also contain a b-quark and a fourth jet.

  14. The Thomas–Fermi quark model: Non-relativistic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Quan Wilcox, Walter

    2014-02-15

    The first numerical investigation of non-relativistic aspects of the Thomas–Fermi (TF) statistical multi-quark model is given. We begin with a review of the traditional TF model without an explicit spin interaction and find that the spin splittings are too small in this approach. An explicit spin interaction is then introduced which entails the definition of a generalized spin “flavor”. We investigate baryonic states in this approach which can be described with two inequivalent wave functions; such states can however apply to multiple degenerate flavors. We find that the model requires a spatial separation of quark flavors, even if completely degenerate. Although the TF model is designed to investigate the possibility of many-quark states, we find surprisingly that it may be used to fit the low energy spectrum of almost all ground state octet and decuplet baryons. The charge radii of such states are determined and compared with lattice calculations and other models. The low energy fit obtained allows us to extrapolate to the six-quark doubly strange H-dibaryon state, flavor symmetric strange states of higher quark content and possible six quark nucleon–nucleon resonances. The emphasis here is on the systematics revealed in this approach. We view our model as a versatile and convenient tool for quickly assessing the characteristics of new, possibly bound, particle states of higher quark number content. -- Highlights: • First application of the statistical Thomas–Fermi quark model to baryonic systems. • Novel aspects: spin as generalized flavor; spatial separation of quark flavor phases. • The model is statistical, but the low energy baryonic spectrum is successfully fit. • Numerical applications include the H-dibaryon, strange states and nucleon resonances. • The statistical point of view does not encourage the idea of bound many-quark baryons.

  15. Effect of aerosolized albuterol sulfate on resting energy expenditure determined by use of open-flow indirect calorimetry in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mazan, Melissa R; Hoffman, Andrew M; Kuehn, Heike; Deveney, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate effects of sedation on stability of resistance of the respiratory system (RRS) and measures of resting energy expenditure (REE) by use of open-flow indirect calorimetry (IC) and treatment with aerosolized albuterol on REE in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). 9 clinically normal horses and 8 horses with RAO. In phase 1, RRS was measured by using forced oscillometry (FOT) in 5 clinically normal horses before and after sedation with xylazine. In phase 2, REE was measured in 4 clinically normal horses between 20 and 25 minutes and again 35 to 40 minutes after sedation with xylazine. In phase 3, IC was performed between 20 and 25 minutes and FOT was performed between 30 and 35 minutes after xylazine administration in 8 horses with RAO; after administration of 450 microg of albuterol, IC and FOT were repeated. In phase 1, RRS values were significantly lower 5 and 10 minutes after sedation. In phase 2, diminishing sedation did not significantly affect REE. In phase 3, there was a significant decrease in mean RRS (1.15 +/- 0.25 vs 0.84 +/- 0.14 cm H20/L/s) and REE (30.68 +/- 17.89 vs 27.46 = 16.54 kcal/kg/d) after albuterol administration. FOT and IC are useful in obtaining repeatable measurements of RRS and REE, respectively, in sedated horses. Concurrent bronchodilation and decreased REE after albuterol administration suggest that increased work of breathing as a result of airway obstruction may contribute to increased energy demands in horses with RAO.

  16. Gut hormones, early dumping and resting energy expenditure in patients with good and poor weight loss response after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, C; Jørgensen, N B; Bojsen-Møller, K N; Kielgast, U; Jacobsen, S H; Clausen, T R; Worm, D; Hartmann, B; Rehfeld, J F; Damgaard, M; Madsen, J L; Madsbad, S; Holst, J J; Hansen, D L

    2013-11-01

    To identify factors contributing to the variation in weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Cross-sectional study of patients with good (excess body mass index lost (EBL) >60%) and poor weight loss response (EBL <50%) >12 months after RYGB and a lean control group matched for age and gender. Sixteen patients with good weight loss response, 17 patients with poor weight loss response, and eight control subjects were included in the study. Participants underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan, indirect calorimetry and a 9 h multiple-meal test with measurements of glucose, insulin, total bile acids (TBA), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, peptide YY3-36 (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), ghrelin, neurotensin and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) as well as assessment of early dumping and appetite. Suppression of hunger was more pronounced in the good than the poor responders in response to the multiple-meal test (P=0.006). In addition, the good responders had a larger release of GLP-1 (P=0.009) and a greater suppression of ghrelin (P=0.037) during the test, whereas the postprandial secretion of CCK was highest in the poor responders (P=0.005). PYY, neurotensin, PP and TBA release did not differ between the RYGB-operated groups. Compared with control subjects, patients had exaggerated release of GLP-1 (P<0.001), PYY (P=0.008), CCK (P=0.010) and neurotensin (P<0.001). Early dumping was comparable in the good and poor responders, but more pronounced than in controlled subjects. Differences in resting energy expenditure between the three groups were entirely explained by differences in body composition. Favorable meal-induced changes in hunger and gut hormone release in patients with good compared with poor weight loss response support the role of gut hormones in the weight loss after RYGB.

  17. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  18. Resting Energy Expenditure in Patients with Stroke during the Subacute Phases - Relationships with Stroke Types, Location, Severity of Paresis, and Activities of Daily Living.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Michiyuki; Liu, Meigen; Wada, Ayako; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    The energy demands in patients with stroke during the subacute phases are unclear. However, this information is essential for appropriate clinical and nutritional management. The aims of this study were to determine the resting energy expenditure (REE) during the subacute phases, examine its relationships with stroke types, location, severity of hemiparesis, and activities of daily living (ADL), and evaluate whether estimation of REE from the Harris-Benedict equation (HB) requires the addition of a 'stress factor' to capture possible additional REE imposed by stroke. We measured REE in 95 patients with subacute stroke (53.5 ± 16.6 days post-stroke) with indirect calorimetry, and compared it with predicted values of energy expenditure estimated from the HB (expressed as percentage). Patients were admitted for rehabilitation of their first ischemic or nonsurgical hemorrhagic stroke. The severity of hemiparesis was assessed with the motor items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS). The ADL was assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). We compared REE and %HB of the two groups divided by hemiparesis severity and ADL limitation using the Student's t-test, and those of the five groups divided by stroke location. The correlations between REE and the motor items of the SIAS and the FIM score were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation test. A multiple regression analysis for REE was conducted. The average body weight (BW) was 57.1 ± 11.3 kg. The average body mass index (BMI) was 22.5 ± 4.0. The mean REE (%HB) was 1,271 ± 284 kcal/day (106.0 ± 17.3%). REE and %HB of the low ADL group was less than that of the high ADL group (p < 0.05). The REE had a positive correlation with the FIM score (rs = 0.51, p < 0.01). The motor items of the SIAS were not significantly correlated with REE. BW, FIM, and stroke location were independent predictors of REE. Analysis of energy expenditure suggests that stroke patients are not hypermetabolic during the

  19. Studies of top quark production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; /Illinois U., Chicago

    2011-07-01

    I present recent results on top quark production in pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The studies were performed by the D0 collaboration using approximately 5 fb{sup -1} of data taken during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator. The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle and completes the quark sector of the three-generation structure of the standard model (SM). It differs from the other quarks not only by its much larger mass, but also by its lifetime which is too short to build hadronic bound states. The SM predicts that top quarks are created via two independent production mechanisms at hadron colliders. The primary mode, in which a t{bar t} pair is produced from a gtt vertex via the strong interaction, was used by the D0 and CDF collaborations to establish the existence of the top quark in 1995. The second production mode of top quarks at hadron colliders is the electroweak production of a single top quark from a Wtb vertex. The predicted cross section for single top quark production is about half that of t{bar t} pairs but the signal-to-background ratio is much worse; observation of single top quark production has therefore until recently been impeded by its low rate and difficult background environment compared to the top pair production. In the following sections I will present results for the measurement of the t{bar t} pair and the single top quark production cross section using respectively 5.3 fb{sup -1} and 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data taken by the D0 experiment.

  20. Practicing Tai Chi had lower energy metabolism than walking but similar health benefits in terms of aerobic fitness, resting energy expenditure, body composition and self-perceived physical health.

    PubMed

    Hui, Stanley Sai-Chuen; Xie, Yao Jie; Woo, Jean; Kwok, Timothy Chi-Yui

    2016-08-01

    To examine the effects of Tai Chi and walking training on aerobic fitness, resting energy expenditure (REE), body composition, and quality of life; as well as analyzing the energy metabolism during exercises, to determine which one had better advantage in improving health status. Three hundred seventy-four middle-aged Chinese subjects who were recruited from nine geographic areas in Sha Tin were randomized into Tai Chi, walking, or control groups at area level. The 12-week (45min per day, 5days per week) Tai Chi or brisk walking training were conducted in respective intervention groups. Measures were performed at baseline and end of trial. Another 30 subjects were recruited to compare the energy metabolism between practicing Tai Chi and walking. The between-group difference of VO2max was 3.3ml/min/kg for Tai Chi vs. control and 3.7ml/min/kg for walking vs. control (both P<0.001). BMI, skinfold thicknesses, and SF-12 physical component scores all improved significantly compared with the control group (all P<0.01). Tai Chi had higher effect on improving REE-VO2 and REE-kilocalorie expenditure than walking. Regarding to energy metabolism test, the self-paced walking produced approximately 46% higher metabolic costs than Tai Chi. Practicing Tai Chi consumes a smaller amount of energy metabolism but similar health benefits as self-paced brisk walking. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction project was completed at BNL in 1999, with the first data-taking runs in the summer of 2000. Since then the early measurements at RHIC have yielded a wealth of data, from four independent detectors, each with its international collaboration of scientists: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR [1]. For the first time, collisions of heavy nuclei have been carried out at colliding-beam energies that have previously been accessible only for high-energy physics experiments with collisions of ''elementary'' particles such as protons and electrons. It is at these high energies that the predictions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory that describes the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter, come into play, and new phenomena are sought that may illuminate our view of the basic structure of matter on the sub-atomic scale, with important implications for the origins of matter on the cosmic scale. The RHIC experiments have recorded data from collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energies ever achieved in man-made particle accelerators. These collisions, of which hundreds of millions have now been examined, result in final states of unprecedented complexity, with thousands of produced particles radiating from the nuclear collision. All four of the RHIC experiments have moved quickly to analyze these data, and have begun to understand the phenomena that unfold from the moment of collision as these particles are produced. In order to provide benchmarks of simpler interactions against which to compare the gold-gold collisions, the experiments have gathered comparable samples of data from collisions of a very light nucleus (deuterium) with gold nuclei, as well as proton-proton collisions, all with identical beam energies and experimental apparatus. The early measurements have revealed compelling evidence for the existence of a new form of nuclear matter at extremely high

  2. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    DOE PAGES

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; ...

    2016-12-18

    Here, we present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction—the “intrinsic” quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ/Z/W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsicmore » heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.« less

  3. Top-quark and electroweak results from ATLAS and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spighi, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    A selection of top-quark and electroweak results performed by ATLAS and CMS are presented. The results obtained with proton-proton collision at the center of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV cover the 2010-2012 data taking period. We present the total and differential cross sections of the top-quark pair, single top-quark and top-quark production in association with a Gauge boson, together with some of the main properties of the top-quark as mass, charge asymmetry and spin. Regarding the electroweak physics, we present the total cross sections of single and double bosons and show results on the lepton universality of electrons and muons, the weak mixing angle sinθw, the W helicity and the study of the Triple Gauge Coupling. All the presented results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  4. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; Smiesko, J.; Tokar, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction-the "intrinsic" quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ / Z / W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsic heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.

  5. The physics of heavy quark distributions in hadrons: Collider tests

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S. J.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Lykasov, G. I.; Smiesko, J.; Tokar, S.

    2016-12-18

    Here, we present a review of the current understanding of the heavy quark distributions in the nucleon and their impact on collider physics. The origin of strange, charm and bottom quark pairs at high light-front (LF) momentum fractions in hadron wavefunction—the “intrinsic” quarks, is reviewed. The determination of heavy-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) is particularly significant for the analysis of hard processes at LHC energies. We show that a careful study of the inclusive production of open charm and the production of γ/Z/W particles, accompanied by the heavy jets at large transverse momenta can give essential information on the intrinsic heavy quark (IQ) distributions. We also focus on the theoretical predictions concerning other observables which are very sensitive to the intrinsic charm contribution to PDFs including Higgs production at high xF and novel fixed target measurements which can be tested at the LHC.

  6. Heavy-quark and lepton-pair production on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Boreskov, K.; Capella, A.; Kaidalov, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J. )

    1993-02-01

    We present a description of the [ital A] dependence of heavy-quark and Drell-Yan pair production in hadron-nucleus collisions, based on the Reggeon approach to strong interactions at high energies and the parton model. The same method has been successfully applied to the production of light-quark states. The existence of a new energy scale, which depends on the mass and [ital x][sub [ital F

  7. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  8. Quark search at the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-03-13

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described. (WHK)

  9. Quark structure of chiral solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-05-01

    There is a prejudice that the chiral soliton model of baryons is something orthogonal to the good old constituent quark models. In fact, it is the opposite: the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong interactions explains the appearance of massive constituent quarks of small size thus justifying the constituent quark models, in the first place. Chiral symmetry ensures that constituent quarks interact very strongly with the pseudoscalar fields. The ''chiral soliton'' is another word for the chiral field binding constituent quarks. We show how the old SU(6) quark wave functions follow from the ''soliton'', however, with computable relativistic corrections and additional quark-antiquark pairs. We also find the 5-quark wave function of the exotic baryon Theta+.

  10. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  11. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  12. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  13. Search for the Supersymmetric Partner of the Top Quark in Dilepton Events Produced in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sedov, Alexei A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a search for the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark $\\sim\\atop{t}$ at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy$\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV. This search was conducted within the framework of the Rp conserved Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, assuming the decay $\\sim\\atop{t}$→ l+ + $\\sim\\atop{ν}$l + b is dominant. We searched a total Luminosity of $L$ = 1 fb-1 of data collected by the CDF experiment looking for two leptons of opposite electric charge, jets and missing transverse energy. No statistically significant evidence of the stop signal has been found in a model with degenerate sneutrino ($\\sim\\atop{ν}$) masses. New limits at 95% confidence level in the stop versus sneutrino mass plane have been set.

  14. Measurement of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at a Center-of-Mass Energy of 7 TeV with the CMS Experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Geng-Yuan

    We perform a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The analysis is based on a 36 pb-1 dataset collected with the CMS experiment in 2010. We study the kinematic characteristics of events with exactly one isolated muon in association with additional hard jets and exhibiting substantial missing transverse energy to distinguish the tt¯ signal from the electroweak and QCD multijet backgrounds. The tt¯ signal is extracted by simultaneously fitting the tri-jet invariant mass distributions in events with exactly three jets and at least four jets. The measured cross section is 157 +/- 12(stat. )+28-35 (syst.) +/- 6(lumi.) pb, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Dissociation of heavy quarkonia in the quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2002-09-01

    Using a temperature-dependent potential obtained from lattice gauge calculations of Karsch et al, we study the stability of heavy quarkonia in the quark-gluon plasma. We find that only the Υ(1S) and ηb(1S) are bound in the quark-gluon plasma, and have a small binding energy. The quark-gluon plasma may be revealed by an Υ(1S) dilepton peak with an invariant mass close to twice the current b quark mass, which is lower than the Υ(1S) mass in free space. The quarkonia Υ(1S) and ηb(1S) can dissociate by collision with quarks and gluons in the quark-gluon plasma. The Υ(1S) and the ηb(1S) can also dissociate spontaneously at temperatures above the dissociation temperature 1.11 Tc, where Tc is the quark-gluon plasma phase transition temperature. At temperatures slightly above the dissociation temperature these states appear as resonances, which provides another signature for the quark-gluon plasma.

  16. Total energy expenditure, resting metabolic rate and physical activity level in free-living rural elderly men and women from Cuba, Chile and México.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Mateo, H; Salazar, G; Hernández-Triana, M; Valencia, M E

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess total energy expenditure (TEE), resting metabolic rate (RMR) and physical activity level (PAL), and to estimate energy requirements (ERs) in free-living elderly subjects from Cuba, Chile and Mexico. Cross-sectional study designed to estimate ERs. Rural regions of Cuba, Chile and Mexico. Forty subjects >60 years old were selected to participate in this study. A dose of doubly labeled water (DLW) was administered and urine samples were collected in the following 12-14 days. From the isotopic analysis, TEE was derived. RMR was measured by indirect calorimetry. TEE in Chilean (8.8+/-1.6 MJ/day) and Cuban (8.3+/-1.3 MJ/day) elderly was not different, and was higher for the Mexican group (9.5+/-1.5 MJ/day) (P < 0.0001). RMR was not different between countries. PAL and activity energy expenditure (AEE) were only different between Chile and Mexico (P < 0.002). For the three regions, overall PALs were 1.70+/-0.16 for male and 1.62+/-0.13 for female subjects (P < 0.02), and AEE was 3.05+/-0.66 and 2.27+/-0.66 MJ/day for male and female subjects, respectively (P < 0.001). Predictive equations (MJ/day) were RMR = 1.6447 + 0.05714 x weight (kg) + 0.449 sex (male = 1; female = 0) (R2 = 0.75; SEE = 0.479) and TEE = 3.414 + 0.0795 x weight (kg) + 1.227 x sex (male = 1; female = 0) (R2 = 0.75; SEE = 0.668). There were differences in TEE and PAL owing to sex and region. The average PAL in men was higher than the PAL reported either with factorial approach or with the DLW method in elderly. Predictive ER equations based on RMR and TEE gave very similar results to calculations from the 2004 FAO/WHO/UNU report.

  17. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  18. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kie Sang; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  19. Shear and bulk viscosities of quark matter from quark-meson fluctuations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Peixoto, Thiago C.; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-04-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear η and bulk ζ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-π and quark-σ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We found a nontrivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios η /s and ζ /s , where s is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the quasiparticle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for η /s has a minimum very close to the quantum lower bound, η /s =1 /4 π .

  20. Resting energy expenditure prediction in recreational athletes of 18-35 years: confirmation of Cunningham equation and an improved weight-based alternative.

    PubMed

    ten Haaf, Twan; Weijs, Peter J M

    2014-01-01

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) is expected to be higher in athletes because of their relatively high fat free mass (FFM). Therefore, REE predictive equation for recreational athletes may be required. The aim of this study was to validate existing REE predictive equations and to develop a new recreational athlete specific equation. 90 (53 M, 37 F) adult athletes, exercising on average 9.1 ± 5.0 hours a week and 5.0 ± 1.8 times a week, were included. REE was measured using indirect calorimetry (Vmax Encore n29), FFM and FM were measured using air displacement plethysmography. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to develop a new FFM-based and weight-based REE predictive equation. The percentage accurate predictions (within 10% of measured REE), percentage bias, root mean square error and limits of agreement were calculated. Results: The Cunningham equation and the new weight-based equation REE(kJ / d) = 49.940* weight(kg) + 2459.053* height(m) - 34.014* age(y) + 799.257* sex(M = 1,F = 0) + 122.502 and the new FFM-based equation REE(kJ / d) = 95.272*FFM(kg) + 2026.161 performed equally well. De Lorenzo's equation predicted REE less accurate, but better than the other generally used REE predictive equations. Harris-Benedict, WHO, Schofield, Mifflin and Owen all showed less than 50% accuracy. For a population of (Dutch) recreational athletes, the REE can accurately be predicted with the existing Cunningham equation. Since body composition measurement is not always possible, and other generally used equations fail, the new weight-based equation is advised for use in sports nutrition.

  1. Comparison of proposed alternative methods for rescaling dialysis dose: resting energy expenditure, high metabolic rate organ mass, liver size, and body surface area.

    PubMed

    Daugirdas, John T; Levin, Nathan W; Kotanko, Peter; Depner, Thomas A; Kuhlmann, Martin K; Chertow, Glenn M; Rocco, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    A number of denominators for scaling the dose of dialysis have been proposed as alternatives to the urea distribution volume (V). These include resting energy expenditure (REE), mass of high metabolic rate organs (HMRO), visceral mass, and body surface area. Metabolic rate is an unlikely denominator as it varies enormously among humans with different levels of activity and correlates poorly with the glomerular filtration rate. Similarly, scaling based on HMRO may not be optimal, as many organs with high metabolic rates such as spleen, brain, and heart are unlikely to generate unusually large amounts of uremic toxins. Visceral mass, in particular the liver and gut, has potential merit as a denominator for scaling; liver size is related to protein intake and the liver, along with the gut, is known to be responsible for the generation of suspected uremic toxins. Surface area is time-honored as a scaling method for glomerular filtration rate and scales similarly to liver size. How currently recommended dialysis doses might be affected by these alternative rescaling methods was modeled by applying anthropometric equations to a large group of dialysis patients who participated in the HEMO study. The data suggested that rescaling to REE would not be much different from scaling to V. Scaling to HMRO mass would mandate substantially higher dialysis doses for smaller patients of either gender. Rescaling to liver mass would require substantially more dialysis for women compared with men at all levels of body size. Rescaling to body surface area would require more dialysis for smaller patients of either gender and also more dialysis for women of any size. Of these proposed alternative rescaling measures, body surface area may be the best, because it reflects gender-based scaling of liver size and thereby the rate of generation of uremic toxins.

  2. Effects of dumb-bell exercise with and without energy restriction on resting metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and body composition in mildly obese women.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1999-06-01

    The effects of dumb-bell exercise (aerobic-resistance exercise) with and without low calorie diet (LCD) therapy on resting metabolic rate (RMR), diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and body composition were studied in 12 mildly obese women aged 19-20 years. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: dumb-bell exercise with LCD (DEx + LCD group), and dumb-bell exercise only (DEx group). The subjects performed dumb-bell exercises with pairs of 2 kg dumb-bells every day after dinner for approximately 20 min. In the DEx + LCD group, subjects also received a liquid-formula diet based on a commercially available diet supplement, Micro Diet, for two of their three daily meals. Thus, they were restricted to approximately 4.18 MJ of energy intake per day for 12 weeks. Subjects underwent several measurements (body composition, RMR and DIT tests) before commencing the experiment and again after 12 weeks while still dieting. During the 12 week experimental period, body weight and body fat decreased significantly in both the DEx + LCD and the DEx groups without reducing fat free mass (FFM). The decreases in body weight and body fat were significantly larger in the LCD + DEx group than in the DEx group. These results suggest that dumb-bell exercise decreases body weight and body fat without reducing FFM in relation to increasing RMR and DIT. Micro Diet LCD may strengthen the effect of dumb-bell exercise on body weight and body fat, but weaken the effects on RMR and DIT.

  3. Effect of weight loss and regain on adipose tissue distribution, composition of lean mass and resting energy expenditure in young overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Bosy-Westphal, A; Schautz, B; Lagerpusch, M; Pourhassan, M; Braun, W; Goele, K; Heller, M; Glüer, C-C; Müller, M J

    2013-10-01

    Although weight cycling is frequent in obese patients, the adverse consequences on body composition and an increased propensity to weight gain remain controversial. We investigated the effect of intentional weight loss and spontaneous regain on fat distribution, the composition of lean mass and resting energy expenditure (REE). Weight regainers (≥ 30% of loss, n=27) and weight-stable subjects (within <± 20% of weight change, n=20) were selected from 103 overweight and obese subjects (body mass index 28-43 kg m(-2), 24-45 years) who passed a 13-week low-calorie diet intervention. REE and body composition (by densitometry and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging) were examined at baseline, after weight loss and at 6 months of follow-up. Mean weight loss was -12.3 ± 3.3 kg in weight-stable subjects and -9.0 ± 4.3 kg in weight regainers (P<0.01). Weight regain was incomplete, accounting for 83 and 42% of weight loss in women and men. Regain in total fat and different adipose tissue depots was in proportion to weight regain except for a higher regain in adipose tissue of the extremities in women and a lower regain in extremity and visceral adipose tissue in men. In both genders, regain in skeletal muscle of the trunk lagged behind skeletal muscle regain at the extremities. In contrast to weight-stable subjects, weight regainers showed a reduced REE adjusted for changes in organ and tissue masses after weight loss (P<0.001). Weight regain did not adversely affect body fat distribution. Weight loss-associated adaptations in REE may impair weight loss and contribute to weight regain.

  4. Body composition, resting energy expenditure and inflammatory markers: impact in users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate after 12 months follow-up.

    PubMed

    Batista, Gisele Almeida; Souza, Aglécio Luiz de; Marin, Daniela Miguel; Sider, Marina; Melhado, Vaneska Carvalho; Fernandes, Arlete Maria; Alegre, Sarah Monte

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate for 12 months the changes of body weight using Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA) and if these changes are related to inflammatory markers. Twenty women of childbearing age who chose the DMPA, without previous use of this method, BMI < 30 kg/m2, and 17 women using IUD TCu 380A, participated in the study. At the baseline and after one year, changes in weight gain, body composition by the bioimpedance electric method, resting energy expenditure (REE) by the indirect calorimetry method, inflammatory markers and HOMA-IR were assessed. After 12 months of evaluation, we could observe a significant increase in the DMPA group in weight (3,01 kg) and BMI, while the IUD group's only significant increase was observed in the BMI. Relative to REE there was an increase of basal metabolic rate (BMR) in both groups after one year. The sub-group DMPA that gained < 3 kg had increased significant weight, BMI and body surface (BS) with respiratory quotient (RQ) reduction, while the sub-group that gained ≥ 3 kg had a significant increase in weight, BMI, BS, fat-free mass, fat mass, BMR, Leptin, HOMA-IR and waist circumference, with RQ significantly reduced. Our study found significant changes in weight, body composition and metabolic profile of the population studied in the first 12 months of contraceptive use. These changes mainly increased body weight, leptin levels and HOMA-IR which can contribute to the development of some chronic complications, including obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus.

  5. Mass versus relativistic and rest masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, L. B.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of relativistic mass, which increases with velocity, is not compatible with the standard language of relativity theory and impedes the understanding and learning of the theory by beginners. The same difficulty occurs with the term rest mass. To get rid of relativistic mass and rest mass it is appropriate to replace the equation E =mc2 by the true Einstein's equation E0=mc2, where E0 is the rest energy and m is the mass.

  6. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2004-04-30

    The existence of the top quark, discovered by CDF and D0 in 1995, has been re-established in the burgeoning dataset being collected in Run 2 of the Tevatron at Fermilab. Results from CDF on the top quark production cross section and top quark mass are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The well-characterized top data samples will make it possible in the future to probe further for new physics in the top quark sector. This report summarizes recent CDF top quark physics results.

  7. Substituting dietary monounsaturated fat for saturated fat is associated with increased daily physical activity and resting energy expenditure and with changes in mood123

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Janice Y; Tompkins, Connie L; Dumas, Julie A; Crain, Karen I; Ebenstein, David B; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Western diet increases risk of metabolic disease. Objective: We determined whether lowering the ratio of saturated fatty acids to monounsaturated fatty acids in the Western diet would affect physical activity and energy expenditure. Design: With the use of a balanced design, 2 cohorts of 18 and 14 young adults were enrolled in separate randomized, double-masked, crossover trials that compared a 3-wk high–palmitic acid diet (HPA; similar to the Western diet fat composition) to a low–palmitic acid and high–oleic acid diet (HOA; similar to the Mediterranean diet fat composition). All foods were provided by the investigators, and the palmitic acid (PA):oleic acid (OA) ratio was manipulated by adding different oil blends to the same foods. In both cohorts, we assessed physical activity (monitored continuously by using accelerometry) and resting energy expenditure (REE). To gain insight into a possible mood disturbance that might explain changes in physical activity, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) was administered in cohort 2. Results: Physical activity was higher during the HOA than during the HPA in 15 of 17 subjects in cohort 1 (P = 0.008) (mean: 12% higher; P = 0.003) and in 12 of 12 subjects in the second, confirmatory cohort (P = 0.005) (mean: 15% higher; P = 0.003). When the HOA was compared with the HPA, REE measured during the fed state was 3% higher for cohort 1 (P < 0.01), and REE was 4.5% higher in the fasted state for cohort 2 (P = 0.04). POMS testing showed that the anger-hostility score was significantly higher during the HPA (P = 0.007). Conclusions: The replacement of dietary PA with OA was associated with increased physical activity and REE and less anger. Besides presumed effects on mitochondrial function (increased REE), the dietary PA:OA ratio appears to affect behavior. The second cohort was derived from a study that was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as R01DK082803. PMID:23446891

  8. Anomalous Gluon-top Quark-anti-top quark Coupling in Single-lepton Top-anti-topquark Events from Proton-anti-proton Collisions at Center of Mass Energy = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Kwok Ming

    2006-01-01

    Using the effective Lagrangian formulation with the requirements of Standard Model SU(3) x SU (2) x U(1) symmetries, the leading order effects of new physics at an energy scale Λ on the gt$\\bar{t}$ vertex can be shown to be determined by the strengths of three anomalous couplings CtG, CqG and CtGΦ.

  9. An S(3) symmetry of nonrelative quark models and a top- quark seesaw model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Hael Switzer

    1999-12-01

    This work explores problems in three areas of particle physics: electroweak symmetry breaking, the spectrum of the L = 1 baryons and the theory of large N baryons. The first chapter investigates the phenomenological consequences of the top quark seesaw mechanism for breaking electroweak symmetry. We first establish some criteria for a sound top quark seesaw model and then study two models that emerge from these requirements. Both models contain a heavy weak- inert fermion with the same hypercharge as the top quark but the second model contains an additional heavy weak- inert partner for the bottom quark. The low energy spectra of these theories have respectively one and two Higgs doublets. We then show that the current measurements of the rho-parameter require that the heavy fermion in the one doublet model have a mass of 5-7 TeV while in the two doublet model, the heavy partner of the bottom quark must have a mass of at least 10 TeV to agree with the measured decay width of the Z0. The second chapter presents a study of the L = 1 baryons in the quark model and the chiral quark model using an S3 symmetry, which corresponds to permuting the positions of the quarks within a baryon. Given a set of operators with known transformation properties under S3 and the spin-flavor group, the masses of the L = 1 baryons are determined in terms of a small number of unknown parameters. These parameters are fit to the observed mass spectrum for both the quark model and the chiral quark model. The latter model leads to a more satisfactory fit with the measured baryon masses. We also make predictions for the unobserved L = 1 baryons. The final chapter examines the large N limit of the generators of the completely symmetric N index representation of SU(m). In this limit, the group generators behave essentially like classical variables. We use this observation to derive an integral formula for the matrix elements of an arbitrary polynomial of the group generators between low-spin, s

  10. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-antitop quark production with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, Julia; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-12-01

    The Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab) operates the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, the is therefore the only collider which is today able to produce the heaviest known particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and D0 collaborations in 1995. At the Tevatron, most top quarks are produced via the strong interaction, whereby quark-antiquark annihilation dominates with 85%, and gluon fusion contributes with 15%. Considering next-to-leading order (NLO) contributions in the cross section of top-antitop quark production, leads to a slight positive asymmetry in the differential distribution of the production angle {alpha} of the top quarks. This asymmetry is due to the interference of certain NLO contributions. The charge asymmetry A in the cosine of {alpha} is predicted [14] to amount to 4-6%. Information about the partonic rest frame, necessary for a measurement of A in the observable cos {alpha}, is not accessible in the experiment. Thus, they use the rapidity difference of the top and the antitop quark as sensitive variable. This quantity offers the advantage of Lorentz invariance and is uniquely correlated with the cosine of {alpha}, justifying the choice of the rapidity difference to describe the behavior of cos {alpha}. In preparation for a measurement of the charge asymmetry, they conduct several Monte Carlo based studies concerning the effect of different event selection criteria on the asymmetry in the selected event samples. They observe a strong dependence of the measured asymmetry on the number of required jets in the particular event sample. This motivates further studies to understand the influence of additional gluon radiation, which leads to more than four observed jets in an event, on the rapidity distribution of the produced top quarks. They find, that events containing hard gluon radiation are correlated with a strong negative shift of the rapidity

  11. The spin and flavor content of intrinsic sea quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bo-Qiang Ma; Brodsky, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    The intrinsic quark-antiquark pairs generated by the minimal energy nonperturbative meson-baryon fluctuations in the nucleon sea provide a consistent framework for understanding a number of empirical anomalies observed in the deep inelastic quark-parton structure of nucleons: the flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea implied by the violation of Gottfried sum rule, the proton spin problem implied by the violation of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule, and the outstanding conflict between two different determinations of the strange quark sea in the nucleon.

  12. Summary of Single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, R.; CDF, on the

    2014-01-01

    The production of single-top quarks occurs via the weak interaction at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Single top quark events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. Multivariate classifiers separate the s-channel and t-channel single-top signals from the large backgrounds. The combination of CDF and D0 results leads to the first observation of the s-channel mode of single top quark production. The t-channel and single top combined cross sections have also been measured.

  13. Chiral extrapolations on the lattice with strange sea quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, Sébastien

    2005-06-01

    The (light but not-so-light) strange quark may play a special role in the low-energy dynamics of QCD. Strange sea-quark pairs may induce significant differences in the pattern of chiral symmetry breaking in the chiral limits of two and three massless flavours, in relation with the violation of the Zweig rule in the scalar sector. This effect could affect chiral extrapolations of unquenched lattice simulations with three dynamical flavours, and it could be detected through the quark-mass dependence of hadron observables [S. Descotes-Genon, hep-ph/0410233].

  14. Heisenberg Uncertainty and the Allowable Masses of the Up Quark and Down Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Brian

    2004-05-01

    A possible explanation for the inability to attain deterministic measurements of an elementary particle's energy, as given by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, manifests itself in an interesting anthropic consequent of Andrei Linde's Self-reproducing Inflationary Multiverse model. In Linde's model, the physical laws and constants that govern our universe adopt other values in other universes, due to variable Higgs fields. While the physics in our universe allow for the advent of life and consciousness, the physics necessary for life are not likely to exist in other universes -- Linde demonstrates this through a kind of Darwinism for universes. Our universe, then, is unique. But what are the physical laws and constants that make our universe what it is? Craig Hogan identifies five physical constants that are not bound by symmetry. Fine-tuning these constants gives rise to the basic behavior and structures of the universe. Three of the non-symmetric constants are fermion masses: the up quark mass, the down quark mass, and the electron mass. I will explore Linde's and Hogan's works by comparing the amount of uncertainty in quark masses, as calculated from the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, to the range of quark mass values consistent with our observed universe. Should the fine-tuning of the up quark and down quark masses be greater than the range of Heisenberg uncertainties in their respective masses (as I predict, due to quantum tunneling), then perhaps there is a correlation between the measured Heisenberg uncertainty in quark masses and the fine-tuning of masses required for our universe to be as it is. Hogan; "Why the Universe is Just So;" Reviews of Modern Physics; Issue 4; Vol. 72; pg. 1149-1161; Oct. 2000 Linde, "The Self-Reproducing Inflationary Universe;" Scientific American; No. 5; Vol. 271; pg. 48-55; Nov. 1994

  15. Improving the Top Quark Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurement at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Han, Zhenyu; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-15

    At the LHC, top quark pairs are dominantly produced from gluons, making it difficult to measure the top quark forward-backward asymmetry. To improve the asymmetry measurement, we study variables that can distinguish between top quarks produced from quarks and those from gluons: the invariant mass of the top pair, the rapidity of the top-antitop system in the lab frame, the rapidity of the top quark in the top-antitop rest frame, the top quark polarization and the top-antitop spin correlation. We combine all the variables in a likelihood discriminant method to separate quark-initiated events from gluon-initiated events. We apply our method on models including G-prime's and W-prime's motivated by the recent observation of a large top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron. We have found that the significance of the asymmetry measurement can be improved by 10% to 30%. At the same time, the central values of the asymmetry increase by 40% to 100%. We have also analytically derived the best spin quantization axes for studying top quark polarization as well as spin-correlation for the new physics models.

  16. Measurement of the front back asymmetry in top-antitop quark pairs produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Quarks, along with leptons and force carrying particles, are predicted by the Standard Model to be the fundamental constituents of nature. In distinction from the leptons, the quarks interact strongly through the chromodynamic force and are bound together within the hadrons. The familiar proton and neutron are bound states of the light ''up'' and ''down'' quarks. The most massive quark by far, the ''top'' quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments in March, 1995. The new quark was observed in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass of the top quark was measured to be 176 ± 13 GeV/c2 and the cross section 6.8$+3.6\\atop{-2.4}$ pb. It is the Q = 2/3, T3 = +1/2 member of the third generation weak-isospin doublet along with the bottom quark. The top quark is the final Standard Model quark to be discovered. Along with whatever is responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, top quark physics is considered one of the least understood sectors of the Standard Model and represents a front line of our understanding of particle physics. Currently, the only direct measurements of top quark properties come from the CDF and D0 experiments observing p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron. Top quark production at the Tevatron is almost exclusively by quark-antiquark annihilation, q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ (85%), and gluon fusion, gg → t$\\bar{t}$ (15%), mediated by the strong force. The theoretical cross-section for this process is σt$\\bar{t}$ = 6.7 ± 0.8 pb for mt = 175 GeV/c2. Top quarks can also be produced at the Tevatron via q$\\bar{b}$' → tb and qg → q'tb through the weak interaction. The cross section for these processes is lower (3pb) and the signal is much more difficult to isolate as backgrounds are much higher. The top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W-boson and a bottom quark (t → Wb). The total decay width t → Wb is Λ = 1.50 GeV. This

  17. Kondo cloud of single heavy quark in cold and dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro

    2017-10-01

    The Kondo effect is a universal phenomena observed in a variety of fermion systems containing a heavy impurity particle whose interaction is governed by the non-Abelian interaction. At extremely high density, I study the Kondo effect by color exchange in quark matter containing a single heavy (charm or bottom) quark as an impurity particle. To obtain the ground state with the Kondo effect, I introduce the condensate mixing the light quark and the heavy quark (Kondo cloud) in the mean-field approximation. I estimate the energy gain by formation of the Kondo cloud, and present that the Kondo cloud exhibits the resonant structure. I also evaluate the scattering cross section for the light quark and the heavy quark, and discuss its effect to the finite size quark matter.

  18. Search for scalar bottom quarks from gluino decays in collisions at.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciverez, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; di Giovanni, G P; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J L; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Dennis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-05

    We searched for scalar bottom quarks 156 pb(-1) of pp collisions at radicalS = 1.96 recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Tevatron. Scalar bottom quarks can be produced from gluino decays in -parity conserving models of supersymmetry when the mass of the gluino exceeds that of the scalar bottom quark. Then, a scalar bottom quark can decay into a bottom quark and a neutralino. To search for this scenario, we investigated events with large missing transverse energy and at least three jets, two or more of which were identified as containing a secondary vertex from the hadronization of quarks. We found four candidate events, where 2.6 +/- 0.7 are expected from standard model processes, and placed 95% confidence level lower limits on gluino and scalar bottom quark masses of up to 280 and 240 GeV/c(2), respectively.

  19. Phase Diagram and Instability of Dense Neutral Three-Flavor Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2006-07-11

    We address the phase structure of color superconducting quark matter at high quark density. Under the electric and color neutrality conditions there appear various phases as a result of the Fermi surface mismatch among different quark flavors induced by finite strange quark mass; the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, the u-quark superconducting (uSC) phase, the d-quark superconducting (dSC) phase, the two-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase, and the unpaired quark matter (UQM). Besides, when the Fermi surface mismatch is large enough to surpass the gap energy, the gapless superconducting phase is expected. We discuss the chromomagnetic instability problem and explore the instability regions on the phase diagram.

  20. Measurement of the charge asymmetry and the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic

    2005-12-23

    different helicities of the W boson. The second focus lies on the production process and the higher order QCD effect causing the charge asymmetry. In the following three chapters the experimental techniques of the CDF detector, hardware and the used software are introduced as well as. In this thesis t{bar t} candidates are selected in the decay mode t {yields} bl{nu}, {bar t} {yields} bjj and the charge conjugated state. An important ingredient for this measurement is the complete reconstruction of the top-antitop partonic process. The reconstruction of the partonic process requires the assignment of reconstructed objects, such as jets, the charged lepton and the missing transverse energy to parton level objects. This assignment implies a certain number of possible permutations and ambiguities. To achieve the optimal reconstruction of the event all combinations have to be considered and evaluated. To measure a t{bar t}-quantity one hypothesis has to be chosen. In chapter five we present a novel technique to fully reconstruct t{bar t} events. The technique is investigated in great detail by comparing to the Monte Carlo truth information. In the sixth chapter the background estimation is given. The identification and selection procedure on data is checked with Monte Carlo samples. Chapter seven describes the measurement of the W boson helicity in the top quark decay. The helicity of the W boson is measured via the angle between the W boson momentum in the top quark rest frame and the lepton momentum in the W boson rest frame. After correcting for acceptance and reconstruction effects the different helicity fractions are extracted by fitting the theoretical expected distribution. The systematic error is determined using the technique of pseudo experiments. In chapter eight the measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-pair production is presented. The measurement of the asymmetry is performed by using the difference of the top quark rapidities times the charge of the lepton

  1. Influence of Exercise on the Metabolic Profile Caused by 28 days of Bed Rest with Energy Deficit and Amino Acid Supplementation in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi E.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Cloutier, Gregory; Vega-López, Sonia; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Muscle loss and metabolic changes occur with disuse [i.e. bed rest (BR)]. We hypothesized that BR would lead to a metabolically unhealthy profile defined by: increased circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, decreased circulating insulin-like-growth-factor (IGF)-1, decreased HDL-cholesterol, and decreased muscle density (MD; measured by mid-thigh computerized tomography). Methods We investigated the metabolic profile after 28 days of BR with 8±6% energy deficit in male individuals (30-55 years) randomized to resistance exercise with amino acid supplementation (RT, n=24) or amino acid supplementation alone (EAA, n=7). Upper and lower body exercises were performed in the horizontal position. Blood samples were taken at baseline, after 28 days of BR and 14 days of recovery. Results We found a shift toward a metabolically unfavourable profile after BR [compared to baseline (BLN)] in both groups as shown by decreased HDL-cholesterol levels (EAA: BLN: 39±4 vs. BR: 32±2 mg/dL, RT: BLN: 39±1 vs. BR: 32±1 mg/dL; p<0.001) and Low MD (EAA: BLN: 27±4 vs. BR: 22±3 cm2, RT: BLN: 28±2 vs. BR: 23±2 cm2; p<0.001). A healthier metabolic profile was maintained with exercise, including NormalMD (EAA: BLN: 124±6 vs. BR: 110±5 cm2, RT: BLN: 132±3 vs. BR: 131±4 cm2; p<0.001, time-by-group); although, exercise did not completely alleviate the unfavourable metabolic changes seen with BR. Interestingly, both groups had increased plasma IGF-1 levels (EAA: BLN:168±22 vs. BR 213±20 ng/mL, RT: BLN:180±10 vs. BR: 219±13 ng/mL; p<0.001) and neither group showed TNFα changes (p>0.05). Conclusions We conclude that RT can be incorporated to potentially offset the metabolic complications of BR. PMID:25317071

  2. Searches for Heavy Quark States at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hok-Chuen Tom; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    This talk highlights the latest results of heavy quark searches from the ATLAS collaboration, mainly on resonance searches and vector-like quarks (VLQs) searches. Searches for it resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy of 8 and 13 TeV are presented. Limits are set for BSM particles such as topcolor-assisted technicolor Z' TC , Kaluza-Klein (K-K) gluons gKK and K-K excitations of graviton GKK in the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions. VLQs arise naturally in many models such as Little Higgs and Composite Higgs and typically couple preferably to the third generation SM quarks and weak bosons. Limits are set for vector-like bottom (B) and top (T) quarks decay to lepton-plus-jets final states via Hb+X and Ht+X channels in two analyses using 8 and 13 TeV datasets from ATLAS.

  3. Quark Deconfinement in Rotating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Richard; Weber, Fridolin; Spinella, William; Contrera, Gustavo; Orsaria, Milva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we use a three flavor non-local Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, an~improved effective model of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at low energies, to investigate the existence of deconfined quarks in the cores of neutron stars. Particular emphasis is put on the possible existence of quark matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars (pulsars). In contrast to non-rotating neutron stars, whose particle compositions do not change with time (are frozen in), the type and structure of the matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars depends on the spin frequencies of these stars, which opens up a possible new window on the nature of matter deep in the cores of neutron stars. Our study shows that, depending on mass and rotational frequency, up to around 8% of the mass of a massive neutron star may be in the mixed quark-hadron phase, if the phase transition is treated as a Gibbs transition. We also find that the gravitational mass at which quark deconfinement occurs in rotating neutron stars varies quadratically with spin frequency, which can be fitted by a simple formula.

  4. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Haisch, Ulrich; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and antiquarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which are provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the b b ¯ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of √{s }=13 TeV . We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the b b ¯ and c c ¯ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  5. Heavy quark photoproduction in pp coherent interactions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.; Meneses, A. R.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we analyze the possibility of constraining the QCD dynamics at high energies studying the heavy quark photoproduction at LHC in coherent interactions. The rapidity distribution and total cross section for charm and bottom production are estimated using three different phenomenological saturation models which successfully describe the HERA data. Our results indicate that the experimental study of the inclusive heavy quark photoproduction can be very useful to discriminate between the classical and quantum versions of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism.

  6. Recalling Quark Matter '83 and the birth of RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlam, Thomas W.

    2016-12-01

    I provide a brief review of the Quark Matter '83 meeting at Brookhaven, in the context of the decisive U.S. science policy actions during the summer of 1983 that led up to it. At the Brookhaven meeting a large community of nuclear and high energy physicists came together for the first time to examine the parameters for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, setting the stage for decades of quark matter research to follow.

  7. Higher dimensional strange quark matter solutions in self creation cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Şen, R.; Aygün, S.

    2016-03-25

    In this study, we have generalized the higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe solutions for a cloud of string with perfect fluid attached strange quark matter (SQM) in Self Creation Cosmology (SCC). We have obtained that the cloud of string with perfect fluid does not survive and the string tension density vanishes for this model. However, we get dark energy model for strange quark matter with positive density and negative pressure in self creation cosmology.

  8. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  9. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  10. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directlymore » employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.« less

  11. Quark-gluon plasma fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-12-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the properties of the fireball formed in early stages of nuclear collision, and argue that QGP formation must be expected down to 40A GeV in central Pb-Pb interactions.

  12. Quark-gluon plasma fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-12-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the properties of the fireball formed in early stages of nuclear collision, and argue that QGP formation must be expected down to 40A GeV in central Pb-Pb interactions.

  13. Semileptonic decays of Λ _c baryons in the relativistic quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, R. N.; Galkin, V. O.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental progress in studying weak decays of the Λ _c baryon we investigate its semileptonic decays in the framework of the relativistic quark model based on the quasipotential approach with the QCD-motivated potential. The form factors of the Λ _c→ Λ lν _l and Λ _c→ nlν _l decays are calculated in the whole accessible kinematical region without extrapolations and additional model assumptions. Relativistic effects are systematically taken into account including transformations of baryon wave functions from the rest to moving reference frame and contributions of the intermediate negative-energy states. Baryon wave functions found in the previous mass spectrum calculations are used for the numerical evaluation. Comprehensive predictions for decay rates, asymmetries and polarization parameters are given. They agree well with available experimental data.

  14. Nucleon quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; W. Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent and spin-independent quark light-cone momentum distributions and structure functions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquarks channels are included. We find excellent agreement between our model results and empirical data.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass using single top quark events in proton-proton collisions at √{s}= 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Dvornikov, O.; Makarenko, V.; Mossolov, V.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Zykunov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Marono, M. 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P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vischia, P.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. 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A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Verweij, M.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Yang, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. F.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Tali, B.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. 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R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Wu, Y.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Forthomme, L.; Kenny, R. P.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Kumar, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Schulte, J. F.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-05-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass is reported in events containing a single top quark produced via the electroweak t channel. The analysis is performed using data from proton-proton collisions collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb^{-1}. Top quark candidates are reconstructed from their decay to a W boson and a b quark, with the W boson decaying leptonically to a muon and a neutrino. The final state signature and kinematic properties of single top quark events in the t channel are used to enhance the purity of the sample, suppressing the contribution from top quark pair production. A fit to the invariant mass distribution of reconstructed top quark candidates yields a value of the top quark mass of 172.95 ± 0.77 {(stat)} ^{+0.97}_{-0.93} {(syst)} {GeV} . This result is in agreement with the current world average, and represents the first measurement of the top quark mass in event topologies not dominated by top quark pair production, therefore contributing to future averages with partially uncorrelated systematic uncertainties and a largely uncorrelated statistical uncertainty.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass using single top quark events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}= 8$$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; ...

    2017-05-29

    In this study, a measurement of the top quark mass is reported in events containing a single top quark produced via the electroweak t channel. The analysis is performed using data from proton-proton collisions collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. Top quark candidates are reconstructed from their decay to a W boson and a b quark, with the W boson decaying leptonically to a muon and a neutrino. The final state signature and kinematic properties of single top quark events in the tmore » channel are used to enhance the purity of the sample, suppressing the contribution from top quark pair production. A fit to the invariant mass distribution of reconstructed top quark candidates yields a value of the top quark mass of 172.95 ± 0.77(stat)+0.97–0.93(syst)GeV. This result is in agreement with the current world average, and represents the first measurement of the top quark mass in event topologies not dominated by top quark pair production, therefore contributing to future averages with partially uncorrelated systematic uncertainties and a largely uncorrelated statistical uncertainty.« less

  17. Measurement of the top quark mass using single top quark events in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV.

    PubMed

    Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Dvornikov, O; Makarenko, V; Mossolov, V; Gonzalez, J Suarez; Zykunov, V; Shumeiko, N; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Skovpen, K; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; 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