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Sample records for quark yukawa coupling

  1. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishara, Fady; Haisch, Ulrich; Monni, Pier Francesco; Re, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavor tagging. Compared to other proposals, it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated with quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  2. Indirect handle on the down-quark Yukawa coupling.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Florian

    2014-12-31

    To measure the Yukawa couplings of the up and down quarks, Yu,d, seems to be far beyond the capabilities of current and (near) future experiments in particle physics. By performing a general analysis of the potential misalignment between quark masses and Yukawa couplings, we derive predictions for the magnitude of induced flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs), depending on the shift in the physical Yukawa coupling of first-generation quarks. We find that a change of more than 50% in Yd would generically result in ds transitions in conflict with kaon physics. This could already be seen as evidence for a nonvanishing direct coupling of the down quark to the newly discovered Higgs boson. The nonobservation of certain--already well-constrained--processes is thus turned into a powerful indirect measure of otherwise basically unaccessible physical parameters of the effective standard model. Similarly, improvements in limits on FCNCs in the up-type quark sector can lead to valuable information on Yu.

  3. Why should we care about the top quark Yukawa coupling?

    DOE PAGES

    Shapshnikov, Mikhail; Bezrukov, Fedor

    2015-04-15

    In the cosmological context, for the Standard Model to be valid up to the scale of inflation, the top quark Yukawa coupling yt should not exceed the critical value ytcrit , coinciding with good precision (about 0.2‰) with the requirement of the stability of the electroweak vacuum. So, the exact measurements of yt may give an insight on the possible existence and the energy scale of new physics above 100 GeV, which is extremely sensitive to yt. In this study, we overview the most recent theoretical computations of and the experimental measurements of ytcrit and the experimental measurements ofmore » yt. Within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties in yt, the required scale of new physics varies from 10⁷ GeV to the Planck scale, urging for precise determination of the top quark Yukawa coupling.« less

  4. Why should we care about the top quark Yukawa coupling?

    SciTech Connect

    Shapshnikov, Mikhail; Bezrukov, Fedor

    2015-04-15

    In the cosmological context, for the Standard Model to be valid up to the scale of inflation, the top quark Yukawa coupling yt should not exceed the critical value ytcrit , coinciding with good precision (about 0.2‰) with the requirement of the stability of the electroweak vacuum. So, the exact measurements of yt may give an insight on the possible existence and the energy scale of new physics above 100 GeV, which is extremely sensitive to yt. In this study, we overview the most recent theoretical computations of and the experimental measurements of ytcrit and the experimental measurements of yt. Within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties in yt, the required scale of new physics varies from 10⁷ GeV to the Planck scale, urging for precise determination of the top quark Yukawa coupling.

  5. Exclusive radiative Higgs decays as probes of light-quark Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the rare exclusive Higgs boson decays into a single vector meson and a photon and investigate the possibility of using these processes to probe the light-quark Yukawa couplings. We work with an effective Lagrangian with modified Higgs couplings to account for possible new-physics effects in a model-independent way. The h → Vγ decay rate is governed by the destructive interference of two amplitudes, one of which involves the Higgs coupling to the quark anti-quark pair inside the vector meson. We derive this amplitude at next-to-leading order in α s using QCD factorization, including the resummation of large logarithmic corrections and accounting for the effects of flavor mixing. The high factorization scale μ ˜ m h ensures that our results are rather insensitive to the hadronic parameters characterizing the light-cone distribution amplitude of the vector meson. The second amplitude arises from the loop-induced effective hγγ * and hγZ * couplings, where the off-shell gauge boson converts into the vector meson. We devise a strategy to eliminate theoretical uncertainties related to this amplitude to almost arbitrary precision. This opens up the possibility to probe for modifications of the c- and b-quark Yukawa couplings and modifications of the s-quark Yukawa coupling in the high-luminosity LHC run. In particular, we show that measurements of the ratios Br( h → Υ( nS) γ)/Br( h → γγ) and can provide complementary information on the real and imaginary parts of the b-quark Yukawa coupling. More accurate measurements would be possible at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider.

  6. Phenomenology of enhanced light quark Yukawa couplings and the W±h charge asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Felix

    2017-02-01

    I propose the measurement of the W ± h charge asymmetry as a consistency test for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs, which is sensitive to enhanced Yukawa couplings of the first and second generation quarks. I present a collider analysis for the charge asymmetry in the same-sign lepton final state, pp → W ± h → ( ℓ ± ν) ( ℓ ± νjj), aimed at discovery significance for the SM W ± h production mode in each charge channel with 300 fb-1 of 14 TeV LHC data. Using this decay mode, I estimate the statistical precision on the charge asymmetry should reach 0.4% with 3 ab-1 luminosity, enabling a strong consistency test of the SM Higgs hypothesis. I also discuss direct and indirect constraints on light quark Yukawa couplings from direct and indirect probes of the Higgs width as well as Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider Higgs data. While the main effect from enhanced light quark Yukawa couplings is a rapid increase in the total Higgs width, such effects could be mitigated in a global fit to Higgs couplings, leaving the W ± h charge asymmetry as a novel signature to test directly the Higgs couplings to light quarks.

  7. Probing Higgs width and top quark Yukawa coupling from t t¯ and t t¯ t¯ productions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Shao-Long; Liu, Yandong

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that four top-quark production is a powerful tool to constrain the top Yukawa coupling. The constraint is robust in the sense that it does not rely on the Higgs boson decay. Taking into account the projection of the t t ¯H production by the ATLAS Collaboration, we obtained a bound on the Higgs boson width, ΓH≤2.57 ΓHSM, at the 14 TeV Large Hadron Collider with an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1.

  8. Exclusive window onto Higgs Yukawa couplings.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Alexander L; Perez, Gilad; Petriello, Frank; Soreq, Yotam; Stoynev, Stoyan; Zupan, Jure

    2015-03-13

    We show that both flavor-conserving and flavor-violating Yukawa couplings of the Higgs boson to first- and second-generation quarks can be probed by measuring rare decays of the form h→MV, where M denotes a vector meson and V indicates either γ, W or Z. We calculate the branching ratios for these processes in both the standard model and its possible extensions. We discuss the experimental prospects for their observation. The possibility of accessing these Higgs couplings appears to be unique to the high-luminosity LHC and future hadron colliders, providing further motivation for those machines.

  9. Renormalization group invariant of lepton Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuyuki, Takanao

    2015-04-01

    By using quark Yukawa matrices only, we can construct renormalization invariants that are exact at the one-loop level in the standard model. One of them, Iq, is accidentally consistent with unity, even though quark masses are strongly hierarchical. We calculate a lepton version of the invariant Il for Dirac and Majorana neutrino cases and find that Il can also be close to unity. For the Dirac neutrino and inverted hierarchy case, if the lightest neutrino mass is 3.0 meV to 8.8 meV, an equality Iq=Il can be satisfied. These invariants are not changed even if new particles couple to the standard model particles, as long as those couplings are generation independent.

  10. Nonstandard Yukawa couplings and Higgs portal dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bishara, Fady; Brod, Joachim; Uttayarat, Patipan; Zupan, Jure

    2016-01-04

    We study the implications of non-standard Higgs Yukawa couplings to light quarks on Higgs-portal dark matter phenomenology. Saturating the present experimental bounds on up-quark, down-quark, or strange-quark Yukawa couplings, the predicted direct dark matter detection scattering rate can increase by up to four orders of magnitude. The effect on the dark matter annihilation cross-section, on the other hand, is subleading unless the dark matter is very light — a scenario that is already excluded by measurements of the Higgs invisible decay width. We investigate the expected size of corrections in multi-Higgs-doublet models with natural flavor conservation, the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model, the Giudice-Lebedev model of light quark masses, minimal flavor violation new physics models, Randall-Sundrum, and composite Higgs models. We find that an enhancement in the dark matter scattering rate of an order of magnitude is possible. In conclusion, we point out that a discovery of Higgs-portal dark matter could lead to interesting bounds on the light-quark Yukawa couplings.

  11. Nonstandard Yukawa couplings and Higgs portal dark matter

    DOE PAGES

    Bishara, Fady; Brod, Joachim; Uttayarat, Patipan; ...

    2016-01-04

    We study the implications of non-standard Higgs Yukawa couplings to light quarks on Higgs-portal dark matter phenomenology. Saturating the present experimental bounds on up-quark, down-quark, or strange-quark Yukawa couplings, the predicted direct dark matter detection scattering rate can increase by up to four orders of magnitude. The effect on the dark matter annihilation cross-section, on the other hand, is subleading unless the dark matter is very light — a scenario that is already excluded by measurements of the Higgs invisible decay width. We investigate the expected size of corrections in multi-Higgs-doublet models with natural flavor conservation, the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model,more » the Giudice-Lebedev model of light quark masses, minimal flavor violation new physics models, Randall-Sundrum, and composite Higgs models. We find that an enhancement in the dark matter scattering rate of an order of magnitude is possible. In conclusion, we point out that a discovery of Higgs-portal dark matter could lead to interesting bounds on the light-quark Yukawa couplings.« less

  12. Higgs characterisation at NLO in QCD: CP properties of the top-quark Yukawa interaction.

    PubMed

    Demartin, Federico; Maltoni, Fabio; Mawatari, Kentarou; Page, Ben; Zaro, Marco

    At the LHC the CP properties of the top-quark Yukawa interaction can be probed through Higgs production in gluon fusion or in association with top quarks. We consider the possibility for both CP-even and CP-odd couplings to the top quark to be present, and study CP-sensitive observables at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD, including parton-shower effects. We show that the inclusion of NLO corrections sizeably reduces the theoretical uncertainties, and confirm that di-jet correlations in [Formula: see text] jet production through gluon fusion and correlations of the top-quark decay products in [Formula: see text] production can provide sensitive probes of the CP nature of the Higgs interactions.

  13. Remarkable coincidence for the top Yukawa coupling and an approximately massless bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2009-08-01

    We calculate, with several corrections, the nonrelativistic binding by Higgs exchange and gluon exchange between six top and six antitop quarks (actually replaced by left-handed b quarks from time to time). The remarkable result is that, within our calculational accuracy of the order of 14% in the top-quark Yukawa coupling g{sub t}, the experimental running top-quark Yukawa coupling g{sub t}=0.935 happens to have just that value which gives a perfect cancellation of the unbound mass=12 top-quark masses by this binding energy. In other words the bound state is massless to the accuracy of our calculation. Our calculation is in disagreement with a similar calculation by Kuchiev et al., but this deviation may be explained by a phase transition. We and Kuchiev et al. compute on different sides of this phase transition.

  14. Examining the identity of Yukawa with gauge couplings in supersymmetric QCD at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Skands, Peter Z.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P.M.; /DESY

    2007-03-01

    The identity of the quark-squark-gluino Yukawa coupling with the corresponding quark-quark-gluon QCD coupling in supersymmetric theories can be examined experimentally at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Extending earlier investigations of like-sign di-lepton final states, we include jets in the analysis of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, adding squark-gluino and gluino-pair production to squark-pair production. Moreover we expand the method towards model-independent analyses which cover more general scenarios. In all cases, squark decays to light charginos and neutralinos persist to play a dominant role.

  15. Holomorphic Yukawa couplings for complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesneag, Stefan; Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Lukas, Andre

    2017-01-01

    We develop methods to compute holomorphic Yukawa couplings for heterotic compactifications on complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds, generalising results of an earlier paper for Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces. Our methods are based on constructing the required bundle-valued forms explicitly and evaluating the relevant integrals over the projective ambient space. We also show how our approach relates to an earlier, algebraic one to calculate the holomorphic Yukawa couplings. A vanishing theorem, which we prove, implies that certain Yukawa couplings allowed by low-energy symmetries are zero due to topological reasons. To illustrate our methods, we calculate Yukawa couplings for SU(5)-based standard models on a co-dimension two complete intersection manifold.

  16. Masses of third family vectorlike quarks and leptons in Yukawa-unified E6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, Aditya; Leontaris, George K.; Shafi, Qaisar

    2016-06-01

    In supersymmetric E6 the masses of the third family quarks and charged lepton, t -b -τ , as well as the masses of the vectorlike quarks and leptons, D -D ¯ and L -L ¯, may arise from the coupling 2 73×2 73×2 7H, where 2 73 and 2 7H denote the third family matter and Higgs multiplets, respectively. We assume that the SO(10) singlet component in 2 7H acquires a TeV-scale vacuum expectation value that spontaneously breaks U (1 )ψ and provides masses to the vectorlike particles in 2 73, while the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model doublets in 2 7H provide masses to t , b , and τ . Imposing Yukawa coupling unification ht=hb=hτ=hD=hL at MGUT and employing the ATLAS and CMS constraints on the Zψ' boson mass, we estimate the lower bounds on the third family vectorlike particles D -D ¯ and L -L ¯ masses to be around 5.85 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively. These bounds apply in the supersymmetric limit.

  17. Scalar decay constant and Yukawa coupling in walking gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2011-05-01

    We propose an approach for the calculation of the Yukawa coupling through the scalar decay constant and the chiral condensate in the context of the extended technicolor . We perform the nonperturbative computation of the Yukawa coupling based on the improved ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation. It turns out that the Yukawa coupling can be larger or smaller than the standard model value, depending on the number N{sub D} of the weak doublets for each technicolor (TC) index. It is thus nontrivial whether or not the huge enhancement of the production of the scalar via the gluon fusion takes place even for a walking TC model with a colored techni-fermion. For the typical one-family TC model near conformality, it is found that the Yukawa coupling is slightly larger than the standard model one, where the expected mass of the scalar bound state is around 500 GeV. In this case, the production cross section via the gluon fusion is considerably enhanced, as naively expected, and hence such a scalar can be discovered/excluded at the early stage of the LHC.

  18. Practical thermodynamics of Yukawa systems at strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Kryuchkov, Nikita P.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2015-05-21

    Simple practical approach to estimate thermodynamic properties of strongly coupled Yukawa systems, in both fluid and solid phases, is presented. The accuracy of the approach is tested by extensive comparison with direct computer simulation results (for fluids and solids) and the recently proposed shortest-graph method (for solids). Possible applications to other systems of softly repulsive particles are briefly discussed.

  19. Nonlinear mode coupling and vibrational energy transfer in Yukawa clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling and the subsequent vibrational energy transfer that results is an important topic in chemical physics research, ranging from small molecules consisting of several atoms to macromolecules such as those found in proteins and DNA. Nonlinear mode coupling is recognized as the mechanism leading to ergodicity, which is a foundational tenet of statistical mechanics. Over the past two decades, Yukawa systems of particles such as those found in complex plasma, have been shown to be an effective model across a large number of physical systems. In this research, nonlinear mode coupling in Yukawa clusters consisting of 3-10 particles is examined via numerical simulation of the vibrational energy transfer between modes starting from an initial excited state. The relationship between the energy transfer process and the internal resonance between modes having a specified frequency ratio and the temporal evolution of the system to a state of equal energy across all modes, i.e., the state of ergodicity, will be discussed. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Unified minimal supersymmetric model with large Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Rattazzi, R.; Sarid, U.

    1996-02-01

    The consequences of assuming the third-generation Yukawa couplings are all large and comparable are studied in the context of the minimal sypersymmetric extension of the standard model. General aspects of the RG evolution of the parameters, theoretical constraints needed to ensure proper electroweak symmetry breaking, and experimental and cosmological bounds on low-energy parameters are presented. We also present complete and exact semianalytic solutions to the one-loop RG equations. Focusing on SU(5) or SO(10) unification, we analyze the relationship between the top and bottom masses and the superspectrum, and the phenomenological implications of the GUT conditions on scalar masses. Future experimental measurements of the superspectrum and of the strong coupling will distinguish between various GUT-scale scenarios. And if present experimental knowledge is to be accounted for most naturally, a particular set of predictions is singled out. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  2. Aspect of Fermion Mass Hierarchy within Flavor Democracy for Yukawa Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Katsuichi; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    We discuss the fermion mass hierarchy by including vector-like fermions which are accommodated in E6 GUTs within flavor democracy for Yukawa couplings. In this framework, all Yukawa couplings for the standard Higgs doublet have the same strength, and all Yukawa couplings for the singlet Higgs have the same strength (New ansatz). In addition, singlet Higgs and right-handed neutrinos exist. Under this condition, the mass hierarchy mt ≫ mb ˜ mτ as well as mt ≫ mc, mu can be naturally explained.

  3. Results from a strong-coupling expansion for a lattice Yukawa model with a real scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Shrock, R.E. )

    1991-01-15

    Results are presented from a strong bare Yukawa coupling expansion for a lattice Yukawa theory with a real scalar field. It is found that the effective action involves competing interactions, consistent with the existence of a ferrimagnetic phase at intermediate Yukawa coupling {ital y}. We also give evidence that the (bosonic) continuum theory defined at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase boundary at large {ital y} is free.

  4. Flavor constraints on two-Higgs-doublet models with general diagonal Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoudi, F.

    2010-02-01

    We consider constraints from flavor physics on two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) with general, flavor-diagonal, Yukawa couplings. Analyzing the charged Higgs contribution to different observables, we find that b{yields}s{gamma} transitions and {Delta}M{sub B{sub d}} restrict the coupling {lambda}{sub tt} of the top quark (corresponding to cot{beta} in models with a Z{sub 2} symmetry) to |{lambda}{sub tt}|<1 for m{sub H}{sup +} < or approx. 500 GeV. Stringent constraints from B meson decays are obtained also on the other third generation couplings {lambda}{sub bb} and {lambda}{sub {tau}{tau},} but with stronger dependence on m{sub H}{sup +}. For the second generation, we obtain constraints on combinations of {lambda}{sub ss}, {lambda}{sub cc}, and {lambda}{sub {mu}{mu}}from leptonic K and D{sub s} decays. The limits on the general couplings are translated to the common 2HDM types I-IV with a Z{sub 2} symmetry, and presented on the (m{sub H}{sup +},tan{beta}) plane. The flavor constraints are most excluding in the type II model which lacks a decoupling limit in tan{beta}. We obtain a lower limit m{sub H}{sup +} > or approx. 300 GeV in models of type II and III, while no lower bound on m{sub H}{sup +} is found for types I and IV.

  5. Radiative Yukawa couplings in the simplest left-right symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Emidio; Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2017-02-01

    We revisit a recent solution to the flavor hierarchy problem based on the paradigm that Yukawa couplings are, rather than fundamental constants, effective low energy couplings radiatively generated by interactions in a hidden sector of the theory. In the present paper we show that the setup required by this scenario can be set by gauge invariance alone, provided that the standard model gauge group be extended to the left-right symmetric group of S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )Y. The simplest scheme in which Yukawa couplings are forbidden at the tree-level organises the right-handed fermions into doublets and presents an additional Higgs S U (2 )R doublet, responsible for the spontaneous breaking of the S U (2 )R gauge sector. The flavor and chiral symmetry breaking induced by the S U (2 )R breaking is transferred at the one-loop level to the standard model via the dynamics of the hidden sector, which effectively regulates the spread of the effective Yukawa couplings. The emerging left-right symmetric framework recovers additional appealing features typical of these models, allowing for instance to identify the hypercharges of the involved fermions with their B -L charges and offering a straightforward solution to the strong C P problem. The scheme gives rise to a distinguishing phenomenology that potentially can be tested at the LHC and future colliders through the same interactions that result in the radiative generation of Yukawa couplings, as well as by exploiting the properties of the additional S U (2 )R Higgs doublet.

  6. Blowup results for the KGS system with higher order Yukawa coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Qi-Hong; Li, Wan-Tong; Wang, Shu

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the Klein-Gordon-Schrödinger (KGS) system with higher order Yukawa coupling in spatial dimensions N ≥ 3. We establish a perturbed virial type identity and prove blowup results relied on Lyapunov functionals for KGS system with a negative energy level. Additionally, we give a result with respect to the blowup rate in finite time for the radial solution in 3 spatial dimensions.

  7. Three-loop Standard Model effective potential at leading order in strong and top Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2014-01-08

    I find the three-loop contribution to the effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field, in the approximation that the strong and top Yukawa couplings are large compared to all other couplings, using dimensional regularization with modified minimal subtraction. Checks follow from gauge invariance and renormalization group invariance. I also briefly comment on the special problems posed by Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential, and on the numerical impact of the result on the relations between the Higgs vacuum expectation value, mass, and self-interaction coupling.

  8. Vortical flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids under external forcing - A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Rajaraman; Charan, Harish

    2016-07-01

    Understanding vortical flows under external forcing in two dimensional (2D) fluids is a fundamental paradigm for structure formation in driven, dissipative systems. Considering Yukawa liquid as a prototype for strongly correlated or strongly coupled plasmas characterized by coupling strength (Γ, the ratio of average potential to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter (κ, ratio of mean inter-particle distance to shielding length), we address two important problems: 1. Onset of Rayleigh Benard convection cell (RBCC) in 2D Yukawa liquids subject to gravity and external temperature gradient 2. Onset of von Karman vortices in 2D Yukawa liquid under external pressure head, using large scale, first principles molecular dynamics simulations. For typical values of (Γ,κ), existence of a critical external temperature difference is demonstrated, beyond which RBCC are seen to set in. Beyond this critical external temperature difference, the strength of the maximum convective flow velocity is shown to exhibit a new, hitherto unsuspected linear relationship with external temperature difference and with a slope independent of (Γ,κ). The time taken for the transients to settle down to a steady state RBCC τ_s, is found to be maximum close to the above said critical external temperature difference and is seen to reduce with increasing external temperature difference. For the range of values of (Γ, κ) considered here, τ_s ≃ 10 000-20 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, where ω_{pd} is dust plasma frequency. As Γ is increased to very high values, due to strong coupling effects, RBC cells are seen to be in a transient state without attaining a steady state for as long as 100 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, even for a very high external temperature difference. In the second part, we address the existence of universal relation between Strouhal (St) and Rayleigh (Ry) numbers for Yukawa liquid using first principles based classical molecular dynamics. The flow past an obstacle is seen to indeed

  9. Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa liquid: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2015-10-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flows in liquids remains a problem of great interest despite decades of intensive research. Here, we report an atomistic study of this transition in a model Yukawa liquid using molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from an thermally equilibrated Yukawa liquid, for a given value of coupling parameter Γ (defined as ratio of potential energy to kinetic energy per particle) and screening length κ, a subsonic flow of magnitude U0 is superposed and transition to an unstable regime is observed eventually leading to turbulent flow at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. We have performed a parametric study for a range of Reynolds number R and found that the flow is neutrally stable for R Rc(Γ) , where Rc is the critical value of Reynolds number. Strong molecular shear heating is observed in all cases studied here. It is found that the coupling parameter Γ decreases because of molecular shear heating on a time scale comparable to the instability time scale. Irrespective of the initial value of coupling parameter Γ, the average heating rate is found to be sensitive to the ratio of equilibrium flow speed to the thermal speed, say, α=U/0 vt h , where vt h=√{2/Γ } . Our results reported here are expected to be generic and should apply to a wide variety of strongly coupled systems such as laboratory dusty plasma, molten salts, and charged colloidal systems.

  10. Unitarity constraints for Yukawa couplings in the two-Higgs-doublet model type III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Andrés; Diaz, Rodolfo A.; Morales, Jhon

    2014-06-01

    Unitarity constraints for Yukawa couplings are considered in the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model type III, by using a general expansion in partial waves for fermionic scattering processes. Constraints over general Flavor Changing Neutral Currents are found from that systematic, wherein such bounds compete with those coming from Lagrangian perturbativity requirement but are weaker than those imposed from phenomenological processes and precision tests. Nevertheless, for bounds based on unitarity, the number of assumptions is the lowest among phenomenological and theoretical limits. Indeed, these new theoretical constraints are independent of scalar masses or mixing angles for this extended Higgs sector, making them less model dependent.

  11. Do we have the Explanation for the Families and Their Properties, for the Higgs and Yukawa Couplings, for the Gauge Vector Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoč Borštnik, Norma Susana

    2015-03-01

    Most physicists declare the Higgs as the last missing particle to be confirmed. But can this at all be true? Shouldn't we understand the origin of families before being able to understand the origin of the Yukawa couplings, for the explanation of which additional scalar fields are needed? The spin-charge-family theory is offering a possible explanation for the origin of families, for several scalar fields manifesting effectively at low energies as the Higgs and the Yukawa couplings, for the fact that the scalar fields are doublets with respect to the weak charge, while they are triplets with respect to the family groups, and also for other assumptions of the standard model. The theory predicts at the observable regime two decoupled groups of four families. The fourth family, coupled to the measured three, will be observed at the LHC. The fifth family is explaining the dark matter. The accuracy with which the fourth family masses can in this theory be predicted depends strongly on the accuracy with which the mixing 3 × 3 sub matrices of the quark and lepton mixing matrices are measured.

  12. Quark dynamics and pion-nucleon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, W.; Werner, E.

    1981-05-01

    In the framework of nonperturbative QCD phenomenology we discuss: (1) The elementary process for the creation of color-singlet qq-pairs inside a hadron. (2) The interaction of the qq-pair with the surrounding quark-gluon medium. An important consequence of these discussions is that meson emission takes place preferentially, if the primary qq-pair is created in the surface region of the hadron. For the case of pseudoscalar coupling we employ PCAC to obtain the coupling of the qq-pair to the pion. The resulting form and coupling strength of the πNN vertex is consistent with the phenomenological OPEP.

  13. Yukawa couplings in SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) Y orbifold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, J. A.; Muñoz, C.

    1988-09-01

    We analyze the Yukawa couplings of the first SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) Y orbifold models recently obtained. In these models the rank is naturally lowered due to the presence of a Fayet-Iliopoulos term associated with an “anomalous” U(1) in the four-dimensional theory. It is shown that the phenomenological viability of the models selects a favoured class of vacua. In particular, for the specific examples considered, some twisted fields with one moded oscillator acting, must acquire non-vanishing VEVs. However other possibilities may exist. We also find that all the baryon and lepton violating operators can be, in general, avoided in a completely natural way.

  14. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standard deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  15. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standardmore » deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.« less

  16. Vacuum polarization corrections to low energy quark effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Ademar; Braghin, Fabio L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work corrections to low energy punctual effective quark couplings up to the eighth order are calculated by considering vacuum polarization effects with the scalar quark-antiquark condensate. The departing point is a QCD-based Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. By separating the quark field into two components, one that condenses and another one for interacting quarks, the former is integrated out with the help of usual auxiliary fields and an effective action in terms of interacting quark fields is found. The scalar auxiliary field reduces to the quark-antiquark condensate in the vacuum and the determinant is expanded in powers of the quark-antiquark bilinears generating chiral invariant effective 2N-quark interactions (N =2,3…). The corresponding coupling constants and effective masses are estimated, and the general trend is that for increasing the effective gluon mass the values of the effective coupling constants decrease. All the values are in good agreement with phenomenological fits.

  17. Heavy quark potential from QCD-related effective coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; González, Pedro; Vento, Vicente

    2016-12-01

    We implement our past investigations of quark-antiquark interaction through a non-perturbative running coupling defined in terms of a gluon mass function, similar to that used in some Schwinger-Dyson approaches. This coupling leads to a quark-antiquark potential, which satisfies not only asymptotic freedom but also describes linear confinement correctly. From this potential, we calculate the bottomonium and charmonium spectra below the first open flavor meson-meson thresholds and show that for a small range of values of the free parameter determining the gluon mass function an excellent agreement with data is attained.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of flow past an obstacle in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2016-12-01

    Turbulence is one of the outstanding open problems. Fluid flow past an obstacle is simplest of all paradigms to understand the transition to turbulence. For Navier-Stokes liquids, a transition to turbulence is fully governed by Reynolds number (Re). Using classical molecular dynamics simulation of particles interacting via a Yukawa-type interaction, it is demonstrated unequivocally that for a given Re, the transition from laminar to turbulent flow is controlled by strength and range of inter-particle potential. For a wide range of inter-particle interaction strengths and ranges, our simulation data are seen to collapse onto a universal Strouhal-Reynolds curve with new asymptotic values for a range of Re, 2 ≤ Re ≤ 35. From the emergence of vortex street structures behind the obstacle, it is evident that the onset of turbulence is possible at low Re in Yukawa liquids. Growth rates of the instability are obtained using atomistic calculations and are observed to increase quadratically with low values of Re.

  19. Sizes and couplings of composite leptons, quarks and W bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F. M.

    1984-08-01

    We assume that leptons and quarks are much smaller objects than W bosons (Λl, q≅3.6 TeV; ΛW≅MW). This expl ains the weakness of W couplings to leptons and quarks (as opposed to strong couplings required by radiative Z0 decays), the strength of sin2θW and the present absence of direct lepton and quark substructure effects. We also define a relativistic description of W substructure which should replace the usual non-relativistic wave function and allow better estimates of several processes. Physique Mathématique et Théorique, Equipe de Recherche Associée au CNRS.

  20. Determination of the quark coupling strength |Vub| using baryonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Mohr, R. Casanova; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; de Bruyn, K.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Silva, W.; de Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; di Canto, A.; di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Pardiñas, J. García; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rodrigues, B. Osorio; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the strength of the couplings of the b quark to the u and c quarks, |Vub| and |Vcb|, are governed by the coupling of the quarks to the Higgs boson. Using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, the probability for the Λb0 baryon to decay into the p final state relative to the final state is measured. Combined with theoretical calculations of the strong interaction and a previously measured value of |Vcb|, the first |Vub| measurement to use a baryonic decay is performed. This measurement is consistent with previous determinations of |Vub| using B meson decays to specific final states and confirms the existing incompatibility with those using an inclusive sample of final states.

  1. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at √s = 1 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improves to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.

  2. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at √s = 1 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; ...

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improvesmore » to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.« less

  3. Quark-meson coupling model with the cloudy bag

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, S.; Miyatsu, T.; Saito, Kenji; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2008-07-01

    Using the volume coupling version of the cloudy bag model, the quark-meson coupling model is extended to study the role of pion field and the properties of nuclear matter. The extended model includes the effect of gluon exchange as well as the pion-cloud effect, and provides a good description of the nuclear matter properties. The relationship between the extended model and the EFT approach to nuclear matter is also discussed.

  4. Textures of Yukawa coupling matrices in the 2HDM type III

    SciTech Connect

    Carcamo, A. E.; Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis

    2008-07-02

    The quark mass matrices ansatze proposed by Fritzsch, Du-Xing and Fukuyama-Nishiura in the framework of the general two Higgs doublet model are studied. The corresponding Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements are computed in all cases and compared with their experimental values. The complex phases of the anstaze are taken into account and the CP violating phase {delta} is computed. Finally some phenomenology is discussed.

  5. Search for anomalous top-quark couplings with the D0 detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-03-06

    Anomalous Wtb couplings modify the angular correlations of the top-quark decay products and change the single top-quark production cross section. We present limits on anomalous top-quark couplings by combining information from W boson helicity measurements in top-quark decays and anomalous coupling searches in the single top-quark final state. We set limits on right-handed vector couplings as well as left-handed and right-handed tensor couplings based on about 1 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment.

  6. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-11-28

    In 0.9 fb(-1) of pp[over] collisions, the D0 Collaboration presented evidence for single top quark production in events with an isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum, and two to four jets. We examine these data to study the Lorentz structure of the Wtb coupling. The standard model predicts a left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex. The most general lowest dimension, CP-conserving Lagrangian admits right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We find that the data prefer the left-handed vector coupling and set upper limits on the anomalous couplings. These are the first direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction and the first direct limits on left- and right-handed tensor couplings.

  7. Nonperturbative Quark Mass and Coupling Renormalization in Two Flavor QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Thomas Charles

    1995-01-01

    Nonperturbative bare quark mass and coupling renormalization is studied for two flavor quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the beta function for the case of Kogut-Susskind quarks is determined over the parameter space of existing lattice (spectrum) simulations from the existing spectrum data. This beta function is combined with a series of finite temperature lattice simulations (N_{t} = 4 ) to calculate the interaction measure, varepsilon-3p, which together with the pressure yields the thermal equation of state. A method of computing the asymmetry, or Karsch, coefficients, is also given. These coefficients give the parameter renormalizations for anisotropic lattices. However, for the three points in parameter space that we studied (one using Wilson fermions and two using Kogut-Susskind fermions), a clear determination of the asymmetry coefficients could not be made because of the remarkable fact that ratios of masses measured in different directions on lattices with anisotropic couplings were Euclidean invariant.

  8. Hyperon stars in a modified quark meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. N.; Sahoo, H. S.; Panda, P. K.; Barik, N.; Frederico, T.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter with the inclusion of hyperons in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a baryon is represented by a phenomenological average potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The hadron-hadron interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ ,ω , and ρ mesons through mean-field approximations. The effect of a nonlinear ω -ρ term on the EOS is studied. The hyperon couplings are fixed from the optical potential values and the mass-radius curve is determined satisfying the maximum mass constraint of 2 M⊙ for neutron stars, as determined in recent measurements of the pulsar PSR J0348+0432. We also observe that there is no significant advantage of introducing the nonlinear ω -ρ term in the context of obtaining the star mass constraint in the present set of parametrizations.

  9. Quark Gluon Plasma: Surprises from strongly coupled QCD matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics has long predicted a transition from normal hadronic matter to a phase where the quarks and gluons are no longer bound together and can move freely. Quark gluon plasma is now produced regularly in collisions of heavy nuclei at very high energy at both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the U.S. and at the LHC in Europe. Quark gluon plasma exhibits remarkable properties. Its vanishingly small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio means that it flows essentially without internal friction, making it one of the most ``perfect'' liquids known. It is also very opaque to transiting particles including heavy charm quarks, though the exact mechanism for this is not yet understood. Recent data suggest that even very small colliding systems may produce a droplet of plasma. The similarities to strongly coupled or correlated systems in ultra-cold atoms and condensed matter are striking, and have inspired novel theoretical descriptions growing out of string theory. It remains a mystery how this plasma emerges from cold, dense gluonic matter deep inside nuclei. I will discuss how a future electron-ion collider can help address this question.

  10. B*Bπ coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J. M.; Fritzsch, P.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Samways, B.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2016-01-27

    We report on a calculation of the B*Bπ coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element (Bπ|B*) is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMΧPT) for B mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order |pa| and (ma)n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of a–1 = 1.729(25) GeV, a–1 = 2.281 (28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HMΧPT coupling gb = 0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. Furthermore, this is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.

  11. B*Bπ coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Flynn, J. M.; Fritzsch, P.; Kawanai, T.; ...

    2016-01-27

    We report on a calculation of the B*Bπ coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element (Bπ|B*) is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMΧPT) for B mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order |p→a| and (ma)n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of a–1 = 1.729(25) GeV, a–1 = 2.281 (28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down tomore » 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HMΧPT coupling gb = 0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. Furthermore, this is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.« less

  12. Special symmetric quark mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Marcos, J. I.

    1998-12-01

    We give a procedure to construct a special class of symmetric quark mass matrices near the democratic limit of equal Yukawa couplings for each sector. It is shown that within appropriate weak-bases, the requirements of symmetry and arg[det(M)]=0 are very strong conditions, that necessarily lead to a Cabibbo angle given by Vus=sqrt(md/ms), and to Vcb~ms/mb, in first order. In addition, we prove that the recently classified ansätze, which also reproduce these mixing matrix relations, and which were based on the hypothesis of the Universal Strength for Yukawa couplings, where all Yukawa couplings have equal moduli while the flavour dependence is only in their phases, are, in fact, particular cases of the generalized symmetric quark mass matrix ansätze we construct here. In an excellent numerical example, the experimental values on all quark mixings and masses are accommodated, and the CP violation phase parameter is shown to be crucially dependent on the values of mu and Vus.

  13. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  14. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-15

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  15. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  16. Quark flavour conserving violations of the lepton number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Dudas, E.; Lavignac, S.; Savoy, C. A.

    1998-03-01

    We study supersymmetric models of lepton and baryon number violation based on an abelian family gauge group. Due to possible lepton-Higgs mixing, the lepton violating couplings are related to the Yukawa couplings and may be generated by them even if they were absent in the original theory. Such terms may be dominant and are not given by the naive family charge counting rules. This enhancement mechanism can provide an alignment between lepton-number violating terms and Yukawa couplings: as a result they conserve quark flavour. A natural way of suppressing baryon number violation in this class of models is also proposed.

  17. Yukawa unification: The good, the bad, and the ugly

    SciTech Connect

    Rattazzi, R.; Sarid, U.; Hall, L.J.

    1993-05-01

    We analyze some consequences of grand unification of the third-generation Yukawa couplings, in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We address two issues: the prediction of the top quark mass, and the generation of the top-bottom mass hierarchy through a hierarchy of Higgs vacuum expectation values. The top mass is strongly dependent on a certain ratio of superpartner masses. And the VEV hierarchy always entails some tuning of the GUT-scale parameters. We study the RG equations and their semi-analytic solutions, which exhibit several interesting features, such as a focusing effect for a large Yukawa coupling in the limit of certain symmetries and a correlation between the A terms (which contribute to b {yields} s{gamma}) and the gaugino masses. This study shows that non-universal soft-SUSY-breaking masses are favored (in particular for splitting the Higgs-doublets via D-terms and for allowing more natural scenarios of symmetry breaking), and hints at features desired in Yukawa-unified models. Several phenomenological implications are also revealed.

  18. Lepton flavor non-universality in B decays from dynamical Yukawas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Fuentes-Martín, Javier; Greljo, Admir; Isidori, Gino

    2017-03-01

    The basic features of quark and lepton mass matrices can be successfully explained by natural minima of a generic potential with dynamical Yukawa fields invariant under the [ SU (3) ] 5 × O (3) flavor symmetry. If this symmetry is gauged, in order to avoid potentially dangerous Goldstone bosons, and small perturbations are added to exactly fit the observed pattern of fermion masses, the spectrum of massive flavor gauge bosons can naturally explain the hints for new physics in b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions, including RK. In particular, the desired pattern of the Standard Model Yukawa couplings is compatible with a gauged U (1) q in the quark sector, and U (1) μ - τ in the lepton sector spontaneously broken around the TeV scale. In order to explain the aforementioned experimental hints, the corresponding neutral gauge bosons are required to mix, yielding to potentially observable signals in dimuon resonance searches at the LHC.

  19. Quark spectral density and a strongly-coupled quark-gluon plasma.

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Chang, L.; Liu, Y.; Roberts, C. D.

    2011-07-13

    The maximum entropy method is used to compute the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent numerical solution of a rainbow truncation of QCD's gap equation at temperatures above that for which chiral symmetry is restored. In addition to the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function also exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode for temperatures extending to 1.4-1.8 times the critical temperature, T{sub c}. In the neighborhood of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength and as long as this mode persists, the system may fairly be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  20. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model.

    PubMed

    Stone, J R; Guichon, P A M; Reinhard, P G; Thomas, A W

    2016-03-04

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter.

  1. Dynamical realization of democratic Yukawa matrices and alignment of A terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Omura, Yuji; Terao, Haruhiko

    2006-09-01

    We study realization of the democratic form of Yukawa matrices by infrared fixed points. We investigate renormalization-group flows of Yukawa couplings in models with a single Yukawa matrix for three families, and up and down-sector Yukawa matrices. It is found that each model has its certain pattern of renormalization-group flows of Yukawa matrices. We apply them to the charged lepton sector and quark sector, and examine in which situation our class of models can lead to realistic results for the mass ratios and mixing angles between the second and third families. We also study corresponding A-terms. The A-terms approach toward the universal form with no physical CP-violating phase. Thus, constraints due to various neutral flavor changing processes except for μ→eγ are found to be satisfied by this dynamics. In order to suppress the electric dipole moments as well as μ→eγ sufficiently, more alignment of the A-terms with some reason is required.

  2. Relativistic energy analysis for D-Dimensional Dirac equation with Eckart plus Hulthen central potential coupled by modified Yukawa tensor potential using Romanovski polynomial method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianawati, D. A.; Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.; Mohtar, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Romanovski Polynomial method was used to analyze D-dimensional Dirac equation with Eckart plus Hulthen central potential coupled by modified Yukawa tensor potential in the case of spin symmetry and pseudospin symmetry. By using parameter and variable substitution, the Dirac equation was reduced into one dimensional Schrodinger like equation with centrifugal approximation that can be solved using Romanovski polynomial. The D- dimensional relativistic energy are obtained from D-dimensional relativistic energy equation by using Matlab R2008b software. The relativistic energy spectra with dimensional variation were obtained.

  3. Particle production within the quark meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2009-07-15

    Quark-meson coupling (QMC) models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter. In the regime of hot hadronic matter very few calculations exist using the QMC model, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. In the present work, we identify the free energy of the bag with the effective mass of the baryons and we calculate the particle production yields on a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with the QMC model and compare them with results obtained previously with other relativistic models. A smaller temperature for the fireball, T=132 MeV, is obtained because of the smaller effective baryon masses predicted by QMC. QMC was also applied to the description of particle yields at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in Pb+Pb collisions.

  4. Renormalization Group Analysis of Yukawa Parameters with One and Two Higgs Doublets, and Flavor Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, G.; Kim, C. S.

    We assume that the standard model (SM) breaks down around some energy Λ and is replaced there by a new (Higgsless) flavor gauge theory (FGT) with fewer input parameters in the interactions corresponding to the Yukawa sector of SM. This would imply more symmetry for the values of the Yukawa (running) parameters of SM at E Λ, possibly by a (approximate) flavor democracy (for the quark mass sector). We investigate this possibility by studying the renormalization group equations (RGE's) for the quark Yukawa couplings of SM with one and two Higgs doublets, by running them from the known physical values at low energies (E 1 GeV) to Λ (> 1 TeV) and comparing the resulting quark masses mq (E Λ) for various mt and υU/υD. Unlike previous investigations of these RGE's, we do not implement the requirement mt(Λpole) = ∞. We found that SM with two Higgs doublets (type 2) is most likely to experience a gradual transition to FGT. Our results also shed more light on the adequacy and deficiencies of the usual RGE approaches within TMSM and related models. We also found that, independent of the assumption of a transition mechanism to FGT, mt phy< ˜ 200 GeV for Λpole≪ ΛPlanck in most cases of SM with two Higgs doublets.

  5. Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, M.

    In these lectures I want to speak about at least two interpretations of the concept of quarks for hadrons and the possible relations between them. First I want to talk about quarks as "constituent quarks". These were used especially by G. Zweig (1964) who referred to them as aces. One has a sort of a simple model by which one gets elementary results about the low-lying bound and resonant states of mesons and baryons, and certain crude symmetry properties of these states, by saying that the hadrons act as if they were made up of subunits, the constituent quarks q. These quarks are arranged in an isotopic spin doublet u, d and an isotopic spin singlet s, which has the same charge as d and acts as if it had a slightly higher mass…

  6. Quarkonium in a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vairo, Antonio

    2010-12-22

    We report about a recent calculation of the heavy quarkonium mass and decay width in a quark-gluon plasma, whose temperature T and screening mass m{sub D} satisfy the hierarchy m{alpha}{sub s}>>T>>m{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}>>m{sub D}, m being the heavy-quark mass, up to order m{alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}. The calculation may be relevant to understand the behavior of the {Upsilon}(1S) in a quark-gluon plasma at present-day colliders.

  7. Quark masses and strong coupling constant in 2+1 flavor QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Maezawa, Y.; Petreczky, P.

    2016-08-30

    We present a determination of the strange, charm and bottom quark masses as well as the strong coupling constant in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD simulations using highly improved staggered quark action. The ratios of the charm quark mass to the strange quark mass and the bottom quark mass to the charm quark mass are obtained from the meson masses calculated on the lattice and found to be mc/ms = 11.877(91) and mb/mc = 4.528(57) in the continuum limit. We also determine the strong coupling constant and the charm quark mass using the moments of pseudoscalar charmonium correlators: αs(μ = mc)more » = 0.3697(85) and mc(μ = mc) = 1.267(12) GeV. Our result for αs corresponds to the determination of the strong coupling constant at the lowest energy scale so far and is translated to the value αs(μ = MZ, nf = 5) = 0.11622(84).« less

  8. Quark masses and strong coupling constant in 2+1 flavor QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Maezawa, Y.; Petreczky, P.

    2016-08-30

    We present a determination of the strange, charm and bottom quark masses as well as the strong coupling constant in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD simulations using highly improved staggered quark action. The ratios of the charm quark mass to the strange quark mass and the bottom quark mass to the charm quark mass are obtained from the meson masses calculated on the lattice and found to be mc/ms = 11.877(91) and mb/mc = 4.528(57) in the continuum limit. We also determine the strong coupling constant and the charm quark mass using the moments of pseudoscalar charmonium correlators: αs(μ = mc) = 0.3697(85) and mc(μ = mc) = 1.267(12) GeV. Our result for αs corresponds to the determination of the strong coupling constant at the lowest energy scale so far and is translated to the value αs(μ = MZ, nf = 5) = 0.11622(84).

  9. Quarkonium Suppression in a Strongly-Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairo, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    We compute the quarkonium nuclear modification factor in a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma for quarkonia that are S-wave Coulombic bound states. We perform the analysis in a non-relativistic effective field theory framework that is accurate at leading-order in the heavy-quark density expansion and at next-to-leading order in the multipole expansion. We write and solve the Lindblad equation for the heavy quark-antiquark density. Thermal mass shift, width and the Lindblad equation depend on only two non-perturbative parameters: the heavy-quark momentum diffusion coefficient and its dispersive counterpart. Finally, we provide preliminary numerical results for the nuclear modification factors of the 1 S and 2 S bottomonium states.

  10. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    DOE PAGES

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; ...

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO⊥ ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets nomore » contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO∥ come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon∥ ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive∥ ∝ αs(αseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥ >> κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.« less

  11. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  12. Towards a fully stringy computation of Yukawa couplings on non-factorized tori and non-abelian twist correlators (I): The classical solution and action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesando, Igor

    2016-09-01

    We consider the simplest possible setting of non-abelian twist fields which corresponds to SU (2) monodromies. We first review the theory of hypergeometric function and of the solutions of the most general Fuchsian second order equation with three singularities. Then we solve the problem of writing the general solution with prescribed U (2) monodromies. We use this result to compute the classical string solution corresponding to three D2 branes in R4. Despite the fact that the configuration is supersymmetric the classical string solution is not holomorphic. Using the equation of motion and not the KLT approach we give a very simple expression for the classical action of the string. We find that the classical action is not proportional to the area of the triangle determined by the branes intersection points since the solution is not holomorphic. Phenomenologically this means that the Yukawa couplings for these supersymmetric configurations on non-factorized tori are suppressed with respect to the factorized case.

  13. Nuclear symmetry energy in a modified quark-meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. N.; Sahoo, H. S.; Panda, P. K.; Barik, N.; Frederico, T.

    2015-10-01

    We study nuclear symmetry energy and the thermodynamic instabilities of asymmetric nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark-meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically averaged potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ ,ω , and ρ mesons through mean-field approximations. We find an analytic expression for the symmetry energy Esym as a function of its slope L . Our result establishes a linear correlation between L and Esym. We also analyze the constraint on neutron star radii in (p n ) matter with β equilibrium.

  14. Anisotropic heavy quark potential in strongly-coupled N =4 SYM theory in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, R.; Critelli, R.; Noronha, J.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we use the gauge/gravity duality to study the anisotropy in the heavy quark potential in strongly coupled N =4 super-Yang Mills (SYM) theory (both at zero and nonzero temperature) induced by a constant and uniform magnetic field B . At zero temperature, the inclusion of the magnetic field decreases the attractive force between heavy quarks with respect to its B =0 value and the force associated with the parallel potential is the least attractive force. We find that the same occurs at nonzero temperature and, thus, at least in the case of strongly coupled N =4 SYM, the presence of a magnetic field generally weakens the interaction between heavy quarks in the plasma.

  15. Radial oscillations of quark stars with strongly coupled QGP in the interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadas, Sineeba; Bannur, Vishnu. M.

    2013-08-01

    The radial oscillations of quark stars are analysed using the recently developed strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (SCQGP) equation of state. This EOS describes the intermediate to strongly coupled phase of deconfined cold quark matter wherein the chiral symmetry has not yet been restored. By integrating the Chandrasekhar eigenequation governing the radial modes we obtain the periods for the fundamental and first overtone, which are plotted for different values of the confining parameter—the bag constant ( B)—pertaining to the equation of state. The eigenfunctions of some of the normal modes are also plotted and analysed. It is found that for lower mass quark stars the oscillation periods are typically of the order of one tenth of a millisecond and has negligible dependence on the bag parameter. For medium and higher mass stars a variation of pulsation period with change in the bag constant is seen—the period increases with increase in B. Comparing with strange stars composed of non-interacting quarks we see that the corresponding pulsation periods show considerable difference throughout the entire range of stellar masses with the difference increasing with decrease in B value (increasing stiffness) for the SCQGP equation of state. Finally we study the damping of small amplitude radial pulsations via non-equilibrium processes. We derive the corresponding neutrino emissivities in the SCQGP case and present the resulting temporal evolution of pulsation energies.

  16. Pentaquarks in the medium in the quark-meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P.K.; Providencia, C.; Menezes, D.P.

    2005-11-01

    We calculate the properties of the pentaquarks {theta}{sup +} and {xi}{sup --,0} in symmetric nuclear matter using the quark-meson coupling model (QMC). The stability of the {theta}{sup +} in the medium with respect to the channel {theta}{sup +}{yields}NK{sup +} is discussed.

  17. Manifestation of sea quark effects in the strong coupling constant in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Ishizuka, N.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Onogi, T.; Ukawa, A. Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University , Kyoto 606 Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 724 Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu 400 National Laboratory for High Energy Physics , Ibaraki 305 )

    1995-01-02

    We demonstrate that sea quark effects of a magnitude expected from renormalization group considerations are clearly visible in the strong coupling constant measured in current full QCD simulations. Building on this result an estimate of [alpha] (5)/MS ([ital M][sub [ital Z

  18. Kaon condensation in the quark-meson coupling model and compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, D.P.; Panda, P.K.; Providencia, C.

    2005-09-01

    The properties of neutron stars, consisting of a crust of hadrons and an internal part of hadrons and kaon condensate, are calculated within the quark-meson-coupling model. We considered stars with nucleons only in the hadron phase and also stars with hyperons as well. The results are compared with the ones obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model for the hadronic phase.

  19. Modeling strongly coupled quark gluon plasmas: hydro vs transport vs general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulassy, Miklos

    2008-04-01

    The discovery of near perfect fluid flow and very high jet opacity in nuclear collisions at 200 AGeV at RHIC/BNL have challenged traditional weak coupling perturbative QCD modeling of quark gluon plasmas. A critical assessment of current theoretical uncertainties facing competing approaches based on relativistic hydrodynamics, quasi-parton transport dynamics, and novel string theory inspired general relativity modeling will be presented. Special focus will be on identified (charm and bottom) heavy quark jets that will serve as powerful probes in upcoming RHIC and LHC experiments to better constrain the initial conditions as well as energy loss mechanisms leading to rapid equilibration in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions.

  20. Top-quark mass coupling and classification of weakly coupled heterotic superstring vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizos, J.

    2014-06-01

    The quest for the Standard Model among the huge number of string vacua is usually based on a set of phenomenological criteria related to the massless spectrum of string models. In this work we study criteria associated with interactions in the effective low energy theory and in particular with the presence of the coupling that provides mass to the top quark. Working in the context of the free-fermionic formulation of the heterotic superstring, we demonstrate that, in a big class of phenomenologically promising compactifications, these criteria can be expressed entirely in terms of the generalised GSO projection coefficients entering the definition of the models. They are shown to be very efficient in identifying phenomenologically viable vacua, especially in the framework of computer-based search, as they are met by approximately one every models. We apply our results in the investigation of a class of supersymmetric Pati-Salam vacua, comprising configurations, and we show that when combined with other phenomenological requirements they lead to a relatively small set of about Standard Model compatible models that can be fully classified.

  1. Probing electroweak top quark couplings at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, U.; Juste, A.; Orr, L.H.; Rainwater, D.

    2005-03-01

    We consider QCD tt{gamma} and ttZ production at hadron colliders as a tool to measure the tt{gamma} and ttZ couplings. At the Tevatron it may be possible to perform a first, albeit not very precise, test of the tt{gamma} vector and axial vector couplings in tt{gamma} production, provided that more than 5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are accumulated. The ttZ cross section at the Tevatron is too small to be observable. At the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) it will be possible to probe the tt{gamma} couplings at the few-percent level, which approaches the precision which one hopes to achieve with a next-generation e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider. The LHC's capability of associated QCD ttV (V={gamma},Z) production has the added advantage that the tt{gamma} and ttZ couplings are not entangled. For an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1}, the ttZ vector (axial vector) coupling can be determined with an uncertainty of 45-85% (15-20%), whereas the dimension-five dipole form factors can be measured with a precision of 50-55%. The achievable limits improve typically by a factor of 2-3 for the luminosity-upgraded (3 ab{sup -1}) LHC.

  2. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ and κ, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ gets no contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive ∝ αsseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ >> κ, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.

  3. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. I. Model and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Boris A.; Shuryak, Edward V.; Zahed, Ismail

    2006-10-01

    We propose a model for the description of strongly interacting quarks and gluon quasiparticles at T=(1-3)Tc as a classical and nonrelativistic colored Coulomb gas. The sign and strength of the interparticle interactions are fixed by the scalar product of their classical color vectors subject to Wong's equations. The model displays a number of phases as the Coulomb coupling is increased ranging from a gas, to a liquid, to a crystal with antiferromagnetic-like color ordering. We analyze the model using molecular dynamics simulations and discuss the density-density correlator in real time. We extract pertinent decorrelation times, diffusion, and viscosity constants for all phases. The classical results when extrapolated to the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma suggest that the phase is liquid-like, with a diffusion constant D≈0.1/T and a shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s≈1/3.

  4. Biography of Hideki Yukawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Humitaka

    2008-06-01

    Life history of Hideki Yukawa is described, together with that of Sin-itiro Tomonaga. They grew upiin Kyoto city and were classmate. Their independency and collaboration had contributed to the growth of physics research in Japan after the end of WWII.

  5. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  6. Scalar correlator, Higgs decay into quarks, and scheme variations of the QCD coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamin, Matthias; Miravitllas, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the perturbative QCD series of the scalar correlation function Ψ( s) is investigated. Besides ImΨ( s), which is relevant for Higgs decay into quarks, two other physical correlators, Ψ'' ( s) and D L ( s), have been employed in QCD applications like quark mass determinations or hadronic τ decays. D L ( s) suffers from large higher-order corrections and, by resorting to the large- β 0 approximation, it is shown that this is related to a spurious renormalon ambiguity at u = 1. Hence, this correlator should be avoided in phenomenological analyses. Moreover, it turns out advantageous to express the quark mass factor, introduced to make the scalar current renormalisation group invariant, in terms of the renormalisation invariant quark mass {widehat{m}}_q .To further study the behaviour of the perturbative expansion, we introduce a QCD coupling {widehat{α}}_s , whose running is explicitly renormalisation scheme independent. The scheme dependence of {widehat{α}}_s is parametrised by a single parameter C, being related to transformations of the QCD scale parameter Λ. It is demonstrated that appropriate choices of C lead to a substantial improvement in the behaviour of the perturbative series for Ψ'' ( s) and ImΨ( s).

  7. Search for heavy vector-like quarks coupling to light quarks in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Böser, S.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.

    2012-05-01

    This Letter presents a search for singly produced vector-like quarks, Q, coupling to light quarks, q. The search is sensitive to both charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) processes, pp → Qq → Wqq‧ and pp → Qq → Zqq‧ with a leptonic decay of the vector gauge boson. In 1.04 fb-1 of data taken in 2011 by the ATLAS experiment at a center-of-mass energy √{ s} = 7 TeV, no evidence of such heavy vector-like quarks is observed above the expected Standard Model background. Limits on the heavy vector-like quark production cross section times branching ratio as a function of mass mQ are obtained. For a coupling κqQ = v /mQ, where v is the Higgs vacuum expectation value, 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of a vector-like quark are set at 900 GeV and 760 GeV from CC and NC processes, respectively.

  8. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  9. Nuclear matter in nontopological soliton models with quark-meson coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnea, Nir; Walhout, Timothy S.

    2000-09-01

    A system of nontopological solitons interacting through meson exchange is used to model dense nuclear matter. The models studied are of the Friedberg-Lee type, which exhibit dynamical bag formation due to the coupling of quarks to a scalar composite gluon field σ. It is shown in the Wigner-Seitz approximation that the high density behavior of such models depends essentially on the leading power of the quark- σ coupling vertex. By insisting that the parameters of any soliton model be chosen to reproduce single nucleon properties, this high-density behavior then selects a promising class of models that better fit the empirical results — the chiral chromodielectric models. The presence of a scalar meson is shown to provide saturation as well as an increase of the proton charge radius with nuclear density. We go beyond the usual Wigner-Seitz approximation by introducing the disorder necessary to reproduce the liquid state, using the significant structure theory of physical chemistry. We study nuclear matter, with particular interest in the transition to a quark plasma, showing that even the simplest version of the model provides a reasonable qualitative fit to both the empirical nuclear matter equation of state and single nucleon properties.

  10. Stable strange quark matter objects with running masses and coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Cheng-Jun; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2017-03-01

    We improve our recently proposed unified description for strange quark matter (SQM) objects, in the way that analytical expressions are derived and used to calculate the distribution of particles inside an SQM object. In the improved model, the computational time is greatly reduced without losing accuracy. The properties of SQM objects are then investigated by adopting perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) with running quark masses and coupling constant. Aside from the increase of masses and radii of strange stars, it is found that the perturbative interactions also make the electric field on the surface stronger and extends deeper into the core, while small SQM objects become less compact and more positively charged. These may affect the experimental searches of SQM.

  11. Higgs boson couplings in multi-doublet models with natural flavour conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagyu, Kei

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the deviation in the couplings of the standard model (SM) like Higgs boson (h) with a mass of 125 GeV from the prediction of the SM in multi-doublet models within the framework where flavour changing neutral currents at the tree level are naturally forbidden. After we present the general expressions for the modified gauge and Yukawa couplings for h, we show the correlation between the deviation in the Yukawa coupling for the tau lepton hτ+τ- and that for the bottom quark hb b bar under the assumption of a non-zero deviation in the hVV (V = W , Z) couplings in two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) and three Higgs doublet models (3HDMs) as simple examples. We clarify the possible allowed prediction of the deviations in the 3HDMs which cannot be explained in the 2HDMs even taking into account the one-loop electroweak corrections to the Yukawa coupling.

  12. Viable and testable SUSY GUTs with Yukawa unification: the case of split trilinears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnoli, Diego; Raby, Stuart; Straub, David M.

    2009-10-01

    We explore general SUSY GUT models with exact third-generation Yukawa unification, but where the requirement of universal soft terms at the GUT scale is relaxed. We consider the scenario in which the breaking of universality inherits from the Yukawa couplings, i.e. is of minimal flavor violating (MFV) type. In particular, the MFV principle allows for a splitting between the up-type and the down-type soft trilinear couplings. We explore the viability of this trilinear splitting scenario by means of a fitting procedure to electroweak observables, quark masses as well as flavor-changing neutral current processes. Phenomenological viability singles out one main scenario. This scenario is characterized by a sizable splitting between the trilinear soft terms and a large μ term. Remarkably, this scenario does not invoke a partial decoupling of the sparticle spectrum, as in the case of universal soft terms, but instead it requires part of the spectrum, notably the lightest stop, the gluino and the lightest charginos and neutralinos to be very close to the current experimental limits. The above mechanism is mostly triggered by a non-trivial interplay between the requirements of negative, sizable SUSY threshold corrections to mb and an instead negligible modification of the B → Xsγ decay rate, in presence of various other constraints, most notably a successful EWSB and a not too large BR(Bs → μ+μ-). We present a model-building interpretation of our discussed scenario and emphasize the crucial role of SUSY spectrum determinations at the LHC for either falsifying Yukawa unification or else providing important hints on the mechanism of SUSY breaking at work.

  13. Search for production of single top quarks via tcg and tug flavor-changing-neutral-current couplings.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-09

    We search for the production of single top quarks via flavor-changing-neutral-current couplings of a gluon to the top quark and a charm (c) or up (u) quark. We analyze 230 pb{-1} of lepton+jets data from pp[over] collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We observe no significant deviation from standard model predictions, and hence set upper limits on the anomalous coupling parameters kappa{g}{c}/Lambda and kappa{g}{u}/Lambda, where kappa{g} define the strength of tcg and tug couplings, and Lambda defines the scale of new physics. The limits at 95% C.L. are kappa{g}{c}/Lambda<0.15 TeV-1 and kappa{g}{u}/Lambda<0.037 TeV-1.

  14. Equilibration Rates in a Strongly Coupled Nonconformal Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Buchel, Alex; Heller, Michal P; Myers, Robert C

    2015-06-26

    We initiate the study of equilibration rates of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasmas in the absence of conformal symmetry. We primarily consider a supersymmetric mass deformation within N=2^{*} gauge theory and use holography to compute quasinormal modes of a variety of scalar operators, as well as the energy-momentum tensor. In each case, the lowest quasinormal frequency, which provides an approximate upper bound on the thermalization time, is proportional to temperature, up to a prefactor with only a mild temperature dependence. We find similar behavior in other holographic plasmas, where the model contains an additional scale beyond the temperature. Hence, our study suggests that the thermalization time is generically set by the temperature, irrespective of any other scales, in strongly coupled gauge theories.

  15. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. II. Screening and equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Boris A.; Shuryak, Edward V.; Zahed, Ismail

    2006-10-01

    We analyze the screening and bulk energy of a classical and strongly interacting plasma of color charges, a model we recently introduced for the description of a quark-gluon plasma at T=(1-3)Tc. The partition function is organized around the Debye-Hückel limit. The linear Debye-Hückel limit is corrected by a virial expansion. For the pressure, the expansion is badly convergent even in the dilute limit. The nonlinear Debye-Hückel theory is studied numerically as an alternative for moderately strong plasmas. We use the Debye theory of solid to extend the analysis to the crystal phase at very strong coupling. The analytical results for the bulk energy per particle compare well with the numerical results from molecular dynamics simulations for all couplings.

  16. Yukawa Unification Predictions with Effective ``Mirage'' Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Raby, Stuart

    2013-11-01

    In this Letter we analyze the consequences, for the LHC, of gauge and third family Yukawa coupling unification with a particular set of boundary conditions defined at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, which we characterize as effective “mirage” mediation. We perform a global χ2 analysis including the observables MW, MZ, GF, αem-1, αs(MZ), Mt, mb(mb), Mτ, BR(B→Xsγ), BR(Bs→μ+μ-), and Mh. The fit is performed in the minimal supersymmetric standard model in terms of 10 GUT scale parameters, while tan⁡β and μ are fixed at the weak scale. We find good fits to the low energy data and a supersymmetry spectrum which is dramatically different than previously studied in the context of Yukawa unification.

  17. Yukawa unification predictions with effective "mirage" mediation.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Raby, Stuart

    2013-11-22

    In this Letter we analyze the consequences, for the LHC, of gauge and third family Yukawa coupling unification with a particular set of boundary conditions defined at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, which we characterize as effective "mirage" mediation. We perform a global χ2 analysis including the observables M(W), M(Z), G(F), α(em)(-1), α(s)(M(Z)), M(t), m(b)(m(b)), M(τ), BR(B→X(s)γ), BR(B(s)→μ(+)μ(-)), and M(h). The fit is performed in the minimal supersymmetric standard model in terms of 10 GUT scale parameters, while tanβ and μ are fixed at the weak scale. We find good fits to the low energy data and a supersymmetry spectrum which is dramatically different than previously studied in the context of Yukawa unification.

  18. Probing Yukawa unification with K and B mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trine, Stéphanie; Westhoff, Susanne; Wiesenfeldt, Sören

    2009-08-01

    We consider corrections to the unification of down-quark and charged-lepton Yukawa couplings in supersymmetric GUTs, which links the large ντ-νμ mixing angle to b → s transitions. These corrections generically occur in simple grand-unified models with small Higgs representations and affect s → d and b → d transitions via the mixing of the corresponding right-handed superpartners. On the basis of a specific SUSY-SO(10) model, we analyze the constraints from K-bar K and Bd-bar Bd mixing on the additional tilde dR-tilde sR rotation angle θ. We find that epsilonK already sets a stringent bound on θ, θmax ~ Script O(1°), indicating a very specific flavor structure of the correction operators. The impact of the large neutrino mixings on the unitarity triangle analysis is also briefly discussed, as well as their ability to account for the sizeable CP-violating phase observed recently in Bs → J/ψphi decays.

  19. SUSY Threshold Effects on Quark and Lepton Masses at the GUT Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the impact of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the GUT scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the MSSM. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons which can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters and discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings. This is a brief summary of the work of Ref. [1].

  20. Quark and lepton masses at the GUT scale including supersymmetric threshold corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the effect of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons and show that they can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters. We discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings.

  1. Yukawa alignment in the two-Higgs-doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, Antonio; Tuzon, Paula

    2009-11-01

    In multi-Higgs-doublet models the alignment in flavor space of the relevant Yukawa matrices guarantees the absence of tree-level flavor-changing couplings of the neutral scalar fields. We analyze the consequences of this condition within the two-Higgs-doublet model and show that it leads to a generic Yukawa structure which contains as particular cases all known specific implementations of the model based on Z{sub 2} symmetries. All possible freedom in the Yukawa sector gets parametrized in terms of three complex couplings {sigma}{sub f}. In spite of having flavor conservation in the neutral scalar couplings, the phases of these three parameters represent potential new sources of CP violation.

  2. Flavor cosmology: dynamical yukawas in the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldes, Iason; Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine

    2016-12-01

    Can the cosmological dynamics responsible for settling down the present values of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix be related to electroweak symmetry breaking? If the Standard Model Yukawa couplings varied in the early universe and started with order one values before electroweak symmetry breaking, the CP violation associated with the CKM matrix could be the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry. The large effective Yukawa couplings which lead to the enhanced CP violation can also help in achieving a strong first-order electroweak phase transition. We study in detail the feasibility of this idea by implementing dynamical Yukawa couplings in the context of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss two main realizations of such a mechanism, related phenomenology, cosmological and collider bounds, and provide an estimate of the baryonic yield. A generic prediction is that this scenario always features a new scalar field below the electroweak scale. We point out ways to get around this conclusion.

  3. Quantum-gravity effects on a Higgs-Yukawa model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Held, Aaron; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2016-11-01

    A phenomenologically viable theory of quantum gravity must accommodate all observed matter degrees of freedom and their properties. Here, we explore whether a toy model of the Higgs-Yukawa sector of the Standard Model is compatible with asymptotically safe quantum gravity. We discuss the phenomenological implications of our result in the context of the Standard Model. We analyze the quantum scaling dimension of the system and find an irrelevant Yukawa coupling at a joint gravity-matter fixed point. Further, we explore the impact of gravity-induced couplings between scalars and fermions, which are nonvanishing in asymptotically safe gravity.

  4. Complementarity of resonant scalar, vector-like quark and superpartner searches in elucidating new phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biekötter, Anke; Hewett, Joanne L.; Kim, Jong Soo; Krämer, Michael; Rizzo, Thomas G.; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Tattersall, Jamie; Weber, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    The elucidation of the nature of new phenomena requires a multi-pronged approach to understand the essential physics that underlies it. As an example, we study the simplified model containing a new scalar singlet accompanied by vector-like quarks. To be specific, we investigate three models with SU(2)L-doublet, vector-like quarks with Yukawa couplings to a new scalar singlet and which also couple off-diagonally to corresponding Standard Model fermions of the first or third generation through the usual Higgs boson. We demonstrate that three classes of searches can play important and complementary roles in constraining this model. In particular, we find that missing energy searches designed for sparticle production, are also very sensitive to vector-like quarks.

  5. Yukawa textures and charged Higgs boson phenomenology in the type-III two-Higgs-doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Hernandez-Sanchez, J.; Moretti, S.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Rosado, A.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the implications of assuming a four-zero Yukawa texture for the properties of the charged Higgs boson within the context of the general two-Higgs-doublet model of type III. We begin by presenting a detailed analysis of the charged Higgs boson couplings with heavy quarks and the resulting pattern for its decays. The production of charged Higgs bosons is also sensitive to the modifications of its couplings, so that we also evaluate the resulting effects on the top decay t{yields}bH{sup +} as well as on 'direct'cb{yields}H{sup +}+c.c. and 'indirect'qq,gg{yields}tbH{sup +}+c.c. production. A significant scope exists at the Large Hadron Collider for several H{sup {+-}} production and decay channels combined to enable one to distinguish between such a model and alternative two-Higgs-doublet scenarios.

  6. Lepton masses and mixing without Yukawa hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, William A.; Zapata, Oscar

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the neutrino masses and mixing pattern in a version of the SU(3){sub c}(multiply-in-circle sign)SU(3){sub L}(multiply-in-circle sign)U(1){sub X} model with one extra exotic charged lepton per family as introduced by Ozer. It is shown that an extended scalar sector, together with a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry, is able to reproduce a consistent lepton mass spectrum without a hierarchy in the Yukawa coupling constants, the former as a consequence of a carefull balance between one universal see-saw and two radiative mechanisms.

  7. Search for W' boson resonances decaying to a top and a bottom quark and probing anomalous Wtb couplings with 1 fb{sup -1} of D0 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Badaud, Frederique

    2008-11-23

    With the first evidence for single top quark production in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp-bar collider, the single top quark cross section is measured, limits on the masses of heavy W' boson resonances are set and anomalous Wtb couplings are studied.

  8. On the shear viscosity of 3D Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Donko, Z.; Hartmann, P.

    2008-09-07

    We report calculations of the shear viscosity of three-dimensional strongly-coupled Yukawa liquids, based on two different non-equilibrium molecular dynamics methods. The present simulations intend to improve the accuracy of shear viscosity data, compared to those obtained in earlier studies.

  9. Vacuum stability of asymptotically safe gauge-Yukawa theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litim, Daniel F.; Mojaza, Matin; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We study the phase diagram and the stability of the ground state for certain four-dimensional gauge-Yukawa theories whose high-energy behaviour is controlled by an interacting fixed point. We also provide analytical and numerical results for running couplings, their crossover scales, the separatrix, and the Coleman-Weinberg effective potential. Classical and quantum stability of the vacuum is established.

  10. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  11. Coupling hydrodynamics to nonequilibrium degrees of freedom in strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Heller, Michal P; Janik, Romuald A; Spaliński, Michał; Witaszczyk, Przemysław

    2014-12-31

    Relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of quark-gluon plasma play a pivotal role in our understanding of heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. They are based on a phenomenological description due to Müller, Israel, Stewart (MIS) and others, which incorporates viscous effects and ensures a well-posed initial value problem. Focusing on the case of conformal plasma we propose a generalization which includes, in addition, the dynamics of the least damped far-from-equilibrium degree of freedom found in strongly coupled plasmas through the AdS/CFT correspondence. We formulate new evolution equations for general flows and then test them in the case of N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma by comparing their solutions alongside solutions of MIS theory with numerical computations of isotropization and boost-invariant flow based on holography. In these tests the new equations reproduce the results of MIS theory when initialized close to the hydrodynamic stage of evolution, but give a more accurate description of the dynamics when initial conditions are set in the preequilibrium regime.

  12. QCD corrections to flavor changing neutral coupling mediated rare top quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Drobnak, Jure; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2010-10-01

    Recently we have presented an analysis of flavor changing neutral coupling mediated radiative top quark decays at next-to-leading order in QCD. In the present paper we provide the details of the calculation of QCD corrections to t{yields}q{gamma} and t{yields}qZ decays within the effective theory approach including operator mixing. In particular, we calculate virtual matrix element corrections and the corresponding bremsstrahlung contributions. In the case of t{yields}q{gamma} we study the effects of kinematic cuts on the extracted branching ratios. Analytical formulas are given at all stages of the calculation. We find that the t{yields}q{gamma} decay can be used to probe also the effective operators mediating t{yields}qg processes, since these can naturally contribute 10% or more to the radiative decay, given typical experimental cuts on the decay kinematics at hadron colliders. Conversely, we argue that any positive experimental signal of the t{yields}qg process would indicate a natural lower bound on t{yields}q{gamma} decay rate.

  13. A search for inverse magnetic catalysis in thermal quark-meson models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, E. S.; Mintz, B. W.; Schaffner-Bielich, J.

    2014-04-01

    We explore the parameter space of the two-flavor thermal quark-meson model and its Polyakov loop-extended version under the influence of a constant external magnetic field B. We investigate the behavior of the pseudo critical temperature for chiral symmetry breaking taking into account the likely dependence of two parameters on the magnetic field: the Yukawa quark-meson coupling and the parameter T0 of the Polyakov loop potential. Under the constraints that magnetic catalysis is realized at zero temperature and the chiral transition at B=0 is a crossover, we find that the quark-meson model leads to thermal magnetic catalysis for the whole allowed parameter space, in contrast to the present picture stemming from lattice QCD.

  14. Next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the top-quark decay via model-independent flavor-changing neutral-current couplings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Zhao; Yuan, C-P; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2009-02-20

    D0 and CDF collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron have searched for nonstandard-model single top-quark production and have set upper limits on the anomalous top-quark flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) couplings kappatcg/Lambda and kappatug/Lambda using the measurement of the total cross section calculated at the next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. In this Letter, we report on the effect of anomalous FCNC couplings to various decay branching ratios of the top quark, calculated at the NLO. This result is not only mandatory for a consistent treatment of both the top-quark production and decay via FCNC couplings by D0 and CDF at the Tevatron, but is also important for the study of ATLAS and CMS sensitivity to these anomalous couplings at the CERN LHC.

  15. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  16. Quark-gluon tagging with shower deconstruction: Unearthing dark matter and Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira de Lima, Danilo; Petrov, Petar; Soper, Davison; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The separation of quark and gluon initiated jets can be an important way to improve the sensitivity in searches for new physics or in measurements of Higgs boson properties. We present a simplified version of the shower deconstruction approach as a novel observable for quark-gluon tagging. Assuming topoclusterlike objects as input, we compare our observable with energy correlation functions and find a favorable performance for a large variety of jet definitions. We address the issue of infrared sensitivity of quark-gluon discrimination. When this approach is applied to dark matter searches in monojet final states, limitations from small signal-to-background ratios can be overcome. We also show that quark-gluon tagging is an alternative way of separating weak boson from gluon-fusion production in the process p +p →H +jet+jet+X .

  17. Probability of metastable states in Yukawa clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Kaehlert, Hanno; Baumgartner, Henning; Bonitz, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Finite strongly coupled systems of charged particles in external traps are of high interest in many fields. Here we analyze the occurrence probabilities of ground- and metastable states of spherical, three-dimensional Yukawa clusters by means of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical method. We find that metastable states can occur with a higher probability than the ground state, thus confirming recent dusty plasma experiments with so-called Yukawa balls [1]. The analytical method [2], based on the harmonic approximation of the potential energy, allows for a very intuitive explanation of the probabilities when combined with the simulation results [3].[1] D. Block, S. Käding, A. Melzer, A. Piel, H. Baumgartner, and M. Bonitz, Physics of Plasmas 15, 040701 (2008)[2] F. Baletto and R. Ferrando, Reviews of Modern Physics 77, 371 (2005)[3] H. Kählert, P. Ludwig, H. Baumgartner, M. Bonitz, D. Block, S. Käding, A. Melzer, and A. Piel, submitted for publication (2008)

  18. On the b-quark running mass in QCD and the SM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, A. V.; Kniehl, B. A.; Pikelner, A. F.; Veretin, O. L.

    2017-03-01

    We consider electroweak corrections to the relation between the running MS ‾ mass mb of the b quark in the five-flavor QCD×QED effective theory and its counterpart in the Standard Model (SM). As a bridge between the two parameters, we use the pole mass Mb of the b quark, which can be calculated in both models. The running mass is not a fundamental parameter of the SM Lagrangian, but the product of the running Yukawa coupling yb and the Higgs vacuum expectation value. Since there exist different prescriptions to define the latter, the relations considered in the paper involve a certain amount of freedom. All the definitions can be related to each other in perturbation theory. Nevertheless, we argue in favour of a certain gauge-independent prescription and provide a relation which can be directly used to deduce the value of the Yukawa coupling of the b quark at the electroweak scale from its effective QCD running mass. This approach allows one to resum large logarithms ln ⁡ (mb /Mt) systematically. Numerical analysis shows that, indeed, the corrections to the proposed relation are much smaller than those between yb and Mb.

  19. Yukawa radiative corrections to the triple self-couplings of neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and to the H {sup {yields}} hh decay rate within the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Yu. P.

    2007-07-15

    Within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, four self-couplings, {lambda}{sub hhh}, {lambda}{sub hhH}, {lambda}{sub hHH}, and {lambda}{sub HHH}, and the decay rate {gamma}(H {sup {yields}} hh) are calculated with allowance for one-loop corrections induced by the contribution of the t, b, and c quarks, the {tau} lepton, and the corresponding superpartners and with the aid of the on-shell renormalization scheme. An analysis of the dependences of these features on tan{beta} and the mass of the A Higgs boson, M{sub A}, shows that, in a specific region of the model-parameter space, the calculated corrections can make a significant contribution to the couplings and decay rate in the one-loop approximation. The inclusion of the radiative corrections in question is mandatory in reconstructing the Higgs potential.

  20. Low density instabilities in asymmetric nuclear matter within the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model with the {delta} meson

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Alexandre M.; Providencia, Constanca; Panda, Prafulla K.

    2009-04-15

    In the present work we include the isovector-scalar {delta} meson in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model and study the properties of asymmetric nuclear within QMC without and with the {delta} meson. Recent constraints set by isospin diffusion on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density are used to adjust the model parameters. The thermodynamical spinodal surfaces are obtained and the instability region at subsaturation densities within QMC and QMC{delta} models are compared with mean-field relativistic models. The distillation effect in the QMC model is discussed.

  1. Higgs singlet boson as a diphoton resonance in a vectorlike quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbrik, R.; Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-03-01

    ATLAS and CMS recently showed the first results from run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at √{s }=13 TeV . A resonant bump at a mass of around 750 GeV in the diphoton invariant mass spectrum was indicated and the corresponding diphoton production cross section is around 3-10 fb. Motivated by the LHC diphoton excess, we propose that the possible resonance candidate is a Higgs singlet. To produce the Higgs singlet via the gluon-gluon fusion process, we embed the Higgs singlet in the framework of the vector-like triplet quark (VLTQ) model. As a result, the Higgs singlet decaying to the diphoton final state is via VLTQ loops. Using the enhanced number of new quarks and new Yukawa couplings of the VLTQs and Higgs singlet, we successfully explain the diphoton production cross section. We find that the width of the Higgs singlet is below 1 GeV, its production cross section can be of the order of 1 pb at √{s }=13 TeV , and the branching ratio for it decaying to a diphoton is around 0.017 and is insensitive to the masses of VLTQs and new Yukawa couplings. We find a strong correlation between the Higgs Yukawa couplings to s -b and c -t ; the resulted branching ratio for t →c h can be 1.1 ×10-4 when the constraint from Bs oscillation is applied. With the constrained parameter values, the signal strength for the standard model Higgs decaying to a diphoton is μγ γ<1.18 , which is consistent with the current measurements at ATLAS and CMS.

  2. Gauge-Higgs unification and quark-lepton phenomenology in the warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Y.; Noda, S.; Sakamura, Y.; Shimasaki, S.

    2006-05-01

    In the dynamical gauge-Higgs unification of electroweak interactions in the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime, the Higgs boson mass is predicted in the range 120-290 GeV, provided that the spacetime structure is determined at the Planck scale. Couplings of quarks and leptons to gauge bosons and their Kaluza-Klein excited states are determined by the masses of quarks and leptons. All quarks and leptons other than top quarks have very small couplings to the Kaluza-Klein excited states of gauge bosons. The universality of weak interactions is slightly broken by magnitudes of 10{sup -8}, 10{sup -6}, and 10{sup -2} for {mu}-e, {tau}-e and t-e, respectively. Yukawa couplings become substantially smaller than those in the standard model, by a factor cos(1/2){theta}{sub W} where {theta}{sub W} is the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm phase (the Wilson line phase) associated with dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking.

  3. Flavor Changing Neutral Coupling Mediated Radiative Top Quark Decays at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Drobnak, Jure; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2010-06-25

    We compute the branching ratios for the rare top quark decays t{yields}c{gamma} and t{yields}cZ mediated by effective flavor changing neutral couplings at next-to-leading order in QCD, including the effects due to operator mixing. After resumming contributions of the order of [{alpha}{sub s}log({Lambda}/m{sub t})]{sup n}, where {Lambda} is the scale at which the effective operators are generated, using renormalization group methods, we compute finite matrix element corrections and study the effects of experimental kinematic cuts on the extracted branching ratios. We find that the t{yields}c{gamma} decay can also be used to probe the effective operators mediating t{yields}cg processes, since the latter can naturally contribute 10% or more to the radiative decay. Conversely, any experimental signal of t{yields}cg would indicate a natural lower bound on t{yields}cZ, {gamma}.

  4. Is Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Victor; Moon, Russell

    2006-11-01

    Reexamining Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force using the principles of the Quark Theory and the Vortex Theory, it was discovered that it is possible for a virtual particle to be passed back and forth between the proton and the neutron. This discovery creates a new and revolutionary explanation of the strong force of nature. The creation of the strong force appears to be the combination of four processes at work in the nucleus: virtual particles, intrinsic magnetism, ``nuclear gravity'', and gluons. 1. V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The bases of the vortex theory, Book of abstracts The 53 International Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear structure St. Petersburg, Russia, 2003, p.251. 2. H. Yukawa, Tabibito, (World Scientific, Singapore, 1982), p. 190-202. 3. K. Gridnev, V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The Photon Acceleration Effect, Book of abstracts, OMEGA 5 -- Symposium on Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies, Nov 8-11, University of Tokyo, Tokyo Japan. 4. R.G. Moon, V.V. Vasiliev. Explanation of the Conservation of Lepton Number, Book of abstracts LV. National Conference on Nuclear Physics, Frontiers in the Physics of Nucleus, June 28-July 1, 2005, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 2005, p. 347.5. .

  5. Is Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Victor; Moon, Russell

    2006-10-01

    Reexamining Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force using the principles of the Quark Theory and the Vortex Theory, it was discovered that it is possible for a virtual particle to be passed back and forth between the proton and the neutron. This discovery creates a new and revolutionary explanation of the strong force of nature. The creation of the strong force appears to be the combination of four processes at work in the nucleus: virtual particles, intrinsic magnetism, ``nuclear gravity'', and gluons. 1. V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The bases of the vortex theory, Book of abstracts The 53 International Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear structure St. Petersburg, Russia, 2003, p.251. 2. H. Yukawa, Tabibito, (World Scientific, Singapore, 1982), p. 190-202. 3. K. Gridnev, V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The Photon Acceleration Effect, Book of abstracts, OMEGA 5 -- Symposium on Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies, Nov 8-11, University of Tokyo, Tokyo Japan. 4. R.G. Moon, V.V. Vasiliev. Explanation of the Conservation of Lepton Number, Book of abstracts LV. National Conference on Nuclear Physics, Frontiers in the Physics of Nucleus, June 28-July 1, 2005, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 2005, p. 347.5. .

  6. The Legacies of Yukawa and His Disciples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Yoichiro

    2008-06-01

    I review and discuss the historical roles Hideki Yukawa and his disciples, Shoichi Sakata in particular, played in developing what we now call particle physics, including their personal and cultural aspects.

  7. Holographic Screening Length on Parallel Motion of Quark-Antiquark Pair in Four Dimensional Strongly Coupled = 4 super-Yang-Mills plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata Atmaja, Ardian

    2014-10-01

    We study the screening length of a quark-antiquark pair moving in a strongly coupled hot plasma of = 4 super-Yang-Mills using AdS/CFT correspondence where the background metric is five dimensional AdS black hole. We take the string solution as such the separation length L of quark-antiquark pair is parallel to the string velocity v. The screening length and the bound energy are computed numerically using Mathematica. We find that the plots are bounded from below by some functions that are related to the momentum flow of the drag force configuration Pc. We compare the result by computing the screening length in the quark-antiquark reference frame by boosting the AdS black hole.

  8. B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} constraints on the top quark anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Xingbo; Hao Yang; Yang Yadng

    2011-01-01

    Observation of the top quark flavor changing neutral process t{yields}c+{gamma} at the LHC would be the signal of physics beyond the standard model. If anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling exists, it will affect the precisely measured B(B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma}). In this paper, we study the effects of a dimension 5 anomalous tc{gamma} operator in B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decay to derive constraints on its possible strength. It is found that, for real anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}, the constraints correspond to the upper bounds B(t{yields}c+{gamma})<6.54x10{sup -5} (for {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}>0) and B(t{yields}c+{gamma})<8.52x10{sup -5} (for {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}<0), respectively, which are about the same order as the 5{sigma} discovery potential of ATLAS (9.4x10{sup -5}) and slightly lower than that of CMS (4.1x10{sup -4}) with 10 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity operating at {radical}(s)=14 TeV.

  9. Search for charged Higgs bosons from top quark decays in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-02-03

    We report the results of a search for a charged Higgs boson in the decays of top quarks produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We use a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 193 pb-1 collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. No evidence for charged Higgs production is found, allowing 95% C.L. upper limits to be placed on BR(t-->H+b) for different charged Higgs decay scenarios. In addition, we present in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (mH+/-, tanbeta) plane the first exclusion regions with radiative and Yukawa coupling corrections.

  10. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  11. From the QCD vacuum to (strongly coupled) quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuryak, Edward

    2005-04-01

    I start with brief discussion of the role of topological objects in the QCD vacuum, reminding why instantons play a special role in chiral symmetry breaking and hadronic physics. Then I move to high temperature T > T c domain, describing briefly some experimental discoveries made at RHIC such as robust collective flow phenomena. They are well described by ideal hydrodynamics, with the Equation of State (EoS) in good agreement with that predicted by lattice simulations. However for hydro to work the transport properties of QGP should be quite remarkable. These and other theoretical developments, especially based on lattice simulations, indicate that matter produced at RHIC is a strongly coupled liquid, sQGP for short. Existence of "new spectroscopy" of states, most of them colored, is expected. We also briefly discuss two other "strongly coupled systems", (i) the strongly coupled supersymmetric theories studied via Maldacena duality; (ii) trapped ultra-cold atoms with very large scattering length.

  12. Is Diffusion Anomalous in Two-Dimensional Yukawa Liquids?

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, T.; Bonitz, M.

    2009-11-06

    There have recently been many predictions of 'superdiffusion' in two-dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa systems, both by computer simulations and in dusty plasma experiments, with substantially varying diffusion exponents. Here we show that the results crucially depend on the strength of dissipation and the time instant of the measurement. For sufficiently large friction even subdiffusion is possible. However, there are strong indications that, in the long-time limit, anomalous diffusion vanishes and the system returns to normal diffusion, for dissipative as well as for frictionless systems.

  13. Universal seesaw mechanisms for quark-lepton mass spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.; Shinohara, Tadatomi

    1993-04-01

    Problems of fermion mass hierarchies and generation mixings are investigated through universal seesaw mechanisms (USM's) in an extension of the standard model with a left-right-symmetric gauge group SU(3)c×SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)y. Electroweak Higgs doublets and singlets induce USM's between ordinary fermion multiplets and exotic electroweak singlets of fermions. The USM's work singly in the charged-fermion sectors to suppress their masses below the electroweak mass scale, and doubly in the neutral-fermion sector to make neutrinos superlight. The wide gap between vanishingly small neutrino masses and the 100 GeV scale of the top-quark mass is explained by multiple USM suppressions without presuming a huge Majorana mass. A global chiral U(1)A symmetry is introduced so as to circumvent the strong CP violation, to distinguish generations, and to restrict the pattern of the Yukawa interactions. Three kinds of electroweak Higgs singlets bring about USM's and cause the generation mixing leading to a realistic variety in each charge sector of the fermion mass spectrum. A fourth Higgs singlet with the largest vacuum expectation value is introduced to make the neutrino masses tiny and to make the axion invisible. By assigning chiral charges to make effective mass matrices of all fermion sectors of the extended Fritzsch type, characteristics of the mass spectra of charged fermions and the quark mixing matrix are described without introducing unnatural hierarchies in the Yukawa coupling constants. Neutrinos have a spectrum comprising doubly degenerate states with a smaller mass and a singlet state with a larger mass. The vacuum mixing angle takes a small value which is favorable for explaining both the new results of the GALLEX Collaboration and the data of the Homestake and Kamiokande experiments.

  14. Cosmological model with fermion and tachyon fields interacting via Yukawa-type potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Marlos O.; Devecchi, Fernando P.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2016-02-01

    A model for the universe with tachyonic and fermionic fields interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is investigated. It is shown that the tachyonic field answers for the initial accelerated regime and for the subsequent decelerated regime so that it behaves as an inflaton at early times and as a matter field at intermediate times, while the fermionic field has the role of a dark energy constituent, since it leads to an accelerated regime at later times. The interaction between the fields via a Yukawa-type potential controls the duration of the decelerated era, since a stronger coupling makes a shorter decelerated period.

  15. Search for top quark decays via Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; El-khateeb, E.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. 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M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. 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M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; SavoyNavarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Kim, H.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Golunov, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Karjavin, V.; Korenkov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Chistov, R.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korneeva, N.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.

    2017-02-01

    A search is performed for Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in the decays of top quarks. The search is based on proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events in which a top quark pair is produced with one top quark decaying into a charm or up quark and a Higgs boson (H), and the other top quark decaying into a bottom quark and a W boson are selected. The Higgs boson in these events is assumed to subsequently decay into either dibosons or difermions. No significant excess is observed above the expected standard model background, and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is set on the branching fraction ℬ(t → Hc) of 0.40% and ℬ(t → Hu) of 0.55%, where the expected upper limits are 0.43% and 0.40%, respectively. These results correspond to upper limits on the square of the flavor-changing Higgs boson Yukawa couplings | λ tc H |2 < 6.9 × 10- 3 and | λ tu H |2 < 9.8 × 10- 3.

  16. Flavor changing neutral current constraints from Kaluza-Klein gluons and quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum I framework

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-03-01

    We continue our previous study on what are the allowed forms of quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum framework that can reproduce the experimentally observed quark mass spectrum and the pattern of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing. We study the constraints the {delta}F=2 processes in the neutral meson sector placed on the admissible forms found there, and we found only the asymmetrical type of quark mass matrices arising from anarchical Yukawa structures remain viable at the few TeV scale reachable at the LHC. We study also the decay of the first Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the gluon. We give the decay branching ratios of the first KK gluon into quark pairs, and we point out that measurements of the decay width and just one of the quark spins in the dominant tt decays can be used to extract the effective coupling of the first KK gluon to top quarks for both chiralities. This provides a further probe into the flavor structure of the Randall-Sundrum framework.

  17. Search for top quark decays via Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-10-16

    A search is performed for Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in the decays of top quarks. The search is based on proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse-femtobarns at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events in which a top quark pair is produced with one top quark decaying into a charm or up quark and a Higgs boson (H), and the other top quark decaying into a bottom quark and a W boson are selected. The Higgs boson in these events is assumed to subsequently decay into either dibosons or difermions. No significant excess is observed above the expected standard model background, and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is set on the branching fraction B(t -> Hc) of 0.40% and B(t -> Hu) of 0.55%, where the expected upper limits are 0.43% and 0.40\\%, respectively. These results correspond to upper limits on the square of the flavor-changing Higgs boson Yukawa couplings | lambda[tc]^H |^2 < 6.9E-3 and | lambda[tu]^H |^2 < 9.8E-3.

  18. The effects of hyper-spherical approximation of Yukawa potential to diffusion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Gee; Murillo, Michael S.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Yukawa potential to the diffusion properties of binary ionic mixtures are investigated in terms of both the classical molecular dynamics and the kinetic theory. The Yukawa interatomic potential is treated by means of the hyper-spherical approximation, which replaces the Ewald summation by a multiple of the hyperbolic trigonometric functions and the lattice summation of screening. The influence of the hyper-spherical approximation of the Yukawa potential is able to be understood through the calculations of transport coefficients with the relationship to Coulomb logarithm. Numerical studies over a various range of the Debye-Hückel screening parameter and of the plasma coupling parameter to binary ionic mixtures will be provided. We consider primarily the interdiffusion coefficients and then discuss about the mixing properties of self-diffusion coefficients.

  19. Low mass thermal dilepton production at NLO in a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo; Moore, Guy D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a computation, within weakly-coupled thermal QCD, of the production rate of low invariant mass ( M 2 ~ g 2 T 2) dileptons, at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the coupling (which is ). This involves extending the NLO calculation of the photon rate which we recently presented to the case of small nonzero photon invariant mass. Numerical results are discussed and tabulated forms and code are provided for inclusion in hydrodynamical models. We find that NLO corrections can increase the dilepton rate by up to 30-40% relative to leading order. We find that the electromagnetic response of the plasma for real photons and for small invariant mass but high energy dilepton pairs (e.g., M 2 < (300 MeV)2 but p T > 1 GeV) are close enough that dilepton pair measurements really can serve as ersatz photon measurements. We also present a matching a la Ghisoiu and Laine between our results and results at larger invariant masses.

  20. Erratum to: Constraining couplings of top quarks to the Z boson in $$ t\\overline{t} $$ + Z production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2015-09-21

    We study top quark pair production in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and investigate the prospects of measuring the couplings of top quarks to the Z boson. To date these couplings have not been constrained in direct measurements. Such a determination will be possible for the first time at the LHC. Our calculation improves previous coupling studies through the inclusion of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections in production and decays of all unstable particles. We treat top quarks in the narrow-width approximation and retain all NLO spin correlations. To determine the sensitivity of amore » coupling measurement we perform a binned log-likelihood ratio test based on normalization and shape information of the angle between the leptons from the Z boson decay. The obtained limits account for statistical uncertainties as well as leading theoretical systematics from residual scale dependence and parton distribution functions. We use current CMS data to place the first direct constraints on the ttbZ couplings. We also consider the upcoming high-energy LHC run and find that with 300 inverse fb of data at an energy of 13 TeV the vector and axial ttbZ couplings can be constrained at the 95% confidence level to C_V=0.24^{+0.39}_{-0.85} and C_A=-0.60^{+0.14}_{-0.18}, where the central values are the Standard Model predictions. This is a reduction of uncertainties by 25% and 42%, respectively, compared to an analysis based on leading-order predictions. We also translate these results into limits on dimension-six operators contributing to the ttbZ interactions beyond the Standard Model.« less

  1. Erratum to: Constraining couplings of top quarks to the Z boson in $ t\\overline{t} $ + Z production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2015-09-21

    We study top quark pair production in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and investigate the prospects of measuring the couplings of top quarks to the Z boson. To date these couplings have not been constrained in direct measurements. Such a determination will be possible for the first time at the LHC. Our calculation improves previous coupling studies through the inclusion of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections in production and decays of all unstable particles. We treat top quarks in the narrow-width approximation and retain all NLO spin correlations. To determine the sensitivity of a coupling measurement we perform a binned log-likelihood ratio test based on normalization and shape information of the angle between the leptons from the Z boson decay. The obtained limits account for statistical uncertainties as well as leading theoretical systematics from residual scale dependence and parton distribution functions. We use current CMS data to place the first direct constraints on the ttbZ couplings. We also consider the upcoming high-energy LHC run and find that with 300 inverse fb of data at an energy of 13 TeV the vector and axial ttbZ couplings can be constrained at the 95% confidence level to C_V=0.24^{+0.39}_{-0.85} and C_A=-0.60^{+0.14}_{-0.18}, where the central values are the Standard Model predictions. This is a reduction of uncertainties by 25% and 42%, respectively, compared to an analysis based on leading-order predictions. We also translate these results into limits on dimension-six operators contributing to the ttbZ interactions beyond the Standard Model.

  2. A precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of D{Ø} Run II data

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huanzhao

    2015-05-16

    The top quark is a very special fundamental particle in the Standard Model (SM) mainly due to its heavy mass. The top quark has extremely short lifetime and decays before hadronization. This reduces the complexity for the measurement of its mass. The top quark couples very strongly to the Higgs boson since the fermion-Higgs Yukawa coupling linearly depends on the fermion’s mass. Therefore, the top quark is also heavily involved in Higgs production and related study. A precise measurement of the top quark mass is very important, as it allows for self-consistency check of the SM, and also gives a insight about the stability of our universe in the SM context. This dissertation presents my work on the measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states of t$\\bar{t}$ events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, using the full DØ Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron. I extracted the top quark mass by reconstructing event kinematics, and integrating over expected neutrino rapidity distributions to obtain solutions over a scanned range of top quark mass hypotheses. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization that I made to minimize the expected statistical uncertainty. I also improve the calibration of jets in dilepton events by using the calibration determined in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton+jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. The measured mass is 173.11 ± 1.34(stat)+0.83 -0.72(sys) GeV .

  3. Rotating compact star with superconducting quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P.K.; Nataraj, H.S.

    2006-02-15

    A compact star with a superconducting quark core, a hadron crust, and a mixed phase between the two is considered. The quark-meson coupling model for hadron matter and the color-flavor-locked quark model for quark matter is used to construct the equation of state for the compact star. The effect of pairing of quarks in the color-flavor-locked phase and the mixed phase on the mass, radius, and period of the rotating star is studied.

  4. Signatures from scalar dark matter with a vector-like quark mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Giacchino, Federica; Tytgat, Michel H.G.; Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian; Honorez, Laura Lopez E-mail: ibarra@tum.de E-mail: mtytgat@ulb.ac.be

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a model where the dark matter is composed of a singlet real scalar that couples to the Standard Model predominantly via a Yukawa interaction with a light quark and a colored vector-like fermion. A distinctive feature of this scenario is that thermal freeze-out in the early universe may be driven by annihilation both into gluon pairs at one-loop (gg) and by virtual internal Bremsstrahlung of a gluon (q q-bar  g). Such a dark matter candidate may also be tested through direct and indirect detection and at the LHC; viable candidates have either a mass nearly degenerate with that of the fermionic mediator or a mass above about 2 TeV.

  5. Signatures from scalar dark matter with a vector-like quark mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacchino, Federica; Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez Honorez, Laura; Tytgat, Michel H. G.; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a model where the dark matter is composed of a singlet real scalar that couples to the Standard Model predominantly via a Yukawa interaction with a light quark and a colored vector-like fermion. A distinctive feature of this scenario is that thermal freeze-out in the early universe may be driven by annihilation both into gluon pairs at one-loop (gg) and by virtual internal Bremsstrahlung of a gluon (qbar q g). Such a dark matter candidate may also be tested through direct and indirect detection and at the LHC; viable candidates have either a mass nearly degenerate with that of the fermionic mediator or a mass above about 2 TeV.

  6. On the estimation of sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, I. L. Thomas, H. M.; Khrapak, S. A.

    2015-11-15

    The longitudinal sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids is estimated using the conventional hydrodynamic expression supplemented by appropriate thermodynamic functions proposed recently by Khrapak et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 083706 (2015)]. In contrast to the existing approaches, such as quasi-localized charge approximation (QLCA) and molecular dynamics simulations, our model provides a relatively simple estimate for the sound speed over a wide range of parameters of interest. At strong coupling, our results are shown to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the QLCA approach and those derived from the phonon spectrum for the triangular lattice. On the other hand, our model is also expected to remain accurate at moderate values of the coupling strength. In addition, the obtained results are used to discuss the influence of the strong coupling effects on the adiabatic index of two-dimensional Yukawa fluids.

  7. Runaway quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gurarie, V.

    1995-08-01

    When heavy nuclei collide, a quark-gluon plasma is formed. The plasma is subject to a strong electric field due to the charge of the colliding nuclei. The electric field can influence the behavior of the quark-gluon plasma. In particular, we might observe an increased number of quarks moving in the direction of that field, as we do in the standard electron-ion plasma. In this paper we show that this phenomenon, called the runaway quarks, does not exist.

  8. Fermionic dark matter with pseudo-scalar Yukawa interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a renormalizable extension of the standard model whose fermionic dark matter (DM) candidate interacts with a real singlet pseudo-scalar via a pseudo-scalar Yukawa term while we assume that the full Lagrangian is CP-conserved in the classical level. When the pseudo-scalar boson develops a non-zero vacuum expectation value, spontaneous CP-violation occurs and this provides a CP-violated interaction of the dark sector with the SM particles through mixing between the Higgs-like boson and the SM-like Higgs boson. This scenario suggests a minimal number of free parameters. Focusing mainly on the indirect detection observables, we calculate the dark matter annihilation cross section and then compute the DM relic density in the range up to m{sub DM} = 300 GeV.We then find viable regions in the parameter space constrained by the observed DM relic abundance as well as invisible Higgs decay width in the light of 125 GeV Higgs discovery at the LHC. We find that within the constrained region of the parameter space, there exists a model with dark matter mass m{sub DM} ∼ 38 GeV annihilating predominantly into b quarks, which can explain the Fermi-LAT galactic gamma-ray excess.

  9. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sehwook

    2011-01-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t$\\bar{t}$ events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from π0 decay are discussed in this thesis.

  10. Exact SU(5) Yukawa matrix unification in the general flavour violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrzyński, Mateusz; Kowalska, Kamila

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of satisfying the SU(5) boundary condition Y d = Y eT at the GUT scale within the renormalizable R-parity conserving Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). Working in the super-CKM basis, we consider non-zero flavour off-diagonal entries in the soft SUSY-breaking mass matrices and the A-terms. At the same time, the diagonal A-terms are assumed to be suppressed by the respective Yukawa couplings. We show that a non-trivial flavour structure of the soft SUSY-breaking sector can contribute to achieving precise Yukawa coupling unification for all three families, and that the relevant flavour-violating parameters are , , and A {12/21/ d }. We indicate the parameter space regions where the Yukawa unification condition can be satisfied, and we demonstrate that it is consistent with a wide set of experimental constraints, including flavour and electroweak observables, Higgs physics and the LHC bounds. However, as a consequence of the down-electron Yukawa unification requirement, the MSSM vacuum in our scenario is metastable, though long-lived. We also point out that the lightest neutralino needs to be almost purely bino-like and relatively light, with the mass in the ballpark of 250 GeV. Since the proper value of the dark matter relic density is in this case obtained through co-annihilation with a sneutrino, at least one generation of sleptons must be light. Such a clear experimental prediction makes the flavour-violating SU(5) Yukawa unification scenario fully testable at the LHC TeV with the 3-lepton searches for electroweakino production.

  11. Collisional and collisionless expansion of Yukawa balls.

    PubMed

    Piel, Alexander; Goree, John A

    2013-12-01

    The expansion of Yukawa balls is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations of collisionless and collisional situations. High computation speed was achieved by using the parallel computing power of graphics processing units. When the radius of the Yukawa ball is large compared to the shielding length, the expansion process starts with the blow-off of the outermost layer. A rarefactive wave subsequently propagates radially inward at the speed of longitudinal phonons. This mechanism is fundamentally different from Coulomb explosions, which employ a self-similar expansion of the entire system. In the collisionless limit, the outer layers carry away most of the available energy. The simulations are compared with analytical estimates. In the collisional case, the expansion process can be described by a nonlinear diffusion equation that is a special case of the porous medium equation.

  12. Exotic Signals of Vectorlike Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Yu, Felix

    2016-12-06

    Vectorlike fermions are an important target for hadron collider searches. We show that the vectorlike quarks may predominantly decay via higher-dimensional operators into a quark plus a couple of other Standard Model fermions. Pair production of vectorlike quarks of charge 2/3 at the LHC would then lead to a variety of possible final states, including $t\\bar t + 4\\tau$, $t\\bar b\

  13. Energy loss of a nonaccelerating quark moving through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills vacuum or plasma in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.

    2016-08-01

    Using AdS /CFT correspondence, we find that a massless quark moving at the speed of light v =1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) vacuum at T =0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B , loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/} 6 π B . We also show that a heavy quark of mass M ≠0 moving at near the speed of light v2=v*2=1 -4/π2T2 B ≃1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 SYM plasma at finite temperature T ≠0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B ≫T2, loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/}6 π B v*2≃-√{λ/}6 π B . Moreover, we argue that, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD theories (when the adjoint QCD theory has four flavors of Weyl fermions and is at its conformal IR fixed point λ =λ*) have the same microscopic degrees of freedom (i.e., gluons and lowest Landau levels of Weyl fermions) even though they have quite different microscopic degrees of freedom in the UV when we consider higher Landau levels. Therefore, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties of N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD plasmas, as well as the rates of energy loss of a quark moving through the plasmas, should be the same.

  14. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  15. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  16. Collective modes in strongly correlated yukawa liquids: waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kalman, G; Rosenberg, M; DeWitt, H E

    2000-06-26

    We determine the collective mode structure of a strongly correlated Yukawa fluid, with the purpose of analyzing wave propagation in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. We identify a longitudinal plasmon and a transverse shear mode. The dispersion is characterized by a low- k acoustic behavior, a frequency maximum well below the plasma frequency, and a high- k merging of the two modes around the Einstein frequency of localized oscillations. The damping effect of collisions between neutrals and dust grains is estimated.

  17. The {rho} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}} and {omega} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}} decays in quark-model approach and estimation of coupling for pion emission by quark

    SciTech Connect

    Anisovich, A. V.; Anisovich, V. V.; Dakhno, L. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.

    2010-03-15

    In the framework of the relativistic and gauge-invariant spectral integral technique, we calculate radiative decays {rho}(770) {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}(140) and {omega}(780) {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}(140) supposing all mesons ({pi}, {rho}, and {omega}) to be quark-antiquark states. The qq-bar wave functions found for mesons and photon lead to a reasonably good description of data ( {Gamma} (exp){rho} {+-} to {gamma} {pi} 68 {+-} 30 keV, {Gamma} (exp) {rho} 0 to {gamma} {pi} 0 = 77 {+-} 28 keV, {Gamma} (exp) {omega} to {gamma} {pi} 0 = 776 {+-} 45 keV) which makes it possible to estimate the coupling for the bremsstrahlung emission of pion by quarks g{sub {pi} {identical_to}} g{sub {pi}}(u {sup {yields}}d{pi}). We have found two values for the pion bremsstrahlung coupling: vertical bar g{sub {pi}}vertical bar = 16.7 {+-} 0.3{sub -2.3}{sup +0.1} (Solution I) and vertical bar g{sub {pi}}vertical bar = 3.0 {+-} 0.3{sub -2.1}{sup +0.1} (Solution II). Within SU(6) symmetry for nucleons, Solution I gives us for {pi}NN coupling the value 16.4 {<=} g{sub {pi}NN}{sup 2}(4{pi}) {<=} 23.2, which is in qualitative agreement with the {pi}N scattering data, g{sub {pi}NN}{sup 2}/(4{pi}) {r_brace}{approx} 14. For excited states, we have estimated the partial widths in Solution I as follows: {Gamma}({rho}{sub 2S}{sup {+-} {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 10-130 keV, {Gamma}({rho}{sub 2S}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 10-130 keV, {Gamma}({omega}{sub 2S} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 60-1080 keV. The large uncertainties emphasize the necessity to carry out measurements of the meson radiative processes in the region of large masses.

  18. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  19. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  20. Pressure of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Wen-de

    2016-06-01

    A simple analytic expression for the pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid is found by fitting results from a molecular dynamics simulation. The results verify that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of the Wigner-Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytic expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochores, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to monolayer dusty plasmas.

  1. A Cloudy Quark Bag Model of S, P, and D wave interactions for the coupled channel antikaon-nucleon system

    SciTech Connect

    He, Guangliang

    1992-05-15

    The Cloudy Quark Bag Model is extended from S-wave to P- and D-wave. The parameters of the model are determined by K{sup {minus}}p scattering cross section data, K{sup {minus}}p {yields}{Sigma}{pi}{pi}{pi} production data, K{sup {minus}}p threshold branching ratio data, and K{sup {minus}}p {yields}{Lambda}{pi}{pi}{pi} production data. The resonance structure of the {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) are studied in the model. The shift and width of kaonic hydrogen are calculated using the model.

  2. Heavy Higgs boson coupled to vectorlike quarks: Strong C P problem and search prospects at the 14 TeV LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Alexandre; Camargo, Daniel A.; Dias, Alex G.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by a solution to the strong C P problem, we propose a model where a new heavy neutral C P -even Higgs boson couples to vectorlike quarks enhancing its production cross section whose dominant decays are into weak bosons. The masses of the vectorlike quarks are generated through interactions with a singlet scalar field charged under a broken global U (1 ) symmetry, providing a solution to the strong C P problem by means of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism. The diboson excess observed by the ATLAS Collaboration is discussed as the new heavy Higgs boson is a candidate to explain a possible signal in this channel. We also show that the 14 TeV LHC is capable of discovering this heavy Higgs with masses up to 1 TeV in the H →Z Z →ℓ+ℓ,SUP- ℓ'+ℓ'- search channel using boosted decision trees to better discriminate between signals and backgrounds and to tame systematic uncertainties in the background rates.

  3. Yukawa textures with an anomalous horizontal abelian symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Lavignac, S.; Ramond, P.

    1996-01-01

    The observed hierarchy of quark and lepton masses and mixings may be obtained by adding an abelian family symmetry to the Minimal Supersymmetric Model and coupling quarks and leptons to an electroweak singlet scalar field. In a large class of such models, this symmetry suffers from anomalies which must be compensated by the Green-Schwarz mechanism; this in turn fixes the electroweak mixing angle to be sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 3/8 at the string scale, without any assumed GUT structure. The analysis is extended to two distinct generalizations of the Standard Model: neutrino masses and mixings and R-parity violating interactions. (author). 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Models of Yukawa interaction in the two Higgs doublet model, and their collider phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Yagyu, Kei; Tsumura, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Possible models of Yukawa interaction are discussed in the two Higgs doublet model (THDM) under the discrete symmetry imposed to avoid the flavor changing neutral current at the leading order. It is known that there are four types of such models corresponding to the possible different assignment of charges for the discrete symmetry on quarks and leptons. We first examine the decay properties of Higgs bosons in each type model, and summarize constraints on the models from current experimental data. We then shed light on the differences among these models in collider phenomenology. In particular, we mainly discuss the so-called type-II THDM and type-X THDM. The type-II THDM corresponds to the model with the same Yukawa interaction as the minimal supersymmetric standard model. On the other hand, in the type-X THDM, additional Higgs bosons can predominantly decay into leptons. This scenario may be interesting because of the motivation for a light charged Higgs boson scenario such as in the TeV-scale model of neutrinos, dark matter, and baryogenesis. We study how we can distinguish the type-X THDM from the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider.

  5. Temperature dependence of nucleation in Yukawa fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-S.; Wilemski, G.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of gas-liquid nucleation in Yukawa fluids with gradient theory (GT) and density functional theory (DFT). Each of these nonclassical theories exhibits a weaker (i.e. better) temperature dependence than classical nucleation theory. At a given temperature, the difference between GT and DFT for the reversible work to form a critical nucleus gets smaller with increasing superaturation. For the temperature dependence, the reversible work for GT is very close to that for DFT at high temperatures. The difference between the two theories increases with decreasing temperature and supersaturation. Thus, in contrast to the behavior of a Peng-Robinson fluid, we find that GT can improve the temperature dependence over that of classical nucleation theory, although not always to the same degree as DFT.

  6. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-01

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  7. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-15

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  8. Hierarchy spectrum of SM fermions: from top quark to electron neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    In the SM gauge symmetries and fermion content of neutrinos, charged leptons and quarks, we study the effective four-fermion operators of Einstein-Cartan type and their contributions to the Schwinger-Dyson equations of fermion self-energy functions. The study is motivated by the speculation that these four-fermion operators are probably originated due to the quantum gravity, which provides the natural regularization for chiral-symmetric gauge field theories. In the chiral-gauge symmetry breaking phase, as to achieve the energetically favorable ground state, only the top-quark mass is generated via the spontaneous symmetry breaking, and other fermion masses are generated via the explicit symmetry breaking induced by the top-quark mass, four-fermion interactions and fermion-flavor mixing matrices. A phase transition from the symmetry breaking phase to the chiral-gauge symmetric phase at TeV scale occurs and the drastically fine-tuning problem can be resolved. In the infrared fixed-point domain of the four-fermion coupling for the SM at low energies, we qualitatively obtain the hierarchy patterns of the SM fermion Dirac masses, Yukawa couplings and family-flavor mixing matrices with three additional right-handed neutrinos ν R f . Large Majorana masses and lepton-number symmetry breaking are originated by the four-fermion interactions among ν R f and their left-handed conjugated fields ν R fc . Light masses of gauged Majorana neutrinos in the normal hierarchy (10-5 - 10-2 eV) are obtained consistently with neutrino oscillations. We present some discussions on the composite Higgs phenomenology and forward-backward asymmetry of toverline{t} -production, as well as remarks on the candidates of light and heavy dark matter particles (fermions, scalar and pseudoscalar bosons).

  9. Shear viscosity measurements in a 2D Yukawa liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, Volodymyr

    2005-03-01

    Shear viscosity was measured for a 2D strongly-coupled Yukawa liquid. First, we formed a dilute monolayer suspension of microspheres in a partially-ionized rarefied gas, i.e., a dusty plasma. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. We used a new in-situ method of applying a shear stress using the scattering forces applied by counter-propagating laser beams. The lattice melted and a shear flow formed. Using digital video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking, the microscopic dynamics of the shear flow are observed. Averaging the velocities of individual microspheres, a velocity flow profile was calculated. Using the Navier-Stokes equation with an additional frictional term to account for gas drag, we fit the velocity profile. The fit yielded the value of the shear viscosity. The kinematic viscosity of our particle suspension is of order 1 mm^2s-1, which is comparable to that for liquid water. We believe this is the first report of a rheological measurement in a 2D dusty plasma. This talk is based on V. Nosenko and J. Goree, PRL 93, 155004 (2004).

  10. Time-dependent correlation buildup in spherical Yukawa balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    In recent years it has become possible to create 3D dust crystals in experiments [1], where the particles arrange on concentric spherical shells. Compared to confined ions the interaction between the dust particles is screened, which has been shown to affect the shell occupation of the ground state [2], and the probability of metastable states [3,4]. Here we study dynamical processes in a trapped Yukawa plasma by means of Langevin dynamics simulations, which fully include the Coulomb correlations, the confinement and friction with the neutral gas. By cooling a weakly correlated initial state towards the strong coupling regime, the formation of concentric shells is observed. While in systems with Coulomb interaction the shells clearly emerge at the cluster boundary, they appear almost simultaneously for sufficiently large screening. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show that the sequence, in which radial order is established, is determined by the confinement potential.[4pt] [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, PRL 93, 165004 (2004)[0pt] [2] H. Baumgartner et al., New J. Phys. 10, 093019 (2008)[0pt] [3] D. Block et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 040701 (2008)[0pt] [4] H. K"ahlert et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036408 (2008)

  11. Continuum strong-coupling expansion of Yang-Mills theory: quark confinement and infra-red slavery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Paul

    1994-04-01

    We solve Schrödinger's equation for the ground-state of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory as an expansion in inverse powers of the coupling. Expectation values computed with the leading-order approximation are reduced to a calculation in two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory which is known to confine. Consequently the Wilson loop in the four-dimensional theory obeys an area law to leading order and the coupling becomes infinite as the mass scale goes to zero.

  12. Dimensional phase transition in small Yukawa clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Wells, K. D.

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the one- to two-dimensional zigzag transition in clusters consisting of a small number of particles interacting through a Yukawa (Debye) potential and confined in a two-dimensional biharmonic potential well. Dusty (complex) plasma clusters with n<=19 monodisperse particles are characterized experimentally for two different confining wells. The well anisotropy is accurately measured, and the Debye shielding parameter is determined from the longitudinal breathing frequency. Debye shielding is shown to be important. A model for this system is used to predict equilibrium particle configurations. The experiment and model exhibit excellent agreement. The critical value of n for the zigzag transition is found to be less than that predicted for an unshielded Coulomb interaction. The zigzag transition is shown to behave as a continuous phase transition from a one-dimensional to a two-dimensional state, where the state variables are the number of particles, the well anisotropy and the Debye shielding parameter. A universal critical exponent for the zigzag transition is identified for transitions caused by varying the Debye shielding parameter.

  13. Numerical studies of the melting transition in 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Kalman, G. J.

    2008-09-07

    We present the latest results of our systematic studies of the solid--liquid phase transition in 2D classical many-particle systems interacting with the Yukawa potential. Our previous work is extended by applying the molecular dynamic simulations to systems with up to 1.6 million particles in the computational box (for {kappa} = 2 case). Equilibrium simulations are performed for different coupling parameters in the vicinity of the expected melting transition ({gamma}{sub m}{sup {kappa}}{sup ={sup 2}}{approx_equal}415) and a wide range of observables are averaged over uncorrelated samples of the micro-canonical ensemble generated by the simulations.

  14. Yukawa couplings in superstring compactification. [in quantum gravity theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strominger, A.

    1985-01-01

    A topological formula is given for the entire tree-level contribution to the low-energy effective action of a Calabi-Yau superstring compactification. The constraints on proton lifetime in the Calabi-Yau compactification are discussed in detail.

  15. The non-perturbative unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entern, D. R.; Ortega, P. G.; Fernández, F.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years states in the quarkonium spectrum not expected in the naive quark model have appeared and created a lot of interest. In the theoretical side the study of the effect of meson-meson thresholds in the spectrum have been performed in different approximations. In a quark model framework, and in the spirit of the Cornell model, when a meson-meson threshold is included, the coupling to all the quark-antiquark states have to be considered. In practice only the closest states are included perturbatively. In this contribution we will present a framework in which we couple quark-antiquark states with meson-meson states non-perturbatively, taking into account effectively the coupling to all quark-antiquark states. The method will be applied to the study of the X(3872) and a comparison with the perturbative calculation will be performed.

  16. Yukawa effects on the mean motion of an orbiting body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Kotsireas, Ilias; Gómez, Guillem; Fullana, Màrius J.; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2016-11-01

    In today's gravity research there exist few modified gravitational theories which among other things predict the existence of a Yukawa-type correction to the classical gravitational potential. In this paper we study the Yukawa effect on the mean motion if any in a two-body scenario, assuming the influence of the existence of a possible Yukawa correction in the gravitational force of a primary. For that, we derive an equation in order to approximate the mean motion for secondary time rate of change of the orbiting body and its total variation over one revolution, under the influence of the non-Newtonian radial acceleration. Numerical results for Mercury and the companion star of the pulsar PSR 1913+16 are calculated. For specific values of the parameters α and λ, as given in the bibliography we have found that there is no corresponding Yukawa effect affecting the mean motion of the planet Mercury. On the other hand it appears that there is a periodic Yukawa effect that affects the mean motion of PSR+16 whose maximum numerical value occurs when the eccentric anomaly is equal to 180°.

  17. Molecular dynamics evaluation of self-diffusion in Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Hamaguchi, S.

    2000-11-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients of Yukawa systems in the fluid phase are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in a wide range of the thermodynamical parameters. The Yukawa system is a collection of particles interacting through Yukawa (i.e., screened Coulomb) potentials, which may serve as a model for charged dust particles in a plasma or colloidal particles in electrolytes. The self-diffusion coefficients are found to follow a simple scaling law with respect to the system temperature, which is consistent with the universal scaling (i.e., temperature scaling independent of the ratio of interparticle distance to screening length) observed by Robbins et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 88, 3286 (1988)] if the fluid system is near solidification. Also discussed is the velocity autocorrelation function, which is in part used to determine the self-diffusion coefficients through the Green-Kubo formula.

  18. Measurements of top quark properties at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 opened a whole new sector of investigation of the Standard Model; today top quark physics remains a key priority of the Tevatron program. Some of the measurements of top quark properties, for example its mass, will be a long-standing legacy. The recent evidence of an anomalously large charge asymmetry in top quark events suggests that new physics could couple preferably with top quarks. I will summarize this long chapter of particle physics history and discuss the road the top quark is highlighting for the LHC program.

  19. Higgs couplings in noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batebi, S.; Haghighat, M.; Tizchang, S.; Akafzade, H.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the Higgs and Yukawa parts of the Noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM). We explore the NC-action to give all Feynman rules for couplings of the Higgs boson to electroweak gauge fields and fermions.

  20. Masses of constituent quarks confined in open bottom hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.; Jovanović, P.; Milošević, J.; Ignjatović, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We apply color-spin and flavor-spin quark-quark interactions to the meson and baryon constituent quarks, and calculate constituent quark masses, as well as the coupling constants of these interactions. The main goal of this paper was to determine constituent quark masses from light and open bottom hadron masses, using the fitting method we have developed and clustering of hadron groups. We use color-spin Fermi-Breit (FB) and flavor-spin Glozman-Riska (GR) hyperfine interaction (HFI) to determine constituent quark masses (especially b quark mass). Another aim was to discern between the FB and GR HFI because our previous findings had indicated that both interactions were satisfactory. Our improved fitting procedure of constituent quark masses showed that on average color-spin (FB) HFI yields better fits. The method also shows the way how the constituent quark masses and the strength of the interaction constants appear in different hadron environments.

  1. On the corresponding states law of the Yukawa fluid.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Duda, Yurko

    2008-04-07

    We have analyzed the currently available simulation results as well as performed some additional Monte Carlo simulation for the hard-core attractive Yukawa fluid in order to study its corresponding state behavior. We show that the values of reduced surface tension map onto the master curve and a universal equation of state can be obtained in the wide range of the attractive Yukawa tail length after a certain rescaling of the number density. Some comparisons with other nonconformal potentials are presented and discussed.

  2. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  3. Yukawa and the Birth of Meson Theory: Fiftieth Anniversary for Nuclear Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1935 physicist Hideki Yukawa proposed the meson theory of nuclear forces. Background, influences, and chronology of Yukawa's work are presented and discussed. Yukawa was supported in his meson idea by Japan's strong emphasis on intuitive and creative approaches which are also evident in subsequent developments in that country. (DH)

  4. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  5. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings and flavour-changing neutral currents in t-channel single top quark production in pp collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Elgammal, S.; Mohamed, A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Asin, I.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; SavoyNavarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Golunov, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Korenkov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Mitsyn, V. 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    2017-02-01

    Single top quark events produced in the t channel are used to set limits on anomalous Wtb couplings and to search for top quark flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions. The data taken with the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0 and 19.7 fb-1, respectively. The analysis is performed using events with one muon and two or three jets. A Bayesian neural network technique is used to discriminate between the signal and backgrounds, which are observed to be consistent with the standard model prediction. The 95% confidence level (CL) exclusion limits on anomalous right-handed vector, and left- and right-handed tensor Wtb couplings are measured to be | f V R | < 0.16, | f T L | < 0.057, and - 0.049 < f T R < 0.048, respectively. For the FCNC couplings κ tug and κ tcg, the 95% CL upper limits on coupling strengths are | κ tug|/ Λ < 4.1 × 10- 3 TeV-1 and | κ tcg|/ Λ < 1.8 × 10- 2 TeV-1, where Λ is the scale for new physics, and correspond to upper limits on the branching fractions of 2 .0 × 10-5 and 4 .1 × 10-4 for the decays t → ug and t → cg, respectively.

  6. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  7. Dynamical symmetry breaking in models with the Yukawa interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ksenzov, V. G.; Romanov, A. I.

    2013-04-15

    The models with a massless fermion and a self-interacting massive scalar field with the Yukawa interaction are discussed. The chiral condensate and the fermion mass are calculated analytically through a one-loop approximation in (1 + 1)-dimensions. It is shown that the models have a phase transition as a function of the squared mass of the scalar field.

  8. Finite and Gauge-Yukawa unified theories: Theory and predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, J.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1999-10-25

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N=1 GUTs in which a complete reduction of couplings has been achieved. FUTs realize an old field theoretical dream and have remarkable predictive power. Reduction of dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI) relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exists RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of the {beta}- functions in certain N=1 supersymmetric GUTS even to all orders. Recent developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking (SSB) sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations also in this sector of the theories. Of particular interest is a RGI sum rule for the soft scalar masses holding to all orders. The characteristic features of SU(5) models that have been constructed based on the above tools are: a) the old agreement of the top quark prediction with the measured value remains unchanged, b) the lightest Higgs boson is predicted to be around 120 GeV, c) the s-spectrum starts above several hundreds of GeV.

  9. Yukawa Meson, Sakata Model and Baryon-Lepton Symmetry Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, R. E.

    It is difficult for me to grasp that this symposium is celebrating the jubilee of meson theory since I was a junior at Columbia College in 1935. I recall hearing a colloquium by Paul Dirac that year telling an enraptured audience about the infinite sea of negative energy states but I do not recall any special note being taken of the birth of an equally revolutionary concept, the Yukawa meson. Perhaps the reason was the publication of Hideki Yukawa's paper in an inaccessible Japanese journal, perhaps Dirac's electron theory was dealing with the well-known electromagnetic force whereas Yukawa' meson theory was put forth to understand the nature of two new forces - the nuclear and the weak. Whatever the reason, the situation changed drastically when I migrated to Cornell (to do my thesis under Hans Bethe during the years 1937sim39) and found a deep interest in meson theory. Thus, my own scientific career has almost spanned the period since the birth of meson theory but, what is more to the point, it has been strongly influenced by the work of Yukawa and his collaborators. It therefore gives me great pleasure to be able to talk at this MESON 50 symposium. As one of the oldest speakers, I shall respond in a loose way to Professor Maki's invitation to cover ``topics concerning the historical developments of hadron physics''. I shall select several major themes from the Japanese work that have had special interest for me. My remarks will fall under the four headings: (A) Yukawa Meson; (B) Sakata Model; (C) Baryon-Lepton Symmetry; and (D) Extensions of Baryon-Lepton Symmetry.

  10. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. 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G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-04-01

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s}=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured to be 0 .37 ± 0 .07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0 .014 π ± 0 .036 π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0 .15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .36 , 0 .10] and Im[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .17 , 0 .23] with a correlation of 0 .11. The results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass,more » $$m_t^{pole}$$, or the strong coupling constant, $$\\alpha_S$$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$$ GeV is obtained when constraining $$\\alpha_S$$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $$m_Z$$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $$m_t^{pole}$$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $$\\alpha_S(m_Z)$$ = 0.1151$$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $$\\alpha_S$$ using events from top-quark production.« less

  12. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass, $m_t^{pole}$, or the strong coupling constant, $\\alpha_S$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$ GeV is obtained when constraining $\\alpha_S$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $m_Z$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $m_t^{pole}$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $\\alpha_S(m_Z)$ = 0.1151$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $\\alpha_S$ using events from top-quark production.

  13. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured tomore » be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  14. Properties of gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa systems—A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman Joy, Ashwin

    2014-04-15

    Using 2D Molecular Dynamics simulation, the equilibrium and dynamical properties of a gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa liquid are investigated. We observe that due to asymmetry introduced in one direction by gravity, several interesting features arise. For example, for a given value of coupling parameter Γ, screening parameter κ, and according to a chosen value of gravitational force g (say in y-direction), the system is seen to exhibit super-, sub- or normal diffusion. Interestingly, x-averaged density profiles, unlike a barotropic fluid, acquires sharp, free surface with scale free linear y-dependence. As can be expected for a system with macroscopic gradients, self-diffusion calculated from Green-Kubo’s formalism does not agree with that obtained from Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion. A 2D angular-radial pair correlation function g(r, θ) clearly indicates asymmetric features induced by gravity. We observe that due to compression in y-direction, though in liquid state for all values of gravity considered, the transverse mode is found to predominant as compared to the longitudinal mode, leading to a novel Anisotropic Solid-like Yukawa liquid.

  15. Higgs couplings and new signals from Flavon-Higgs mixing effects within multi-scalar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Cruz, J. Lorenzo; Saldaña-Salazar, Ulises J.

    2016-12-01

    Testing the properties of the Higgs particle discovered at the LHC and searching for new physics signals, are some of the most important tasks of Particle Physics today. Current measurements of the Higgs couplings to fermions and gauge bosons, seem consistent with the Standard Model, and when taken as a function of the particle mass, should lay on a single line. However, in models with an extended Higgs sector the diagonal Higgs couplings to up-quarks, down-quarks and charged leptons, could lay on different lines, while non-diagonal flavor-violating Higgs couplings could appear too. We describe these possibilities within the context of multi-Higgs doublet models that employ the Froggatt-Nielsen (FN) mechanism to generate the Yukawa hierarchies. Furthermore, one of the doublets can be chosen to be of the inert type, which provides a viable dark matter candidate. The mixing of the Higgs doublets with the flavon field, can provide plenty of interesting signals, including: i) small corrections to the couplings of the SM-like Higgs, ii) exotic signals from the flavon fields, iii) new signatures from the heavy Higgs bosons. These aspects are studied within a specific model with 3 + 1 Higgs doublets and a singlet FN field. Constraints on the model are derived from the study of K and D mixing and the Higgs search at the LHC. For last, the implications from the latter aforementioned constraints to the FCNC top decay t → ch are presented too.

  16. Top quark mass in supersymmetric SO(10) unification

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Rattazzi, R.; Sarid, U. )

    1994-12-01

    The successful prediction of the weak mixing angle suggests that the effective theory beneath the grand unification scale is the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with just two Higgs doublets. If we further assume that the unified gauge group contains SO(10), that the two light Higgs doublets lie mostly in a single irreducible SO(10) representation, and that the [ital t], [ital b], and [tau] masses originate in renormalizable Yukawa interactions of the form 1[bold 6][sub 3][ital scrO]1[bold 6][sub 3], then also the top quark mass can be predicted in terms of the MSSM parameters. To compute [ital m][sub [ital t

  17. New GUT predictions for quark and lepton mass ratios confronted with phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2009-05-01

    Group theoretical factors from grand unified theory (GUT) symmetry breaking can lead to predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton masses (or Yukawa couplings) at the unification scale. Because of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections the viability of such predictions can depend strongly on the SUSY parameters. For three common minimal SUSY breaking scenarios with anomaly, gauge, and gravity mediation we investigate which GUT scale ratios m{sub e}/m{sub d}, m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}, and y{sub t}/y{sub b} are allowed when phenomenological constraints from electroweak precision observables, B physics, (g-2){sub {mu}}, mass limits on sparticles from direct searches as well as, optionally, dark matter constraints are taken into account. We derive possible new predictions for the GUT scale mass ratios and compare them with the phenomenologically allowed ranges. We find that new GUT scale predictions such as m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}=9/2 or 6 and y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}=3/2 or 2 are often favored compared to the ubiquitous relations m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}=3 or y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}=1. They are viable for characteristic SUSY scenarios, testable at the CERN LHC and future colliders.

  18. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. 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B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. 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T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. 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A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korneeva, N.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-06-01

    Our paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark, using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. Furthermore, our analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model and corresponding to a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported.

  19. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark (tHq), using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. The analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model, corresponding to a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Our paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark, using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. Furthermore, our analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model and corresponding tomore » a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported.« less

  1. Power law behavior of the zigzag transition in Yukawa clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Magyar, Andrew L.

    2010-11-15

    We provide direct experimental evidence that the width of a Yukawa cluster exhibits power law behavior during the one-dimensional (1D) to two-dimensional (2D) zigzag transition. Configurations of small dusty (complex) plasma clusters confined in a biharmonic potential well are characterized as the well anisotropy is varied. When the anisotropy is large the particles are in a 1D straight-line configuration. As the anisotropy is decreased the cluster undergoes a zigzag transition to a 2D configuration. The measured dependence of cluster width on anisotropy follows a power law. A second transition from the zigzag to an elliptical configuration is also observed. The results are in very good agreement with a model of identical particles interacting through a Yukawa potential.

  2. Meson properties in a nonlocal SU(3) chiral quark model at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Contrera, G. A.; Gomez Dumm, D.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2010-11-12

    Finite temperature meson properties are studied in the context of a nonlocal SU(3) quark model which includes flavor mixing and the coupling of quarks to the Polyakov loop (PL). We analyze the behavior of scalar and pseudoscalar meson masses and mixing angles, as well as quark-meson couplings and pseudoscalar meson decay constants.

  3. Review of Top Quark Physics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, R.; Narain, M.; Kumar, A.

    2007-12-01

    As the heaviest known fundamental particle, the top quark has taken a central role in the study of fundamental interactions. Production of top quarks in pairs provides an important probe of strong interactions. The top quark mass is a key fundamental parameter which places a valuable constraint on the Higgs boson mass and electroweak symmetry breaking. Observations of the relative rates and kinematics of top quark final states constrain potential new physics. In many cases, the tests available with study of the top quark are both critical and unique. Large increases in data samples from the Fermilab Tevatron have been coupled with major improvements in experimental techniques to produce many new precision measurements of the top quark. The first direct evidence for electroweak production of top quarks has been obtained, with a resulting direct determination of V{sub tb}. Several of the properties of the top quark have been measured. Progress has also been made in obtaining improved limits on potential anomalous production and decay mechanisms. This review presents an overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments in this field. We also provide a brief discussion of the implications for further efforts.

  4. The Top Quark, QCD, And New Physics.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dawson, S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup+}e{sup -}+ t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup+}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  5. Shocks in 2D Yukawa systems : thermodynamics and kinetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Michael S.; Marciante, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    The study of shock propagation has become a common way to obtain statistical information on a medium, as one can relate properties of the undisturbed medium to the shock dynamics through the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. However, theoretical investigations of shock dynamics are often done through idealized fluid models, which neglect kinetic properties. In this poster we study the propagation of shock waves in plasmas at the particle level, using molecular dynamics simulations to model the propagation of stationary shock waves in a two-dimensional Yukawa plasma. Stationary shocks are generated by a piston moving at constant speed, and macroscopic thermodynamic quantities such as temperature and pressure are computed from statistical averages. This theoretical investigation comprises two parts. First, we present the thermodynamic equilibrium properties of Yukawa plasmas under shock dynamics. Next, we focus on the influence of the kinetic aspects of the plasma, showing how transport coefficients of fluid models are related to the microscopic dynamics in phase-space and apply it to the Yukawa plasma case. Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  6. Bcc crystal-fluid interfacial free energy in Yukawa systems.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, V; Mijailović, A; Achim, C V; Ala-Nissila, T; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J; Löwen, H

    2013-01-28

    We determine the orientation-resolved interfacial free energy between a body-centered-cubic (bcc) crystal and the coexisting fluid for a many-particle system interacting via a Yukawa pair potential. For two different screening strengths, we compare results from molecular dynamics computer simulations, density functional theory, and a phase-field-crystal approach. Simulations predict an almost orientationally isotropic interfacial free energy of 0.12k(B)T/a(2) (with k(B)T denoting the thermal energy and a the mean interparticle spacing), which is independent of the screening strength. This value is in reasonable agreement with our Ramakrishnan-Yussouff density functional calculations, while a high-order fitted phase-field-crystal approach gives about 2-3 times higher interfacial free energies for the Yukawa system. Both field theory approaches also give a considerable anisotropy of the interfacial free energy. Our result implies that, in the Yukawa system, bcc crystal-fluid free energies are a factor of about 3 smaller than face-centered-cubic crystal-fluid free energies.

  7. Hideki Yukawa ---January 23, 1907 - September 8, 1981---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Y.

    1981-10-01

    Hideki Yukawa took the first step in his research in 1929 as an associate at Kyoto Imperial University (nowadays called Kyoto University). Most Japanese physicists of those days were isolated far from Western centers of physical science, where the `Sturm und Drang' of astonighing developments in the twentieth century physics had been roaring. There were only a handful of physicists in Japan who had already set to work in quantum physics, but never any one working on the quantum field theory and theoretical nuclear physics. Yukawa had to initiate his study of these frontiers of physical science by himself, without any teacher or senior scholar in this field. In 1935, Yukawa published his first paper with the title ``On the Interaction of Elementary Particles. I'', in which he developed the revolutionary idea of the meson theory. Although even the term `elementary particle' was not so popular in those days, the meson theory was proposed as a unified theory of interactions of elementary particles. His theory opened up a new fundamental view of Nature. This event might be regarded as a miracle in the history of Japanese physics. Through all of his works and thoughts, we are impressed by the simplicity of approach, the unfailing intuition and the creativity of a great master, which are deep-rooted in his culture. A sketch of his life, mainly based on his autobiographical material and partly based on the present writer's personal recollection, is presented to show his thought and activity.

  8. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of Shocks in Two-Dimensional Yukawa Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciante, M.; Murillo, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Particle-level simulations of shocked plasmas are carried out to examine kinetic properties not captured by hydrodynamic models. In particular, molecular dynamics simulations of 2D Yukawa plasmas with variable couplings and screening lengths are used to examine shock features unique to plasmas, including the presence of dispersive shock structures for weak shocks. A phase-space analysis reveals several kinetic properties, including anisotropic velocity distributions, non-Maxwellian tails, and the presence of fast particles ahead of the shock, even for moderately low Mach numbers. We also examine the thermodynamics (Rankine-Hugoniot relations) of recent experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 015002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.015002] and find no anomalies in their equations of state.

  9. Soft mean spherical approximation for dusty plasma liquids: One-component Yukawa systems with plasma shielding.

    PubMed

    Tolias, P; Ratynskaia, S; de Angelis, U

    2014-11-01

    The structure and thermodynamics of strongly coupled dusty plasmas are investigated with the soft mean spherical approximation. This integral theory approach is analytically solvable for Yukawa pair interactions yielding a closed-form solution for the direct correlation function. The pair correlation function, the structure factor, and basic thermodynamic quantities are calculated for a wide range of parameters. Exact consistency between the "energy"-"virial" thermodynamic routes and approximate consistency between the "energy"-"compressibility" paths is demonstrated. Comparison with extensive molecular dynamics results is carried out and a remarkable agreement from the Coulomb limit to the strongly screened limit is revealed. The soft mean spherical approximation is concluded to be particularly well suited for the study of dusty plasma liquids, uniquely combining simplicity and accuracy.

  10. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings and flavour-changing neutral currents in t-channel single top quark production in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Single top quark events produced in the t channel are used to set limits on anomalous Wtb couplings and to search for top quark flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions. The data taken with the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0 and 19.7 fb$$^{-1}$$, respectively. We performed an analysis using events with one muon and two or three jets. A Bayesian neural network technique is used to discriminate between the signal and backgrounds, which are observed to be consistent with the standard model prediction. The 95% confidence level (CL) exclusion limits on anomalous right-handed vector, and left- and right-handed tensor Wtb couplings are measured to be |f$$_{V}^{R}$$ |<0.16, |f$$_{T}^{L}$$ |<0.057, and -0.049 < f$$_{T}^{R}$$<0.048, respectively. Furthermore, for the FCNC couplings κ$$_{tug}$$ and κ$$_{tcg}$$, the 95% CL upper limits on coupling strengths are |κ$$_{tug}$$|/Λ<4.1×10$$^{-3}$$ TeV$$^{-1}$$ and |κ$$_{tcg}$$|/Λ<1.8×10$$^{-2}$$ TeV$$^{-1}$$, where Λ is the scale for new physics, and correspond to upper limits on the branching fractions of 2.0 × 10$$^{-5}$$ and 4.1 × 10$$^{-4}$$ for the decays t → ug and t → cg, respectively.« less

  11. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  12. Measurements and searches with top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2008-08-01

    In 1995 the last missing member of the known families of quarks, the top quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab near Chicago. Until today, the Tevatron is the only place where top quarks can be produced. The determination of top quark production and properties is crucial to understand the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. The most striking property of the top quark is its mass--of the order of the mass of a gold atom and close to the electroweak scale--making the top quark not only interesting in itself but also as a window to new physics. Due to the high mass, much higher than of any other known fermion, it is expected that the top quark plays an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which is the most prominent candidate to explain the mass of particles. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by one Higgs field, producing one additional physical particle, the Higgs boson. Although various searches have been performed, for example at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), no evidence for the Higgs boson could yet be found in any experiment. At the Tevatron, multiple searches for the last missing particle of the Standard Model are ongoing with ever higher statistics and improved analysis techniques. The exclusion or verification of the Higgs boson can only be achieved by combining many techniques and many final states and production mechanisms. As part of this thesis, the search for Higgs bosons produced in association with a top quark pair (t$\\bar{t}$H) has been performed. This channel is especially interesting for the understanding of the coupling between Higgs and the top quark. Even though the Standard Model Higgs boson is an attractive candidate, there is no reason to believe that the electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by only one Higgs field. In many models more than one Higgs boson are expected to exist, opening even more

  13. Charmonium with three flavors of synamical quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro et al.

    2003-12-23

    We present a calculation of the charmonium spectrum with three flavors of dynamical staggered quarks from gauge configurations that were generated by the MILC collaboration. We use the Fermilab action for the valence charm quarks. Our calculation of the spin-averaged 1P-1S and 2S-1S splittings yields a determination of the strong coupling, with {alpha}{sub {ovr MS}}(M{sub Z}) = 0.119(4).

  14. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. 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E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured to be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  15. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  16. Observability of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive.

  17. Hadron spectroscopy in lattice QCD with dynamical quark loops

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Oyanagi, Y.; Ukawa, A.

    1986-08-25

    Hadron mass calculations are carried out in lattice QCD on a 9/sup 3/ x 18 lattice for flavor-nonsinglet mesons and baryons. Dynamical quark loops are fully incorporated with the Langevin technique. The contribution of dynamical quark loops significantly modifies the hadron masses in lattice units, but its dominant part can be absorbed into a shift of the coupling constant for the quark mass range we explored.

  18. Quasi-Yukawa unification and fine-tuning in U(1) extended SSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiçyılmaz, Yaşar; Ceylan, Meltem; Altaş, Aslı; Solmaz, Levent; Ün, Cem Salih

    2016-11-01

    We consider the low scale implications in the U(1 ) ' extended minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (UMSSM). We restrict the parameter space such that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is always the lightest neutralino. In addition, we impose quasi-Yukawa unification (QYU) at the grand unification scale (MGUT). QYU strictly requires the ratios among the Yukawa couplings as yt/yb˜1.2 , yτ/yb˜1.4 , and yt/yτ˜0.8 . We find that the need for fine-tuning over the fundamental parameter space of QYU is in the acceptable range (ΔEW≤1 03), even if the universal boundary conditions are imposed at MGUT, in contrast to CMSSM and nonuniversal Higgs masses. The UMSSM with universal boundary conditions yields heavy stops (mt ˜≳2.5 TeV ), gluinos (mg ˜≳2 TeV ), and squarks from the first two families (mq ˜≳4 TeV ). Similarly, the stau mass is bounded from below at about 1.5 TeV. Despite this heavy spectrum, we find ΔEW≳300 , which is much lower than that needed for the minimal supersymmetric models. In addition, the UMSSM yields a relatively small μ term, and the LSP neutralino is mostly formed by the Higgsinos of mass ≳700 GeV . We also obtain bino-like dark matter of mass about 400 GeV. The wino is usually found to be heavier than Higgsinos and binos, but there is a small region where μ ˜M1˜M2˜1 TeV . We also identify a chargino-neutralino coannihilation channel and A -resonance solutions which reduce the relic abundance of LSP neutralinos down to the ranges compatible with the current WMAP and Planck measurements.

  19. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-06-05

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  20. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  1. Memorial Archival Libraries of Yukawa, Tomonaga, and Sakata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaiwa, Yoshinobu; Bando, Masako; Gotoh, Haruyoshi; Hayakawa, Hisao; Hirata, Kohji; Ito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kenji; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Konagaya, Daisuke; Konuma, Michiji; Kugo, Taichiro; Namba, Chusei; Nishitani, Tadashi; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kio; Tanaka, Sho; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    Brief history of the memorial archival libraries of Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga, and Shoichi Sakata, the great pioneers of nuclear and particle physics in Japan, is described. A recent project of maintaining the archival libraries is going on and the catalog databases of their documents are now almost ready for public access using Internet. In the project it is tried to make use of recent knowledge and technologies of archival science and the databases, and thus the documents themselves, willbe made accessible easier than before and may attract the interest of much broader range of audiences. Some interesting documents are picked up for demonstration.

  2. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  3. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Jain, S.; Rominsky, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Dyer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top-quark partner that is always produced from strong-coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top-quark production has been searched for in ever larger data sets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} data set that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top-quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and tt events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix-element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top-quark production of {sigma}(pp{yields}tb+X,tqb+X)=4.7{+-}1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top-quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}|=1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68<|V{sub tb}|{<=}1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  4. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-02-14

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  5. LHC phenomenology of SO(10) models with Yukawa unification. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theories (GUTs) with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) nonuniversal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global χ2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare this to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on Mg ˜ in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ˜1.2 TEV at the 1σ level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the lightest supersymmetric particle, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

  6. Wigner crystallization in quantum wires within the Yukawa approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Camacho, Reyna; Cruz-Hernández, Esteban; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2017-02-01

    One crucial and important aspect to account for the nature of the quantum wires is the understanding of the effects associated to many-body interactions between confined electrons. The inclusion of such many-body forces in any theoretical framework is a difficult and computationally demanding task. Then one has to make use of coarse-grained descriptions that allow one to incorporate the contribution of all the electrons. In a simple physical picture, the interaction between two electrons can be considered screened due to the presence of the other ones. If the latter are homogeneously distributed inside the wire, the interaction between the former can then be assumed of the Yukawa form. In this contribution, we report on the lower energy states of n -doped GaAs circular-quantum wires with two electrons in the conduction band interacting through a repulsive Yukawa potential. By varying the length and the electronic density of the wire, quite different trends in the electronic distribution are observed. By changing the material parameters to InSb and InAs nanowires, we found that our results are consistent with available experimental data that have reported the formation of Wigner crystals.

  7. Discovery of single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Gillberg, Dag

    2009-04-01

    The top quark is by far the heaviest known fundamental particle with a mass nearing that of a gold atom. Because of this strikingly high mass, the top quark has several unique properties and might play an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking - the mechanism that gives all elementary particles mass. Creating top quarks requires access to very high energy collisions, and at present only the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is capable of reaching these energies. Until now, top quarks have only been observed produced in pairs via the strong interaction. At hadron colliders, it should also be possible to produce single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. Studies of single top quark production provide opportunities to measure the top quark spin, how top quarks mix with other quarks, and to look for new physics beyond the standard model. Because of these interesting properties, scientists have been looking for single top quarks for more than 15 years. This thesis presents the first discovery of single top quark production. An analysis is performed using 2.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Boosted decision trees are used to isolate the single top signal from background, and the single top cross section is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb. Using the same analysis, a measurement of the amplitude of the CKM matrix element Vtb, governing how top and b quarks mix, is also performed. The measurement yields: |V{sub tb}|f1L| = 1.05 -0.12+0.13, where f1L is the left-handed Wtb coupling. The separation of signal from background is improved by combining the boosted decision trees with two other multivariate techniques. A new cross section measurement is performed, and the significance for the excess over the predicted background exceeds 5

  8. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  9. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  10. A More improved lattice action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    M. B. Oktay et al.

    2004-03-17

    We extend the Fermilab formalism for heavy quarks to develop a more improved action. We give results of matching calculations of the improvement couplings at tree level. Finally, we estimate the discretization errors associated with the new action.

  11. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chwalek, Thorsten; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-10-01

    bosons depends on the Yukawa coupling of the top quarks, the measurement of F{sub 0} is sensitive to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Alternative models can lead to an altered F{sub 0} fraction. In this analysis the W helicity fractions are measured in a selected sample rich in t{bar B} events where one lepton, at least four jets, and missing transverse energy are required. All kinematic quantities describing the t{bar t} decay are determined. As a sensitive observable, we use the cosine of the decay angle {theta}*, which is defined as the angle between the momentum of the charged lepton in the W boson rest frame and the W boson momentum in the top quark rest frame. The data used in this analysis were taken with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in the years 2002-2006 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 955 pb{sup -1}. Previous CDF measurements of the W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays used either the square of the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the b quark jet, M{sub {ell}b}{sup 2}, or the lepton p{sub T} distribution as a discriminant. The D0 collaboration used a matrix-element method to extract a value of F{sub 0}; in a second analysis the reconstructed distribution of cos {theta}* was utilized to measure F{sub +}. CDF gives the latest value of F{sub 0} = 0.74{sub -0.34}{sup +0.22}, while D measured F{sub 0} = 0.56 {+-} 0.31. The CDF collaboration also gives the current upper limit of F{sub +} < 0.09.

  12. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry and same-sign top quark pairs.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Li, Chong Sheng; Zhang, Hao

    2011-05-20

    The top quark forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron collider shows a large deviation from standard model expectations. Among possible interpretations, a nonuniversal Z' model is of particular interest as it naturally predicts a top quark in the forward region of large rapidity. To reproduce the size of the asymmetry, the couplings of the Z' to standard model quarks must be large, inevitably leading to copious production of same-sign top quark pairs at the energies of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We explore the discovery potential for tt and ttj production in early LHC experiments at 7-8 TeV and conclude that if no tt signal is observed with 1 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity, then a nonuniversal Z' alone cannot explain the Tevatron forward-backward asymmetry.

  13. Nonperturbative heavy-quark diffusion in the quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    van Hees, H; Mannarelli, M; Greco, V; Rapp, R

    2008-05-16

    We evaluate heavy-quark (HQ) transport properties in a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) within a Brueckner many-body scheme employing interaction potentials extracted from thermal lattice QCD. The in-medium T matrices for elastic charm- and bottom-quark scattering off light quarks in the QGP are dominated by attractive meson and diquark channels which support resonance states up to temperatures of ~1.5T(c). The resulting drag coefficient increases with decreasing temperature, contrary to expectations based on perturbative QCD scattering. Employing relativistic Langevin simulations we compute HQ spectra and elliptic flow in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. A good agreement with electron decay data supports our nonperturbative computation of HQ diffusion, indicative for a strongly coupled QGP.

  14. Determination of the top-quark mass from hadro-production of single top-quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Moch, S.; Thier, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new determination of the top-quark mass mt based on the experimental data from the Tevatron and the LHC for single-top hadro-production. We use the inclusive cross sections of s- and t-channel top-quark production to extract mt and to minimize the dependence on the strong coupling constant and the gluon distribution in the proton compared to the hadro-production of top-quark pairs. As part of our analysis we compute the next-to-next-to-leading order approximation for the s-channel cross section in perturbative QCD based on the known soft-gluon corrections and implement it in the program HATHOR for the numerical evaluation of the hadronic cross section. Results for the top-quark mass are reported in the MS ‾ and in the on-shell renormalization scheme.

  15. Equation of state and critical point behavior of hard-core double-Yukawa fluids.

    PubMed

    Montes, J; Robles, M; López de Haro, M

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical study on the equation of state and the critical point behavior of hard-core double-Yukawa fluids is presented. Thermodynamic perturbation theory, restricted to first order in the inverse temperature and having the hard-sphere fluid as the reference system, is used to derive a relatively simple analytical equation of state of hard-core multi-Yukawa fluids. Using such an equation of state, the compressibility factor and phase behavior of six representative hard-core double-Yukawa fluids are examined and compared with available simulation results. The effect of varying the parameters of the hard-core double-Yukawa intermolecular potential on the location of the critical point is also analyzed using different perspectives. The relevance of this analysis for fluids whose molecules interact with realistic potentials is also pointed out.

  16. New lattice action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Oktay, Mehmet B.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2008-03-01

    We extend the Fermilab method for heavy quarks to include interactions of dimension six and seven in the action. There are, in general, many new interactions, but we carry out the calculations needed to match the lattice action to continuum QCD at the tree level, finding six non-zero couplings. Using the heavy-quark theory of cutoff effects, we estimate how large the remaining discretization errors are. We find that our tree-level matching, augmented with one-loop matching of the dimension-five interactions, can bring these errors below 1%, at currently available lattice spacings.

  17. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  18. Ewald sums for Yukawa potentials in quasi-two-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mazars, Martial

    2007-02-07

    In this article, the author derive Ewald sums for Yukawa potential for three-dimensional systems with two-dimensional periodicity. This sums are derived from the Ewald sums for Yukawa potentials with three-dimensional periodicity [G. Salin and J.-M. Caillol, J. Chem. Phys.113, 10459 (2000)] by using the method proposed by Parry for the Coulomb interactions [D. E. Parry, Surf. Sci.49, 433 (1975); 54, 195 (1976)].

  19. a Field-Theoretical Investigation of 2-D Coulomb Systems with Short-Range Yukawa Repulsion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargocki, Krzysztof Piotr

    The two-dimensional Coulomb gas, consisting of positive and negative charges, is an important system which, on one hand, is equivalent to the vortex sector of the planar X-Y model, and, on the other, to the sine-Gordon field theory. In most treatments the charged particles are assumed to have a repulsive hard core which prevents arbitrarily close approaches. In the present work a new regularization scheme based on a soft short-range Yukawa repulsion between the Coulomb gas particles is presented. This formulation is transcribed into a local sine-Gordon-like field theory involving two Bose fields, one the original massless sine -Gordon field corresponding to the long-range Coulomb interaction and an auxiliary massive field corresponding to the short -range Yukawa repulsion. The resulting Lagrangian is not Hermitian. Using the techniques of functional integration, an effective field theory involving the Coulomb field alone is obtained by integrating out the massive field. The resulting Lagrangian is now Hermitian. Then a generalization of Peierls' inequality is used to make a variational calculation of the ground state energy of the Coulomb system. Unlike in the pure sine-Gordon case the theory has a well-defined ground state energy for (beta)q('2) > 2 (or (beta)c('2) > 8(pi)). A new method is used to derive the Kosterlitz -Thouless renormalization group equations, starting with the original sine-Gordon-like theory. The equations are identical to those found previously by other authors. A wave function renormalization is found to be necessary in addition to the normal ordering discussed by Coleman. A fermionized version of the theory is obtained, using the dictionary provided by Kogut and Susskind, which involves two Fermi fields and an electromagnetic potential. Position -space correlation functions are calculated at the critical point. The effective potential is computed in the one -loop approximation. A nonlinear field theory with derivative couplings is found to

  20. Structure and thermodynamics of hard-core Yukawa fluids: thermodynamic perturbation approaches.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Soon-Chul; Seong, Baek-Seok

    2011-07-21

    The thermodynamic perturbation theories, which are based on the power series of a coupling constant (λ-expansion), have been proposed for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of a hard-core Yukawa (HCY) fluid: one (A1-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the hard-sphere repulsion as a reference system. The other (A2-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the reference system which incorporates both the repulsive and short-range attractive interactions. The first-order mean-spherical approximation (FMSA) provided by Tang and Lu [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9828 (1993)] has been employed for investigating the thermodynamic properties of a HCY fluid using the alternative method via the direct correlation function. The calculated results show that (i) the A1 and A2 approximations are in excellent agreements with previous computer simulation results in the literature and compare with the semi-empirical works of Shukla including the higher-order free energy terms, (ii) the A1 and A2 approximations are better than the FMSA and the mean-spherical approximation, (iii) the A2-approximation compares with the A1-approximation, even though the perturbation effect of an A2-approximation is much smaller than that of an A1-approximation, and that (iv) the FMSA study is particularly of advantage in providing the structure and thermodynamics in a simple and analytic manner.

  1. Density profiles and solvation forces for a Yukawa fluid in a slit pore.

    PubMed

    Karanikas, S; Dzubiella, J; Moncho-Jordá, A; Louis, A A

    2008-05-28

    The effect of varying wall-particle and particle-particle interactions on the density profiles near a single wall and the solvation forces between two walls immersed in a fluid of particles is investigated by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Attractive and repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interactions are modeled by a versatile hard-core Yukawa form. These simulation results are compared to theoretical calculations using the hypernetted chain integral equation technique, as well as with fundamental measure density functional theory (DFT), where particle-particle interactions are either treated as a first order perturbation using the radial distribution function or else with a DFT based on the direct-correlation function. All three theoretical approaches reproduce the main trends fairly well, but exhibit inconsistent accuracy, particularly for attractive particle-particle interactions. We show that the wall-particle and particle-particle attractions can couple together to induce a nonlinear enhancement of the adsorption and a related "repulsion through attraction" effect for the effective wall-wall forces. We also investigate the phenomenon of bridging, where an attractive wall-particle interaction induces strongly attractive solvation forces.

  2. Structure and thermodynamics of hard-core Yukawa fluids: Thermodynamic perturbation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Soon-Chul; Seong, Baek-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The thermodynamic perturbation theories, which are based on the power series of a coupling constant (λ-expansion), have been proposed for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of a hard-core Yukawa (HCY) fluid: one (A1-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the hard-sphere repulsion as a reference system. The other (A2-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the reference system which incorporates both the repulsive and short-range attractive interactions. The first-order mean-spherical approximation (FMSA) provided by Tang and Lu [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9828 (1993)], 10.1063/1.465465 has been employed for investigating the thermodynamic properties of a HCY fluid using the alternative method via the direct correlation function. The calculated results show that (i) the A1 and A2 approximations are in excellent agreements with previous computer simulation results in the literature and compare with the semi-empirical works of Shukla including the higher-order free energy terms, (ii) the A1 and A2 approximations are better than the FMSA and the mean-spherical approximation, (iii) the A2-approximation compares with the A1-approximation, even though the perturbation effect of an A2-approximation is much smaller than that of an A1-approximation, and that (iv) the FMSA study is particularly of advantage in providing the structure and thermodynamics in a simple and analytic manner.

  3. Shear and bulk viscosities of quark matter from quark-meson fluctuations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Peixoto, Thiago C.; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-04-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear η and bulk ζ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-π and quark-σ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We found a nontrivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios η /s and ζ /s , where s is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the quasiparticle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for η /s has a minimum very close to the quantum lower bound, η /s =1 /4 π .

  4. Transport properties of quark and gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heiselberg, H.

    1993-12-01

    The kinetic properties of relativistic quark-gluon and electron-photon plasmas are described in the weak coupling limit. The troublesome Rutherford divergence at small scattering angles is screened by Debye screening for the longitudinal or electric part of the interactions. The transverse or magnetic part of the interactions is effectively screened by Landau damping of the virtual photons and gluons transferred in the QED and QCD interactions respectively. Including screening a number of transport coefficients for QCD and QED plasmas can be calculated to leading order in the interaction strength, including rates of momentum and thermal relaxation, electrical conductivity, viscosities, flavor and spin diffusion of both high temperature and degenerate plasmas. Damping of quarks and gluons as well as color diffusion in quark-gluon plasmas is, however, shown not to be sufficiently screened and the rates depends on an infrared cut-off of order the ``magnetic mass,`` m{sub mag} {approximately} g{sup 2}T.

  5. Search for W' boson resonances decaying to a top quark and a bottom quark.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-05-30

    We search for the production of a heavy W' gauge boson that decays to third generation quarks in 0.9 fb-1 of pp collisions at square root(s)=1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find no significant excess in the final-state invariant mass distribution and set upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction. For a left-handed W' boson with SM couplings, we set a lower mass limit of 731 GeV. For right-handed W' bosons, we set lower mass limits of 739 GeV if the W' boson decays to both leptons and quarks and 768 GeV if the W' boson decays only to quarks. We also set limits on the coupling of the W' boson to fermions as a function of its mass.

  6. Top-quark and electroweak results from ATLAS and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spighi, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    A selection of top-quark and electroweak results performed by ATLAS and CMS are presented. The results obtained with proton-proton collision at the center of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV cover the 2010-2012 data taking period. We present the total and differential cross sections of the top-quark pair, single top-quark and top-quark production in association with a Gauge boson, together with some of the main properties of the top-quark as mass, charge asymmetry and spin. Regarding the electroweak physics, we present the total cross sections of single and double bosons and show results on the lepton universality of electrons and muons, the weak mixing angle sinθw, the W helicity and the study of the Triple Gauge Coupling. All the presented results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  7. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  8. Density profile of strongly correlated spherical Yukawa plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, M.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Golubnychiy, V.; Baumgartner, H.; Piel, A.; Block, D.

    2006-10-01

    Recently the discovery of 3D-dust crystals [1] excited intensive experimental and theoretical activities [2-4]. Details of the shell structure of these crystals has been very well explained theoretically by a simple model involving an isotropic Yukawa-type pair repulsion and an external harmonic confinement potential [4]. On the other hand, it has remained an open question how the average radial density profile, looks like. We show that screening has a dramatic effect on the density profile, which we derive analytically for the ground state. Interestingly, the result applies not only to a continuous plasma distribution but also to simulation data for the Coulomb crystals exhibiting the above mentioned shell structure. Furthermore, excellent agreement between the continuum model and shell models is found [5]. [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] H. Totsuji, C. Totsuji, T. Ogawa, and K. Tsuruta, Phys. Rev. E 71, 045401 (2005) [3] P. Ludwig, S. Kosse, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. E 71, 046403 (2005) [4] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golubnychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel, and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006) [5] C. Henning, M. Bonitz, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, H. Baumgartner, V. Golubnichiy, and D. Block, submitted to Phys. Rev. E

  9. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  10. Three electroweak results from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, A.S., FERMI

    1998-08-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is needed to understand quarks and, hence, to determine the quarks` Yukawa couplings from experimental measurements. As a short illustration, the results of three lattice calculations are given.

  11. Light colored scalars and the up quarks phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Doršner, Ilja; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Košnik, Nejc

    2010-12-01

    A colored weak singlet scalar can accommodate the 2 σ disagreement of the measured forward-backward asymmetry from the Standard model prediction in the tt¯ production at the Tevatron. Such colored scalars appear in a class of grand unified theories. Their couplings to up quarks can be fully constrained using D-D oscillation observables, as well as di-jet and single top production measurements at the Tevatron. After making predictions for the flavour changing neutral current transitions in the charm and top quark sectors, we discuss the impact of these constraints on the texture of the up-quark mass matrix within a class of grand unified models.

  12. Structure of multi-component/multi-Yukawa mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L.; Arias, M.

    2006-09-01

    Recent small angle scattering experiments reveal new peaks in the structure function S(k) of colloidal systems (Liu et al 2005 J. Chem. Phys. 122 044507), in a region that was inaccessible with older instruments. It has been increasingly evident that a single (or double) Yukawa MSA-closure cannot account for these observations, and three or more terms are needed. On the other hand the MSA is not sufficiently accurate (Broccio et al 2005 Preprint); more accurate theories such as the HNC have been tried. But while the MSA is asymptotically exact at high densities (Rosenfield and Blum 1986 J. Chem. Phys. 85 1556), it does not satisfy the low density asymptotics. This has been corrected in the soft MSA (Blum et al 1972 J. Chem. Phys. 56 5197, Narten et al 1974 J. Chem. Phys. 60 3378) by adding exponential type terms. The results compared to experiment and simulation for liquid sodium by Rahman and Paskin (as shown in Blum et al 1972 J. Chem. Phys. 56 5197) are remarkably good. We use here a general closure of the Ornstein-Zernike equation, which is not necessarily the MSA closure (Blum and Hernando 2001 Condensed Matter Theories vol 16 ed Hernandez and Clark (New York: Nova) p 411). \\begin{equation} \\fl c_{ij}(r)=\\sum_{n=1}^{M}{\\cal{K}}_{ij}^{(n)}\\rme^{-z_{n}r}/r\\tqs {\\cal{K}}_{ij}^{(n)}=K^{(n)}\\delta_{i}^{(n)}\\delta_{j}^{(n)}\\tqs r\\geq \\sigma_{ij} \\label{eq1} \\end{equation} with the boundary condition for gij(r) = 0 for r<=σij. This general closure of the Ornstein-Zernike equation will go well beyond the MSA since it has been tested by Monte Carlo simulation for tetrahedral water (Blum et al 1999 Physica A 265 396), toroidal ion channels (Enriquez and Blum 2005 Mol. Phys. 103 3201) and polyelectrolytes (Blum and Bernard 2004 Proc. Int. School of Physics Enrico Fermi, Course CLV vol 155, ed Mallamace and Stanley (Amsterdam: IOS Press) p 335). For this closure we get for the Laplace transform of the pair correlation function an explicitly symmetric result

  13. QCD correction to single top quark production at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Penunuri, F.; Larios, F.; Bouzas, Antonio O.

    2011-04-01

    Single top quark production at the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be used to obtain high precision measurements of the V{sub tb} Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix (CKM) element as well as the effective tbW coupling. We have calculated the QCD correction for the cross section in the context of an effective vector boson approximation. Our results show a {approx}10% increase due to the strong interaction.

  14. Phase behavior of the modified-Yukawa fluid and its sticky limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll-Paschinger, Elisabeth; Valadez-Pérez, Néstor E.; Benavides, Ana L.; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2013-11-01

    Simple model systems with short-range attractive potentials have turned out to play a crucial role in determining theoretically the phase behavior of proteins or colloids. However, as pointed out by D. Gazzillo [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 124504 (2011)], one of these widely used model potentials, namely, the attractive hard-core Yukawa potential, shows an unphysical behavior when one approaches its sticky limit, since the second virial coefficient is diverging. However, it is exactly this second virial coefficient that is typically used to depict the experimental phase diagram for a large variety of complex fluids and that, in addition, plays an important role in the Noro-Frenkel scaling law [J. Chem. Phys. 113, 2941 (2000)], which is thus not applicable to the Yukawa fluid. To overcome this deficiency of the attractive Yukawa potential, D. Gazzillo has proposed the so-called modified hard-core attractive Yukawa fluid, which allows one to correctly obtain the second and third virial coefficients of adhesive hard-spheres starting from a system with an attractive logarithmic Yukawa-like interaction. In this work we present liquid-vapor coexistence curves for this system and investigate its behavior close to the sticky limit. Results have been obtained with the self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation (SCOZA) for values of the reduced inverse screening length parameter up to 18. The accuracy of SCOZA has been assessed by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Measurement of sin2 θeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  16. Measurement of sin2 θℓeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θℓeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θℓeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  17. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  18. Quark structure of chiral solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-05-01

    There is a prejudice that the chiral soliton model of baryons is something orthogonal to the good old constituent quark models. In fact, it is the opposite: the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong interactions explains the appearance of massive constituent quarks of small size thus justifying the constituent quark models, in the first place. Chiral symmetry ensures that constituent quarks interact very strongly with the pseudoscalar fields. The ''chiral soliton'' is another word for the chiral field binding constituent quarks. We show how the old SU(6) quark wave functions follow from the ''soliton'', however, with computable relativistic corrections and additional quark-antiquark pairs. We also find the 5-quark wave function of the exotic baryon Theta+.

  19. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  20. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  1. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Yukawa Systems by Particle-in-cell Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Zeiler, Andreas; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2002-12-01

    Aiming at a fully self-consistent numerical model for the simulation of complex plasmas in rf-driven discharges, a highly efficient parallel particle-in-cell code has been developed, allowing for realizations of up to one billion interacting particles. As a first test case, we consider a Yukawa system which represents the simplest approximation of a complex plasma. The Yukawa approach where the dust particles are dressed with an isotropic Debye potential can be regarded as a low-order description of the dust-plasma interaction in the bulk a rf-driven complex plasma, away from the electrode sheaths. The simulation code is tested by examining a liquid-solid phase transition, i.e., the formation of a face-centered-cubic Yukawa crystal. This is done in a periodic-cube sub-volume, containing 13,824 dust particles, which corresponds to a total system size of ≈ 884,000 particles.

  3. Spinless particles in the field of unequal scalar—vector Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzavi, M.; M. Ikhdair, S.; E. Thylwe, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present analytical bound state solutions of the spin-zero Klein—Gordon (KG) particles in the field of unequal mixture of scalar and vector Yukawa potentials within the framework of the approximation scheme to the centrifugal potential term for any arbitrary l-state. The approximate energy eigenvalues and unnormalized wave functions are obtained in closed forms using a simple shortcut of the Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method. Further, we solve the KG—Yukawa problem for its exact numerical energy eigenvalues via the amplitude phase (AP) method to test the accuracy of the present solutions found by using the NU method. Our numerical tests using energy calculations demonstrate the existence of inter-dimensional degeneracy amongst the energy states of the KG—Yukawa problem. The dependence of the energy on the dimension D is numerically discussed for spatial dimensions D = 2-6.

  4. TESTING YUKAWA-LIKE POTENTIALS FROM f(R)-GRAVITY IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, N. R.; Capozziello, S.; Capaccioli, M.; Romanowsky, A. J.

    2012-04-01

    We present the first analysis of extended stellar kinematics of elliptical galaxies where a Yukawa-like correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential derived from f(R)-gravity is considered as an alternative to dark matter. In this framework, we model long-slit data and planetary nebula data out to 7 R{sub eff} of three galaxies with either decreasing or flat dispersion profiles. We use the corrected Newtonian potential in a dispersion-kurtosis Jeans analysis to account for the mass-anisotropy degeneracy. We find that these modified potentials are able to fit nicely all three elliptical galaxies and the anisotropy distribution is consistent with that estimated if a dark halo is considered. The parameter which measures the 'strength' of the Yukawa-like correction is, on average, smaller than the one found previously in spiral galaxies and correlates both with the scale length of the Yukawa-like term and the orbital anisotropy.

  5. Quark-gluon plasma fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-12-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the properties of the fireball formed in early stages of nuclear collision, and argue that QGP formation must be expected down to 40A GeV in central Pb-Pb interactions.

  6. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Searches for Heavy Quark States at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hok-Chuen Tom; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    This talk highlights the latest results of heavy quark searches from the ATLAS collaboration, mainly on resonance searches and vector-like quarks (VLQs) searches. Searches for it resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy of 8 and 13 TeV are presented. Limits are set for BSM particles such as topcolor-assisted technicolor Z' TC , Kaluza-Klein (K-K) gluons gKK and K-K excitations of graviton GKK in the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions. VLQs arise naturally in many models such as Little Higgs and Composite Higgs and typically couple preferably to the third generation SM quarks and weak bosons. Limits are set for vector-like bottom (B) and top (T) quarks decay to lepton-plus-jets final states via Hb+X and Ht+X channels in two analyses using 8 and 13 TeV datasets from ATLAS.

  8. FKG inequality for the Yukawa/sub 2/ quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, G.A.; Rosen, L.

    1980-02-01

    WE establish the FKG correlation inequality for the Euclidean scalar Yukawa/sub 2/ quantum field model and, when the Fermi mass is zero, for pseudoscalar Yukawa/sub 2/. To do so we approximate the quantum field model by a lattice spin system and show that the FKG inequality for this system follows from a positivity condition on the fundamental solution of the Euclidean Dirac equation with external field. We prove this positivity condition by applying the Vekua--Bers theory of generalized analytic functions.

  9. New results with colour-sextet quarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D. K.; Kogut, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    We study QCD with 2 and 3 flavours of colour-sextet quarks. The 2-flavour theory is a candidate Walking Technicolor theory. Since we are attempting to distinguish whether this theory is walking or conformal, we also study the 3-flavour theory, which is believed to be conformal, for comparison. We simulate lattice QCD with 2 and 3 flavours of colour-sextet staggered quarks at finite temperatures to determine the scales of confinement and chiral-symmetry breaking from the positions of the deconfinement and chiral-symmetry restoration transitions. Unlike the case with fundamental quarks, these transitions are far apart. For 2 flavours the values of {beta} = 6/g{sup 2} for both transitions increase as Ta is decreased from 1/4 to 1/6 to 1/8, as expected for a theory whose coupling runs to smaller values as the lattice spacing is decreased. However, for the chiral transition, the increase in {beta} between Ta = 1/4 and Ta = 1/6 is much larger than the increase between Ta = 1/6 and Ta = 1/8. This suggests that between Ta = 1/4 and Ta = 1/6 we are at strong coupling where the theory is effectively quenched, while between Ta = 1/6 and Ta = 1/8 we are emerging into the weak coupling regime. It will require even smaller Ta values to determine whether the running of the chiral-transition coupling is controlled by asymptotic freedom and the theory walks, or if it reaches a non-zero limit when the transition becomes a bulk transition and the theory is conformal. The 3 flavour case at Ta = 1/4 and Ta = 1/6 behaves similarly to the 2 flavour case. Since this theory is expected to be conformal, the interpretation that we are seeing strong-coupling behaviour, inaccessible from the weak-coupling limit (continuum) is the most likely interpretation.

  10. Hadron-Hadron Interactions in the Constituent Quark Model: Results and Extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Swanson

    2001-01-01

    Hadronic interactions are discussed within the context of the constituent quark model. The ''Quark Born Diagram'' methodology is outlined, extensive applications to meson-meson and meson-baryon interactions are discussed, and general features of these interactions are highlighted. The second half of this document deals with shortcomings of the quark model approach and methods to overcome them. These include relativistic kinematics, unitarity, nonlocal potentials, coupled channel effects, and the chiral nature of the pion.

  11. Top quark mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula

    2008-03-18

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parametrized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parametrized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector.

  12. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2004-04-30

    The existence of the top quark, discovered by CDF and D0 in 1995, has been re-established in the burgeoning dataset being collected in Run 2 of the Tevatron at Fermilab. Results from CDF on the top quark production cross section and top quark mass are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The well-characterized top data samples will make it possible in the future to probe further for new physics in the top quark sector. This report summarizes recent CDF top quark physics results.

  13. Light Higgs and vector-like quarks without prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Mustać, Ivana

    2013-07-01

    Light vector-like quarks with non-renormalizable couplings to the Higgs are a common feature of models trying to address the electroweak (EW) hierarchy problem by treating the Higgs as a pseudo-goldstone boson of a global (approximate) symmetry. We systematically investigate the implications of the leading dimension five operators on Higgs phenomenology in presence of dynamical up- and down-type weak singlet as well as weak doublet vector-like quarks. After taking into account constraints from precision EW and flavour observables we show that contrary to the renormalizable models, significant modifications of Higgs properties are still possible and could shed light on the role of vector-like quarks in solutions to the EW hierarchy problem. We also briefly discuss implications of higher dimensional operators for direct vector-like quark searches at the LHC.

  14. Phase structure of the Polyakov-quark-meson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B.-J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Wambach, J.

    2007-10-01

    The relation between the deconfinement and chiral phase transition is explored in the framework of a Polyakov-loop-extended two-flavor quark-meson (PQM) model. In this model the Polyakov loop dynamics is represented by a background temporal gauge field which also couples to the quarks. As a novelty an explicit quark chemical potential and Nf-dependence in the Polyakov loop potential is proposed by using renormalization group arguments. The behavior of the Polyakov loop as well as the chiral condensate as function of temperature and quark chemical potential is obtained by minimizing the grand canonical thermodynamic potential of the system. The effect of the Polyakov loop dynamics on the chiral phase diagram and on several thermodynamic bulk quantities is presented.

  15. Hadron resonances with a quark core embedded in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Kiyotaka; Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto

    2011-05-06

    We investigate the excited baryons and mesons which cannot be described in terms of a simple constituent quark model, such as {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) as a resonance in a coupled channel hadron-hadron (baryon-meson or meson-meson) scattering with a 'bound state embedded in the continuum' (BSEC). For this purpose, we solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation including a BSEC in the momentum space. This BSEC is introduced by hand, as a state not originated from a simple baryon-meson or meson-meson system. We assume it comes from the three-quark state or quark-anti quark state and show such a picture can describe the {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) resonances.

  16. Superfluidity and vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavarapu, Satyanarayana Kumar

    This dissertation will elucidate specific features of superfluid behavior in dense quark matter, It will start with issues regarding spontaneous decay of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter. This will be followed by topics that explain superfluid phenomena from field theoretical viewpoint. In particular the first part of the dissertation will talk about superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter which are known to be energetically disfavored as compared to well-separated triplets of "semi-superfluid" color flux tubes. In this talk we will provide results which will identify regions in parameter space where the superfluid vortex spontaneously decays. We will also discuss the nature of the mode that is responsible for the decay of a superfluid vortex in dense quark matter. We will conclude by mentioning the implications of our results to neutron stars. In the field theoretic formulation of a zero-temperature superfluid one connects the superfluid four-velocity which is a macroscopic observable with a microscopic field variable namely the gradient of the phase of a Bose-Condensed scalar field. On the other hand, a superfluid at nonzero temperatures is usually described in terms of a two-fluid model: the superfluid and the normal fluid. In the later part of the dissertation we offer a deeper understanding of the two-fluid model by deriving it from an underlying microscopic field theory. In particular, we shall obtain the macroscopic properties of a uniform, dissipationless superfluid at low temperatures and weak coupling within the framework of a ϕ 4 model. Though our study is very general, it may also be viewed as a step towards understanding the superfluid properties of various phases of dense nuclear and quark matter in the interior of compact star.

  17. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  18. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  19. Full QCD hadron spectroscopy with two flavors of dynamical Kogut-Susskind quarks on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M. ); Ishizuka, N. , Ibaraki 305 ); Mino, H. ); Okawa, M. , Ibaraki 305 ); Ukawa, A. )

    1993-05-15

    A full lattice QCD simulation is carried out with two flavors of Kogut-Susskind staggered dynamical quarks using lattices of a size ranging from 4[sup 4] to 20[sup 4] at the gauge coupling constant [beta]=6/[ital g][sup 2]=5.7 with the quark mass of [ital m][sub [ital q

  20. Instabilities of Coulomb phases and quark confinement in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Asorey, Manuel; Santagata, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    The Gribov picture to quark confinement is based on the Coulomb phase instability due to the very large values that the effective α{sub s} coupling constant can reach in the infrared regime. The Gribov instability is driven by a vacuum decay into light quarks beyond a critical value of the coupling constant α{sub s}3π(1-√(2/3))/4 (for SU(3) gauge group). From first principles it has been shown the existence of an instability of the Coulomb phase in pure gauge theories for α≥√(2), much beyond the Gribov critical value. In this paper we analyze the effect of dynamical quarks in the instability of the Coulomb phase. We find a critical value of the coupling α=√(3) where a quark-antiquark pair creation mechanism leads to vacuum instability. However, the new critical value turns out to be larger than the pure gauge critical value α=√(2), unlike it is expected in the standard Gribov scenario. The result is analytically derived from first principles and provides further consistency to the picture where quark confinement is mainly driven by gluonic fluctuation instabilities.

  1. Study of heavy quark production with the Mark II at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.; Amidei, D.; Baden, A.; de la Vaissiere, C.; Gidal, G.; Gold, M.; Goldhaber, G.; Golding, L.; Herrup, D.; Juricic, I.

    1983-10-01

    The methods adopted by the Mark II collaboration to study heavy quark production at PEP are described. Two complementary techniques are used: D* tagging using the decay chain D*/sup +/. D/sup 0/..pi../sup +/, D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sup -/..pi../sup +/, and inclusive lepton tagging using the characteristic p/sub T/ distributions to distinguish contributions from b and c quarks. These techniques are used to derive information about heavy quark fragmentation and about the weak coupling of heavy quarks.

  2. Nucleon quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; W. Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent and spin-independent quark light-cone momentum distributions and structure functions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquarks channels are included. We find excellent agreement between our model results and empirical data.

  3. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  4. Nuclear equation of state in a relativistic independent quark model with chiral symmetry and dependence on quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Mishra, R. N.; Mohanty, D. K.; Panda, P. K.; Frederico, T.

    2013-07-01

    We have calculated the properties of nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner with a quark-meson coupling mechanism incorporating the structure of nucleons in vacuum through a relativistic potential model; where the dominant confining interaction for the free independent quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically average potential in equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. Corrections due to spurious center of mass motion as well as those due to other residual interactions, such as the one gluon exchange at short distances and quark-pion coupling arising out of chiral symmetry restoration, have been considered in a perturbative manner to obtain the nucleon mass in vacuum. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ and ω mesons through mean field approximations. The relevant parameters of the interaction are obtained self-consistently while realizing the saturation properties such as the binding energy, pressure, and compressibility of the nuclear matter. We also discuss some implications of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter along with the nucleon and nuclear σ term and the sensitivity of nuclear matter binding energy with variations in the light quark mass.

  5. Photon initiated single top quark production via flavor-changing neutral currents at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldouzian, Reza; Clerbaux, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Single top quark production is a powerful process to search for new physics signs. In this work we propose and investigate a search for top quark flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) via a photon using direct single top quark production events in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at CERN. We show that the direct single top quark final state can provide constraints on the strengths of top-quark-γ and top-quark-gluon FCNC couplings simultaneously. Results of a search for direct single top quark production at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV performed by the ATLAS Collaboration are used to set first experimental limits on the anomalous FCNC top decay branching fractions B (t →u γ )<0.05 % and B (t →c γ )<0.14 % via direct single top quark production. Finally, the sensitivity of the proposed channel for probing the top-quarkcouplings at 13 TeV is presented.

  6. Searches for new physics in the top quark samples at the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Scodellaro, Luca; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    Twelve years after the discovery of the top quark at Fermilab's Tevatron, they are now finally beginning to shed light on this peculiarily massive quark. With 1-1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector, they are able to probe the knowledge of the top quark physics, and to search for signals of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, they present results of measurements of top quark properties, as well as tests for the production mechanism of the top quark. They also describe CDF latest searches for beyond Standard Model couplings of the top quark. Finally, they present the most recent searches for direct production of new particles in the collected data samples.

  7. Quark matter or new particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  8. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model. (LEW)

  9. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  10. Quark forces from hadronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2009-04-17

    We consider the implications of the most general two-body quark-quark interaction Hamiltonian for the spin-flavor structure of the negative parity L = 1 excited baryons. Assuming the most general two-body quark interaction Hamiltonian, we derive two correlations among the masses and mixing angles of these states, which constrain the mixing angles, and can be used to test for the presence of three-body quark interactions. We find that the pure gluon-exchange model is disfavored by data, independently of any assumptions about hadronic wave functions.

  11. Valence quark spin distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1998-09-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the constituent quark model provide a natural explanation for many nucleon properties, including the {Delta} - N splitting, the charge radius of the neutron, and the observation that the proton's quark distribution function ratio d(x)/u(x) {r_arrow} 0 as x {r_arrow} 1. The hyperfine-perturbed quark model also makes predictions for the nucleon spin-dependent distribution functions. Precision measurements of the resulting asymmetries A{sub 1}{sup p}(x) and A{sub 1}{sup n}(x) in the valence region can test this model and thereby the hypothesis that the valence quark spin distributions are ''normal''.

  12. Quark mean field model with pion and gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xueyong; Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied within the quark mean field (QMF) model by taking the effects of pions and gluons into account at the quark level. The nucleon is described as the combination of three constituent quarks confined by a harmonic oscillator potential. To satisfy the spirit of QCD theory, the contributions of pions and gluons on the nucleon structure are treated in second-order perturbation theory. In a nuclear many-body system, nucleons interact with each other by exchanging mesons between quarks. With different constituent quark mass, mq, we determine three parameter sets for the coupling constants between mesons and quarks, named QMF-NK1, QMF-NK2, and QMF-NK3, by fitting the ground-state properties of several closed-shell nuclei. It is found that all of the three parameter sets can give a satisfactory description of properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei, moreover they also predict a larger neutron star mass around 2.3 M⊙ without hyperon degrees of freedom.

  13. Comparing the drag force on heavy quarks in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2007-12-15

    Computations of the drag force on a heavy quark moving through a thermal state of strongly coupled N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory have appeared recently. I compare the strength of this effect between N=4 gauge theory and QCD, using the static force between external quarks to normalize the 't Hooft coupling. Comparing N=4 and QCD at fixed energy density then leads to a relaxation time of roughly 2 fm/c for charm quarks moving through a quark-gluon plasma at T=250 MeV. This estimate should be regarded as preliminary because of the difficulties of comparing two such different theories.

  14. Tau flavored dark matter and its impact on tau Yukawa coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Wei; Guo, Huai-Ke; Li, Hao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of the tau flavored dark matter (DM) model by introducing two kinds of mediators (a scalar doublet and a charged scalar singlet). The electromagnetic properties of the DM, as well as their implications in DM direct detections, are analyzed in detail. The model turns out contributing a significant radiative correction to the tau lepton mass, in addition to loosing the tension between the measured DM relic density and constraints of DM direct detections. The loop corrections can be Script O(10%) of the total tau mass. Signal rates of the Higgs measurements from the LHC in the h→τ τ and h→ γ γ channels, relative to the Standard Model expectations, can be explained in this model.

  15. Low-energy effects of charged Higgs bosons with general Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Cruz, J. L.; Godina Nava, J. J.; Lopez Castro, G.

    1995-05-01

    We study a model with two Higgs doublets where FCNC's are allowed at the tree level. In this model, the interactions of charged Higgs bosons with fermions (H+/-ff¯') include a term that is not proportional to the fermion masses, which we constrain using the following low-energy processes: (i) τ decays (τ-->ντeνe,ντμνμ,ντπ), (ii) leptonic decays of pseudoscalar mesons (π,K-->lνl), and (iii) semileptonic b decays. With these constraints it is possible to make predictions; we illustrate this by presenting the rates for the (FCNC) decay c-->u+γ, the (second class-current) decay τ-->ντ+ηπ, and also the theoretical value of the neutron lifetime.

  16. Differences between heavy and light quarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.

    1997-11-10

    The quark Dyson-Schwinger equation shows that there are distinct differences between light and heavy quarks. The dynamical mass function of the light quarks is characterized by a sharp increase below 1 GeV, whereas the mass function of the heavy quarks is approximately constant in this infrared region. As a consequence, the heavy meson masses increase linearly with the current quark masses, whereas the light pseudoscalar meson masses are proportional to the square root of the current quark masses.

  17. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  18. Search for top quark decays via Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2017-02-15

    A search is performed for Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in the decays of top quarks. The search is based on proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse-femtobarns at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events in which a top quark pair is produced with one top quark decaying into a charm or up quark and a Higgs boson (H), and the other top quark decaying into a bottom quark and a W boson are selected. The Higgs boson in these events is assumed to subsequently decay into either dibosons or difermions. No significant excess is observed above the expected standard model background, and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is set on the branching fraction B(t -> Hc) of 0.40% and B(t -> Hu) of 0.55%, where the expected upper limits are 0.43% and 0.40\\%, respectively. These results correspond to upper limits on the square of the flavor-changing Higgs boson Yukawa couplingsmore » $$|\\lambda^{H}_{tu}|^2$$ < 6.9E-3 and $$|\\lambda^{H}_{tu}|^2$$ < 9.8 x 10$$^{-3}$$.« less

  19. Search for top quark decays via Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-02-15

    Here, a search is performed for Higgs-boson-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents in the decays of top quarks. The search is based on proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events in which a top quark pair is produced with one top quark decaying into a charm or up quark and a Higgs boson (H), and the other top quark decaying into a bottom quark and a W boson are selected. The Higgs boson in these events is assumed to subsequently decay into either dibosons or difermions. No significant excess is observed above the expected standard model background, and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is set on the branching fraction B(t → Hc) of 0.40% and B(t → Hu) of 0.55%, where the expected upper limits are 0.43% and 0.40\\%, respectively. These results correspond to upper limits on the square of the flavor-changing Higgs boson Yukawa couplingsmore » $$|\\lambda^{H}_{tu}|^2$$ < 6.9E-3 and $$|\\lambda^{H}_{tu}|^2$$ < 9.8 x 10$$^{-3}$$.« less

  20. The Legacy of Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga, and Shoichi Sakata: Some Aspects from their Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuma, Michiji; Bando, Masako; Gotoh, Haruyoshi; Hayakawa, Hisao; Hirata, Kohji; Ito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kenji; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Konagaya, Daisuke; Kugo, Taichiro; Namba, Chusei; Nishitani, Tadashi; Takaiwa, Yoshinobu; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kio; Tanaka, Sho; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga and Shoichi Sakata pioneered nuclear and particle physics and left enduring legacies. Their friendly collaboration and severe competition laid the foundation to bring up the active postwar generation of nuclear and particle physicists in Japan. In this presentation we illustrate milestones of nuclear and particle physics in Japan from 1930's to mid-1940's which have been clarified in Yukawa Hall Archival Library, Tomonaga Memorial Room and Sakata Memorial Archival Library.

  1. Supercritical fluid of particles with a Yukawa potential: A new approximation for the direct correlation function and the Widom line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tareyeva, E. E.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    We propose an approximation of a direct correlation function corresponding to the linearization with respect to - βϕ( r) of a generalized mean spherical approximation for a hard-core multi-Yukawa system of particles. We use the results to study the behavior of maximums of thermodynamic response functions in the supercritical region of a fluid with a two-term Yukawa potential imitating the Lennard-Jones potential.

  2. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  3. Quark Gluon Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  4. Application of the proximity force approximation to gravitational and Yukawa-type forces

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2009-06-15

    We apply the proximity force approximation, which is widely used for the calculation of the Casimir force between bodies with nonplanar boundary surfaces, to gravitational and Yukawa-type interactions. It is shown that for the gravitational force in a sphere-plate configuration the general formulation of the proximity force approximation is well applicable. For a Yukawa-type interaction we demonstrate the validity of both the general formulation of the proximity force approximation and a simple mapping between the sphere-plate and plate-plate configurations. The claims to the contrary in some recent literature are thus incorrect. Our results justify the constraints on the parameters of non-Newtonian gravity previously obtained from the indirect dynamic measurements of the Casimir pressure.

  5. Thermodynamic properties and static structure factor for a Yukawa fluid in the mean spherical approximation.

    PubMed

    Montes-Perez, J; Cruz-Vera, A; Herrera, J N

    2011-12-01

    This work presents the full analytic expressions for the thermodynamic properties and the static structure factor for a hard sphere plus 1-Yukawa fluid within the mean spherical approximation. To obtain these properties of the fluid type Yukawa analytically it was necessary to solve an equation of fourth order for the scaling parameter on a large scale. The physical root of this equation was determined by imposing physical conditions. The results of this work are obtained from seminal papers of Blum and Høye. We show that is not necessary the use the series expansion to solve the equation for the scaling parameter. We applied our theoretical result to find the thermodynamic and the static structure factor for krypton. Our results are in good agreement with those obtained in an experimental form or by simulation using the Monte Carlo method.

  6. Taste changing in staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Quentin Mason et al.

    2004-01-05

    The authors present results from a systematic perturbative investigation of taste-changing in improved staggered quarks. They show one-loop taste-changing interactions can be removed perturbatively by an effective four-quark term and calculate the necessary coefficients.

  7. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Déliot, Frédéric; Hadley, Nicholas; Parke, Stephen; Schwarz, Tom

    2014-10-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, and it is often seen as a window to search for new physics processes in particle physics. A large program to study the top-quark properties has been performed both at the Tevatron and LHC colliders by the D0, CDF, ATLAS and CMS experiments. The most recent results are discussed in this article.

  8. Density-Dependent Relations among Properties of Hadronic Matter and Applications to Hadron-Quark Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Hiroshi; Uechi, Schun T.

    2011-05-06

    Density-dependent relations among the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter and hyperonic matter, and properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars are shown by applying the conserving nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} hadronic mean-field theory. Nonlinear interactions are renormalized self-consistently as effective coupling constants, effective masses, and sources of equations of motion by maintaining thermodynamic consistency to the mean-field approximation. Effective masses and coupling constants at the saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter simultaneously determine the binding energy and saturation properties of hyperonic matter. The coupling constants expected from the hadronic mean-field model and SU(6) quark model for the vector coupling constants are compared by calculating masses of hadron-quark neutron stars. The nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} mean-field approximation with vacuum fluctuation corrections and strange quark matter defined by the MIT-bag model were employed to examine properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars. We found that hadron-(strange) quark stars become more stable at high densities compared to pure hadronic and strange quark stars.

  9. Taylor-Laplace Expansions of the Yukawa and Related Potential Energy Functions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    thle ’Yukawa po tenilt iaI i tseIf. Inl thle I iiit a,, thle 20 continued e xponei’i t 3 van is hes , t he Yu kawa pot en t i a I trains f’ rms i l the...analyses of nuclear models . The Woods-Saxon potential has a simple form: _-VO 1 l ’Ws 1+ exp[(r-rO)/p]. This function does not easily admit a Fourier

  10. Fcc-bcc transition for Yukawa interactions determined by applied strain deformation.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Robert S; Robbins, Mark O

    2004-05-01

    Calculations of the work required to transform between bcc and fcc phases yield a high-precision bcc-fcc transition line for monodisperse point Yukawa (screened-Coulomb) systems. Our results agree qualitatively but not quantitatively with recently published simulations and phenomenological criteria for the bcc-fcc transition. In particular, the bcc-fcc-fluid triple point lies at a higher inverse screening length than previously reported.

  11. Discrete perturbation theory for the hard-core attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Arenas, J.; Cervantes, L. A.; Benavides, A. L.; Chapela, G. A.; del Río, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we apply the discrete perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides and A. Gil-Villegas, Mol. Phys. 97, 1225 (1999)] to obtain an equation of state for the case of two continuous potentials: the hard-core attractive Yukawa potential and the hard-core repulsive Yukawa potential. The main advantage of the presented equation of state is that it is an explicit analytical expression in the parameters that characterize the intermolecular interactions. With a suitable choice of their inverse screening length parameter one can model the behavior of different systems. This feature allows us to make a systematic study of the effect of the variation in the parameters on the thermodynamic properties of this system. We analyze single phase properties at different conditions of density and temperature, and vapor-liquid phase diagrams for several values of the reduced inverse screening length parameter within the interval κ∗=0.1-5.0. The theoretical predictions are compared with available and new Monte Carlo simulation data. Good agreement is found for most of the cases and better predictions are found for the long-range ones. The Yukawa potential is an example of a family of hard-core plus a tail (attractive or repulsive) function that asymptotically goes to zero as the separations between particles increase. We would expect that similar results could be found for other potentials with these characteristics.

  12. Tuning the phase diagram of colloid-polymer mixtures via Yukawa interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González García, Álvaro; Tuinier, Remco

    2016-12-01

    Theory that predicts the phase behavior of interacting Yukawa spheres in a solution containing nonadsorbing polymer is presented. Our approach accounts for multiple overlap of depletion zones. It is found that additional Yukawa interactions beyond hard core interactions strongly affect the location and presence of coexistence regions and phase states. The theoretical phase diagrams are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between the two approaches supports the validity of the theoretical approximations made and confirms that, by choosing the parameters of the interaction potentials, tuning of the binodals is possible. The critical end point characterizes the phase diagram topology. It is demonstrated how an additional Yukawa interaction shifts this point with respect to the hard sphere case. Provided a certain depletant-to-colloid size ratio for which a stable colloidal gas-liquid phase coexistence takes place for hard spheres, added direct interactions turn this into a metastable gas-liquid equilibrium. The opposite case, the induction of a stable gas-liquid coexistence where only fluid-solid was present for hard spheres, is also reported.

  13. Discrete perturbation theory for the hard-core attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials.

    PubMed

    Torres-Arenas, J; Cervantes, L A; Benavides, A L; Chapela, G A; del Río, F

    2010-01-21

    In this work we apply the discrete perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides and A. Gil-Villegas, Mol. Phys. 97, 1225 (1999)] to obtain an equation of state for the case of two continuous potentials: the hard-core attractive Yukawa potential and the hard-core repulsive Yukawa potential. The main advantage of the presented equation of state is that it is an explicit analytical expression in the parameters that characterize the intermolecular interactions. With a suitable choice of their inverse screening length parameter one can model the behavior of different systems. This feature allows us to make a systematic study of the effect of the variation in the parameters on the thermodynamic properties of this system. We analyze single phase properties at different conditions of density and temperature, and vapor-liquid phase diagrams for several values of the reduced inverse screening length parameter within the interval kappa( *)=0.1-5.0. The theoretical predictions are compared with available and new Monte Carlo simulation data. Good agreement is found for most of the cases and better predictions are found for the long-range ones. The Yukawa potential is an example of a family of hard-core plus a tail (attractive or repulsive) function that asymptotically goes to zero as the separations between particles increase. We would expect that similar results could be found for other potentials with these characteristics.

  14. Quark Confinement and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    QCD was proposed as a theory for the strong interactions long before we had any idea as to how it could be that its fundamental constituents, the quarks, are never seen as physical particles. Massless gluons also do not exist as free particles. How can this be explained? The first indication that this question had to be considered in connection with the topological structure of a gauge theory came when Nielsen and Olesen observed the occurrence of stable magnetic vortex structures [1] in the Abelian Higgs model. Expanding on such ideas, the magnetic monopole solution was found [2]. Other roundabout attempts to understand confinement involve instantons. Today, we have better interpretations of these topological structures, including a general picture of the way they do lead to unbound potentials confining quarks. It is clear that these unbound potentials can be ascribed to a string-like structure of the vortices formed by the QCD field lines. Can string theory be used to analyze QCD? Many researchers think so. The leading expert on this is Sacha Polyakov. In his instructive account he adds how he experienced the course of events in Gauge Theory, emphasizing the fact that quite a few discoveries often ascribed to researchers from the West, actually were made independently by scientists from the Soviet Union…

  15. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  17. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry from the 3-3-1 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, E. Ramirez; Coutinho, Y. A.; Sá Borges, J.

    2011-03-01

    The forward-backward asymmetry AFB in top quark pair production, measured at the Tevatron, is probably related to the contribution of new particles. The Tevatron result is more than a 2σ deviation from the standard model prediction and motivates the application of alternative models introducing new states. However, as the standard model predictions for the total cross section σtt and invariant mass distribution Mtt for this process are in good agreement with experiments, any alternative model must reproduce these predictions. These models can be placed into two categories: One introduces the s-channel exchange of new vector bosons with chiral couplings to the light quarks and to the top quark, and another relies on the t-channel exchange of particles with large flavor-violating couplings in the quark sector. In this work, we employ a model which introduces both s- and t-channel nonstandard contributions for the top quark pair production in proton-antiproton collisions. We use the minimal version of the SU(3)C⊗SU(3)L⊗U(1)X model (3-3-1 model) that predicts the existence of a new neutral gauge boson, called Z'. This gauge boson has both flavor-changing couplings to up and top quarks and chiral coupling to the light quarks and to the top quark. This very peculiar model coupling can correct the AFB for top quark pair production for two ranges of Z' mass while leading to a cross section and invariant mass distribution quite similar to the standard model ones. This result reinforces the role of the 3-3-1 model for any new physics effect.

  18. Prospects for collider searches for dark matter with heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Artoni, Giacomo; Lin, Tongyan; Penning, Bjoern; Sciolla, Gabriella; Venturini, Alessio

    2013-08-05

    We present projections for future collider searches for dark matter produced in association with bottom or top quarks. Such production channels give rise to final states with missing transverse energy and one or more b-jets. Limits are given assuming an effective scalar operator coupling dark matter to quarks, where the dedicated analysis discussed here improves significantly over a generic monojet analysis. We give updated results for an anticipated high-luminosity LHC run at 14 TeV and for a 33 TeV hadron collider.

  19. Linearized Boltzmann transport model for jet propagation in the quark-gluon plasma: Heavy quark evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-07-01

    A linearized Boltzmann transport (LBT) model coupled with hydrodynamical background is established to describe the evolution of jet shower partons and medium excitations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We extend the LBT model to include both elastic and inelastic processes for light and heavy partons in the quark-gluon plasma. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is developed for the hadronization of heavy quarks. Within this framework, we investigate how heavy flavor observables depend on various ingredients, such as different energy loss and hadronization mechanisms, the momentum and temperature dependences of the transport coefficients, and the radial flow of the expanding fireball. Our model calculations show good descriptions of the D meson suppression and elliptic flow observed at the Larege Hadron Collider and the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The prediction for the Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV is provided.

  20. Wigner Distributions of Quarks for Different Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Jai; Mukherjee, Asmita; Nair, Sreeraj

    2017-03-01

    We calculate quark Wigner distributions using the light-front wave functions in a dressed quark model. In this model, a proton target is replaced by a simplified spin-1/2 state, namely a quark dressed with a gluon. We calculate the Wigner distributions for different polarization configuration of quark and the target state in this model.

  1. Quark models of dibaryon resonances in nucleon-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, J. L.; Huang, H. X.; Pang, H. R.; Wang Fan; Wong, C. W.

    2009-02-15

    We look for {delta}{delta} and N{delta} resonances by calculating NN scattering phase shifts of two interacting baryon clusters of quarks with explicit coupling to these dibaryon channels. Two phenomenological nonrelativistic chiral quark models giving similar low-energy NN properties are found to give significantly different dibaryon resonance structures. In the chiral quark model (ChQM), the dibaryon system does not resonate in the NNS waves, in agreement with the experimental SP07 NN partial-wave scattering amplitudes. In the quark delocalization and color screening model (QDCSM), the S-wave NN resonances disappear when the nucleon size b falls below 0.53 fm. Both quark models give an IJ{sup P}=03{sup +}{delta}{delta} resonance. At b=0.52 fm, the value favored by the baryon spectrum, the resonance mass is 2390 (2420) MeV for the ChQM with quadratic (linear) confinement, and 2360 MeV for the QDCSM. Accessible from the {sup 3}D{sub 3}{sup NN} channel, this resonance is a promising candidate for the known isoscalar ABC structure seen more clearly in the pn{yields}d{pi}{pi} production cross section at 2410 MeV in the recent preliminary data reported by the CELSIUS-WASA Collaboration. In the isovector dibaryon sector, our quark models give a bound or almost bound {sup 5}S{sub 2}{sup {delta}}{sup {delta}} state that can give rise to a {sup 1}D{sub 2}{sup NN} resonance. None of the quark models used have bound N{delta}P states that might generate odd-parity resonances.

  2. Landau levels of cold dense quark matter in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin-Jian; Liang, Jun-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The occupied Landau levels of strange quark matter are investigated in the framework of the SU(3) NJL model with a conventional coupling and a magnetic-field dependent coupling respectively. At lower density, the Landau levels are mainly dominated by u and d quarks. Threshold values of the chemical potential for the s quark onset are shown in the μ -B plane. The magnetic-field-dependent running coupling can broaden the region of three-flavor matter by decreasing the dynamical masses of s quarks. Before the onset of s quarks, the Landau level number of light quarks is directly dependent on the magnetic field strength B by a simple inverse proportional relation ki ,max≈Bi0/B with Bd0=5 ×1 019 G , which is approximately 2 times Bu0 of u quarks at a common chemical potential. When the magnetic field increases up to Bd0, almost all three flavors are lying in the lowest Landau level.

  3. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  4. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Menzione, A.

    1995-10-01

    Most of the material presented in this report, comes from contributions to the parallel session PL20 of this conference. We summarise the experimental results of direct production of Top quarks, coming from the CDF and C0 Collaborations at Fermilab, and compare these results to what one expects within current theoretical understanding. Particular attention is given to new results such as all hadronic modes of t{bar t} decay. As far as the mass is concerned, a comparison is made with precision measurements of related quantities, coming from LEP and other experiments. An attempt is made to look at the medium-term future and understand which variables and with what accuracy one can measure them with increased integrated luminosity.

  5. Bottom quark mass from {Upsilon} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    The bottom quark pole mass M{sub b} is determined using a sum rule which relates the masses and the electronic decay widths of the {Upsilon} mesons to large {ital n} moments of the vacuum polarization function calculated from nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. The complete set of next-to-next-to-leading order [i.e., O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2},{alpha}{sub s}v,v{sup 2}) where v is the bottom quark c.m. velocity] corrections is calculated and leads to a considerable reduction of theoretical uncertainties compared to a pure next-to-leading order analysis. However, the theoretical uncertainties remain much larger than the experimental ones. For a two parameter fit for M{sub b}, and the strong M{bar S} coupling {alpha}{sub s}, and using the scanning method to estimate theoretical uncertainties, the next-to-next-to-leading order analysis yields 4.74 GeV {le}M{sub b}{le}4.87 GeV and 0.096{le}{alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}){le}0.124 if experimental uncertainties are included at the 95{percent} confidence level and if two-loop running for {alpha}{sub s} is employed. M{sub b} and {alpha}{sub s} have a sizable positive correlation. For the running M{bar S} bottom quark mass this leads to 4.09 GeV {le}m{sub b}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}/2){le}4.32 GeV. If {alpha}{sub s} is taken as an input, the result for the bottom quark pole mass reads 4.78 GeV {le}M{sub b}{le}4.98 GeVthinsp[4.08 GeV {le}m{sub b}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}/2){le}4.28 GeV] for 0.114{le}{alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}){le}0.122. The discrepancies between the results of three previous analyses on the same subject by Voloshin, Jamin, and Pich and K{umlt u}hn {ital et al.} are clarified. A comprehensive review on the calculation of the heavy-quark{endash}antiquark pair production cross section through a vector current at next-to-next-to leading order in the nonrelativistic expansion is presented. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Decays of the b quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  7. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  8. Off-forward quark-quark correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Sabrina

    2006-09-01

    The properties of the nonforward quark-quark correlation function are examined. We derive constraints on the correlation function from the transformation properties of the fundamental fields of QCD occurring in its definition. We further develop a method to construct an Ansatz for this correlator. We present the complete leading order set of generalized parton distributions in terms of the amplitudes of the Ansatz. Finally we conclude that the number of independent generalized parton helicity changing distributions is four.

  9. Hadron formation from interaction among quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z. G.; Yang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the hadronization process of quark system. A phenomenological potential is introduced to describe the interaction between a quark pair. The potential depends on the color charge of those quarks and their relative distances. Those quarks move according to classical equations of motion. Due to the color interaction, coloring quarks are separated to form color neutral clusters which are supposed to be the hadrons.

  10. QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH NF=2+1 NEAR THE CONTINUUM LIMIT AT REALISTIC QUARK MASSES.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.

    2006-07-23

    We report on our study of QCD thermodynamics with 2 + 1 flavors of dynamical quarks. In this proceeding we present several thermodynamic quantities and our recent calculation of the critical temperature. In order to investigate the thermodynamic properties of QCD near the continuum limit we adopt improved staggered (p4) quarks coupled with tree-level Symanzik improved glue on N{sub t} = 4 and 6 lattices. The simulations are performed with a physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark masses which are in the range of m{sub q}/m{sub s} = 0.05 - 0.4. The lightest quark mass corresponds to a pion mass of about 150 MeV.

  11. Polyakov loop and heavy quark entropy in strong magnetic fields from holographic black hole engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critelli, Renato; Rougemont, Romulo; Finazzo, Stefano I.; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Polyakov loop and heavy quark entropy in a bottom-up Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton (EMD) holographic model for the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma that quantitatively matches lattice data for the (2 +1 )-flavor QCD equation of state at finite magnetic field and physical quark masses. We compare the holographic EMD model results for the Polyakov loop at zero and nonzero magnetic fields and the heavy quark entropy at vanishing magnetic field with the latest lattice data available for these observables and find good agreement for temperatures T ≳150 MeV and magnetic fields e B ≲1 GeV2 . Predictions for the behavior of the heavy quark entropy at nonzero magnetic fields are made that could be readily tested on the lattice.

  12. Probing anomalous Higgs couplings in H → ZV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Tanmoy; Srivastava, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the possibility of probing anomalous Higgs couplings in the rare decays H → ZV, V being a vector quarkonium state. These rare decays involve both gauge as well as the Yukawa sectors and either of them can potentially be anomalous. We show that the branching fractions for H → ZV decays in Standard Model (SM) are small, making it a sensitive probe for anomalous Higgs couplings originating from physics beyond SM. Moreover, as both V and Z can decay into pair of charged leptons, they provide experimentally clean channels and future LHC runs should observe such decays. We perform a model independent analysis and show how angular asymmetries can be used to probe these anomalous Higgs couplings, taking further decays of V and Z to pair of charged leptons into account. The angular asymmetries can provide significant information about anomalous Higgs couplings in both gauge and Yukawa sectors.

  13. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  14. Unexpected manifestation of quark condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    A comparative analysis of some quark ensembles governed by a four-fermion interaction is performed. Arguments in support of the statement that the presence of a gas-liquid phase transition is a feature peculiar to them are adduced. The instability of small quark droplets is discussed and is attributed to the formation of a chiral soliton. The stability of baryon matter is due to a mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter.

  15. Deconfining and chiral transitions of finite-temperature quantum chromodynamics in the presence of dynamical quark loops

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Ukawa, A.

    1986-08-04

    Finite-temperature behavior of quantum chromodynamics is investigated with the Langevin technique including the dynamical quark loops. The deconfining and chiral transitions occur at the same temperature. The strength of transition weakens initially as the quark mass decreases from infinity, but at small quark masses it strengthens again and shows the characteristic of a first-order transition. We estimate the inverse coupling constant at zero quark mass to be beta/sub c/ = 6/g/sub c//sup 2/approx. =4.9--5.0 for four flavors on an 8/sup 3/ x 4 lattice.

  16. Radial Correlations Between Two Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Koponen, J.; Pennanen, P.; Michael, C.

    2002-04-01

    In nuclear many-body problems the short-range correlation between two nucleons is well described by the corresponding correlation in the two-body problem. Therefore, as a first step in any attempt at an analogous description of many-quark systems, it is necessary to know the two-quark correlation. With this in mind, we study the light quark distribution in a heavy-light meson with a static heavy quark. The charge and matter radial distributions of these heavy-light mesons are measured on a lattice with a light quark mass about that of the strange quark. Both distributions can be well fitted upto r ≈ 0.7 fm with the exponential form wi2 (r), where Wi(r) = A exp(-r/ri). For the charge(c) and matter(m) distributions rc ≈ 0.32(2)fm and rm ≈ 0.24(2)fm. We also discuss the normalisation of the total charge (defined to be unity in the continuum limit) and matter integrated over all space, finding 1.30(5) and 0.4(1) respectively for a lattice spacing ≈ 0.17 fm.

  17. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  18. The Chiral Quark Soliton Model for the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, T.; Toki, H.

    1992-03-01

    We study the chiral invariant quark model lagrangians under the Hartree approximation for construction of a hedgehog solution with the baryon number B = 1. We take into account the Dirac sea contributions to the energy and various densities in terms of the heat-kernel method. With the parameters of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model lagrangian fixed by the meson properties, we do not find any B = 1 hedgehog solutions except for one case, even which is, however, unstable against small perturbation. We study then the Diakonov-Petrov model lagrangian, which is introduced by investigating the properties of the quark field in the instanton background in QCD. We find in this case stable hedgehog solutions under the heat-kernel regularization method in some parameter region. We study also the isoscalar-vector type (omega-meson type) correlations among quarks for the nucleon properties. The hedgehog energy, the baryon root mean square radius and the axial vector coupling constant g_{A} are calculated as a function of the omega-quark coupling strength.

  19. Molecular thermodynamic modeling of ionic liquids using the perturbation-based linear Yukawa isotherm regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi Mahboub, Mahdi; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an extensive study on a novel approach to the molecular modeling of pure ionic liquids (ILs) that incorporates the perturbed thermodynamic linear Yukawa isotherm regularity (LYIR), which is derived based on an effective nearest neighboring pair attractive interaction of the Yukawa potential. The LYIR was used to model the densities of ILs up to high pressures (35 MPa) and in the temperature range 293.15 to 393.15 K. To use the LYIR for ILs, a simple molecular model was proposed to describe their molecular structure, in which they were considered as a liquid consisting of the ion pairs moving together in the fluid, and each ion pair was assumed to be a one-center spherical united atom. The ILs under consideration contained one of the IL cations [C2mim]+, [C4mim]+, [C7mim]+, [C8mim]+, [C3mpy]+, [C3mpip]+, [C3mpyr]+ or [C4mpyr]+, and one of the IL anions [BF4]-, [C(CN)3]-, [CF3SO4]- or [NTf2]-. The reliability and physical significance of the parameters as well as the proposed molecular model were tested by calculating the densities of pure imidazolium-, pyridinium-, piperidinium- and pyrrolidimium-based ILs. The results showed that the LYIR can be used to predict and reproduce the density of ILs in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the LYIR enabled us to determine the physical quantities, such as an effective Yukawa screening length, λ eff, the product of the effective energy well depth and the effective coordination number, (ɛ eff/k)z eff, the contribution of the non-reference thermal pressure and also the influence of the anionic and cationic structure on the λ eff parameter. The standard deviation of the IL densities predicted in this work is lower than those calculated by the one other important equation of state reported in the literature.

  20. Flavor Physics in the Quark Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, Mario; Asner, David Mark; Bauer, Daniel Adams; Becher, Thomas G.; Beneke, M.; Bevan, Adrian John; Blanke, Monika; Bloise, C.; Bona, Marcella; Bondar, Alexander E.; Bozzi, Concezio; Brod, Joachim; Buras, Andrzej J.; Cabibbo, N.; Carbone, A.; Cavoto, Gianluca; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ciuchini, Marco; Coleman, Jonathon P.; Cronin-Hennessy, Daniel P.; Dalseno, J.P.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Glasgow U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Freiburg U. /Charles U. /Pisa U. /Vienna, OAW /Imperial Coll., London /Bergen U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Munich, Tech. U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Southampton U. /INFN, Rome /Nara Women's U. /Florida U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Edinburgh U. /Warwick U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /KEK, Tsukuba /Bern U. /CERN /Munich, Tech. U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Wayne State U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /CERN /Frascati /Brookhaven /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Munich, Tech. U. /Siegen U. /Imperial Coll., London /Victoria U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Fermilab /Washington U., St. Louis /Frascati /Warwick U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Madras /Melbourne U. /Princeton U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome3 /Fermilab /SLAC /York U., Canada /Brookhaven /UC, Irvine /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Valencia U., IFIC /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona U. /Warwick U. /Tata Inst. /Frascati /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Vienna U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LPT /Frascati /Munich, Tech. U. /Brookhaven /Bern U. /CERN /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Wayne State U. /Valencia U., IFIC /CERN /Kentucky U. /Oxford U. /Iowa State U. /Bristol U. /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /CERN /Orsay, LAL /Glasgow U. /INFN, Padua /Queen Mary, U. of London /Texas U. /LPHE, Lausanne /Fermilab /UC, Santa Cruz /Vienna, OAW /Cincinnati U. /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /Ohio State U. /Purdue U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Frascati /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Rome /Bern U. /Karlsruhe U. /Brookhaven /CERN /Paris U., VI-VII /Zurich, ETH /Pisa U. /Frascati /Oxford U. /Orsay, LAL /INFN, Rome2 /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome3 /Princeton U. /Fermilab /Queen's U., Kingston /KEK, Tsukuba /Melbourne U. /Brookhaven /Indiana U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Pisa U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe U. /Oxford U. /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Edinburgh U. /CERN

    2010-08-26

    In the past decade, one of the major challenges of particle physics has been to gain an in-depth understanding of the role of quark flavor. In this time frame, measurements and the theoretical interpretation of their results have advanced tremendously. A much broader understanding of flavor particles has been achieved, apart from their masses and quantum numbers, there now exist detailed measurements of the characteristics of their interactions allowing stringent tests of Standard Model predictions. Among the most interesting phenomena of flavor physics is the violation of the CP symmetry that has been subtle and difficult to explore. In the past, observations of CP violation were confined to neutral K mesons, but since the early 1990s, a large number of CP-violating processes have been studied in detail in neutral B mesons. In parallel, measurements of the couplings of the heavy quarks and the dynamics for their decays in large samples of K,D, and B mesons have been greatly improved in accuracy and the results are being used as probes in the search for deviations from the Standard Model. In the near future, there will be a transition from the current to a new generation of experiments, thus a review of the status of quark flavor physics is timely. This report is the result of the work of the physicists attending the 5th CKM workshop, hosted by the University of Rome 'La Sapienza', September 9-13, 2008. It summarizes the results of the current generation of experiments that is about to be completed and it confronts these results with the theoretical understanding of the field which has greatly improved in the past decade.

  1. Static structure factor and thermodynamic properties of a binary Yukawa mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Óscar; Herrera, J. N.; Blum, L.

    2003-07-01

    We use the solution of the Ornstein Zernike equation in the mean spherical approximation to find the static structure factor for a hard spheres Yukawa fluid. The thermodynamic and the structure properties of this fluid are given in terms of an accumulative parameter Γ, which satisfies a polynomial equation of degree n⩾4. This parameter is obtained mumerically by an iterative method. We study binary mixtures with a factored interaction for which the classical Lorentz-Berthelot rules are satisfied. Our result for the static structure factor and thermodynamics properties are in good agreement with the computer simulations and former numerical solutions.

  2. Isotropic-nematic transition and cholesteric phases of helical Yukawa rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnhold, A.; Schilling, T.

    2016-11-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of helical Yukawa rods as a model for chiral liquid crystal mesogens. To simulate the cholesteric phase, we introduce a new simulation method that uses soft walls and self-determined boundary conditions. We observe that the isotropic-nematic phase transition is shifted to lower volume fractions with decreasing salt concentration as well as with increasing internal pitch of the rods. For particular sets of interaction parameters, the sense of the cholesteric pitch inverts, i.e., depending on concentration, mesogens of a given handedness can produce cholesteric phases of both chiral senses.

  3. Scalar mass stability bound in a simple Yukawa-theory from renormalization group equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovác, A.; Kaposvári, I.; Patkós, A.

    2017-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) equations are constructed for a simple Yukawa-model with discrete chiral symmetry, including also the effect of a nonzero composite fermion background beyond the conventional scalar condensate. The evolution of the effective potential of the model, generically depending on two invariants, is explored with the help of power series expansions. Systematic investigation of the effect of a class of irrelevant operators on the lower (stability) bound allows a non-perturbative extension of the maximal cutoff value consistent with any given mass of the scalar field.

  4. Constraints on composition independent Yukawa interactions inferred from measurements of the Newtonian gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect

    Trenkel, C.

    2008-06-15

    Two independent measurements of the Newtonian gravitational constant G, with stated relative uncertainties below 20 ppm, have been reported in the literature. These measurements were carried out at significantly different separations between source and test masses. The close agreement between the two reported values is used to derive constraints on the existence of a single, composition-independent Yukawa interaction at intermediate ranges. These inferred limits are tighter than those obtained through direct search, for ranges between about 2 cm and 1 m. At a range of 10 cm, the improvement is by a factor of approximately 50.

  5. Decay of a Yukawa fermion at finite temperature and applications to leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiessig, Clemens P.; Pluemacher, Michael; Thoma, Markus H.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate the decay rate of a Yukawa fermion in a thermal bath using finite-temperature cutting rules and effective Green's functions according to the hard thermal loop resummation technique. We apply this result to the decay of a heavy Majorana neutrino in leptogenesis. Compared to the usual approach where thermal masses are inserted into the kinematics of final states, we find that deviations arise through two different leptonic dispersion relations. The decay rate differs from the usual approach by more than 1 order of magnitude in the temperature range which is interesting for the weak washout regime. We discuss how to arrive at consistent finite-temperature treatments of leptogenesis.

  6. Three-dimensional noncommutative Yukawa theory: Induced effective action and propagating modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalo, R.; Ghasemkhani, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we establish the analysis of noncommutative Yukawa theory, encompassing neutral and charged scalar fields. We approach the analysis by considering carefully the derivation of the respective effective actions. Hence, based on the obtained results, we compute the one-loop contributions to the neutral and charged scalar field self-energy, as well as to the Chern-Simons polarization tensor. In order to properly define the behavior of the quantum fields, the known UV/IR mixing due to radiative corrections is analyzed in the one-loop physical dispersion relation of the scalar and gauge fields.

  7. Cores in dwarf galaxies from dark matter with a Yukawa potential.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham; Weiner, Neal

    2011-04-29

    We show that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the recently observed cores in dwarf galaxies without affecting the dynamics of objects with a much larger velocity dispersion, such as clusters of galaxies. The velocity dependence of the associated cross section as well as the possible exothermic nature of the interaction alleviates earlier concerns about strongly interacting dark matter. Dark matter evaporation in low-mass objects might explain the observed deficit of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way halo and have important implications for the first galaxies and reionization.

  8. Neutrino mass matrices from two zero 3 × 2 Yukawa textures and minimal d = 5 entries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achelashvili, Avtandil; Tavartkiladze, Zurab

    2016-05-01

    Aiming to relate leptonic CP violating phase δ to the cosmological CP asymmetry, we study the extension of MSSM by two quasi-degenerate (strictly degenerate at tree level) right-handed neutrinos and consider all possible two texture zero 3 × 2 Yukawa matrices plus one ΔL = 2 dimension five (d = 5) operator contributing to the light neutrino mass matrix. We classify all experimentally viable mass matrices, leading to several predictions, and analytically derive predictive relations. We also relate the CP violating δ phase to the CP phase of the thermal leptogenesis.

  9. Melting in three-dimensional and two-dimensional Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Koss, X. G.

    2015-10-01

    Solid-liquid phase transitions in three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) Yukawa systems were studied numerically and analytically, including the melting of the fcc and bcc 3D lattices, and of a hexagonal primitive (hp) 2D lattice. An approach is proposed for the determination of the melting lines in these systems. The suggested approach takes into account the nonlinearity (anharmonicity) of pair interaction forces and allows one to correctly predict the conditions of melting for 3D and 2D crystal systems. The obtained results are compared with the existing theoretical and numerical data.

  10. Vapor-liquid surface tension of strong short-range Yukawa fluid.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, G; Bárcenas, M; Orea, P

    2011-04-21

    The thermodynamic properties of strong short-range attractive Yukawa fluids, κ = 10, 9, 8, and 7, are determined by combining the slab technique with the standard and the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) methods. A good agreement was found among the coexistence curves of these systems calculated by REMC and those previously reported in the literature. However, REMC allows exploring the coexistence at lower temperatures, where dynamics turns glassy. To obtain the surface tension we employed, for both methods, a procedure that yields the pressure tensor components for discontinuous potentials. The surface tension results obtained by the standard MC and REMC techniques are in good agreement.

  11. Numerical simulations of thermal conductivity in dissipative two-dimensional Yukawa systems.

    PubMed

    Khrustalyov, Yu V; Vaulina, O S

    2012-04-01

    Numerical data on the heat transfer constants in two-dimensional Yukawa systems were obtained. Numerical study of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity was carried out for the equilibrium systems with parameters close to conditions of laboratory experiments with dusty plasma. For calculations of heat transfer constants the Green-Kubo formulas were used. The influence of dissipation (friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems was investigated. The approximation of the coefficient of thermal conductivity is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing experimental and numerical data is discussed.

  12. Implications of a high-mass diphoton resonance for heavy quark searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shankha; Barducci, Daniele; Bélanger, Geneviève; Delaunay, Cédric

    2016-11-01

    Heavy vector-like quarks coupled to a scalar S will induce a coupling of this scalar to gluons and possibly (if electrically charged) photons. The decay of the heavy quark into Sq, with q being a Standard Model quark, provides, if kinematically allowed, new channels for heavy quark searches. Inspired by naturalness considerations, we consider the case of a vector-like partner of the top quark. For illustration, we show that a singlet partner can be searched for at the 13 TeV LHC through its decay into a scalar resonance in the 2γ + ℓ + X final states, especially if the diphoton branching ratio of the scalar S is further enhanced by the contribution of non coloured particles. We then show that conventional heavy quark searches are also sensitive to this new decay mode, when S decays hadronically, by slightly tightening the current selection cuts. Finally, we comment about the possibility of disentangling, by scrutinising appropriate kinematic distributions, heavy quark decays to St from other standard decay modes.

  13. The QCD deconfinement transition for heavy quarks and all baryon chemical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Michael; Langelage, Jens; Lottini, Stefano; Philipsen, Owe

    2012-01-01

    Using combined strong coupling and hopping parameter expansions, we derive an effective three-dimensional theory from thermal lattice QCD with heavy Wilson quarks. The theory depends on traced Polyakov loops only and correctly reflects the centre symmetry of the pure gauge sector as well as its breaking by finite mass quarks. It is valid up to certain orders in the lattice gauge coupling and hopping parameter, which can be systematically improved. To its current order it is controlled for lattices up to N τ ~ 6 at finite temperature. For nonzero quark chemical potentials, the effective theory has a fermionic sign problem which is mild enough to carry out simulations up to large chemical potentials. Moreover, by going to a flux representation of the partition function, the sign problem can be solved. As an application, we determine the deconfinement transition and its critical end point as a function of quark mass and all chemical potentials.

  14. New LUX result constrains exotic quark mediators with the vector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Ren; Li, Ming-Jie

    2016-12-01

    The scenario of the compressed mass spectrum between heavy quark and dark matter is a challenge for LHC searches. However, the elastic scattering cross-section between dark matter and nuclei in dark matter direct detection experiments can be enhanced with nearly degenerate masses between heavy quarks and dark matter. In this paper, we illustrate such scenario with a vector dark matter, using the latest result from LUX 2016. The mass constraints on heavy quarks can be more stringent than current limits from LHC, unless the coupling strength is very small. However, the compress mass spectrum with allowed tiny coupling strength makes the decay lifetime of heavy quarks longer than the timescale of QCD hadronization.

  15. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  16. Top Quark Properties in Little Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Perelstein, M.; Petriello, F.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-12-08

    Identifying the mechanism which breaks electroweak symmetry and generates fermion masses is one of the main physics goals for both the LHC and the ILC. Studies of the top quark have the potential to illuminate this issue; since it is the heaviest of the Standard Model (SM) fermions, the top is expected to couple strongly to the symmetry-breaking sector. Consequently, the structure of that sector can have significant, potentially observable effects on the properties of the top. for example, it is well known that the vector and axial t{bar t}Z form factors receive large corrections (of order 5-10%) in certain models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking [1]. At future colliders such as the LHC and the ILC, we will be able to pursue a program of precision top physics, similar to the program studying the Z at LEP and SLC. In this manuscript, they study the corrections to the top quark properties in ''Little Higgs'' models of electroweak symmetry breaking [2], and compare the expected deviations from the SM predictions with expected sensitivities of experiments at the LHC and the ILC. In the Little Higgs models, electroweak symmetry is driven by the radiative effects from the top sector, including the SM-like top and its heavy counterpart, a TeV-scale ''heavy top'' T. Probing this structure experimentally is quite difficult. While the LHC should be able to discover the T quark, its potential for studying its couplings is limited [3,4]. Direct production of the T will likely be beyond the kinematic reach of the ILC. However, we will show below that the corrections to the gauge couplings of the SM top, induced by its mixing with the T, will be observable at the ILC throughout the parameter range consistent with naturalness. Measuring these corrections will provide a unique window on the top sector of the Little Higgs. Many Little Higgs models have been proposed in the literature. We will consider two examples in this study, the ''Littlest Higgs'' model [5], and its

  17. Origin of the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2007-05-01

    There is a measure of debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We briefly outline some of the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently to density dependent effective interactions.

  18. Phase transitions in heavy-quark QCD from an effective theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, M.; Langelage, J.; Lottini, S.; Neuman, M.; Philipsen, O.

    2013-04-01

    With combined hopping parameter and strong coupling expansions, we calculate a dimensionally reduced Polyakov-loop effective theory valid for heavy quarks at nonzero temperature and arbitrary chemical potential. We numerically compute the critical endpoint of the deconfinement transition as a function of quark masses and number of flavours. We also investigate the applicability of the model to the low-T and high density region, specifically in terms of baryon condensation phenomena.

  19. Progress in Understanding the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas; P.A.M. Guichon

    2007-01-03

    At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions.

  20. A heuristic rule for classification of classical fluids: Master curves for Mie, Yukawa and square-well potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orea, Pedro; Varga, Szabolcs; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2015-07-01

    A shift of the vapor-liquid coexistence curves by the critical value of the reduced second virial coefficient yields striking data collapses to define master curves. This is observed for the Mie, Yukawa and square-well fluids of different attractive ranges. This modification of the extended corresponding-states law of Noro and Frenkel strongly improves the outcomes from the van der Waals principle. Moreover, this shifted extended principle makes the master curves from Mie and Yukawa potentials to be one on top of the other. The square-well potential forms two well defined master curves, each one corresponding to different effective critical exponents.

  1. Nuclear Matter from Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Fukukawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  2. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  3. Stability of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored relative to well-separated triplets of so-called semi-superfluid color flux tubes. However, the short-range interaction (metastable versus unstable) has not been established. In this paper we perform numerical calculations using the effective theory of the condensate field, mapping the regions in the parameter space of coupling constants where the vortices are metastable versus unstable. For the case of zero-gauge coupling we analytically identify a candidate for the unstable mode and show that it agrees well with the results of the numerical calculations. We find that in the region of the parameter space that seems likely to correspond to real-world CFL quark matter the vortices are unstable, indicating that if such matter exists in neutron star cores it is very likely to contain semi-superfluid color flux tubes rather than superfluid vortices.

  4. Inverse magnetic catalysis from the properties of the QCD coupling in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, C. A.; Hernández, L. A.; Loewe, M.; Zamora, R.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the vacuum one-loop quark-gluon vertex correction at zero temperature in the presence of a magnetic field. From the vertex function we extract the effective quark-gluon coupling and show that it grows with increasing magnetic field strength. The effect is due to a subtle competition between the color charge associated to gluons and the color charge associated to quarks, the former being larger than the latter. In contrast, at high temperature the effective thermo-magnetic coupling results exclusively from the contribution of the color charge associated to quarks. This produces a decrease of the coupling with increasing field strength. We interpret the results in terms of a geometrical effect whereby the magnetic field induces, on average, a closer distance between the (electrically charged) quarks and antiquarks. At high temperature, since the effective coupling is proportional only to the color charge associated to quarks, such proximity with increasing field strength makes the effective coupling decrease due to asymptotic freedom. In turn, this leads to a decreasing quark condensate. In contrast, at zero temperature both the effective strong coupling and the quark condensate increase with increasing magnetic field. This is due to the color charge associated to gluons dominating over that associated to quarks, with both having the opposite sign. Thus, the gluons induce a kind of screening of the quark color charge, in spite of the quark-antiquark proximity. We discuss the implications for the inverse magnetic catalysis phenomenon.

  5. Demonstrating universal scaling for dynamics of Yukawa one-component plasmas after an interaction quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, T. K.; Strickler, T.; Maksimovic, N.; McQuillen, P.; Pohl, T.; Vrinceanu, D.; Killian, T. C.

    2016-02-01

    The Yukawa one-component plasma (OCP) model is a paradigm for describing plasmas that contain one component of interest and one or more other components that can be treated as a neutralizing, screening background. In appropriately scaled units, interactions are characterized entirely by a screening parameter, κ . As a result, systems of similar κ show the same dynamics, regardless of the underlying parameters (e.g., density and temperature). We demonstrate this behavior using ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) created by photoionizing a cold (T ≤10 mK) gas. The ions in UNP systems are well described by the Yukawa model, with the electrons providing the screening. Creation of the plasma through photoionization can be thought of as a rapid quench of the interaction potential from κ =∞ to a final κ value set by the electron density and temperature. We demonstrate experimentally that the postquench dynamics are universal in κ over a factor of 30 in density and an order of magnitude in temperature. Results are compared with molecular-dynamics simulations. We also demonstrate that features of the postquench kinetic energy evolution, such as disorder-induced heating and kinetic-energy oscillations, can be used to determine the plasma density and the electron temperature.

  6. Demonstrating universal scaling for dynamics of Yukawa one-component plasmas after an interaction quench.

    PubMed

    Langin, T K; Strickler, T; Maksimovic, N; McQuillen, P; Pohl, T; Vrinceanu, D; Killian, T C

    2016-02-01

    The Yukawa one-component plasma (OCP) model is a paradigm for describing plasmas that contain one component of interest and one or more other components that can be treated as a neutralizing, screening background. In appropriately scaled units, interactions are characterized entirely by a screening parameter, κ. As a result, systems of similar κ show the same dynamics, regardless of the underlying parameters (e.g., density and temperature). We demonstrate this behavior using ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) created by photoionizing a cold (T≤10 mK) gas. The ions in UNP systems are well described by the Yukawa model, with the electrons providing the screening. Creation of the plasma through photoionization can be thought of as a rapid quench of the interaction potential from κ=∞ to a final κ value set by the electron density and temperature. We demonstrate experimentally that the postquench dynamics are universal in κ over a factor of 30 in density and an order of magnitude in temperature. Results are compared with molecular-dynamics simulations. We also demonstrate that features of the postquench kinetic energy evolution, such as disorder-induced heating and kinetic-energy oscillations, can be used to determine the plasma density and the electron temperature.

  7. A study of the pair and triplet structures of the quantum hard-sphere Yukawa fluid.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M

    2009-02-21

    The pair and triplet structures of the quantum hard-sphere Yukawa fluid, evaluated for equilateral and isosceles correlations in both the r and the k spaces for a range of conditions and with a particular focus on a region where the onset of increasing number fluctuations takes place (for densities 0.4Yukawa attractions and the quantum diffraction effects in hard-sphere fluids.

  8. An equation for pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Qiaoling; Lin, Wei; Goree, John; Liu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic behavior of two-dimensional (2D) dusty plasmas has been studied experimentally and theoretically recently. As a crucial parameter in thermodynamics, the pressure of dusty plasmas arises from frequent collisions of individual dust particles. Here, equilibrium molecular dynamical simulations were performed to study the pressure of 2D Yukawa liquids. A simple analytical expression for the pressure of a 2D Yukawa liquid is found by fitting the obtained pressure data over a wide range of temperatures, from the coldest close to the melting point, to the hottest about 70 times higher than the melting points. The obtained expression verifies that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of Wigner-Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytical expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochors, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to 2D dusty plasmas. Work in China supported by by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11505124, the 1000 Youth Talents Plan, and startup funds from Soochow University. Work in the US supported by DOE & NSF.

  9. SOSpin, a C++ library for Yukawa decomposition in SO(2 N) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Nuno; Emmanuel-Costa, David; Gonçalves, Nuno; Simões, C.

    2016-06-01

    We present in this paper the SOSpin library, which calculates an analytic decomposition of the Yukawa interactions invariant under SO(2N) in terms of an SU(N) basis. We make use of the oscillator expansion formalism, where the SO(2N) spinor representations are expressed in terms of creation and annihilation operators of a Grassmann algebra acting on a vacuum state. These noncommutative operators and their products are simulated in SOSpin through the implementation of doubly-linked-list data structures. These data structures were determinant to achieve a higher performance in the simplification of large products of creation and annihilation operators. We illustrate the use of our library with complete examples of how to decompose Yukawa terms invariant under SO(2N) in terms of SU(N) degrees of freedom for N=2N=2 and 5. We further demonstrate, with an example for SO(4), that higher dimensional field-operator terms can also be processed with our library. Finally, we describe the functions available in SOSpin that are made to simplify the writing of spinors and their interactions specifically for SO(10) models.

  10. New hidden beauty molecules predicted by the local hidden gauge approach and heavy quark spin symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C. W.; Ozpineci, A.; Oset, E.

    2015-10-01

    Using a coupled channel unitary approach, combining the heavy quark spin symmetry and the dynamics of the local hidden gauge, we investigate the meson-meson interaction with hidden beauty. We obtain several new states of isospin I = 0: six bound states, and weakly bound six more possible states which depend on the influence of the coupled channel effects.

  11. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The Top Quark as a Window to Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chiu-Tien

    2013-01-01

    The top quark was the last of the Standard Model quarks to be discovered, and is of considerable interest. The closeness of the top quark mass to the electroweak scale is suggestive that the top quark could be closely related to the mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking. Any new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking models could then preferentially couple to the top quark, making the top quark a promising probe for new physics. In this thesis, we will explore two aspects of the top quark as a harbinger to new physics: the top forward-backward asymmetry as seen at the Tevatron and the search for stops. In this thesis, we will discuss the Asymmetric Left-Right Model (ALRM), a model that is based on the gauge group $U'(1)\\times SU(2)\\times SU'(2)$ with couplings $g_1^\\prime, g_2^\\prime,$ and $g'$ associated with the fields $B',W,W'$, respectively, and show how this model can explain the top forward-backward asymmetry. We will then explore the scalar sector of the ALRM, and provide a specific Higgs mechanism that provides the masses for the $W'$ and $Z'$ bosons. The top forward-backward asymmetry is a test of invariance of charge-conjugation. Thus, we look at the $X$-gluon model, a model that was motivated by the top forward-backward asymmetry, and show that one can look at the longitudinal polarization of the top-quark to test parity conservation. Finally, we investigate searches for stop squarks, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using shape-based analyses.

  13. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  14. Effective field theories of baryons and mesons, or, what do quarks do?

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, G.L.

    1995-06-26

    This thesis is an attempt to understand the properties of the protons, pions and other hadrons in terms of their fundamental building blocks. In the first chapter the author reviews several of the approaches that have already been developed. The Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model offers the classic example of a derivation of meson properties from a quark Lagrangian. The chiral quark model encodes much of the intuition acquired in recent decades. The author also discusses the non-linear sigma model, the Skyrme model, and the constituent quark model, which is one of the oldest and most successful models. In the constituent quark model, the constituent quark appears to be different from the current quark that appears in the fundamental QCD Lagrangian. Recently it was proposed that the constituent quark is a topological soliton. In chapter 2 the author investigates this soliton, calculating its mass, radius, magnetic moment, color magnetic moment, and spin structure function. Within the approximations used, the magnetic moments and spin structure function cannot simultaneously be made to agree with the constituent quark model. In chapter 3 the author uses a different plan of attack. Rather than trying to model the constituents of the baryon, he begins with an effective field theory of baryons and mesons, with couplings and masses that are simply determined phenomenologically. Meson loop corrections to baryon axial currents are then computed in the 1/N expansion. It is already known that the one-loop corrections are suppressed by a factor 1/N; here it is shown that the two-loop corrections are suppressed by 1/N{sup 2}. To leading order, these corrections are exactly the same as would be calculated in the constituent quark model. This method therefore offers a different approach to the constituent quark.

  15. Equilibration in quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Alam, J.; Mohanty, P.

    2011-07-01

    The hydrodynamic expansion rate of quark gluon plasma (QGP) is evaluated and compared with the scattering rate of quarks and gluons within the system. Partonic scattering rates evaluated within the ambit of perturbative Quantum Choromodynamics (pQCD) are found to be smaller than the expansion rate evaluated with ideal equation of state (EoS) for the QGP. This indicate that during the space-time evolution the system remains out of equilibrium. Enhancement of pQCD cross sections and a more realistic EoS keep the partons closer to the equilibrium.

  16. SPONTANEOUS CP VIOLATION AND QUARK MASS AMBIGUITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2004-09-21

    I explore the regions of quark masses where CP will be spontaneously broken in the strong interactions. The boundaries of these regions are controlled by the chiral anomaly, which manifests itself in ambiguities in the definition of non-degenerate quark masses. In particular, the concept of a single massless quark is ill defined.

  17. LATTICE QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH WILSON QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    EJIRI,S.

    2007-11-20

    We review studies of QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with dynamical Wilson quarks. After explaining the basic properties of QCD with Wilson quarks at finite temperature including the phase structure and the scaling properties around the chiral phase transition, we discuss the critical temperature, the equation of state and heavy-quark free energies.

  18. Phase diagram of three-flavor quark matter under compact star constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Blaschke, D.; Fredriksson, S.; Sandin, F.; Grigorian, H.; Oeztas, A.M.

    2005-09-15

    The phase diagram of three-flavor quark matter under compact star constraints is investigated within a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Global color and electric charge neutrality is imposed for {beta}-equilibrated superconducting quark matter. The constituent quark masses and the diquark condensates are determined self-consistently in the plane of temperature and quark chemical potential. Both strong and intermediate diquark coupling strengths are considered. We show that in both cases, gapless superconducting phases do not occur at temperatures relevant for compact star evolution, i.e., below T{approx}50 MeV. The stability and structure of isothermal quark star configurations are evaluated. For intermediate coupling, quark stars are composed of a mixed phase of normal (NQ) and two-flavor superconducting (2SC) quark matter up to a maximum mass of 1.21 M{sub {center_dot}}. At higher central densities, a phase transition to the three-flavor color flavor locked (CFL) phase occurs and the configurations become unstable. For the strong diquark coupling we find stable stars in the 2SC phase, with masses up to 1.33 M{sub {center_dot}}. A second family of more compact configurations (twins) with a CFL quark matter core and a 2SC shell is also found to be stable. The twins have masses in the range 1.30...1.33 M{sub {center_dot}}. We consider also hot isothermal configurations at temperature T=40 MeV. When the hot maximum mass configuration cools down, due to emission of photons and neutrinos, a mass defect of 0.1 M{sub {center_dot}} occurs and two final state configurations are possible.

  19. Disoriented chiral condensate formation from tubes of hot quark plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Birse, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a system of quarks interacting with {sigma} and pion fields starting from an initial configuration consisting of a tube of hot quark plasma undergoing a boost-invariant longitudinal expansion. We work within the framework of the linear sigma model using classical transport equations for the quarks coupled to the mean-field equations for the meson fields. In certain cases we find strong amplifications of any initial pion fields. For large-radius tubes, starting from quark densities that are very close to critical, we find that a disoriented chiral condensate can form in the center of the tube. Eventually the collapse of the tube drives this state back to the true vacuum. This process converts the disoriented condensate, dominated by long-wavelength pion modes, into a coherent excitation of the pion field that includes significant components with transverse momenta of around 400 MeV. In contrast, for narrow tubes or larger initial temperatures, amplification occurs only via the pion-laser-like mechanism found previously for spherical systems. In addition, we find that explicit chiral symmetry breaking significantly suppresses the formation of disoriented condensates. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Higgs mediated flavor violating top quark decays t{yields}u{sub i}H, u{sub i{gamma}}, u{sub i{gamma}{gamma}}, and the process {gamma}{gamma}{yields}tc in effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, J. I.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.; Tututi, E. S.; Toscano, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    The rare top quark couplings tu{sub i{gamma}} and tu{sub i{gamma}{gamma}} (u{sub i}=u, c) induced at the one-loop level by a flavor violating tu{sub i}H vertex are studied within the context of an effective Yukawa sector that incorporates SU{sub L}(2)xU{sub Y}(1)-invariant operators of up to dimension six. Data on the recently observed D{sup 0}-D{sup 0} mixing are employed to constrain the tu{sub i}H vertex, which is then used to predict the t{yields}u{sub i}H, t{yields}u{sub i{gamma}}, and t{yields}u{sub i{gamma}{gamma}} decays, as well as the {gamma}{gamma}{yields}tu{sub i}+tu{sub i} reaction in the context of the ILC. It is found that the t{yields}cH and t{yields}c{gamma}{gamma} decays can reach sizable branching ratios as high as 5x10{sup -3} and 10{sup -4}, respectively. As for the t{yields}c{gamma} decay, it can have a branching ratio of 5x10{sup -8} that is about 6 orders of magnitude larger than the standard model prediction, which, however, is still very small to be detected. As for tc production, it is found that, due to the presence of a resonant effect in the convoluted cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{gamma}{gamma}{yields}}tc+tc), about (0.5-2.7)x10{sup 3} tc events may be produced at the ILC for a value of the Higgs mass near to the top mass.

  1. Isoscalar-vector interaction and hybrid quark core in massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, G. Y.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, B.

    2013-05-01

    The hadron-quark phase transition in the core of massive neutron stars is studied with a newly constructed two-phase model. For nuclear matter, a nonlinear Walecka type model with general nucleon-meson and meson-meson couplings, recently calibrated by Steiner, Hemper and Fischer, is taken. For quark matter, a modified Polyakov-Nambu—Jona-Lasinio model, which gives consistent results with lattice QCD data, is used. Most importantly, we introduce an isoscalar-vector interaction in the description of quark matter, and we study its influence on the hadron-quark phase transition in the interior of massive neutron stars. With the constraints of neutron star observations, our calculation shows that the isoscalar-vector interaction between quarks is indispensable if massive hybrids star exist in the universe, and its strength determines the onset density of quark matter, as well as the mass-radius relations of hybrid stars. Furthermore, as a connection with heavy-ion-collision experiments we give some discussions about the strength of isoscalar-vector interaction and its effect on the signals of hadron-quark phase transition in heavy-ion collisions, in the energy range of the NICA at JINR-Dubna and FAIR at GSI-Darmstadt facilities.

  2. Effect of temperature and magnetic field on two-flavor superconducting quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Tanumoy; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of turning on temperature for the charge neutral phase of two-flavor color superconducting (2SC) dense quark matter in the presence of constant external magnetic field. Within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, by tuning the diquark coupling strength, we study the interdependent evolution of the quark Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer gap and dynamical mass as functions of temperature and magnetic field. We find that magnetic field B ≳0.02 GeV2 (1 018 G ) leads to anomalous temperature behavior of the gap in the gapless 2SC phase (moderately strong coupling), reminiscent of previous results in the literature found in the limit of weak coupling without magnetic field. The 2SC gap in the strong coupling regime is abruptly quenched at ultrahigh magnetic field due to the mismatched Fermi surfaces of up and down quarks imposed by charge neutrality and oscillation of the gap due to Landau level quantization. The dynamical quark mass also displays strong oscillation and magnetic catalysis at high magnetic field, although the latter effect is tempered by nonzero temperature. We discuss the implications for newly born compact stars with superconducting quark cores.

  3. Heavy-quark QCD exotica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, Richard F.; Mitchell, Ryan E.; Swanson, Eric S.

    2017-03-01

    This review presents an overview of the remarkable progress in the field of heavy-quark exotic hadrons over the past 15 years. It seeks to be pedagogical rather than exhaustive, summarizing both the progress and specific results of experimental discoveries, and the variety of theoretical approaches designed to explain these new states.

  4. Observation of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Alvarez, G.; Alves, G.A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Aronson, S.H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R.E.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S.B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N.I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Butler, J.M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chen, L.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christenson, J.H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.R.; Cobau, W.G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W.E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O.I.; De, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S.R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A.O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M.K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H.E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G.E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K.C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A.N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T.L.; Genik, R.J. II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Gibbard, B.; Glaubman, M.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L.T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Green, D.R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Gruenendahl, S.; Guida, J.A.; Guida, J.M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutnikov, Y.E.

    1995-04-03

    The D0 Collaboration reports on a search for the standard model top quark in {ital p{bar p}} collisions at {radical}{ital s}=1.8TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50pb{sup {minus}1}. We have searched for {ital t{bar t}} production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels with and without tagging of {ital b}-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3.8{plus_minus}0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2{times}10{sup {minus}6} (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measured its mass to be 199{sub {minus}21}{sup +19} (stat) {plus_minus}22 (syst) GeV/{ital c}{sup 2} and its production cross section to be 6.4{plus_minus}2.2pb.

  5. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  6. Quark Matter '87: Concluding remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1988-03-01

    This year marked the beginning of the experimental program at BNL and CERN to probe the properties of ultra dense hadronic matter and to search for the quark-gluon plasma phase of matter. Possible implications of the preliminary findings are discussed. Problems needing further theoretical and experimental study are pointed out. 50 refs.

  7. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  8. Heavy Quark Photoproduction at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Meneses, A. R.; Machado, M. V.

    2010-11-01

    In this work we calculate the inclusive and difractive photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies within the color dipole picture employing three phenomenological saturation models based on the color glass condensate formalism. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analyzes of these reactions is feasible and that the cross sections are sensitive to the underlying parton dynamics.

  9. Top Quark Studies at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-26

    Years after its discovery in 1995 by CDF and D0, the top quark still undergoes intense investigations at the Tevatron. Using up to the full Run II data sample, new measurements of top quark production and properties by the D0 Collaboration are presented. In particular, the first observation of single top quark s-channel production, the measurement of differential tbar t distributions, forward-backward tbar t asymmetry, a new measurement of the top quark mass, and a measurement of the top quark charge are discussed.

  10. Measurements of top quark properties at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kraan, Aafke C.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-11-01

    The top quark with its mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2} is the most massive fundamental particle observed by experiment. In this talk they highlight the most recent measurements of several top quark properties performed with the CDF detector based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities up to 1 fb{sup -1}. These results include a search for top quark pair production via new massive resonances, measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top-quark decay, and a direct limit on the lifetime of the top quark.

  11. Does the b quark decay left-handedly

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, M. ); Wakaizumi, S. )

    1992-03-23

    The left-handedness of the {ital b} quark weak couplings has not yet been tested experimentally. We present an SU(2){sub {ital L}}{times}SU(2){sub {ital R}}{times}U(1) model with purely right-handed {ital b} decay couplings. We show that the model is consistent with the quite severe existing experimental constraints from {ital B} decays, from {ital B}{sup 0-}{ital {bar B}} {sup 0} mixing, from the neutral {ital K} mass difference, and from {ital CP} violation in the kaon system. We point out a difficulty in distinguishing our scheme from the standard model in semileptonic {ital B} decays.

  12. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  13. Two-Yukawa fluid at a hard wall: Field theory treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsiv, I.; Patsahan, T.; Holovko, M.; Caprio, D. di

    2015-05-21

    We apply a field-theoretical approach to study the structure and thermodynamics of a two-Yukawa fluid confined by a hard wall. We derive mean field equations allowing for numerical evaluation of the density profile which is compared to analytical estimations. Beyond the mean field approximation, analytical expressions for the free energy, the pressure, and the correlation function are derived. Subsequently, contributions to the density profile and the adsorption coefficient due to Gaussian fluctuations are found. Both the mean field and the fluctuation terms of the density profile are shown to satisfy the contact theorem. We further use the contact theorem to improve the Gaussian approximation for the density profile based on a better approximation for the bulk pressure. The results obtained are compared to computer simulation data.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of short-range attractive Yukawa fluid: simulation and theory.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Tapia-Medina, Carlos; Pini, Davide; Reiner, Albert

    2010-03-21

    Coexistence properties of the hard-core attractive Yukawa potential with inverse-range parameter kappa=9, 10, 12, and 15 are calculated by applying canonical Monte Carlo simulation. As previously shown for longer ranges, we show that also for the ranges considered here the coexistence curves scaled by the critical density and temperature obey the law of corresponding states, and that a linear relationship between the critical density and the reciprocal of the critical temperature holds. The simulation results are compared to the predictions of the self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation, and a good agreement is found for both the critical points and the coexistence curves, although some slight discrepancies are present.

  15. a Semirelativistic Treatment of Spinless Particles Subject to the Yukawa Potential with Arbitrary Angular Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzavi, Majid; Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Solaimani, M.

    We obtain analytical solutions of the two-body spinless Salpeter (SS) equation with the Yukawa potential within the conventional approximation scheme to the centrifugal term for any l-state. The semirelativistic bound-state energy spectra and the corresponding normalized wave functions are calculated by means of the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method. We also obtain the numerical energy spectrum of the SS equation without any approximation to centrifugal term for the same potential and compare them with the approximated numerical ones obtained from the analytical expressions. It is found that the exact numerical results are in good agreement with the approximated ones for the lower energy states. Special cases are treated like the nonrelativistic limit and the solution for the Coulomb problem.

  16. Enhanced auxeticity in Yukawa systems due to introduction of nanochannels in [001]-direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Konstantin V.; Pigłowski, Paweł M.; Hyżorek, Krzysztof; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to search for materials with auxetic properties by modifying structures of solids at molecular level has been proposed. The analysis of elastic properties of the face-centered cubic Yukawa crystals with very narrow nanochannels in the [001] crystallographic direction using Monte Carlo simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble has been done. An influence of the size of nanochannels on the value of Poisson’s ratio in main crystallographic directions has been studied. It has been shown that the insertion of nanochannels in the system causes a decrease of the Poisson’s ratio in the direction [110][1\\bar{1}0] from -0.15(2) to -0.29(3). That means an amplification of auxetity in the studied system twice as compared to the system without nanochannels.

  17. Dynamics of two-dimensional one-component and binary Yukawa systems in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ott, T; Löwen, H; Bonitz, M

    2014-01-01

    We consider two-dimensional Yukawa systems in a perpendicular magnetic field. Computer simulations of both one-component and binary systems are used to explore the equilibrium particle dynamics in the fluid state. The mobility is found to scale with the inverse of the magnetic field strength (Bohm diffusion), for strong fields (ωc/ωp≳1). For bidisperse mixtures, the magnetic field dependence of the long-time mobility depends on the particle species, providing an external control of their mobility ratio. At large magnetic fields, the highly charged particles are almost immobilized by the magnetic field and form a porous matrix of obstacles for the mobile low-charge particles.

  18. Viscosity of confined two-dimensional Yukawa liquids: A nonequilibrium method

    SciTech Connect

    Landmann, S.; Kählert, H.; Thomsen, H.; Bonitz, M.

    2015-09-15

    We present a nonequilibrium method that allows one to determine the viscosity of two-dimensional dust clusters in an isotropic confinement. By applying a tangential external force to the outer parts of the cluster (e.g., with lasers), a sheared velocity profile is created. The decay of the angular velocity towards the center of the confinement potential is determined by a balance between internal (viscosity) and external friction (neutral gas damping). The viscosity can then be calculated from a fit of the measured velocity profile to a solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. Langevin dynamics simulations are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. We find good agreement of the measured viscosity with previous results for macroscopic Yukawa plasmas.

  19. Mixed Axion/Axino Dark Matter in mSUGRA and Yukawa-unified SUSY

    SciTech Connect

    Ann Summy, Heaya

    2010-02-10

    Axion/axino dark matter (DM) is explored in the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and Yukawa-unified supersymmetric grand-unified theory (SUSY GUT) models with surprising results. For this type of scenario, relic DM abundance has three components: i.) cold axions, ii.) warm axinos from neutralino decay, and iii.) cold or warm thermally produced axinos. Reheat temperatures T{sub R} exceeding 10{sup 6} GeV are required in order to solve the gravitino/Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) problem while also allowing for baryogensis via non-thermal leptogenesis. In order to attain high enough reheat temperatures, we also need high values of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking scale f{sub a} on the order 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} GeV.

  20. Anomalous resonant production of the fourth-family up-type quarks at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, I. T.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, O.; Uenel, G.

    2009-11-01

    Considering the present limits on their masses from the Tevatron experiments, the fourth-family quarks are expected to have masses larger than the top quark. Because of their expected large masses, they could have different dynamics than the third-family quarks of the standard model. The resonant production of the fourth-family up-type quark t{sup '} has been studied via the anomalous production subprocess gq{sub i}{yields}t{sup '} (where q{sub i}=u, c) at the LHC, with center-of-mass energies of 10 TeV and 14 TeV. The signatures of such a process are discussed within the standard model decay modes. The sensitivity to the anomalous coupling {kappa}/{lambda}=0.1 TeV{sup -1} can be reached at {radical}(s)=10 TeV and L{sub int}=100 pb{sup -1}.

  1. On-shell parameter fixing in the quark-meson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Prabal; Andersen, Jens O.; Kneschke, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    The quark-meson model is often used as an effective low-energy model for QCD to study the chiral transition at finite temperature T and baryon chemical potential μB. The parameters in the quark-meson model can be found by expressing them in terms of the sigma mass mσ, the pion mass mπ, the constituent quark mass mq and the pion decay constant fπ. In practice, this matching is done at tree level, which is inconsistent once loop effects of the effective potential are taken into account. We show how to properly perform the matching in the quark-meson model by using the on-shell and the minimal subtraction renormalization schemes relating the physical masses and the pion decay constant to the running mass parameter and couplings. We map out the phase diagram in the μB- T plane and compare our results with other approximations.

  2. Vector-like quarks and leptons, SU(5) ⊗ SU(5) grand unification, and proton decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2017-02-01

    SU(5) ⊗ SU(5) provides a minimal grand unification scheme for fermions and gauge forces if there are vector-like quarks and leptons in nature. We explore the gauge coupling unification in a non-supersymmetric model of this type, and study its implications for proton decay. The properties of vector-like quarks and intermediate scales that emerge from coupling unification play a central role in suppressing proton decay. We find that in this model, the familiar decay mode p → e +π0 may have a partial lifetime within the reach of currently planned experiments.

  3. QCD constraints on the shape of polarized quark and gluon distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burkardt, Matthias; Schmidt, Ivan

    1995-02-01

    We develop simple analytic representations of the polarized quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon at low Q2 which incorporate general constraints obtained from the requirements of color coherence of gluon couplings at x ˜ 0 and the helicity retention properties of perturbative QCD couplings at x ˜ 1. The unpolarized predictions are similar to the Do' distributions given by Martin, Roberts, and Stirling. The predictions for the quark helicity distributions are compared with polarized structure functions measured by the E142 experiment at SLAC and the SMC experiment at CERN.

  4. Asymmetries at the Z pole: The Quark and Lepton Quantum Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenchini, R.

    2016-10-01

    The impressive progress on the knowledge of lepton and quark electroweak couplings over the LEP and SLC decade is reviewed. The experimental methods for measuring the forward-backward asymmetry of charged-fermion pair-production are described, for different fermion species. The precise measurements of the l-right asymmetry and of tau polarisation at the Z resonance are also reminded. After discussing the determination of the Weinberg electroweak mixing angle, lepton and quark couplings are extracted by combining asymmetry and polarisation measurements with measurements of partial decay widths of the Z boson, performed at LEP in the same years.

  5. Anomalous single production of fourth family up-type quark associated with neutral gauge bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, O.; Çakır, I. T.; Senol, A.; Tasci, A. T.

    2012-05-01

    The fourth family quarks are expected to have mass larger than the top quark considering the results from recent studies on the allowed parameter space. They could also have different dynamics than the quarks of three families of the standard model. The single production of the fourth family up-type quark t‧ is studied via the anomalous production process pp → t‧VX (where V = g, Z, γ) at the LHC with the center of mass energy of 7 and 14 TeV. The signatures of such process are discussed within both the SM and the anomalous decay modes of t‧ quarks. The sensitivity to anomalous coupling κ/Λ = 0.004 TeV-1 can be reached at \\sqrt{s}=14 TeV and Lint = 100 pb-1.

  6. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV.

  7. Calculation of the cross section for top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Contopanagos, H.

    1996-06-21

    The authors summarize calculations of the cross section for top quark production at hadron colliders within the context of perturbative quantum chromodynamics, including resummation of the effects of initial-state soft gluon radiation to all orders in the strong coupling strength. In their approach they resume the universal leading-logarithm contributions, and they restrict the calculation to the region of phase space that is demonstrably perturbative. They compare the approach with other methods. They present predictions of the physical cross section as a function of the top quark mass in proton-antiproton reactions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 and 2.0 TeV, and they discuss estimated uncertainties.

  8. Minimal nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay, and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Khan, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 5 4H+12 6H+1 0H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings, and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yr for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp≳1.29 ×1034 yr . With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong C P problem. The intermediate scale, MI≈(1013- 1014) GeV which is also the B -L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p →e+π0 and p →ν ¯π+. Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of the LHC, the next-generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to reach a verdict on this minimal scenario.

  9. Anarchic Yukawas and top partial compositeness: the flavour of a successful marriage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Lee, Seung J.; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    The top quark can be naturally singled out from other fermions in the Standard Model due to its large mass, of the order of the electroweak scale. We follow this reasoning in models of pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson composite Higgs, which may derive from an underlying confining dynamics. We consider a new class of flavour models, where the top quark obtains its mass via partial compositeness, while the lighter fermions acquire their masses by a deformation of the dynamics generated at a high flavour scale. One interesting feature of such scenario is that it can avoid all the flavour constraints without the need of flavour symmetries, since the flavour scale can be pushed high enough. We show that both flavour conserving and violating constraints can be satisfied with top partial compositeness without invoking any flavour symmetry for the up-type sector, in the case of the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset with top partners in the four-plet and singlet of SO(4). In the down-type sector, some degree of alignment is required if all down-type quarks are elementary. We show that taking the bottom quark partially composite provides a dynamical explanation for the hierarchy causing this alignment. We present explicit realisations of this mechanism which do not require to include additional bottom partner fields. Finally, these conclusions are generalised to scenarios with non-minimal cosets and top partners in larger representations.

  10. Searching for anomalous top quark production at the early LHC.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Yang, Li Lin; Zhang, Hao

    2011-08-26

    We present a detailed study of the anomalous top quark production with subsequent decay at the LHC induced by model-independent flavor-changing neutral-current couplings, incorporating the complete next-to-leading order QCD effects. Our results show that, taking into account the current limits from the Tevatron, the LHC with √s=7  TeV may discover the anomalous coupling at 5σ level for a very low integrated luminosity of 61  pb⁻¹. The discovery potentials for the anomalous couplings at the LHC are examined in detail. We also discuss the possibility of using the charge ratio to distinguish the tug and tcg couplings.

  11. Measurement of parity violation in electron-quark scattering.

    PubMed

    2014-02-06

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks' chirality preference when participating in the weak force, which have been measured directly only once in the past 40 years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u - C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.

  12. Measurement of parity violation in electron–quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Deng, X.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Myers, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman,; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2014-02-05

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks chirality preference when participating in the weak force, which have been measured directly3, 4 only once in the past 40?years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u???C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.

  13. Top quark results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We briefly describe the candidate events selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. The study of two new decay channels (all hadronic and ``tau dilepton``) is also reported.

  14. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered—and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  15. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    C. Paus

    2002-11-13

    The contribution summarizes the latest results from CDF on heavy quark production. Results from top, bottom and charm production are included. Some new analysis using Run I (1991-1994) data have become available. More importantly there are a number of results using Run II data which began in April 2001. The data indicate the potential of CDF for bottom and charm production physics in the near future.

  16. Superconducting quark matter in the Chromodielectric Model

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, L.; Malheiro, M.; Fiolhais, M.; Taurines, A.R.

    2004-12-02

    In this work we study the strange quark matter in an extended version of the Chromodielectric Model (CDM) with a BCS quark pairing implemented, and analyze the superconducting color flavor locked (CFL) phase. We compare the equation of state and the stability of the strange quark matter from QCD in the CFL phase with the superconducting version of the CDM. In the CDM there is a confining potential which originates a dynamical bag constant in the sense that its value depends on the density. Our results indicate that the inclusion in the energy density of the pairing quark interaction allows for an absolutely stable quark matter state even for large potential energies, preventing the metastability of quark matter found in the CDM at high densities.

  17. Physics of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-03-10

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However,recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that (bar u) < (bar d) in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  18. Higgs production in association with a single top quark at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Demartin, Federico; Maltoni, Fabio; Mawatari, Kentarou; Zaro, Marco

    We present a detailed study of Higgs boson production in association with a single top quark at the LHC, at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD. We consider total and differential cross sections, at the parton level as well as by matching short distance events to parton showers, for both t-channel and s-channel production. We provide predictions relevant for the LHC at 13 TeV together with a thorough evaluation of the residual uncertainties coming from scale variation, parton distributions, strong coupling constant and heavy quark masses. In addition, for t-channel production, we compare results as obtained in the 4-flavour and 5-flavour schemes, pinning down the most relevant differences between them. Finally, we study the sensitivity to a non-standard-model relative phase between the Higgs couplings to the top quark and to the weak bosons.

  19. Top quark mass: past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    The top quark is the most massive elementary particle discovered thus far. Its large mass may help explain the mechanism by which fundamental particles gain mass - the Standard Model's greatest standing mystery. Today the top quark mass, together with the W boson mass, plays an important role in constraining the Higgs boson mass. The current status of the top quark mass measurement and a brief outline of the expectation at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider will be covered.

  20. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. When the C in C P does not matter: Anatomy of order-4 C P eigenstates and their Yukawa interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Alfredo; Ivanov, Igor P.; Jiménez, Enrique

    2017-03-01

    We explore the origin and Yukawa interactions of the scalars with peculiar C P properties which were recently found in a multi-Higgs model based on an order-4 C P symmetry. We relate the existence of such scalars to the enhanced freedom of defining C P , even beyond the well-known generalized C P symmetries, which arises in models with several zero-charge scalar fields. We also show that despite possessing exotic C P quantum numbers, these scalars do not have to be inert: they can have C P -conserving Yukawa interactions provided the C P acts on fermions by also mixing generations. This paper focuses on formal aspects—exposed in a pedagogical manner—and includes a brief discussion of possible phenomenological consequences.

  2. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 sextet quarks on N{sub t}=8 lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, J. B.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2011-10-01

    We continue our lattice simulations of QCD with 2 flavors of color-sextet quarks as a model for conformal or walking technicolor. A 2-loop perturbative calculation of the {beta} function which describes the evolution of this theory's running coupling constant predicts that it has a second zero at a finite coupling. This nontrivial zero would be an infrared stable fixed point, in which case the theory with massless quarks would be a conformal field theory. However, if the interaction between quarks and antiquarks becomes strong enough that a chiral condensate forms before this IR fixed point is reached, the theory is QCD-like with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry and confinement. However, the presence of the nearby IR fixed point means that there is a range of couplings for which the running coupling evolves very slowly, i.e. it ''walks.'' We are simulating the lattice version of this theory with staggered quarks at finite temperature, studying the changes in couplings at the deconfinement and chiral-symmetry restoring transitions as the temporal extent (N{sub t}) of the lattice, measured in lattice units, is increased. Our earlier results on lattices with N{sub t}=4, 6 show both transitions move to weaker couplings as N{sub t} increases consistent with walking behavior. In this paper we extend these calculations to N{sub t}=8. Although both transitions again move to weaker couplings, the change in the coupling at the chiral transition from N{sub t}=6 to N{sub t}=8 is appreciably smaller than that from N{sub t}=4 to N{sub t}=6. This indicates that at N{sub t}=4, 6 we are seeing strong-coupling effects and that we will need results from N{sub t}>8 to determine if the chiral-transition coupling approaches zero as N{sub t}{yields}{infinity}, as needed for the theory to walk.

  3. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry in e+ e- annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2014-12-31

    We report on a complete calculation of electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+ e- annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics. Our setup is fully differential in phase space and can be used to calculate any infrared-safe observable. Especially we calculated the next-to-next-to-leading-order corrections to the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry and found sizable effects. Our results show a large reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in predictions of the forward-backward asymmetry, and allow for a precision determination of the top-quark electroweak couplings at future e+ e- colliders.

  4. Quark-mass dependence of the rho and sigma mesons from dispersion relations and chiral perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Hanhart, C; Peláez, J R; Ríos, G

    2008-04-18

    We use the one-loop chiral perturbation theory pipi-scattering amplitude and dispersion theory in the form of the inverse amplitude method to study the quark-mass dependence of the two lightest resonances of the strong interactions, the f(0)(600) (sigma) and the rho meson. As the main results, we find that the rhopipi coupling constant is almost quark mass independent and that the rho mass shows a smooth quark-mass dependence while that of the sigma shows a strong nonanalyticity. These findings are important for studies of the meson spectrum on the lattice.

  5. Phase diagram and surface tension of the hard-core attractive Yukawa model of variable range: Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Duda, Yurko; Romero-Martínez, Ascención; Orea, Pedro

    2007-06-14

    The liquid-vapor phase diagram and surface tension for hard-core Yukawa potential with 4

  6. Approximate bound-state solutions of the Dirac equation for the generalized yukawa potential plus the generalized tensor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikot, Akpan N.; Maghsoodi, Elham; Hassanabadi, Hassan; Obu, Joseph A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we obtain the approximate analytical bound-state solutions of the Dirac particle with the generalized Yukawa potential within the framework of spin and pseudospin symmetries for the arbitrary к state with a generalized tensor interaction. The generalized parametric Nikiforov-Uvarov method is used to obtain the energy eigenvalues and the corresponding wave functions in closed form. We also report some numerical results and present figures to show the effect of the tensor interaction.

  7. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton antiproton collider, precise measurements of its mass are ongoing. Using data recorded by the D0 and CDF experiment, corresponding to up to the full Tevatron data sample, top quark mass measurements performed in different final states using various extraction techniques are presented in this article. The recent Tevatron top quark mass combination yields m_t=173.20 +-0.87 GeV. Furthermore, measurements of the top antitop quark mass difference from the Tevatron are discussed.

  8. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGES

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; ...

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  9. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  10. Quarks and gluons at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    Data from proton-antiproton collisions at high energy provide important information on constraining the quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon and place limits on quark substructure. The S asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass. Drell-Yan data at high invariant mass provides strong limits on quark substructure. Information on {alpha}{sub s} and the gluon distributions can be extracted from high P{sub T} jet data and direct photons.

  11. Quark Physics without Quarks: A Review of Recent Developments in S-Matrix Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capra, Fritjof

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the developments in S-matrix theory over the past five years which have made it possible to derive results characteristic of quark models without any need to postulate the existence of physical quarks. In the new approach, the quark patterns emerge as a consequence of combining the general S-matrix principles with the concept of order.…

  12. The quark revolution and the ZGS - new quarks physics since the ZGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J. |

    1994-12-31

    Overwhelming experimental evidence for quarks as real physical constituents of hadrons along with the QCD analogs of the Balmer Formula, Bohr Atom and Schroedinger Equation already existed in 1966 but was dismissed as heresy. ZGS experiments played an important role in the quark revolution. This role is briefly reviewed and subsequent progress in quark physics is described.

  13. Review of meson spectroscopy: quark states and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A group of three lectures on hadron spectroscopy are presented. Topics covered include: light L = 0 mesons, light L = 1 mesons, antiquark antiquark quark quark exotics, a catalogue of higher quark antiquark excitations, heavy quarkonium, and glueballs. (GHT)

  14. Advance and prospects in constraining the Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report stronger constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the lateral Casimir force between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. In the interaction range from 1.6 to 14 nm the strengthening of previously known high confidence constraints up to a factor of 2.4x10{sup 7} is achieved using these measurements. It is shown that the replacement of a plane plate with a corrugated one in the measurements of the normal Casimir force by means of an atomic force microscope would result in the strengthening of respective high confidence constraints on the Yukawa-type interaction by a factor of 1.1x10{sup 12}. The use of a corrugated plate instead of a plane plate in the experiment by means of a micromachined oscillator also leads to strengthening of the obtained constraints. We further obtain constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type interaction from the data of experiments measuring the gradient of the Casimir pressure between two parallel plates and the gradient of the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a plate. The obtained results are compared with the previously known constraints. The possibilities of how to further strengthen the constraints on non-Newtonian gravity are discussed.

  15. Search for the Effect of Massive Bodies on Atomic Spectra and Constraints on Yukawa-Type Interactions of Scalar Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leefer, N.; Gerhardus, A.; Budker, D.; Flambaum, V. V.; Stadnik, Y. V.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new method to search for hypothetical scalar particles that have feeble interactions with standard-model particles. In the presence of massive bodies, these interactions produce a nonzero Yukawa-type scalar-field magnitude. Using radio-frequency spectroscopy data of atomic dysprosium, as well as atomic clock spectroscopy data, we constrain the Yukawa-type interactions of a scalar field with the photon, electron, and nucleons for a range of scalar-particle masses corresponding to length scales >10 cm . In the limit as the scalar-particle mass mϕ→0 , our derived limits on the Yukawa-type interaction parameters are Λγ≳8 ×1 019 GeV , Λe≳1.3 ×1 019 GeV , and ΛN≳6 ×1 020 GeV . Our measurements also constrain combinations of interaction parameters, which cannot otherwise be probed with traditional anomalous-force measurements. We suggest further measurements to improve on the current level of sensitivity.

  16. Checker Board Model predicts 5 Generations of Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore M., II

    2002-10-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus is a 2 Dimensional model that relies on the belief that nature is superbly symmetric and the belief that the synchronization of the 2 outer rotating quarks in the nucleons accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the magnetic flux from the nucleons couples (weaves) into the checker board array structures and this in addition to electrostatic forces of the rotating and stationary quarks accounts for the apparent strong nuclear force. The symmetry of the He nucleus, one might call it Super Symmetric, helps explain the stable structure of the alpha particle. A semi-classical (relativistic) approach was used to explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes in terms of the above structure and two newly proposed quarks (1) : the "up" and the "dn" quarks, not to be confused with the lighter u and d quarks in the standard model. Using the prescribed 2D checkerboard arrays where protons go on dark squares and neutrons go on light squares, one is able to recreate all the known nuclei. This exercise came up with structures that could explain the rational for the Halo nuclei and why 9He was so unstable where as 8He was much more stable and 10He is not a bound structure. Since the heavy masses of the "up" and "dn" quark (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively) did not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d, a new model (New Physics) had to be invented that would explain why "up" and "dn" were so heavy. Trial and error resulted in the empirical fitting of these two new quarks into a scheme that placed them between the mass of u / d and the c / s quarks. This new particle physics model predicts that nature has 5 generations not 3. Perhaps it should be called the 5G model. The two new generations come from the "up" and "dn' quark and a much heavier generation of a 42.5 GeV "massive dn" or (Big Bottom, B') and 65 GeV "massive up" or (Big

  17. Baryons as relativistic three-quark bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Williams, Richard; Alkofer, Reinhard; Fischer, Christian S.

    2016-11-01

    We review the spectrum and electromagnetic properties of baryons described as relativistic three-quark bound states within QCD. The composite nature of baryons results in a rich excitation spectrum, whilst leading to highly non-trivial structural properties explored by the coupling to external (electromagnetic and other) currents. Both present many unsolved problems despite decades of experimental and theoretical research. We discuss the progress in these fields from a theoretical perspective, focusing on nonperturbative QCD as encoded in the functional approach via Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We give a systematic overview as to how results are obtained in this framework and explain technical connections to lattice QCD. We also discuss the mutual relations to the quark model, which still serves as a reference to distinguish 'expected' from 'unexpected' physics. We confront recent results on the spectrum of non-strange and strange baryons, their form factors and the issues of two-photon processes and Compton scattering determined in the Dyson-Schwinger framework with those of lattice QCD and the available experimental data. The general aim is to identify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the plethora of observable phenomena in terms of the underlying quark and gluon degrees of freedom.

  18. Understanding the Quark-gluon Plasma via String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    2007-10-01

    Collisions of high-energy gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in Brookhaven National Laboratory create exploding droplets of quark-gluon plasma, the stuff which filled the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. The quark- gluon plasma at RHIC exhibits many surprising properties: it is close to an ideal liquid and it strongly attenuates the high energy quarks trying to plow through it. So far calculations in QCD have not been able to explain these properties satisfactorily, but interesting insight has been gained by using techniques from string theory. In the last ten years string theory has revealed a surprising and deep connection between quantum gravity and non-Abelian gauge theories similar to QCD. Such a connection enables one to answer difficult questions in some strongly coupled gauge theories by simple calculations of classical gravity. I will discuss some examples where these string theory techniques have been used to shed light on existing data from RHIC and to make one prediction that can be tested by experiments in the near future.

  19. Dynamical quark mass generation in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Niklas; Bonnet, Jacqueline A.; Fischer, Christian S.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effect of a strong magnetic field on dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in quenched and unquenched QCD. To this end we apply the Ritus formalism to the coupled set of (truncated) Dyson-Schwinger equations for the quark and gluon propagator under the presence of an external constant Abelian magnetic field. We work with an approximation that is trustworthy for large fields eH >ΛQCD2 but is not restricted to the lowest Landau level. We confirm the linear rise of the quark condensate with a large external field previously found in other studies and observe the transition to the asymptotic power law at extremely large fields. We furthermore quantify the validity of the lowest Landau level approximation and find substantial quantitative differences to the full calculation even at very large fields. We discuss unquenching effects in the strong field propagators, condensate and the magnetic polarization of the vacuum. We find a significant weakening of magnetic catalysis caused by the backreaction of quarks on the Yang-Mills sector. Our results support explanations of the inverse magnetic catalysis found in recent lattice studies due to unquenching effects.

  20. SU (2) Dirac-Yang-Mills quantum mechanics of spatially constant quark and gluon fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, H.-P.

    2011-06-01

    The quantum mechanics of spatially constant SU (2) Yang-Mills- and Dirac-fields minimally coupled to each other is investigated as the strong coupling limit of 2-color-QCD. Using a canonical transformation of the quark and gluon fields, which Abelianises the Gauss law constraints to be implemented, the corresponding unconstrained Hamiltonian and total angular momentum are derived. In the same way as this reduces the colored spin-1 gluons to unconstrained colorless spin-0 and spin-2 gluons, it reduces the colored spin-1/2 quarks to unconstrained colorless spin-0 and spin-1 quarks. These however continue to satisfy anti-commutation relations and hence the Pauli-exclusion principle. The obtained unconstrained Hamiltonian is then rewritten into a form, which separates the rotational from the scalar degrees of freedom. In this form the low-energy spectrum can be obtained with high accuracy. As an illustrative example, the spin-0 energy-spectrum of the quark-gluon system is calculated for massless quarks of one flavor. It is found, that only for the case of 4 reduced quarks (half-filling) satisfying the boundary condition of particle-antiparticle C-symmetry, states with energy lower than for the pure-gluon case are obtained. These are the ground state, with an energy about 20% lower than for the pure-gluon case and the formation of a quark condensate, and the sigma-antisigma excitation with an energy about a fifth of that of the first glueball excitation.

  1. Spectrum structure of a fermion on Bloch branes with two scalar–fermion couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qun-Ying; Guo, Heng; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Du, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Peng

    2017-03-01

    It is known that the Bloch brane is generated by an odd scalar field ϕ and an even one χ. In order to localize a bulk fermion on the Bloch brane, the coupling between the fermion and scalars should be introduced. There are two localization mechanisms in the literature, the Yukawa coupling -η \\bar{\\Psi}{{F}1}≤ft(φ,χ \\right) \\Psi and non-Yukawa coupling λ \\bar{\\Psi}{ΓM}{{\\partial}M}{{F}2}≤ft(φ,χ \\right){γ5} \\Psi . The Yukawa coupling has been considered. In this paper, we consider both couplings between the fermion and the scalars with {{F}1}={χm}{φ2p+1} and {{F}2}={χn}{φ2q} , and investigate the localization and spectrum structure of the fermion on the Bloch brane. It is found that the left-handed fermion zero mode can be localized on the Bloch brane under some conditions, and the effective potentials have rich structure and may be volcano-like, finite square well-like, and infinite potentials. As a result, the spectrum consists of a series of resonant Kaluza–Klein fermions, finite or infinite numbers of bound Kaluza–Klein fermions. Especially, we find a new feature of the introduction of both couplings: the spectrum for the case of finite square well-like potentials contains discrete quasi-localized and localized massive KK modes simultaneously.

  2. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  3. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  4. Heavy-quark spin symmetry partners of the X(3872) revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Filin, A. A.; Hanhart, C.; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Nefediev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the consequences of the heavy-quark spin symmetry for the possible spin partners of the X (3872). We confirm that, if the X (3872) were a DDbar* molecular state with the quantum numbers JPC =1++, then in the strict heavy-quark limit there should exist three more hadronic molecules degenerate with the X (3872), with the quantum numbers 0++, 1+-, and 2++ in line with previous results reported in the literature. We demonstrate that this result is robust with respect to the inclusion of the one-pion exchange interaction between the D mesons. However, this is true only if all relevant partial waves as well as particle channels which are coupled via the pion-exchange potential are taken into account. Otherwise, the heavy-quark symmetry is destroyed even in the heavy-quark limit. Finally, we solve the coupled-channel problem in the 2++ channel with nonperturbative pions beyond the heavy-quark limit and, contrary to the findings of previous calculations with perturbative pions, find for the spin-2 partner of the X (3872) a significant shift of the mass as well as a width of the order of 50 MeV.

  5. Single top quark production at the CERN LHC as a probe of R parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappetta, P.; Deandrea, A.; Nagy, E.; Negroni, S.; Polesello, G.; Virey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    We investigate the potential of the CERN LHC to probe the R parity violating couplings involving the third generation by considering single top quark production. This study is based on particle level event generation for both signal and background, interfaced to a simplified simulation of the ATLAS detector.

  6. Quark anomalous chromomagnetic moment bounds -- Projection to higher luminosities and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, K.; Silverman, D.

    1998-12-31

    The statistical limits on detectability of an anomalous chromomagnetic moment of a quark coupling to a gluon are projected to higher luminosities at the Tevatron at Fermilab, and to the LHC. They roughly scale as the energy, and are not strongly improved with increasing luminosity.

  7. Equation of state of a quark-gluon plasma using the Cornell potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayanandan, K. M.; Sethumadhavan, P.; Bannur, V. M.

    2007-10-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) using the Cornell potential based on Mayer's cluster expansion is presented. The string constant and the strong coupling constant for QGP are calculated. The EOS developed could describe the lattice EOS for pure gauge, two-flavor and three-flavor QGP qualitatively.

  8. Enhanced Higgs associated production with a top quark pair in the NMSSM with light singlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2017-02-01

    Precision measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs resonance recently discovered at the LHC have determined that its properties are similar to the ones of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. However, the current uncertainties in the determination of the Higgs boson couplings leave room for significant deviations from the SM expectations. In fact, if one assumes no correlation between the top-quark and gluon couplings to the Higgs, the current global fit to the Higgs data lead to central values of the Higgs couplings to the bottom-quark and the top-quark that are about 2 σ away from the SM predictions. In a previous work, we showed that such a scenario could be realized in the Next to Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the SM (NMSSM), for heavy singlets and light MSSM-like Higgs bosons and scalar top quarks, but for couplings that ruined the perturbative consistency of the theory up to the GUT scale. In this work we show that a perturbative consistent scenario, for somewhat heavier stops, may be obtained in the presence of light singlets. An interesting bonus of this scenario is the possibility of explaining an excess of events observed in CP-even Higgs searches at LEP2.

  9. Near-threshold production of heavy quarks with QQbar_threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Maier, A.; Piclum, J.

    2016-12-01

    We describe the QQbar_threshold library for computing the production cross section of heavy quark-antiquark pairs near threshold at electron-positron colliders. The prediction includes all presently known QCD, electroweak, Higgs, and nonresonant corrections in the combined nonrelativistic and weak-coupling expansion.

  10. Hadronic physics of q anti q light quark mesons, quark molecules and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    A brief introduction reviews the development of QCD and defines quark molecules and glueballs. This review is concerned primarily with u, d, and s quarks, which provide practically all of the cross section connected with hadronic interactions. The following topics form the bulk of the paper: status of quark model classification for conventional u, d, s quark meson states; status of multiquark or quark molecule state predictions and experiments; glueballs and how to find them; and the OZI rule in decay and production and how glueballs might affect it. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  11. Generation of strong magnetic fields in dense quark matter driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2016-12-01

    We study the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in dense quark matter. The magnetic field growth is owing to the magnetic field instability driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks. We discuss the situation when the chiral symmetry is unbroken in the degenerate quark matter. In this case we predict the amplification of the seed magnetic field 1012G to the strengths (1014 -1015)G. In our analysis we use the typical parameters of the quark matter in the core of a hybrid star or in a quark star. We also discuss the application of the obtained results to describe the magnetic fields generation in magnetars.

  12. Pair-correlation functions and phase separation in a two-component point Yukawa fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, P.; Archer, A. J.; Evans, R.

    2006-02-01

    We investigate the structure of a binary mixture of particles interacting via purely repulsive point Yukawa pair potentials with a common inverse screening length λ. Using the hypernetted chain closure to the Ornstein-Zernike equations, we find that for a system with "ideal" (Berthelot mixing rule) pair-potential parameters for the interaction between unlike species, the asymptotic decay of the total correlation functions crosses over from monotonic to damped oscillatory on increasing the fluid total density at fixed composition. This gives rise to a Kirkwood line in the phase diagram. We also consider a "nonideal" system, in which the Berthelot mixing rule is multiplied by a factor (1+δ). For any δ >0 the system exhibits fluid-fluid phase separation and remarkably the ultimate decay of the correlation functions is now monotonic for all (mixture) state points. Only in the limit of vanishing concentration of either species does one find oscillatory decay extending to r =∞. In the nonideal case the simple random-phase approximation provides a good description of the phase separation and the accompanying Lifshitz line.

  13. Freezing lines of colloidal Yukawa spheres. I. A Rogers-Young integral equation study.

    PubMed

    Gapinski, Jacek; Nägele, Gerhard; Patkowski, Adam

    2012-01-14

    Using the Rogers-Young (RY) integral equation scheme for the static structure factor combined with the one-phase Hansen-Verlet (HV) freezing rule, we study the equilibrium structure and two-parameter freezing lines of colloidal particles with Yukawa-type pair interactions representing charge-stabilized silica spheres suspended in dimethylformamide (DMF). Results are presented for a vast range of concentrations, salinities and effective charges covering particles with masked excluded-volume interactions. The freezing lines were obtained for the low-charge and high-charge solutions of the static structure factor, for various two-parameter sets of experimentally accessible system parameters. All RY-HV based freezing lines can be mapped on a universal fluid-solid coexistence line in good agreement with computer simulation predictions. The RY-HV calculations extend the freezing lines obtained in earlier simulations to a broader parameter range. The experimentally observed fluid-bcc-fluid reentrant transition of charged silica spheres in DMF can be explained using the freezing lines obtained in this work.

  14. Spectral Deformation for Two-Body Dispersive Systems with e.g. the Yukawa Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, Matthias; Rasmussen, Morten Grud

    2016-12-01

    We find an explicit closed formula for the k'th iterated commutator {{ad}Ak}(HV(ξ )) of arbitrary order k ⩾ 1 between a Hamiltonian HV(ξ )=M_{ω _{ξ }}+S_{\\check V} and a conjugate operator A={i}/2(v_{ξ}\\cdotnabla+nabla\\cdot v_{ξ}), where M_{ω _{ξ }} is the operator of multiplication with the real analytic function ω ξ which depends real analytically on the parameter ξ, and the operator S_{\\check V} is the operator of convolution with the (sufficiently nice) function \\check V, and v ξ is some vector field determined by ω ξ . Under certain assumptions, which are satisfied for the Yukawa potential, we then prove estimates of the form {{{ad}Ak}(HV(ξ ))(H0(ξ )+{i} )}|≤ C_{ξ }kk! where C ξ is some constant which depends continuously on ξ. The Hamiltonian is the fixed total momentum fiber Hamiltonian of an abstract two-body dispersive system and the work is inspired by a recent result [3] which, under conditions including estimates of the mentioned type, opens up for spectral deformation and analytic perturbation theory of embedded eigenvalues of finite multiplicity.

  15. Transport properties for an electroneutral Yukawa-type fluid in the MSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Perez, J.; Herrera, J. N.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of a linear response theory, in which Onsager’s continuity equations are combined with the Mean Spherical Approximation (MSA) from the theory of correlation functions in equilibrium, and using a Green’s function formalism, we consider the transport properties of electrolytes. The interaction between the ions in the electrolyte is represented by an intermolecular Yukawa potential which satisfies the electroneutrality condition. The model contains an adjustable parameter z which takes into account the effects of the solvent. Transport processes in an ionic solution are determined by two dominant forces: the relaxation and the electrophoretic forces; their contributions to the transport properties are calculated using the Fuoss-Onsager theory. We find the conductivity and the self-diffusion coefficient for a family of electrolytes using the linear response theory. The predictions of our model can be adjusted by means of the parameter z. The electrophoretic effect, due to the hydrodynamic interaction between the ions, is calculated using the Rotne-Prager tensor. Our theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data for electrolytes 1-1, even for high concentrations. We applied this theory also to two unsymmetrical electrolytes, namely the aqueous solutions of MgCl2 and CaCl2, with results in good accord with experimental data.

  16. Sparticle spectroscopy with neutralino dark matter from t-b-{tau} quasi-Yukawa unification

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Shahida; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Uen, Cem Salih

    2011-10-15

    We consider two classes of t-b-{tau} quasi-Yukawa unification scenarios which can arise from realistic supersymmetric SO(10) and SU(4){sub C}xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R} models. We show that these scenarios can be successfully implemented in the nonuniversal Higgs model with m{sub H{sub u}}=m{sub H{sub d}}{ne}m{sub 0} and the constrained minimal sumersymmetric model frameworks, and they yield a variety of sparticle spectra with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe compatible neutralino dark matter. In the nonuniversal Higgs model with m{sub H{sub u}}=m{sub H{sub d}}{ne}m{sub 0}, we find bino-Higgsino dark matter as well as the stau coannihilation and A-funnel solutions. The constrained minimal sumersymmetric model case yields the stau coannihilation and A-funnel solutions. The gluino and squark masses are found to lie in the TeV range.

  17. Freezing lines of colloidal Yukawa spheres. I. A Rogers-Young integral equation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapinski, Jacek; Nägele, Gerhard; Patkowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Using the Rogers-Young (RY) integral equation scheme for the static structure factor combined with the one-phase Hansen-Verlet (HV) freezing rule, we study the equilibrium structure and two-parameter freezing lines of colloidal particles with Yukawa-type pair interactions representing charge-stabilized silica spheres suspended in dimethylformamide (DMF). Results are presented for a vast range of concentrations, salinities and effective charges covering particles with masked excluded-volume interactions. The freezing lines were obtained for the low-charge and high-charge solutions of the static structure factor, for various two-parameter sets of experimentally accessible system parameters. All RY-HV based freezing lines can be mapped on a universal fluid-solid coexistence line in good agreement with computer simulation predictions. The RY-HV calculations extend the freezing lines obtained in earlier simulations to a broader parameter range. The experimentally observed fluid-bcc-fluid reentrant transition of charged silica spheres in DMF can be explained using the freezing lines obtained in this work.

  18. The structural properties of a two-Yukawa fluid: Simulation and analytical results.

    PubMed

    Broccio, Matteo; Costa, Dino; Liu, Yun; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-02-28

    Standard Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to assess the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the structural properties of a model fluid interacting through a hard-core two-Yukawa potential composed of a short-range attractive well next to a hard repulsive core, followed by a smooth, long-range repulsive tail. Theoretical calculations are performed in the framework provided by the Ornstein-Zernike equation, solved either analytically with the mean spherical approximation (MSA) or iteratively with the hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure. Our analysis shows that both theories are generally accurate in a thermodynamic region corresponding to a dense vapor phase around the critical point. For a suitable choice of potential parameters, namely, when the attractive well is deep and/or large enough, the static structure factor displays a secondary low-Q peak. In this case HNC predictions closely follow the simulation results, whereas MSA results progressively worsen the more pronounced this low-Q peak is. We discuss the appearance of such a peak, also experimentally observed in colloidal suspensions and protein solutions, in terms of the formation of equilibrium clusters in the homogeneous fluid.

  19. The structural properties of a two-Yukawa fluid: Simulation and analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccio, Matteo; Costa, Dino; Liu, Yun; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-02-01

    Standard Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to assess the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the structural properties of a model fluid interacting through a hard-core two-Yukawa potential composed of a short-range attractive well next to a hard repulsive core, followed by a smooth, long-range repulsive tail. Theoretical calculations are performed in the framework provided by the Ornstein-Zernike equation, solved either analytically with the mean spherical approximation (MSA) or iteratively with the hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure. Our analysis shows that both theories are generally accurate in a thermodynamic region corresponding to a dense vapor phase around the critical point. For a suitable choice of potential parameters, namely, when the attractive well is deep and/or large enough, the static structure factor displays a secondary low-Q peak. In this case HNC predictions closely follow the simulation results, whereas MSA results progressively worsen the more pronounced this low-Q peak is. We discuss the appearance of such a peak, also experimentally observed in colloidal suspensions and protein solutions, in terms of the formation of equilibrium clusters in the homogeneous fluid.

  20. Freezing lines of colloidal Yukawa spheres. II. Local structure and characteristic lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Gapinski, Jacek Patkowski, Adam; Nägele, Gerhard

    2014-09-28

    Using the Rogers-Young (RY) integral equation scheme for the static pair correlation functions combined with the liquid-phase Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, we study the generic behavior of the radial distribution function and static structure factor of monodisperse charge-stabilized suspensions with Yukawa-type repulsive particle interactions at freezing. In a related article, labeled Paper I [J. Gapinski, G. Nägele, and A. Patkowski, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024507 (2012)], this hybrid method was used to determine two-parameter freezing lines for experimentally controllable parameters, characteristic of suspensions of charged silica spheres in dimethylformamide. A universal scaling of the RY radial distribution function maximum is shown to apply to the liquid-bcc and liquid-fcc segments of the universal freezing line. A thorough analysis is made of the behavior of characteristic distances and wavenumbers, next-neighbor particle coordination numbers, osmotic compressibility factor, and the Ravaché-Mountain-Streett minimum-maximum radial distribution function ratio.

  1. Crystallization limits of the two-term Yukawa potentials based on the entropy criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Hara, Michael C.; Simon, Steven J.; Ramos, Franklin S.; Winkle, Andrew J.; Bomont, Jean-Marc

    2010-02-01

    We examine the fluid-solid transition for the potential with two Yukawa terms (one attractive and the other repulsive) and a hard core by exploration of the parameter space of (K1, Z1, and Z2), i.e., the parameters of interaction strength and interaction ranges, respectively. We apply the single-phase crystallization rule of Giaquinta and Giunta (1992) by searching for the conditions where the residual entropy reaches zero. To obtain accurate entropy properties, we adopt the self-consistent closure theory of the zero-separation genre. This closure gives accurate thermodynamic properties. The Ornstein-Zernike equation is solved to obtain the correlation functions. The structure factor S(q ) is examined with respect to its cluster-cluster peak, whose value is another indication of phase transition according to Hansen and Verlet (1969). We discover that the parameter Z1 (which determines the range of attractive forces) is important in crystal formation, so long as sufficient attraction (parameter K1) is present. If the range of attraction is too narrow, strength alone is not adequate to satisfy the Giaquinta rule or to solidify at given concentration and temperature. The control of the range of repulsion rests with the Z2-parameter. Its variations can bring about a high peak in S(q ) at zero wave number (i.e., at q =0). Implications for the crystallization of protein and colloidal solutions are discussed.

  2. Virtual photon emission from a quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    We present phenomenological formulas for virtual photon emission rates from a thermalized quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that include bremsstrahlung and annihilation with scattering (AWS) mechanisms along with the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects. For this purpose we follow the approach of generalized emission functions (GEF) for virtual photon emission, we showed earlier for a fixed temperature and strong coupling constant. In the present work, we extend the LPM calculations for several temperatures and strong coupling strengths, photon energies (q0), photon mass (Q2), and quark energies (p0). We generalize the dynamical scaling variables, xT,xL, for bremsstrahlung and AWS processes that are now functions of variables p0,q0,Q2,T,αs. The GEF introduced earlier, gTb,gTa,gLb,gLa, are also generalized for any temperatures and coupling strengths. From this, the imaginary part of the photon polarization tensor as a function of photon mass and energy has been calculated as a one-dimensional integral over these GEF and parton distribution functions in the plasma. By fitting these polarization tensors obtained from GEF method, we obtained a phenomenological formula for virtual photon emission rates as a function of {q0,Q2,T,αs} that includes bremsstrahlung and AWS mechanisms with LPM effects.

  3. Quark Spectral Function above T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Sixue; Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin; Roberts, Craig D.

    2011-05-24

    The maximum entropy method is used to calculate the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent solution of the rainbow-truncated gap equation of QCD at temperatures above T{sub c}, the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration. We find that, besides the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode at the temperatures above but near T{sub c}. In the vicinity of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength. So long as this mode persists, the system may reasonably be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  4. The heavy Top Quark Partner in Little Higgs Model