Science.gov

Sample records for quasar absorption-line constraints

  1. Properties of quasar broad absorption line outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellupo, Daniel Moshin

    2012-06-01

    Broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasar spectra identify high velocity outflows that likely exist in all quasars and could play a major role in feedback to galaxy evolution. In this dissertation, I use two methods to illuminate important properties of these outflows with the goal of a better understanding of these outflow systems and ultimately of the connection between quasars and their host galaxies. The variability of BALs can help us understand the structure, evolution, and basic physical properties of the outflows. I report here on a BAL monitoring programme of a sample of 24 luminous quasars at redshifts 1.2quasar rest-frame. I find that 39% (7/18) of the quasars varied in the short-term, whereas 65% (15/23) varied in the long-term, with a larger typical change in strength in the long-term data. The variability occurs typically in only portions of the BAL troughs. The components at higher outflow velocities are more likely to vary than those at lower velocities, and weaker BALs are more likely to vary than stronger BALs. I then directly compare the variabilities in the C IV and Si IV lambda1400 absorption to try to ascertain the cause(s) of the variability. I find that Si IV BALs are more likely to vary than C IV BALs. When both C IV and Si IV varied, those changes always occurred in the same sense (either getting weaker or stronger). The multi-epoch data, including up to 10 epochs of data per quasar, show that the BAL changes were not generally monotonic across the full ˜5 to ˜8 yr time span of our observations, suggesting that the characteristic time-scale for significant line variations, and (perhaps) for structural changes in the outflows, is less than a few years. The evidence presented here indicates that the cause of variability is likely a complex mixture of changing ionization in the outflowing

  2. Quasar Absorption Line Survey - Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, John

    1994-01-01

    The Absorption Line Survey of bright quasars provides a homogeneous data base for studying fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of gaseous systems in the universe. The initial results determine at small redshifts the number densities of Ly-ALPHA systems, of metal-lines and extragalactic halos, of Lyman-limit systems, of associated absorption systems, and the shapes and intensities of quasar emission lines and spectral energy distributions. The survey reveals that much of the sky is covered by high or very high velocity metal-line clouds present in the Galactic halo. A larger sample, which includes the requested Cycle 3 observations, is required to answer many important questions. For example, what is the correlation function of Ly-ALPHA systems at small redshifts? What fraction of the metal, the Ly-ALPHA, and the Ly-limit systems are associated with galaxies and what are the characteristic sizes of the outer gaseous regions of different types of galaxies? Do absorbing systems show evidence of the large-scale structure seen with galaxies and clusters of galaxies? The observations requested in Cycle 3 will extend the region of coverage of the Key Project sample from the redshift range of z = 0.0 to 1.0 (Cycles 1& 2) to z = 0.0 to 1.6 (Cycles 1-3). THIS FILE CONTAINS THE HIGH PRIORITY OBSERVATIONS FROM CYCLES 2 and 3 WHICH WERE NOT COMPLETED IN THOSE CYCLES.

  3. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF RADIO-SELECTED BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; Becker, R. H.; Gregg, M. D.; Tran, H. D.; White, R. L.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2010-07-15

    We report spectropolarimetry of 30 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with the Keck Observatory, 25 from the sample of Becker et al. Both high- and low-ionization BAL quasars are represented, with redshifts ranging from 0.5 to 2.5. The spectropolarimetric properties of radio-selected BAL quasars are very similar to those of radio-quiet BAL quasars: a sizeable fraction (20%) shows large continuum polarization (2%-10%) usually rising toward short wavelengths; emission lines are typically less polarized than the continuum; and absorption line troughs often show large polarization jumps. There are no significant correlations between polarization properties and radio properties, including those indicative of system orientation, suggesting that BAL quasars are not simply normal quasars seen from an edge-on perspective.

  4. Broad Absorption Line Quasar catalogues with Supervised Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Scaringi, Simone; Knigge, Christian; Cottis, Christopher E.; Goad, Michael R.

    2008-12-05

    We have applied a Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm to SDSS DR5 quasar spectra in order to create a large catalogue of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). We first discuss the problems with BALQSO catalogues constructed using the conventional balnicity and/or absorption indices (BI and AI), and then describe the supervised LVQ network we have trained to recognise BALQSOs. The resulting BALQSO catalogue should be substantially more robust and complete than BI-or AI-based ones.

  5. Observational Cosmology Using Absorption Lines in Quasar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaee, A.

    2016-09-01

    Distant, highly luminous quasars are important cosmological probes for a variety of astrophysical questions: the first generation of galaxies, the star formation history and metal enrichment in the early Universe, the growth of the first super massive black holes (SMBHs), the role of feedback from quasars and SMBHs in galaxy evolution, the epoch of reionization, etc. In addition, they are used as background illuminating source that reveal any object located by chance on the line of sight. I will present our group works in these issues that can be done using absorption lines in the quasar spectra.

  6. Monitoring the variability of intrinsic absorption lines in quasar spectra , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Toru; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have monitored 12 intrinsic narrow absorption lines (NALs) in five quasars and seven mini-broad absorption lines (mini-BALs) in six quasars for a period of 4-12 yr (1-3.5 yr in the quasar rest-frame). We present the observational data and the conclusions that follow immediately from them, as a prelude to a more detailed analysis. We found clear variability in the equivalent widths (EWs) of the mini-BAL systems but no easily discernible changes in their profiles. We did not detect any variability in the NAL systems or in narrow components that are often located at the center of mini-BAL profiles. Variations in mini-BAL EWs are larger at longer time intervals, reminiscent of the trend seen in variable BALs. If we assume that the observed variations result from changes in the ionization state of the mini-BAL gas, we infer lower limits to the gas density ∼10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} and upper limits on the distance of the absorbers from the central engine of the order of a few kiloparsecs. Motivated by the observed variability properties, we suggest that mini-BALs can vary because of fluctuations of the ionizing continuum or changes in partial coverage while NALs can vary primarily because of changes in partial coverage.

  7. Quasar absorption lines with a nonzero cosmological constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.; Ikeuchi, Satoru

    1992-01-01

    Quasar absorption lines in flat universes with nonzero cosmological constant Lambda are examined and compared with more conventional zero Lambda universes. Various evolution effects for intergalactic absorbers and the observed number density evolution of each absorption system are examined in order to discriminate between evolution effects and the cosmological models. An interesting interaction between Lambda effects and cosmic absorption phenomena is explored. Equations describing IGM absorption statistics are developed for nonzero Lambda cosmologies, both for unevolving absorber populations and some of the more popular physical models for the IGM and intergalactic clouds which include the effects of the absorber evolution.

  8. THE VIEWING ANGLES OF BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VERSUS UNABSORBED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.

    2012-06-10

    It was recently shown that there is a significant difference in the radio spectral index distributions of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and unabsorbed quasars, with an overabundance of BAL quasars with steeper radio spectra. This result suggests that source orientation does play into the presence or absence of BAL features. In this paper, we provide more quantitative analysis of this result based on Monte Carlo simulations. While the relationship between viewing angle and spectral index does indeed contain a lot of scatter, the spectral index distributions are different enough to overcome that intrinsic variation. Utilizing two different models of the relationship between spectral index and viewing angle, the simulations indicate that the difference in spectral index distributions can be explained by allowing BAL quasar viewing angles to extend about 10 Degree-Sign farther from the radio jet axis than non-BAL sources, though both can be seen at small angles. These results show that orientation cannot be the only factor determining whether BAL features are present, but it does play a role.

  9. Monitoring the Variability of Intrinsic Absorption Lines in Quasar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have monitored 12 intrinsic narrow absorption lines (NALs) in five quasars and seven mini-broad absorption lines (mini-BALs) in six quasars for a period of 4-12 yr (1-3.5 yr in the quasar rest-frame). We present the observational data and the conclusions that follow immediately from them, as a prelude to a more detailed analysis. We found clear variability in the equivalent widths (EWs) of the mini-BAL systems but no easily discernible changes in their profiles. We did not detect any variability in the NAL systems or in narrow components that are often located at the center of mini-BAL profiles. Variations in mini-BAL EWs are larger at longer time intervals, reminiscent of the trend seen in variable BALs. If we assume that the observed variations result from changes in the ionization state of the mini-BAL gas, we infer lower limits to the gas density ~103-105 cm-3 and upper limits on the distance of the absorbers from the central engine of the order of a few kiloparsecs. Motivated by the observed variability properties, we suggest that mini-BALs can vary because of fluctuations of the ionizing continuum or changes in partial coverage while NALs can vary primarily because of changes in partial coverage. Based on data collected at Subaru telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory at La Silla, Chile in programs 65.O-0063(B), 65.O-0474(A), 67.A-0078(A), 68.A-0461(A), 69.A-0204(A), 70.B-0522(A), 072.A-0346(A), 076.A-0860(A), 079.B-0469(A), and 166.A-0106(A).

  10. Outflow and hot dust emission in broad absorption line quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaohua; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Tinggui; Xing, Feijun; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Kai E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated a sample of 2099 broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with z = 1.7-2.2 built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven and the Wide-field Infrared Survey. This sample is collected from two BAL quasar samples in the literature and is refined by our new algorithm. Correlations of outflow velocity and strength with a hot dust indicator (β{sub NIR}) and other quasar physical parameters—such as an Eddington ratio, luminosity, and a UV continuum slope—are explored in order to figure out which parameters drive outflows. Here β{sub NIR} is the near-infrared continuum slope, which is a good indicator of the amount of hot dust emission relative to the accretion disk emission. We confirm previous findings that outflow properties moderately or weakly depend on the Eddington ratio, UV slope, and luminosity. For the first time, we report moderate and significant correlations of outflow strength and velocity with β{sub NIR} in BAL quasars. It is consistent with the behavior of blueshifted broad emission lines in non-BAL quasars. The statistical analysis and composite spectra study both reveal that outflow strength and velocity are more strongly correlated with β{sub NIR} than the Eddington ratio, luminosity, and UV slope. In particular, the composites show that the entire C IV absorption profile shifts blueward and broadens as β{sub NIR} increases, while the Eddington ratio and UV slope only affect the high and low velocity part of outflows, respectively. We discuss several potential processes and suggest that the dusty outflow scenario, i.e., that dust is intrinsic to outflows and may contribute to the outflow acceleration, is most likely.

  11. DISCOVERY OF THE TRANSITION OF A MINI-BROAD ABSORPTION LINE INTO A BROAD ABSORPTION LINE IN THE SDSS QUASAR J115122.14+020426.3

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, Paola Rodriguez; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane; Hamann, Fred; Murphy, Michael T.; Nestor, Daniel

    2013-09-20

    We present the detection of a rare case of dramatic strengthening in the UV absorption profiles in the spectrum of the quasar J115122.14+020426.3 between observations {approx}2.86 yr apart in the quasar rest frame. A spectrum obtained in 2001 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey shows a C IV ''mini-broad'' absorption line (FWHM = 1220 km s{sup -1}) with a maximum blueshift velocity of {approx}9520 km s{sup -1}, while a later spectrum from the Very Large Telescope shows a significantly broader and stronger absorption line, with a maximum blueshift velocity of {approx}12, 240 km s{sup -1} that qualifies as a broad absorption line. A similar variability pattern is observed in two additional systems at lower blueshifted velocities and in the Ly{alpha} and N V transitions as well. One of the absorption systems appears to be resolved and shows evidence for partial covering of the quasar continuum source (C{sub f} {approx} 0.65), indicating a transverse absorber size of, at least, {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm. In contrast, a cluster of narrower C IV lines appears to originate in gas that fully covers the continuum and broad emission line sources. There is no evidence for changes in the centroid velocity of the absorption troughs. This case suggests that at least some of the absorbers that produce ''mini-broad'' and broad absorption lines in quasar spectra do not belong to intrinsically separate classes. Here, the ''mini-broad'' absorption line is most likely interpreted as an intermediate phase before the appearance of a broad absorption line due to their similar velocities. While the current observations do not provide enough constraints to discern among the possible causes for this variability, future monitoring of multiple transitions at high resolution will help achieve this goal.

  12. Reionisation and High-Redshift Galaxies: The View from Quasar Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, George D.; Bolton, James S.; Lidz, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Determining when and how the first galaxies reionised the intergalactic medium promises to shed light on both the nature of the first objects and the cosmic history of baryons. Towards this goal, quasar absorption lines play a unique role by probing the properties of diffuse gas on galactic and intergalactic scales. In this review, we examine the multiple ways in which absorption lines trace the connection between galaxies and the intergalactic medium near the reionisation epoch. We first describe how the Ly α forest is used to determine the intensity of the ionising ultraviolet background and the global ionising emissivity budget. Critically, these measurements reflect the escaping ionising radiation from all galaxies, including those too faint to detect directly. We then discuss insights from metal absorption lines into reionisation-era galaxies and their surroundings. Current observations suggest a buildup of metals in the circumgalactic environments of galaxies over z ~ 6 to 5, although changes in ionisation will also affect the evolution of metal line properties. A substantial fraction of metal absorbers at these redshifts may trace relatively low-mass galaxies. Finally, we review constraints from the Ly α forest and quasar near zones on the timing of reionisation. Along with other probes of the high-redshift Universe, absorption line data are consistent with a relatively late end to reionisation (5.5 ≲ z ≲ 7); however, the constraints are still fairly week. Significant progress is expected to come through improved analysis techniques, increases in the number of known high-redshift quasars from optical and infrared sky surveys, large gains in sensitivity from next-generation observing facilities, and synergies with other probes of the reionisation era.

  13. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. II - Data calibration and absorption-line selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Saxe, David H.; Weymann, Ray J.; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    We present the observational and data processing aspects of the Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. Topics discussed include the observational technique, calibration of the data, software that simulates the data, the automated procedure used to identify and characterize the absorption features, and the determination of the sensitivity limits of the survey.

  14. The Nature of Partial Covering in Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen

    2012-10-01

    Ejected gas is seen as broad absorption lines in 20% of quasars. It has been known for 15 years that prominent lines such as CIV are usually saturated but not black because the absorbing gas only partially covers the continuum emission region. Therefore, column densities estimated from these lines are only lower limits. Accurate column densities can be obtained from rare ions that have two or more transitions from the same lower level, so that the optical depth and covering fraction can be solved for simultanously. Suitable lines are hard to find, so such measurements are rare. We have found that metastable helium is particularly useful for these measurements. Yet despite these advances, partial covering remains a just a parameter and its physical nature is not understood.We propose a unique experiment to constrain the physical nature of partial covering. We will compare the covering fraction measured from PV {a doublet in the far UV} with that measured from metastable HeI {optical and IR}. The ions creating these lines are relatively rare, and they present similar opacity over a wide range of gas parameters. But due to their wide wavelength separation, these lines probe dramatically different regions of the continuum source, the temperature-dependent accretion disk. So we expect different covering fraction behavior for different partial covering scenarios. This experiment is relevant for understanding the geometry and clumpiness of the outflow, and the results may impact our understanding of the global covering fraction, a parameter critical for determining the outflow kinetic luminosity, and thereby estimating feedback efficiency for broad absorption line outflows.

  15. X-Ray Continua of Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    The targets for this program, PG1416-129 and LBQS 2212-1759 were known to be Broad Absorption Line Quasars (BALQSOs). BALQSOs are highly absorbed in soft X-rays. Good high energy response of Rossi-XTE made them ideal targets for observation. We observed LBQS 2212-1759 with PCA. We have now analyzed the data and found that the source was not detected. Since our target was expected to be faint, reliable estimate of background was very important. With the release of new FTOOLS (version 4.1) we were able to do so. We also analyzed a well known bright object and verified our results with the published data. This gave us confidence in the non-detection of our target LBQS 2212-1759. We are currently investigating the implications of this non-detection. Due to some scheduling problems, our second target PG1416-129 was not observed in A01. It was observed on 06/26/98. This target was detected with RXTE. We are now working on the spectral analysis with XSPEC.

  16. The Physical Nature of Polar Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghost, Kajal; Punsly, Brian

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown based on radio variability arguments that some BALQSOs (broad absorption line quasars) are viewed along the polar axis (o rthogonal to accretion disk) in the recent article of Zhou et a. Thes e arguments are based on the brightness temperature, T(sub b) exceedi ng 10(exp 12) K which leads to the well-known inverse Compton catastr ophe unless the radio jet is relativistic and is viewed along its axi s. In this letter, we expand the Zhou et al sample of polar BALQSOs u sing their techniques applied to SDSS DR5. In the process, we clarify a mistake in their calculation of brightness temperature. The expanded sample of high T(sub b) BALQSOS, has an inordinately large fraction of LoBALQSOs (low ionization BALQSOs). We consider this an important clue to understanding the nature of the polar BALQSOs. This is expec ted in the polar BALQSO analytical/numerical models of Punsly that pr edicted that LoBALQSOs occur when the line of sight is very close to the polar axis, where the outflow density is the highest.

  17. FR-II Broad Absorption Line Quasars and the Life Cycle of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; de Vries, W

    2006-01-05

    By combining the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey Third Data Release quasar list with the VLA FIRST survey, we have identified five objects having both broad absorption lines in their optical spectra and FR-II radio morphologies. We identify an additional example of this class from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey, J1408+3054. Including the original FR-II-BAL object, J1016+5209, brings the number of such objects to eight. These quasars are relatively rare; finding this small handful has required the 45,000-large quasar sample of SDSS. The FR-II-BAL quasars exhibit a significant anti-correlation between radio-loudness and the strength of the BAL features. This is easily accounted for by the evolutionary picture in which quasars emerge from cocoons of BAL-producing material which stifle the development of radio jets and lobes. There is no such simple explanation for the observed properties of FR-II-BALs in the unification-by-orientation model of quasars. The rarity of the FR-II-BAL class implies that the two phases do not coexist for very long in a single quasar, perhaps less than 10{sup 5} years, with the combined FR-II, high ionization broad absorption phase being even shorter by another factor of 10 or more.

  18. The VLBI structure of radio-loud Broad Absorption Line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The nature and origin of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars and their relationship to non-BAL quasars are an open question. The BAL quasars are probably normal quasars seen along a particular line of sight. Alternatively, they are young or recently refueled. The high resolution radio morphology of BAL quasars is very important to understand the radio properties of BAL quasars. We present VLBA observations at L and C bands for a sample of BAL quasars. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties, and distinguish the present models of explaining BAL phenomena.

  19. The First HeI* 10830 Broad Absorption Line Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen; Dietrich, M.; Barber, S.

    2010-03-01

    We report discovery of the first metastable HeI* broad absorption line quasar using SpeX on IRTF. The blue-shifted absorption profile extends in velocity space from about -1,000 to -11,000 km/s, and it shows considerable velocity structure of the order of 1,000 km/s. The maximum apparent optical depth is 0.6. Integration over the 10830 apparent optical depth profile yields a lower limit on the log HeI* column density of >14.3. Absorption is also seen in the HeI* λ3888Å line in optical spectra from SDSS and the MDM Hiltner telescope. These two transitions have the same lower level; thus, the covering fraction and optical depth can be determined. A pure partial covering model yields log HeI* column of 15.5-15.7, while a power law absorption distribution yields 16.1. These column densities are significantly larger than the lower limit because of the high ratio of the product of the wavelength and the oscillator strength (23.3). This property, plus the relatively low densities of HeI* in ionized gas, makes HeI* absorption a valuable probe of high column densities. Cloudy simulations were performed to investigate the nature of the absorber. The HeI* column density yielded a lower limit on the log ionization parameter of -0.2 and a corresponding lower limit on the log hydrogen column density of 23. The latter value is at least an order of magnitude larger than those generally obtained from BALQSOs with spectra amenable to partial covering analysis. The lack of Balmer absorption provided an upper limit on the log density of 7. The log kinetic luminosity was constrained to be between 46 and 48, corresponding to at least 0.3% to a large fraction of the bolometric luminosity. A proposed Suzaku observation may remove model degeneracy between the spectral energy distribution and ionization parameter. This work is funded by NSF AST-0707703.

  20. Time-Variable Complex Metal Absorption Lines in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Tajitsu, Akito

    2005-08-01

    We present a new spectrum of the quasar HS 1603+3820 taken 1.28 yr (0.36 yr in the quasar rest frame) after a previous observation with Subaru+HDS. The new spectrum enables us to search for time variability as an identifier of intrinsic narrow absorption lines (NALs). This quasar shows a rich complex of C IV NALs within 60,000 km s-1 of the emission redshift. On the basis of covering factor analysis, Misawa et al. found that the C IV NAL system at zabs=2.42-2.45 (system A, at a shift velocity of vsh=8300-10,600 km s-1 relative to the quasar) was intrinsic to the quasar. With our new spectrum, we perform time variability analysis, as well as covering factor analysis, to separate intrinsic NALs from intervening NALs for eight C IV systems. Only system A, which was identified as an intrinsic system in the earlier paper by Misawa et al., shows a strong variation in line strength (Wobs~10.4-->19.1 Å). We speculate that a broad absorption line (BAL) could be forming in this quasar (i.e., many narrower lines will blend together to make a BAL profile). We illustrate the plausibility of this suggestion with the help of a simulation in which we vary the column densities and covering factors of the NAL complex. Under the assumption that a change of ionization state causes the variability, a lower limit can be placed on the electron density (ne>~3×104cm-3) and an upper limit on the distance from the continuum source (r<=6 kpc). On the other hand, if the motion of clumpy gas causes the variability (a more likely scenario), the crossing velocity and the distance from the continuum source are estimated to be vcross>8000 km s-1 and r<3 pc. In this case, the absorber does not intercept any flux from the broad emission line region, but only flux from the UV continuum source. If we adopt the dynamical model of Murray et al., we can obtain a much more strict constraint on the distance of the gas parcel from the continuum source, r<0.2 pc. Based on data collected at the Subaru

  1. Ca II AND Na I QUASAR ABSORPTION-LINE SYSTEMS IN AN EMISSION-SELECTED SAMPLE OF SDSS DR7 GALAXY/QUASAR PROJECTIONS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this project is to identify low-redshift host galaxies of quasar absorption-line systems by selecting galaxies that are seen in projection onto quasar sightlines. To this end, we use the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct a parent sample of 97,489 galaxy/quasar projections at impact parameters of up to 100 kpc to the foreground galaxy. We then search the quasar spectra for absorption-line systems of Ca II and Na I within {+-}500 km s{sup -1} of the galaxy's velocity. This yields 92 Ca II and 16 Na I absorption systems. We find that most of the Ca II and Na I systems are sightlines through the Galactic disk, through high-velocity cloud complexes in our halo, or Virgo Cluster sightlines. Placing constraints on the absorption line rest equivalent width significance ({>=}3.0{sigma}), the local standard of rest velocity along the sightline ({>=}345 km s{sup -1}), and the ratio of the impact parameter to the galaxy optical radius ({<=}5.0), we identify four absorption-line systems that are associated with low-redshift galaxies at high confidence, consisting of two Ca II systems (one of which also shows Na I) and two Na I systems. These four systems arise in blue, {approx}L*{sub r} galaxies. Tables of the 108 absorption systems are provided to facilitate future follow-up.

  2. Rest-frame optical properties of luminous, radio-selected broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Ganguly, R.; Brotherton, M. S.; DiPompeo, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    We have obtained Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX spectra of eight moderate-redshift (z = 0.7-2.4), radio-selected (log R* ≈ 0.4-1.9) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. The spectra cover the rest-frame optical band. We compare the optical properties of these quasars to those of canonically radio-quiet (log R* ≲ 1) BAL quasars at similar redshifts and to low-redshift quasars from the Palomar-Green catalogue. As with previous studies of BAL quasars, we find that [O III] λ5007 is weak, and optical Fe II emission is strong, a rare combination in canonically radio-loud (log R* ≳ 1) quasars. With our measurements of the optical properties, particularly the Balmer emission-line widths and the continuum luminosity, we have used empirical scaling relations to estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios. These lie in the range (0.4-2.6) × 109 M⊙ and 0.1-0.9, respectively. Despite their comparatively extreme radio properties relative to most BAL quasars, their optical properties are quite consistent with those of radio-quiet BAL quasars and dissimilar to those of radio-loud non-BAL quasars. While BAL quasars generally appear to have low values of [O III] λ5007/Fe II an extreme of `Eigenvector 1', the Balmer line widths and Eddington ratios do not appear to significantly differ from those of unabsorbed quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities.

  3. LOW-z Mg II BROAD ABSORPTION-LINE QUASARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shaohua; Wang Tingi; Wang Huiyuan; Zhou Hongyan; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.c

    2010-05-01

    We present a sample of 68 low-z Mg II low-ionization broad absorption-line (loBAL) quasars. The sample is uniformly selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 according to the following criteria: (1) redshift 0.4 < z {<=} 0.8, (2) median spectral S/N>7 pixel{sup -1}, and (3) Mg II absorption-line width {Delta}v{sub c} {>=} 1600 km s{sup -1}. The last criterion is a trade-off between the completeness and consistency with respect to the canonical definition of BAL quasars that have the 'balnicity index' BI>0 in C IV BAL. We adopted such a criterion to ensure that {approx}90% of our sample are classical BAL quasars and the completeness is {approx}80%, based on extensive tests using high-z quasar samples with measurements of both C IV and Mg II BALs. We found (1) Mg II BAL is more frequently detected in quasars with narrower H{beta} emission line, weaker [O III] emission line, stronger optical Fe II multiplets, and higher luminosity. In term of fundamental physical parameters of a black hole accretion system, loBAL fraction is significantly higher in quasars with a higher Eddington ratio than those with a lower Eddington ratio. The fraction is not dependent on the black hole mass in the range concerned. The overall fraction distribution is broad, suggesting a large range of covering factor of the absorption material. (2) [O III]-weak loBAL quasars averagely show undetected [Ne V] emission line and a very small line ratio of [Ne V] to [O III]. However, the line ratio in non-BAL quasars, which is much larger than that in [O III]-weak loBAL quasars, is independent of the strength of the [O III] line. (3) loBAL and non-loBAL quasars have similar colors in near-infrared to optical band but different colors in ultraviolet. (4) Quasars with Mg II absorption lines of intermediate width are indistinguishable from the non-loBAL quasars in optical emission line properties but their colors are similar to loBAL quasars, redder than non-BAL quasars. We also discuss

  4. Discovery of an X-ray Violently Variable Broad Absorption Line Quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Punsly, Brian; Chevallier, Loic; Goncalves, Anabela C.

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, we report on a quasar that is violently variable in the X-rays, XVV. It is also a broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) that exhibits both high ionization and low ionization UV absorption lines (LoBALQSO). It is very luminous in the X-rays (approximately 10(exp 46) ergs s(sup -l) over the entire X-ray band). Surprisingly, this does not over ionize the LoBAL outflow. The X-rays vary by a factor of two within minutes in the quasar rest frame, which is shorter than 1/30 of the light travel time across a scale length equal to the black hole radius. We concluded that the X-rays are produced in a relativistic jet beamed toward earth in which variations in the Doppler enhancement produce the XVV behavior.

  5. Radiatively driven winds for different power law spectra. [for explaining narrow and broad quasar absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltrametti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The analytic solutions for radiatively driven winds are given for the case in which the winds are driven by absorption of line and continuum radiation. The wind solutions are analytically estimated for different parameters of the central source and for different power law spectra. For flat spectra, three sonic points can exist; it is shown, however, that only one of these sonic points is physically realistic. Parameters of the central source are given which generate winds of further interest for explaining the narrow and broad absorption lines in quasars. For the quasar model presented here, winds which could give rise to the narrow absorption lines are generated by central sources with parameters which are not realistic for quasars.

  6. AN INFRARED EXCESS IDENTIFIED IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Myers, A. D.

    2013-01-10

    If broad absorption line (BAL) quasars represent a high-covering-fraction evolutionary state (even if this is not the sole factor governing the presence of BALs), it is expected that they should show an excess of mid-infrared radiation compared to normal quasars. Some previous studies have suggested that this is not the case. We perform the first analysis of the IR properties of radio-loud BAL quasars, using IR data from WISE and optical (rest-frame ultraviolet) data from SDSS, and compare the BAL quasar sample with a well-matched sample of unabsorbed quasars. We find a statistically significant excess in the mid- to near-infrared luminosities of BAL quasars, particularly at rest-frame wavelengths of 1.5 and 4 {mu}m. Our sample was previously used to show that BALs are observed along many lines of sight toward quasars, but with an overabundance of more edge-on sources, suggesting that orientation factors into the appearance of BALs. The evidence here-of a difference in IR luminosities between BAL quasars and unabsorbed quasars-can be ascribed to evolution. This suggests that a merging of the current BAL paradigms is needed to fully describe the class.

  7. A VERY LARGE ARRAY SURVEY OF RADIO-SELECTED SDSS BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally

    2011-12-10

    We have built a sample of 74 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters, along with a well-matched sample of 74 unabsorbed 'normal' quasars. The sources have been observed with the NRAO Very Large Array/Expanded Very Large Array at 8.4 GHz (3.5 cm) and 4.9 GHz (6 cm). All sources have additional archival 1.4 GHz (21 cm) data. Here we present the measured radio fluxes, spectral indices, and our initial findings. The percentage of BAL quasars with extended structure (on the order of 10%) in our sample is similar to previous studies at similar resolutions, suggesting that BAL quasars are indeed generally compact, at least at arsecond resolutions. The majority of sources do not appear to be significantly variable at 1.4 GHz, but we find two previously unidentified BAL quasars that may fit into the 'polar' BAL category. We also identify a significant favoring of steeper radio spectral index for BAL compared to non-BAL quasars. This difference is apparent for several different measures of the spectral index and persists even when restricting the samples to only include compact objects. Because radio spectral index is a statistical indicator of viewing angle for large samples, these results suggest that BAL quasars do have a range of orientations but are more often observed farther from the jet axis compared to normal quasars.

  8. What Quasars Really Look Like: Unification of the Emission and Absorption Line Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    We propose a simple unifying structure for the inner regions of quasars and AGN. This empirically derived model links together the broad absorption line (BALS), the narrow UV/X-ray ionized absorbers, the BELR, and the 5 Compton scattering/fluorescing regions into a single structure. The model also suggests an alternative origin for the large-scale bi-conical outflows. Some other potential implications of this structure are discussed.

  9. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY MULTI-FREQUENCY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING OF RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Takayuki J.; Nagai, Hiroshi; Doi, Akihiro

    2013-07-20

    We conducted the first multi-frequency polarimetric imaging of four broad absorption line (BAL) quasars using the Very Long Baseline Array at milliarcsecond resolutions to investigate the inclination of the nonthermal jet and test the hypothesis that radio sources in BAL quasars are still young. Among these four sources, J0928+446, J1018+0530, and J1405+4056 show one-sided structures in parsec scales and polarized emission detected in the core. These characteristics are consistent with those of blazars. We set constraints on viewing angles to <66 Degree-Sign for these jets in the framework of a Doppler beaming effect. J1159+0112 exhibits an unpolarized gigahertz-peaked spectrum component and several discrete blobs with steep spectra on both sides of the central component across {approx}1 kpc. These properties are consistent with those of young radio sources. We discuss the structures of jets and active galactic nucleus wind.

  10. Discovery of Broad Soft X-ray Absorption Lines from the Quasar Wind in PDS 456

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Nardini, E.; Behar, E.; O’Brien, P. T.; Tombesi, F.; Turner, T. J.; Costa, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy of the prototype accretion disk wind quasar, PDS 456, is presented. Here, the XMM-Newton reflection grating spectrometer spectra are analyzed from the large 2013–2014 XMM-Newton campaign, consisting of five observations of approximately 100 ks in length. During the last observation (OBS. E), the quasar is at a minimum flux level, and broad absorption line (BAL) profiles are revealed in the soft X-ray band, with typical velocity widths of {σ }{{v}}˜ {{10,000}} km s‑1. During a period of higher flux in the third and fourth observations (OBS. C and D, respectively), a very broad absorption trough is also present above 1 keV. From fitting the absorption lines with models of photoionized absorption spectra, the inferred outflow velocities lie in the range ˜ 0.1{--}0.2c. The absorption lines likely originate from He and H-like neon and L-shell iron at these energies. A comparison with earlier archival data of PDS 456 also reveals a similar absorption structure near 1 keV in a 40 ks observation in 2001, and generally the absorption lines appear most apparent when the spectrum is more absorbed overall. The presence of the soft X-ray BALs is also independently confirmed by an analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC spectra below 2 keV. We suggest that the soft X-ray absorption profiles could be associated with a lower ionization and possibly clumpy phase of the accretion disk wind, where the latter is known to be present in this quasar from its well-studied iron K absorption profile and where the wind velocity reaches a typical value of 0.3c.

  11. THE INTRINSIC FRACTIONS AND RADIO PROPERTIES OF LOW-IONIZATION BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xinyu; Shankar, Francesco; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-10-01

    Low-ionization (Mg II, Fe II, and Fe III) broad absorption line quasars (LoBALs) probe a relatively obscured quasar population and could be at an early evolutionary stage for quasars. We study the intrinsic fractions of LoBALs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm survey. We find that the LoBAL fractions of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio samples are approximately 5-7 times higher than those measured in the optical sample. This suggests that the fractions measured in the NIR and radio bands are closer to the intrinsic fractions of the populations, and that the optical fractions are significantly biased due to obscuration effects, similar to high-ionization broad absorption line quasars (HiBALs). Considering a population of obscured quasars that do not enter the SDSS, which could have a much higher LoBAL fraction, we expect that the intrinsic fraction of LoBALs could be even higher. We also find that the LoBAL fractions decrease with increasing radio luminosities, again, similarly to HiBALs. In addition, we find evidence for increasing fractions of LoBALs toward higher NIR luminosities, especially for FeLoBALs with a fraction of {approx}18% at M{sub K{sub s}}< -31 mag. This population of NIR-luminous LoBALs may be at an early evolutionary stage of quasar evolution. To interpret the data, we use a luminosity-dependent model for LoBALs that yields significantly better fits than those from a pure geometric model.

  12. BROAD ABSORPTION LINE DISAPPEARANCE ON MULTI-YEAR TIMESCALES IN A LARGE QUASAR SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Gibson, R. R.; Lundgren, B. F.; Myers, A. D.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen Yue; York, D. G.; Bizyaev, D.; Brinkmann, J.; Malanushenko, E.; Oravetz, D. J.; Pan, K.; Simmons, A. E.; Weaver, B. A.

    2012-10-01

    We present 21 examples of C IV broad absorption line (BAL) trough disappearance in 19 quasars selected from systematic multi-epoch observations of 582 bright BAL quasars (1.9 < z < 4.5) by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (SDSS-I/II) and SDSS-III. The observations span 1.1-3.9 yr rest-frame timescales, longer than have been sampled in many previous BAL variability studies. On these timescales, Almost-Equal-To 2.3% of C IV BAL troughs disappear and Almost-Equal-To 3.3% of BAL quasars show a disappearing trough. These observed frequencies suggest that many C IV BAL absorbers spend on average at most a century along our line of sight to their quasar. Ten of the 19 BAL quasars showing C IV BAL disappearance have apparently transformed from BAL to non-BAL quasars; these are the first reported examples of such transformations. The BAL troughs that disappear tend to be those with small-to-moderate equivalent widths, relatively shallow depths, and high outflow velocities. Other non-disappearing C IV BALs in those nine objects having multiple troughs tend to weaken when one of them disappears, indicating a connection between the disappearing and non-disappearing troughs, even for velocity separations as large as 10,000-15,000 km s{sup -1}. We discuss possible origins of this connection including disk-wind rotation and changes in shielding gas.

  13. Radio line and continuum observations of quasar-galaxy pairs and the origin of low reshift quasar absorption line systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Vangorkom, J. H.; Hauxthausen, E. M.; Stocke, J. T.; Salzer, J.

    1990-01-01

    There are a number of known quasars for which our line of sight to the high redshift quasar passes within a few Holmberg radii of a low redshift galaxy. In a few of these cases, spectra of the quasar reveal absorption by gas associated with the low redshift galaxy. A number of these pairs imply absorption by gas which lies well outside the optical disk of the associated galaxy, leading to models of galaxies with 'halos' or 'disks' of gas extending to large radii. The authors present observations of 4 such pairs. In three of the four cases, they find that the associated galaxy is highly disturbed, typically due to a gravitational interaction with a companion galaxy, while in the fourth case the absorption can be explained by clouds in the optical disk of the associated galaxy. They are led to an alternative hypothesis concerning the origin of the low redshift absorption line systems: the absorption is by gas clouds which have been gravitationally stripped from the associated galaxy. These galaxies are rapidly evolving, and should not be used as examples of absorption by clouds in halos of field spirals. The authors conclude by considering the role extended gas in interacting systems plays in the origin of higher redshift quasar absorption line systems.

  14. A variable P v broad absorption line and quasar outflow energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellupo, D. M.; Hamann, F.; Barlow, T. A.

    2014-10-01

    Broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasar spectra identify high-velocity outflows that might exist in all quasars and could play a major role in feedback to galaxy evolution. The viability of BAL outflows as a feedback mechanism depends on their kinetic energies, as derived from the outflow velocities, column densities, and distances from the central quasar. We estimate these quantities for the quasar, Q1413+1143 (redshift ze = 2.56), aided by the first detection of P V λλ1118, 1128 BAL variability in a quasar. In particular, P V absorption at velocities where the C IV trough does not reach zero intensity implies that the C IV BAL is saturated and the absorber only partially covers the background continuum source (with characteristic size <0.01 pc). With the assumption of solar abundances, we estimate that the total column density in the BAL outflow is log NH ≳ 22.3 cm-2. Variability in the P V and saturated C IV BALs strongly disfavours changes in the ionization as the cause of the BAL variability, but supports models with high column density BAL clouds moving across our lines of sight. The observed variability time of 1.6 yr in the quasar rest frame indicates crossing speeds >750 km s-1 and a radial distance from the central black hole of ≲ 3.5 pc, if the crossing speeds are Keplerian. The total outflow mass is ˜4100 M⊙, the kinetic energy ˜4 × 1054 erg, and the ratio of the outflow kinetic energy luminosity to the quasar bolometric luminosity is ˜0.02 (at the minimum column density and maximum distance), which might be sufficient for important feedback to the quasar's host galaxy.

  15. The Physical Nature of Weak MgII Quasar Absorption Line Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Anand

    2007-12-01

    In a span of four decades, quasar absorption line spectroscopy has emerged as one of the most efficient methods for probing HI gas and associated metals in a wide range of environments, from redshifts corresponding to the most distant quasars up to the present. The connection between strong MgII quasar absorption systems and the disks/halos of galaxies of various morphologies is fairly well established. In contrast, the physical nature of weak MgII absorbers is not sufficiently understood. In this talk, I will present results from my dissertation work, which is a study of weak MgII quasar absorption line systems at 0quasars, we have produced a census of weak absorbers in this redshift interval. Based on the observed number statistics and constrains derived for the chemical abundances and ionization conditions in these absorbers, we have extended specific propositions on the type of astrophysical processes/systems these absorbers might correspond to. A significant population of weak MgII clouds, identified at high redshift (z >1), could be gas clouds in the extended halos of galaxies, analogous to the Milky Way high velocity clouds. The gas might correspond to material expelled from rapidly star-forming galaxies in correlated supernova events. Some fraction of the population of weak MgII clouds can also arise along sight lines that intercept tidally stripped interstellar gas, residing in circumgalactic environments. The `iron-rich’ weak MgII clouds, which are prevalent at lower redshifts (z<1), must be tracing Type Ia enriched gas in sites that have been previously enriched by star formation, most likely in dwarf galaxies. These scenarios will be reviewed in my presentation. This work is supported by NSF. I thankfully acknowledge the Zaccheus Daniel Foundation and Sigma Xi for providing generous travel support.

  16. Thomson Thick X-Ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar, PG 0946+301.

    PubMed

    Mathur; Green; Arav; Brotherton; Crenshaw; deKool; Elvis; Goodrich; Hamann; Hines; Kashyap; Korista; Peterson; Shields; Shlosman; van Breugel W; Voit

    2000-04-20

    We present a deep ASCA observation of a broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) PG 0946+301. The source was clearly detected in one of the gas imaging spectrometers, but not in any other detector. If BALQSOs have intrinsic X-ray spectra similar to normal radio-quiet quasars, our observations imply that there is Thomson thick X-ray absorption (NH greater, similar1024 cm-2) toward PG 0946+301. This is the largest column density estimated so far toward a BALQSO. The absorber must be at least partially ionized and may be responsible for attenuation in the optical and UV. If the Thomson optical depth toward BALQSOs is close to 1, as inferred here, then spectroscopy in hard X-rays with large telescopes like XMM would be feasible.

  17. Surprises from a Deep ASCA Spectrum of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar PHL 5200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita; Matt, G.; Green, P. J.; Elvis, M.; Singh, K. P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a deep (approx. 85 ks) ASCA observation of the prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) PHL 5200. This is the best X-ray spectrum of a BALQSO yet. We find the following: (1) The source is not intrinsically X-ray weak. (2) The line-of-sight absorption is very strong, with N(sub H) = 5 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm. (3) The absorber does not cover the source completely; the covering fraction is approx. 90%. This is consistent with the large optical polarization observed in this source, implying multiple lines of sight. The most surprising result of this observation is that (4) the spectrum of this BALQSO is not exactly similar to other radio-quiet quasars. The hard X-ray spectrum of PHL 5200 is steep, with the power-law spectral index alpha approx. 1.5. This is similar to the steepest hard X-ray slopes observed so far. At low redshifts, such steep slopes are observed in narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies, believed to be accreting at a high Eddington rate. This observation strengthens the analogy between BALQSOs and NLS1 galaxies and supports the hypothesis that BALQSOs represent an early evolutionary state of quasars. It is well accepted that the orientation to the line of sight determines the appearance of a quasar: age seems to play a significant role as well.

  18. THE PITTSBURGH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY Mg II QUASAR ABSORPTION-LINE SURVEY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Quider, Anna M.; Nestor, Daniel B.; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.; Weyant, Anja N.; Monier, Eric M.; Busche, Joseph R.

    2011-04-15

    We present a catalog of intervening Mg II quasar absorption-line systems in the redshift interval 0.36 {<=} z {<=} 2.28. The catalog was built from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Four (SDSS DR4) quasar spectra. Currently, the catalog contains {approx}17, 000 measured Mg II doublets. We also present data on the {approx}44, 600 quasar spectra which were searched to construct the catalog, including redshift and magnitude information, continuum-normalized spectra, and corresponding arrays of redshift-dependent minimum rest equivalent widths detectable at our confidence threshold. The catalog is available online. A careful second search of 500 random spectra indicated that, for every 100 spectra searched, approximately one significant Mg II system was accidentally rejected. Current plans to expand the catalog beyond DR4 quasars are discussed. Many Mg II absorbers are known to be associated with galaxies. Therefore, the combination of large size and well understood statistics makes this catalog ideal for precision studies of the low-ionization and neutral gas regions associated with galaxies at low to moderate redshift. An analysis of the statistics of Mg II absorbers using this catalog will be presented in a subsequent paper.

  19. Broad Absorption Line Variability on Multi-Year Timescales in a Large Quasar Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Filiz Ak, N.; Hall, P. B.; Schneider, D. P.; SDSS-III BAL Variability Team

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a detailed investigation of the variability of 428 C IV and 235 Si IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs identified in multi-epoch observations of 291 quasars by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II/III. These observations primarily sample rest-frame timescales of 1-3 yr over which significant rearrangement of the BAL wind is expected. We derive a number of observational results on, e.g., the frequency of BAL variability, the velocity range over which BAL variability occurs, the primary observed form of BAL-trough variability, the dependence of BAL variability upon timescale, the frequency of BAL strengthening vs. weakening, correlations between BAL variability and BAL-trough profiles, relations between C IV and Si IV BAL variability, coordinated multi-trough variability, and BAL variations as a function of quasar properties. We assess implications of these observational results for quasar winds. Our results support models where most BAL absorption is formed within an order-of-magnitude of the wind-launching radius, although a significant minority of BAL troughs may arise on larger scales. We estimate an average lifetime for a BAL trough along our line-of-sight of a few thousand years. BAL disappearance and emergence events appear to be extremes of general BAL variability, rather than being qualitatively distinct phenomena. We derive the parameters of a random-walk model for BAL EW variability, finding that this model can acceptably describe some key aspects of EW variability. The coordinated trough variability of BAL quasars with multiple troughs suggests that changes in "shielding gas" may play a significant role in driving general BAL variability. The good prospects for significantly extending this work will be briefly summarized.

  20. BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VARIABILITY ON MULTI-YEAR TIMESCALES IN A LARGE QUASAR SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Lundgren, B. F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2013-11-10

    We present a detailed investigation of the variability of 428 C IV and 235 Si IV broad absorption line (BAL) troughs identified in multi-epoch observations of 291 quasars by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II/III. These observations primarily sample rest-frame timescales of 1-3.7 yr over which significant rearrangement of the BAL wind is expected. We derive a number of observational results on, e.g., the frequency of BAL variability, the velocity range over which BAL variability occurs, the primary observed form of BAL-trough variability, the dependence of BAL variability upon timescale, the frequency of BAL strengthening versus weakening, correlations between BAL variability and BAL-trough profiles, relations between C IV and Si IV BAL variability, coordinated multi-trough variability, and BAL variations as a function of quasar properties. We assess implications of these observational results for quasar winds. Our results support models where most BAL absorption is formed within an order-of-magnitude of the wind-launching radius, although a significant minority of BAL troughs may arise on larger scales. We estimate an average lifetime for a BAL trough along our line-of-sight of a few thousand years. BAL disappearance and emergence events appear to be extremes of general BAL variability, rather than being qualitatively distinct phenomena. We derive the parameters of a random-walk model for BAL EW variability, finding that this model can acceptably describe some key aspects of EW variability. The coordinated trough variability of BAL quasars with multiple troughs suggests that changes in 'shielding gas' may play a significant role in driving general BAL variability.

  1. Broad Absorption Line Variability on Multi-year Timescales in a Large Quasar Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; Schneider, D. P.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Lundgren, B. F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the variability of 428 C IV and 235 Si IV broad absorption line (BAL) troughs identified in multi-epoch observations of 291 quasars by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II/III. These observations primarily sample rest-frame timescales of 1-3.7 yr over which significant rearrangement of the BAL wind is expected. We derive a number of observational results on, e.g., the frequency of BAL variability, the velocity range over which BAL variability occurs, the primary observed form of BAL-trough variability, the dependence of BAL variability upon timescale, the frequency of BAL strengthening versus weakening, correlations between BAL variability and BAL-trough profiles, relations between C IV and Si IV BAL variability, coordinated multi-trough variability, and BAL variations as a function of quasar properties. We assess implications of these observational results for quasar winds. Our results support models where most BAL absorption is formed within an order-of-magnitude of the wind-launching radius, although a significant minority of BAL troughs may arise on larger scales. We estimate an average lifetime for a BAL trough along our line-of-sight of a few thousand years. BAL disappearance and emergence events appear to be extremes of general BAL variability, rather than being qualitatively distinct phenomena. We derive the parameters of a random-walk model for BAL EW variability, finding that this model can acceptably describe some key aspects of EW variability. The coordinated trough variability of BAL quasars with multiple troughs suggests that changes in "shielding gas" may play a significant role in driving general BAL variability.

  2. Multi-Sightline Observation of Narrow Absorption Lines in Lensed Quasar SDSS J1029+2623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Saez, Cristian; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Chartas, George; Bauer, Franz E.; Inada, Naohisa; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2016-07-01

    We exploit the widely separated images of the lensed quasar SDSS J1029+2623 ({z}{em} = 2.197, θ = 22.″5) to observe its outflowing wind through two different sightlines. We present an analysis of three observations, including two with the Subaru telescope in 2010 February and 2014 April, separated by four years, and one with the Very Large Telescope, separated from the second Subaru observation by ˜2 months. We detect 66 narrow absorption lines (NALs), of which 24 are classified as intrinsic NALs that are physically associated with the quasar based on partial coverage analysis. The velocities of intrinsic NALs appear to cluster around values of {v}{ej} ˜ 59,000, 43,000, and 29,000 km s‑1, which is reminiscent of filamentary structures obtained by numerical simulations. There are no common intrinsic NALs at the same redshift along the two sightlines, implying that the transverse size of the NAL absorbers should be smaller than the sightline distance between two lensed images. In addition to the NALs with large ejection velocities of {v}{ej} > 1000 km s‑1, we also detect broader proximity absorption lines (PALs) at {z}{abs} ˜ {z}{em}. The PALs are likely to arise in outflowing gas at a distance of r ≤ 620 pc from the central black hole with an electron density of n e ≥8.7 × 103 cm‑3. These limits are based on the assumption that the variability of the lines is due to recombination. We discuss the implications of these results on the three-dimensional structure of the outflow.

  3. THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTRINSIC N V NARROW ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEMS OF THREE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Charlton, Jane C.; Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Ganguly, Rajib E-mail: misawatr@shinshu-u.ac.j

    2010-10-20

    We employ detailed photoionization models to infer the physical conditions of intrinsic narrow absorption line systems found in high-resolution spectra of three quasars at z = 2.6-3.0. We focus on a family of intrinsic absorbers characterized by N V lines that are strong relative to the Ly{alpha} lines. The inferred physical conditions are similar for the three intrinsic N V absorbers, with metallicities greater than 10 times the solar value (assuming a solar abundance pattern), and with high ionization parameters (log U {approx} 0). Thus, we conclude that the unusual strength of the N V lines results from a combination of partial coverage, a high ionization state, and high metallicity. We consider whether dilution of the absorption lines by flux from the broad emission line region can lead us to overestimate the metallicities and we find that this is an unlikely possibility. The high abundances that we infer are not surprising in the context of scenarios in which metal enrichment takes place very early on in massive galaxies. We estimate that the mass outflow rate in the absorbing gas (which is likely to have a filamentary structure) is less than a few M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} under the most optimistic assumptions, although it may be embedded in a much hotter, more massive outflow.

  4. The Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project: The Unusual Absorption-Line System in the Spectrum of PG 2302+029--Ejected or Intervening?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jannuzi, B. T.; Hartig, G. F.; Kirhakos, S.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Turnshek, D. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bergeron, J.; Boksenberg, A.; Savage, B. D.; Schneider, D. P.; Wolfe, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report the discovery of a high-ionization broad absorption line system at a redshift of z(sub abs) = 0.695 in the spectrum of the z(sub em) = 1.052 radio-quiet quasar PG 2302+029. Broad absorption with FWHM from 3000 to 5000 km/s is detected from C iv, N v, and O vi in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph spectra of the quasar. A narrow-line system (FWHM approx. 250 km/s) at z(sub abs) = 0.7016 is resolved from the broad blend and includes absorption by Ly alpha and the C iv, N v, and O vi doublets. No absorption by low-ionization metal species (e.g., Si II and Mg II) is detected in the HST or ground-based spectra for either the broad or the narrow system. The centroids of the broad system lines are displaced by approx. 56,000 km/s to the blue of the quasar's broad emission lines. The reddest extent of the broad-line absorption is more than 50,000 km/s from the quasar. The properties of this system are unprecedented, whether it is an intervening or an ejected system.

  5. Time variations of narrow absorption lines in high resolution quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissé, P.; Bergeron, J.; Prochaska, J. X.; Péroux, C.; York, D. G.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We have searched for temporal variations of narrow absorption lines in high resolution quasar spectra. A sample of five distant sources were assembled, for which two spectra are available, either VLT/UVES or Keck/HIRES, which were taken several years apart. Methods: We first investigate under which conditions variations in absorption line profiles can be detected reliably from high resolution spectra and discuss the implications of changes in terms of small-scale structure within the intervening gas or intrinsic origin. The targets selected allow us to investigate the time behaviour of a broad variety of absorption line systems by sampling diverse environments: the vicinity of active nuclei, galaxy halos, molecular-rich galaxy disks associated with damped Lyα systems, as well as neutral gas within our own Galaxy. Results: Intervening absorption lines from Mg ii, Fe ii, or proxy species with lines of lower opacity tracing the same kind of (moderately ionised) gas appear in general to be remarkably stable (1σ upper limits as low as 10% for some components on scales in the range 10-100 au), even for systems at zabs ≈ ze. Marginal variations are observed for Mg ii lines towards PKS 1229-021 at zabs = 0.83032; however, we detect no systems that display any change as large as those reported in low resolution SDSS spectra. The lack of clear variations for low β Mg ii systems does not support the existence of a specific population of absorbers made of swept-up gas towards blazars. In neutral or diffuse molecular media, clear changes are seen for Galactic Na i lines towards PKS 1229-02 (decrease in N by a factor of four for one of the five components over 9.7 yr), corresponding to structure on a scale of about 35 au, in good agreement with known properties of the Galactic interstellar medium. Tentative variations are detected for H2J = 3 lines towards FBQS J2340-0053 at zabs = 2.05454 (≃35% change in column density, N, over 0.7 yr in the rest frame), suggesting

  6. Fast outflows in broad absorption line quasars and their connection with CSS/GPS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni , G.; Mack, K.-H.; Montenegro-Montes, F. M.; Brienza, M.; González-Serrano, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    Broad absorption line quasars are among the objects presenting the fastest outflows. The launching mechanism itself is not completely understood. Models in which they could be launched from the accretion disk, and then curved and accelerated by the effect of the radiation pressure, have been presented. We conducted an extensive observational campaign, from radio to optical band, to collect information about their nature and test the models present in the literature, the main dichotomy being between a young scenario and an orientation one. We found a variety of possible orientations, morphologies, and radio ages, not converging to a particular explanation for the BAL phenomenon. From our latest observations in the m- and mm-band, we obtained an indication of a lower dust abundance with respect to normal quasars, thus suggesting a possible feedback process on the host galaxy. Also, in the low-frequency regime we confirmed the presence of CSS components, sometime in conjunction with a GPS one already detected at higher frequencies. Following this, about 70 % of our sample turns out to be in a GPS or CSS+GPS phase. We conclude that fast outflows, responsible for the BAL features, can be more easily present among objects going through a restarting or just-started radio phase, where radiation pressure can substantially contribute to their acceleration.

  7. Evidence for two spatially separated UV continuum emitting regions in the Cloverleaf broad absorption line quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Hutsemékers, D.; Anguita, T.; Braibant, L.; Riaud, P.

    2015-10-01

    Testing the standard Shakura-Sunyaev model of accretion is a challenging task because the central region of quasars where accretion takes place is unresolved with telescopes. The analysis of microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars is one of the few techniques that can test this model, yielding to the measurement of the size and of temperature profile of the accretion disc. We present spectroscopic observations of the gravitationally lensed broad absorption line quasar H1413+117, which reveal partial microlensing of the continuum emission that appears to originate from two separated regions: a microlensed region, corresponding the compact accretion disc; and a non-microlensed region, more extended and contributing to at least 30% of the total UV-continuum flux. Because this extended continuum is occulted by the broad absorption line clouds, it is not associated with the host galaxy, but rather with light scattered in the neighbourhood of the central engine. We measure the amplitude of microlensing of the compact continuum over the rest-frame wavelength range 1000-7000 Å. Following a Bayesian scheme, we confront our measurements to microlensing simulations of an accretion disc with a temperature varying as T ∝ R-1/ν. We find a most likely source half-light radius of R1/2 = 0.61 × 1016cm (i.e., 0.002 pc) at 0.18 μm, and a most-likely index of ν = 0.4. The standard disc (ν = 4/3) model is not ruled out by our data, and is found within the 95% confidence interval associated with our measurements. We demonstrate that, for H1413+117, the existence of an extended continuum in addition to the disc emission only has a small impact on the inferred disc parameters, and is unlikely to solve the tension between the microlensing source size and standard disc sizes, as previously reported in the literature. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). ESO program ID: 386.B-0337.Appendices A and B are available in electronic form

  8. Constraining the variation of the fine-structure constant with observations of narrow quasar absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10{sup –5}, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (– 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10{sup –5} in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10{sup –5}, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (– 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10{sup –5}. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (– 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10{sup –5}. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of

  9. Unusual high-redshift radio broad absorption-line quasar 1624+3758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, C. R.; Carballo, R.; Holt, J.; Vigotti, M.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Mack, K.-H.; Perley, R. A.

    2005-07-01

    We present observations of the most radio-luminous broad absorption-line (BAL) quasar known, 1624+3758, at redshift z= 3.377. The quasar has several unusual properties. (1) The FeII UV191 1787-Åemission line is very prominent. (2) The BAL trough (BALnicity index 2990 km s-1) is detached by 21000 km s-1 and extends to velocity v=-29000 km s-1. There are additional intrinsic absorbers at -1900 and -2800 km s-1. (3) The radio rotation measure of the quasar, 18350 rad m-2, is the second highest known. The radio luminosity is P1.4GHz= 4.3 × 1027 W Hz-1 (H0= 50 km s-1 Mpc-1, q0= 0.5) and the radio loudness is R*= 260. The radio source is compact and the radio spectrum is GHz-peaked, consistent with it being relatively young. The width of the CIV emission line, in conjunction with the total optical luminosity, implies a black hole mass MBH~ 109Msolar, L/LEddington~ 2. The high Eddington ratio and the radio-loudness place this quasar in one corner of Boroson's two-component scheme for the classification of active galactic nuclei, implying a very high accretion rate, and this may account for some of the unusual observed properties. The v=-1900km s-1 absorber is a possible Lyman-limit system, with N(HI) = 4 × 1018 cm-2, and a covering factor of 0.7. A complex mini-BAL absorber at v=-2200 to -3400 km s-1 is detected in each of CIV, NV and OVI. The blue and red components of the CIV doublet happen to be unblended, allowing both the covering factor and optical depth to be determined as a function of velocity. Variation of the covering factor with velocity dominates the form of the mini-BAL, with the absorption being saturated (e-τ~ 0) over most of the velocity range. The velocity dependence of the covering factor and the large velocity width imply that the mini-BAL is intrinsic to the quasar. There is some evidence of line-locking between velocity components in the CIV mini-BAL, suggesting that radiation pressure plays a role in accelerating the outflow.

  10. Dramatically Variable C IV Mini-Broad Absorption Line System in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, T.; Eracleous, M.; Charlton, J. C.; Chartas, G.; Kashikawa, N.

    2008-10-01

    We observed the quasar HS 1603+3820 (z_{em} = 2.542, first discovered by Dobrzycki et al. 1996) six times over an interval of 4.2 yrs (1.2 yrs in the quasar rest frame) using the High Dispersion Spectrograph on Subaru telescope. The purpose was to study the mini-broad absorption line (mini-BAL; FWHM ˜ 1,000 km s^{-1}) that is blue-shifted from the quasar by ˜ 9,500 km s^{-1}. We found significant time variability, which supported the physical association of the mini-BAL gas with an outflow from the quasar. We have narrowed down the cause of the variability to two possible scenarios. We also used archival Chandra x-ray data to study the x-ray properties of this quasar. The results constrain the location of the absorbing gas relative to the overall outflow.

  11. Is there a connection between broad absorption line quasars and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies?

    SciTech Connect

    Grupe, Dirk; Nousek, John A.

    2015-02-01

    We consider whether broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are similar, as suggested by Brandt and Gallagher and Boroson. For this purpose, we constructed a sample of 11 BAL QSOs from existing Chandra and Swift observations. We found that BAL QSOs and NLS1s both operate at high Eddington ratios L/L{sub Edd}, although BAL QSOs have slightly lower L/L{sub Edd}. BAL QSOs and NLS1s in general have high Fe ii/Hβ and low [O iii]/Hβ ratios following the classic “Boroson and Green” eigenvector 1 relation. We also found that the mass accretion rates M-dot of BAL QSOs and NLS1s are more similar than previously thought, although some BAL QSOs exhibit extreme mass accretion rates of more than 10 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These extreme mass accretion rates may suggest that the black holes in BAL QSOs are relativistically spinning. Black hole masses in BAL QSOs are a factor of 100 larger than NLS1s. From their location on a M−σ plot, we find that BAL QSOs contain fully developed black holes. Applying a principal component analysis to our sample, we find eigenvector 1 to correspond to the Eddington ratio L/L{sub Edd}, and eigenvector 2 to black hole mass.

  12. Broad absorption line variability on multi-year timescales in a large quasar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiz Ak, Nurten

    Outflows launched near the central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are a common and important component of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Outflows in luminous AGNs (i.e., quasars) play a key role in mass accretion onto SMBH as well as in the feedback into host galaxies. The most prominent signature of such outflows appears as broad absorption lines (BALs) that are blueshifted from the emission line with a few thousands km s--1 velocities. In this dissertation, I place further constrains upon the size scale, internal structure, dynamics, and evolution of the outflows investigating profiles, properties, and variation characteristics of BAL troughs. I present observational results on BAL troughs in a large quasar sample utilizing spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spanning on multi-year timescales. The results presented here, for the first time, provide a large and well-defined variability data base capable of discriminating between time-dependent hydrodynamic wind calculations in a statistically powerful manner. In a study of 582 quasars, I present 21 examples of BAL trough disappearance. Approximately 3.3% of BAL quasars show disappearing C IV trough on rest-frame timescales of 1.1--3.9 yr. BAL disappearance appears to occur mainly for shallow and weak or moderate-strength absorption troughs but not the strongest ones. When one BAL trough in a quasar spectrum disappears, the other present troughs usually weaken. Possible causes of such coordinated variations could be disk-wind rotation or variations of shielding gas that lead to variations of ionizing-continuum radiation. I present a detailed study on the variability of 428 C IV and 235 Si IV BAL troughs using a systematically observed sample of 291 BAL quasars. BAL variation distributions indicate that BAL disappearance is an extreme type of general BAL variability, rather than a qualitatively distinct phenomenon. The high observed frequency of BAL variability on multi-year timescales is

  13. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. III - First observational results on Milky Way gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Lu, Limin; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Lockman, Felix J.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption lines found near zero redshift due to Milky Way disk and halo gas in the spectra of 15 quasars observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) of the HST at a resolution of about 230 km/s are reported. Results show that Milky Way absorption lines comprise about 44 percent of all absorption lines seen in the first group of Key Project FOS spectra. Milky Way lines were observed for 3C 273 and H1821 + 643. Limits to the Mg-to-H abundance ratio obtained for very high velocity Mg II absorption detections imply gas-phase Mg abundances for the very high velocity gas ranging from more than 0.059 to more than 0.32 times the solar abundance. In all cases where high-velocity H I emission is seen, corresponding high-velocity metal-line absorption is observed.

  14. The Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. 10: Galactic H I 21 centimeter emission toward 143 quasars and active Galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; Savage, Blair D.

    1995-01-01

    Sensitive H I 21 cm emission line spectra have been measured for the directions to 143 quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) chosen from the observing lists for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. Narrow-band and wide-band data were obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 43 m radio telescope for each object. The narrow-band data have a velocity resolution of 1 km/s, extend from -220 to +170 km/s, and are corrected for stray 21 cm radiation. The wide-band data have a resolution of 4 km/s and extend from -1000 to +1000 km/s. The data are important for the interpretation of ultraviolet absorption lines near zero redshift in Key Project spectra. Twenty-two percent of the quasars lie behind Galactic high-velocity H I clouds with absolute value of V(sub LSR) greater than 100 km/s whose presence can increase the equivalent width of interstellar absorption lines significantly. This paper contains the emission spectra and measures of the H I velocities and column densities along the sight line to each quasar. We discuss how the measurements can be used to estimate the visual and ultraviolet extinction toward each quasar and to predict the approximate strength of the strong ultraviolet resonance lines of neutral gas species in the HST Key Project spectra.

  15. The Discovery of the First He Iλ10830 Broad Absorption Line Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Barber, Sara

    2011-02-01

    We report the discovery of the first He I*λ10830 broad absorption line quasar FBQS J1151+3822. Using new infrared and optical spectra, as well as the SDSS spectrum, we extracted the apparent optical depth profiles as a function of velocity of the 3889 Å and 10830 Å He I* absorption lines. Since these lines have the same lower levels, inhomogeneous absorption models could be used to extract the average true He I* column density; the log of that number was 14.9. The total hydrogen column density was obtained using Cloudy models. A range of ionization parameters and densities were allowed, with the lower limit on the ionization parameter of log U = -1.4 determined by the requirement that there be sufficient He I*, and the upper limit on the density of log n = 8 determined by the lack of Balmer absorption. Simulated UV spectra showed that the ionization parameter could be further constrained in principle using a combination of low- and high-ionization lines (such as Mg II and P V), but the only density-sensitive line predicted to be observable and not significantly blended was C IIIλ1176. We estimated the outflow rate and kinetic energy, finding them to be consistent but on the high side compared with analyses of other objects. Assuming that radiative line driving is the responsible acceleration mechanism, a force multiplier model was constructed. A dynamical argument using the model results strongly constrained the density to be log n >= ~7. Consequently, the log hydrogen column density is constrained to be between 21.7 and 22.9, the mass outflow rate to be between 11 and 56 solar masses per year, the ratio of the mass outflow rate to the accretion rate to be between 1.2 and 5.8, and the kinetic energy to be between 1 and 5 × 1044 erg s-1. We discuss the advantages of using He I* to detect high column density BALQSOs and measure their properties. We find that the large λfik ratio of 23.3 between the 10830 Å and 3889 Å components makes He I* analysis sensitive

  16. Limits on the time variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant in the low energy limit from absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars.

    PubMed

    Srianand, R; Chand, H; Petitjean, P; Aracil, B

    2004-03-26

    We present the results of a detailed many-multiplet analysis performed on a new sample of Mg ii systems observed in high quality quasar spectra obtained using the Very Large Telescope. The weighted mean value of the variation in alpha derived from our analysis over the redshift range 0.4constraint obtained based on high redshift quasar absorption line systems.

  17. Dependence of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar Fraction on Radio Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Dai, Xinyu; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2008-11-01

    We find that the fraction of classical broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) among the FIRST radio sources in the Sloan Data Release 3, is 20.5+ 7.3-5.9% at the faintest radio powers detected (L1.4 GHz ~ 1032 erg s-1), and rapidly drops to lesssim8% at L1.4 GHz ~ 3 × 1033 erg s-1. Similarly, adopting the broader absorption index (AI) definition of Trump et al., we find the fraction of radio BALQSOs to be 44+ 8.1-7.8%, reducing to 23.1+ 7.3-6.1% at high luminosities. While the high fraction at low radio power is consistent with the recent near-IR estimates by Dai et al., the lower fraction at high radio powers is intriguing and confirms previous claims based on smaller samples. The trend is independent of the redshift range, the optical and radio flux selection limits, or the exact definition of a radio match. We also find that at fixed optical magnitude, the highest bins of radio luminosity are preferentially populated by non-BALQSOs, consistent with the overall trend. We do find, however, that those quasars identified as AI-BALQSOs but not under the classical definition do not show a significant drop in their fraction as a function of radio power, further supporting independent claims that these sources, characterized by lower equivalent width, may represent an independent class from the classical BALQSOs. We find the balnicity index, a measure of the absorption trough in BALQSOs, and the mean maximum wind velocity to be roughly constant at all radio powers. We discuss several plausible physical models which may explain the observed fast drop in the fraction of the classical BALQSOs with increasing radio power, although none is entirely satisfactory. A strictly evolutionary model for the BALQSO and radio emission phases requires a strong fine-tuning to work, while a simple geometric model, although still not capable of explaining polar BALQSOs and the paucity of FRII BALQSOs, is statistically successful in matching the data if part of the apparent radio

  18. {ital Hubble Space Telescope} Observations of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar PG 0946+301

    SciTech Connect

    Arav, N.; Korista, K.T. |; de Kool, M. |; Junkkarinen, V.T.; Begelman, M.C.

    1999-05-01

    We analyze {ital Hubble Space Telescope} ({ital HST}) and ground-based spectra of the brightest broad absorption line (BAL) quasar in the UV: PG 0946+301. A detailed study of the absorption troughs as a function of velocity is presented, facilitated by the use of a new algorithm to solve for the optical depth as a function of velocity for multiplet lines. We find convincing evidence for saturation in parts of the troughs. This supports our previous assertion that saturation is common in BALs and therefore cast doubts on claims for very high metallicity in BAL flows. Because of the importance of BAL saturation we also discuss its evidence in other objects. In PG 0946+301 large differences in ionization as a function of velocity are detected, and our findings support the hypothesis that the line of sight intersects a number of flow components that combine to give the appearance of the whole trough. Based on the optical depth profiles, we develop a geometrical-kinematical model for the flow. We have positively identified 16 ions of eight elements (H i, C iii, C iv, N iii, N iv, N v, O iii, O iv, O v, O vi, Ne v, Ne viii, P v, Si iv, S v, S vi) and have probable identifications of Mg x and S iv. Unlike earlier analysis of {ital IUE} data, we find no evidence for BALs arising from excited ionic states in the {ital HST} spectrum of PG 0946+301. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  19. X-RAYS FROM A RADIO-LOUD COMPACT BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASAR 1045+352 AND THE NATURE OF OUTFLOWS IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Katarzynski, Krzysztof; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2009-11-10

    We present new results on X-ray properties of radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and focus on broadband spectral properties of a high-ionization BAL (HiBAL) compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio-loud quasar 1045+352. This HiBAL quasar has a very complex radio morphology indicating either strong interactions between a radio jet and the surrounding interstellar medium or a possible re-start of the jet activity. We detected 1045+352 quasar in a short 5 ksec Chandra ACIS-S observation. We applied theoretical models to explain spectral energy distribution of 1045+352 and argue that non-thermal, inverse-Compton (IC) emission from the innermost parts of the radio jet can account for a large fraction of the observed X-ray emission. In our analysis, we also consider a scenario in which the observed X-ray emission from radio-loud BAL quasars can be a sum of IC jet X-ray emission and optically thin corona X-ray emission. We compiled a sample of radio-loud BAL quasars that were observed in X-rays to date and report no correlation between their X-ray and radio luminosity. However, the radio-loud BAL quasars show a large range of X-ray luminosities and absorption columns. This is consistent with the results obtained earlier for radio-quiet BAL quasars and may indicate an orientation effect in BAL quasars or more complex dependence between X-ray emission, radio emission, and an orientation based on the radio morphology.

  20. Quasars as the formation sites of high-redshift ellipticals: a signature in the `associated' absorption-line systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, A.; Gratton, R.

    1997-03-01

    Published data on the average metallicities and abundance ratios for absorption-line systems in high-redshift quasars suggest that a dichotomy may exist between the chemical composition of damped Lyman alpha (Lyalpha) systems (interpreted as intervening galaxies in the QSO line of sight) and the z_abs~=z_em absorption- line systems associated with the quasar. Intervening systems have smaller than solar metallicities, whereas associated absorbers have solar or greater than solar metallicities and small N/C ratios. While these results have to be confirmed by more precise abundance determinations, we argue that they may be explained by an early phase of efficient metal enrichment occurring only in the close environment of high-z QSOs, and characterized by an excess type-II supernova (SNII) activity. This is reminiscent of the SNII phase required to explain the abundance ratios (favouring alpha- over Fe-group elements) observed in the intracluster (IC) medium of local galaxy clusters. We explore the following scenario, to be tested by forthcoming observations of QSO absorption lines using very large optical telescopes. (a) Well-studied damped- Lyalpha, Lyalpha and metal lines in intervening systems trace only part of the history of metal production in the Universe - the one concerning slowly star-forming discs or dwarf irregulars. (b) The complementary class of early-type and bulge-dominated galaxies formed quickly (at z>~4-5) through a huge episode of star formation favouring high-mass stars. (c) The nucleus of the latter is the site of the subsequent formation of a quasar, which partly hides from view the dimmer host galaxy. (d) The products of a galactic wind, following the violent episode of star formation in the host galaxy and metal pollution of the IC medium in the forming cluster, could be directly observable in the z_abs~=z_em associated absorption systems on the QSO line of sight.

  1. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P.; Stern, D.; Teng, S. H.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Ogle, P.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  2. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R.; Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  3. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  4. A new analysis of fine-structure constant measurements and modelling errors from quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczynska, Michael R.; Webb, John K.; King, Julian A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of 23 absorption systems along the lines of sight towards 18 quasars in the redshift range of 0.4 ≤ zabs ≤ 2.3 observed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Considering both statistical and systematic error contributions we find a robust estimate of the weighted mean deviation of the fine-structure constant from its current, laboratory value of Δα/α = (0.22 ± 0.23) × 10-5, consistent with the dipole variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al. This paper also examines modelling methodologies and systematic effects. In particular, we focus on the consequences of fitting quasar absorption systems with too few absorbing components and of selectively fitting only the stronger components in an absorption complex. We show that using insufficient continuum regions around an absorption complex causes a significant increase in the scatter of a sample of Δα/α measurements, thus unnecessarily reducing the overall precision. We further show that fitting absorption systems with too few velocity components also results in a significant increase in the scatter of Δα/α measurements, and in addition causes Δα/α error estimates to be systematically underestimated. These results thus identify some of the potential pitfalls in analysis techniques and provide a guide for future analyses.

  5. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. 6: Properties of the metal-rich systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, Jacqueline; Petitjean, Patrick; Sargent, W. L. W.; Bahcall, John N.; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Savage, Blair D.; Schneider, Donald P.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of the properties of a sample of 18 metal-rich, low-redshift z(sub abs) much less than z(sub em) absorbers seen in low- and medium-resolution spectra obtained for the Quasar Absorption Line Key Project with the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph (HST/FOS). For most of the C IV and Lyman-limit systems, observations in the optical wavelength range of the expected associated Mg II absorption are available. As at high redshift (z approximately 2), there are two subclasses of absorbers which are characterized by the presence or absence of MG II absorption. However, some low-redshift Mg II and Fe absorptions originate from regions optically thin to UV ionizing photons and thus, at low redshift, the low-ionization systems do not always trace high opacities, as is the case at high redshift. This implies that the mean ionization state of metal-rich, optically thin absorbing clouds falls with decreasing redshift, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the gas is photoionized by the metagalactic UV background radiation field. Two main constraints are derived from the analysis of the Lyman-limit sample, assuming photoionization models are valid. First, a low opacity to ionizing photons (tau(sub LL) approximately less than 1), as observed for several Mg II-Fe II systems at z approximately 0.5, sets limits on the ionization level of hydrogen, thus on the total hydrogen column density and the heavy element abundances, (Z/H) approximately -0.5 to -0.3. Second, the dimensions of individual Mg II clouds are smaller than at high redshift by a factor 3-10. At z approximately greater than 0.6, the O VI absorption doublet is detected in four of the five z(sub abs) much less than z(sub em) systems for which the O VI wavelength range has been observed, whereas the associated N V doublet is detected in only two cases. This suggests that the presence of a high-ionization O VI phase is a general property of z approximately 0.6-1 absorption systems

  6. Limits on variations in fundamental constants from 21-cm and ultraviolet Quasar absorption lines.

    PubMed

    Tzanavaris, P; Webb, J K; Murphy, M T; Flambaum, V V; Curran, S J

    2005-07-22

    Quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and UV rest wavelengths are used to estimate the time variation of x [triple-bond] alpha(2)g(p)mu, where alpha is the fine structure constant, g(p) the proton g factor, and m(e)/m(p) [triple-bond] mu the electron/proton mass ratio. Over a redshift range 0.24 < or = zeta(abs) < or = 2.04, (Deltax/x)(weighted)(total) = (1.17 +/- 1.01) x 10(-5). A linear fit gives x/x = (-1.43 +/- 1.27) x 10(-15) yr(-1). Two previous results on varying alpha yield the strong limits Deltamu/mu = (2.31 +/- 1.03) x 10(-5) and Deltamu/mu=(1.29 +/- 1.01) x10(-5). Our sample, 8 x larger than any previous, provides the first direct estimate of the intrinsic 21-cm and UV velocity differences 6 km s(-1).

  7. Unveiling the intrinsic X-ray properties of broad absorption line quasars with a relatively unbiased sample

    SciTech Connect

    Morabito, Leah K.; Dai, Xinyu; Leighly, Karen M.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Shankar, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence of a higher intrinsic fraction of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) than that obtained in optical surveys, on which most previous X-ray studies of BALQSOs have focused. Here we present Chandra observations of 18 BALQSOs at z ∼ 2, selected from a near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey) sample, where the BALQSO fraction is likely to be close to the intrinsic fraction. We measure photon indices using the stacked spectra of the optically faint (i – K{sub s} ≥ 2.3 mag) and optically bright (i – K{sub s} < 2.3 mag) samples to be Γ ≅ 1.5-2.1. We constrain their intrinsic column density by modeling the X-ray fractional hardness ratio, finding a mean column density of 3.5 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} assuming neutral absorption. We incorporate Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical measurements (rest frame UV) to study the broadband spectral index between the X-ray and UV bands, and compare this to a large sample of normal quasars. We estimate that the optically faint BALQSOs are X-ray weaker than the optically bright ones, and the entire sample of BALQSOs are intrinsically X-ray weak when compared to normal active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Correcting for magnification of X-ray emission via gravitational lensing by the central black hole viewed at large inclination angles makes these BALQSOs even more intrinsically X-ray weak. Finally, we estimate AGN kinetic feedback efficiencies of a few percent for an X-ray wind of 0.3c in high-ionization BALQSOs. Combined with energy carried by low-ionization BALQSOs and UV winds, the total kinetic energy in BALQSOs can be sufficient to provide AGN kinetic feedback required to explain the co-evolution between black holes and host galaxies.

  8. Nustar Reveals an Intrinsically X-ray Weak Broad Absorption Line Quasar in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy Markarian 231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Brandt. W. N.; Harrison, F. A.; Luo, B.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Gandhi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Madsen, K. K.; Ptak, A. F.; Rigby, Jane Rebecca; Risaliti, G.; Saz, C.; Stern, D.; Veilleux, S.; Walton, D. J.; Wik, D. R.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present high-energy (3-30 keV) NuSTAR observations of the nearest quasar, the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Markarian 231 (Mrk 231), supplemented with new and simultaneous low-energy (0.5-8 keV) data from Chandra. The source was detected, though at much fainter levels than previously reported, likely due to contamination in the large apertures of previous non-focusing hard X-ray telescopes. The full band (0.5-30 keV) X-ray spectrum suggests the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in Mrk 231 is absorbed by a patchy and Compton-thin N(sub H) approx. 1.2(sup +0.3) sub-0.3) x 10(exp 23) / sq cm) column. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity L(sub 0.5-30 Kev) approx. 1.0 x 10(exp 43) erg /s) is extremely weak relative to the bolometric luminosity where the 2-10 keV to bolometric luminosity ratio is approx. 0.03% compared to the typical values of 2-15%. Additionally, Mrk 231 has a low X-ray-to-optical power law slope alpha(sub 0X) approx. -1.7. It is a local example of a low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar that is intrinsically X-ray weak. The weak ionizing continuum may explain the lack of mid-infrared [O IV], [Ne V], and [Ne VI] fine-structure emission lines which are present in sources with otherwise similar AGN properties. We argue that the intrinsic X-ray weakness may be a result of the super-Eddington accretion occurring in the nucleus of this ULIRG, and may also be naturally related to the powerful wind event seen in Mrk 231, a merger remnant escaping from its dusty cocoon.

  9. Searching for variations in the fine-structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio using quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julian A.

    2012-02-01

    (abridged) Quasar absorption lines provide a precise test of the assumed constancy of the fundamental constants of physics. We have investigated potential changes in the fine-structure constant, alpha, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, mu. The many-multiplet method allows one to use optical fine-structure transitions to constrain (Delta alpha)/alpha at better than the 10^(-5) level. We present a new analysis of 154 quasar absorbers with 0.2 < z <3.7 in VLT/UVES spectra. From these absorbers we find 2.2 sigma evidence for angular variations in alpha under a dipole+monopole model. Combined with previous Keck/HIRES observations, we find 4.1 sigma evidence for angular (and therefore spatial) variations in alpha, with maximal increase of alpha occurring in the direction RA=(17.3 +/- 1.0) hr, dec=(-61 +/- 10) deg. Under a model where the observed effect is proportional to the lookback-time distance the significance increases to 4.2 sigma. Dipole models fitted to the VLT and Keck samples and models fitted to z<1.6 and z>1.6 sub-samples independently yield consistent estimates of the dipole direction, which suggests that the effect is not caused by telescope systematics. We consider a number of systematic effects and show that they are unable to explain the observed dipole effect. We have used spectra of the quasars Q0405-443, Q0347-383 and Q0528-250 from VLT/UVES to investigate the absorbers at z=2.595, 3.025 and 2.811 in these spectra respectively. We find that (Delta mu)/mu=(10.1 +/- 6.6) x 10^(-6), (8.2 +/- 7.5) x 10^(-6) and (-1.4 +/- 3.9) x 10^(-6) in these absorbers respectively. A second spectrum of Q0528-250 provides an additional constraint of (Delta mu)/mu=(0.2 +/- 3.2_stat +/- 1.9_sys) x 10^(-6). The weighted mean of these values yields (Delta mu)/mu=(1.7 +/- 2.4) x 10^(-6), the most precise constraint on evolution in mu at z>1.

  10. The Evolution of Quasar C IV and Si IV Broad Absorption Lines over Multi-year Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Robert R.; Brandt, W. N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hewett, Paul C.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the variability of C IV λ1549 broad absorption line (BAL) troughs over rest-frame timescales of up to ≈7 yr in 14 quasars at redshifts z >~ 2.1. For nine sources at sufficiently high redshift, we also compare the C IV and Si IV λ1400 absorption variation. We compare shorter and longer term variability using spectra from up to four different epochs per source and find complex patterns of variation in the sample overall. The scatter in the change of absorption equivalent width (EW), ΔEW, increases with the time between observations. BALs do not, in general, strengthen or weaken monotonically, and variation observed over shorter (lsimmonths) timescales is not predictive of multi-year variation. We find no evidence for asymmetry in the distribution of ΔEW that would indicate that BALs form and decay on different timescales, and we constrain the typical BAL lifetime to be gsim30 yr. The BAL absorption for one source, LBQS 0022+0150, has weakened and may now be classified as a mini-BAL. Another source, 1235+1453, shows evidence of variable, blue continuum emission that is relatively unabsorbed by the BAL outflow. C IV and Si IV BAL shape changes are related in at least some sources. Given their high velocities, BAL outflows apparently traverse large spatial regions and may interact with parsec-scale structures such as an obscuring torus. Assuming BAL outflows are launched from a rotating accretion disk, notable azimuthal symmetry is required in the outflow to explain the relatively small changes observed in velocity structure over times up to 7 yr.

  11. The Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. XIV. The Evolution of Lyα Absorption Lines in the Redshift Interval z = 0-1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Ray J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Lu, Limin; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Sargent, W. L. W.; Savage, Blair D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Turnshek, David A.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    1998-10-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the rate of evolution of the Lyα absorption lines in the redshift interval 0.0 to ~1.5 based upon a sample of 987 Lyα absorption lines identified in the spectra of 63 QSOs obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These spectra were obtained as part of the QSO Absorption Line Survey, an HST Key Project during the first four years of observations with the telescope. Fits to the evolution of the number of absorbers per unit redshift (dN/dz) of the form dN/dz = A × (1 + z)γ continue to yield values of γ in the range 0.1-0.3, decidedly flatter than results from ground-based data pertaining to the redshift range z > 1.7. These results are consistent with our previous results based on a much smaller sample of lines, but the uncertainties in the fit have been greatly reduced. The combination of the HST and ground-based data suggest a marked transition in the rate of evolution of the Lyα lines at a redshift of about 1.7. The 19 Lyα lines from an additional higher redshift QSO from our sample for which tentative line identifications are available (UM 18; zem = 1.89) support the suggestion of a rapid increase at around this redshift. We derive the cumulative distribution of the full sample of Lyα lines and show that the distribution in redshift can indeed be well represented by a power law of the form (1 + z)γ. For this same sample, the distribution of equivalent widths of the Lyα absorbers above a rest equivalent width of 0.1 Å is fit quite well by an exponential. Comparing samples of Lyα lines, one set of which has redshifts the same as, or very near to, the redshifts of ions from heavy elements and another set in which no ions from heavy elements have been identified, we find that the Lyα systems with heavy element detections have a much steeper slope than the high rest equivalent width portion of the Lyman-only sample. We argue that this result is not likely to be due to

  12. UNSHIFTED METASTABLE He I* MINI-BROAD ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEM IN THE NARROW-LINE TYPE 1 QUASAR SDSS J080248.18+551328.9

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Tuo; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Chenwei; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Komossa, S.; Yuan, Weimin; Zuther, Jens; Lu, Honglin; Zuo, Wenwen

    2015-02-10

    We report the identification of an unusual absorption-line system in the quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9 and present a detailed study of the system, incorporating follow-up optical and near-IR spectroscopy. A few tens of absorption lines are detected, including He I*, Fe II*, and Ni II*, which arise from metastable or excited levels, as well as resonant lines in Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Mn II, and Ca II. All of the isolated absorption lines show the same profile of width Δv ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1} centered at a common redshift as that of the quasar emission lines, such as [O II], [S II], and hydrogen Paschen and Balmer series. With narrow Balmer lines, strong optical Fe II multiplets, and weak [O III] doublets, its emission-line spectrum is typical for that of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1). We have derived reliable measurements of the gas-phase column densities of the absorbing ions/levels. Photoionization modeling indicates that the absorber has a density of n {sub H} ∼ (1.0-2.5) × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} and a column density of N {sub H} ∼ (1.0-3.2) × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} and is located at R ∼100-250 pc from the central supermassive black hole. The location of the absorber, the symmetric profile of the absorption lines, and the coincidence of the absorption- and emission-line centroid jointly suggest that the absorption gas originates from the host galaxy and is plausibly accelerated by stellar processes, such as stellar winds and/or supernova explosions. The implications for the detection of such a peculiar absorption-line system in an NLS1 are discussed in the context of coevolution between supermassive black hole growth and host galaxy buildup.

  13. Unshifted Metastable He I* Mini-broad Absorption Line System in the Narrow-line Type 1 Quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Tuo; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Tinggui; Ge, Jian; Wang, Huiyuan; Komossa, S.; Hamann, Fred; Zuther, Jens; Liu, Wenjuan; Lu, Honglin; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Chenwei; Yuan, Weimin

    2015-02-01

    We report the identification of an unusual absorption-line system in the quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9 and present a detailed study of the system, incorporating follow-up optical and near-IR spectroscopy. A few tens of absorption lines are detected, including He I*, Fe II*, and Ni II*, which arise from metastable or excited levels, as well as resonant lines in Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Mn II, and Ca II. All of the isolated absorption lines show the same profile of width Δv ~ 1500 km s-1 centered at a common redshift as that of the quasar emission lines, such as [O II], [S II], and hydrogen Paschen and Balmer series. With narrow Balmer lines, strong optical Fe II multiplets, and weak [O III] doublets, its emission-line spectrum is typical for that of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1). We have derived reliable measurements of the gas-phase column densities of the absorbing ions/levels. Photoionization modeling indicates that the absorber has a density of n H ~ (1.0-2.5) × 105 cm-3 and a column density of N H ~ (1.0-3.2) × 1021 cm-2 and is located at R ~100-250 pc from the central supermassive black hole. The location of the absorber, the symmetric profile of the absorption lines, and the coincidence of the absorption- and emission-line centroid jointly suggest that the absorption gas originates from the host galaxy and is plausibly accelerated by stellar processes, such as stellar winds and/or supernova explosions. The implications for the detection of such a peculiar absorption-line system in an NLS1 are discussed in the context of coevolution between supermassive black hole growth and host galaxy buildup.

  14. Results of Monitoring the Dramatically Variable C IV Mini-Broad Absorption Line System in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Kashikawa, Nobunari

    2007-05-01

    We present six new and two previously published high-resolution spectra of the quasar HS 1603+3820 (zem=2.542) taken over an interval of 4.2 yr (1.2 yr in the quasar rest frame). The observations were made with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope and the Medium Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The purpose was to study the narrow absorption lines (NALs). We use time variability and coverage fraction analysis to separate intrinsic absorption lines, which are physically related to the quasar, from intervening absorption lines. By fitting models to the line profiles, we derive the parameters of the respective absorbers as a function of time. Only the mini-BAL system at zabs~2.43 (vshift~9500 km s-1) shows both partial coverage and time variability, although two NAL systems possibly show evidence of partial coverage. We find that all the troughs of the mini-BAL system vary in concert and its total equivalent width variations resemble those of the coverage fraction. However, no other correlations are seen between the variations of different model parameters. Thus, the observed variations cannot be reproduced by a simple change of ionization state or by motion of a homogeneous parcel of gas across the cylinder of sight. We propose that the observed variations are a result of rapid continuum fluctuations, coupled with coverage fraction fluctuations caused by a clumpy screen of variable optical depth located between the continuum source and the mini-BAL gas. An alternative explanation is that the observed partial coverage signature is the result of scattering of continuum photons around the absorber, thus the equivalent width of the mini-BAL can vary as the intensity of the scattered continuum changes. Based on data collected at the Subaru telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  15. Further constraints on variation of the fine-structure constant from alkali-doublet QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Prochaska, J. X.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-11-01

    Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption-line spectra with laboratory spectra provides a precise probe for variability of the fine-structure constant, α, over cosmological time-scales. We constrain variation in α in 21 Keck/HIRES Siiv absorption systems using the alkali-doublet (AD) method in which changes in α are related to changes in the doublet spacing. The precision obtained with the AD method has been increased by a factor of 3: Δα/α=(-0.5+/-1.3)×10-5. We also analyse potential systematic errors in this result. Finally, we compare the AD method with the many-multiplet method, which has achieved an order of magnitude greater precision, and we discuss the future of the AD method.

  16. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. I - First observational results, including Lyman-alpha and Lyman-limit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Sargent, W. L. W.; Savage, Blair D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Turnshek, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra are presented for 37 quasars with small and moderate redshifts; the quasars were observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph of the HST. New higher resolution measurements of the absorption lines in the UV spectra of 11 quasars with emission-line redshifts that lie between 0.3 and 1.0 are reported. Calibrated spectra and continuum fits are shown for each object. A total of 104 extragalactic Ly-alpha systems are identified, nine of which are found at the same redshifts as metal-line systems. The local number density of Ly-alpha systems with rest equivalent widths larger than 0.32 A and without detected metal lines is about 15.1 +/- 4.3 Ly-alpha systems per unit redshift with gamma = 0.30 +/- 0.62 and W* = 0.22 +/- 0.02 A. A total of 10 Lyman-limit systems with an optical depth greater than 0.4 are identified. The paucity of damped Ly-alpha lines at small and moderate redshifts shows that the number density of damped absorption systems decreases with decreasing redshift.

  17. The HST quasar absorption line key project. 4: HST faint-object spectrograph and ground-based observations of the unusual low-redshift broad absorption-line quasi-stellar object PG 0043+039

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnshek, David A.; Espey, Brian R.; Kopko, Michael, Jr.; Rauch, Michael; Weymann, Ray J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Boksenberg, Alec; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Hartig, George F.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph (HST FOS) observations have shown that the spectrum of the low-redshift (z(sub em) approximately equal to 0.384) QSO PG 0043+039 exhibits weak broad absorption lines (BALs). The BALs were discovered during the course of UV spectrophotometry made for the HST Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. The HST data are analyzed along with ground-based optical and IUE spectrophotometry. The object is found to have a number of atypical properties relative to normal non-BAL QSOs. The observed continuum is atypical in the sense that it is much weaker than that of a normal optically selected QSO at rest wavelengths approximately less than 2200 A. Intrinsic reddening of E(B-V) approximately equal to 0.11 mag by dust similar to that found in the SMC at the redshift of PG 0043+039 conservatively accounts for the observed continuum shape moderately well. These observed characteristics are typical of low-ionization BAL QSOs, but convincing evidence for BALs due to low-ionization transitions of Mg II, Al III, Al II, or C II does not exist. Therefore, this object may be a misaligned BAL QSO having many of the characteristics of low-ionization BAL QSOs with the sight line passing through a putative dusty region, but evidently missing clouds of high enough column density to produce observable low-ionization BALs. If the intrinsic dust-extinction model is correct, the observations suggest that the dust is not confined to the presumably higher density, low-ionization BAL clouds, but that it has drifted to nearby high-ionization BAL regions. We also consider other possible mechanisms for producing the shape of the continuous energy distribution which cannot be ruled out. We compare the Fe II emission in PG 0043+039 with that in another Key Project QSO, NGC 2841-UB 3, which has optical Fe II emission comparable in strength to that in PG 0043+039, but has anomalously weak UV Fe II emission. In addition, from an analysis of UV and optical

  18. Spectroscopy of Bright Quasars with the Hubble Space Telescope and Lyman-Alpha Absorption Lines in the Redshift Range 0.5 < Z < 1.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, C. D.; Petry, C. E.; Malkan, M. A.; Webb, W.

    1996-06-01

    We report ultraviolet spectroscopy of three bright quasars obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope. The good quality spectra covering the range 1800-3300 A result from spectropolarimetry acquired for these targets, the interpretation of which has been published elsewhere. Objective algorithms were used to select absorption lines whose strength exceeded 4 times the rms noise in the nearby continuum, resulting in 109 significant lines for PG 1222+228, 91 significant lines for PG 1634+706, and 19 significant lines for PG 2302+029. Most of the spectral range covers the region with a high density of lines due to intervening absorbers, blueward of the Lyman- α emission line. In PG 1222+228, we identify about 35% of the lines as being associated with the seven metal line systems already known in this quasar. Three have seven or more metal lines identified. An additional 12% are either galactic lines or Lyman-α, Lyman-β pairs with no associated metals. In PG 1634 + 706, nearly 42% of the absorption lines are identified with metal systems. Some are associated with the two metal line systems previously known in this quasar, others are associated with two newly identified C IV Systems at z = 0.6540 and z = 0.9057. Another 19% are galactic lines or Lyman-α, Lyman-β pairs with no associated metals. Six galactic lines are identified in the spectrum of PG 2302 + 029; no lines due to intervening absorbers could be identified. The data for PG 1222 + 228 and PG 1634 + 706 can be used to estimate the number density of Lyman-α absorbers in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.7. Above an effective rest equivalent width of 0.4 A there are 25 Lyman-α lines in PG 1222 + 228 in the wavelength range 2300- 3300 A, and 11 Lyman-α lines in PG 1634 + 706 in the wavelength range 1865-2650 A. We have been able to demonstrate that the identification procedure and the method of fitting lines in blended regions is unlikely to contribute systematic errors beyond

  19. Precise limits on cosmological variability of the fine-structure constant with zinc and chromium quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Malec, Adrian L.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The strongest transitions of Zn and Cr II are the most sensitive to relative variations in the fine-structure constant (Δα/α) among the transitions commonly observed in quasar absorption spectra. They also lie within just 40 Å of each other (rest frame), so they are resistant to the main systematic error affecting most previous measurements of Δα/α: long-range distortions of the wavelength calibration. While Zn and Cr II absorption is normally very weak in quasar spectra, we obtained high signal-to-noise, high-resolution echelle spectra from the Keck and Very Large Telescopes of nine rare systems where it is strong enough to constrain Δα/α from these species alone. These provide 12 independent measurements (three quasars were observed with both telescopes) at redshifts 1.0-2.4, 11 of which pass stringent reliability criteria. These 11 are all consistent with Δα/α = 0 within their individual uncertainties of 3.5-13 parts per million (ppm), with a weighted mean Δα/α = 0.4 ± 1.4stat ± 0.9sys ppm (1σ statistical and systematic uncertainties), indicating no significant cosmological variations in α. This is the first statistical sample of absorbers that is resistant to long-range calibration distortions (at the <1 ppm level), with a precision comparable to previous large samples of ˜150 (distortion-affected) absorbers. Our systematic error budget is instead dominated by much shorter range distortions repeated across echelle orders of individual spectra.

  20. A multi-epoch spectroscopic study of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. II. Emission- and absorption-line variability time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturni, F. G.; Trevese, D.; Vagnetti, F.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The study of high-redshift bright quasars is crucial to gather information about the history of galaxy assembly and evolution. Variability analyses can provide useful data on the physics of quasar processes and their relation with the host galaxy. Aims: In this study, we aim to measure the black hole mass of the bright lensed BAL QSO APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 through reverberation mapping, and to update and extend the monitoring of its C IV absorption line variability. Methods: We perform the first reverberation mapping of the Si IV and C IV emission lines for a high-luminosity quasar at high redshift with the use of 138 R-band photometric data and 30 spectra available over 16 years of observations. We also cross-correlate the C IV absorption equivalent width variations with the continuum light curve to estimate the recombination time lags of the various absorbers and infer the physical conditions of the ionised gas. Results: We find a reverberation-mapping time lag of ~900 rest-frame days for both Si IV and C IV emission lines. This is consistent with an extension of the BLR size-to-luminosity relation for active galactic nuclei up to a luminosity of ~1048 erg s-1, and implies a black hole mass of 1010 M⊙. Additionally, we measure a recombination time lag of ~160 days in the rest frame for the C IV narrow absorption system, which implies an electron density of the absorbing gas of ~2.5 × 104 cm-3. Conclusions: The measured black hole mass of APM 08279+5255 indicates that the quasar resides in an under-massive host-galaxy bulge with Mbulge ~ 7.5MBH, and that the lens magnification is lower than ~8. Finally, the inferred electron density of the narrow-line absorber implies a distance of the order of 10 kpc of the absorbing gas from the quasar, placing it within the host galaxy.

  1. NuSTAR reveals an intrinsically X-ray weak broad absorption line quasar in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Markarian 231

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Stacy H.; Rigby, J. R.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Ptak, A. F.; and others

    2014-04-10

    We present high-energy (3-30 keV) NuSTAR observations of the nearest quasar, the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Markarian 231 (Mrk 231), supplemented with new and simultaneous low-energy (0.5-8 keV) data from Chandra. The source was detected, though at much fainter levels than previously reported, likely due to contamination in the large apertures of previous non-focusing hard X-ray telescopes. The full band (0.5-30 keV) X-ray spectrum suggests the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in Mrk 231 is absorbed by a patchy and Compton-thin (N{sub H}∼1.2{sub −0.3}{sup +0.3}×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}) column. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity (L {sub 0.5–30} {sub keV} ∼ 1.0 × 10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}) is extremely weak relative to the bolometric luminosity where the 2-10 keV to bolometric luminosity ratio is ∼0.03% compared to the typical values of 2%-15%. Additionally, Mrk 231 has a low X-ray-to-optical power law slope (α{sub OX} ∼ –1.7). It is a local example of a low-ionization broad absorption line quasar that is intrinsically X-ray weak. The weak ionizing continuum may explain the lack of mid-infrared [O IV], [Ne V], and [Ne VI] fine-structure emission lines which are present in sources with otherwise similar AGN properties. We argue that the intrinsic X-ray weakness may be a result of the super-Eddington accretion occurring in the nucleus of this ULIRG, and may also be naturally related to the powerful wind event seen in Mrk 231, a merger remnant escaping from its dusty cocoon.

  2. Improved constraints on possible variation of physical constants from H i 21-cm and molecular QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.

    2001-11-01

    Quasar (QSO) absorption spectra provide an extremely useful probe of possible cosmological variation in various physical constants. Comparison of Hi 21-cm absorption with corresponding molecular (rotational) absorption spectra allows us to constrain variation in [formmu2]y≡α2gp, where α is the fine-structure constant and gp is the proton g-factor. We analyse spectra of two QSOs, PKS 1413+135 and TXS 0218+357, and derive values of [formmu3]Δy/y at absorption redshifts of [formmu4]z=0.2467 and 0.6847 by simultaneous fitting of the Hi 21-cm and molecular lines. We find [formmu5]Δy/y=(-0.20+/-0.44)×10-5 and [formmu6]Δy/y=(-0.16+/-0.54)×10-5 respectively, indicating an insignificantly smaller y in the past. We compare our results with other constraints from the same two QSOs given recently by Drinkwater et al. and Carilli et al., and with our recent optical constraints, which indicated a smaller α at higher redshifts.

  3. The Redshifted Hydrogen Balmer and Metastable He 1 Absorption Line System in Mini-FeLoBAL Quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3: A Parsec-scale Accretion Inflow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Ji, Tuo; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2016-10-01

    The accretion of the interstellar medium onto central super-massive black holes is widely accepted as the source of the gigantic energy released by the active galactic nuclei. However, few pieces of observational evidence have been confirmed directly demonstrating the existence of the inflows. The absorption line system in the spectra of quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3 presents an interesting example in which the rarely detected hydrogen Balmer and metastable He i absorption lines are found redshifted to the quasar's rest frame along with the low-ionization metal absorption lines Mg ii, Fe ii, etc. The repeated SDSS spectroscopic observations suggest a transverse velocity smaller than the radial velocity. The motion of the absorbing medium is thus dominated by infall. The He i* lines present a powerful probe to the strength of ionizing flux, while the Balmer lines imply a dense environment. With the help of photoionization simulations, we find that the absorbing medium is exposed to the radiation with ionization parameter U ≈ 10-1.8, and the density is n({{H}})≈ {10}9 {{cm}}-3. Thus the absorbing medium is located ˜4 pc away from the central engine. According to the similarity in the distance and physical conditions between the absorbing medium and the torus, we strongly propose the absorption line system as a candidate for the accretion inflow, which originates in the inner surface of the torus.

  4. Neutral atomic-carbon quasar absorption-line systems at z> 1.5. Sample selection, H i content, reddening, and 2175 Å extinction feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, C.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for cold gas at high redshift along quasar lines of sight carried out without any a priori assumption on the neutral atomic-hydrogen content of the absorption-line systems. To do this, we systematically looked for neutral-carbon (C i) λλ1560, 1656 transition lines in 41 696 low-resolution quasar spectra (1.5 < zem < 4.46) from the SDSS-II - Data Release 7 - database. C i absorption lines should indeed probe the shielded gas in the neutral interstellar medium of galaxies more efficiently than traditional tracers such as neutral atomic-hydrogen (H i) damped Lyman-α (DLA) and/or Mg ii systems. We built up a sample of 66 C i absorbers with redshifts in the range 1.5 < z < 3.1 and rest-frame equivalent widths 0.1 quasars and their reddened spectral energy distributions, with E(B-V) values up to ~0.3. The overall N(H i) distribution of C i systems is, however, relatively flat. As a consequence, among the C i systems classifying as DLAs, there is a probable excess of strong DLAs with log N(H i) > 21 (atoms cm-2) compared to systematic DLA surveys. Whilst the dust content

  5. Time-variability of the fine-structure constant expected from the Oklo constraint and the QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2003-10-01

    The data from the QSO absorption lines indicating a nonzero time-variability of the fine-structure constant has been re-analyzed on the basis of a ``damped-oscillator'' fit, as motivated by the same type of behavior of a scalar field, dilaton, which mimics a cosmological constant to understand the accelerating universe. We find nearly as good fit to the latest data as the simple weighted mean. In this way, we offer a way to fit the more stringent result from the Oklo phenomenon, as well.

  6. Active Galactic Nuclei Probed by QSO Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru

    2007-07-01

    Quasars are the extremely bright nuclei found in about 10% of galaxies. A variety of absorption features (known collectively as quasar absorption lines) are detected in the rest-frame UV spectra of these objects. While absorption lines that have very broad widths originate in gas that is probably physocally related to the quasars, narrow absorption lines (NALs) were thought to arise in galaxies and/or in the intter-alacttic medium between the quasars and us. Using high-resolution spectra of quasars, it is found that a substantial fraction of NALs arise in gas in the immediate vicinity of the quasars. A dramatically variable, moderately-broad absorption line in the spectrum of the quasar HS 1603+3820l is also found. The variability of this line is monitored in a campaign with Subaru telescope. These observational results are compared to models for outflows from the quasars, specifically, models for accretion disk winds and evaporating obscuring tori. It is quite important to determine the mechanism of outflow because of its cosmological implications. The outflow could expel angular momentum from the accretion disk and enable quasars to accrete and shine. In addition, the outflow may also regulate star formation in the early stages of the assembly of the host galaxy and enrich the interstellar and intergalactic medium with metals.

  7. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  8. High Signal-to-Noise Echelle Spectroscopy of Quasar Absorption-Line Systems in the Direction of HS 1946+7658

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripp, Todd M.; Lu, Limin; Savage, Blair D.

    1996-02-01

    We have obtained a high signal-to-noise (40 <= S/N <= 80) high- resolution (FWHM = 20 km s^-1^) spectrum of the radio-quiet QSO HS 1946+7658 (z_em_ = 3.051) with the echelle spectrograph on the KPNO 4 m telescope. We detect 11 metal systems in the direction of this QSO, including two Mg II systems, five C IV systems, two damped Lyα systems, and two associated systems. We use the apparent column density technique and profile fitting to measure the heavy element column densities and to assess the effects of absorption-line saturation. Profile fitting indicates that three of the C IV systems are narrow with b < 8 km s^-1^. This implies that T < 50,000 K, and therefore these systems are probably photoionized. The abundance patterns in the damped Lyα systems are strikingly similar to those observed in low- metallicity Milky Way stars and suggest that these absorption lines are due to galaxies in early stages of chemical enrichment (see Lu et al.). The prominent associated system at z_abs_ = 3.0496,3.0504 is detected in H I, C II, CIV, SiII, Si III, Si IV, A1 II, Al III, and N V. The high ion column density ratios in this associated system imply that the gas is more highly ionized than the Galactic halo. The high degree of ionization is not surprising given the extraordinary luminosity of the QSO (Hagen et al.). To study ionization and abundances in this associated system, we compare the observed column densities to a series of CLOUDY models in which photoionization by the QSO is the dominant ionization mechanism. For the input radiation field, we have used the various spectral energy distributions of HS 1946+7658 observed by Kuhn et al. The model that best fits the observed column densities of singly and doubly ionized species has solar relative and absolute abundances, but models with absolute metallicities a few times greater than solar fit comparably well. None of the models produce enough Si IV and C IV, but the QSO flux near the ionization potentials of these

  9. Unveiling the X-ray/UV properties of disk winds in active galactic nuclei using broad and mini-broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of the uniform analysis of 46 XMM-Newton observations of six BAL and seven mini-BAL QSOs belonging to the Palomar-Green Quasar catalogue. Moderate-quality X-ray spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn, and allowed to characterise the general source spectral shape to be complex, significantly deviating from a power law emission. A simple power law analysis in different energy bands strongly suggests absorption to be more significant than reflection in shaping the spectra. If allowing for the absorbing gas to be either partially covering the continuum emission source or to be ionised, large column densities of the order of 1022-1024 cm-2 are inferred. When the statistics was high enough, virtually every source was found to vary in spectral shape on various time scales, from years to hours. All in all these observational results are compatible with radiation driven accretion disk winds shaping the spectra of these intriguing cosmic sources.

  10. Microlensing Constraints on Quasar Emission Regions: Athena's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides a unique tool to study the emission regions of quasars from the smallest X-ray emission region to the larger BLR region. I will review the recent progress of the field focusing on the constraints on the non-thermal X-ray emission, based on our Chandra long-term monitoring results (over 3 Msec) of a sample of lenses. We discover for the first time chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands in the X-ray continuum emission. Our results indicate that the coronae above the accretion disk thought to generate X-rays have a non-uniform electron distribution, and the hard X-ray emission region is smaller than the soft region in two cases tracking the event horizon of black holes. We detect metal emission lines for almost all X-ray images in all lenses. We measure larger equivalent line widths in lensed quasars compared to a large sample of normal non-lensed AGNs of similar luminosities. We conclude that the iron line emission region is smaller than that of the X-ray continuum, possibly resulting from strong gravitational lensing near the black hole. Both the X-ray and optical emission region sizes scale with the black hole mass with similar slopes, but with a much smaller normalization for the X-ray emission. With the order of magnitude increase of effective area by Athena, I will discuss the perspective of quasar microlensing in the Athena era.

  11. More Constraints on the Physical Conditions of the Kinematically Complex, Multiphase Absorption Line System at z=0.93 toward PG1206+459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwasser, Ben; Muzahid, Sowgat; Norris, Jackson; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of photo- and collisional ionization modeling of the strong MgII absorption system at redshift z~0.93 towards the quasar PG1206+459. This system has been extensively studied over the last two decades (Churchill & Charlton 1999; Ding et al. 2003; Tripp et al. 2011) using a combination of spectra from Keck/HIRES, HST/FOS, HST/STIS, and HST/COS. Here we present newconstraints using the most complete spectral coverage including more recent observations of OVI and the Lyman series from HST/COS. Numerous absorption components are seen over a large velocity spread (~1500km/s), and multiple ionization phases are required to account for the detected transitions, which include MgI, MgII, FeII, SiII, SiIII, SiIV, CII, CIII, CIV, SIII, SIV, SV, SVI, NIII, NIV, NV, OIII, OIV, OV, OVI, and NeVIII. Considering the new constraints, we revisit the question of the physical nature of the structures that produce this absorber.

  12. Constraints on the temperature inhomogeneity in quasar accretion discs from the ultraviolet-optical spectral variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubo, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The physical mechanisms of the quasar ultraviolet (UV)-optical variability are not well understood despite the long history of observations. Recently, Dexter & Agol presented a model of quasar UV-optical variability, which assumes large local temperature fluctuations in the quasar accretion discs. This inhomogeneous accretion disc model is claimed to describe not only the single-band variability amplitude, but also microlensing size constraints and the quasar composite spectral shape. In this work, we examine the validity of the inhomogeneous accretion disc model in the light of quasar UV-optical spectral variability by using five-band multi-epoch light curves for nearly 9 000 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 region. By comparing the values of the intrinsic scatter σint of the two-band magnitude-magnitude plots for the SDSS quasar light curves and for the simulated light curves, we show that Dexter & Agol's inhomogeneous accretion disc model cannot explain the tight inter-band correlation often observed in the SDSS quasar light curves. This result leads us to conclude that the local temperature fluctuations in the accretion discs are not the main driver of the several years' UV-optical variability of quasars, and consequently, that the assumption that the quasar accretion discs have large localized temperature fluctuations is not preferred from the viewpoint of the UV-optical spectral variability.

  13. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-03-20

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx}< 50 kpc extended Ly{alpha} nebulosities are detected in 34% of our sample, which are likely the high-redshift analogs of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) commonly observed around low-redshift (z < 0.5) quasars. This may be fluorescent recombination radiation from a population of very dense clouds with a low covering fraction illuminated by the quasar. We also detect a compact high rest-frame equivalent width (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence

  14. Quasars.

    PubMed

    Smith, H J

    1966-11-01

    A short historical outline of the discovery and a description of observed properties of quasars introduces questions as to their nature. Some of the principal arguments concerning their reality, distance, intrinsic properties and age lead to the conclusion that, while there is room for other points of view; a strong case can be made for the interpretation, on which quasars are the most distant observable objects in the known universe. To produce such luminosities over times of thousands to millions of years requires the presence of millions of solar masses. For each quasar this enormous mass may be concentrated into a single object, in which case novel physics comes into play. Whatever the final interpretation, quasars seem certain to illuminate such questions as the origin and evolution of galaxies, perhaps also the structure and origin of the universe.

  15. Evidence for Photoionization-driven Broad Absorption Line Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Ferland, Gary

    2015-12-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the variability of quasar broad absorption lines using the large multi-epoch spectroscopic data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We confirm that variations of absorption lines are highly coordinated among different components of the same ion or the same absorption component of different ions for C iv, Si iv, and N v. Furthermore, we show that the equivalent widths (EWs) of the lines decrease or increase statistically when the continuum brightens or dims. This is further supported by the synchronized variations of emission and absorption-line EWs when the well-established intrinsic Baldwin effect for emission lines is taken into account. We find that the emergence of an absorption component is usually accompanied by the dimming of the continuum while the disappearance of an absorption-line component is accompanied by the brightening of the continuum. This suggests that the emergence or disappearance of a C iv absorption component is only the extreme case, when the ionic column density is very sensitive to continuum variations or the continuum variability the amplitude is larger. These results support the idea that absorption-line variability is driven mainly by changes in the gas ionization in response to continuum variations, that the line-absorbing gas is highly ionized, and in some extreme cases, too highly ionized to be detected in UV absorption lines. Due to uncertainties in the spectroscopic flux calibration, we cannot quantify the fraction of quasars with asynchronized continuum and absorption-line variations.

  16. Constraints on Reionization and Source Properties from the Absorption Spectra of z > 6.2 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Andrei; Haiman, Zoltán

    2007-05-01

    We make use of hydrodynamical simulations of the intergalactic medium (IGM) to create model quasar absorption spectra. We compare these model spectra with the observed Keck spectra of three z>6.2 quasars with full Gunn-Peterson troughs: SDSS J1148+5251 (z=6.42), SDSS J1030+0524 (z=6.28), and SDSS J1623+3112 (z=6.22). We fit the probability density distributions (PDFs) of the observed Lyα optical depths (τα) with those generated from the simulation by exploring a range of values for the size of the quasar's surrounding H II region, RS; the volume-weighted mean neutral hydrogen fraction in the ambient IGM, x¯HI; and the quasar's ionizing photon emissivity, N˙Q. In order to avoid averaging over possibly large sight line-to-sight line fluctuations in IGM properties, we analyze each observed quasar independently. We find the following results for J1148+5251, J1030+0524, and J1623+3112: the best-fit sizes RS are 40, 41, and 29 (comoving) Mpc, respectively. For the later two quasars, the value is significantly larger than the radius corresponding to the wavelength at which the quasar's flux vanishes. These constraints are tight, with only ~10% uncertainties, comparable to those caused by redshift determination errors. The best-fit values of N˙Q are 2.1, 1.3, and 0.9×1057 s-1, respectively, with a factor of ~2 uncertainty in each case. Finally, the best-fit values of x¯HI are 0.16, 1.0, and 1.0, respectively. The uncertainty in the case of J1148+5251 is large, and x¯HI is not well constrained. However, for both J1030+0524 and J1623+3112, we find a significant lower limit of x¯HI>~0.033. Our method is different from previous analyses of the GP absorption spectra of these quasars, and our results strengthen the evidence that the rapid end stage of reionization is occurring near z~6.

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 5 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Enoki, M.; Capak, P.; Masters, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Civano, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-09-10

    We present the result of our low-luminosity quasar survey in the redshift range of 4.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 5.5 in the COSMOS field. Using the COSMOS photometric catalog, we selected 15 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 5 that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the same redshift range. We obtained optical spectra for 14 of the 15 candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope and did not identify any low-luminosity type-1 quasars at z {approx} 5, while a low-luminosity type-2 quasar at z {approx} 5.07 was discovered. In order to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5, we calculated the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density of type-1 quasars. As a result, the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits on the quasar space density are {Phi} < 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -24.52 < M{sub 1450} < -23.52 and {Phi} < 2.88 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -23.52 < M{sub 1450} < -22.52. The inferred 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density are then used to provide constraints on the faint-end slope and the break absolute magnitude of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5. We find that the quasar space density decreases gradually as a function of redshift at low luminosity (M{sub 1450} {approx} -23), being similar to the trend found for quasars with high luminosity (M{sub 1450} < -26). This result is consistent with the so-called downsizing evolution of quasars seen at lower redshifts.

  18. Absorption Line Analysis to Interprete and Constrain Cosmological Simulations of Galaxy Evolution with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher

    2011-10-01

    The mammoth challenge for contemporary studies of galaxy formation and evolution are to establish detailed models in the cosmological context in which both the few parsec scale physics within galaxies are self-consistently unified and made consistent with the observed universe of galaxies. They key diagnostics reside with the gas physics, which dictate virtually every aspect of galaxy formation and evolution. The small scale physics includes stellar feedback, gas cooling, heating, and advection and the multiphase interstellar medium; the large scale physics includes intergalactic accretion, local merging, effects of supernovae driven winds, and the development of extended metal-enriched gas halos.Absorption line data have historically proven to be {and shall in the future} virtually the most powerful tool for understanding gas physics on all spatial scales over the majority of the age of the universe- the key to success. Simply stated, absorption lines are one of astronomy's most powerful observational windows on the universe {galaxy formation, galaxy winds, IGM metal enrichment, etc.}. The high quality and vast numbers of absorption line data {obtained with HST and FUSE} probe a broad range of gas structures {ISM, HVCs, halos, IGM} over the full cosmic span when galaxies are actively evolving.We propose to use LCDM hydrodynamic cosmological simulations employing a Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree {ART} code to develop and refine our understanding of stellar feedback physics and its role in governing the gas physics that regulates the evolution of galaxies and the IGM. We aim to substantially progress our understanding of all possible gas phases embedded within and extending far from galaxies. Our methodology is to apply a series of quantitative observational constraints from absorption line systems to better understand extended galaxy halos and the influence of the cosmological environment of the simulated galaxies: {1} galaxy halos

  19. Possible evidence for a variable fine-structure constant from QSO absorption lines: motivations, analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.; Barrow, J. D.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental search for variation in the fundamental coupling constants is strongly motivated by modern high-energy physics theories. Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption-line spectra with laboratory spectra provides a sensitive probe for variability of the fine-structure constant, α, over cosmological time-scales. We have previously developed and applied a new method providing an order-of-magnitude gain in precision over previous optical astrophysical constraints. Here we extend that work by including new quasar spectra of damped Lyman-α absorption systems. We also reanalyse our previous lower-redshift data and confirm our initial results. The constraints on α come from simultaneous fitting of absorption lines of subsets of the following species: Mgi, Mgii, Alii, Aliii, Siii, Crii, Feii, Niii and Znii. We present a detailed description of our methods and results based on an analysis of 49 quasar absorption systems (towards 28 QSOs) covering the redshift range [formmu2]0.5

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. III Constraints on Dark Energy From The Third Data Release Quasar Lens Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, M; Inada, N; Strauss, M A; Kochanek, C S; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Becker, R H; Fukugita, M; Gregg, M D; Hall, P B; Hennawi, J F; Johnston, D E; Kayo, I; Keeton, C R; Pindor, B; Shin, M; Turner, E; White, R L; York, D G; Anderson, S F; Bahcall, N A; Brunner, R J; Burles, S; Castander, F J; Chiu, K; Clocchiatti, A; Einsenstein, D; Frieman, J; Kawano, Y; Lupton, R; Morokuma, T; Rix, H; Scranton, R; Sheldon, E S

    2007-09-12

    We present cosmological results from the statistics of lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search. By taking proper account of the selection function, we compute the expected number of quasars lensed by early-type galaxies and their image separation distribution assuming a flat universe, which is then compared with 7 lenses found in the SDSS Data Release 3 to derive constraints on dark energy under strictly controlled criteria. For a cosmological constant model (w = -1) we obtain {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.74{sub -0.15}{sup +0.11}(stat.){sub -0.06}{sup +0.13}(syst.). Allowing w to be a free parameter we find {Omega}{sub M} = 0.26{sub -0.06}{sup +0.07}(stat.){sub -0.05}{sup +0.03}(syst.) and w = -1.1 {+-} 0.6(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.3}(syst.) when combined with the constraint from the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample. Our results are in good agreement with earlier lensing constraints obtained using radio lenses, and provide additional confirmation of the presence of dark energy consistent with a cosmological constant, derived independently of type Ia supernovae.

  1. Constraints on Primordial Non-Gaussianity from 800 000 Photometric Quasars.

    PubMed

    Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V; Roth, Nina

    2014-11-28

    We derive robust constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) using the clustering of 800 000 photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift range 0.5quasar halo bias at the largest scales, while discarding as little as possible of the data. The standard local-type PNG parameters f_{NL} and g_{NL} both imprint a k^{-2} scale-dependent effect in the bias. Constraining these individually, we obtain -49constraints lead to -105quasar clustering to the underlying dark matter. These are the strongest constraints obtained to date on PNG using a single population of large-scale structure tracers, and are already at the level of pre-Planck constraints from the cosmic microwave background. A conservative forecast for a Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)-like survey incorporating mode projection yields σ(f_{NL})∼5-competitive with the Planck result-highlighting the power of upcoming large scale structure surveys to probe the initial conditions of the Universe.

  2. Constraints on Primordial Non-Gaussianity from 800 000 Photometric Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Roth, Nina

    2014-11-01

    We derive robust constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) using the clustering of 800 000 photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift range 0.5 quasar halo bias at the largest scales, while discarding as little as possible of the data. The standard local-type PNG parameters fNL and gNL both imprint a k-2 scale-dependent effect in the bias. Constraining these individually, we obtain -49 constraints lead to -105 quasar clustering to the underlying dark matter. These are the strongest constraints obtained to date on PNG using a single population of large-scale structure tracers, and are already at the level of pre-Planck constraints from the cosmic microwave background. A conservative forecast for a Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)-like survey incorporating mode projection yields σ (fNL)˜5 —competitive with the Planck result—highlighting the power of upcoming large scale structure surveys to probe the initial conditions of the Universe.

  3. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  4. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  5. A Study of PG Quasar-Driven Outflows with COS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Frederick

    2013-10-01

    Quasar outflows are an important part of the quasar phenomenon, but many questions remain about their energetics, physical properties and the role they might play in providing feedback to host galaxy evolution. We searched our own COS far-UV observations from the QUEST survey and other large COS programs to find a sample of 6 bright PG quasars with broad {FWHM > 400 km/s} high velocity {v > 1000 km/s} absorption lines that clearly form in quasar-driven winds. These quasars can fill an important gap in our understanding between local Seyferts with low-speed winds and high-redshift quasars with extreme BAL outflows. They are also well-studied at other wavelengths, with some evidence for the quasars driving galaxy-scale blowouts and shutting down star formation. But almost nothing is known about the quasar outflows themselves. We propose a detailed study of these 6 outflow quasars using new COS FUV observations to 1} expand the existing wavelength coverage across critical lines that are diagnostic of the outflow physical conditions, kinetic energies, and metallicities, and 2} check for line variability as an indicator of the outflow structure and locations. This quasar sample includes unusual cases with many low-abundance {PV 1118,1128 and SIV 1063} and excited-state lines {SIV 1073*, CIII* 1175, CII* 1335} that will provide unprecedented constraints on the outflow properties, plus the first known OVI-only mini-BAL outflow {no lower ions detected} for which we will cover NeVIII 770,780 to probe the highest ionization gas. The high FUV sensitivity of COS is uniquely able to measure this wide range of outflow lines in low-redshift quasars with no Lya forest contamination.

  6. High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1996-01-01

    The report for this period includes three papers: 'Associated Absorption at Low and High Redshift'; 'Strong X-ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar: PHL5200'; and 'ASCA and ROSAT X-ray Spectra of High-Redshift Radio-Loud Quasars'. The first gives examples from both low and high redshift for combining information on absorbing material in active galactic nuclei from both x-ray and the UV. The second presents ASCA observations of the z = 1.98 prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO): PHL 5200, detected with both the solid-state imaging spectrometers and the gas imaging spectometers. The third paper presents results on the x-ray properties of 9 high-redshift radio-loud quasars observed by ASCA and ROSAT, including ASCA observations of S5 0014+81 (z = 3.38) and S5 0836+71 (z = 2.17) and ROSAT observations of PKS 2126-158.

  7. Quasars and gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Turner, E L

    1984-03-23

    Despite the expenditure of large amounts of telescope time and other resources, most of the fundamental questions concerning quasi-stellar objects (quasars) remain unanswered. A complex phenomenology of radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray properties has accumulated but has not yielded even a satisfactory classification system. The large red shifts (distances) of quasars make them very valuable tools for studying cosmology and the properties of intervening matter in the Universe through observations of absorption lines and gravitational lenses.

  8. THE QUASAR-GALAXY CROSS SDSS J1320+1644: A PROBABLE LARGE-SEPARATION LENSED QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Iye, Masanori; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Shin, Min-Su; Sluse, Dominique; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-03-10

    We report the discovery of a pair of quasars at z = 1.487, with a separation of 8.''585 {+-} 0.''002. Subaru Telescope infrared imaging reveals the presence of an elliptical and a disk-like galaxy located almost symmetrically between the quasars, in a cross-like configuration. Based on absorption lines in the quasar spectra and the colors of the galaxies, we estimate that both galaxies are located at redshift z = 0.899. This, as well as the similarity of the quasar spectra, suggests that the system is a single quasar multiply imaged by a galaxy group or cluster acting as a gravitational lens, although the possibility of a binary quasar cannot be fully excluded. We show that the gravitational lensing hypothesis implies that these galaxies are not isolated, but must be embedded in a dark matter halo of virial mass {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1}{sub 70} M{sub Sun} assuming a Navarro-Frenk-White model with a concentration parameter of c{sub vir} = 6, or a singular isothermal sphere profile with a velocity dispersion of {approx}670 km s{sup -1}. We place constraints on the location of the dark matter halo, as well as the velocity dispersions of the galaxies. In addition, we discuss the influence of differential reddening, microlensing, and intrinsic variability on the quasar spectra and broadband photometry.

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; et al.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  10. MISALIGNMENT OF THE JET AND THE NORMAL TO THE DUSTY TORUS IN THE BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QSO FIRST J155633.8+351758

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Cormac; Punsly, Brian; O'Dea, Christopher P. E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com

    2013-08-10

    We performed Very Long Baseline Array observations of the broad absorption line quasar FIRST J155633.8+351758, ''the first radio loud BALQSO''. Our observations at 15.3 GHz partially resolved a secondary component at position angle (P.A.) Almost-Equal-To 35 Degree-Sign . We combine this determination of the radio jet projection on the sky plane, with the constraint that the jet is viewed within 14. Degree-Sign 3 of the line of sight (as implied by the high variability brightness temperature) and with the P.A. of the optical/UV continuum polarization in order to study the quasar geometry. Within the context of the standard model, the data indicates a ''dusty torus'' (scattering surface) with a symmetry axis tilted relative to the accretion disk normal and a polar broad absorption line outflow aligned with the accretion disk normal. We compare this geometry to that indicated by the higher resolution radio data, brightness temperature, and optical/UV continuum polarization P.A. of a similar high optical polarization BALQSO, Mrk 231. A qualitatively similar geometry is found in these two polar BALQSOs; the continuum polarization is determined primarily by the tilt of the dusty torus.

  11. X-ray absorption and high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The low energy cut-offs toward radio-loud quasars with z greater than 2, red quasars, and broad absorption line quasars are discussed. The X-ray absorption seems to be common among different types of red shift quasar. The Rosat position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) spectra of z = 3 quasars and of a red quasar are presented. Broad absorption lines show outflow velocities of up to 0.1 c to 0.2 c. The advantages and the disadvantages of high red shift observations are underlined.

  12. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. VI. CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY AND THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Fukugita, Masataka; Inada, Naohisa; Strauss, Michael A.; Shin, Min-Su; Bahcall, Neta A.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Richards, Gordon T.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.; White, Richard L.

    2012-05-15

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention given to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.79{sup +0.06}{sub -0.07}(stat.){sup +0.06}{sub -0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w = -1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z {approx}< 1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as {nu}{sub n} {identical_to} dln {phi}{sub *}/dln (1 + z) and the velocity dispersion evolution {nu}{sub {sigma}} {identical_to} dln {sigma}{sub *}/dln (1 + z) are constrained to {nu}{sub n} = 1.06{sup +1.36}{sub -1.39}(stat.){sup +0.33}{sub -0.64}(syst.) and {nu}{sub {sigma}} = -0.05{sup +0.19}{sub -0.16}(stat.){sup +0.03}{sub -0.03}(syst.), respectively, when the SQLS result is combined with BAO and WMAP for flat models with a cosmological constant. We find that a significant amount of dark energy is preferred even after fully marginalizing over the galaxy evolution parameters. Thus, the statistics of lensed quasars robustly confirm the accelerated cosmic expansion.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: QSOs narrow absorption line variability (Hacker+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, T. L.; Brunner, R. J.; Lundgren, B. F.; York, D. G.

    2013-06-01

    Catalogues of 2,522 QAL systems and 33 variable NAL systems detected in SDSS DR7 quasars with repeat observations. The object identifiers, position coordinates, and plate-MJD-fibre designations are taken from the SpecObjAll table in the SDSS Catalogue Archive Server (CAS) while the quasar redshifts (zqso) are from Hewett & Wild (2010, Cat. J/MNRAS/405/2302). The absorption system redshift (zabs), system grade, and detected lines are outputs of the York et al. (2013, in. prep.) QAL detection pipeline. Some absorption lines are flagged based on alternate identifications (a), proximity of masked pixels (b), or questionable continuum fits (c). (3 data files).

  14. Constraints of flat spectrum radio quasars in the hadronic model: the case of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, M.; Dimitrakoudis, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a method of constraining the properties of the γ-ray emitting region in flat spectrum radio quasars in the one-zone proton synchrotron model, where the γ-rays are produced by synchrotron radiation of relativistic protons. We show that for low enough values of the Doppler factor δ, the emission from the electromagnetic (EM) cascade which is initiated by the internal absorption of high-energy photons from photohadronic interactions may exceed the observed ˜GeV flux. We use that effect to derive an absolute lower limit of δ; first, an analytical one, in the asymptotic limit where the external radiation from the broad-line region (BLR) is negligible, and then a numerical one in the more general case that includes BLR radiation. As its energy density in the emission region depends on δ and the region's distance from the galactic centre, we use the EM cascade to determine a minimum distance for each value of δ. We complement the EM cascade constraint with one derived from variability arguments and apply our method to the FSRQ 3C 273. We find that δ ≳ 18-20 for B ≲ 30 G and ˜day time-scale variability; the emission region is located outside the BLR, namely at r ≳ 10RBLR ˜ 3 pc; the model requires at pc-scale distances stronger magnetic fields than those inferred from core shift observations; while the jet power exceeds by at least one order of magnitude the accretion power. In short, our results disfavour the proton synchrotron model for the FSRQ 3C 273.

  15. VERY LARGE TELESCOPE SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.

    2011-03-15

    We present spectropolarimetry of 19 confirmed and four possible bright, southern broad absorption line (BAL) quasars from the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. A wide range of redshifts is covered in the sample (from 0.9 to 3.4), and both low- and high-ionization quasars are represented, as well as radio-loud and radio-quiet BALQSOs. We continue to confirm previously established spectropolarimetric properties of BALQSOs, including the generally rising continuum polarization with shorter wavelengths and comparatively large fraction with high broadband polarization (6 of 19 with polarizations >2%). Emission lines are polarized less than or similar to the continuum, except in a few unusual cases, and absorption troughs tend to have higher polarizations. A search for correlations between polarization properties has been done, identifying two significant or marginally significant correlations. These are an increase in continuum polarization with decreasing optical luminosity (increasing absolute B magnitude) and decreasing C IV emission-line polarization with increased continuum polarization.

  16. CONSTRAINTS ON QUASAR LIFETIMES AND BEAMING FROM THE He II Ly{alpha} FOREST

    SciTech Connect

    Furlanetto, Steven R.; Lidz, Adam

    2011-07-10

    We show that comparisons of He II Ly{alpha} forest lines of sight to nearby quasar populations can strongly constrain the lifetimes and emission geometry of quasars. By comparing the He II and H I Ly{alpha} forests along a particular line of sight, one can trace fluctuations in the hardness of the radiation field (which are driven by fluctuations in the He II ionization rate). Because this high-energy background is highly variable-thanks to the rarity of the bright quasars that dominate it and the relatively short attenuation lengths of these photons-it is straightforward to associate features in the radiation field with their source quasars. Here we quantify how finite lifetimes and beamed emission geometries affect these expectations. Finite lifetimes induce a time delay that displaces the observed radiation peak relative to the quasar. For beamed emission, geometry dictates that sources invisible to the observer can still create a peak in the radiation field. We show that both these models produce substantial populations of 'bare' peaks (without an associated quasar) for reasonable parameter values (lifetimes {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} yr and beaming angles {approx}< 90 deg.). A comparison to existing quasar surveys along two He II Ly{alpha} forest lines of sight rules out isotropic emission and infinite lifetime at high confidence; they can be accommodated either by moderate beaming or lifetimes {approx}10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} yr. We also show that the distribution of radial displacements between peaks and their quasars can unambiguously distinguish these two models, although larger statistical samples are needed.

  17. Evidence for active galactic nucleus feedback in the broad absorption lines and reddening of MRK 231 {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Leighly, Karen M.; Baron, Eddie; Lucy, Adrian B.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Gallagher, Sarah C.

    2014-06-20

    We present the first J-band spectrum of Mrk 231, which reveals a large He I* λ10830 broad absorption line with a profile similar to that of the well-known Na I broad absorption line. Combining this spectrum with optical and UV spectra from the literature, we show that the unusual reddening noted by Veilleux et al. is explained by a reddening curve like those previously used to explain low values of total-to-selective extinction in Type Ia supernovae. The nuclear starburst may be the origin and location of the dust. Spatially resolved emission in the broad absorption line trough suggests nearly full coverage of the continuum emission region. The broad absorption lines reveal higher velocities in the He I* lines (produced in the quasar-photoionized H II region) compared with the Na I and Ca II lines (produced in the corresponding partially ionized zone). Cloudy simulations show that a density increase is required between the H II and partially ionized zones to produce ionic column densities consistent with the optical and IR absorption line measurements and limits, and that the absorber lies ∼100 pc from the central engine. These results suggest that the He I* lines are produced in an ordinary quasar BAL wind that impacts upon, compresses, and accelerates the nuclear starburst's dusty effluent (feedback in action), and the Ca II and Na I lines are produced in this dusty accelerated gas. This unusual circumstance explains the rarity of Na I absorption lines; without the compression along our line of sight, Mrk 231 would appear as an ordinary iron low-ionization, broad absorption line quasar.

  18. Intrinsic X-ray Weakness and the Launching of Powerful Quasar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    Recent NuSTAR observations suggest that a significant fraction of local Broad Absorption Line quasars (BALQSOs) are intrinsically X-ray weak, a result of considerable interest. However, the current measurements of this fraction suffer from large uncertainties. We therefore propose to improve significantly constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak high-ionization BALQSOs. This can be accomplished systematically and economically by re-observing six objects from the Gallagher et al. (2006) sample of well-studied z ~ 1.5-3 BALQSOs from the Large Bright Quasar Survey. The ultimate result will be improved understanding of the general importance of intrinsic X-ray weakness to the launching of powerful quasar winds.

  19. MICROLENSING OF QUASAR BROAD EMISSION LINES: CONSTRAINTS ON BROAD LINE REGION SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Munoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.

    2013-02-20

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that the broad emission lines are in general weakly microlensed. The results show, at a modest level of confidence (1.8{sigma}), that high ionization lines such as C IV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines such as H{beta}, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region size of r{sub s} = 24{sup +22} {sub -15} and r{sub s} = 55{sup +150} {sub -35} lt-day (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the samples are divided into higher and lower luminosity quasars, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  20. Low-redshift Lyman-alpha absorption lines and the dark matter halos of disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the low-redshift quasar 3C 273 using the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed many more Lyman-alpha absorption lines than would be expected from extrapolation of the absorption systems seen toward QSOs at z about 2. It is shown here that these absorption lines can plausibly be produced by gas at large radii in the disks of spiral and irregular galaxies; the gas is confined by the dark matter halos and ionized and heated by the extragalactic radiation field. This scenario does not require the extragalactic ionizing radiation field to decline as rapidly with decreasing z as the QSO emissivity. Observations of Ly-alpha absorption through the halos of known galaxies at low redshift will constrain both the extragalactic background and the properties of galactic halos.

  1. Absorption lines in the spectrum of Q0248 + 4302 due to a foreground tidal tail

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, W.L.W.; Steidel, C.C. California Univ., Berkeley )

    1990-08-01

    The strong absorption lines in the spectrum of the quasar Q0248 + 4302 are discussed. The absorption has been shown to be produced in a sinuous tidal tail which emanates from the nearby galaxy pair G0248 + 4302A,B. There is a velocity difference of about 260 km/s between the systemic redshift of the interacting galaxies and the redshift of the tidal tail at a galactocentric distance of about 11/h kpc. The large velocity spread observed in the tail gas is probably responsible for the unusual strength of the interstellar lines. 18 refs.

  2. Spectrophotometry of six broad absorption line QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Smith, Harding E.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of six broad absorption-line QSOs (BALQSOs) are presented. The continua and emission lines are compared with those in the spectra of QSOs without BALs. A statistically significant difference is found in the emission-line intensity ratio for (N V 1240-A)/(C IV 1549-A). The median value of (N V)/(C IV) for the BALQSOs is two to three times the median for QSOs without BALs. The absorption features of the BALQSOs are described, and the column densities and limits on the ionization structure of the BAL region are discussed. If the dominant ionization mechanism is photoionization, then it is likely that either the ionizing spectrum is steep or the abundances are considerably different from solar. Collisional ionization may be a significant factor, but it cannot totally dominate the ionization rate.

  3. Non-Voigt Lyalpha Absorption Line Profiles.

    PubMed

    Outram; Carswell; Theuns

    2000-02-01

    Recent numerical simulations have lead to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the intergalactic medium and the loss of a physical justification for Voigt profile fitting of the Lyalpha forest. Many individual lines seen in simulated spectra have significant departures from the Voigt profile, yet could be well fitted by a blend of two or more such lines. We discuss the expected effect on the line profiles due to ongoing gravitational structure formation and Hubble expansion. We develop a method to detect departures from Voigt profiles of the absorption lines in a statistical way and apply this method to simulated Lyalpha forest spectra, confirming that the profiles seen do statistically differ from Voigt profiles. PMID:10622758

  4. Discovery of Associated Absorption Lines in an X-Ray Warm Absorber: Hubble Space Telescope Observations of PG 1114+445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda; Elvis, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The unified picture of X-ray/UV absorbers offers a unique opportunity to probe the nuclear environment of active galactic nuclei. To test the unified absorber scenario and to understand the physical properties of the absorber, we obtained the first UV spectrum of PG 1114+445 using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph. PG 1114+445 is known to have an X-ray ionized ('warm') absorber,so that UV absorption is predicted. The HST spectrum clearly shows strong UV absorption lines due to Lyalpha, C iv, and N v, blueshifted by approximately 530 km s(exp -1) with respect to the quasar redshift. Since both X-ray and UV absorbers are rare in radio-quiet quasars, these observations argue strongly that the X-ray and UV absorbers are closely physically related. perhaps identical. We place constraints on the parameters of the absorber and conclude that the mass outflow rate is comparable to the accretion rate in PG 1114+445.

  5. Dust depletion of Ca and Ti in QSO absorption-line systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, C. R.; Richter, P.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: To explore the role of titanium- and calcium-dust depletion in gas in and around galaxies, we systematically study Ti/Ca abundance ratios in intervening absorption-line systems at low and high redshift. Methods: We investigate high-resolution optical spectra obtained by the UVES instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and spectroscopically analyze 34 absorption-line systems at z ≤ 0.5 to measure column densities (or limits) for Ca ii and Ti ii. We complement our UVES data set with previously published absorption-line data on Ti/Ca for redshifts up to z ~ 3.8. Our absorber sample contains 110 absorbers including damped Lyman α systems (DLAs), sub-DLAs, and Lyman-Limit systems (LLS). We compare our Ti/Ca findings with results from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds and discuss the properties of Ti/Ca absorbers in the general context of quasar absorption-line systems. Results: Our analysis indicates that there are two distinct populations of absorbers with either high or low Ti/Ca ratios with a separation at [Ti/Ca] ≈ 1. While the calcium-dust depletion in most of the absorbers appears to be severe, the titanium depletions are mild in systems with high Ti/Ca ratios. The derived trend indicates that absorbers with high Ti/Ca ratios have dust-to-gas ratios that are substantially lower than in the Milky Way. We characterize the overall nature of the absorbers by correlating Ti/Ca with other observables (e.g., metallicity, velocity-component structure) and by modeling the ionization properties of singly-ionized Ca and Ti in different environments. Conclusions: We conclude that Ca ii and Ti ii bearing absorption-line systems trace predominantly neutral gas in the disks and inner halo regions of galaxies, where the abundance of Ca and Ti reflects the local metal and dust content of the gas. Our study suggests that the Ti/Ca ratio represents a useful measure for the gas-to-dust ratio and overall metallicity in intervening absorption-line systems.

  6. Heavily reddened z ˜ 2 Type 1 quasars - II. H α star formation constraints from SINFONI IFU observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2016-06-01

    We use near-infrared integral field unit spectroscopy to search for H α emission associated with star formation in a sample of 28 heavily reddened (E(B - V) ≃ 0.5-1.9), hyperluminous (log({{L}}_{bol}/erg s^{-1})≃ 47-48) broad-line quasars at z ≃ 1.4-2.7. 16 of the 28 quasars show evidence for star formation with an average extinction-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 320 ± 70 M⊙ yr-1. A stacked spectrum of the detections shows weak [N II], consistent with star formation as the origin of the narrow H α emission. The star-forming regions are spatially unresolved in 11 of the 16 detections and constrained to lie within ˜6 kpc of the quasar emission. In the five resolved detections we find the star-forming regions are extended on scales of ˜8 kpc around the quasar emission. The prevalence of high SFRs is consistent with the identification of the heavily reddened quasar population as representing a transitional phase from apparent `starburst galaxies' to optically luminous quasars. Upper limits are determined for 10 quasars in which star formation is undetected. In two of the quasars the SFR is constrained to be relatively modest, <50 M⊙ yr-1, but significantly higher levels of star formation could be present in the other eight quasars. The combination of the 16 strong star formation detections and the eight high SFR limits means that high levels of star formation may be present in the majority of the sample. Higher spatial resolution data, of multiple emission lines, will allow us to better understand the interplay between star formation and active galactic nucleus activity in these transitioning quasars.

  7. CO Emission from Low-Redshift QSO Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. E.; Bechtold, J.; Black, J. H.

    1994-12-01

    By studying the physical conditions in galaxies at different redshifts, we can begin to understand the evolutionary process of starformation from early epochs to the present. Such studies have been performed at optical and centimeter wavelengths for a number of years. Due to advances in receiver and telescope technology at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, molecular line studies have recently been performed toward high redshift absorption line systems. Observations of the mm/submm CO lines in these very young galaxies provide a way to investigate abundances of and conditions in potential starforming material. CO provides some of the strongest emission lines associated with star formation in nearby disk galaxies. Here we report the detection of CO in emission toward 4 galaxies at redshifts of 0.02 to 0.40. From these observations we are able to compute the molecular mass of the starforming material. Studies of starformation in galaxies at low to mid-redshift ranges are important, because these systems represent a transitional phase between starformation at early epochs and the present. Our recent detections of CO emission indicate total molecular masses in three of the galaxies to be a few times 10(9) Msun, using the ``standard conversion factor'' for molecular hydrogen column density to integrated CO intensity ratio (N(H_2)/Ico) and an H_o=75km/s/Mpc and q_o= 0.5. The fourth system, the z=0.40 21 cm absorber toward PKS 1229-021, has a molecular mass of ~ 10(11) M_sunh(-2) . Together with data at other wavelengths, the z=0.40 absorber may be a in pre-starburst phase. All four of our sources were selected to be metal line systems (with high HI column densities) and possess strong FIR fluxes detected by IRAS at 60 and/or 100{microns }. The source possessing the brightest FIR emission among the four is the z=0.05 21 cm absorber toward S4 0248+43. The total observed FIR luminosity for this source is LFIR =3.0x10E11 Lsun. Taking into account its luminosity and

  8. Studies of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arav, Nahum

    2002-01-01

    The main aim of this research program is to determine the ionization equilibrium and abundances in quasar outflows. Especially in the broad absorption line QSO PG 0946+301. We find that the outflow's metalicity is consistent with being solar, while the abundance ratio of phosphorus to other metals is at least ten times solar. These findings are based on diagnostics that are not sensitive to saturation and partial covering effects in the BALs (Broad Adsorption Lines), which considerably weakened previous claims for enhanced metalicity. Ample evidence for these effects is seen in the spectrum.

  9. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  10. Discovery of Extremely Broad Balmer Absorption Lines in SDSS J152350.42+391405.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Zhou, Hongyan; Shi, Xiheng; Shu, Xinwen; Liu, Wenjuan; Ji, Tuo; Jiang, Peng; Sun, Luming; Zhou, Junyan; Pan, Xiang

    2015-12-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer line absorption from Hα to Hγ in an iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar SDSS J152350.42+391405.2 (hereafter SDSS J1523+3914), by the quasi-simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The Balmer line absorption is at {z}{absor}=0.6039+/- 0.0021 and blueshifted by v = 10,353 km s-1 with respect to the Balmer emission lines. All Balmer BALs have a uniform absorption profile with the widths of {{Δ }}v˜ 12,000 km s-1. We also found the absorption trough in He i* λ10830 with the same velocity and width in the H-band TripleSpec spectrum of SDSS J1523+3914. This object is only the 10th active galactic nucleus known to exhibit nonstellar Balmer absorption, as well as the case with the highest velocity and broadest Balmer absorption lines that have ever been found. A CLOUDY analysis shows that the absorbers require a gas density of {{log}}10 {n}{{e}} ({{cm}}-3)=9 and an ionization parameter of {{log}}10 U=-1.0. They are located at a distance of ˜0.2 pc from the central ionizing source, which is slightly farther than that of broad emission line regions. Furthermore, SDSS J1523+3914 is one of the brightest Balmer BAL quasars ever reported, with unique iron absorption variations, making it the most promising candidate for follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy, multiband observations, and long-term monitoring.

  11. THE JHU-SDSS METAL ABSORPTION LINE CATALOG: REDSHIFT EVOLUTION AND PROPERTIES OF Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Menard, Brice

    2013-06-20

    We present a generic and fully automatic method aimed at detecting absorption lines in the spectra of astronomical objects. The algorithm estimates the source continuum flux using a dimensionality reduction technique and nonnegative matrix factorization, and then detects and identifies metal absorption lines. We apply it to a sample of {approx}10{sup 5} quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and compile a sample of {approx}40,000 Mg II- and Fe II-absorber systems, spanning the redshift range 0.4 < z < 2.3. The corresponding catalog is publicly available. We study the statistical properties of these absorber systems and find that the rest equivalent width distribution of strong Mg II absorbers follows an exponential distribution at all redshifts, confirming previous studies. Combining our results with recent near-infrared observations of Mg II absorbers, we introduce a new parameterization that fully describes the incidence rate of these systems up to z {approx} 5. We find the redshift evolution of strong Mg II absorbers to be remarkably similar to the cosmic star formation history over 0.4 < z < 5.5 (the entire redshift range covered by observations), suggesting a physical link between these two quantities.

  12. Detectability of cold streams into high-redshift galaxies by absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Dekel, Avishai; Sternberg, Amiel; Gnat, Orly; Ceverino, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Cold gas streaming along the dark matter filaments of the cosmic web is predicted to be the major source of fuel for disc buildup, violent disc instability and star formation in massive galaxies at high redshift. We investigate to what extent such cold gas is detectable in the extended circumgalactic environment of galaxies via Lyα absorption and selected low-ionization metal absorption lines. We model the expected absorption signatures using high-resolution zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations. In the post-processing, we distinguish between self-shielded gas and unshielded gas. In the self-shielded gas, which is optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation, we assume pure collisional ionization for species with an ionization potential greater than 13.6 eV. In the optically-thin, unshielded gas, these species are also photoionized by the metagalactic radiation. In addition to absorption of radiation from background quasars, we compute the absorption line profiles of radiation emitted by the galaxy at the centre of the same halo. We predict the strength of the absorption signal for individual galaxies without stacking. We find that the Lyα absorption profiles produced by the streams are consistent with observations of absorption and emission Lyα profiles in high-redshift galaxies. Due to the low metallicities in the streams, and their low covering factors, the metal absorption features are weak and difficult to detect.

  13. Measurability of Kinetic Temperature from Metal Absorption-Line Spectra Formed in Chaotic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Agafonova, Irina I.

    1999-06-01

    We present a new method for recovering the kinetic temperature of the intervening diffuse gas to an accuracy of 10%. The method is based on the comparison of unsaturated absorption-line profiles of two species with different atomic weights. The species are assumed to have the same temperature and bulk motion within the absorbing region. The computational technique involves the Fourier transform of the absorption profiles and the consequent entropy-regularized χ2-minimization (ERM) to estimate the model parameters. The procedure is tested using synthetic spectra of C+, Si+, and Fe+ ions. The comparison with the standard Voigt fitting analysis is performed, and it is shown that the Voigt deconvolution of the complex absorption-line profiles may result in estimated temperatures that are not physical. We also successfully analyze Keck telescope spectra of C II λ1334 and Si II λ1260 lines observed at the redshift z=3.572 toward the quasar Q1937-1009 by Tytler et al. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is jointly operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  14. Extreme Red Quasars in SDSS-BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia; Paris, Isabelle; Herbst, Hanna; Villforth, Carolin; Alexandroff, Rachael; Ross, Nicholas; Greene, Jenny; Strauss, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Red quasars are believed to mark a critical transition stage of massive galaxy evolution when a blowout of gas and dust truncates the initial starburst and provides our first visible views of a luminous central AGN. Red quasars could therefore have unusual properties associated with a young evolution stage, such as higher accretion rates, higher rates of mergers and interactions, and more common or more powerful outflows capable of driving a galaxy-wide blowout (e.g., compared to normal blue quasars in presumably more evolved galaxy hosts). The recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey (BOSS) of SDSS-III has discovered many more faint quasars with higher redshifts and redder colors than any previous large survey. We combine BOSS spectra with SDSS and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry of nearly 100,000 quasars to identify and characterize the red quasar population at redshifts >2. We find a number of strong trends with the amount of reddening/obscuration. For example, red quasars are 5 to 8 times more likely to have broad absorption lines and other "intrinsic" absorption lines that identify quasar-driven outflows. Perhaps most interesting is that extreme red quasars (ERQs), selected via rest-frame UV to near-IR colors similar to Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs), have uniquely exotic emission line properties that include extreme velocity shifts between lines and the broadest and most blueshifted [OIII] lines yet discovered (with FWHMs reaching >3000 km/s). We will discuss the implications of these results for models of the structure and evolution of quasars and their host galaxy environments.

  15. Exploration of quasars with the Gaia mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proft, Svea; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the opportunities in and limits to investigating quasars with the Gaia satellite by studying Gaia's low- and high-resolution quasar spectra, with consideration of their signal-to-noise ratios. Furthermore, we explore bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with broad emission lines (BELs) redshifted into the spectral range of Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrograph (RVS). We find that Gaia low-resolution spectra of quasars enable a determination of equivalent widths, continuum variability, and the Baldwin effect. Additionally, it will be feasible to analyze BEL reverberation mapping with Gaia data for a small sample of objects. These quasars should have a high cadence of measurements or higher time lags due to large redshifts, high quasar luminosities, or selected low-ionization lines. More than 500 known quasars will also get high-resolution spectra of individual BELs in the small wavelength range of the RVS. This allows an investigation of broad emission line shapes and their variabilities to get information on the spatial structure and kinematics of the broad line region. We identify six known variable SDSS quasars with BELs in the RVS that have interesting spectra for a potential intrinsic line variability investigation. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the RVS is too small for studying narrow and broad absorption lines in quasar spectra.

  16. On Wolf-Rayet stars with unshifted absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. F. J.; Lamontagne, R.; Shara, M. M.; McAlister, H. A.

    1986-06-01

    The authors examine a sample of 16 galactic Wolf-Rayet stars that exhibit unshifted absorption lines, but for which orbital motion involving the WR star and an O-type companion is either unknown or thought to be absent. If all of these are binaries, this would increase the estimate of the binary frequency for WR stars by about 10%. Speckle interferometry of three bright non-WNL+abs stars in Cygnus fails to reveal any astrometric companions down to a separation of 0.05arcsec. Thus, either the absorption lines are intrinsic to the WR star in these three cases or, more likely, they arise in a bound companion. The search for wide spectroscopic orbits for WR 137 and the WN3+abs star WR 3 is re-examined.

  17. Interstellar absorption lines in the galaxy NGC 1705

    SciTech Connect

    York, D.G.; Caulet, A.; Rybski, P.M.; Gallagher, J.S.; Blades, J.C. Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1990-03-01

    The possibility is considered, and shown to be plausible, that the strong C IV and Si IV absorption lines in low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of gas-rich dwarf galaxies are primarily interstellar, not stellar as has been supposed. The argument is based on analogies with H II regions in the Local Group, on low-resolution equivalent width measurements of gas-rich dwarf galaxies from the literature and on high-resolution UV spectra of NGC 1705. 48 refs.

  18. Interstellar absorption lines in the galaxy NGC 1705

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Donald G.; Caulet, Adeline; Rybski, Paul M.; Gallagher, John S.; Blades, J. Chris

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is considered, and shown to be plausible, that the strong C IV and Si IV absorption lines in low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of gas-rich dwarf galaxies are primarily interstellar, not stellar as has been supposed. The argument is based on analogies with H II regions in the Local Group, on low-resolution equivalent width measurements of gas-rich dwarf galaxies from the literature and on high-resolution UV spectra of NGC 1705.

  19. Characterizing Quasar Outflows I: Sample, Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Christenson, D. H.; Richmond, J. M.; Derseweh, J. A.; Robbins, J. M.; Townsend, S. L.; Stark, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we subjectively divide these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). We present measurements of the absorption (velocities, velocity widths, equivalent widths), composite spectral profiles of outflows as a function of velocity, as well as measurements of the continuum and CIV, MgII, and FeII emission-line properties. In accompanying posters, we add photometry from the rest-frame X-ray (ROSAT and Chandra), EUV (GALEX), optical (2MASS), and infrared (WISE) bands to complete the SED. The continuum and emission-line measurements from the SDSS spectra and accompanying photometry provides estimates on the black hole masses, bolometric luminsosities, and SED. We consider empirically how these affect the outflow properties. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under

  20. Quasar microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. W.; Wambsganss, J.

    2010-09-01

    Quasar microlensing deals with the effect of compact objects along the line of sight on the apparent brightness of the background quasars. Due to the relative motion between quasar, lenses and observer, the microlensing magnification changes with time which results in uncorrelated brightness variations in the various images of multiple quasar systems. The amplitudes of the signal can be more than a magnitude with time scales of weeks to months to years. The effect is due to the “granular” nature of the gravitational microlenses—stars or other compact objects in the stellar mass range. Quasar microlensing allows to study the quasar accretion disk with a resolution of tens of microarcseconds, hence quasar microlensing can be used to explore an astrophysical field that is hardly accessible by any other means. Quasar microlensing can also be used to study the lensing objects in a statistical sense, their nature (compact or smoothly distributed, normal stars or dark matter) as well as transverse velocities. Quasar microlensing light curves are now being obtained from monitoring programs across the electromagnetic spectrum from the radio through the infrared and optical range to the X-ray regime. Recently, spectroscopic microlensing was successfully applied, it provides quantitative comparisons with quasar/accretion disk models. There are now more than a handful of systems with several-year long light curves and significant microlensing signal, lending to detailed analysis. This review summarizes the current state of the art of quasar microlensing and shows that at this point in time, observational monitoring programs and complementary intense simulations provide a scenario where some of the early promises of quasar microlensing can be quantitatively applied. It has been shown, e.g., that smaller sources display more violent microlensing variability, first quantitative comparison with accretion disk models has been achieved, and quasar microlensing has been used to

  1. Neutral hydrogen at the present epoch: A constraint on the evolution of high redshift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Sandhya; Briggs, Frank H.

    1993-01-01

    Damped Lyman-alpha and metal absorption lines in the spectra of quasars indicate the presence of intervening gas-rich systems at high redshift (z greater than 2). These systems have characteristic size scales, velocity dispersions, and neutral hydrogen column densities (N(H1)) similar to present day spirals and are thus thought to be their progenitors. Constraints on galaxy evolution can be derived by comparing the H1 properties of high redshift systems to the present galaxy population. Good observational statistics on high redshift absorbers specify the number of these systems along the line of sight as a function of N(H1), the column density of neutral hydrogen per absorber. Similar statistics for nearby (z = 0) galaxies of which spirals are the only gas-rich systems that provide a significant cross-section for the interception of light from quasars is derived.

  2. ON THE LINK BETWEEN ASSOCIATED Mg II ABSORBERS AND STAR FORMATION IN QUASAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Menard, Brice E-mail: menard@pha.jhu.edu

    2012-04-01

    A few percent of quasars show strong associated Mg II absorption, with velocities (v{sub off}) lying within a few thousand km s{sup -1} from the quasar systemic redshift. These associated absorption line (AAL) systems are usually interpreted as absorbers that are either intrinsic to the quasar and its host, or arising from external galaxies clustering around the quasar. Using composite spectra of {approx}1800 Mg II AAL quasars selected from SDSS DR7 at 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2, we show that quasars with AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} have a prominent excess in [O II] {lambda}3727 emission (detected at >7{sigma}) at rest relative to the quasar host, compared to unabsorbed quasars. We interpret this [O II] excess as due to enhanced star formation in the quasar host. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} are physically associated with the quasar and its host. AAL quasars also have dust reddening lying between normal quasars and the so-called dust-reddened quasars. We suggest that the unique properties of AAL quasars can be explained if they are the transitional population from heavily dust-reddened quasars to normal quasars in the formation process of quasars and their hosts. This scenario predicts a larger fraction of young bulges, disturbed morphologies, and interactions of AAL quasar hosts compared to normal quasars. The intrinsic link between associated absorbers and quasar hosts opens a new window to probe massive galaxy formation and galactic-scale feedback processes, and provides a crucial test of the evolutionary picture of quasars.

  3. Through BAL Quasars Brightly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, George

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observation of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1115+080 performed with the XMM-Newton observatory. Spectral analysis reveals the second case of a relativistic X-ray-absorbing outflow in a BAL quasar. The first case was revealed in a recent observation of APM 08279+5255 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. As in the case of APM 08279+5255, the observed flux of PG 1115+080 is greatly magnified by gravitational lensing. The relatively high redshift (z=1.72) of the quasar places the redshifted energies of resonant absorption features in a sensitive portion of the XMM- Newton spectral response. The spectrum indicates the presence of complex low-energy absorption in the 0.2-0.6 keV observed energy band and high-energy absorption in the 2-5 keV observed energy band. The high-energy absorption is best modeled by two Gaussian absorption lines with rest-frame energies of 7.4 and 9.5 keV. Assuming that these two lines axe produced by resonant absorption due to Fe XXV, we infer that the X-ray absorbers are outflowing with velocities of approx. 0.10c and approx. 0.34c respectively. We have detected significant variability of the energies and widths of the X-ray BALs in PG 1115+080 and APM 08279+5255 over timescales of 19 and 1.8 weeks (proper time), respectively. The BAL variability observed from APM 08279+5255 supports our earlier conclusion that these absorbers are most likely launched at relatively small radii of less than 10(exp 16)(Mbh/M8)(sup 1/2) cm. A comparison of the ionization properties and column densities of the low-energy and high-energy absorbers indicates that these absorbers are likely distinct; however, higher spectral resolution is needed to confirm this result. Finally, we comment on prospects for constraining the kinematic and ionization properties of these X-ray BALs with the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  4. Observations of Absorption Lines from Highly Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1984-01-01

    In the ultraviolet spectra of hot stars, absorption lines can be seen from highly ionized species in the interstellar medium. Observations of these features which have been very influential in revising the perception of the medium's various physical states, are discussed. The pervasiveness of O 6 absorption lines, coupled with complementary observations of a diffuse background in soft X-rays and EUV radiation, shows that there is an extensive network of low density gas (n approx. fewX 0.001/cucm) existing at coronal temperatures, 5.3 or = log T or = 6.3. Shocks created by supernova explosions or mass loss from early-type stars can propagate freely through space and eventually transfer a large amount of energy to the medium. To create the coronal temperatures, the shocks must have velocities in excess of 150 km/sec; shocks at somewhat lower velocity 9v or = 100 km/sec) can be directly observed in the lines of Si3. Observations of other lines in the ultraviolet, such as Si 4V and C 5, may highlight the widespread presence of energetic uv radiation from very hot, dward stars. More advanced techniques in visible and X-ray astronomical spectroscopy may open up for inspection selected lines from atoms in much higher stages of ionization.

  5. What sodium absorption lines tell us about Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2014-10-01

    We propose that the sodium responsible for the variable Na ID absorption lines in some Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) originate mainly from dust residing at ˜1 pc from the supernovae. In this Na-from-dust absorption (NaDA) model, the process by which the SN Ia peak luminosity releases sodium from dust at ˜1 pc from the SN is similar to the processes by which solar radiation releases sodium from cometary dust when comets approach a distance of ≲ 1 au from the Sun. The dust grains are not sublimated but rather stay intact, and release sodium by photon-stimulated desorption (or photosputtering). Some of the Na might start in the gas phase before the explosion. Weakening in absorption strength is caused by Na-ionizing radiation of the SN. We apply the NaDA model to SN 2006X and SN 2007le, and find it to comply better with the observed time variability of the Na ID absorption lines than the Na recombination model. The mass in the dusty shell of the NaDA model is much too high to be accounted for in the single-degenerate scenario for SN Ia. Therefore, the presence of variable Na ID lines in some SN Ia further weakens the already very problematic single-degenerate scenario for SN Ia.

  6. HST images of FeLoBAL quasars: Testing quasar-galaxy evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Villforth, Carolin; Caselli, Paola; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an HST imaging study of FeLoBAL quasars, which have extremely low-ionization Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows and might be a young quasar population based on their red colors, large far-IR luminosities (suggesting high star formation rates), and powerful outflows. Some models of quasar - host galaxy evolution propose a triggering event, such as a merger, to fuel both a burst of star formation and the quasar/AGN activity. These models suggest young quasars are initially obscured inside the dusty starburst until a "blowout" phase, driven by the starburst or quasar outflows like FeLoBALs, ends the star formation and reveals the visibly luminous quasar. Despite the popularity of this evolution scheme, there is little observational evidence to support the role of mergers in triggering AGN or the youth of dust-reddened quasars (such as FeLoBALs) compared to normal blue quasars.Our Cycle 22 HST program is designed to test the youth of FeLoBAL quasars and the connection of FeLoBALs to mergers. We obtain WFC3/IR F160W images of 10 FeLoBAL quasars at redshift z~0.9 (covering ~8500A in the quasar rest frame). We will compare the host galaxy morphologies and merger signatures of FeLoBALs with normal blue quasars (which are older according to the evolution model) and non-AGN galaxies matched in redshift and stellar mass. If FeLoBAL quasars are indeed in a young evolutionary state, close in time to the initial merging event, they should have stronger merger features compared to blue quasars and non-AGN galaxies. Preliminary results suggest that this is not the case - FeLoBAL quasars appear to reside in faint, compact hosts with weak or absent merger signatures. We discuss the implications of these results for galaxy evolution models and other studies of dust-reddened quasar populations.

  7. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY. II. RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2012-11-20

    The spectral absorption lines in early-type galaxies contain a wealth of information regarding the detailed abundance pattern, star formation history, and stellar initial mass function (IMF) of the underlying stellar population. Using our new population synthesis model that accounts for the effect of variable abundance ratios of 11 elements, we analyze very high quality absorption line spectra of 38 early-type galaxies and the nuclear bulge of M31. These data extend to 1 {mu}m and they therefore include the IMF-sensitive spectral features Na I, Ca II, and FeH at 0.82 {mu}m, 0.86 {mu}m, and 0.99 {mu}m, respectively. The models fit the data well, with typical rms residuals {approx}< 1%. Strong constraints on the IMF and therefore the stellar mass-to-light ratio, (M/L){sub stars}, are derived for individual galaxies. We find that the IMF becomes increasingly bottom-heavy with increasing velocity dispersion and [Mg/Fe]. At the lowest dispersions and [Mg/Fe] values the derived IMF is consistent with the Milky Way (MW) IMF, while at the highest dispersions and [Mg/Fe] values the derived IMF contains more low-mass stars (is more bottom-heavy) than even a Salpeter IMF. Our best-fit (M/L){sub stars} values do not exceed dynamically based M/L values. We also apply our models to stacked spectra of four metal-rich globular clusters in M31 and find an (M/L){sub stars} that implies fewer low-mass stars than a MW IMF, again agreeing with dynamical constraints. We discuss other possible explanations for the observed trends and conclude that variation in the IMF is the simplest and most plausible.

  8. Variations in the Absorption Lines Associated with SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.

    Analysis of 8th year IUE data for a faint sdOB star situated behind the young and suspected Type I supernova remnant of AD 1006 together with a careful re-analysis of earlier IUE spectra (Wu et al. 1983) confirm the presence of several very strong and definitely non-stellar absorption lines in this star's UV spectrum (Fesen, Wu, Leventhal, and Hamilton 1986). Exceedingly broad and strong absorption features at 2370 and 2600 A agree well with the relative strengths and wavelengths of the Fe II 2343, 2382, and 2599 A resonance lines and indicate an Fe II mass of about 0.1 solar mass. Other strong absorption features at 1282, 1331, and 1420 A are identified as redshifted S II (1259, 1254), O I (1302), and Si IV (1393, 1402) respectively with radial velocities of 5000 to 6700 km s^-1. The UV spectra of this sdOB star has provided us with an exciting and invaluable observational probe of the elemental composition and dynamical properties of a young Type I supernova remnant via the line-of-sight interception of the remnant's outer ejecta knots and expanding central iron core. The elements, ionization, and velocities implied by these absorption lines are in good agreement with both optical spectral features seen in Type I SN as well as detailed model calculations predicting the final explosive nucleosynthesis production and expansion velocities. Importantly however, some absorption line variations are seen between the 1982/83 and 1986 IUE spectra. Indeed, if the 1282, 1331, and 1420 A features are really due to knots of ejecta with dimensions similar to those of other remnants (i.e., 0.01 pc), these features cannot persist or remain unchanged over time scales greater than a few years. In order to understand fully the nature of the remnant's ejecta, we propose to monitor these changes in these absorption features over the next two IUE observing seasons (1987/88 and 1988/89). The exposure times are well known with the data reduction and analysis already established and

  9. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR QUASAR DEMOGRAPHICS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; White, Martin

    2013-01-10

    We present a simple model for the relationship between quasars, galaxies, and dark matter halos from 0.5 < z < 6. In the model, black hole (BH) mass is linearly related to galaxy mass, and galaxies are connected to dark matter halos via empirically constrained relations. A simple 'scattered' light bulb model for quasars is adopted, wherein BHs shine at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity during accretion episodes, and Eddington ratios are drawn from a lognormal distribution that is redshift independent. This model has two free, physically meaningful parameters at each redshift: the normalization of the M {sub BH}-M {sub gal} relation and the quasar duty cycle; these parameters are fit to the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) over the interval 0.5 < z < 6. This simple model provides an excellent fit to the LF at all epochs and also successfully predicts the observed projected two-point correlation of quasars from 0.5 < z < 2.5. It is significant that a single quasar duty cycle at each redshift is capable of reproducing the extant observations. The data are therefore consistent with a scenario wherein quasars are equally likely to exist in galaxies, and therefore dark matter halos, over a wide range in masses. The knee in the quasar LF is a reflection of the knee in the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. Future constraints on the quasar LF and quasar clustering at high redshift will provide strong constraints on the model. In the model, the autocorrelation function of quasars becomes a strong function of luminosity only at the very highest luminosities and will be difficult to observe because such quasars are so rare. Cross-correlation techniques may provide useful constraints on the bias of such rare objects. The simplicity of the model allows for rapid generation of quasar mock catalogs from N-body simulations that match the observed LF and clustering to high redshift.

  10. Ultraviolet observations of interstellar absorption lines toward SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Joseph, Charles L.; De Boer, Klass S.

    1989-01-01

    High-dispersion IUE echelle spectra of SN 1987A were averaged in order to obtain UV absorption-line profiles of the highest possible quality in the direction of SN 1987A. The profiles for Si IV and C IV are quite similar and have much less structure than the Al III profile. On relating column densities, while the C IV and Si IV ratio is relatively constant over the 0-100 km/s velocity range, the C IV to Al III and Si IV to Al III ratios vary by nearly a factor of 10. This suggests that the C IV and Si IV along this sight line in the Galaxy and its halo may have a common origin which differs from that for Al III.

  11. A search for quasars in the Virgo cluster region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X.-T.; Cannon, R. D.; Peacock, J. A.; Smith, M. G.; Oke, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    Using objective-prism plates taken with the 44-arcmin objective prism mounted on the UK Schmidt telescope, 53 emission-line quasar candidates and 29 ultraviolet-excess objects (possible low-redshift quasars) have been found in a 5 x 5-degree field centered on 12 h 27 m, + 13 deg 30 min (1950) in the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Eighteen of these 82 candidates were observed using the double spectrograph on the Palomar 5-meter telescope; 13 of the observed objects proved to be quasars. The broad-absorption-line QSO Q1232 + 134 is the first example of the class to show broad low-ionization absorption lines (such as Mg II 2798 A) in addition to the usual high-excitation lines such as Nv 1240 A. Although no conclusive evidence for quasar-galaxy associations is found in this field, there do exist nonuniformities in the distribution of the quasar candidates which may merit further investigation. These objects will provide a useful network of probes for absorbing material in the Virgo cluster. The lines-of-sight to two of the confirmed quasars pass very close to NGC galaxies; the respective projected QSO-galaxy separations are only 4 and 11 kpc at the assumed distance of the Virgo cluster.

  12. XMM-Newton Spectroscopy of the X-ray Detected Broad Absorption Line QSO CSO 755

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Niel

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from XMM-Newton observations of the highly optically polarized broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) CSO 755. By analyzing its X-ray spectrum with a total of approximately 3000 photons we find that this source has an X-ray continuum of "typical" radio-quiet quasars, with a photon index of Gamma=1.83, and a rather flat (X-ray bright) intrinsic optical-to-X-ray spectral slope of alpha_ox=- 1.51. The source shows evidence for intrinsic absorption, and fitting the spectrum with a neutral-absorption model gives a column density of N_H approximately 1.2x10^22 cm^{-2}; this is among the lowest X-ray columns measured for BALQSOs. We do not detect, with high significance, any other absorption features in the X-ray spectrum. Upper limits we place on the rest-frame equivalent width of a neutral (ionized) Fe K-alpha line, less than =180 eV (less than =120 eV), and on the Compton-reflection component parameter, R less than =0.2, suggest that most of the X-rays from the source are directly observed rather than being scattered or reflected; this is also supported by the relatively flat intrinsic alpha ox we measure. The possibility that most of the X-ray flux is scattered due to the high level of UV-optical polarization is ruled out. Considering data for 46 BALQSOs from the literature, including CSO 755, we have found that the UV-optical continuum polarization level of BALQSOs is not correlated with any of their X-ray properties. A lack of significant short-term and long-term X-ray flux variations in the source may be attributed to a large black-hole mass in CSO 755. We note that another luminous BALQSO, PG 2112+059, has both similar shallow C IV BALs and moderate X-ray absorption.

  13. Absorption-line systems in simulated galaxies fed by cold streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Kasen, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydro-cosmological simulations reveal that massive galaxies at high redshift are fed by long narrow streams of merging galaxies and a smoother component of cold gas. We post-process seven high-resolution simulated galaxies with radiative transfer to study the absorption characteristics of the gas in galaxies and streams, in comparison with the statistics of observed absorption-line systems. We find that much of the stream gas is ionized by UV radiation from background and local stellar sources, but still optically thick (? cm-2) so that the streams appear as Lyman-limit systems (LLSs). At z > 3, the fraction of neutral gas in streams becomes non-negligible, giving rise to damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) as well. The gas in the central and incoming galaxies remains mostly neutral, responsible for DLAs. Within one (two) virial radii, the covering factor of optically thick gas is <25 per cent (10 per cent) for LLSs and <5 per cent (1 per cent) for DLAs, slowly declining with time following the universal expansion. Nevertheless, galaxies and their cold streams in the studied mass range, Mvir= 1010-1012 M⊙, account for >30 per cent of the observed absorbers in the foreground of quasars, the rest possibly arising from smaller galaxies or the intergalactic medium. The mean metallicity in the streams is ˜1 per cent solar, much lower than in the galaxies. The simulated galaxies reproduce the Lyα-absorption equivalent widths observed around Lyman-break galaxies, but they severely underpredict the equivalent widths in metal lines, suggesting that the latter may arise from outflows. We conclude that the observed metal-poor LLSs are likely detections of the predicted cold streams. Revised analysis of the observed LLSs kinematics and simulations with more massive outflows in conjunction with the inflows may enable a clearer distinction between the signatures of the various gas modes.

  14. Are cold flows detectable with metal absorption lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Slyz, Adrianne; Devriendt, Julien; Pichon, Christophe

    2011-05-01

    Cosmological simulations have shown that dark matter haloes are connected to each other by large-scale filamentary structures. Cold gas flowing within this ‘cosmic web’ is believed to be an important source of fuel for star formation at high redshift. However, the presence of such filamentary gas has never been observationally confirmed despite the fact that its covering fraction within massive haloes at high redshift is predicted to be significant (˜25 per cent). In this Letter, we investigate in detail whether such cold gas is detectable using low-ionization metal absorption lines, such as C IIλ1334, as this technique has a proven observational record for detecting gaseous structures. Using a large statistical sample of galaxies from the MARENOSTRUM N-body+ adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulation, we find that the typical covering fraction of the dense, cold gas in 1012 M⊙ haloes at z˜ 2.5 is lower than expected (˜5 per cent). In addition, the absorption signal by the interstellar medium of the galaxy itself turns out to be so deep and so broad in velocity space that it completely drowns that of the filamentary gas. A detectable signal might be obtained from a cold filament exactly aligned with the line of sight, but this configuration is so unlikely that it would require surveying an overwhelmingly large number of candidate galaxies to tease it out. Finally, the predicted metallicity of the cold gas in filaments is extremely low (≤10-3 Z⊙). If this result persists when higher resolution runs are performed, it would significantly increase the difficulty of detecting filamentary gas inflows using metal lines. However, even if we assume that filaments are enriched to Z⊙, the absorption signal that we compute is still weak. We are therefore led to conclude that it is extremely difficult to observationally prove or disprove the presence of cold filaments as the favourite accretion mode of galaxies using low-ionization metal absorption

  15. Tracing inflows and outflows with absorption lines in circumgalactic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Amanda Brady; Davé, Romeel; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Katz, Neal; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Thompson, Robert; Weinberg, David H.

    2014-10-01

    We examine how H I and metal absorption lines within low-redshift galaxy haloes trace the dynamical state of circumgalactic gas, using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations that include a well-vetted heuristic model for galactic outflows. We categorize inflowing, outflowing, and ambient gas based on its history and fate as tracked in our simulation. Following our earlier work, showing that the ionization level of absorbers was a primary factor in determining the physical conditions of absorbing gas, we show here that it is also a governing factor for its dynamical state. Low-ionization metal absorbers (e.g. Mg II) tend to arise in gas that will fall on to galaxies within several Gyr, while high-ionization metal absorbers (e.g. O VI) generally trace material that was deposited by outflows many Gyr ago. Inflowing gas is dominated by enriched material that was previously ejected in an outflow; hence, accretion at low redshifts is typically substantially enriched. Recycling wind material is preferentially found closer to galaxies, and is more dominant in lower mass haloes since high-mass haloes have more hot gas that is able to support itself against infall. Low-mass haloes also tend to re-eject more of their accreted material, owing to our outflow prescription that employs higher mass loading factors for lower mass galaxies. Typical H I absorbers trace unenriched ambient material that is not participating in the baryon cycle, but stronger H I absorbers arise in cool, enriched inflowing gas. Instantaneous radial velocity measures of absorbers are generally poor at distinguishing between inflowing and outflowing gas, except in the case of very recent outflows. These results suggest that probing halo gas using a range of absorbers can provide detailed information about the amount and physical conditions of material that is participating in the baryon cycle.

  16. Causes and effects of the first quasars.

    PubMed

    Rees, M J

    1993-06-01

    The light we observe from the most distant known quasars set out when the Universe was about 200 times denser than it is now and less than one-tenth of its present age. The existence of these objects implies that galaxy formation had already, at that early epoch, proceeded to the stage when massive (>10(8)M[symbol, see text]) objects had accumulated in the centers of at least some young galaxies. A specific model is presented to show that the evolution and luminosity function of quasars are compatible with the cold dark matter cosmogony. Most big galaxies probably passed through a quasar phase; the remnant black holes in nearby galaxies may reveal themselves via the flares that occur whenever a star passes too close to them and gets tidally disrupted. The rich absorption spectra of quasars serve as a probe of the intervening medium. The gas responsible for the Lyman alpha absorption lines may be due to primordial gas gravitationally confined in minihalos of dark matter--shallow potential wells whose evolution and relation to dwarf galaxies are briefly discussed. The patchy heat input into the intergalactic medium from early quasars could modulate the environment in which galaxies form, leading to large-scale spatial correlations in the galaxy distribution. This review concludes with general comments on the prospects for a fully quantitative understanding of galaxy formation.

  17. Causes and effects of the first quasars.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, M J

    1993-01-01

    The light we observe from the most distant known quasars set out when the Universe was about 200 times denser than it is now and less than one-tenth of its present age. The existence of these objects implies that galaxy formation had already, at that early epoch, proceeded to the stage when massive (>10(8)M[symbol, see text]) objects had accumulated in the centers of at least some young galaxies. A specific model is presented to show that the evolution and luminosity function of quasars are compatible with the cold dark matter cosmogony. Most big galaxies probably passed through a quasar phase; the remnant black holes in nearby galaxies may reveal themselves via the flares that occur whenever a star passes too close to them and gets tidally disrupted. The rich absorption spectra of quasars serve as a probe of the intervening medium. The gas responsible for the Lyman alpha absorption lines may be due to primordial gas gravitationally confined in minihalos of dark matter--shallow potential wells whose evolution and relation to dwarf galaxies are briefly discussed. The patchy heat input into the intergalactic medium from early quasars could modulate the environment in which galaxies form, leading to large-scale spatial correlations in the galaxy distribution. This review concludes with general comments on the prospects for a fully quantitative understanding of galaxy formation. PMID:11607397

  18. Causes and effects of the first quasars.

    PubMed

    Rees, M J

    1993-06-01

    The light we observe from the most distant known quasars set out when the Universe was about 200 times denser than it is now and less than one-tenth of its present age. The existence of these objects implies that galaxy formation had already, at that early epoch, proceeded to the stage when massive (>10(8)M[symbol, see text]) objects had accumulated in the centers of at least some young galaxies. A specific model is presented to show that the evolution and luminosity function of quasars are compatible with the cold dark matter cosmogony. Most big galaxies probably passed through a quasar phase; the remnant black holes in nearby galaxies may reveal themselves via the flares that occur whenever a star passes too close to them and gets tidally disrupted. The rich absorption spectra of quasars serve as a probe of the intervening medium. The gas responsible for the Lyman alpha absorption lines may be due to primordial gas gravitationally confined in minihalos of dark matter--shallow potential wells whose evolution and relation to dwarf galaxies are briefly discussed. The patchy heat input into the intergalactic medium from early quasars could modulate the environment in which galaxies form, leading to large-scale spatial correlations in the galaxy distribution. This review concludes with general comments on the prospects for a fully quantitative understanding of galaxy formation. PMID:11607397

  19. Characterizing Quasar Outflows II: The Incidence of the Highest Velocity Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Michele A.; Ganguly, R.; Christenson, D. H.; Richmond, J. M.; Derseweh, J. A.; Robbins, J. M.; Townsend, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In an accompanying poster, we subjectively divide these quasars into four categories (broad absorption-line quasars, associated absorption-line quasars, reddened quasars, and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars). This subjective scheme is limited with regard to classifying narrow absorption-line systems (NALs). With single epoch, low dispersion SDSS spectra, we cannot distinguish between cosmologically intervening NALs, and intrinsic NALs that appear at large velocity offsets. In this poster, we tackle this uncertainty statistically by considering the incidence of both CIV and MgII NALs as a function of velocity, and how this distribution changes with quasar properties. We expect that absorption by intervening structures should not vary with quasar property. Other accompanying posters add photometry from rest-frame X-ray through the infrared (WISE) to complete the SED, which we utilize in these efforts. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under

  20. Optical variability properties of mini-BAL and NAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Takashi; Misawa, Toru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Koyamada, Suzuka; Takahashi, Kazuma; Wada, Hisashi

    2016-05-01

    While narrow absorption lines (NALs) are relatively stable, broad absorption lines (BALs) and mini-BAL systems usually show violent time variability within a few years via a mechanism that is not yet understood. In this study, we examine the variable ionization state (VIS) scenario as a plausible mechanism, as previously suspected. Over three years, we performed photometric monitoring observations of four mini-BAL and five NAL quasars at zem ˜ 2.0-3.1 using the 105 cm Kiso Schmidt Telescope in u, g, and i bands. We also performed spectroscopic monitoring observation of one of our mini-BAL quasars (HS 1603+3820) using the 188 cm Okayama Telescope over the same period as the photometric observations. Our main results are as follows: (1) Structure function (SF) analysis revealed that the quasar UV flux variability over three years was not large enough to support the VIS scenario, unless the ionization condition of outflow gas is very low. (2) There was no crucial difference between the SFs of mini-BAL and NAL quasars. (3) The variability of the mini-BAL and quasar light curves was weakly synchronized with a small time delay for HS 1603+3820. These results suggest that the VIS scenario may need additional mechanisms such as variable shielding by X-ray warm absorbers.

  1. Optical variability properties of mini-BAL and NAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Takashi; Misawa, Toru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Koyamada, Suzuka; Takahashi, Kazuma; Wada, Hisashi

    2016-08-01

    While narrow absorption lines (NALs) are relatively stable, broad absorption lines (BALs) and mini-BAL systems usually show violent time variability within a few years via a mechanism that is not yet understood. In this study, we examine the variable ionization state (VIS) scenario as a plausible mechanism, as previously suspected. Over three years, we performed photometric monitoring observations of four mini-BAL and five NAL quasars at zem ˜ 2.0-3.1 using the 105 cm Kiso Schmidt Telescope in u, g, and i bands. We also performed spectroscopic monitoring observation of one of our mini-BAL quasars (HS 1603+3820) using the 188 cm Okayama Telescope over the same period as the photometric observations. Our main results are as follows: (1) Structure function (SF) analysis revealed that the quasar UV flux variability over three years was not large enough to support the VIS scenario, unless the ionization condition of outflow gas is very low. (2) There was no crucial difference between the SFs of mini-BAL and NAL quasars. (3) The variability of the mini-BAL and quasar light curves was weakly synchronized with a small time delay for HS 1603+3820. These results suggest that the VIS scenario may need additional mechanisms such as variable shielding by X-ray warm absorbers.

  2. Quasar Absorption in the UV: Probing the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, David; Katz, Neal

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to model the low-redshift Lyman-alpha forest and exploration of the relation between Lyman-alpha absorbers and galaxies. This paper shows that the simulation models that are so successful at explaining properties of the high-redshift forest also account for the most important results of observational studies of the low-redshift forest, from HST (especially the Quasar Absorption Line Key Project) and ground-based follow-up.

  3. VARIABLE REDDENING AND BROAD ABSORPTION LINES IN THE NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY WPVS 007: AN ORIGIN IN THE TORUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leighly, Karen M.; Cooper, Erin; Grupe, Dirk; Terndrup, Donald M.; Komossa, S.

    2015-08-10

    We report the discovery of an occultation event in the low-luminosity narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy WPVS 007 in 2015 February and March. In concert with longer timescale variability, these observations place strong constraints on the nature and location of the absorbing material. Swift monitoring has revealed a secular decrease since ∼2010 accompanied by flattening of the optical and UV photometry that suggests variable reddening. Analysis of four Hubble Space Telescope COS observations since 2010, including a Director’s Discretionary time observation during the occultation, shows that the broad-absorption-line velocity offset and the C iv emission-line width both decrease as the reddening increases. The occultation dynamical timescale, the BAL variability dynamical timescale, and the density of the BAL gas show that both the reddening material and the broad-absorption-line gas are consistent with an origin in the torus. These observations can be explained by a scenario in which the torus is clumpy with variable scale height, and the BAL gas is blown from the torus material like spray from the crest of a wave. As the obscuring material passes into our line of sight, we alternately see high-velocity broad absorption lines and a clear view to the central engine, or low-velocity broad absorption lines and strong reddening. WPVS 007 has a small black hole mass, and correspondingly short timescales, and so we may be observing behavior that is common in BALQSOs, but is not typically observable.

  4. Gravitationally redshifted absorption lines in the X-ray burst spectra of a neutron star.

    PubMed

    Cottam, J; Paerels, F; Mendez, M

    2002-11-01

    The fundamental properties of neutron stars provide a direct test of the equation of state of cold nuclear matter, a relationship between pressure and density that is determined by the physics of the strong interactions between the particles that constitute the star. The most straightforward method of determining these properties is by measuring the gravitational redshift of spectral lines produced in the neutron star photosphere. The equation of state implies a mass-radius relation, while a measurement of the gravitational redshift at the surface of a neutron star provides a direct constraint on the mass-to-radius ratio. Here we report the discovery of significant absorption lines in the spectra of 28 bursts of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO0748-676. We identify the most significant features with the Fe XXVI and XXV n = 2-3 and O VIII n = 1-2 transitions, all with a redshift of z = 0.35, identical within small uncertainties for the respective transitions. For an astrophysically plausible range of masses (M approximately 1.3-2.0 solar masses; refs 2-5), this value is completely consistent with models of neutron stars composed of normal nuclear matter, while it excludes some models in which the neutron stars are made of more exotic matter. PMID:12422210

  5. Mining for Dust in Type 1 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Hall, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ˜35,000 uniformly selected quasars with 0\\lt z≤slant 5.3 in order to better understand their intrinsic optical/ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions. Using rest-frame optical-UV photometry taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 7th data release, cross-matched to WISE in the mid-infrared, 2MASS and UKIDSS in the near-infrared, and GALEX in the UV, we isolate outliers in the color distribution and find them well described by an SMC-like reddening law. A hierarchical Bayesian model with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling method was used to find distributions of power law indices and E(B-V) consistent with both the broad absorption line (BAL) and non-BAL samples. We find that, of the ugriz color-selected type 1 quasars in SDSS, 2.5% (13%) of the non-BAL (BAL) sample are consistent with E(B-V)\\gt 0.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)\\gt 0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index ({{α }λ }) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger high-ionization emission lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former pointing to differences in black hole mass and/or orientation.

  6. Galaxies on Top of Quasars: Probing Dwarf Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie; York, D. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; Khare, P.; Bishof, M.; Whichard, Z.; Kulkarni, V. P.

    2013-07-01

    Absorption lines from galaxies at intervening redshifts in quasar spectra are sensitive probes of metals and gas that are otherwise invisible due to distance or low surface brightness. However, in order to determine the environments these absorption lines arise in, we must detect these galaxies in emission as well. Galaxies on top of quasars (GOTOQs) are low-z galaxies found intervening with background quasars in the SDSS. These galaxies have been flagged for their narrow galactic emission lines present in quasar spectra in the SDSS. Typically, the low-z nature of these galaxies allows them to be easily detected in SDSS imaging. However, a number of GOTOQs (about 10%), despite being detected in spectral emission, are NOT seen in SDSS imaging. This implies that these may be dark galaxies, dwarf galaxies, or similarly low surface brightness galaxies. Additionally, about 25% of those detected in imaging are dwarf galaxies according to their L* values. Dwarf galaxies have long been underrepresented in observations compared to theory and are known to have large extents in dark matter. Given their prevalence here in our sample we must ask what role they play in quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS). Recent detections of 21-cm galaxies with few stars imply that aborted star formation in dark matter sub halos may produce QSOALS. Thus, this sub sample of galaxies offers a unique technique for probing dark and dwarf galaxies. The sample and its properties will be discussed, including star formation rates and dust estimates, as well as prospects for the future.

  7. Vanishing absorption and blueshifted emission in FeLoBAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza; Pirkola, Patrik; Hall, Patrick B.; Galati, Natalee; Rogerson, Jesse; Ameri, Abtin

    2016-07-01

    We study the dramatic decrease in iron absorption strength in the iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar SDSS J084133.15+200525.8. We report on the continued weakening of absorption in the prototype of this class of variable broad absorption line quasar, FBQS J140806.2+305448. We also report a third example of this class, SDSS J123103.70+392903.6; unlike the other two examples, it has undergone an increase in observed continuum brightness (at 3000 Å rest frame) as well as a decrease in iron absorption strength. These changes could be caused by absorber transverse motion or by ionization variability. We note that the Mg II and UV Fe II lines in several FeLoBAL quasars are blueshifted by thousands of km s-1 relative to the H β emission line peak. We suggest that such emission arises in the outflowing winds normally seen only in absorption.

  8. NuSTAR J033202-2746.8: Direct constraints on the Compton reflection in a heavily obscured quasar at z ≈ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Del Moro, A.; Mullaney, J. R.; Alexander, D. M.; Aird, J. A.; Gandhi, P.; Comastri, A.; Vignali, C.; Gilli, R.; Bauer, F. E.; Treister, E.; Stern, D.; Civano, F.; Ranalli, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Baloković, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We report Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, a heavily obscured, radio-loud quasar detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, the deepest layer of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey (∼400 ks, at its deepest). NuSTAR J033202-2746.8 is reliably detected by NuSTAR only at E > 8 keV and has a very flat spectral slope in the NuSTAR energy band (Γ=0.55{sub −0.64}{sup +0.62}; 3-30 keV). Combining the NuSTAR data with extremely deep observations by Chandra and XMM-Newton (4 Ms and 3 Ms, respectively), we constrain the broad-band X-ray spectrum of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, indicating that this source is a heavily obscured quasar (N{sub H}=5.6{sub −0.8}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}) with luminosity L {sub 10-40} {sub keV} ≈ 6.4 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}. Although existing optical and near-infrared (near-IR) data, as well as follow-up spectroscopy with the Keck and VLT telescopes, failed to provide a secure redshift identification for NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, we reliably constrain the redshift z = 2.00 ± 0.04 from the X-ray spectral features (primarily from the iron K edge). The NuSTAR spectrum shows a significant reflection component (R=0.55{sub −0.37}{sup +0.44}), which was not constrained by previous analyses of Chandra and XMM-Newton data alone. The measured reflection fraction is higher than the R ∼ 0 typically observed in bright radio-loud quasars such as NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, which has L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 10{sup 27} W Hz{sup –1}. Constraining the spectral shape of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including bright quasars, is very important for understanding the AGN population, and can have a strong impact on the modeling of the X-ray background. Our results show the importance of NuSTAR in investigating the broad-band spectral properties of quasars out to high redshift.

  9. NuSTAR J033202-2746.8: Direct Constraints on the Compton Reflection in a Heavily Obscured Quasar at z ≈ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, A.; Mullaney, J. R.; Alexander, D. M.; Comastri, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Treister, E.; Stern, D.; Civano, F.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.; Aird, J. A.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Baloković, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gandhi, P.; Gilli, R.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; LaMassa, S. M.; Lansbury, G. B.; Luo, B.; Puccetti, S.; Urry, M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-05-01

    We report Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, a heavily obscured, radio-loud quasar detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, the deepest layer of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey (~400 ks, at its deepest). NuSTAR J033202-2746.8 is reliably detected by NuSTAR only at E > 8 keV and has a very flat spectral slope in the NuSTAR energy band (\\Gamma =0.55^{+0.62}_{-0.64}; 3-30 keV). Combining the NuSTAR data with extremely deep observations by Chandra and XMM-Newton (4 Ms and 3 Ms, respectively), we constrain the broad-band X-ray spectrum of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, indicating that this source is a heavily obscured quasar (N_H=5.6^{+0.9}_{-0.8}\\times 10^{23} cm-2) with luminosity L 10-40 keV ≈ 6.4 × 1044 erg s-1. Although existing optical and near-infrared (near-IR) data, as well as follow-up spectroscopy with the Keck and VLT telescopes, failed to provide a secure redshift identification for NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, we reliably constrain the redshift z = 2.00 ± 0.04 from the X-ray spectral features (primarily from the iron K edge). The NuSTAR spectrum shows a significant reflection component (R=0.55^{+0.44}_{-0.37}), which was not constrained by previous analyses of Chandra and XMM-Newton data alone. The measured reflection fraction is higher than the R ~ 0 typically observed in bright radio-loud quasars such as NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, which has L 1.4 GHz ≈ 1027 W Hz-1. Constraining the spectral shape of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including bright quasars, is very important for understanding the AGN population, and can have a strong impact on the modeling of the X-ray background. Our results show the importance of NuSTAR in investigating the broad-band spectral properties of quasars out to high redshift.

  10. Absorption lines from magnetically driven winds in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, S.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Ferreira, J.; Henri, G.; Belmont, R.; Clavel, M.; Corbel, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Coriat, M.; Drappeau, S.; Malzac, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High resolution X-ray spectra of black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) show blueshifted absorption lines suggesting the presence of outflowing winds. Furthermore, observations show that the disk winds are equatorial and they occur in the Softer (disk dominated) states of the outburst and are less prominent or absent in the Harder (power-law dominated) states. Aims: We want to test whether the self-similar magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) accretion-ejection models can explain the observational results for accretion disk winds in BHBs. In our models, the density at the base of the outflow from the accretion disk is not a free parameter. This mass loading is determined by solving the full set of dynamical MHD equations without neglecting any physical term. Thus, the physical properties of the outflow depend on and are controlled by the global structure of the disk. Methods: We studied different MHD solutions characterized by different values of the disk aspect ratio (ɛ) and the ejection efficiency (p). We also generate two kinds of MHD solutions depending on the absence (cold solution) or presence (warm solution) of heating at the disk surface. Such heating could be either from dissipation of energy due to MHD turbulence in the disk or from illumination of the disk surface. Warm solutions can have large (>0.1) values of p, which would imply larger wind mass loading at the base of the outflow. We use each of these MHD solutions to predict the physical parameters (distance, density, velocity, magnetic field, etc.) of an outflow. Motivated by observational results, we have put limits on the ionization parameter (ξ), column density, and timescales. Further constraints were derived for the allowed values of ξ from thermodynamic instability considerations, particularly for the Hard SED. These physical constraints were imposed on each of these outflows to select regions within it, which are consistent with the observed winds. Results: The cold MHD solutions are found to be

  11. Rapid CIV BAL Variability in an SDSS-RM Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Catherine; Hall, Patrick B.; Brandt, W. Niel; Trump, Jonathan; Shen, Yue; Vivek, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project (SDSS-RM) recently completed its first round of spectroscopic observations of a sample of ~850 quasars with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. From 2014 January-July, more than 30 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained for this quasar sample, and supporting observations were carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope. A number of quasars observed as a part of this project have broad absorption line (BAL) features in their spectra; we here report on observations of one such target that displays very rapid BAL variability --- the CIV trough is variable on rest frame timescales shorter than a few days. We will discuss the observed short-timescale variability of this BAL and the implications for the physical environment and physics regulating BALs in active galactic nuclei.

  12. Metallicity and far-infrared luminosity of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Leah E.; Hamann, Fred

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of an exploratory study of broad-line region (BLR) metallicity in 34 2.2 <= z <= 4.6 quasars with far-infrared (FIR) luminosities (LFIR) from 1013.4 to <=1012.1 Lsolar. Quasar samples sorted by LFIR might represent an evolutionary sequence if the star formation rates (SFRs) in quasar hosts generally diminish across quasar lifetimes. We use rest-frame ultraviolet spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct three composite spectra sorted by LFIR, corresponding to average SFRs of 4980, 2130 and <=340 Msolar yr-1 after correcting for a nominal quasar FIR contribution. The measured NV λ1240/CIV λ1550 and SiIV λ1397+OIV] λ1402/CIV λ1550 emission line ratios indicate supersolar BLR metallicities in all three composites, with no evidence for a trend with the star formation rate. The formal derived metallicities, Z ~ 5-9Zsolar, are similar to those derived for the BLRs of other quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities. These results suggest that the ongoing star formation in the host is not responsible for the metal enrichment of the BLR gas. Instead, the BLR gas must have been enriched before the visible quasar phase. These results for high quasar metallicities, regardless of LFIR, are consistent with evolution scenarios wherein visibly bright quasars appear after the main episode(s) of star formation and metal enrichment in the host galaxies. Finally, young quasars, those more closely associated with a recent merger or a blowout of gas and dust, may exhibit tracers of these events, such as redder continuum slopes and higher incidence of narrow absorption lines. With the caveat of small sample sizes, we find no relation between LFIR and the reddening or the incidence of absorption lines.

  13. Characterizing Quasar Outflows III: SEDs, and Bolometric Luminosity Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph; Robbins, J. M.; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Christenson, D. H.; Derseweh, J. A.; Townsend, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we add photometry from both the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). 2MASS photometry covers the rest-frame optical regime of these qusars, while the WISE W1, W2, and W3 bands cover the rest-frame wavelength ranges 0.9-1.27 micron, 1.35-1.75 micron, and 2.52-5.51 micron, respectively. The preliminary release of WISE data cover 3800 of our quasars. In an accompnying poster, we have subjectively divided these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). Here, we present average SEDs for these subsamples, estimates of bolometric luminosity, and explore changes in SED based on both outflow properties and quasar physical properties. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the

  14. Unveiling the X-ray/UV properties of AGN winds using Broad and mini-Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, M.

    2015-07-01

    BAL/mini-BALs are observed in the UV spectra of ˜ 20-30% of optically selected AGN as broad absorption troughs blueshifted by several thousands km/s, indicative of powerful nuclear winds. They could be representative of the average AGN if their winds cover only 20-30% of the continuum source, and/or represent an evolutionary state analogous to the high-soft state of BHB, when the jet emission is quenched and strong X-ray absorbing equatorial disk winds are virtually ubiquitous. High-quality, possibly time-resolved X-ray/UV studies are crucial to assess the global amount and 'character' of absorption in BAL/mini-BAL QSOs and to constrain the physical mechanism responsible for the launch and acceleration of their winds, therefore placing them in the broader context of AGN geometry and evolution. I will review here the known X-ray properties of BAL/mini-BAL QSOs, and present new results from a comprehensive X-ray spectral analysis of all the Palomar-Green BAL/mini-BAL QSOs with available XMM-Newton observations, for a total of 51 pointings of 14 different sources. These will include the most recent results from a high-quality simultaneous XMM/HST observational campaign on the mini-BAL QSO PG 1126-041, that unveiled with stunning details the X-ray/UV connection in action in an AGN disk wind through correlated X-ray/UV absorption variability.

  15. The HST quasar absorption line key project. 9: An emission-line study of PG 2251+113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espey, Brian R.; Turnshek, David A.; Lee, Lincoln; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Savage, Blair D.; Schneider, Donald P.

    1994-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and quasi-simultaneous ground-based observations of the z = 0.3252 QSO PG 2251+113. We find a correlation between line widths and the critical density for de-excitation of the forbidden emission lines observed in this object. We can show that this correlation also applies to the semiforbidden and possibly also the permitted lines which arise in the broad emission-line region. While this result was predicted from statistical studies, it has never previously been shown to hold in detail in any individual object. This relationship between the narrow and broad emission-line regions may help constrain dynamical models of both regions. We examine the implications of this result for a simple radial infall model of the emitting gas developed to explain the origin of narrow-line profiles.

  16. Monitoring Emergent Absorption Troughs in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Patrick; Rodriguez Hidalgo, Paola; Brandt, W. Niel; Rogerson, Jesse; Filiz Ak, Nur; Chajet, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Outflows from luminous AGN are important ingredients in galaxy formation. These outflows manifest as broad absorption line (BAL) troughs in quasar spectra. Trough variability can be used to constrain the physical parameters of these absorbing structures through comparison to models and simulations of accretion disk winds. Monitoring appearing/disappearing BAL troughs can constrain the distribution of BAL trough lifetimes along our line of sight. By comparing spectra from the SDSS Data Release (DR) 7 and DR 9, we identified 68 quasars in whose spectra new absorption troughs have appeared over 300-1200 restframe days, including one trough outflowing at v=60,000 km/s. We propose to complete our third-epoch GMOS spectroscopy of the brightest of those quasars (48 in 2013AB and 9 proposed here) to measure the absorption strength in newly appeared troughs <=365 restframe days after their previous measurement. Preliminary 2013AB results indicate that troughs are not on average still strengthening between SDSS and Gemini epochs; we therefore propose observations of 40 targets to probe shorter rest-frame time separations. We also target 8 objects showing simultaneous absorption variations in multiple ionization states, to help develop methods to distinguish absorption variations from cloud motion vs. those from ionization changes within clouds.

  17. THE FIRST HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASAR FROM Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; De Rosa, Gisella; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chambers, Ken; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Greiner, Jochen; Price, Paul

    2012-06-15

    We present the discovery of the first high-redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i{sub P1} dropout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Its near-infrared spectrum was taken at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBT) with the LBT Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z{sub P1} magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}, and a black hole mass of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. It is a broad absorption line quasar with a prominent Ly{beta} peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high-redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than 100 i{sub P1} dropout quasars and could potentially find more than 10 z{sub P1} dropout (z > 6.8) quasars.

  18. THE X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE OPTICALLY BRIGHTEST MINI-BAL QUASARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Comins, M. L.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Gibson, Robert R.; Shemmer, Ohad

    2010-11-20

    We have compiled a sample of 14 of the optically brightest radio-quiet quasars (m{sub i} {<=} 17.5 and z {>=} 1.9) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog that have C IV mini-broad absorption lines (mini-BALs) present in their spectra. X-ray data for 12 of the objects were obtained via a Chandra snapshot survey using ACIS-S, while data for the other two quasars were obtained from archival XMM-Newton observations. Joint X-ray spectral analysis shows that the mini-BAL quasars have a similar average power-law photon index ({Gamma} {approx} 1.9) and level of intrinsic absorption (N{sub H} {approx}< 8 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}) as non-BMB (neither BAL nor mini-BAL) quasars. Mini-BAL quasars are more similar to non-BMB quasars than to BAL quasars in their distribution of relative X-ray brightness (assessed with {Delta}{alpha}{sub ox}). Relative colors indicate mild dust reddening in the optical spectra of mini-BAL quasars. Significant correlations between {Delta}{alpha}{sub ox} and UV absorption properties are confirmed for a sample of 56 sources combining mini-BAL and BAL quasars with high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame UV spectra, which generally supports models in which X-ray absorption is important in enabling driving of the UV absorption-line wind. We also propose alternative parameterizations of the UV absorption properties of mini-BAL and BAL quasars, which may better describe the broad absorption troughs in some respects.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN data and absorption-line measurements (Richter+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; Wakker, B. P.; Fechner, C.; Herenz, P.; Tepper-Garcia, T.; Fox, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Names, positions and emission redshifts for 303 QSOs are provided in Table A.1. Table A.2 summarizes the absorption-line measurements for 59 intervening SiIII absorbers including absorption redshifts, equivalent-widths, and column densities for various different ions. (2 data files).

  20. HI Absorption Lines Detected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong-zu, Wu; Martha P, Haynes; Riccardo, Giovanelli; Ming, Zhu; Ru-rong, Chen

    2015-10-01

    We present some preliminary results of an on-going study of HI 21-cm absorption lines based on the 40% survey data released by the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA). (1) Ten HI candidate absorbers have been detected. Five of them are previously published in the literature, and the rest of them are new detections that need further confirmation. (2) For those sources with no detected absorptions, we have calculated the upper limit of their foreground HI column density NHI. The statistical result of the NHI distribution indicates that the ratio Ts/f between the averaged spin temperature and coverage factor for DLAs (the damped Lyα systems) might be larger than 500 K. The radio frequency interference (RFI) and standing wave are the main factors affecting the detection of HI absorption lines, which have been analyzed and discussed as well in order to find a method of solution. Our study can serve as a pathfinder for the future large-scale search of HI 21-cm absorption lines using the Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), which is an Arecibo-type radio telescope currently under construction in China with greatly increased sensitivity, bandwidth, and observational sky area. As prospects, we have discussed two types of observational studies of HI absorption lines toward extragalactic sources using the FAST telescope.

  1. Studying Velocity Turbulence from Doppler-broadened Absorption Lines: Statistics of Optical Depth Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2008-10-10

    We continue our work on developing techniques for studying turbulence with spectroscopic data. We show that Doppler-broadened absorption spectral lines, in particular, saturated absorption lines, can be used within the framework of the previously introduced technique termed the velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS). The VCS relates the statistics of fluctuations along the velocity coordinate to the statistics of turbulence; thus, it does not require spatial coverage by sampling directions in the plane of the sky. We consider lines with different degree of absorption and show that for lines of optical depth less than one, our earlier treatment of the VCS developed for spectral emission lines is applicable, if the optical depth is used instead of intensity. This amounts to correlating the logarithms of absorbed intensities. For larger optical depths and saturated absorption lines, we show that only wings of the line are available for the analysis. In terms of the VCS formalism, this results in introducing an additional window, whose size decreases with the increase of the optical depth. As a result, strongly saturated absorption lines only carry the information about the small-scale turbulence. Nevertheless, the contrast of the fluctuations corresponding to the small-scale turbulence increases with the increase of the optical depth, which provides advantages for studying turbulence by combining lines with different optical depths. By combining different absorption lines one can develop a tomography of the turbulence in the interstellar gas in all its complexity.

  2. H i Absorption in the Steep-Spectrum Superluminal Quasar 3C 216.

    PubMed

    Pihlström; Vermeulen; Taylor; Conway

    1999-11-01

    The search for H i absorption in strong compact steep-spectrum sources is a natural way to probe the neutral gas contents in young radio sources. In turn, this may provide information about the evolution of powerful radio sources. The recently improved capabilities of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope have made it possible to detect a 0.31% (19 mJy) deep neutral atomic hydrogen absorption line associated with the steep-spectrum superluminal quasar 3C 216. The redshift (z=0.67) of the source shifts the frequency of the 21 cm line down to the ultra-high-frequency (UHF) band (850 MHz). The exact location of the H i-absorbing gas remains to be determined by spectral line VLBI observations at 850 MHz. We cannot exclude that the gas might be extended on galactic scales, but we think it is more likely to be located in the central kiloparsec. Constraints from the lack of X-ray absorption probably rule out obscuration of the core region, and we argue that the most plausible site for the H i absorption is in the jet-cloud interaction observed in this source.

  3. Discovery of a z = 6.1 Radio-Loud Quasar in the NDWFS

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, I D; Becker, R H; Helfand, D J; White, R L

    2006-07-24

    From examination of only 4 deg{sup 2} of sky in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) region, we have identified the first radio-loud quasar at a redshift z > 6. The object, FIRST J1427385+331241, was discovered by matching the FLAMEX IR survey to FIRST survey radio sources with NDWFS counterparts. One candidate z > 6 quasar was found, and spectroscopy with the Keck II telescope confirmed its identification, yielding a redshift z = 6.12. The object is a Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasar with an optical luminosity of M{sub B} {approx} -26.9 and a radio-to-optical flux ratio {approx} 60. Two Mg II absorptions systems are present at redshifts of z = 2.18 and z = 2.20. We briefly discuss the implications of this discovery for the high-redshift quasar population.

  4. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. v. redshift evolution of lyman limit absorption in the spectra of a large sample of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengler-Larrea, Erik A.; Boksenberg, Alec; Steidel, Charles, C.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Bacall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Savage, Blair D.

    1995-01-01

    Using a sample of 119 QSOs, containing objects we have selected having previously available high quality ground-based and IUE spectral observations, together with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of 26 QSOs from Bahcall et al. (1993, 1995) and Impey et al. (1995) and new optical observations of 41 objects by Steidel & Sargent (1995), we study the redshift evolution of Lyman limit absorption systems (LLSs; tau greater than 1.0) over the reshift range 0.32 less than or equal to z(sub LLS) less than or equal to 4.11. The HST observations significantly improve the determination of the low redshift (0.4 less than or equal to z(sub LLS) less than or equal to 1.4) distribution. We find the effect which may have been responsible for the apparent strong evolution at a(sub LLS) greater than or equal to 2.5 found by Lanzetta (1991), which led him to consider a broken, not single power law as a better description of the redshift distribution of LLSs. After removing objects which may bias our sample, leaving a total of 169 QSOs, we find the distribution is well described by a single power law, and obtain for the number density as a function of redshift the form N(z) = N(sub 0)(1 + z)(exp gamma) with gamma = 1.50 =/- 0.39 and N(sub 0) = 0.25(sup -0.10)(sub +0.17), consistent with a constant comoving density of absorbers in a Firedmann universe with q(sub 0) = 0 but indicating evolution if q(sub 0) = 1/2.

  5. Nature and statistical properties of quasar associated absorption systems in the XQ-100 Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Prochaska, J. X.; Cristiani, S.; Cupani, G.; Ellison, S.; López, S.; Becker, G. D.; Berg, T. A. M.; Christensen, L.; Denney, K. D.; Hamann, F.; Pâris, I.; Vestergaard, M.; Worseck, G.

    2016-11-01

    We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyse the spectra of 100 quasars with 3.5 < zem < 4.5, observed with X-shooter/Very Large Telescope in the context of the XQ-100 Legacy Survey. We detect an ˜8σ excess in the C IV number density within 10 000 km s- 1 of the quasar emission redshift with respect to the random occurrence of NALs. This excess does not show a dependence on the quasar bolometric luminosity and it is not due to the redshift evolution of NALs. It extends far beyond the standard 5000 km s- 1 cut-off traditionally defined for associated absorption lines. We propose to modify this definition, extending the threshold to 10 000 km s- 1 when weak absorbers (equivalent width < 0.2 Å) are also considered. We infer N V is the ion that better traces the effects of the quasar ionization field, offering the best statistical tool to identify intrinsic systems. Following this criterion, we estimate that the fraction of quasars in our sample hosting an intrinsic NAL system is 33 per cent. Lastly, we compare the properties of the material along the quasar line of sight, derived from our sample, with results based on close quasar pairs investigating the transverse direction. We find a deficiency of cool gas (traced by C II) along the line of sight connected to the quasar host galaxy, in contrast with what is observed in the transverse direction.

  6. THE 2dF REDSHIFT SURVEY. I. PHYSICAL ASSOCIATION AND PERIODICITY IN QUASAR FAMILIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, C. C.; Arp, H. C. E-mail: arp@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-08-01

    We have tested for physical association of candidate companion quasars with putative parent galaxies by virtue of Karlsson periodicity in quasar redshifts. We examined galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and quasars from the 2dF Quasar Redshift Survey (2QZ) in the two declination strips (at declinations 0 Degree-Sign and -30 Degree-Sign ) covered by the 2QZ, first filtering out galaxies and quasars using the respective survey masks and observation qualities as described, and using only quasars with z {>=} 0.5 to avoid the redshift region of mixed galaxies and quasars. Around each galaxy, quasars are detected as physically associated with a putative parent galaxy if their respective redshifts conform to empirically derived constraints based on an ejection hypothesis. We ran Monte Carlo control trials against the pure physical associations by replacing the actual redshifts of the candidate companion quasars with quasar redshifts drawn randomly from each respective right ascension hour. The constraints are grouping of quasar redshifts and Karlsson periodicity of quasar redshifts.

  7. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    a function of the redshift and the corresponding look-back time. The open circle is the measurement from the Oklo natural reactor. The horizontal long dashed lines show the area of the previous claim of variation of the fine structure constant. Clearly, the new UVES data are inconsistent with this range. A team of astronomers [1], led by Patrick Petitjean (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris and Observatoire de Paris, France) and Raghunathan Srianand (IUCAA Pune, India) very carefully studied a homogeneous sample of 50 absorption systems observed with UVES and Kueyen along 18 distant quasars lines of sight. They recorded the spectra of quasars over a total of 34 nights to achieve the highest possible spectral resolution and the best signal-to-noise ratio. Sophisticated automatic procedures specially designed for this programme were applied. In addition, the astronomers used extensive simulations to show that they can correctly model the line profiles to recover a possible variation of alpha. The result of this extensive study is that over the last 10,000 million years, the relative variation of alpha must be less than 0.6 part per million. This is the strongest constraint from quasar absorption lines studies to date. More importantly, this new result does not support previous claims of a statistically significant change of alpha with time. Interestingly, this result is supported by another - less extensive - analysis, also conducted with the UVES spectrometer on the VLT [2]. Even though those observations were only concerned with one of the brightest known quasar HE 0515-4414, this independent study lends further support to the hypothesis of no variation of alpha. Even though these new results represent a significant improvement in our knowledge of the possible (non-) variation of one of the fundamental physical constants, the present set of data would in principle still allow variations that are comparatively large compared to those resulting from the measurements

  8. XMM-Newton spectroscopy of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Turner, M. J. L.

    2005-11-01

    XMM-Newton observations of 29 high-redshift (z > 2) quasars, including seven radio-quiet, 16 radio-loud and six broad absorption line (BAL) objects, are presented; due to the high redshifts, the rest-frame energy bands extend up to ~30-70 keV. Over 2-10 keV, the quasars can be well fitted in each case by a simple power law, with no strong evidence for iron emission lines. The lack of iron lines is in agreement both with dilution by the radio jet emission (for the radio-loud quasars) and the X-ray Baldwin effect. No Compton reflection humps at higher energies (i.e. above 10 keV in the rest frame) are detected either. Over the broad-band (0.3-10 keV), approximately half (nine out of 16) of the radio-loud quasars are intrinsically absorbed, with the values of NH generally being 1 × 1022 to 2 × 1022cm-2 in the rest frames of the objects. None of the seven radio-quiet objects shows excess absorption, while four of the six BAL quasars are absorbed. The radio-loud quasars have flatter continuum slopes than their radio-quiet counterparts (ΓRL~ 1.55; ΓRQ~ 1.98 over 2-10 keV), while, after modelling the absorption, the underlying photon index for the six BAL quasars is formally consistent with the non-BAL radio-quiet objects.

  9. Testing quasar unification: radiative transfer in clumpy winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. H.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.; Sim, S. A.; Higginbottom, N.; Mangham, S. W.

    2016-05-01

    Various unification schemes interpret the complex phenomenology of quasars and luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) in terms of a simple picture involving a central black hole, an accretion disc and an associated outflow. Here, we continue our tests of this paradigm by comparing quasar spectra to synthetic spectra of biconical disc wind models, produced with our state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Previously, we have shown that we could produce synthetic spectra resembling those of observed broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, but only if the X-ray luminosity was limited to 1043 erg s-1. Here, we introduce a simple treatment of clumping, and find that a filling factor of ˜0.01 moderates the ionization state sufficiently for BAL features to form in the rest-frame UV at more realistic X-ray luminosities. Our fiducial model shows good agreement with AGN X-ray properties and the wind produces strong line emission in, e.g., Lyα and C IV 1550 Å at low inclinations. At high inclinations, the spectra possess prominent LoBAL features. Despite these successes, we cannot reproduce all emission lines seen in quasar spectra with the correct equivalent-width ratios, and we find an angular dependence of emission line equivalent width despite the similarities in the observed emission line properties of BAL and non-BAL quasars. Overall, our work suggests that biconical winds can reproduce much of the qualitative behaviour expected from a unified model, but we cannot yet provide quantitative matches with quasar properties at all viewing angles. Whether disc winds can successfully unify quasars is therefore still an open question.

  10. Absorption line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10(exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  11. Cm and mm Survey of Molecular Absorption Lines in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Juergen; Muller, S.; Meier, D.; Peck, A.; Impellizzeri, V.; Walter, F.; Henkel, C.; Martin, S.; Aalto, S.; van der Werf, P.; Feain, I.; Anderson, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present Australia Telescope Array data of molecular absorption lines toward the bright central core of Centaurus A. The line of sight crosses the prominent dust lane and continues through the disk and eventually through gas that may be very close to the central supermassive black hole. The goal of our the survey is to determine the physical conditions of the gas via analyses of molecular line tracers including molecular abundances and excitation that is sensitive to changes in temperature, density, ionization, and shocks. This study allows us to derive the physical conditions of every absorption line complex and finally let us assign the most likely environments. We present ATCA data in the 20-50GHz range at medium resolution of a few km/s and possibly ALMA data at 3mm and 1mm wavelengths. The project continues with sub-km/s higher spectral resolution for the most important lines in 2012.

  12. Fraunhofer-type absorption lines in double-pulse laser-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael; Gornushkin, Igor

    2012-03-01

    We studied the confocal double-pulse laser-induced plasma in the very beginning of its life. It was found that the second laser pulse fired 0.7 to 5 µs after the first pulse produces plasma which, during the first 0 to 20 ns, resembles solar configuration. There is a very hot and compact plasma core that radiates a broad continuum spectrum and a much larger and cooler outer shell. The light from the hot core passes through the cold outer shell and is partly absorbed by atoms and ions that are in ground (or close to ground) states. This produces absorption lines that are similar to Fraunhofer lines observed in the sun spectrum. The possibility to use these absorption lines for new direct and calibration free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analytical applications, both in laboratory and industrial conditions, is proved.

  13. Absorption-line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass-losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10 (exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  14. PG 1700 + 518 - a low-redshift, broad absorption line QSO

    SciTech Connect

    Pettini, M.; Boksenberg, A.

    1985-07-01

    The first high-resolution optical spectra and lower resolution UV spectra of PG 1700 + 518, the only known broad-absorption-line (BAL) QSO at low emission redshift (0.288) are presented. The optical data were obtained with the Isaac Newton Telescope on the island of La Palma and the UV data with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. The outstanding feature of the optical spectrum is a strong, broad Mg II absorption trough, detached from the Mg II emission line and indicative of ejection velocities of between 7000 and 18,000 km/s. Also detected were narrow (FWHM = 350 km/s) Mg II absorption lines at absolute z = 0.2698, which are probably related to the mass ejection phenomenon. It is concluded that the emission-line spectrum is similar to that of other low-redshift QSOs although there are some obvious differences from typical BAL QSOs, most notably in the unusually low level of ionization of both emission-line and broad absorption line gas. 21 references.

  15. C IV Broad Absorption Line Variability in QSO spectra from SDSS I-III Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cicco, D.; Brandt, W. N.; Paolillo, M.; Grier, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of our study of C IV broad absorption line (BAL) variability in the spectra of more than 1500 QSO's from several SDSS I-III surveys. Absorption lines in QSO spectra are due to outflowing winds which originate from the accretion disk, at a distance on the order of 1/100 - 1/10 pc from the central super-massive black hole (SMBH). Winds trigger the accretion mechanism onto the SMBH removing angular momentum from the disk and, since they evacuate gas from the host galaxy, they are believed to play a fundamental role in galaxy evolution. Absorption lines can be classified on the basis of their width and of the observed transitions, and their equivalent width can change on timescales from months to years, due to variations in the covering factor and/or in the ionization level. We analyzed the largest sample ever used for such kind of studies. We find that the fraction of disappearing BALs is three times larger than the one found in previous works. Strong evidence is found for a coordinated variability in spectra with multiple BAL troughs which may be interpreted in terms of disk-wind rotation, and/or variations in the physical status of the shielding gas. We also find that, in spectra with multiple BAL troughs, the disappearing ones are generally those with the highest central velocity.

  16. A Hubble Diagram for Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, G.; Lusso, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new method to test the ΛCDM cosmological model and to estimate cosmological parameters based on the nonlinear relation between the ultraviolet and X-ray luminosities of quasars. We built a data set of 1138 quasars by merging several samples from the literature with X-ray measurements at 2 keV and SDSS photometry, which was used to estimate the extinction-corrected 2500 Å flux. We obtained three main results: (1) we checked the nonlinear relation between X-ray and UV luminosities in small redshift bins up to z˜ 6, confirming that the relation holds at all redshifts with the same slope; (2) we built a Hubble diagram for quasars up to z˜ 6, which is well matched to that of supernovae in the common z = 0-1.4 redshift interval and extends the test of the cosmological model up to z˜ 6; and (3) we showed that this nonlinear relation is a powerful tool for estimating cosmological parameters. Using the present data and assuming a ΛCDM model, we obtain {{{Ω }}}M = 0.22{}-0.08+0.10 and {{{Ω }}}{{Λ }} = 0.92{}-0.30+0.18 ({{{Ω }}}M = 0.28 ± 0.04 and {{{Ω }}}{{Λ }} = 0.73 +/- 0.08 from a joint quasar-SNe fit). Much more precise measurements will be achieved with future surveys. A few thousand SDSS quasars already have serendipitous X-ray observations from Chandra or XMM-Newton, and at least 100,000 quasars with UV and X-ray data will be made available by the extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array all-sky survey in a few years. The Euclid, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, and Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics surveys will further increase the sample size to at least several hundred thousand. Our simulations show that these samples will provide tight constraints on the cosmological parameters and will allow us to test for possible deviations from the standard model with higher precision than is possible today.

  17. The Unique FE II Emitting Quasars in IC 2943 and Mark 957

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. Martin

    Observations are sought of two low-redshift quasars which are unusual in two respects: they have extremely narrow broad lines (FWHMs of 420 and 470 km/sec) and unusually weak Balmer lines. They also appear to have exceptionally strong Fe II emission compared with the Balmer lines (but this is entirely because the Balmer lines are suppressed and the Fe II emission is "normal"). Prior to being granted two shifts (out of a requested 6) in the current (10th) year, no UV spectra had been obtained for any such quasars and a major question addressed in this research is whether these quasars are normal in their UV properties. The indication from the one SWP spectrum obtained to date in "No". I am aiming to find out why these quasars are so unusual in their kinematics and physical conditions. Some specific predictions are being tested. First it was predicted that they might be broad absorption line quasars (the first one looked at with SWP looks like it could be but a confirming spectrum is required). If this proves to be so it will almost double the known number of low redshift broad absorption line quasars and provide an important link between emission line and absorption line properties. There is also a prediction in the literature that these quasars will show a high Si III]/C III] ratio indicating an unusually high density and this can obviously be tested (but the time allocated this year was insufficient to get LWR spectra). There are two classes of model for producing the puzzling low ionization clouds in quasars (i.e. those producing Fe II), models which produce Fe II in the same clouds that give the high ionization lines (the so called "standard model") and models which produce it in radically different clouds (the model I favor myself). The standard model would predict that Lyman-alpha should be extremely weak and unresolved with the IUE. This seems to be the case for the one SWP spectrum taken so far, although (again) because of the low SIN a confirming spectrum

  18. SDSS J0246-0825: A New Gravitationally Lensed Quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, N; Burles, S; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; Schechter, P L; Eisenstein, D J; Oguri, M; Castander, F J; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Pindor, B; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; White, R L; Brinkmann, J; Szalay, A; York, D G

    2005-11-10

    We report the discovery of a new two-image gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J024634.11-082536.2 (SDSS J0246-0825). This object was selected as a lensed quasar candidate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by the same algorithm that was used to discover other SDSS lensed quasars (e.g., SDSS J0924+0219). Multicolor imaging with the Magellan Consortium's Walter Baade 6.5-m telescope and the spectroscopic observations using the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck II telescope confirm that SDSS J0246-0825 consists of two lensed images ({Delta}{theta} = 1''.04) of a source quasar at z = 1.68. Imaging observations with the Keck telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope reveal an extended object between the two quasar components, which is likely to be a lensing galaxy of this system. From the absorption lines in the spectra of quasar components and the apparent magnitude of the galaxy, combined with the expected absolute magnitude from the Faber-Jackson relation, we estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be z = 0.724. A highly distorted ring is visible in the Hubble Space Telescope images, which is likely to be the lensed host galaxy of the source quasar. Simple mass modeling predicts the possibility that there is a small (faint) lensing object near the primary lensing galaxy.

  19. Narrow absorption lines with two observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Cao, Yue

    2015-07-01

    We assemble 3524 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with repeated observations to search for variations of the narrow C IV λ λ 1548,1551 and Mg II λ λ 2796,2803 absorption doublets in spectral regions shortward of 7000 Å in the observed frame, which corresponds to time-scales of about 150-2643 d in the quasar rest frame. In these quasar spectra, we detect 3580 C IV absorption systems with zabs = 1.5188-3.5212 and 1809 Mg II absorption systems with zabs = 0.3948-1.7167. In term of the absorber velocity (β) distribution in the quasar rest frame, we find a substantial number of C IV absorbers with β < 0.06, which might be connected to absorption of quasar outflows. The outflow absorption peaks at υ ≈ 2000 km s^{-1} and drops rapidly below this peak value. Among 3580 C IV absorption systems, 52 systems (˜1.5 per cent) show obvious variations in equivalent widths in the absorber rest frame (Wr): 16 enhanced, 16 emerged, 12 weakened and 8 disappeared systems, respectively. We find that changes in Wrλ1548 are related neither to the time-scales of the two SDSS observations nor to absorber velocities in the quasar rest frame. Variable absorption in low-ionization species is important to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbing gas. There are two variable Mg II absorption systems measured from SDSS spectra detected by Hacker et al. However, in our Mg II absorption sample, we find that neither shows variable absorption with confident levels of >4σ for λ2796 lines and >3σ for λ2803 lines.

  20. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ ‑22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  1. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ -22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  2. Quasars with Anomalous Hβ Profiles. I. Demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.

    2013-08-01

    The Hβ emission line in a typical Type I quasar is composed of a broad base and a narrow core, with the core velocity characteristic of narrow-line region emission, and line-fitting routines typically assume this picture. We test the effects of removing this constraint, and find a substantial group of Type I quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalog with Hβ emission line cores broader than 1200 km s-1 , above the velocity believed possible for gas in the quasar narrow-line region. We identify this group of ``anomalous Hβ quasars'' (AHQs) as a distinct population because of a variety of spectral and photometric signatures common to these AHQs but atypical of other quasars. These features are similar to some aspects of narrow-line Seyfert 1s and correlations identified by Eigenvector 1, but also contain distinct features that make it difficult to classify AHQs. We demonstrate that AHQs comprise at least 11% and most likely approximately one quarter of the SDSS Type I quasar population at 0.2 < z < 0.8. For AHQs, the [O III]λ 4959, 5007 profile is often better fit by de-linking it from the Hβ core, while a more standard linked fit produces a tight correlation between narrow- and broad-line velocities. We find that [O III] in AHQs sometimes has a standard narrow-line profile and other times matches the Hβ core, but is rarely in between the two, implying that the broadened core emission arises from a distinct physical region. Another feature of AHQs is a diminished [O II] line, which might indicate a connection between AHQs and the interstellar mediums of their host galaxies, through reduced photoionization or star formation. We find that it is difficult to produce AHQs using the current quasar standard model.

  3. OUTFLOW AND HOT DUST EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Xing, Feijun; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Shaohua

    2013-10-10

    Correlations of hot dust emission with outflow properties are investigated, based on a large z ∼ 2 non-broad absorption line quasar sample built from the Wide-field Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases. We use the near-infrared slope and the infrared to UV luminosity ratio to indicate the hot dust emission relative to the emission from the accretion disk. In our luminous quasars, these hot dust emission indicators are almost independent of the fundamental parameters, such as luminosity, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, but moderately dependent on the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) and FWHM of C IV lines. Interestingly, the latter two correlations dramatically strengthen with increasing Eddington ratio. We suggest that, in high Eddington ratio quasars, C IV regions are dominated by outflows so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) can reliably reflect the general properties and velocity of outflows, respectively. In low Eddington ratio quasars, on the other hand, C IV lines are primarily emitted by virialized gas so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) become less sensitive to outflows. Therefore, the correlations for the highest Eddington ratio quasars are more likely to represent the true dependence of hot dust emission on outflows and the correlations for the entire sample are significantly diluted by the low Eddington ratio quasars. Our results show that an outflow with a large BAI or velocity can double the hot dust emission on average. We suggest that outflows either contain hot dust in themselves or interact with the dusty interstellar medium or torus.

  4. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel; Myers, Adam D.; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  5. DISENTANGLING THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR ENVIRONS OF CENTAURUS A. II. ON THE NATURE OF THE BROAD ABSORPTION LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Espada, D.; Matsushita, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Peck, A. B.; Henkel, C.; Iono, D.; Israel, F. P.; Muller, S.; Petitpas, G.; Pihlstroem, Y.; Taylor, G. B.; Trung, D. V.

    2010-09-01

    We report on atomic gas (H I) and molecular gas (as traced by CO(2-1)) redshifted absorption features toward the nuclear regions of the closest powerful radio galaxy, Centaurus A (NGC 5128). Our H I observations using the Very Long Baseline Array allow us to discern with unprecedented sub-parsec resolution H I absorption profiles toward different positions along the 21 cm continuum jet in the inner 0.''3 (or 5.4 pc). In addition, our CO(2-1) data obtained with the Submillimeter Array probe the bulk of the absorbing molecular gas with little contamination by emission, which was not possible with previous CO single-dish observations. We shed light on the physical properties of the gas in the line of sight with these data, emphasizing the still open debate about the nature of the gas that produces the broad absorption line ({approx}55 km s{sup -1}). First, the broad H I line is more prominent toward the central and brightest 21 cm continuum component than toward a region along the jet at a distance {approx}20 mas (or 0.4 pc) further from the nucleus. This indicates that the broad absorption line arises from gas located close to the nucleus, rather than from diffuse and more distant gas. Second, the different velocity components detected in the CO(2-1) absorption spectrum match well with other molecular lines, such as those of HCO{sup +}(1-0), except the broad absorption line that is detected in HCO{sup +}(1-0) (and most likely related to that of the H I). Dissociation of molecular hydrogen due to the active galactic nucleus seems to be efficient at distances r {approx}< 10 pc, which might contribute to the depth of the broad H I and molecular lines.

  6. A Massive X-ray Outflow From The Quasar PDS 456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ward, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    We report on XMM-Newton spectroscopic observations of the luminous, radio-quiet quasar PDS 456. The hard X-ray spectrum of PDS 456 shows a deep absorption trough (constituting 50% of the continuum) at energies above 7 keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be attributed to a series of blue-shifted K-shell absorption edges due to highly ionized iron. The higher resolution soft X-ray grating RGS spectrum exhibits a broad absorption line feature near 1 keV, which can be modeled by a blend of L-shell transitions from highly ionized iron (Fe XVII - XXIV). An extreme outflow velocity of approx. 50000 km/s is required to model the K and L shell iron absorption present in the XMM-Newton data. Overall, a large column density (N(sub H) = 5 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm) of highly ionized gas (log xi = 2.5) is required in PDS 456. A large mass outflow rate of approx. 10 solar mass/year (assuming a conservative outflow covering factor of 0.1 steradian) is derived, which is of the same order as the overall mass accretion rate in PDS 456. This represents a substantial fraction (approx. 10%) of the quasar energy budget, whilst the large column and outflow velocity place PDS 456 towards the extreme end of the broad absorption line quasar population.

  7. Multiple Views of the Accretion Disk and Outflow of the Cloverleaf Quasar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, George; Eracleous, M.; Gallagher, S.; Agol, E.; Dai, X.

    2006-09-01

    We present results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar H 1413+117 (Cloverleaf quasar). Our spatial and spectral analysis confirm a microlensing event in one of the images. Based on the microlensing interpretation we estimate that the size-scale of the Fe emission region in this quasar is of the order of 10 rg. Our analysis of the combined Chandra spectrum of the images indicates the presence of two Fe emission lines at rest-frame energies of 5.4 keV and 6.3 keV and detected at the >97% and >99% confidence levels, respectively. The Fe Ka emission in the Cloverleaf quasar is fit well with an accretion disk-line model. Another possible interpretation of the Fe emission is fluorescent Fe emission from the back-side of the wind. The deep Chandra observation of H 1413+117 has also revealed several remarkable absorption features.The spectra of images C and D show significant high-energy broad absorption lines that extend up to rest-frame energies of 9 keV and 15 keV, respectively. We investigate several plausible scenarios to explain the spectral differences between the images.

  8. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-07-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  9. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  10. Atlas of absorption lines from 0 to 17 900 cm(-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Rothman, L. S.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Richardson, D. J.; Larsen, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Plots of absorption line strength versus line position for wavenumbers from 0 to 17,900 cm(-1) are shown for 20 atmospheric gases (H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, NO, SO2, NO2, NH3, HNO3, OH, HF, HCl, HBr, HI, ClO, OCS, H2CO). Also shown are similar plots of lower-state energy values for adsorption lines for the strongly adsorbing atmospheric gases (H2O, CO2, O3, and CH4) for wavenumbers from 0 to 5000 cm(-1).

  11. Integrative fitting of absorption line profiles with high accuracy, robustness, and speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrotzki, Julian; Habig, Jan Christoph; Ebert, Volker

    2014-08-01

    The principle of the integrative evaluation of absorption line profiles relies on the numeric integration of absorption line signals to retrieve absorber concentrations, e.g., of trace gases. Thus, it is a fast and robust technique. However, previous implementations of the integrative evaluation principle showed shortcomings in terms of accuracy and the lack of a fit quality indicator. This has motivated the development of an advanced integrative (AI) fitting algorithm. The AI fitting algorithm retains the advantages of previous integrative implementations—robustness and speed—and is able to achieve high accuracy by introduction of a novel iterative fitting process. A comparison of the AI fitting algorithm with the widely used Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) fitting algorithm indicates that the AI algorithm has advantages in terms of robustness due to its independence from appropriately chosen start values for the initialization of the fitting process. In addition, the AI fitting algorithm shows speed advantages typically resulting in a factor of three to four shorter computational times on a standard personal computer. The LM algorithm on the other hand retains advantages in terms of a much higher flexibility, as the AI fitting algorithm is restricted to the evaluation of single absorption lines with precomputed line width. Comparing both fitting algorithms for the specific application of in situ laser hygrometry at 1,370 nm using direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) suggests that the accuracy of the AI algorithm is equivalent to that of the LM algorithm. For example, a signal-to-noise ratio of 80 and better typically yields a deviation of <1 % between both fitting algorithms. The properties of the AI fitting algorithm make it an interesting alternative if robustness and speed are crucial in an application and if the restriction to a single absorption line is possible. These conditions are fulfilled for the 1,370 nm TDLAS hygrometry at the

  12. Broad-band spectral energy distribution of 3000 Å break quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, H.; Schalldach, P.; Mirhosseini, A.; Pertermann, F.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In past decades, huge surveys have confirmed the existence of populations of exotic and hitherto unknown quasar types. The discovery and investigation of these rare peculiar objects is important because they may represent links to special evolutionary stages and hold clues to the evolution of quasars and galaxies. Aims: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) discovered the unusual quasars J010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8 and a small number of similar objects. Their spectra are characterised by a break in the continuum around 3000 Å that neither shows the typical structure of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs nor is explained by typical intrinsic dust reddening. The main aim of the present paper was twofold. First, a new target-oriented search was performed in the spectra database of the SDSS to construct a sizable sample of such 3000 Å break quasars. Second, their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) was compared with SEDs of BAL quasars. Methods: We used the method of Kohonen self-organising maps for data mining in the SDSS spectra archive to search for more quasars with properties comparable to the prototypes J010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8. We constructed a sample of 3000 Å break quasars and comparison samples of quasars with similar properties, to some extent, but also showing indications for typical BAL features. Particular attention was payed to a possible contamination by rare stellar spectral types, in particular DQ white dwarfs. We construct ensemble-averaged broad-band SEDs based on archival data from SDSS, GALEX, 2MASS, UKIDSS, WISE, and other surveys. The SEDs were corrected for dust absorption at the systemic redshifts of the quasars by the comparison with the average SED of normal quasars. Results: We compiled a list of 23 quasars classified as 3000 Å break quasars with properties similar to 010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8. Their de-reddened arithmetic median composite SED is indistinguishable

  13. Study of quasar variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerke, Jonathan Lee

    The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey has been completed. This thesis has analyzed the data set with the goal of determining the variability of a large sample of quasars. We construct light curves for each individual quasar. We interpret the light curves in terms of a structure function analysis. A slope is extracted from the scaling of the structure function to measure the power law of the quasar optical variability, taking the power spectral density to behave as a power law of the frequency of variation, f-alpha. Monte carlo simulations are used to estimate the errors on the model and the final data quality. With these estimates, individual quasars are assigned a chi2 value and nearly every event has a reduced chi 2 less than 10. The first 100 light curves and structure functions with errors are shown in the Appendix. We have shown that the final distribution of power law coefficients alpha of 1944 quasars is inconsistent with a model with a simple value of alpha. Several models with different alpha are required to explain the behavior of the sample. We find that quasars are less variable on all time scales for increasing luminosity. We also find that the quasars with black hole masses below 10 8 show a lower power law then the average. This means less massive quasars are less variable at long time scales.

  14. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data. II. The Spring Equatorial Stripe

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Anderson, Scott F.; Voges, Wolfgang; Margon, Bruce; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u{sup '} g{sup '} r{sup '} i{sup '} z{sup '}) imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we present 22 high-redshift quasars (z>3.6) discovered from {approx}250 deg2 of data in the spring Equatorial Stripe, plus photometry for two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of the sky. Our success rate in identifying high-redshift quasars is 68%. Five of the newly discovered quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.62, 4.69, 4.70, 4.92, and 5.03). All the quasars have i{sup *} <20.2 with absolute magnitude - 28.8quasars show unusual emission and absorption features in their spectra, including an object at z=4.62 without detectable emission lines, and a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar at z=4.92. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society.

  15. A CATALOG OF QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2011-06-01

    We present a compilation of properties of the 105,783 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7) quasar catalog. In this product, we compile continuum and emission line measurements around the H{alpha}, H{beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions, as well as other quantities such as radio properties, and flags indicating broad absorption line quasars, disk emitters, etc. We also compile virial black hole mass estimates based on various calibrations. For the fiducial virial mass estimates we use the Vestergaard and Peterson (VP06) calibrations for H{beta} and C IV, and our own calibration for Mg II which matches the VP06 H{beta} masses on average. We describe the construction of this catalog and discuss its limitations. The catalog and its future updates will be made publicly available online.

  16. The Milky Way's Hot Gas Kinematics: Signatures in Current and Future OVII Absorption Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-02-01

    Detections of z ≈ 0 oxygen absorption and emission lines indicate the Milky Way hosts a hot (˜ {10}6 K), low-density plasma extending ≳ 50 {{kpc}} into the Mily Way’s halo. Current X-ray telescopes cannot resolve the line profiles, but the variation of their strengths on the sky constrains the radial gas distribution. Interpreting the O vii Kα absorption line strengths has several complications, including optical depth and line of sight velocity effects. Here, we present model absorption line profiles accounting for both of these effects to show the lines can exhibit asymmetric structures and be broader than the intrinsic Doppler width. The line profiles encode the hot gas rotation curve, the net inflow or outflow of hot gas, and the hot gas angular momentum profile. We show how line of sight velocity effects impact the conversion between equivalent width and the column density, and provide modified curves of growth accounting for these effects. As an example, we analyze the LMC sight line pulsar dispersion measure and O vii equivalent width to show the average gas metallicity is ≳ 0.6{Z}⊙ and b ≳ 100 km s-1. Determining these properties offers valuable insights into the dynamical state of the Milky Way’s hot gas, and improves the line strength interpretation. We discuss future strategies to observe these effects with an instrument that has a spectral resolution of about 3000, a goal that is technically possible today.

  17. Low redshift Lyman alpha absorption lines and the dark matter halos of disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations using the Hubble Space Telescope of the z = 0.156 QSO 3C 273 have discovered a surprisingly large number of Ly-alpha absorption lines. In particular, Morris et al. found 9 certain and 7 possible Ly-alpha lines with equivalent widths above 25 mA. This is much larger (by a factor of 5-10) than the number expected from extrapolation of the high-redshift behavior of the Ly-alpha forest. Within the context of pressure-confined models for the Ly-alpha clouds, this behavior can be understood if the ionizing background declines sharply between z is approximately 2 and z is approximately 0. However, this requires that the ionizing photon flux drop as rapidly as the QSO volume emissivity; moreover, the absorbers must have a space density n(sub O) is approximately 2.6(N/10)h/((D/100 kpc)(sup 2)) Mpc(sup -3) where D is the present-day diameter of the absorbers. It is somewhat surprising that such necessarily fragile objects could have survived in such numbers to the present day. It is shown that it is plausible that the atomic hydrogen extents of spiral and irregular galaxies are large enough to produce the observed number of Ly-alpha absorption lines toward 3C 273, and that the neutral column densities and doppler b-values expected under these conditions fall in the range found by Morris et al. (1991).

  18. Radiation Pressure-Driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKool, Martin; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-01-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALS) are formed in a radiation pressure-driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  19. Probing the Inner Regions of Protoplanetary Disks with CO Absorption Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Burgh, Eric B.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Schindhelm, Eric; Brown, Joanna M.; Brown, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most commonly used tracer of molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. CO can be used to constrain the excitation and structure of the circumstellar environment. Absorption line spectroscopy provides an accurate assessment of a single line of sight through the protoplanetary disk system, giving more straightforward estimates of column densities and temperatures than CO and molecular hydrogen (H2) emission line studies. We analyze new observations of ultraviolet CO absorption from the Hubble Space Telescope along the sightlines to six classical T Tauri stars. Gas velocities consistent with the stellar velocities, combined with the moderate-to-high disk inclinations, argue against the absorbing CO gas originating in a fast-moving disk wind. We conclude that the far-ultraviolet observations provide a direct measure of the disk atmosphere or possibly a slow disk wind. The CO absorption lines are reproduced by model spectra with column densities in the range N(12CO) ~ 1016-1018 cm-2 and N(13CO) ~ 1015-1017 cm-2, rotational temperatures T rot(CO) ~ 300-700 K, and Doppler b-values, b ~ 0.5-1.5 km s-1. We use these results to constrain the line-of-sight density of the warm molecular gas (n CO ~ 70-4000 cm-3) and put these observations in context with protoplanetary disk models.

  20. Observations of absorption lines from highly ionized atoms. [of interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.

    1987-01-01

    In the ultraviolet spectra of hot stars, absorption lines can be seen from highly ionized species in the interstellar medium. Observations of these features which have been very influential in revising the perception of the medium's various physical states, are discussed. The pervasiveness of O 6 absorption lines, coupled with complementary observations of a diffuse background in soft X-rays and EUV radiation, shows that there is an extensive network of low density gas (n approx. few x 0.001/cu cm) existing at coronal temperatures log T = 5.3 or 6.3. Shocks created by supernova explosions or mass loss from early-type stars can propagate freely through space and eventually transfer a large amount of energy to the medium. To create the coronal temperatures, the shocks must have velocities in excess of 150 km/sec; shocks at somewhat lower velocity (v = 100 km/sec) can be directly observed in the lines of Si3. Observations of other lines in the ultraviolet, such as Si 4V and C 5, may highlight the widespread presence of energetic UV radiation from very hot, dwarf stars. More advanced techniques in visible and X-ray astronomical spectroscopy may open up for inspection selected lines from atoms in much higher stages of ionization.

  1. Stark broadening of impurity absorption lines by inhomogeneous electric fields in highly compensated germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Fujii, K.; Ohyama, T.; Itoh, K. M.; Haller, E. E.

    1996-06-01

    Stark broadening of Zeeman absorption lines caused by inhomogeneous electric fields in highly compensated Ge has been studied by means of far-infrared magneto-optical absorption spectroscopy measurements. A number of transmutation-doped Ge single crystals with a systematically varying compensation ratio were employed. The broadening of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of an absorption line of the Ga acceptor is studied as a function of excitation light intensity with above-band-gap energy. The FWHM increases with decreasing intensity of the band-edge light excitation. Observation of the theoretically predicted 4/3-power law of Stark broadening, due to ionized impurities, is reported. The line broadening originates in the Stark effect, due to inhomogeneous electric fields caused by the random distribution of ionized impurities. In order to understand the mechanism for the line broadening in detail, a numerical approach based on a Monte Carlo simulation has been performed. The results of this simulation show that the inhomogeneity of the field distribution becomes larger with increasing concentration of ionized impurities. The simulation based on a perfectly random distribution for an initial impurity arrangement gives a fairly good agreement with the experimental results. We conclude that the distribution of impurities in transmutation-doped Ge samples is close to random.

  2. On the cosmic evolution of Fe/Mg in QSO absorption line systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Arjun; Torrey, Paul; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Suresh, Joshua

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the variation of the ratio of the equivalent widths of the Fe II λ2600 line to the Mg II λλ2796, 2803 doublet as a function of redshift in a large sample of absorption lines drawn from the Johns Hopkins University - Sloan Digital Sky Survey Absorption Line Catalog. We find that despite large scatter, the observed ratio shows a trend where the equivalent width ratio R≡ W_{Fe II}/W_{Mg II} decreases monotonically with increasing redshift z over the range 0.55 ≤ z ≤ 1.90. Selecting the subset of absorbers where the signal-to-noise ratio of the Mg II equivalent width W_{Mg II} is ≥ 3 and modelling the equivalent width ratio distribution as a Gaussian, we find that the mean of the Gaussian distribution varies as R∝ (-0.045± 0.005)z. We discuss various possible reasons for the trend. A monotonic trend in the Fe/Mg abundance ratio is predicted by a simple model where the abundances of Mg and Fe in the absorbing clouds are assumed to be the result of supernova (SN) ejecta and where the cosmic evolution in the SNIa and core-collapse SN rates is related to the cosmic star formation rate. If the trend in R reflects the evolution in the abundances, then it is consistent with the predictions of the simple model.

  3. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Churchill, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with azimuthal

  4. ANOMALOUSLY STEEP REDDENING LAW IN QUASARS: AN EXCEPTIONAL EXAMPLE OBSERVED IN IRAS 14026+4341

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Peng; Zhou Hongyan; Ji Tuo; Shu Xinwen; Liu Wenjuan; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui; Wang Jianguo

    2013-06-15

    A fraction of the heavily reddened quasars require a reddening curve that is even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this paper, we thoroughly characterize the anomalously steep reddening law in quasars via an exceptional example observed in IRAS 14026+4341. By comparing the observed spectrum to the quasar composite spectrum, we derive a reddening curve in the rest-frame wavelength range of 1200-10000 A. It has a steep rise at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A, but no significant reddening at longer wavelengths. The absence of dust reddening in the optical continuum is confirmed by the normal broad-line Balmer decrement (the H{alpha}/H{beta} ratio) in IRAS 14026+4341. The anomalous reddening curve can be satisfactorily reproduced with a dust model containing silicate grains in a power-law size distribution, dn(a)/da{proportional_to}a {sup -1.4}, truncated at a maximum size of a{sub max} = 70 nm. The unusual size distribution may be caused by the destruction of large 'stardust' grains by quasar activities or a different dust formation mechanism (i.e., the in situ formation of dust grains in quasar outflows). It is also possible that the analogies of the dust grains observed near the Galactic center are responsible for the steep reddening curve. In addition, we find that IRAS 14026+4341 is a weak emission-line quasar (i.e., PHL 1811 analogies) with heavy dust reddening and blueshifted broad absorption lines.

  5. Anomalously Steep Reddening Law in Quasars: An Exceptional Example Observed in IRAS 14026+4341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Shu, Xinwen; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Bai, Jinming; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Tinggui

    2013-06-01

    A fraction of the heavily reddened quasars require a reddening curve that is even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this paper, we thoroughly characterize the anomalously steep reddening law in quasars via an exceptional example observed in IRAS 14026+4341. By comparing the observed spectrum to the quasar composite spectrum, we derive a reddening curve in the rest-frame wavelength range of 1200-10000 Å. It has a steep rise at wavelengths shorter than 3000 Å, but no significant reddening at longer wavelengths. The absence of dust reddening in the optical continuum is confirmed by the normal broad-line Balmer decrement (the Hα/Hβ ratio) in IRAS 14026+4341. The anomalous reddening curve can be satisfactorily reproduced with a dust model containing silicate grains in a power-law size distribution, dn(a)/davpropa -1.4, truncated at a maximum size of a max = 70 nm. The unusual size distribution may be caused by the destruction of large "stardust" grains by quasar activities or a different dust formation mechanism (i.e., the in situ formation of dust grains in quasar outflows). It is also possible that the analogies of the dust grains observed near the Galactic center are responsible for the steep reddening curve. In addition, we find that IRAS 14026+4341 is a weak emission-line quasar (i.e., PHL 1811 analogies) with heavy dust reddening and blueshifted broad absorption lines.

  6. Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption Lines in the Burst Spectra of the Neutron Star in the X-Ray Binary EXO 0748-676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottoam, J.; Paerels, F.; Mendez, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The most straightforward manner of determining masses and radii of neutron stars is by measuring the gravitational redshift of spectral lines produced in the neutron star photosphere; such a measurement would provide direct constraints on the mass-to-radius ratio of the neutron star, and therefore on the equation of state for neutron star matter. Using data taken with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board the XMM-Newton observatory we identify, for the first time, significant absorption lines in the spectra of 28 bursts of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676. The most significant features are consistent with the Fe XXVI and XXV n=2-3 and O VIII n=1-2 transitions, with a redshift of z=0.35, identical within small uncertainties for the different transitions. This constitutes the first direct and unambiguous measurement of the gravitational redshift in a neutron star.

  7. EIGHT NEW QUASAR LENSES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Kayo, Issha; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hall, Patrick B.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-04-15

    We report the discovery and confirmation of eight new two-image lensed quasars by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search. The lenses are SDSS J0904+1512 (image separation {theta} = 1.''13, source redshift z{sub s} = 1.826), SDSS J1054+2733 ({theta} = 1.''27, z{sub s} = 1.452), SDSS J1055+4628 ({theta} = 1.''15, z{sub s} = 1.249), SDSS J1131+1915 ({theta} = 1.''46, z{sub s} = 2.915), SDSS J1304+2001 ({theta} = 1.''87, z{sub s} = 2.175), SDSS J1349+1227 ({theta} = 3.''00, z{sub s} = 1.722), SDSS J1455+1447 ({theta} = 1.''73, z{sub s} = 1.424), and SDSS J1620+1203 ({theta} = 2.''77, z{sub s} = 1.158). Three of them, SDSS J1055+4628, SDSS J1455+1447, and SDSS J1620+1203, satisfy the criteria for constructing our statistical sample for studying the cosmological model. Based on galactic absorption lines of the lens galaxies, we also derive lens redshifts of z{sub l} = 0.398 and z{sub l} = 0.513 for SDSS J1620+1203 and the previously discovered lens SDSS J0746+4403, respectively.

  8. Quasar Dust Factories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Massimo; Elvis, Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    We show that quasars are naturally copious producers of dust, assuming only that the quasar broad emission lines (BELs) are produced by gas clouds that are part of an outflowing wind. These BEL clouds have large initial densities (ne ˜109 - 1011 cm-3) so that as they expand quasi-adiabatically they cool from an initial T = 104 K to a dust-capable T = 103 K, and reduce their pressures from ˜0.1 dyn cm-2 to ˜ 10-3 -10-5 dyn cm-2.. This places the expanded BEL clouds in the (T,P) dust forming regime of late-type giants extended atmospheres, both static and pulsing. The result applies whether the clouds have C/O abundance ratio greater or lower than 1. Photo-destruction of the grains by the quasar UV/X-ray continuum is not important, as the BEL clouds reach these conditions several parsecs from the quasar nucleus, well below the dust evaporation temperature. This result offers a new insight for the strong link between quasars and dust, and for the heavy obscuration around many quasars. It also introduces a new means of forming dust at early cosmological times, and a direct mechanism for the injection of such dust in the intergalactic medium. Since dust at high z is found only by observing quasars, our result allows far less dust to be present at early epochs, since dust only need be present where a quasar is, rather than the quasar illuminating pre-existing dust which would then need to be present in all galaxies at high z. See astro-ph/0202002 or ApJ 576, L107 (2002).

  9. The η Car Campaign with UVES at the ESO VLT II. Interstellar and circumstellar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, K.; Bomans, D. J.; Stahl, O.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.; Gull, T. R.

    2005-09-01

    We monitored η Car and the Homunculus using the ESO VLT UVES spectrograph between 2002 and 2004 (see Weis et al., this proceedings). In these high dispersion spectra practically all interstellar absorption features known in the 3000 Å to 10000 Å regime are present (e.g. 4 Ti II lines, 3 Fe I lines, the Ca I line, both Na I doublets, the two K I doublets, and the Ca II doublets, several molecular lines, and a number of diffuse interstellar bands). Near-UV STIS spectra show many low ionization absorption lines (e.g. Gull et al., this proceedings), but there are several differences in the velocity structure and line strengths between these lines of sight, e.g. we do not detect multiple absorption components between -350 to -550 km s-1 in the UVES spectra. Changes over time are present in e.g. the Ca II lines, with small column density changes in the (probably interstellar) +80 km s-1 component and large changes in the -510 km s-1 component, which is most probably located in the outer shell of the Homunculus (see e.g. Nielsen et al., this proceedings). Similar changes in the Ti II 3384 Å component at -147 km s-1 are present, too. With the data set, we not only follow the temporal evolution of the circumstellar absorption components (presumably originating near η Car and in the Homunculus) before, during and after the event, but also search for changes along our long-slits centered on the star and on FOS4. Indeed, the -147 km s-1 component of the Ti II 3384 Å lines shows line strength variations over the southeast lobe of the Homunculus. A preliminary search for very high velocity absorption lines from the outer ejected using only one of our spectra already yielded a possible detection at -1500 km s-1. Clearly a detailed analysis of the absorption lines in the UVES data will provide many new insights into the structure and physics of η Car's ejecta.

  10. UNIFICATION OF LUMINOUS TYPE 1 QUASARS THROUGH C IV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Gordon T.; Kruczek, Nicholas E.; Deo, Rajesh P.; Kratzer, Rachael M.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hewett, Paul C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Shen, Yue

    2011-05-15

    Using a sample of {approx}30,000 quasars from the 7th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we explore the range of properties exhibited by high-ionization, broad emission lines, such as C IV {lambda}1549. Specifically, we investigate the anti-correlation between continuum luminosity and emission-line equivalent width (the Baldwin Effect (BEff)) and the 'blueshifting' of the high-ionization emission lines with respect to low-ionization emission lines. Employing improved redshift determinations from Hewett and Wild, the blueshift of the C IV emission line is found to be nearly ubiquitous, with a mean shift of {approx}810 km s{sup -1} for radio-quiet (RQ) quasars and {approx}360 km s{sup -1} for radio-loud (RL) quasars. The BEff is present in both RQ and RL samples. We consider these phenomena within the context of an accretion disk-wind model that is modulated by the nonlinear correlation between ultraviolet and X-ray continuum luminosity. Composite spectra are constructed as a function of C IV emission-line properties in an attempt to reveal empirical relationships between different line species and the continuum. Within a two-component disk+wind model of the broad emission-line region (BELR), where the wind filters the continuum seen by the disk component, we find that RL quasars are consistent with being dominated by the disk component, while broad absorption line quasars are consistent with being dominated by the wind component. Some RQ objects have emission-line features similar to RL quasars; they may simply have insufficient black hole (BH) spin to form radio jets. Our results suggest that there could be significant systematic errors in the determination of L{sub bol} and BH mass that make it difficult to place these findings in a more physical context. However, it is possible to classify quasars in a paradigm where the diversity of BELR parameters is due to differences in an accretion disk wind between quasars (and over time); these differences are

  11. Effect of a partial coverage of quasar broad-line regions by intervening -bearing clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Balashev, S. A.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Kaminker, A. D.; Klimenko, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the effect of a partial coverage of quasar broad-line regions (QSO BLRs) by intervening -bearing clouds when a part of quasar (QSO) radiation passes by a cloud not taking part in absorption-line system formation of the QSO spectrum. That leads to modification of observable absorption line profiles and consequently to a bias in physical parameters derived from standard absorption line analysis. In application to the absorption systems the effect has been revealed in the analysis of absorption system in the spectrum of Q 1232+082 (see Ivanchik et al. in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 404:1583, 2010, Balashev et al. in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 418:357, 2011). We estimate a probability of the effect to be detected in QSO spectra. To do this we derive distribution of BLR sizes of high-z QSOs from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) catalogue and assume different distributions of cloud sizes. We conclude that the low limit of the probability is about 11 %. The latest researches shows that about a fifth of observed absorption systems can be partially covered. Accounting of the effect may allow to revise significantly physical parameters of interstellar clouds obtained by the spectral analysis.

  12. An absorption line in the ultraviolet spectrum of 40 Eridani B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstein, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Two excellent low-resolution spectra show an absorption line of equivalent width 3 A, near 1391 A, in the typical DA (hydrogen atmosphere) white dwarf 40 Eri B. The line is confirmed by a high-resolution spectrum and is the first seen in any DA star. Ultraviolet fluxes and the profile of Lyman-alpha confirm an effective temperature near 17,000 K. If the line is Si IV, it requires a temperature near 40,000 K. Unattractive possibilities are a hot circumstellar absorbing envelope dependent on accretion from companions, or formation at large optical depth in a transparent atmosphere with high Si/H. A suggestion that H2 should be considered leads to the possible interpretation as the (0, 5) transition of the Lyman band, formed at small optical depth. The band should be stronger in cooler DAs.

  13. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  14. Multi-wavelength Monitoring of Lensed Quasars: Deciphering Quasar Structure at Micro-arcseconds Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Ana; Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dai, Xinyu; Chen, Bin; MacLeod, Chelsea Louise; Chartas, George

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing in multiply imaged gravitationally lensed quasars provides us with a unique tool to zoom in on the structure of AGN and explore their physics in more detail. Microlensing magnification, caused primarily by stars and white dwarfs close to the line of sight towards the lensed quasar images, is seen as uncorrelated flux variations due to the relative motions of the quasar, the lens, its stars, and the observer, and it depends on the structural and dynamical properties of the source and the lens. Since the magnification depends upon the size of the source, we can use microlensing to measure the size of quasar emission regions. In essence, the amplitude of the microlensing variability encodes the source size, with smaller sources showing larger variability amplitudes. Using state of the art microlensing techniques, our team has performed pioneering research in the field based on multi-wavelength space and ground-based observations. Among the most remarkable results, using Chandra observations we have set the first quantitative constraints on the sizes of the X-ray emission regions of quasars. In this work l briefly describe the methodology, the results from our previous multi-wavelength monitoring programs, and the next frontier of exploring the dependence of the structure of the X-ray emission regions on black hole mass and X-ray energy.

  15. BINARY QUASARS AT HIGH REDSHIFT. I. 24 NEW QUASAR PAIRS AT z {approx} 3-4

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Myers, Adam D.; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Glikman, Eilat; Mahabal, Ashish; Fan Xiaohui; Martin, Crystal L.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shankar, Francesco

    2010-08-20

    The clustering of quasars on small scales yields fundamental constraints on models of quasar evolution and the buildup of supermassive black holes. This paper describes the first systematic survey to discover high-redshift binary quasars. Using color-selection and photometric redshift techniques, we searched 8142 deg{sup 2} of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data for binary quasar candidates, and confirmed them with follow-up spectroscopy. Our sample of 27 high-redshift binaries (24 of them new discoveries) at redshifts 2.9 < z < 4.3 with proper transverse separations 10 kpc < R{sub perpendicular} < 650 kpc increases the number of such objects known by an order of magnitude. Eight members of this sample are very close pairs with R{sub perpendicular} < 100 kpc, and of these close systems four are at z>3.5. The completeness and efficiency of our well-defined selection algorithm are quantified using simulated photometry and we find that our sample is {approx}50% complete. Our companion paper uses this knowledge to make the first measurement of the small-scale clustering (R < 1 h {sup -1} Mpc comoving) of high-redshift quasars. High-redshift binaries constitute exponentially rare coincidences of two extreme (M {approx}> 10{sup 9} M {sub sun}) supermassive black holes. At z {approx} 4, there is about one close binary per 10 Gpc{sup 3}, thus these could be the highest sigma peaks, the analogs of superclusters, in the early universe.

  16. Quasars: A Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weedman, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Reports on some of the discoveries over the last quarter century regarding quasars including spectra and energy sources, formation and evolution, and cosmological probes. Describes some of the fundamental mysteries that remain. (CW)

  17. SDSS J131339.98+515128.3: A new GravitationallyLensed Quasar Selected Based on Near-infrared Excess

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, E.O.; Oguri, M.; Jackson, N.; Inada, N.; Kayo, I.

    2007-09-28

    We report the discovery of a new gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J131339.98+515128.3, at a redshift of 1:875 with an image separation of 1: 0024. The lensing galaxy is clearly detected in visible-light follow-up observations. We also identify three absorption-line doublets in the spectra of the lensed quasar images, from which we measure the lens redshift to be 0:194. Like several other known lenses, the lensed quasar images have different continuum slopes. This difference is probably the result of reddening and microlensing in the lensing galaxy. The lensed quasar was selected by correlating Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic quasars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) sources and choosing quasars that show near-infrared (IR) excess. The near-IR excess can originate, for example, from the contribution of the lensing galaxy at near-IR wavelengths. We show that the near-IR excess technique is indeed an efficient method to identify lensed systems from a large sample of quasars.

  18. Cosmology with AGN: can we use quasars as standard candles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, G.

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear relation between X-ray and UV luminosity in quasars can be used to estimate their distance. Recently, we have shown that despite the large dispersion of the relation, a Hubble Diagram made of large samples of quasars can provide unique constraints on cosmology at high redshift. Furthermore, the dispersion of the relation is heavily affected by measurement errors: until now we have used serendipitous X-ray observations, but dedicated observations would significantly increase the precision of the distance estimates. I discuss the future role of XMM in this new field, showing (1) the fundamental contribution of the Serendipitous Source Catalogue and of large surveys, and (2) the breakthrough advancements we may achieve with the observation of a large number of SDSS quasars at high redshift: every 12-15 quasars observed at z~3 would be equivalent to discovering a supernova at that redshift.

  19. Quasars and their emission lines as cosmological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.

    2014-10-01

    Quasars are the most luminous sources in the Universe. They are currently observed out to redshift z≈7 when the Universe was less than one tenth of its present age. Since their discovery 50 years ago astronomers have dreamed of using them as standard candles. Unfortunately quasars cover a very large range (8 dex) of luminosity making them far from standard. We briefly review several methods that can potentially exploit quasars properties and allow us to obtain useful constraints on principal cosmological parameters. Using our 4D Eigenvector 1 formalism we have found a way to effectively isolate quasars radiating near the Eddington limit. If the Eddington ratio is known, under several assumptions it is possible to derive distance independent luminosities. We discuss the main statistical and systematic errors involved, and whether these “standard Eddington candles” can be actually used to constrain cosmological models.

  20. Characterizing Quasar Outflows IV: Regulating Outflows Through X-ray and EUV Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derseweh, Jeffrey; Ganguly, R.; Richmond, J. M.; Stark, M. A.; Christenson, D. H.; Robbins, J. M.; Townsend, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we add photometry from the GALEX All-sky imaging survey, as well as the Chandra and ROSAT archives. These provide coverage of the rest-frame extreme ultraviolet, and soft X-ray bands. In an accompanying poster, we have subjectively divided these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). We are interested in testing the radiative-driving hypothesis that requires a suppression of X-ray flux in order to transfer momentum efficiently to the UV-absorbing gas. Hence, we explore how absorption in both the extreme ultraviolet and the soft X-ray bands correlate with properties of the UV outflows, quasar property, and changes in SED shape. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program and by Chandra

  1. A novel control system for automatically locking a diode laser frequency to a selected gas absorption line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Ma, Weiguang; Jia, Suotang

    2007-05-01

    A novel control system has been developed for avoiding manual operation during traditional frequency locking. The control system uses a computer with a commercial data acquisition card. This accomplishes the whole operation of frequency locking, including generating ramp, searching locking point, engaging a proportional-integral-differential (PID) regulator at the proper time and outputting PID compensation signal. Moreover, a new method has also been employed to make the novel control system accurately identify the locking points of all absorption lines within the scanning range, so that the laser frequency can be automatically firmly brought onto any selected absorption line centre without any adjusting time. The operation of the system, the ability to identify absorption lines and the performance of the frequency locking were discussed in detail. Successful tests were made with two different lasers: external cavity diode lasers and distributed feedback diode lasers.

  2. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Velocity Shifts of Quasar Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Richards, Gordon T.; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Grier, C. J.; Ho, Luis C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P.; Tao, Charling; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2016-11-01

    Quasar emission lines are often shifted from the systemic velocity due to various dynamical and radiative processes in the line-emitting region. The level of these velocity shifts depends both on the line species and on quasar properties. We study velocity shifts for the line peaks (not the centroids) of various narrow and broad quasar emission lines relative to systemic using a sample of 849 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. The coadded (from 32 epochs) spectra of individual quasars have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to measure stellar absorption lines to provide reliable systemic velocity estimates, as well as weak narrow emission lines. The large dynamic range in quasar luminosity (∼2 dex) of the sample allowed us to explore potential luminosity dependence of the velocity shifts. We derive average line peak velocity shifts as a function of quasar luminosity for different lines, and quantify their intrinsic scatter. We further quantify how well the peak velocity can be measured as a function of continuum S/N, and demonstrate that there is no systematic bias in the velocity measurements when S/N is degraded to as low as ∼3 per SDSS pixel (∼ 69 {km} {{{s}}}-1). Based on the observed line shifts, we provide empirical guidelines on redshift estimation from [O ii] λ 3727, [O iii] λ 5007, [Ne v] λ 3426, Mg ii, C iii], He ii λ 1640, broad Hβ, C iv, and Si iv, which are calibrated to provide unbiased systemic redshifts in the mean, but with increasing intrinsic uncertainties of 46, 56, 119, 205, 233, 242, 400, 415, and 477 {km} {{{s}}}-1, in addition to the measurement uncertainties. These results demonstrate the infeasibility of measuring quasar redshifts to better than ∼ 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1 with only broad lines.

  3. A Population of X-ray Weak Quasars: PHL 1811 Analogs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; Gibson, R. R.; Richards, G. T.; Schneider, D. P.; Shemmer, O.; Just, D. W.; Schmidt, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    Luminous X-ray emission is considered to be a universal property of efficiently accreting supermassive black holes. However, there are a few notable examples of quasars emitting X-rays much more weakly by a factor of 10-100. We report X-ray observations of a sample of 10 high-redshift (z 2.2) type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. All of the eight radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of 13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, suggesting they are intrinsically X-ray weak. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs support a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be < 1.2%. Correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset ( 30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization "shielding gas" covers most of the BELR, but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs.

  4. Modeling the Observability of Recoiling Black Holes as Offset Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Snyder, Gregory; Bird, Simeon; Nelson, Dylan; Xu, Dandan; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-08-01

    The merger of two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) imparts a gravitational-wave (GW) recoil kick to the remnant SMBH. In extreme cases these kicks may be thousands of km/s -- enough to easily eject them from their host galaxies. Moderate recoil kicks may also cause substantial displacements of the SMBH, however. An actively-accreting, recoiling SMBH may be observable as an offset quasar. Prior to the advent of a space-based GW observatory, detections of these offset quasars may offer the best chance for identifying recent SMBH mergers. Indeed, observational searches for recoiling quasars have already identified several promising candidates. However, systematic searches for recoils are currently hampered by large uncertainties regarding how often offset quasars should be observable, where they are most likely to be found, and whether BH spin alignment prior to merger is efficient at suppressing large recoils. Motivated by this, we have developed a model for the observable population of recoiling quasars in a cosmological framework, utilizing detailed information about the progenitor galaxies from state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulations (the Illustris Project). The model for offset quasar lifetimes includes a physically-motivated, time-dependent model for accretion onto kicked SMBHs, and results are analyzed for a range of possible BH spin alignment models. We find that the observability of offset quasars depends strongly on the efficiency of pre-merger spin alignment, with promising indications that observations of recoils could distinguish between at least the extreme limits of spin alignment models. Our results also suggest that observable offset quasars should inhabit preferred types of host galaxies, where again these populations depend on the degree of pre-merger spin alignment. These findings will be valuable for planned and future dedicated searches for recoiling quasars, and they indicate that such objects might be used to place indirect

  5. Physical Properties of Quasar Outflows: From BALs to mini-BALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Frederick

    2009-07-01

    Accretion disk outflows are important components of quasar environments. They might play a major role in facilitating accretion, regulating star formation in the host galaxies and distributing metals to the surrounding gas. They reveal themselves most conspicuously via broad absorption lines {BALs}, but they appear even more frequently in other guises such as the weaker and narrower ``mini-BALs.'' How are these diverse outflow features related? Are mini-BALs really just ``mini'' versions of the BALs, or do they represent a fundamentally different type of outflow, with different degrees of ionization, column densities, mass loss rates, physical origins, etc.? We propose HST-COS spectroscopy to make the first quantitative assessment of the outflow physical conditions across the full range of weak/narrow mini-BALs to strong/broad BALs. Our strategy is to measure key diagnostic lines {SVI, OVI, CIII, SIV, PV, etc.} at 930A - 1130A {rest-frame} in a sample of 7 outflow quasars with known mini-BALs through weak BALs. We will then 1} combine the COS data with ground-based spectra of the same quasars to include more lines {CIV, SiIV} at longer wavelengths, and 2} include in our analysis a nearly identical UV/optical dataset obtained previously for a sample of quasars with strong BALs. Our study of this combined dataset will be an essential next step toward a more global understanding of quasar outflows.

  6. SDSS J133401.39+331534.3: A NEW SUBARCSECOND GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Iye, Masanori; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Minowa, Yosuke; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    The quasar SDSS J133401.39+331534.3 at z = 2.426 is found to be a two-image gravitationally lensed quasar with an image separation of 0.''833. The object is first identified as a lensed quasar candidate in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search, and then confirmed as a lensed system from follow-up observations at the Subaru and University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescopes. We estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be 0.557 based on absorption lines in the quasar spectra as well as the color of the galaxy. In particular, we observe the system with the Subaru Telescope AO188 adaptive optics with a laser guide star, in order to derive accurate astrometry, which well demonstrates the usefulness of the laser guide star adaptive optics imaging for studying strong lens systems. Our mass modeling with improved astrometry implies that a nearby bright galaxy {approx}4'' apart from the lensing galaxy is likely to affect the lens potential.

  7. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  8. Determination of the width of the absorption line of atomic iodine in optimization of the parameters of an iodine switch

    SciTech Connect

    Eroshenko, V.A.; Kirillov, G.A.; Mochalov, M.R.; Shemyakin, V.I.; Shurygin, V.K.

    1981-09-01

    A theoretical basis is given for the optimization of the parameters of an iodine switch. The results are reported of an experimental study of the pressure dependence of the width of the absorption line of atomic iodine. The broadening coefficient of molecular iodine is 3.2 MHz/Torr in the temperature range 800--1000 /sup 0/C.

  9. On the origin of excess cool gas in quasar host haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sean D.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Mulchaey, John S.

    2015-09-01

    Previous observations of quasar host haloes at z ≈ 2 have uncovered large quantities of cool gas that exceed what is found around inactive galaxies of both lower and higher masses. To better understand the source of this excess cool gas, we compiled an exhaustive sample of 195 quasars at z ≈ 1 with constraints on chemically enriched, cool gas traced by Mg II absorption in background quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This quasar sample spans a broad range of luminosities from Lbol = 1044.4 to 1046.8 erg s-1 and allows an investigation of whether halo gas properties are connected with quasar properties. We find a strong correlation between luminosity and cool gas covering fraction. In particular, low-luminosity quasars exhibit a mean gas covering fraction comparable to inactive galaxies of similar masses, but more luminous quasars exhibit excess cool gas approaching what is reported previously at z ≈ 2. Moreover, 30-40 per cent of the Mg II absorption occurs at radial velocities of |Δv| > 300 km s-1 from the quasar, inconsistent with gas bound to a typical quasar host halo. The large velocity offsets and observed luminosity dependence of the cool gas near quasars can be explained if the gas arises from: (1) neighbouring haloes correlated through large-scale structure at Mpc scales, (2) feedback from luminous quasars or (3) debris from the mergers thought to trigger luminous quasars. The first of these scenarios is in tension with the lack of correlation between quasar luminosity and clustering while the latter two make distinct predictions that can be tested with additional observations.

  10. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  11. MOSFIRE ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY OF z > 2 QUIESCENT GALAXIES: PROBING A PERIOD OF RAPID SIZE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S.; Konidaris, Nick P.; Newman, Andrew B.

    2014-06-20

    Using the MOSFIRE near-infrared multi-slit spectrograph on the Keck 1 Telescope, we have secured high signal-to-noise ratio absorption line spectra for six massive galaxies with redshift 2 < z < 2.5. Five of these galaxies lie on the red sequence and show signatures of passive stellar populations in their rest-frame optical spectra. By fitting broadened spectral templates we have determined stellar velocity dispersions and, with broad-band Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer photometry and imaging, stellar masses and effective radii. Using this enlarged sample of galaxies, we confirm earlier suggestions that quiescent galaxies at z > 2 have small sizes and large velocity dispersions compared to local galaxies of similar stellar mass. The dynamical masses are in very good agreement with stellar masses (log M {sub *}/M {sub dyn} = –0.02 ± 0.03), although the average stellar-to-dynamical mass ratio is larger than that found at lower redshift (–0.23 ± 0.05). By assuming evolution at fixed velocity dispersion, not only do we confirm a surprisingly rapid rate of size growth but we also consider the necessary evolutionary track on the mass-size plane and find a slope α = dlog R{sub e} /dlog M {sub *} ≳ 2 inconsistent with most numerical simulations of minor mergers. Both results suggest an additional mechanism may be required to explain the size growth of early galaxies.

  12. Atlas of Absorption Lines from 0 to 17900 Cm (sup)-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Rothman, L. S.; Rinsland, C. P.; Pickett, H. M.; Richardson, D. J.; Namkung, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Plots of logarithm (base 10) of absorption line strength versus wavenumber from 0 to 17900/cm(sup)-1 are shown for the 28 atmospheric gases (H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, NO, SO2, NO2, NH3, HNO3, OH, HF, HCl, HBr, HI, ClO, OCS, H2CO, HOCl, N2, HCN, CH3Cl, H2O2, C2H2, C2H6, PH3), which appear in the 1986 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory high-resolution transmission molecular absorption data base (HITRAN) compilation, and for O(P-3), O-18 isotopic ozone, and HO2 from the 1984 JPL compilation in the 0- to 200/cm(sup)-1 region, and infrared solar CO lines at 4500 K. Also shown are plots of logarithm (base 10) of approximate infrared absorption cross sections of 11 heavy molecules versus wavenumber. The cross-section data cover 700 to 1800/cm(sup)-1 and are included as a separate data file in the 1986 HITRAN database.

  13. Absorption Line Studies and the Distribution of Neutral Gas in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Previous published absorption line studies performed at ultraviolet and visual wavelengths are combined with new ultraviolet data in order to map out the distribution of HI within 150 pc of the Sun. Newly presented data for distances less than 50 pc further support the local cloud model as presented by Bruhweiler (1982). The Sun is embedded, near the edge of a diffuse cloud with total column density 2 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm. Most observed directions within 50 pc away from the cloud body reveal trace amounts of gas (N)HI) approximately 10 to the 18th power/sq cm presumably arising in the outer skin of the local cloud. At greater distances (50 approximately or d approximately or 150 pc) most directions show significant absorption with N(HI) 10(19)/sq cm. Two directions, one toward the northern galactic pole (NGP), the other toward beta CMa exhibit unusually low HI column densities out to distances of 150 to 200 pc. However, substantial amounts of gas N(HI) 10 to the 19th power/sq cm, are seen toward the NGP at greater distances. The implicatons of these results on astronomy at wavelengths shortward of 912A are discussed.

  14. Quasars and H II regions during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Roban Hultman

    The reionization history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift (z ≳ 6) is just beginning to be probed by observational astronomy. In this dissertation, I discuss three projects related to the epoch of reionization. The first project explores how the evolution of the IGM neutral fraction was likely shaped by feedback processes. Because the earliest ionizing sources formed at the locations of the rare density peaks, their spatial distribution was strongly clustered. By building a semi-analytical model which includes feedback and clustering simultaneously and applying this model to the suppression of star formation in minihalos due to photoionization, I demonstrate that this clustering significantly boosts the impact of feedback processes operating at high redshift. The second project exploits the fact that high-redshift quasars drive ionization fronts (I-fronts) into the IGM, with the thickness of the front generally increasing with the hardness of the ionizing spectrum. If the thickness of the front can be measured, it can provide a novel constraint on the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED). I simulate the propagation of an I-front into a uniform IGM, and compute its thickness for a range of possible quasar spectra and ages, and IGM neutral hydrogen densities and clumping factors. With a sufficiently high intrinsic hydrogen column density obscuring the source or a sufficiently hard power-law spectrum and some obscuration, the thickness of the front exceeds ˜ 1 physical Mpc and may be measurable from the three-dimensional morphology of its redshifted 21cm signal. In the third project, I investigate one promising method for probing the tail end of reionization, through the detection and characterization of the Gunn-Peterson damping wing absorption of the IGM in bright quasar spectra. However, the use of quasar spectra to measure the IGM damping wing requires a model of the quasar's intrinsic Lyman-alpha emission line. I quantify uncertainties

  15. Insights into quasar UV spectra using unsupervised clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammour, A.; Gallagher, S. C.; Daley, M.; Richards, G. T.

    2016-06-01

    Machine learning techniques can provide powerful tools to detect patterns in multidimensional parameter space. We use K-means - a simple yet powerful unsupervised clustering algorithm which picks out structure in unlabelled data - to study a sample of quasar UV spectra from the Quasar Catalog of the 10th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR10) of Paris et al. Detecting patterns in large data sets helps us gain insights into the physical conditions and processes giving rise to the observed properties of quasars. We use K-means to find clusters in the parameter space of the equivalent width (EW), the blue- and red-half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) of the Mg II 2800 Å line, the C IV 1549 Å line, and the C III] 1908 Å blend in samples of broad absorption line (BAL) and non-BAL quasars at redshift 1.6-2.1. Using this method, we successfully recover correlations well-known in the UV regime such as the anti-correlation between the EW and blueshift of the C IV emission line and the shape of the ionizing spectra energy distribution (SED) probed by the strength of He II and the Si III]/C III] ratio. We find this to be particularly evident when the properties of C III] are used to find the clusters, while those of Mg II proved to be less strongly correlated with the properties of the other lines in the spectra such as the width of C IV or the Si III]/C III] ratio. We conclude that unsupervised clustering methods (such as K-means) are powerful methods for finding `natural' binning boundaries in multidimensional data sets and discuss caveats and future work.

  16. A summary of transition probabilities for atomic absorption lines formed in low-density clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.; Smith, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A table of wavelengths, statistical weights, and excitation energies is given for 944 atomic spectral lines in 221 multiplets whose lower energy levels lie below 0.275 eV. Oscillator strengths were adopted for 635 lines in 155 multiplets from the available experimental and theoretical determinations. Radiation damping constants also were derived for most of these lines. This table contains the lines most likely to be observed in absorption in interstellar clouds, circumstellar shells, and the clouds in the direction of quasars where neither the particle density nor the radiation density is high enough to populate the higher levels. All ions of all elements from hydrogen to zinc are included which have resonance lines longward of 912 A, although a number of weaker lines of neutrals and first ions have been omitted.

  17. Possible evidence for a variable fine-structure constant from QSO absorption lines: systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2001-11-01

    Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption spectra with laboratory spectra allows us to probe possible variations in the fundamental constants over cosmological time-scales. In a companion paper we present an analysis of Keck/HIRES spectra and report possible evidence suggesting that the fine-structure constant, α, may have been smaller in the past: [formmu2]Δα/α=(-0.72+/-0.18)×10-5 over the redshift range [formmu3]0.5

  18. Unusual quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey selected by means of Kohonen self-organising maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, H.; Schalldach, P.; Scholz, R.-D.; in der Au, A.; Newholm, M.; de Hoon, A.; Kaminsky, B.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Large spectroscopic surveys have discovered very peculiar and hitherto unknown types of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Such rare objects may hold clues to the accretion history of the supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies. Aims: We aim to create a sizeable sample of unusual quasars from the unprecedented spectroscopic database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Methods: We exploit the spectral archive of the SDSS Data Release 7 to select unusual quasar spectra. The selection method is based on a combination of the power of self-organising maps and the visual inspection of a huge number of spectra. Self-organising maps were applied to nearly 105 spectra classified as quasars at redshifts from z = 0.6 to 4.3 by the SDSS pipeline. Particular attention was paid to minimise possible contamination by rare peculiar stellar spectral types. All selected quasar spectra were individually studied to determine the object type and the redshift. Results: We present a catalogue of 1005 quasars with unusual spectra. These spectra are dominated by either broad absorption lines (BALs; 42%), unusual red continua (27%), weak emission lines (18%), or conspicuously strong optical and/or UV iron emission (11%). This large sample provides a useful resource for both studying properties and relations of/between different types of unusual quasars and selecting particularly interesting objects, even though the compilation is not aimed at completeness in a quantifiable sense. The spectra are grouped into six types for which composite spectra are constructed and mean properties are computed. Remarkably, all these types turn out to be on average more luminous than comparison samples of normal quasars after a statistical correction is made for intrinsic reddening (E(B - V) ≈ 0 to 0.4 for SMC-like extinction). Both the unusual BAL quasars and the strong iron emitters have significantly lower radio luminosities than normal quasars. We also confirm that strong BALs avoid

  19. THE COLOR VARIABILITY OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Knecht, Matthias; Hogg, David W.; Shields, Joseph C.; Maoz, Dan; Bovy, Jo

    2012-01-10

    We quantify quasar color variability using an unprecedented variability database-ugriz photometry of 9093 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, observed over 8 years at {approx}60 epochs each. We confirm previous reports that quasars become bluer when brightening. We find a redshift dependence of this blueing in a given set of bands (e.g., g and r), but show that it is the result of the flux contribution from less-variable or delayed emission lines in the different SDSS bands at different redshifts. After correcting for this effect, quasar color variability is remarkably uniform, and independent not only of redshift, but also of quasar luminosity and black hole mass. The color variations of individual quasars, as they vary in brightness on year timescales, are much more pronounced than the ranges in color seen in samples of quasars across many orders of magnitude in luminosity. This indicates distinct physical mechanisms behind quasar variability and the observed range of quasar luminosities at a given black hole mass-quasar variations cannot be explained by changes in the mean accretion rate. We do find some dependence of the color variability on the characteristics of the flux variations themselves, with fast, low-amplitude, brightness variations producing more color variability. The observed behavior could arise if quasar variability results from flares or ephemeral hot spots in an accretion disk.

  20. A long-term space astrophysics research program: The evolution of the quasar continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1993-01-01

    The research program supported by this grant now has great momentum. Numerous papers are in progress, and a strong multi-wavelength observing program is rapidly accumulating data on samples of high redshift quasars across the spectrum. ROSAT spectra of quasars continue to yield surprises. Of four z = 3 quasars with X-ray spectra, three show strong absorption. This contrasts strongly with the situation for luminous AGN at low redshifts where fewer than 1 in 20 show X-ray absorption. A new site for this absorption is probably needed, either around the quasar (e.g. in a cluster cooling flow) or along the line of sight (e.g. in a Damped Lyman-alpha system). The unabsorbed quasar allows limits on the physical conditions in a damped Lyman-alpha cloud to be calculated, and will allow a X-ray Gunn-Peterson test to be applied that will limit the fraction of the closure mass in an intergalactic medium. The X-ray spectral indices of these z = 3 quasars show no change from those of similar objects at low z, suggesting that 'short-lifetime' models apply. Eight other z = 3-4 quasars have been detected and their energy distributions from X-rays to Infrared (using new infrared spectrographs) have been compiled. These are now being compared with the low z continua from the 'Atlas of Quasar Energy Distributions' to search for evolutionary changes. The discovery of a likely warm absorber in 3C351 made recognition of another example simple. Also, modeling of the conditions in the absorber in 3C351 using the OVI absorption line from HST and the high ionization emission lines, suggests that the broad line region is indeed the origin of the warm absorber in this quasar, and by extension, others. Warm absorbers can now be used as a new diagnostic of this region. The X-ray spectrum of a 'Red Quasar', 3C212, has a cut-off spectrum, which could be fitted by an absorbed power-law, or more remarkably, by an unabsorbed black body. Using our quasi-simultaneous optical data and photoionization

  1. Extreme star formation events in quasar hosts over 0.5 < z < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, L. K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Feltre, A.; Farrah, D.; Clarke, C.; Harris, K. A.; Hurley, P.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Wang, L.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the relationship between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation in a sample of 513 optically luminous type 1 quasars up to redshifts of ˜4 hosting extremely high star formation rates (SFRs). The quasars are selected to be individually detected by the Herschel SPIRE instrument at >3σ at 250 μm, leading to typical SFRs of order of 1000 M⊙ yr-1. We find the average SFRs to increase by almost a factor 10 from z ˜ 0.5 to z ˜ 3, mirroring the rise in the comoving SFR density over the same epoch. However, we find that the SFRs remain approximately constant with increasing accretion luminosity for accretion luminosities above 1012 L⊙. We also find that the SFRs do not correlate with black hole mass. Both of these results are most plausibly explained by the existence of a self-regulation process by the starburst at high SFRs, which controls SFRs on time-scales comparable to or shorter than the AGN or starburst duty cycles. We additionally find that SFRs do not depend on Eddington ratio at any redshift, consistent with no relation between SFR and black hole growth rate per unit black hole mass. Finally, we find that high-ionization broad absorption line (HiBAL) quasars have indistinguishable far-infrared properties to those of classical quasars, consistent with HiBAL quasars being normal quasars observed along a particular line of sight, with the outflows in HiBAL quasars not having any measurable effect on the star formation in their hosts.

  2. A new perspective on the interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun from UV absorption line results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    We offer a new, more inclusive, picture of the local interstellar medium, where it is composed of a single, monolithic cloud that surrounds the Sun in all directions. Our study of velocities based on Mg II and Fe II ultraviolet absorption lines indicates that the cloud has an average motion consistent with the velocity vector of gas impacting the heliosphere and does not behave like a rigid body: gas within the cloud is being differentially decelerated in the direction of motion, and the cloud is expanding in directions perpendicular to this flow, much like the squashing of a balloon. The outer boundary of the cloud is in average 10 pc away from us but is highly irregular, being only a few parsecs away in some directions, with possibly a few extensions up to 20 pc. Average H I volume densities vary between 0.03 and 0.1 cm3 over different sight lines. Metals appear to be significantly depleted onto grains, and there is a steady increase in this effect from the rear of the cloud to the apex of motion. There is no evidence that changes in the ionizing radiation influence the apparent abundances. Additional, secondary velocity components are detected in 60% of the sight lines. Almost all of them appear to be interior to the volume holding the gas that we identify with the main cloud. Half of the sight lines exhibit a secondary component moving at about - 7.2 km/s with respect to the main component, which may be the signature of an implosive shock propagating toward the cloud's interior.

  3. Fifty Years of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    2013-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was dismissed largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maartin Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16 leading to the general acceptance of the quasars as being extragalactic origin and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Subsequent radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts. However, claims for a more local population continued for at least several decades confused perhaps by the recognition of the much larger class of radio quiet quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGN), and the uncertain connection with Seyfert galaxies and Zwicky’s compact galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the brightest extragalactic extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the mag 13 optical counterpart was known at least as early as 1887. Although, since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio interferometer positions, 3C273 eluded identification until the series of lunar occultations by Cyril Hazard and others were used to determine the position and morphology of the radio source.

  4. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-06-01

    Correlations of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the C IV line, with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are investigated. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to C IV increase prominently with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of the dominant coolant, C IV line, decreases, and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using Si IV+O IV]/C IV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicity and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7-6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely by affecting outflow acceleration. This effect may have a profound impact on galaxy evolution via momentum feedback and chemical enrichment.

  5. METALLICITY AND QUASAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Tinggui; Yuan, Weimin

    2012-06-01

    Correlations of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the C IV line, with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are investigated. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to C IV increase prominently with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of the dominant coolant, C IV line, decreases, and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using Si IV+O IV]/C IV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicity and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7-6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely by affecting outflow acceleration. This effect may have a profound impact on galaxy evolution via momentum feedback and chemical enrichment.

  6. Physical Evolution of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Olga Patricia

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the quasar luminosity function is well described by pure luminosity evolution (PLE), in which the statistical luminosity, L^*(z), declines by a factor of ~100 from z = 3 to z sim 0.1 (Boyle et al. 1988a). If PLE is produced by the gradual dimming of a single generation of long-lived quasars, then the emitted continua of high redshift, younger, quasars are expected to differ from those of their low redshift, older, counterparts. This thesis aims to test this interpretation of PLE via a statistical comparison between the continua of sets of high and low redshift quasars which match in evolved luminosity, having similar L/L^ *(z).. Rest-frame ~ 1200A-5500A spectral energy distributions were constructed for 15 high redshift quasars and compared to those of 27 z sim 0.1 quasars (Elvis et al. 1994a). Optical/UV spectral indices, alpha (F_ nu ~nu^alpha), were determined by fitting single power laws through narrow (Deltalambda/lambda < 2%) continuum bands at 1285A, 1460A, 4200A, 4650A and 5100A. The mean spectral indices are -0.38 +/- 0.07 for the low and -0.32 +/- 0.07 for the high redshift samples. No significant evolution is found in the optical/UV continuum shapes. K-S tests give probabilities < 4% that the distributions of alpha for the high and low redshift samples differ. There is a significant range in continuum shapes within the low (alpha = -1.2 to +0.5) and high (alpha = { -}0.75 to +0.2) redshift samples. The spread is real, being about 20 times greater than the typical errors, sim 0.01 - 0.08. The distributions of spectral indices that result from fits using a power law plus SMC reddening model are not consistent with the hypothesis that the range is produced by intrinsic extinction. The predicted spectra from non-steady accretion disks, as would result from temperature redistribution due to irradiation or unstable mass accretion, can explain values of alpha from 1/3 down to at least - 1, and may account for the full range. The strengths of

  7. The discovery of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, K. I.

    2013-03-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high radio and optical luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maarten Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16. Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as being by far the most distant and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Arguments for a more local population continued for at least several decades, fueled in part by a greater willingness to accept the unclear new physics needed to interpret the large observed redshifts rather than the extreme luminosities and energies implied by the cosmological interpretation of the redshifts. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio interferometer positions, measured primarily at the Caltech Owens Valley Radio Observatory. However, 3C 273 eluded identification until the series of lunar occultation observations led by Cyril Hazard. Subsequent attempts to classify quasars into numerous sub-categories based on their observed optical, radio, IR and high energy properties have perhaps led to more confusion than clarity. However, quasars and the broader class of AGN are now a fundamental part of astrophysics and cosmology. They were the basis for the recognition of supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei, which are intimately tied to the formation and

  8. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  9. Studying low-redshift universe through observation of Damped Lyman-alpha quasar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharanfoli, Soheila

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, an extremely successful method to study galaxy formation and evolution, has been provided by observation of quasar absorbers. Quasar absorbers are systems intercepting our line-of-sight to a given quasar and thus produce a feature in the quasar spectrum, the so-called absorption lines. The Damped Lyman-a (DLA) and sub-Damped Lyman-a (sub-DLA) absorption features in quasar spectra are believed to be produced by intervening galaxies. However, the connection of quasar absorbers to galaxies is not well-understood, since attempts to image the absorbing galaxies have often failed. DLAs and sub-DLAs were originally thought to be the precursors of present day disk galaxies, but there is evidence that they may be dominated by gas-rich, proto-dwarf galaxies representing the basic building blocks of hierarchical growth of structure. While most DLAs appear to be metal-poor, a population of metal-rich absorbers, mostly sub-DLAs, has been discovered in recent spectroscopic studies. It is of great interest to image these metal-rich absorbers, especially with high spatial resolution, to understand the connection between the stellar and interstellar content of the underlying galaxies. This dissertation consists of several projects designed to further our understanding of galaxies and galactic structures associated with intervening quasar absorption lines. Two projects were completed that involved the imaging of 13 DLA/sub-DLA galaxies at z < 1. High angular resolution near-infrared images were obtained, using the Hokupa'a Adaptive Optics system with the QUIRC near-infrared camera on the 8-m Gemini-North telescope, and the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system on the 10-m Keck telescope. Detailed properties of the identified absorber galaxies are described. They are shown to be drawn from a variety of morphological types with a range of luminosities, sizes, and impact parameters. In the other set of projects, follow-up spectroscopy was performed to confirm the

  10. Recovery of acetylene absorption line profile basing on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Thursby, Graham; Stewart, George; Arsad, Norhana; Uttamchandani, Deepak; Culshaw, Brian; Wang, Yiding

    2010-04-01

    A novel and direct absorption line recovery technique based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation is presented. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied for high sensitivity, zero background and efficient acoustic enhancement at a low modulation frequency. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror driven by an electrothermal actuator is used for generating laser intensity modulation (without wavelength modulation) through the external reflection. The MEMS mirror with 10μm thick structure material layer and 100nm thick gold coating is formed as a circular mirror of 2mm diameter attached to an electrothermal actuator and is fabricated on a chip that is wire-bonded and placed on a PCB holder. Low modulation frequency is adopted (since the resonant frequencies of the photoacoustic gas cell and the electrothermal actuator are different) and intrinsic high signal amplitude characteristics in low frequency region achieved from measured frequency responses for the MEMS mirror and the gas cell. Based on the property of photoacoustic spectroscopy and Beer's law that detectable sensitivity is a function of input laser intensity in the case of constant gas concentration and laser path length, a Keopsys erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) with opto-communication C band and high output power up to 1W is chosen to increase the laser power. High modulation depth is achieved through adjusting the MEMS mirror's reflection position and driving voltage. In order to scan through the target gas absorption line, the temperature swept method is adopted for the tunable distributed feed-back (DFB) diode laser working at 1535nm that accesses the near-infrared vibration-rotation spectrum of acetylene. The profile of acetylene P17 absorption line at 1535.39nm is recovered ideally for ~100 parts-per-million (ppm) acetylene balanced by nitrogen. The experimental signal to noise ratio (SNR) of absorption line recovery for 500mW laser power was ~80 and hence the

  11. Impact of difference in absorption line parameters in spectroscopic databases on CO2 and CH4 atmospheric content retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnokova, T. Yu.; Chentsov, A. V.; Rokotyan, N. V.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of uncertainties in CH4 and CO2 absorption line parameters in modern spectroscopic databases on the atmospheric transmission simulation in the near-infrared region is investigated. The atmospheric contents of CH4 and CO2 are retrieved from the absorption solar spectra measured by a ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer. Different spectroscopic databases are used in the forward radiative transfer model and a comparison of the retrieved results is made.

  12. The hydration dependence of CaCO3 absorption lines in the Far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Johnny; Emery, Logan P

    2014-06-01

    The far infrared (FIR) absorption lines of CaCO3 have been measured at a range of relative humidities (RH) between 33 and 92% RH using a Bruker 66v/S spectrometer. Hydration measurements on CaCO3 have been made in the mid-infrared (MIR) by [Al-Hosney, H.A. and Grassian, V.H., 2005, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 7, 1266], and astrophysically-motivated temperature-dependent FIR measurements of CaCO3 in vacuum have also been reported [Posch, T., et al., 2007, Ap. J., 668, 993]. The custom sample cell constructed for these hydrated-FIR spectra is required because the 66v/S bench is under vacuum (3 mbar) during typical measurements. Briefly, the sample cell consists of two Thalium Bromoiodide (KRS-5) windows, four O-rings, a plastic ring for separating the windows and providing a volume for the saturated atmosphere. CaCO3 was deposited on KRS-5 windows using doubly-distilled water as an intermediary. The KRS-5 window with sample and assembled sample cell were placed in a desiccator with the appropriated saturated salt solution [Washburn, E.W. (Ed.), International Critical Tables of Numerical Data, Physics Chemistry and Technology, Vol. 1, (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1926), p. 67-68] and allowed to hydrate for 23 hours. For spectroscopy the desiccator was quickly opened and the second KRS-5 window placed in the cell to seal the chamber. A spectrum was then taken of the sample at the appropriate RH. The spectra taken characterize the adsorption of water vapor and CaCO3 that might occur in circumstellar environments [Melnick, G.J., et al. 2001, Nature, 412, 160].The MIR and FIR reflectance spectra of calcite (CaCO3) have been thoroughly studied by [Hellwege, K.H., et al., 1970, Z. Physik, 232, 61]. Five Lorentzian curves were fit to our data in the range from 378-222 cm-1/SUP> and each was able to be assigned to a known mode of CaCO3. The data does not support the conclusion of a hydration effect on these modes of CaCO3, but it does suggest a possible broadening of three modes

  13. Detection of harmonics and recovery of the absorption line profile using logarithmic-transformed wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Menglong; Sun, Dandan

    2016-07-01

    A versatile signal processing strategy for eliminating the residual amplitude modulation (RAM) and distortion in tunable diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy is theoretically demonstrated and experimentally validated. The strategy involves logarithmic transformation and differential detection, which are achieved using a homemade circuit. Through the logarithmic transformation, the optical intensity modulation of the laser, which performs as the source of RAM and distortion, is separated from the absorption-induced power attenuation and further balanced during the differential detection. The first harmonic, which is proportional to the first-order derivative of the absorption line profile in the case of a small modulation index, is extracted along with the second harmonic and is integrated for the recovery of the absorption line profile. The experiments are carried out for CH4 at its R(3) absorption line of the 2ν3 overtone for validation of the system, and the derived results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical simulations. These promising results indicate the high potential of the strategy for absorption spectrum-based determination of gas properties.

  14. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of quasar disk winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, N.

    2015-09-01

    Disk winds are a compelling candidate to provide geometrical unification between Broad Absorption Line QSOs (BALQSOs) and Type1 Quasars. However, the geometry of these winds, and even the driving mech- anism remain largely unknown. Progress has been made through RT simulations and theoretical analysis of simplified wind geometries but there are several outstanding issues including the problem of shielding the low ionization BAL gas from the intense X-ray radiation from the central corona, and also how to produce the strong emission lines which exemplify Type 1 Quasars. A complex, clumpy geometry may provide a solution, and a full hydrodynamic model in which such structure may well spontaneously develop is something we wish to investigate. We have already demonstrated that the previous generation of hydrodynamic models of BALQSOs suffer from the fact that radiation transfer (RT) was necessarily simplified to permit computation, thereby neglecting the effects of multiple scattering and reprocessing of photons within the wind (potentially very important processes). We have therefore embarked upon a project to marry together a RT code with a hydrodynamics code to permit full radiation hydrodynamics simulations to be carried out on QSO disk winds. Here we present details of the project and results to date.

  15. Quasars and galaxy formation. I - The z greater than 4 objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    The physical properties of the known quasars with z greater than 4 are examined with particular reference to theories of cosmic structure formation. A 'standard' massive accreting black hole model for quasars is used to calculate the masses, radiative efficiencies, and accretion rates of the observed objects. The masses, densities, cosmological overdensities, and sizes of the accretion fuel reservoirs associated with the quasar black holes are considered, and several indirect arguments are used to connect these quantities to the masses and overdensities of the quasar host objects. Finally, constraints on the epoch of formation of the host objects are discussed. The general conclusion is that the observed quasars with z greater than 4 suggest that the cosmic structure formation was already well advanced at z = 5, when the universe was a small fraction of its present age.

  16. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2016-09-01

    A population of quasars at z ˜ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities νL ν (7.8 μm) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio νL ν (0.25 μm)/νL ν (7.8 μm) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust that produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest-frame 7.8 μm are determined for quasars in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 μm sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far-infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest-frame 7.8 μm, but the ratio L ν (100 μm)/L ν (7.8 μm) is about three times higher for obscured quasars than for unobscured, so that far-infrared or submillimeter quasar detections are dominated by obscured quasars. We find that only ˜5% of high-redshift submillimeter sources are quasars and that existing 850 μm surveys or 2 mm surveys should already have detected sources at z ˜ 10 if quasar and starburst luminosity functions remain the same from z = 2 until z = 10.

  17. Narrow C IV absorption doublets on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Zhou, Luwenjia; Chen, Yan-Mei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we extend our work of Papers I and II, which are assigned to systematically survey C IV λλ1548,1551 narrow absorption lines (NALs) with zabs ≪ zem on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) to collect C IV NALs with zabs ≈ zem from blue to red wings of C IV λ1549 emission lines. Together with Papers I and II, we have collected a total number of 41 479 C IV NALs with 1.4544 ≤ zabs ≤ 4.9224 in surveyed spectral region redward of Lyα until red wing of C IV λ1549 emission line. We find that the stronger C IV NALs tend to be the more saturated absorptions, and associated systems (zabs ≈ zem) seem to have larger absorption strengths when compared to intervening ones (zabs ≪ zem). The redshift density evolution behaviour of absorbers (the number of absorbers per redshift path) is similar to the history of the cosmic star formation. When compared to the quasar-frame velocity (β) distribution of Mg II absorbers, the β distribution of C IV absorbers is broader at β ≈ 0, shows longer extended tail, and exhibits a larger dispersion for environmental absorptions. In addition, for associated C IV absorbers, we find that low-luminosity quasars seem to exhibit smaller β and stronger absorptions when compared to high-luminosity quasars.

  18. Quasars at 25.

    PubMed

    Trimble, V; Woltjer, L

    1986-10-10

    In the quarter century since the first optical identification of a "radio star" (3C 48), astronomers have come to general agreement that the underlying quasar energy source is accretion onto a massive black hole. There is much less agreement on the detailed physics of the processes by which this energy is converted to the forms observed, but this has not prevented the objects from serving as valuable probes of the universe at distant times and places.

  19. Evidence for Fluorescent Fe II Emission from Extended Low Ionization Outflows in Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tinggui; Ferland, Gary J.; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe ii UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe ii at wavelengths longer than 2800 Å. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C iv, Al iii and Mg ii but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C iii], S iii and He ii. We interpret the Fe ii lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 Å produces Fe ii emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to collisionally excite Fe ii lines, accounting for the lack of optical emission. The spectral energy distribution from the UV to the mid-infrared can be modeled as emission from a clumpy dusty torus, with UV emission being reflected/scattered light either by the dusty torus or the outflow. Within this scenario, we estimate a minimum covering factor of the outflows from a few to 20% for the Fe ii scattering region, suggesting that Fe ii BAL quasars are at a special stage of quasar evolution.

  20. The road to quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, K. I.

    2015-03-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of 3C 48 and other quasi stellar radio sources was discussed as early as 1960 by John Bolton and others, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be unrealistically high radio and optical luminosities. Not until the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, which led Maarten Schmidt to identify 3C 273 with an apparent stellar object at a redshift of 0.16, was the true nature understood. Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as the very luminous nuclei of galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first cataloged in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio interferometer positions which were measured primarily at the Caltech Owens Valley Radio Observatory. However, 3C 273 eluded identification until the series of lunar occultation observations led by Cyril Hazard. Although an accurate radio position had been obtained earlier with the OVRO interferometer, inexplicably 3C 273 was initially misidentified with a faint galaxy located about an arc minute away from the true quasar position.

  1. Probing the interstellar medium of external galaxies using quasar absortion lines: The 3C 232/NGC 3067 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocke, John T.; Case, James; Donahue, Megan; Shull, J. Michael; Snow, Theodore P.

    1990-07-01

    Quasar absorption lines offer unique opportunities to probe the interstellar medium of external galaxies. Researchers present new optical and UV absorption line spectroscopy of the quasar 3C232 (z=0.55) revealing new detail in the foreground absorption system due to the bright, spiral galaxy NGC 3067 (cz=1420 km/s). Specifically, the spectra show evidence for two and possibly three separate absorption components in CaII and Na I spanning approx. 150 km/s. The original HI detection of Haschick and Burke (1975) corresponds to the strongest of these metal systems which exhibits doublet ratios consistent with saturation in both CaII and Na I. Due to the recent detection in HI emission of a tidal tail or finger of HI extending from the western edge of NGC 3067 through the position of 3C 232 (Carilli, van Gorkom and Stocke, 1989), the morphology of the HI absorber is now known and is not either a warped disk nor a spherical halo as had been proposed. New deep continuum and H alpha imaging provides a sensitive upper limit on the the ionizing continuum impinging upon this cloud (and thus a limit on the intensity of the extragalactic ionizing radiation field). Together with the observed UV spectrum of 3C 232, the optical emission line ratios and the deep H alpha imaging set a minimum distance between the quasar and the HI cloud disregarding redshift information. This limit strains the non-cosmological redshift interpretation for 3C 232 -- and this quasar is one of the original 5 3C quasars found to be too close to NGC galaxies as if by chance (Burbidge, Burbidge, Solomon and Strittmatter, 1972).

  2. Probing the interstellar medium of external galaxies using quasar absortion lines: The 3C 232/NGC 3067 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, John T.; Case, James; Donahue, Megan; Shull, J. Michael; Snow, Theodore P.

    1990-01-01

    Quasar absorption lines offer unique opportunities to probe the interstellar medium of external galaxies. Researchers present new optical and UV absorption line spectroscopy of the quasar 3C232 (z=0.55) revealing new detail in the foreground absorption system due to the bright, spiral galaxy NGC 3067 (cz=1420 km/s). Specifically, the spectra show evidence for two and possibly three separate absorption components in CaII and Na I spanning approx. 150 km/s. The original HI detection of Haschick and Burke (1975) corresponds to the strongest of these metal systems which exhibits doublet ratios consistent with saturation in both CaII and Na I. Due to the recent detection in HI emission of a tidal tail or finger of HI extending from the western edge of NGC 3067 through the position of 3C 232 (Carilli, van Gorkom and Stocke, 1989), the morphology of the HI absorber is now known and is not either a warped disk nor a spherical halo as had been proposed. New deep continuum and H alpha imaging provides a sensitive upper limit on the the ionizing continuum impinging upon this cloud (and thus a limit on the intensity of the extragalactic ionizing radiation field). Together with the observed UV spectrum of 3C 232, the optical emission line ratios and the deep H alpha imaging set a minimum distance between the quasar and the HI cloud disregarding redshift information. This limit strains the non-cosmological redshift interpretation for 3C 232 -- and this quasar is one of the original 5 3C quasars found to be too close to NGC galaxies as if by chance (Burbidge, Burbidge, Solomon and Strittmatter, 1972).

  3. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  4. Quasar optical variability: searching for interband time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachev, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The main purpose of this paper is to study time delays between the light variations in different wavebands for a sample of quasars. Measuring a reliable time delay for a large number of quasars may help constraint the models of their central engines. The standard accretion disk irradiation model predicts a delay of the longer wavelengths behind the shorter ones, a delay that depends on the fundamental quasar parameters. Since the black hole masses and the accretion rates are approximately known for the sample we use, one can compare the observed time delays with the expected ones. Methods: We applied the interpolation cross-correlation function (ICCF) method to the Giveon et al. sample of 42 quasars, monitored in two (B and R) colors, to find the time lags represented by the ICCF peaks. Different tests were performed to assess the influence of photometric errors, sampling, etc., on the final result. Results: We found that most of the objects show a delay in the red light curve behind the blue one (a positive lag), which on average for the sample is about +4 days (+3 for the median), although the scatter is significant. These results are broadly consistent with the reprocessing model, especially for the well-sampled objects. The normalized time-lag deviations do not seem to correlate significantly with other quasar properties, including optical, radio, or X-ray measurables. On the other hand, many objects show a clear negative lag, which, if real, may have important consequences for the variability models.

  5. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Green, R. F.

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  6. Evidence for large temperature fluctuations in quasar accretion disks from spectral variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Agol, Eric; Dexter, Jason

    2014-03-10

    The well-known bluer-when-brighter trend observed in quasar variability is a signature of the complex processes in the accretion disk and can be a probe of the quasar variability mechanism. Using a sample of 604 variable quasars with repeat spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (SDSS), we construct difference spectra to investigate the physical causes of this bluer-when-brighter trend. The continuum of our composite difference spectrum is well fit by a power law, with a spectral index in excellent agreement with previous results. We measure the spectral variability relative to the underlying spectra of the quasars, which is independent of any extinction, and compare to model predictions. We show that our SDSS spectral variability results cannot be produced by global accretion rate fluctuations in a thin disk alone. However, we find that a simple model of an inhomogeneous disk with localized temperature fluctuations will produce power-law spectral variability over optical wavelengths. We show that the inhomogeneous disk will provide good fits to our observed spectral variability if the disk has large temperature fluctuations in many independently varying zones, in excellent agreement with independent constraints from quasar microlensing disk sizes, their strong UV spectral continuum, and single-band variability amplitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on quasar variability models and add to the mounting evidence that quasar accretion disks have large localized temperature fluctuations.

  7. Spectral study of quasars of the Second Byurakan Survey of the northern sky. I. The quasars SBS 0953 + 549, SBS 1116 + 603, and SBS 1138 + 584

    SciTech Connect

    Levshakov, S.A.; Varshalovich, D.A.; Nazarov, E.A.

    1987-05-01

    The 6-m telescope was used in conjunction with a scanner (IPCS) and the SP-124 spectrograph to make an investigation with resolution approx. 3.5 A of three new quasars: SBS 0953 + 549 (z/sub e/ = 2.580), SBS 1116 + 603 (z/sub e/ = 2.628), and SBS 1138 + 584 (z/sub e/ = 1.699). The spectra of these quasars are analyzed. The emission line L/sub approx./ in the quasar SBS 1116 + 603 may have a two-component structure: a narrow peak (FWHM a 3000 km/sec) and a broad pedestal (FWHM a 19,400 km/sec). In the quasar SBS 0953 + 549, the profile of the emission line L/sub approx./ recalls the profiles of P Cyg type lines, which are observed in the spectra of stars with expanding shells; two strong (tau approx. 1) and broad (FWHM approx. 1700 and 1000 km/sec) absorption lines with z/sub a/ = 2.451 and 2.503 have been found and identified as L/sub approx./ lines. The symmetric profiles of these lines correspond to N(HI) approx. 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -2/ for the cloud with z/sub a/ = 2.541 and 5 x 10/sup 19/ cm/sup -2/ for the cloud with z/sub a/ = 2.503. The authors have also estimated the line-of-sight densities of heavy elements found at z/sub a/ = 0.3800 (SBS 0953 + 549) and z/sub a/ = 1.4082 (SBS 1138 + 584). The densities of the absorption details in these and other known quasars are compared.

  8. Extremely red quasars from SDSS, BOSS and WISE: classification of optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Richards, Gordon T.; Villforth, Carolin; Strauss, Michael A.; Greene, Jenny E.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Brandt, W. Niel; Liu, Guilin; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-11-01

    Quasars with extremely red infrared-to-optical colours are an interesting population that can test ideas about quasar evolution as well as orientation, obscuration and geometric effects in the so-called AGN unified model. To identify such a population, we match the quasar catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to identify quasars with extremely high infrared-to-optical ratios. We identify 65 objects with rAB - W4Vega > 14 mag (i.e. Fν(22 μm)/Fν(r) ≳ 1000). This sample spans a redshift range of 0.28 < z < 4.36 and has a bimodal distribution, with peaks at z ˜ 0.8 and z ˜ 2.5. It includes three z > 2.6 objects that are detected in the W4 band but not W1 or W2 (i.e. `W1W2 dropouts'). The SDSS/BOSS spectra show that the majority of the objects are reddened type 1 quasars, type 2 quasars (both at low and high redshift) or objects with deep low-ionization broad absorption lines (BALs) that suppress the observed r-band flux. In addition, we identify a class of type 1 permitted broad emission-line objects at z ≃ 2-3 which are characterized by emission line rest-frame equivalent widths (REWs) of ≳150 Å, much larger than those of typical quasars. In particular, 55 per cent (45 per cent) of the non-BAL type 1s with measurable C IV in our sample have REW(C IV) > 100 (150) Å, compared to only 5.8 per cent (1.3 per cent) for non-BAL quasars in BOSS. These objects often also have unusual line ratios, such as very high N V/Ly α ratios. These large REWs might be caused by suppressed continuum emission analogous to type 2 quasars; however, there is no obvious mechanism in standard unified models to suppress the continuum without also obscuring the broad emission lines.

  9. A POPULATION OF X-RAY WEAK QUASARS: PHL 1811 ANALOGS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Richards, Gordon T.; Shemmer, Ohad; Just, Dennis W.

    2011-07-20

    We report the results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 10 type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. These quasars were identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at high redshift (z {approx} 2.2); eight are radio quiet while two are radio intermediate. All of the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of {approx}13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, supporting the hypothesis that they are intrinsically X-ray weak like PHL 1811 itself. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our sample of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs supports a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be {approx}< 1.2%. We have investigated correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties (e.g., C IV equivalent width and blueshift) for a sample combining our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, PHL 1811 itself, and typical type 1 quasars. These correlation analyses suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset ({approx}30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization 'shielding gas' covers most of the broad emission-line region (BELR), but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs. The two radio-intermediate PHL 1811 analogs are X

  10. A Population of X-Ray Weak Quasars: PHL 1811 Analogs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, Patrick B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Just, Dennis W.; Schmidt, Sarah J.

    2011-07-01

    We report the results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 10 type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. These quasars were identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at high redshift (z ≈ 2.2); eight are radio quiet while two are radio intermediate. All of the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of ≈13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, supporting the hypothesis that they are intrinsically X-ray weak like PHL 1811 itself. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our sample of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs supports a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be <~ 1.2%. We have investigated correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties (e.g., C IV equivalent width and blueshift) for a sample combining our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, PHL 1811 itself, and typical type 1 quasars. These correlation analyses suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset (≈30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization "shielding gas" covers most of the broad emission-line region (BELR), but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs. The two radio-intermediate PHL 1811 analogs are X-ray bright. X-ray spectral

  11. The pattern of extreme star formation events in SDSS quasar hosts in Herschel fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, Lura Katherine; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Feltre, Anna; Clarke, Charlotte; Farrah, Duncan; Harris, Kathryn Amy; Hurley, Peter; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of ~500 quasars up to redshifts of ~4 detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instrument of Herschel, we describe the behavior of intense starbursts in luminous quasars and how it correlates with the properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). We select our objects in the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS) and in the largest fields of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), including the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS).The far-infrared (FIR) emission of our objects is quantified using a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique. As our sources are individually detected in the SPIRE bands, they are bright in the FIR, exhibiting typical star formation rates (SFRs) of order of 1000 M⊙yr-1. We find the SFR to increase by a factor of nearly ten from z~0.5 to z~3, in line with the increasing comoving SFR density over a similar redshift range. The SFR, however, is shown to remain constant with increasing quasar luminosity for quasars with IR luminosities above 1012L⊙, indicating a self-regulating star formation process rather than a suppression effect due to the presence of powerful AGN. We find no further proof of a causal relation between star formation and accretion onto the central black hole, as the SFR and the Eddington ratio, λEdd, are found to be uncorrelated.We then compare the broad absorption line (BAL) quasars to the rest of the quasar population, as they are candidates for outflows in action from which shorter-term feedback effects could be sought. We find the accretion luminosities and λEdd values of BAL quasars to be drawn from the same population as those of the non-BAL quasars; further, the host SFRs are statistically similar among the two populations, all of which argue against feedback effects. These similarities also oppose an evolutionary scenario, as a different evolutionary stage would imply differences in either the accretion state

  12. The Circumgalactic Medium of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennawi, Joe

    2014-07-01

    I will argue that observations of the diffuse gas in the outskirts of quasar host galaxies, or the so called circumgalactic medium, are essential for understanding how luminous quasars evolve in a cosmological context. Such observations also provide a fruitful comparison to theory, because hydrodynamics at moderate overdensities is much easier to simulate than the complicated processes which trigger quasar activity. A novel technique will be introduced, whereby a foreground quasar can be studied in absorption against a background quasar, resolving scales as small as 30 kpc. This experiment reveals a rich absorption spectrum which contains a wealth of information about the physical conditions of diffuse gas around quasars. Hydrodynamical simulations of the massive dark matter halos which host luminous quasars under predict the amount of cool gas observed in quasar environs by a large factor, challenging our understanding of how massive galaxies form. I will also discuss a very sensitive search for Ly-alpha emission from the same gas which we study in absorption.

  13. Quasar Winds Near the Peak in Galaxy Merger Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, George; Brandt, Niel; Saez, Cristian; Giustini, Margherita; Garmire, Gordon

    We present results from recent XMM-Newton, Chandra and Suzaku monitoring observations of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. We present constraints on the kinematic and photoion-ization properties of the wind in this z=3.91 quasar and find that it is capable of playing an important role in controlling the evolution of the host galaxy and central black hole close to the peak in galaxy merger rate. We place constraints of the X-ray emission region of APM08279 and find it to be comparable to its ISCO radius. The X-ray emission size of APM08279 is consistent with sizes derived from our analysis of microlensing lightcurves of several gravitationally lensed quasars. A possible trend found between the X-ray photon index and the maximum outflow veloc-ity points towards a plausible mechanism that may explain the acceleration of the wind in APM08279. We also present prospects for future advances in our understanding of the role of quasar winds in galaxy feedback with the International X-ray Observatory.

  14. Theoretical study of the spectral shift of the absorption line of Rb and Cs in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-01

    A combined and sequential use of Monte Carlo simulation and time-dependent density functional theory is made to obtain the excitation line shifts and widths of Rb and Cs embedded in liquid 4He. In each case calculations are made on 100 statistically uncorrelated configurations with Rb (Cs) surrounded by nearly 60 He atoms treated explicitly. Different basis sets and functionals are used for obtaining the blue shifts of the absorption lines 5s → 5p of Rb and 6s → 6p of Cs. Estimate of the line broadening is also made and results for both the shift and broadening are obtained in good agreement with experiment.

  15. A study of the H2O absorption line shifts in the visible spectrum region due to air pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Bykov, A. D.; Kapitanov, V. A.; Korotchenko, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of measured and calculated shift coefficients are presented for 170 absorption lines of H2O in five vibrational-rotational bands. The measurements have been carried out using highly sensitive laser spectrometers with a resolution of at least 0.01/cm; the calculations are based on the Anderson-Tsao-Curnutte-Frost method. Good agreement is obtained between the theoretical and experimental values of the shift coefficients of H2O lines due to N2, O2, and air pressure.

  16. 1E 0104.2 + 3153 - A broad absorption-line QSO viewed through a giant elliptical galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J. T.; Liebert, J.; Schild, R.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.

    1984-01-01

    The optical identification of the X-ray source 1E 0104.2 + 3153 is complicated by the close projection of a broad absorption-line (BAL) QSO (z = 2.027) 10 arcsec from a giant elliptical galaxy (z = 0.111) at the center of a compact group of galaxies. At only 1.2 de Vaucouleur radii (16 kpc for H sub 0 = 100 km/s Mpc) this QSO-galaxy projection is the closest yet discovered. Based upon current observations, the source of the X-ray emission cannot be conclusively determined. Present in the BAL QSO spectrum are extremely strong Ca II H and K absorption lines due to the intervening galaxy, the first optical detection of the cold interstellar medium in an elliptical galaxy. The strength of these lines (EW = 2 and 1 A) requires observation through several interstellar clouds in the line of sight to the QSO. By its proximity to the central regions of the elliptical galaxy and the relative distances of the galaxy and QSO, this QSO is a particularly good candidate for observing dramatic transient gravitational lensing phenomena due to halo stars in the foreground galaxy.

  17. First constraint on cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from two independent telescopes.

    PubMed

    van Weerdenburg, F; Murphy, M T; Malec, A L; Kaper, L; Ubachs, W

    2011-05-01

    A high signal-to-noise spectrum covering the largest number of hydrogen lines (90 H(2) lines and 6 HD lines) in a high-redshift object was analyzed from an observation along the sight line to the bright quasar source J2123-005 with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile). This delivers a constraint on a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio of Δμ/μ=(8.5 ± 3.6(stat) ± 2.2(syst))×10(-6) at redshift z(abs) = 2.059, which agrees well with a recently published result on the same system observed at the Keck telescope yielding Δμ/μ=(5.6 ± 5.5(stat) ± 2.9(syst))×10(-6). Both analyses used the same robust absorption line fitting procedures with detailed consideration of systematic errors. PMID:21635080

  18. First constraint on cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from two independent telescopes.

    PubMed

    van Weerdenburg, F; Murphy, M T; Malec, A L; Kaper, L; Ubachs, W

    2011-05-01

    A high signal-to-noise spectrum covering the largest number of hydrogen lines (90 H(2) lines and 6 HD lines) in a high-redshift object was analyzed from an observation along the sight line to the bright quasar source J2123-005 with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile). This delivers a constraint on a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio of Δμ/μ=(8.5 ± 3.6(stat) ± 2.2(syst))×10(-6) at redshift z(abs) = 2.059, which agrees well with a recently published result on the same system observed at the Keck telescope yielding Δμ/μ=(5.6 ± 5.5(stat) ± 2.9(syst))×10(-6). Both analyses used the same robust absorption line fitting procedures with detailed consideration of systematic errors.

  19. First Constraint on Cosmological Variation of the Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio from Two Independent Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Weerdenburg, F. van; Kaper, L.; Murphy, M. T.; Malec, A. L.; Ubachs, W.

    2011-05-06

    A high signal-to-noise spectrum covering the largest number of hydrogen lines (90 H{sub 2} lines and 6 HD lines) in a high-redshift object was analyzed from an observation along the sight line to the bright quasar source J2123-005 with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile). This delivers a constraint on a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio of {Delta}{mu}/{mu}=(8.5{+-}3.6{sub stat{+-}}2.2{sub syst})x10{sup -6} at redshift z{sub abs}=2.059, which agrees well with a recently published result on the same system observed at the Keck telescope yielding {Delta}{mu}/{mu}=(5.6{+-}5.5{sub stat{+-}}2.9{sub syst})x10{sup -6}. Both analyses used the same robust absorption line fitting procedures with detailed consideration of systematic errors.

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Adler Planetarium, Chicago /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Eotvos U. /Tokyo U., Astron. Dept. /Tokyo U., RESCEU /Tokyo U., ICRR /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Microsoft, BARC /Johns Hopkins U. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.

    2005-03-01

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

  1. The SCUBA Bright Quasar Survey (SBQS): 850-μm observations of the z >~ 4 sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, Kate G.; Priddey, Robert S.; McMahon, Richard G.; Omont, Alain; Peroux, Celine; Sharp, Robert G.; Withington, Stafford

    2002-01-01

    We present initial results of a new, systematic search for massive star formation in the host galaxies of the most luminous and probably most massive z>~4 radio-quiet quasars (MB<=-27.5 νLν(1450Å)>1013Lsolar). The survey, undertaken at 850μm using SCUBA at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), has a target sensitivity limit of 3σ~10mJy, set to identify sources suitable for detailed follow-up, e.g. continuum mapping and molecular line diagnostics. A total of 38 z>~4 radio-quiet quasars have been observed at 850μm, of which eight were detected (>3σ) with S850μm>~10mJy (submillimetre-loud). The new detections almost triple the number of optically selected, submillimetre-loud z>~4 radio-quiet quasars known to date. We include a detailed description of how our quasar sample is defined in terms of radio and optical properties. As a by-product of our selection procedure, we have identified 17 radio-loud quasars with z>~4. There is no strong evidence for trends in either detectability or 850-μm flux with absolute magnitude, MB. We find that the weighted mean flux of the undetected sources is 2.0+/-0.6mJy, consistent with an earlier estimate of ~3mJy based on more sensitive observations of a sample z>~4 radio-quiet quasars. This corresponds to an inferred star formation rate of ~1000Msolaryr-1, similar to Arp220. The typical star formation time-scale for the submillimetre-bright sources is ~1Gyr, 10 times longer than the typical accretion-driven e-folding time-scale of ~ 5×107yr. Our 850-μm detection of the z=4.4 quasar PSS J1048+4407, when analysed in conjunction with 1.2-mm single-dish and interferometric observations, suggests that this source is resolved on angular scales of 1-2arcsec (6-12kpc). In addition, we present a new optical spectrum of this source, identifying it as a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar. The new redshift is outside that covered in a recent CO line search, highlighting the need for accurate redshifts for the observation and

  2. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. I. Target Selection and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Yi, Weimin; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D.; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Wang, Shu; Cai, Zheng; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-03-01

    High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at z≳ 4.5. We have developed a new method to select 4.7≲ z≲ 5.4 quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous z˜ 5 quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with z-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5, and 64 (64.6%) of them are quasars with redshifts of 4.4≲ z≲ 5.5 and absolute magnitudes of -29≲ {M}1450≲ -26.4. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same criteria and identified 8 (57.1%) of them as quasars with 4.7\\lt z\\lt 5.4. Among 72 newly identified quasars, 12 of them are at 5.2\\lt z\\lt 5.7, which leads to an increase of ˜36% of the number of known quasars at this redshift range. More importantly, our identifications doubled the number of quasars with {M}1450\\lt -27.5 at z\\gt 4.5, which will set strong constraints on the bright end of the quasar luminosity function. We also expand our method to select quasars at z ≳ 5.7. In this paper we report the discovery of four new luminous z ≳ 5.7 quasars based on SDSS-WISE selection.

  3. Invisible Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Radio Morphologies and Five New H i 21cm Absorption Line Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sharma, Soniya; Kanekar, Nissim

    2016-03-01

    This is the second paper directed toward finding new highly redshifted atomic and molecular absorption lines at radio frequencies. To this end, we selected a sample of 80 candidates for obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and presented their basic optical/near-infrared (NIR) properties in Paper I. In this paper, we present both high-resolution radio continuum images for all of these sources and H i 21 cm absorption spectroscopy for a few selected sources in this sample. A-configuration 4.9 and 8.5 GHz Very Large Array continuum observations find that 52 sources are compact or have substantial compact components with size <0.″5 and flux densities >0.1 Jy at 4.9 GHz. The 36 most compact sources were then observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at 1.4 GHz. One definite and 10 candidate Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) are newly identified, which is a detection rate of CSOs ∼three times higher than the detection rate previously found in purely flux-limited samples. Based on possessing compact components with high flux densities, 60 of these sources are good candidates for absorption-line searches. Twenty-seven sources were observed for H i 21 cm absorption at their photometric or spectroscopic redshifts with only six detections (five definite and one tentative). However, five of these were from a small subset of six CSOs with pure galaxy optical/NIR spectra (i.e., any AGN emission is obscured) and for which accurate spectroscopic redshifts place the redshifted 21 cm line in a radio frequency intereference (RFI)-free spectral “window” (i.e., the percentage of H i 21 cm absorption-line detections could be as high as ∼90% in this sample). It is likely that the presence of ubiquitous RFI and the absence of accurate spectroscopic redshifts preclude H i detections in similar sources (only 1 detection out of the remaining 22 sources observed, 13 of which have only photometric redshifts); that is, H i absorption may well be present but is masked by

  4. BAL PHOSPHORUS ABUNDANCE AND EVIDENCE FOR IMMENSE IONIC COLUMN DENSITIES IN QUASAR OUTFLOWS: VLT/X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF QUASAR SDSS J1512+1119

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2012-10-10

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is {approx}1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth.

  5. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high-resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium-argon calibration can be tracked with ˜10 m s-1 precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders (˜50-100 Å) and entire spectrographs arms (˜1000-3000 Å). Using archival spectra from the past 20 yr, we have probed the supercalibration history of the Very Large Telescope-Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (VLT-UVES) and Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically ±200 m s-1 per 1000 Å. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The spurious deviations in α produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT-UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in α from quasar absorption lines.

  6. Asteroids to Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugger, Phyllis M.

    2004-12-01

    Asteroid dedication; William Liller: Biographical Sketch; William Liller: Autobiographical Meanderings; Preface; List of Participants; Conference Photo; Part I. 1. Solar System Astronomy: Asteroids Joseph Veverka; 2. Sixteen years of stellar occultations James Elliott; 3. Comets to Quasars: Surface photometry from standard stars and the morphology of the galaxy-quasar interface Peter Usher; 4. Observing Solar Eclipses Jay Pasachoff; Part II. 5. Planetary Nebulae: new insights and opportunities Lawrence Aller; 6. Studies of planetary nebulae at radio wavelengths Yervant Terzian; 7. Optical identifications of compact galactic X-ray sources: Liller Lore Jonathan Grindlay; 8. Ages of globular clusters derived from BVRI CCD photometry Gonzalo Alcaino; 9. Stellar spectrum synthesis Jun Jugaku; 10. Mass exchange and stellar abundance anomalies Benjamin Peery; Part III. Extragalactic Astronomy: 11. The M31 globular cluster system John Huchra; 12. Spiral structure and star formation in galaxies Debra Elmegreen; 13. The discovery of hot coronae around early type galaxies William Forman and Christine Jones; 14. The morphology of clusters of galaxies, the formation efficiency of galaxies and the origin of the intracluster medium Christine Jones and William Forman; 15. Testing models for the dynamical evolution of clusters of galaxies Phyllis Lugger; 16. What is in the X-ray sky? Rudolph Schild; 17. Einstein deep surveys Stephen Murray, Christine Jones and William Forman; Part IV. History, Lore and Archaeoastronomy: 18. Robert Wheeler Willson: His Life and Legacy Barbara Welther; 19. The great mnemonics contest Owen Gingerich; 20. Hetu'u Rapanui: The archaeoastronomy of Easter Island William Liller; Indexes; Names; Objects; Subjects.

  7. HIGHLY IONIZED Fe-K ABSORPTION LINE FROM CYGNUS X-1 IN THE HIGH/SOFT STATE OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Makishima, K.; Torii, S.; Noda, H.; Mineshige, S.; Ueda, Y.; Kubota, A.; Gandhi, P.; Done, C.

    2013-04-20

    We present observations of a transient He-like Fe K{alpha} absorption line in Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 on 2011 October 5 near superior conjunction during the high/soft state, which enable us to map the full evolution from the start to the end of the episodic accretion phenomena or dips for the first time. We model the X-ray spectra during the event and trace their evolution. The absorption line is rather weak in the first half of the observation, but instantly deepens for {approx}10 ks, and weakens thereafter. The overall change in equivalent width is a factor of {approx}3, peaking at an orbital phase of {approx}0.08. This is evidence that the companion stellar wind feeding the black hole is clumpy. By analyzing the line with a Voigt profile, it is found to be consistent with a slightly redshifted Fe XXV transition, or possibly a mixture of several species less ionized than Fe XXV. The data may be explained by a clump located at a distance of {approx}10{sup 10-12} cm with a density of {approx}10{sup (-13)-(-11)} g cm{sup -3}, which accretes onto and/or transits the line of sight to the black hole, causing an instant decrease in the observed degree of ionization and/or an increase in density of the accreting matter. Continued monitoring for individual events with future X-ray calorimeter missions such as ASTRO-H and AXSIO will allow us to map out the accretion environment in detail and how it changes between the various accretion states.

  8. Broad Balmer Absorption Line Variability: Evidence of Gas Transverse Motion in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiheng; Zhou, Hongyan; Shu, Xinwen; Zhang, Shaohua; Ji, Tuo; Pan, Xiang; Sun, Luming; Zhao, Wen; Hao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    We report on the discovery of broad Balmer absorption lines variability in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6, based on the optical and near-infrared spectra taken from the SDSS-I, SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and TripleSpec observations over a timescale of 5.8 years in the QSO's rest-frame. The blueshifted absorption profile of Hβ shows a variation of more than 5σ at a high velocity portion (\\gt 3000 {km} {{{s}}}-1) of the trough. We perform a detailed analysis for the physical conditions of the absorber using Balmer lines as well as metastable He i and optical Fe ii absorptions (λ4233 from b4P5/2 level and λ5169 from a6S5/2) at the same velocity. These Fe ii lines are identified in the QSO spectra for the first time. According to the photoionization simulations, we estimate a gas density of n({{H}})≈ {10}9.1 {{cm}}-3 and a column density of {N}{col}({{H}})≈ {10}23 {{cm}}-2 for the BOSS data, but the model fails to predict the variations of ionic column densities between the SDSS and BOSS observations if changes in ionizing flux are assumed. We thus propose transverse motion of the absorbing gas being the cause of the observed broad Balmer absorption line variability. In fact, we find that the changes in covering factors of the absorber can well-reproduce all of the observed variations. The absorber is estimated ∼0.94 pc away from the central engine, which is where the outflow likely experiences deceleration due to the collision with the surrounding medium. This scheme is consistent with the argument that LoBAL QSOs may represent the transition from obscured star-forming galaxies to classic QSOs.

  9. A census of quasar-intrinsic absorption in the Hubble Space Telescope archive: systems from high-resolution echelle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Lynch, Ryan S.; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Tripp, Todd M.; Palma, Christopher; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Misawa, Toru; Masiero, Joseph R.; Milutinovic, Nikola; Lackey, Benjamin D.; Jones, Therese M.

    2013-10-01

    We present a census of zabs ≲ 2 intrinsic (those showing partial coverage) and associated (zabs ˜ zem) quasar absorption-line systems detected in the Hubble Space Telescope archive of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle spectra. This work complements the Misawa et al. survey of 2 < zem < 4 quasars that selects systems using similar techniques. We confirm the existence of so-called strong N V intrinsic systems (where the equivalent width of H I Lyα is small compared to N V λ1238) presented in that work, but find no convincing cases of `strong C IV' intrinsic systems at low redshift/luminosity. Moreover, we also report on the existence of `strong O VI' systems. From a comparison of partial coverage results as a function of ion, we conclude that systems selected by the N V ion have the highest probability of being intrinsic. By contrast, the C IV and O VI ions are poor selectors. Of the 30 O VI systems tested, only two of the systems in the spectrum on 3C 351 show convincing evidence for partial coverage. However, there is an ˜3σ excess in the number of absorbers near the quasar redshift (|Δv| ≤ 5000 km s-1) over absorbers at large redshift differences. In at least two cases, the associated O VI systems are known not to arise close to the accretion disc of the quasar.

  10. The Environments of Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kristen M.; Lacy, Mark; Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) feedback is prescribed for driving the high-end shape of the galaxy luminosity function, clearing the circumnuclear environment during the end stages of mergers, and eventually turning off its own accretion. Yet the dominant processes and characteristics of active galactic nuclei are indistinct. Chief among this confusion is how significant the role of dust is in each galaxy. Orientation of the dusty torus is attributed to causing the differences between Sy1 and Sy2, but whether obscured quasars are found in particularly dusty host galaxies, if they exist at a different stage in the merger process (early on, before the dust is blown out), or if they are merely oriented differently than optical quasars is not yet so well distinguished. With obscured quasars now observed to make up 50% or greater of the population of quasars, the question of what causes obscuration becomes vital to address. With this in mind, I study matched samples of obscured and unobscured quasars to characterize their environments, with the intent of addressing what contribution environment has to obscuration levels. I investigate the megaparsec-scale environments of SIRTF Wide-field Infra-Red Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) quasars at z ˜ 1-3 by cross-correlating the sample with 3.8 million galaxies from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). Optically obscured quasars are compared to a control sample of optically-bright quasars via selection in the mid-infrared. Environments were observed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm to a depth of ≈ 2 μJy (AB = 23.1). Recent work has found diverse results in such studies, with dependence of environmental richness on both redshift and level of obscuration. I find that, within reasonable error, on average there is no distinct difference between the level of clustering for obscured and normal quasars, and that there is no dependence on redshift of this result within the range of 1.3 < z < 2.5. I compare our results

  11. Testing the Radiative-Driving Hypothesis of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Michele A.; Ganguly, R.; Gallagher, S. C.; Gibson, R.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Outflows are seen prominently in the UV spectra of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) QSOs. Models of radiatively-driven outflows predict that the velocity should scale with UV luminosity. Observations show that the UV luminosity only provides a cap to the velocity. One explanation is that the X-ray absorbing gas in an individual quasar provides a shield that improves its radiative-driving efficiency. That is, quasars with thick shields can accelerate gas to higher velocity. X-ray observations of BALQSOs support this in the sense that BALQSOs with more soft X-ray absorption tend to have higher velocity outflows. But there is much scatter in this trend, making the underlying physics difficult to extract. To combat this, we conducted an experiment using exploratory Chandra-ACIS observations of 12 carefully-selected z=1.7-2.0 BALQSOs. These BALQSOs were chosen to have very narrow ranges in (1) UV luminosity, (2) UV spectral shape, and (3) absorption velocity width. Within this otherwise uniform sample, the outflow velocities range from 4500km/s to 18000km/s, a factor of four. All objects are detected in the full band (0.5-8keV), with count rates in the range (0.5-5)e-3 cps, and have hardness ratios in the range -0.6 to 0.3. We compare the X-ray brightnesses and spectral shapes of our sample with those of more diverse samples of BALQSOs. We gratefully acknowledge support through Chandra grant GO9-0120X.

  12. Quasar Unification Via Disk Winds: From Phenomenology to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, C.

    2015-09-01

    I will give an overview of a collaborative project aimed at testing the viability of QSO unification via accretion disk winds. In this scenario, most of the characteristic spectral features of QSOs are formed in these outflows. More specifically, broad absorption lines (BALs) are produced for sight lines within the outflow, while broad emission lines (BELs) are observed for other viewing angles. In order to test these ideas, we use a state-of- the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer and photoionization code to predict emergent spectra for a wide range of viewing angles and quasar properties (black hole mass, accretion rate, X-ray luminosity, etc). It turns out to be relatively straightforward to produce BALs, but harder to obtain sufficiently strong BELs. We also find that it is easy to overionize the wind with realistic X-ray luminosities. In addition, we are using our code to test and improve hydrodynamic disk wind models for quasars. So far, we have been able to demonstrate that the treatment of ionization in existing hydrodynamic models of line-driven disk winds is too simplistic to yield realistic results: the modelled outflows would be strongly overionized and hence would not feel the line-driving forces that are asssumed to produce them. We have therefore embarked on an effort to model line-driven disk winds self-consistently by linking a hydrodynamics code with our ionization and radiative transfer code. Finally, we can also predict the reverberation signatures produced by disk winds, which can be directly compared to the results of the latest reverberation mapping campaigns.

  13. In the Dusty Recesses: Characterizing the Dark Matter Halos of Obscured Quasars via Clustering and CMB Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Adam D.; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Runnoe, Jessie C.

    2016-06-01

    The spatial clustering of obscured and unobscured quasars provides an interesting constraint on the connection between the growth of supermassive black holes and the evolution of galaxies and large-scale structure. In pursuit of these constraints, we update our recent measurements of quasar clustering using WISE and Planck data. We carefully assess how alterations in these missions' data reduction pipelines result in different systematics on a range of angular scales, and define samples of WISE-selected quasars that appear to be least-influenced by differences in data calibration. With these samples we analyze quasar clustering via two complementary methods; the angular autocorrelation function and cosmic microwave background lensing cross-correlations. We measure a higher bias and halo mass for obscured quasars (b ~ 2.1) as compared to unobscured quasars (b ~ 1.8). This is at odds with simple orientation models but at a reduced significance (1.5σ) as compared to our work with previous survey data. Assuming that some fraction (as high as 75%) of obscured quasars are intrinsically similar to unobscured quasars but viewed through a "dusty torus," we infer that the remaining non-torus obscured quasar population must have a large clustering bias of ~3, and inhabit typical halo masses of ~3 × 1013 h-1M⊙ at a redshift of z ~ 1. These massive halos are likely the descendants of high-mass unobscured quasars at high redshift, and will evolve into members of galaxy groups by z ~ 0. This work was supported in part by NSF grants 1211112, 1515404 and 1515364.

  14. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the quasar PKS 0405-12 and the local density of Lyman-alpha absorption systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hartig, George F.

    1993-01-01

    A sample of 32 absorption lines has been identified in the ultraviolet spectrum of the z = 0.57 quasar PKS 0405-12. Data cover the wavelength range 1190-3260 A. There are 10 extragalactic Ly-alpha absorption lines in the complete sample, all with observed equivalent widths greater than or equal to 0.40 A; three of the Ly-alpha lines have Ly-beta counterparts. The number of Ly-alpha lines observed in the spectrum of PKS 0405-12 is within 1 sigma of the number predicted on the basis of previous HST observations of 3C 273 and of H1821 + 643. Combining the HST observations of 3C 273, H1821 + 643, and PKS 0405-12, we estimate the local number density of Ly-alpha systems with rest equivalent widths larger than 0.32 A to be about 15 +/- 4 Ly-alpha lines per unit redshift. Ground-based images reveal a rich field of galaxies in the direction of PKS 0405-12, including many galaxies with the brightnesses and sizes expected if they belong to a cluster associated with the quasar. The quasar spectrum does not show any evidence for absorption at the redshift of the emission lines, indicating a covering factor of less than unity for the halos of galaxies in the cluster around PKS 0405 - 12.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Post-Starburst Signatures in Quasar Host Galaxies at z > 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Strauss, Michael A.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, William N.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2015-10-01

    Quasar host galaxies are key for understanding the relation between galaxies and the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at their centers. We present a study of 191 broad-line quasars and their host galaxies at z\\lt 1, using high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. Clear detection of stellar absorption lines allows a reliable decomposition of the observed spectra into nuclear and host components, using spectral models of quasar and stellar radiations as well as emission lines from the interstellar medium. We estimate age, mass {M}*, and velocity dispersion {σ }* of the host stars, the star formation rate (SFR), quasar luminosity, and SMBH mass {M}\\bullet , for each object. The quasars are preferentially hosted by massive galaxies with {M}*˜ {10}11 {M}⊙ characterized by stellar ages around 1 billion yr, which coincides with the transition phase of normal galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The host galaxies have relatively low SFRs and fall below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. These facts suggest that the hosts have experienced an episode of major star formation sometime in the past 1 billion yr, which was subsequently quenched or suppressed. The derived {M}\\bullet -{σ }* and {M}\\bullet -{M}* relations agree with our past measurements and are consistent with no evolution from the local universe. The present analysis demonstrates that reliable measurements of stellar properties of quasar host galaxies are possible with high-S/N fiber spectra, which will be acquired in large numbers with future powerful instruments such as the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph.

  16. Evidence for Gravitational Infall of Matter onto the Supermassive Black Hole in the Quasar PG 1211+143?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Pounds, K.; Uttley, P.; Kraemer, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Yaqoob, T.; George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.

    2005-11-01

    We report the detection of redshifted iron Kα absorption lines in the Chandra LETG spectrum of the narrow-line quasar PG 1211+143. The absorption lines are observed at 4.22 and 4.93 keV in the quasar spectrum, corresponding to 4.56 and 5.33 keV in the rest frame of PG 1211+143. From Monte Carlo simulations, the chance probability of both lines being false detections is low at 1.36×10-4. Highly redshifted ionized iron Kα (Fe XXV or Fe XXVI) is the most plausible identification for the lines at their observed energies. If identified with H-like iron Kα at 6.97 keV, then the relativistic velocity shifts required are 0.40c and 0.26c. The extreme velocities can be explained by pure gravitational redshift if the matter exists in a stable orbit within 6 gravitational radii of the black hole. This would require a Kerr metric for the black hole. Alternatively, the absorption may be the result of matter infalling directly onto the black hole, with a maximum observed velocity of 0.38c at 6Rg in the Schwarzschild metric. This matter may originate in a failed outflow or jet, which does not escape the gravitational potential of the black hole.

  17. Possible Signatures of a Cold-flow Disk from MUSE Using a z ˜ 1 Galaxy-Quasar Pair toward SDSS J1422-0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouché, N.; Finley, H.; Schroetter, I.; Murphy, M. T.; Richter, P.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Richard, J.; Wendt, M.; Kamann, S.; Epinat, B.; Cantalupo, S.; Straka, L. A.; Schaye, J.; Martin, C. L.; Péroux, C.; Wisotzki, L.; Soto, K.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Brinchmann, J.; Kollatschny, W.

    2016-04-01

    We use a background quasar to detect the presence of circumgalactic gas around a z=0.91 low-mass star-forming galaxy. Data from the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope show that the galaxy has a dust-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 4.7 ± 2.0 M⊙ yr-1, with no companion down to 0.22 M⊙ yr-1 (5σ) within 240 {h}-1 kpc (“30”). Using a high-resolution spectrum of the background quasar, which is fortuitously aligned with the galaxy major axis (with an azimuth angle α of only 15°), we find, in the gas kinematics traced by low-ionization lines, distinct signatures consistent with those expected for a “cold-flow disk” extending at least 12 kpc (3× {R}1/2). We estimate the mass accretion rate {\\dot{M}}{{in}} to be at least two to three times larger than the SFR, using the geometric constraints from the IFU data and the H i column density of log {N}{{H}{{I}}}/{{cm}}-2 ≃ 20.4 obtained from a Hubble Space Telescope/COS near-UV spectrum. From a detailed analysis of the low-ionization lines (e.g., Zn ii, Cr ii, Ti ii, Mn ii, Si ii), the accreting material appears to be enriched to about 0.4 {Z}⊙ (albeit with large uncertainties: {log} Z/{Z}⊙ =-0.4\\quad +/- \\quad 0.4), which is comparable to the galaxy metallicity (12 + log O/H = 8.7 ± 0.2), implying a large recycling fraction from past outflows. Blueshifted Mg ii and Fe ii absorptions in the galaxy spectrum from the MUSE data reveal the presence of an outflow. The Mg ii and Fe ii absorption line ratios indicate emission infilling due to scattering processes, but the MUSE data do not show any signs of fluorescent Fe ii* emission. Based on observations made at the ESO telescopes under program 080.A-0364 (SINFONI), 079.A-0600 (UVES), and as part of MUSE commissioning (ESO program 060.A-9100). Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities

  18. The double quasar 0957+561: examination of the gravitational lens hypothesis using the very large array.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, P E; Roberts, D H; Burke, B F

    1980-05-01

    A full 12-hour synthesis at 6-centimeter wavelength with the Very Large Array confirms the major features previously reported for the double quasar 0957+561. In addition, the existence of radio jets apparently associated with both quasars is demonstrated. Gravitational lens models are now favored on the basis of recent optical observations, and the radio jets place severe constraints on such models. Further radio observations of the double quasar are needed to establish the expected relative time delay in variations between the images.

  19. A theoretical analysis of the X-ray cyclotron absorption lines of the isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ai-fang; Liu, Dang-bo; Chen, Lei; Ding, Li; You, Jun-hang

    2006-07-01

    As revealed by recent observations, in the X-ray continuum of the radio quiet isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209 there exist several equidistant absorption lines, and their energies are, respectively, 0.7, 1.4 and 2.1 keV. According to the theory of quantum cyclotron radiation under the quadrupolar approximation developed in recent years, we have clarified some existing doubts and affirmed that these lines are electron cyclotron absorption lines instead of proton cyclotron lines. Besides, the spatial orientation of the spin axis of this neutron star has been theoretically determined.

  20. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line.

  1. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line. PMID:25910116

  2. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  3. The soft X ray excess in Einstein quasar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Masnou, Jean-Louis; Elvis, Martin; Mcdowell, Jonathan; Arnaud, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The soft X-ray excess component is studied for a signal to noise limited subsample of 14 quasars from the WE87 sample observed with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Detailed analysis of the IPC data, combined with Einstein Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) data where possible, and use of accurate galactic N sub H values allows estimation of the strength of any excess and improvement of constraints on the spectral slope at higher X-ray energies. A significant excess in 9 of the 14 objects is found. It is confined in all but one case to below 0.6 keV and variable in the two cases where there are multiple observations. The relation of the soft excess to other continuum properties of the quasars is investigated.

  4. Millimeter and Radio Observations of z ~ 6 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Carilli, Chris L.; Beelen, Alexandre; Bertoldi, Frank; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Menten, Karl M.; Omont, Alain; Cox, Pierre; Strauss, Michael A.; Jiang, Linhua

    2007-08-01

    We present millimeter and radio observations of 13 SDSS quasars at redshifts z~6. We observed 11 of them with the Max Planck Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO-2) at the IRAM 30 m telescope at 250 GHz and all of them with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.4 GHz. Four sources are detected by MAMBO-2 and six are detected by the VLA at the >~3 σ level. These sources, together with another six published in previous papers, yield a submillimeter/millimeter- and radio-observed SDSS quasar sample at z~6. We use this sample to investigate the far-infrared (FIR) and radio properties of optically bright quasars in the early universe. We compare this sample to lower redshift samples of quasars observed in the submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths [(sub)mm] and find that the distribution of the FIR-to-B-band optical luminosity ratio (LFIR/LB) is similar from z~2 to 6. We find a weak correlation between the FIR luminosity (LFIR) and B-band optical luminosity (LB) by including the (sub)mm observed samples at all redshifts. Some strong (sub)mm detections in the z~6 sample have radio-to-FIR ratios within the range defined by star-forming galaxies, which suggests possible coeval star-forming activity with the powerful AGN in these sources. We calculate the rest-frame radio-to-optical ratios (R*1.4=Lν,1.4GHz/Lν,4400Å) for all of the VLA-observed sources in the z~6 quasar sample. Only one radio detection in this sample, J083643.85+005453.3, has R*1.4~40 and can be considered radio-loud. There are no strong radio sources (R*1.4>=100) among these SDSS quasars at z~6. These data are consistent with, although do not set strong constraints on, a decreasing radio-loud quasar fraction with increasing redshift.

  5. Atmospheric Profiling Combining the Features of GPS ro & Mls: Satellite to Satellite Occultations Near Water & Ozone Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing climate models & their predictions requires observations that determine the state of the real climate system precisely and unambiguously, independently from models. For this purpose, we have been developing a new orbiting remote sensing system called the Active Temperature, Ozone & Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS) which is a cross between GPS RO and the Microwave Limb Sounder. ATOMMS actively probes water vapor, ozone & other absorption lines at cm & mm wavelengths in a satellite to satellite occultation geometry to simultaneously profile temperature, pressure, water vapor and ozone as well as other important constituents. Individual profiles of water vapor, temperature & pressure heights will extend from near the surface into the mesosphere with ~1%, 0.4K and 10 m precision respectively and still better accuracy, with 100 m vertical resolution. Ozone profiles will extend upward from the upper troposphere. Line of sight wind profiles will extend upwards from the mid-stratosphere. ATOMMS is a doubly differential absorption system which eliminates drift and both sees clouds and sees thru them, to deliver performance in clouds within a factor of 2 of the performance in clear skies. This all-weather sampling combined with insensitivity to surface emissivity avoids sampling biases that limit most existing satellite records. ATOMMS will profile slant liquid water in clouds & rain and as well as turbulence via scintillations ("twinkling of a star"). Using prototype ATOMMS instrumentation that we developed with funding from NSF, several ATOMMS ground field campaigns precisely measured water vapor, cloud amount, rainfall, turbulence and absorption line spectroscopy. ATOMMS's dynamic range was demonstrated as water vapor was derived to 1% precision in optical depths up to 17. We are developing high altitude aircraft to aircraft instrumentation to further demonstrate ATOMMS performance, refine spectroscopy & support future field campaigns. Our vision is a

  6. Molecules and metals in the distant universe: Sub-mm and optical spectroscopy of quasar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sean Stephen

    In order to gain a complete understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, knowledge of the atomic and molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) is required. Absorption-line spectroscopy of quasars offer a powerful and luminosity independent probe of gas to high redshifts. The sub-Damped Lyman-alpha systems (sub-DLAs; 19.0 < log NHI < 20.3), and Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs; 20.3 < log NHI), are the highest neutral hydrogen column density quasar absorbers contain most of the neutral gas available for star formation in the high-redshift Universe. This thesis presents photometric measurements of 10 quasars absorbers with redshifts 0.652 < zabs < 3.104 taken with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) on Herschel. Of these 10 objects, 3 showed fluxes > 1 Jy. In addition spectra for 5 other quasars with DLAs (0.524 < zabs < 1.173) were taken with SPIRE and Heterodyne Instrument for the far-infrared (HIFI) on Herschel. These observations, in the far-IR and sub-mm bands, were optimized for detection of molecular lines of CO, 13CO, C 18O, H2O, HCO, and the forbidden transitions of [C II] and [N II]. Two targets, the DLA towards PKS0420-014 at z = 0.633 and the DLA towards AO0235+164 at z = 0.524, had a tentative detection of C18O, and another, the DLA towards TXS0827+243 at z = 0.52476, had a tentative detection of HCO. There were a number of other 3 sigma limits, with at least one limit for each of the 5 systems. In addition to the DLAs, 2 super-DLAs (with z = 2.5036 and z = 2.045) were observed using the echellette mode on Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI). These observations, in the optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, were optimized to detect metal lines. Both absorbers show remarkably similar metallicities of ~ -1.3 to ~ -1.4 dex and comparable, definitive depletion levels, as judged from [Fe/Zn] and [Ni/Zn]. One of the absorbers shows supersolar [S/Zn] and [Si/Zn]. Using potential detections of weak Ly-alpha emission at the

  7. A DISTANT QUASAR'S BRILLIANT LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The arrow in this image, taken by a ground-based telescope, points to a distant quasar, the brilliant core of an active galaxy residing billions of light-years from Earth. As light from this faraway object travels across space, it picks up information on galaxies and the vast clouds of material between galaxies as it moves through them. The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope decoded the quasar's light to find the spectral 'fingerprints' of highly ionized (energized) oxygen, which had mixed with invisible clouds of hydrogen in intergalactic space. The quasar's brilliant beam pierced at least four separate filaments of the invisible hydrogen laced with the telltale oxygen. The presence of oxygen between the galaxies implies there are huge quantities of hydrogen in the universe. Credits: WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona. The telescope is owned and operated by the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories.

  8. "Dead quasars" in nearby galaxies?

    PubMed

    Rees, M J

    1990-02-16

    The nuclei of some galaxies undergo violent activity, quasars being the most extreme instances of this phenomenon. Such activity is probably short-lived compared to galactic lifetimes, and was most prevalent when the universe was only about one-fifth of its present age. A massive black hole seems the inevitable end point of such activity, and dead quasars should greatly outnumber active ones. In recent years, studies of stellar motions in the cores of several nearby galaxies indicate the presence of central dark masses which could be black holes. This article discusses how such evidence might be corroborated, and the potential implications for our understanding of active galaxies and black holes.

  9. Frequency doubling of 1560nm diode laser via PPLN and PPKTP crystals and frequency stabilization to rubidium absorption line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shanlong; Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-11-01

    In our experiment, a polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-pigtailed butterfly-sealed 1560nm distributed-feedback (DFB) laser diode is amplified by a 5-Watt EDFA, then a multiple-period PPLN crystal (1mm×10mm×20mm) and a single-period PPKTP crystal (1mm×2mm×30mm) are utilized to perform SHG via single pass configuration. The second harmonic power of ~ 239 mW@780 nm for PPLN and ~ 210 mW@780 nm for PPKTP are obtained with ~5W@1560 nm laser input, corresponding to SHG efficiency of ~ 5.2% for PPLN and ~ 4.4% for PPKTP, respectively. Finally the 1560 nm laser diode's frequency is locked to rubidium absorption line via SHG and rubidium absorption spectroscopy, the laser frequency drift for free-running case is ~ 56 MHz in 30 s, the residual frequency after being locked drift is ~ +/- 3.5 MHz.

  10. Atmospheric profiling via satellite to satellite occultations near water and ozone absorption lines for weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Stovern, M.; Sammler, K.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.; McCormick, C.; Griggs, E.

    2016-05-01

    Significantly reducing weather and climate prediction uncertainty requires global observations with substantially higher information content than present observations provide. While GPS occultations have provided a major advance, GPS observations of the atmosphere are limited by wavelengths chosen specifically to minimize interaction with the atmosphere. Significantly more information can be obtained via satellite to satellite occultations made at wavelengths chosen specifically to characterize the atmosphere. Here we describe such a system that will probe cm- and mmwavelength water vapor absorption lines called the Active Temperature, Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS). Profiling both the speed and absorption of light enables ATOMMS to profile temperature, pressure and humidity simultaneously, which GPS occultations cannot do, as well as profile clouds and turbulence. We summarize the ATOMMS concept and its theoretical performance. We describe field measurements made with a prototype ATOMMS instrument and several important capabilities demonstrated with those ground based measurements including retrieving temporal variations in path-averaged water vapor to 1%, in clear, cloudy and rainy conditions, up to optical depths of 17, remotely sensing turbulence and determining rain rates. We conclude with a vision of a future ATOMMS low Earth orbiting satellite constellation designed to take advantage of synergies between observational needs for weather and climate, ATOMMS unprecedented orbital remote sensing capabilities and recent cubesat technological innovations that enable a constellation of dozens of very small spacecraft to achieve many critical, but as yet unfulfilled, monitoring and forecasting needs.

  11. X-ray absorption lines suggest matter infalling onto the central black-hole of Mrk 509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadina, M.; Cappi, M.; Malaguti, G.; Ponti, G.; de Rosa, A.

    2005-11-01

    Evidence for both red- and blue-shifted absorption lines due to ionized Fe in the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 509 is reported. These features appear to be transient on time-scales as short as ~20 ks, and have been observed with two different satellites, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton. The red- and blue-shifted lines are found at E˜5.5 keV and ~8.1-8.3 keV (rest-frame), respectively. The first is seen in one out of six BeppoSAX observations, the latter is seen by both satellites. Under the assumption that the absorption is due to either H- or He-like Iron, the implied velocities for the absorbing matter are v˜0.15-0.2 c, in both outward and inward directions. An alternative explanation in terms of gravitational red-shift for the ~5.5 keV line cannot be ruled out with the current data. We argue, however, that the temporal patterns and sporadic nature of the lines are more easily reconciled with models that predict important radial motions close to the central black hole, such as the "aborted jet" model, the "thundercloud" model, or magneto-hydrodynamical models of jets and accretion-disks.

  12. Highly Ionized Iron Absorption Lines from Outflowing Gases in the X-ray Spectrum of NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Baldi, A.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Zezas, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the discovery of four absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365, at energies between 6.7 and 8.3 keV. The lines are detected with high statistical confidence (from >20 sigma for the strongest to -4 sigma for the weakest) in two XMM-Newton observations 60 ks long. We also detect the same lines, with a lower signal-to-noise ratio (but still >2 sigma for each line), in two previous shorter (-10 ks) XMM-Newton observations. The spectral analysis identifies these features as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI Kalpha and Kbeta lines, outflowing with velocities varying between -1000 and -5000 km/s among the observations. These are the highest quality detections of such lines so far. The high equivalent widths [EW (Kalpha) approximately 100 eV] and the Kalpha/Kbeta ratios imply that the lines are due to absorption of the AGN continuum by a highly ionized gas with column density NH-5?1023 cm(exp -2) at a distance of -(50-100)RS from the continuum source.

  13. Intersstellar absorption lines between 2000 and 3000 A in nearby stars observed with BUSS. [Balloon Borne Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, K. S.; Lenhart, H.; Van Der Hucht, K. A.; Kamperman, T. M.; Kondo, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Spectra obtained between 2000 and 3000 A with the Balloon Borne Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (BUSS) payload were examined for interstellar absorption lines. In bright stars, with spectral types between O9V and F5V, such lines were measured of Mg I, Mg II, Cr II, Mn II, Fe II and Zn II, with Cr II and Zn II data of especially high quality. Column densities were derived and interstellar abundances were determined for the above species. It was found that metal depletion increases with increasing E(B-V); Fe was most affected and Zn showed a small depletion for E(B-V) greater than 0.3 towards Sco-Oph. The metal column densities, derived for Alpha-And, Kappa-Dra, Alpha-Com, Alpha-Aql, and 29 Cyg were used to infer N(H I). It was shown that the ratio of Mg I to Na I is instrumental in determining the ionization structure along each line of sight. The spectra of Aql stars confirms the presence of large gas densities near Alpha-Oph. Moreover, data indicated that the Rho-Oph N(H I) value needs to be altered to 35 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm, based on observed ion ratios and analysis of the Copernicus L-alpha profile.

  14. Clustering of intermediate redshift quasars using the final SDSS III-BOSS sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; White, Martin; Weinberg, David H.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ross, Nicholas P.; Paris, Isabelle; Streblyanska, Alina

    2015-11-01

    We measure the two-point clustering of spectroscopically confirmed quasars from the final sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) on comoving scales of 4 ≲ s ≲ 22 h-1 Mpc. The sample covers 6950 deg2 [ ˜ 19 (h- 1Gpc)3] and, over the redshift range 2.2 ≤ z ≤ 2.8, contains 55 826 homogeneously selected quasars, which is twice as many as in any similar work. We deduce bQ = 3.54 ± 0.10; the most precise measurement of quasar bias to date at these redshifts. This corresponds to a host halo mass of ˜2 × 1012 h-1 M⊙ with an implied quasar duty cycle of ˜1 per cent. The real-space projected correlation function is well fitted by a power law of index 2 and correlation length r0 = (8.12 ± 0.22) h- 1 Mpc over scales of 4 ≲ rp ≲ 25 h-1 Mpc. To better study the evolution of quasar clustering at moderate redshift, we extend the redshift range of our study to z ˜ 3.4 and measure the bias and correlation length of three subsamples over 2.2 ≤ z ≤ 3.4. We find no significant evolution of r0 or bias over this range, implying that the host halo mass of quasars decreases somewhat with increasing redshift. We find quasar clustering remains similar over a decade in luminosity, contradicting a scenario in which quasar luminosity is monotonically related to halo mass at z ≈ 2.5. Our results are broadly consistent with previous BOSS measurements, but they yield more precise constraints based upon a larger and more uniform data set.

  15. The Line-of-Sight Proximity Effect and the Mass of Quasar Host Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Lidz, Adam; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We show that the Lyα optical depth statistics in the proximity regions of quasar spectra depend on the mass of the dark matter halos hosting the quasars. This is owing to both the overdensity around the quasars and the associated infall of gas toward them. For a fiducial quasar host halo mass of (3.0 +/- 1.6) × 1012 h-1 M⊙, as inferred by Croom and coworkers from clustering in the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, we show that estimates of the ionizing background (Γbkg) from proximity effect measurements could be biased high by a factor of ≈2.5 at z = 3 owing to neglecting these effects alone. The clustering of galaxies and other AGNs around the proximity effect quasars enhances the local background but is not expected to skew measurements by more than a few percent. Assuming the measurements of Γbkg based on the mean flux decrement in the Lyα forest to be free of bias, we demonstrate how the proximity effect analysis can be inverted to measure the mass of the dark matter halos hosting quasars. In ideal conditions, such a measurement could be made with a precision comparable to the best clustering constraints to date from a modest sample of only about 100 spectra. We discuss observational difficulties, including continuum flux estimation, quasar systematic redshift determination, and quasar variability, which make accurate proximity effect measurements challenging in practice. These are also likely to contribute to the discrepancies between existing proximity effect and flux decrement measurements of Γbkg.

  16. Signals from the Noise: Image Stacking for Quasars in the FIRST Survey

    SciTech Connect

    White, R L; Helfand, D J; Becker, R H; Glikman, E; deVries, W

    2006-05-05

    We present a technique to explore the radio sky into the nanoJansky regime by employing image stacking using the FIRST radio sky survey. We begin with a discussion of the non-intuitive relationship between the mean and median values of a non-Gaussian distribution in which measurements of the members of the distribution are dominated by noise. Following a detailed examination of the systematic effects present in the 20 cm VLA snapshot images that comprise FIRST, we demonstrate that image stacking allows us to recover the average properties of source populations with flux densities a factor of 30 or more below the rms noise level. With the calibration described herein, mean estimates of radio flux density, luminosity, radio loudness, etc. are derivable for any undetected source class having arcsecond positional accuracy. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by exploring the radio properties of quasars found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compute the mean luminosities and radio-loudness parameters for 41,295 quasars in the SDSS DR3 catalog. There is a tight correlation between optical and radio luminosity, with the radio luminosity increasing as the 0.72 power of optical luminosity. This implies declining radio-loudness with optical luminosity, with the most luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -30) having on average ten times lower radio-to-optical ratios than the least luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -21). There is also a striking correlation between optical color and radio loudness: quasars that are either redder or bluer than the norm are brighter radio sources. Quasars having g-r {approx} 0.8 magnitudes redder than the SDSS composite spectrum are found to have radio-loudness ratios that are higher by a factor of 8. We examine the radio properties of the subsample of quasars with broad absorption lines, finding, surprisingly, that BAL quasars have higher mean radio flux densities at all redshifts, with the greatest disparity arising in the rare low

  17. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  18. NARROW Na AND K ABSORPTION LINES TOWARD T TAURI STARS: TRACING THE ATOMIC ENVELOPE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Simon, M. N.; Edwards, S.; Heyer, M.; Rigliaco, E.; Hillenbrand, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.

    2015-11-20

    We present a detailed analysis of narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines toward nearly 40 T Tauri stars in Taurus with the goal of clarifying their origin. The Na i λ5889.95 line is detected toward all but one source, while the weaker K i λ7698.96 line is detected in about two-thirds of the sample. The similarity in their peak centroids and the significant positive correlation between their equivalent widths demonstrate that these transitions trace the same atomic gas. The absorption lines are present toward both disk and diskless young stellar objects, which excludes cold gas within the circumstellar disk as the absorbing material. A comparison of Na i and CO detections and peak centroids demonstrates that the atomic gas and molecular gas are not co-located, the atomic gas being more extended than the molecular gas. The width of the atomic lines corroborates this finding and points to atomic gas about an order of magnitude warmer than the molecular gas. The distribution of Na i radial velocities shows a clear spatial gradient along the length of the Taurus molecular cloud filaments. This suggests that absorption is associated with the Taurus molecular cloud. Assuming that the gradient is due to cloud rotation, the rotation of the atomic gas is consistent with differential galactic rotation, whereas the rotation of the molecular gas, although with the same rotation axis, is retrograde. Our analysis shows that narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines are useful tracers of the atomic envelope of molecular clouds. In line with recent findings from giant molecular clouds, our results demonstrate that the velocity fields of the atomic and molecular gas are misaligned. The angular momentum of a molecular cloud is not simply inherited from the rotating Galactic disk from which it formed but may be redistributed by cloud–cloud interactions.

  19. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY. I. DATA AND EMPIRICAL TRENDS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Conroy, Charlie

    2012-11-20

    The strength of gravity-sensitive absorption lines in the integrated light of old stellar populations is one of the few direct probes of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) outside of the Milky Way. Owing to the advent of fully depleted CCDs with little or no fringing it has recently become possible to obtain accurate measurements of these features. Here, we present spectra covering the wavelength ranges 0.35-0.55 {mu}m and 0.72-1.03 {mu}m for the bulge of M31 and 34 early-type galaxies from the SAURON sample, obtained with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on Keck. The signal-to-noise ratio is {approx}> 200 A{sup -1} out to 1 {mu}m, which is sufficient to measure gravity-sensitive features for individual galaxies and to determine how they depend on other properties of the galaxies. Combining the new data with previously obtained spectra for globular clusters in M31 and the most massive elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster, we find that the dwarf-sensitive Na I {lambda}8183, 8195 doublet and the FeH {lambda}9916 Wing-Ford band increase systematically with velocity dispersion, while the giant-sensitive Ca II {lambda}8498, 8542, 8662 triplet decreases with dispersion. These trends are consistent with a varying IMF, such that galaxies with deeper potential wells have more dwarf-enriched mass functions. In a companion paper, we use a comprehensive stellar population synthesis model to demonstrate that IMF effects can be separated from age and abundance variations and quantify the IMF variation among early-type galaxies.

  20. An ALMA Early Science survey of molecular absorption lines toward PKS 1830-211. Analysis of the absorption profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, S.; Combes, F.; Guélin, M.; Gérin, M.; Aalto, S.; Beelen, A.; Black, J. H.; Curran, S. J.; Darling, J.; V-Trung, Dinh; García-Burillo, S.; Henkel, C.; Horellou, C.; Martín, S.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Menten, K. M.; Murphy, M. T.; Ott, J.; Wiklind, T.; Zwaan, M. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first results of an ALMA spectral survey of strong absorption lines for common interstellar species in the z = 0.89 molecular absorber toward the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. The dataset brings essential information on the structure and composition of the absorbing gas in the foreground galaxy. In particular, we find absorption over large velocity intervals (≳100 km s-1) toward both lensed images of the blazar. This suggests either that the galaxy inclination is intermediate and that we sample velocity gradients or streaming motions in the disk plane, that the molecular gas has a large vertical distribution or extraplanar components, or that the absorber is not a simple spiral galaxy but might be a merger system. The number of detected species is now reaching a total of 42 different species plus 14 different rare isotopologues toward the SW image, and 14 species toward the NE line-of-sight. The abundances of CH, H2O, HCO+, HCN, and NH3 relative to H2 are found to be comparable to those in the Galactic diffuse medium. Of all the lines detected so far toward PKS 1830-211, the ground-state line of ortho-water has the deepest absorption. We argue that ground-state lines of water have the best potential for detecting diffuse molecular gas in absorption at high redshift. Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectrum (FITS format) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A112

  1. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of 13 gravitationally lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Quimby, Robert M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ( ≲ 2 arcsec) confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs ≈ 4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  2. Four Quasars above Redshift 6 Discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Delorme, Philippe; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Albert, Loic; Reylé, Céline; Hill, Gary J.; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Vinten, Phillip; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Simard, Luc; Sawicki, Marcin; Beelen, Alexandre; Cox, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshifts greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z = 6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust properties of these quasars, finding an unusual dust extinction curve for one quasar and a high far-infrared luminosity due to dust emission for another. The mean millimeter continuum flux for CFHQS quasars is substantially lower than that for SDSS quasars at the same redshift, likely due to a correlation with quasar UV luminosity. For two quasars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra, we use the spectra to investigate the ionization state of hydrogen at z > 5. For CFHQS J1509-1749 at z = 6.12 we find significant evolution (beyond a simple extrapolation of lower redshift data) in the Gunn-Peterson optical depth at z > 5.4. The line of sight to this quasar has one of the highest known optical depths at z approx 5.8. An analysis of the sizes of the highly ionized near-zones in the spectra of two quasars at z = 6.12 and 6.43 suggest that the intergalactic medium surrounding these quasars was substantially ionized before these quasars turned on. Together, these observations point toward an extended reionization process, but we caution that cosmic variance is still a major limitation in z > 6 quasar observations.

  3. THE DISAPPEARANCE OF A NARROW Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN QUASAR SDSS J165501.31+260517.4

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhifu; Qin Yiping; Gu Minfeng E-mail: ypqin@126.com

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, we present for the first time the discovery of the disappearance of a narrow Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption system from the spectra of the quasar SDSS J165501.31+260517.4 (z{sub e} = 1.8671). This absorber is located at z{sub abs} = 1.7877 and has a velocity offset of 8423 km s{sup -1} with respect to the quasar. According to the velocity offset and the line variability, this narrow Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption system is likely intrinsic to the quasar. Since the corresponding UV continuum emission and the absorption lines of another narrow Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption system at z{sub abs} = 1.8656 are very stable, we believe that the disappearance of the absorption system is unlikely to be caused by the change in ionization of absorption gas. Instead, it likely arises from the motion of the absorption gas across the line of sight.

  4. First Connection between Cold Gas in Emission and Absorption: CO Emission from a Galaxy-Quasar Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeleman, Marcel; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Zwaan, Martin A.; Kanekar, Nissim; Christensen, Lise; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; van Kampen, Eelco; Møller, Palle; Zafar, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    We present the first detection of molecular emission from a galaxy selected to be near a projected background quasar using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The ALMA detection of CO(1-0) emission from the z = 0.101 galaxy toward quasar PKS 0439-433 is coincident with its stellar disk and yields a molecular gas mass of Mmol ≈ 4.2 × 109 M⊙ (for a Galactic CO-to-H2 conversion factor), larger than the upper limit on its atomic gas mass. We resolve the CO velocity field, obtaining a rotational velocity of 134 ± 11 km s-1 and a resultant dynamical mass of ≥4 × 1010 M⊙. Despite its high metallicity and large molecular mass, the z = 0.101 galaxy has a low star formation rate, implying a large gas consumption timescale, larger than that typical of late-type galaxies. Most of the molecular gas is hence likely to be in a diffuse extended phase, rather than in dense molecular clouds. By combining the results of emission and absorption studies, we find that the strongest molecular absorption component toward the quasar cannot arise from the molecular disk, but is likely to arise from diffuse gas in the galaxy’s circumgalactic medium. Our results emphasize the potential of combining molecular and stellar emission line studies with optical absorption line studies to achieve a more complete picture of the gas within and surrounding high-redshift galaxies.

  5. QUART: Quasar hosts Unveiled by high Angular Resolution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley; Murray, Norman W.; Armus, Lee; Larkin, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the new QUART survey that aims to resolve high-redshift (z = 1.5 - 2.5) radio-quiet and radio-loud quasi stellar object (QSO) host galaxies using the integral field spectrograph (IFS) OSIRIS, and the Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) system. The combination of AO and IFS provides the necessary contrast to disentangle the bright-unresolved QSO from the underlying faint host galaxy with unprecedented sensitivity. We study the ionized gas in these systems to sub-kiloparsec scales, yielding essential constraints on the resolved host galaxies dynamics, morphologies, star formation rates, metallicities, and nebular emission diagnostics. We combine OSIRIS and AO observations with multi-wavelength data sets from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Very Large Array to better understand the multiple phases of the ISM and stellar population properties of the hosts. Radio-quiet QSOs have shown little-to-no star formation and no evidence of extended QSO narrow line emission. In contrast, our latest OSIRIS results of radio-loud z~1.5-2 quasars have revealed evidence for both concurrent star formation and extended quasar narrow line emission with strong outflows. These outflows are co-spatial with structure observed in the radio data, typically with the path of the quasar jet and/or lobe structure. These winds are highly extended (8-12 kpc) and show broad emission line profiles (extending up to 2,500 km/s), indicating strong evidence of quasar “feedback” in their host galaxies.

  6. Discovery of a narrow line quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J.; Liebert, J.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Steiner, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A stellar object is reported which, while having X-ray and optical luminosities typical of quasars, has narrow permitted and forbidden emission lines over the observed spectral range. The narrow-line spectrum is high-excitation, the Balmer lines seem to be recombinational, and a redder optical spectrum than that of most quasars is exhibited, despite detection as a weak radio source. The object does not conform to the relationships between H-beta parameters and X-ray flux previously claimed for a large sample of the active galactic nuclei. Because reddish quasars with narrow lines, such as the object identified, may not be found by the standard techniques for the discovery of quasars, the object may be a prototype of a new class of quasars analogous to high-luminosity Seyfert type 2 galaxies. It is suggested that these objects cannot comprise more than 10% of all quasars.

  7. DISCOVERY OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN THE CLOVERLEAF QUASAR AT z = 2.56

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Emprechtinger, M.; Peng, R.; Neufeld, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high-redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we detect the HF J = 1-0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object at z = 2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the {approx}6{sigma} level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/N{sub H} ratio, HF accounts for at least {approx}10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  8. Abundances of O, Mg, S, Cr, Mn, Ti, Ni and Zn from absorption lines of neutral gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud in front of R136

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, K. S.; Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Savage, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    Weak absorption lines of C I, O I, Mg I, Mg II, Si I, Si II, P I, Cl I, Cr II, Mn II, Fe I, Ni II, Zn II, CO and C2 are detected in neutral gas in front of the 30 Doradus H II region by IUE spectra of R 136. The Large Magellanic Cloud abundances from the absorption lines are a factor of 2 or 3 below those of the Milky Way, in agreement with emission line study results. Neutral gas density and temperature are estimated from the observed excitation and ionization to be about 300/cu cm and 100 K, respectively; this implies a gas pressure of 30,000/cu cm K.

  9. Molecular gas in the host galaxy of a quasar at redshift z = 6.42.

    PubMed

    Walter, Fabian; Bertoldi, Frank; Carilli, Chris; Cox, Pierre; Lo, K Y; Neri, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Omont, Alain; Strauss, Michael A; Menten, Karl M

    2003-07-24

    Observations of molecular hydrogen in quasar host galaxies at high redshifts provide fundamental constraints on galaxy evolution, because it is out of this molecular gas that stars form. Molecular hydrogen is traced by emission from the carbon monoxide molecule, CO; cold H2 itself is generally not observable. Carbon monoxide has been detected in about ten quasar host galaxies with redshifts z > 2; the record-holder is at z = 4.69 (refs 1-3). Here we report CO emission from the quasar SDSS J114816.64 + 525150.3 (refs 5, 6) at z = 6.42. At that redshift, the Universe was only 1/16 of its present age, and the era of cosmic reionization was just ending. The presence of about 2 x 1010 M\\circ of H2 in an object at this time demonstrates that molecular gas enriched with heavy elements can be generated rapidly in the youngest galaxies.

  10. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    SciTech Connect

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Basa, S.; Biagi, S.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; and others

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of 1.08× 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.

  11. Quasars and Active Galaxies: A Reading List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1988-01-01

    Contains the annotated bibliographies of introductory books and sections of books, recent introductory articles, more advanced articles, and more advanced books dealing with quasars and active galaxies. (CW)

  12. "Dead quasars" in nearby galaxies?

    PubMed

    Rees, M J

    1990-02-16

    The nuclei of some galaxies undergo violent activity, quasars being the most extreme instances of this phenomenon. Such activity is probably short-lived compared to galactic lifetimes, and was most prevalent when the universe was only about one-fifth of its present age. A massive black hole seems the inevitable end point of such activity, and dead quasars should greatly outnumber active ones. In recent years, studies of stellar motions in the cores of several nearby galaxies indicate the presence of central dark masses which could be black holes. This article discusses how such evidence might be corroborated, and the potential implications for our understanding of active galaxies and black holes. PMID:17746076

  13. Extreme-velocity quasar outflows and the role of X-ray shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, F.; Chartas, G.; McGraw, S.; Rodriguez Hidalgo, P.; Shields, J.; Capellupo, D.; Charlton, J.; Eracleous, M.

    2013-10-01

    Quasar accretion disc winds observed via broad absorption lines (BALs) in the UV produce strong continuous absorption in X-rays. The X-ray absorber is believed to serve critically as a radiative shield to keep the outflow ionizations low enough for radiative driving. However, previous studies have shown that `mini-BAL' and narrow absorption line (NAL) outflows have dramatically less X-ray absorption than BALs. Here, we examine X-ray and rest-frame UV spectra of eight mini-BAL quasars with outflow speeds in the range 0.1-0.2c to test the hypothesis that these extreme speeds require a strong shield. We find that the X-ray absorption is weak or moderate, with neutral-equivalent column densities NH < few × 1022 cm-2, consistent with mini-BALs at lower speeds. We use photoionization models to show that the amount of shielding consistent with our data is too weak to control the outflow ionizations and, therefore, it is not important for the acceleration. Shielding in complex geometries also seems unlikely because the alleged shield would need to extinguish the ionizing far-UV flux while avoiding detection in X-rays and the near-UV. We argue that the outflow ionizations are kept moderate, instead, by high gas densities in small clouds. If the mini-BALs form at radial distances of the order of R ˜ 2 pc from the central quasar (broadly consistent with theoretical models and with the mini-BAL variabilities observed here and in previous work), and the total column densities in the mini-BAL gas are NH ≲ 1021 cm-2, then the total radial extent of outflow clouds is only ΔRclouds ≲ 3 × 1013 cm in cases of no/weak shielding or ΔRclouds ≲ 3 × 1014 cm behind the maximum shield allowed by our data. This implies radial filling factors ΔRclouds/R ≲ 5 × 10- 6 or ≲ 5 × 10- 5 for the unshielded or maximally shielded cases, respectively. Compared to the transverse sizes ≳ 8 × 1015 cm (based on measured line depths), the outflows have shapes like thin `pancakes' viewed

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Narrow absorption lines of lensed QSO J1029+2623 (Misawa+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, T.; Saez, C.; Charlton, J. C.; Eracleous, M.; Chartas, G.; Bauer, F. E.; Inada, N.; Uchiyama, H.

    2016-08-01

    We acquired high-resolution spectra of the brightest two of the three lensed images of the quasar SDSS J1029+2623, A and B with V=18.72 and 18.67mags, with the VLT using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) in queue mode (ESO program 092.B-0512(A)). The observations were performed from 2014 January 28 to February 26, which is ~4yrs after the first observation on 2010 February 10 (Misawa+ 2013AJ....145...48M), and ~2 months before the third observation on 2014 April 4 (Misawa+ 2014ApJ...794L..20M) with Subaru using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS). The wavelength coverage is 3300-6600Å with R~33000. Log of observations: -------------------------------------------------------------- Target Obs. date Instrument R Ref -------------------------------------------------------------- SDSS J1029+2623 A 2010 Feb 10 Subaru/HDS 30000 1 SDSS J1029+2623 A 2014 Jan 28-Feb 3 VLT/UVES 33000 2 SDSS J1029+2623 A 2014 Apr 4 Subaru/HDS 36000 3 SDSS J1029+2623 B 2010 Feb 10 Subaru/HDS 30000 1 SDSS J1029+2623 B 2014 Feb 4-26 VLT/UVES 33000 2 SDSS J1029+2623 B 2014 Apr 4 Subaru/HDS 36000 3 -------------------------------------------------------------- Ref: 1 = Misawa et al. 2013AJ....145...48M, 2 = This paper, 3 = Misawa et al. 2014ApJ...794L..20M -------------------------------------------------------------- (1 data file).

  15. OPTOPUS observations of quasar candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.

    1987-06-01

    OPTOPUS is a fiber-optic instrument for multiple-object spectroscopy with the Boiler & Chivens spectrograph and a CCD detector at the 3.6-m telescope. The system has been described in detail by the Optical Instrumentation Group (1985, The Messenger 41,25). Its application for observing Halley's comet has been reported by Lund and Surdej (1986, The Messenger 43, 1). Here another "classical" use of multiple-object spectroscopy is presented: followup observations of quasar candidates.

  16. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  17. X-rays from the redshift 7.1 quasar ULAS J1120+0641

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Simpson, C.; Mortlock, D. J.; Warren, S. J.; Hewett, P. C.; Venemans, B. P.; McMahon, R. G.

    2014-05-01

    We present X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the redshift z = 7.084 radio-quiet quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton. The quasar is detected as a point source with both observatories. The Chandra observation provides a precise position, confirming the association of the X-ray source and the quasar, while a sufficient number of photons is detected in the XMM-Newton observation to yield a meaningful X-ray spectrum. In the XMM-Newton observation, the quasar has a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4.7 ± 0.9 × 1044 erg s-1 and a spectral slope α = 1.6^{+0.4}_{-0.3} (where fν ∝ ν-α). The quasar appears to have dimmed in the 15 months between the two observations, with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 1.8^{+1.0}_{-0.7}× 10^{45} erg s-1 during the Chandra observation. We derive optical-to-X-ray spectral slopes αOX of 1.76 ± 0.07 and 1.54^{+0.09}_{-0.08} at the times of the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, respectively, consistent with the range of αOX found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. The very soft X-ray spectrum suggests that the quasar is accreting above the Eddington rate, L/L_Edd = 5^{+15}_{-4}, compared to L/L_Edd = 1.2^{+0.6}_{-0.5} derived from the rest-frame ultraviolet. Super-Eddington accretion would help to reduce the discrepancy between the age of the quasar implied by the small size of the ionized near-zone in which it sits (<107 yr) and the characteristic e-folding time (2.5 × 107 yr if L/LEdd = 2). Such super-Eddington accretion would also alleviate the challenging constraints on the seed black hole mass provided that the quasar has been rapidly accreting throughout its history. The remnant of an individual Population III star is a plausible progenitor if an average L/LEdd > 1.46 has been maintained over the quasar's lifetime. L71

  18. Quasar target selection fiber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.; Yanny, B.

    1996-05-01

    We present estimates of the efficiency for finding QSOs as a function of limiting magnitude and galactic latitude. From these estimates, we have formulated a target selection strategy that should net 80,000 QSOs in the north galactic cap with an average of 70 fibers per plate, not including fibers reserved for high-redshift quasars. With this plan, we expect 54% of the targets to be QSOs. The North Galactic Cap is divided into two zones of high and low stellar density. We use about five times as many fibers for QSO candidates in the half of the survey with the lower stellar density as we use in the half with higher stellar density. The current plan assigns 15% of the fibers to FIRST radio sources; if these are not available, those fibers would be allocated to lower probability QSO sources, dropping the total number of QSOs by a small factor (5%). We will find about 17,000 additional quasars in the southern strips, and maybe a few more at very high redshift. Use was made of two data sets: the star and quasar simulated test data generated by Don Schneider, and the data from UJFN plate surveys by Koo (1986) and Kron (1980). This data was compared to results from the Palomar-Green Survey and a recent survey by Pat Osmer and collaborators.

  19. Near-Infrared Imaging of Six Metal-rich Quasar Absorber Galaxy Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie A.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.

    2011-06-01

    Absorption lines in quasar spectra allow us to locate and study intervening galaxies. In order to obtain a clearer picture of these absorber galaxies, we have used the Near-Infrared Camera Fabry-Perot System at Apache Point Observatory to obtain near-infrared broadband images in one or more filters (J and Ks ) of six quasar fields containing metal-rich low-z damped or sub-damped Lyα systems. These data allow us to search for the galaxies and constrain their luminosities. Candidate absorber galaxies are detected at 2farcs01-7farcs38 separation from the quasar in three out of six fields in the J and Ks bands at >3σ level with luminosities ranging from log(L/L sun) = 10.44-10.36 in the J band (for E-Sc type galaxies) and log(L/L sun) = 11.59-10.03 in the Ks band for our detections. We place limits on the remaining fields with no detections of log(L/L sun) <10.83-9.75 for the J band and log(L/L sun) <10.43-10.05 for the Ks band. We are also able to utilize Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra for each field to calculate optical fluxes and limits as well as limits on star formation rate via [O II]λ3727 emission in spectra. Our data, combined with other recent imaging results for metal-rich absorbers, suggest a possible positive correlation between absorber metallicity and galaxy luminosity, although the samples are still small.

  20. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF SIX METAL-RICH QUASAR ABSORBER GALAXY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, Lorrie A.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.

    2011-06-15

    Absorption lines in quasar spectra allow us to locate and study intervening galaxies. In order to obtain a clearer picture of these absorber galaxies, we have used the Near-Infrared Camera Fabry-Perot System at Apache Point Observatory to obtain near-infrared broadband images in one or more filters (J and K{sub s} ) of six quasar fields containing metal-rich low-z damped or sub-damped Ly{alpha} systems. These data allow us to search for the galaxies and constrain their luminosities. Candidate absorber galaxies are detected at 2.''01-7.''38 separation from the quasar in three out of six fields in the J and K{sub s} bands at >3{sigma} level with luminosities ranging from log(L/L{sub sun}) = 10.44-10.36 in the J band (for E-Sc type galaxies) and log(L/L{sub sun}) = 11.59-10.03 in the K{sub s} band for our detections. We place limits on the remaining fields with no detections of log(L/L{sub sun}) <10.83-9.75 for the J band and log(L/L{sub sun}) <10.43-10.05 for the K{sub s} band. We are also able to utilize Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra for each field to calculate optical fluxes and limits as well as limits on star formation rate via [O II]{lambda}3727 emission in spectra. Our data, combined with other recent imaging results for metal-rich absorbers, suggest a possible positive correlation between absorber metallicity and galaxy luminosity, although the samples are still small.

  1. The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution: A comparison of optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution are discussed, based on comparison of available data on optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs. It is assumed that the red shift of quasars is cosmological and the results are expressed in the framework of the Lambda = 0, Q sub Q = 1 cosmological model. The predictions of various density evolution laws are compared with observations of an optically selected sample of quasars and quasar samples from radio catalogs. The differences between the optical luminosity functions, the red shift distributions and the radio to optical luminosity ratios of optically selected quasars and radio quasars rule out luminosity functions where there is complete absence of correlation between radio and optical luminosities. These differences also imply that Schmidt's (1970) luminosity function, where there exists a statistical correlation between radio and optical luminosities, although may be correct for high red shift objects, disagrees with observation at low red shifts. These differences can be accounted for by postulating existence of two classes (1 and 2) of objects.

  2. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs. I. Detection and statistical incidence of Fe K-shell absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Yaqoob, T.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines have been detected in recent years between 7 and 10 keV in the X-ray spectra of several radio-quiet AGNs. The derived blue-shifted velocities of the lines can often reach mildly relativistic values, up to 0.2-0.4c. These findings are important because they suggest the presence of a previously unknown massive and highly ionized absorbing material outflowing from their nuclei, possibly connected with accretion disk winds/outflows. Aims: The scope of the present work is to statistically quantify the parameters and incidence of the blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines through a uniform analysis on a large sample of radio-quiet AGNs. This allows us to assess their global detection significance and to overcome any possible publication bias. Methods: We performed a blind search for narrow absorption features at energies greater than 6.4 keV in a sample of 42 radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. A simple uniform model composed by an absorbed power-law plus Gaussian emission and absorption lines provided a good fit for all the data sets. We derived the absorption lines parameters and calculated their detailed detection significance making use of the classical F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We detect 36 narrow absorption lines on a total of 101 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observations. The number of absorption lines at rest-frame energies higher than 7 keV is 22. Their global probability to be generated by random fluctuations is very low, less than 3 × 10-8, and their detection have been independently confirmed by a spectral analysis of the MOS data, with associated random probability <10-7. We identify the lines as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonant absorption. They are systematically blue-shifted, with a velocity distribution ranging from zero up to ~0.3c, with a peak and mean value at ~0.1c. We detect variability of the lines on both EWs and blue-shifted velocities among different XMM-Newton observations

  3. Quasars: Active nuclei of young galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komberg, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    The hypothetical properties of 'young' galaxies and possible methods of observing them are discussed. It is proposed that star formation first takes place in the central regions of protogalaxies which may appear as quasar-like objects. An evolutionary scheme is outlined in which the radio quasars are transformed in time into the nuclei of radio galaxies.

  4. Quasars - powerhouses at the edge of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, M.

    2000-06-01

    1999 was the 70th anniversary of Edwin Hubble's seminal publication1 showing a cosmological redshift in galaxies. More recent discoveries of quasars have extended the universe's boundaries back in time nearer to the Big Bang. Some amateur spectrograms of quasars are presented showing a cosmological redshift.

  5. HST Imaging of Quasar Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. J.; Impey, C. D.; Foltz, C. B.

    1996-12-01

    A sample of 16 quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS) has been imaged with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample was selected to cover a range of radio luminosity typical of optically selected quasars in narrow intervals of redshift (0.4 <= z >= 0.5) and absolute magnitude (-25 < MB < -23). Two-dimensional cross-correlation techniques were used to determine the magnitudes of the host galaxies and quasar nuclear components, as well as the axial ratios of the hosts. The derived host galaxy magnitudes are near or below L(*) and are correlated with the quasar nuclear magnitude, similar to the trend in near-infrared host galaxy luminosity found by McLeod & Rieke (1995, ApJ, 454, L77). There is no discernable difference in host galaxy luminosity between radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars in the sample. Preliminary analysis of the host galaxy morphologies indicates that many, including several of the radio-quiet quasars, are probably in early type galaxies, consistent with other high-resolution imaging studies of quasar hosts. However, the distribution of axial ratios is not consistent with a population of early type galaxies. The hosts in the LBQS sample are rather flattened, with half having axial ratios <= 0.5. It is possible that these are inclined disk systems or galaxies with substantial bar components.

  6. Quasars as very-accurate clock synchronizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Quasars can be employed to synchronize global data communications, geophysical measurements, and atomic clocks. It is potentially two to three orders of magnitude better than presently-used Moon-bounce system. Comparisons between quasar and clock pulses are used to develop correction or synchronization factors for station clocks.

  7. CONSTRAINING SUB-PARSEC BINARY SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN QUASARS WITH MULTI-EPOCH SPECTROSCOPY. I. THE GENERAL QUASAR POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2013-09-20

    We perform a systematic search for sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes (BHs) in normal broad-line quasars at z < 0.8, using multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy of the broad Hβ line. Our working model is that (1) one and only one of the two BHs in the binary is active; (2) the active BH dynamically dominates its own broad-line region (BLR) in the binary system, so that the mean velocity of the BLR reflects the mean velocity of its host BH; (3) the inactive companion BH is orbiting at a distance of a few R{sub BLR}, where R{sub BLR} ∼ 0.01-0.1 pc is the BLR size. We search for the expected line-of-sight acceleration of the broad-line velocity from binary orbital motion by cross-correlating SDSS spectra from two epochs separated by up to several years in the quasar rest frame. Out of ∼700 pairs of spectra for which we have good measurements of the velocity shift between two epochs (1σ error ∼40 km s{sup –1}), we detect 28 systems with significant velocity shifts in broad Hβ, among which 7 are the best candidates for the hypothesized binaries, 4 are most likely due to broad-line variability in single BHs, and the rest are ambiguous. Continued spectroscopic observations of these candidates will easily strengthen or disprove these claims. We use the distribution of the observed accelerations (mostly non-detections) to place constraints on the abundance of such binary systems among the general quasar population. Excess variance in the velocity shift is inferred for observations separated by longer than 0.4 yr (quasar rest frame). Attributing all the excess to binary motion would imply that most of the quasars in this sample must be in binaries, that the inactive BH must be on average more massive than the active one, and that the binary separation is at most a few times the size of the BLR. However, if this excess variance is partly or largely due to long-term broad-line variability, the requirement of a large population of close

  8. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelgrims, V.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two LQGs at redshift ~1.3. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range 1.0-1.8. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least 20 members. This result independently supports the observations at optical wavelengths. We additionally found that when the richness of an LQG decreases, the quasar spin axis becomes preferentially perpendicular to the LQG major axis and that no correlation is detected for quasar groups with fewer than 10 members.

  9. Probing the Interstellar Medium and Star Formation of the Most Luminous Quasar at z = 6.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Wu, Xue-Bing; Neri, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Carilli, Chris L.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Bertoldi, Frank; Strauss, Michael A.; Li, Qiong; Wang, Feige; Riechers, Dominik A.; Jiang, Linhua; Omont, Alain; Wagg, Jeff; Cox, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z = 6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH), 1.24× {10}10 {M}ȯ , that is known at z > 6. We detect the [C ii] 158 μm fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353, 260, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C ii] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C ii] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ∼ 1000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 from that measured with the quasar Mg ii line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides a direct constraint on the molecular gas mass, which is about (1.0+/- 0.3)× {10}10 {M}ȯ . We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/- 0.7)× {10}12 {L}ȯ , and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C ii]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010 ± 0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z ∼ 6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C ii] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH–galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.

  10. Systematic Effects in Large-Scale Angular Power Spectra of Photometric Quasars and Implications for Constraining Primordial Non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2013-06-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is predicted to lead to enhanced halo clustering on very large scales. Photometric quasars, which can be seen from cosmological redshifts z > 2 even in wide-shallow optical surveys, are promising tracers for constraining non-Gaussianity using this effect. However, large-scale systematics can also mimic this signature of non-Gaussianity. In order to assess the contribution of systematic effects, we cross-correlate overdensity maps of photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 6 (DR6) in different redshift ranges. We find that the maps are significantly correlated on large scales, even though we expect the angular distributions of quasars at different redshifts to be uncorrelated. This implies that the quasar maps are contaminated with systematic errors. We investigate the use of external templates that provide information on the spatial dependence of potential systematic errors to reduce the level of spurious clustering in the quasar data. We find that templates associated with stellar density, the stellar color locus, airmass, and seeing are major contaminants of the quasar maps, with seeing having the largest effect. Using template projection, we are able to decrease the significance of the cross-correlation measurement on the largest scales from 9.2σ to 5.4σ. Although this is an improvement, the remaining cross-correlation suggests the contamination in this quasar sample is too great to allow a competitive constraint on fNL by correlations internal to this sample. The SDSS quasar catalog exhibits spurious number density fluctuations of approximately 2% rms, and we need a contamination level less than 1% (0.6%) in order to measure values of fNL less than 100 (10). Properly dealing with these systematics will be paramount for future large scale structure surveys that seek to constrain non-Gaussianity.

  11. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy of astronomical and laboratory sources at 8.5 micron. [absorption line profiles of nitrogen oxide and black body emission from Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M.; Kostiuk, T.; Cohen, S.; Buhl, D.; Vonthuna, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The first infrared heterodyne spectrometer using tuneable semiconductor (PbSe) diode lasers has been constructed and was used near 8.5 micron to measure absorption line profiles of N2O in the laboratory and black body emission from the Moon and from Mars. Spectral information was recorded over a 200 MHz bandwidth using an 8-channel filter bank. The resolution was 25 MHz and the minimum detectable (black body) power was 1 x 10 to the minus 16th power watts for 8 minutes of integration. The results demonstrate the usefulness of heterodyne spectroscopy for the study of remote and local sources in the infrared.

  12. Prospects for determining the cosmological helium-3 to helium-4 ratio via absorption-line studies of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Bowyer, S.

    1985-01-01

    The prospects for determining the interstellar (He-3)/(He-4) ratio via absorption-line studies in the extreme ultraviolet are considered. A high-resolution extreme-ultraviolet spectrometer fed by a 1-meter-class telescope similar to that discussed in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Report (1983) is assumed, and it is found that detection of He-3 may be possible with less than three days of observing time. To measure the (He-3)/(He-4) ratio with sufficient precision to determine the number of light neutrino species will require over 50 days of integration time for each object studied.

  13. HUBBLE CAPTURES MERGER BETWEEN QUASAR AND GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows evidence fo r a merger between a quasar and a companion galaxy. This surprising result might require theorists to rethink their explanations for the nature of quasars, the most energetic objects in the universe. The bright central object is the quasar itself, located several billion light-years away. The two wisps on the (left) of the bright central object are remnants of a bright galaxy that have been disrupted by the mutual gravitational attraction between the quasar and the companion galaxy. This provides clear evidence for a merger between the two objects. Since their discovery in 1963, quasars (quasi-stellar objects) have been enigmatic because they emit prodigious amounts of energy from a very compact source. The most widely accepted model is that a quasar is powered by a supermassive black hole in the core of a galaxy. These new observations proved a challenge for theorists as no current models predict the complex quasar interactions unveiled by Hubble. The image was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. Credit: John Bahcall, Institute for Advanced Study, NASA.

  14. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  15. Quasar Classification Using Color and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christina M.; Richards, Gordon

    2015-08-01

    We use the Non-parametric Bayesian Classification Kernel Density Estimation (NBC KDE) quasar selection algorithm (Richards et al. 2004) to identify 36,569 type 1 quasar candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field using the combination of optical photometry and variability. 5-band coadded optical photometry is taken from the SDSS-I/II to a depth of r ~ 22.4; from these data variability parameters are calculated by fitting the structure function of each object in each band with a power law using 10 to >100 observations for timescales from ~1 day to ~8 years. Selection was based on a training sample of 13,221 spectroscopically-confirmed type 1 quasars from SDSS-I/II and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Using variability alone, colors alone, and combining variability and colors we achieve 91%, 93%, and 97% quasar completeness and 98%, 98%, and 97% efficiency respectively, with particular improvement in the selection of quasars at 2.7 < z < 3.5 where quasars and stars have similar optical colors. The 23,043 quasar candidates that are not spectroscopically confirmed reach a depth of coadd i ~ 22: 0 and 21,380 (92.8%) are dimmer than coadded i -band magnitude of 20.2, the cut off for spectroscopic follow-up for SDSSDR7.

  16. Quasars, blazars, and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Dermer, C D; Schlickeiser, R

    1992-09-18

    Before the launch of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), the only source of >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma radiation known outside our galaxy was the quasar 3C 273. After less than a year of observing, 13 other extragalactic sources have been discovered with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on CGRO, and it is expected that many more will be found before the full sky survey is complete. All 14 sources show evidence of blazar properties at other wavelengths; these properties include high optical polarization, extreme optical variability, flat-spectrum radio emission associated with a compact core, and apparent superluminal motion. Such properties are thought to be produced by those few, rare extragalactic radio galaxies and quasars that are favorably aligned to permit us to look almost directly down a relativistically outflowing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole. Although the origin of the gamma rays from radio jets is a subject of much controversy, the gamma-ray window probed by CGRO is providing a wealth of knowledge about the central engines of active galactic nuclei and the most energetic processes occurring in nature.

  17. Quasars, blazars, and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Dermer, C D; Schlickeiser, R

    1992-09-18

    Before the launch of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), the only source of >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma radiation known outside our galaxy was the quasar 3C 273. After less than a year of observing, 13 other extragalactic sources have been discovered with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on CGRO, and it is expected that many more will be found before the full sky survey is complete. All 14 sources show evidence of blazar properties at other wavelengths; these properties include high optical polarization, extreme optical variability, flat-spectrum radio emission associated with a compact core, and apparent superluminal motion. Such properties are thought to be produced by those few, rare extragalactic radio galaxies and quasars that are favorably aligned to permit us to look almost directly down a relativistically outflowing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole. Although the origin of the gamma rays from radio jets is a subject of much controversy, the gamma-ray window probed by CGRO is providing a wealth of knowledge about the central engines of active galactic nuclei and the most energetic processes occurring in nature. PMID:17841159

  18. Understanding post-starburst quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cales, Sabrina L.

    Post-starburst quasars (PSQs) are an interesting type of hybrid galaxy that harbor both a post-starburst stellar population and luminous AGN. The starburst is hundreds of millions of years old with a mass on the order of 10 billion solar masses. This type of hybrid galaxy provides a natural breading ground for studying the role active galactic nuclei (AGN) play in galaxy evolution (i.e., the black hole mass-galaxy bulge mass relation). My thesis work has centered on testing the idea that, at z ˜ 0.3, PSQs are a phase in the life of galaxies triggered by external events (e.g., mergers, tidal interactions) or whether they are a more heterogeneous population in which multiple mechanisms can contribute to the class (i.e., external events and internal processes). This project is devoted to understanding the properties of PSQs and is comprised of three sub-projects: (i) two-dimensional image analysis with HST imaging and characterization of PSQ morphologies, (ii) determination of stellar population ages and masses and quasar black hole masses and accretion rates via spectral modeling of Keck and KPNO spectroscopy, (iii) comparisons of PSQ properties with other galaxy types and models. Finally, I briefly outline my conclusions in the context of AGN/galaxy evolution.

  19. OPTIMAL TIME-SERIES SELECTION OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2011-03-15

    We present a novel method for the optimal selection of quasars using time-series observations in a single photometric bandpass. Utilizing the damped random walk model of Kelly et al., we parameterize the ensemble quasar structure function in Sloan Stripe 82 as a function of observed brightness. The ensemble model fit can then be evaluated rigorously for and calibrated with individual light curves with no parameter fitting. This yields a classification in two statistics-one describing the fit confidence and the other describing the probability of a false alarm-which can be tuned, a priori, to achieve high quasar detection fractions (99% completeness with default cuts), given an acceptable rate of false alarms. We establish the typical rate of false alarms due to known variable stars as {approx}<3% (high purity). Applying the classification, we increase the sample of potential quasars relative to those known in Stripe 82 by as much as 29%, and by nearly a factor of two in the redshift range 2.5 < z < 3, where selection by color is extremely inefficient. This represents 1875 new quasars in a 290 deg{sup 2} field. The observed rates of both quasars and stars agree well with the model predictions, with >99% of quasars exhibiting the expected variability profile. We discuss the utility of the method at high redshift and in the regime of noisy and sparse data. Our time-series selection complements well-independent selection based on quasar colors and has strong potential for identifying high-redshift quasars for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and other cosmology studies in the LSST era.

  20. Varying alpha: New constraints from seasonal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-09-15

    We analyze the constraints obtained from new atomic clock data on the possible time variation of the fine structure 'constant' and the electron-proton mass ratio, and show how they are strengthened when the seasonal variation of the Sun's gravitational field at the Earth's surface is taken into account. We compare these bounds with those obtainable from tests of the weak equivalence principle and high redshift observations of quasar absorption spectra.

  1. The X-ray spectrum and spectral energy distribution of FIRST J155633.8+351758: a LoBAL quasar with a probable polar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, Robert C.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Ganguly, Rajib; Shang, Zhaohui; DiPompeo, Michael; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Lacy, Mark; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results of a new 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer S-array (ACIS-S) observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized `FeLoBAL' quasar FIRST J1556+3517. We investigated a number of models of varied sophistication to fit the 531-photon spectrum. These models ranged from simple power laws to power laws absorbed by hydrogen gas in differing ionization states and degrees of partial covering. Preferred fits indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity, i.e. an intrinsic, dereddened and unabsorbed optical to X-ray spectral index of -1.7. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Γ = 1.7 or flatter at a >99 per cent confidence for a neutral hydrogen absorber model). Absorption is present, with a column density a few times 1023 cm-2, with both partially ionized models and partially covering neutral hydrogen models providing good fits. We present several lines of argument that suggest the fraction of X-ray emissions associated with the radio jet is not large. We combine our Chandra data with observations from the literature to construct the spectral energy distribution of FIRST J1556+3517 from radio to X-ray energies. We make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio jet, optical dust reddening and X-ray absorption, in order to recover a probable intrinsic spectrum. The quasar FIRST J1556+3517 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with a reddened optical/UV spectrum, a Doppler-boosted but intrinsically weak radio jet and an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars.

  2. Merging Galaxies Create a Binary Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    Astronomers have found the first clear evidence of a binary quasar within a pair of actively merging galaxies. Quasars are the extremely bright centers of galaxies surrounding super-massive black holes, and binary quasars are pairs of quasars bound together by gravity. Binary quasars, like other quasars, are thought to be the product of galaxy mergers. Until now, however, binary quasars have not been seen in galaxies that are unambiguously in the act of merging. But images of a new binary quasar from the Carnegie Institution's Magellan telescope in Chile show two distinct galaxies with "tails" produced by tidal forces from their mutual gravitational attraction. "This is really the first case in which you see two separate galaxies, both with quasars, that are clearly interacting," says Carnegie astronomer John Mulchaey who made observations crucial to understanding the galaxy merger. Most, if not all, large galaxies, such as our galaxy the Milky Way, host super-massive black holes at their centers. Because galaxies regularly interact and merge, astronomers have assumed that binary super-massive black holes have been common in the Universe, especially during its early history. Black holes can only be detected as quasars when they are actively accreting matter, a process that releases vast amounts of energy. A leading theory is that galaxy mergers trigger accretion, creating quasars in both galaxies. Because most such mergers would have happened in the distant past, binary quasars and their associated galaxies are very far away and therefore difficult for most telescopes to resolve. The binary quasar, labeled SDSS J1254+0846, was initially detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a large scale astronomical survey of galaxies and over 120,000 quasars. Further observations by Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and colleagues* using NASA's Chandra's X-ray Observatory and telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona and Palomar

  3. Incidence of strong Mg II absorbers towards different types of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna

    2013-10-01

    We report the first comparative study of strong Mg II absorbers (Wr ≥ 1.0 Å) seen towards radio-loud quasars of core-dominated (CDQ) and lobe-dominated (LDQ) types and normal quasars (QSOs). The CDQ and LDQ samples were derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 after excluding known `broad-absorption-line' quasars and blazars. The Mg II associated absorption systems having a velocity offset v < 5000 km s-1 from the systemic velocity of the background quasar were also excluded. Existing spectroscopic data for redshift-matched sightlines of 3975 CDQs and 1583 LDQs, covering an emission redshift range 0.39-4.87, were analysed and 864 strong Mg II absorbers were found, covering the redshift range 0.45-2.17. The conclusions reached using this well-defined large data set of strong Mg II absorbers are (i) the number density, dN/dz, towards CDQs shows a small, marginally significant excess (˜9 per cent at 1.5σ significance) over the estimate available for QSOs; (ii) in the redshift space, this difference is reflected in terms of a 1.6σ excess of dN/dz over the QSOs, within the narrow redshift interval 1.2-1.8; (iii) the dN/dβ distribution (with β = v/c) for CDQs shows a significant excess (at 3.75σ level) over the distribution found for a redshift- and luminosity-matched sample of QSOs, at β in the range 0.05-0.1. This leads us to infer that a significant fraction of strong Mg II absorption systems seen in this offset velocity range are probably associated with the CDQs and might be accelerated into the line of sight by their powerful jets and/or due to the accretion-disc outflows close to our direction. Support to this scenario comes from a consistency check in which we consider only the spectral range corresponding to β > 0.2. The computed redshift distribution for strong Mg II absorbers towards CDQs now shows excellent agreement with that known for QSOs, as indeed is expected for purely intervening absorption systems. Thus, it appears that for

  4. Investigation of SO3 absorption line for in situ gas detection inside combustion plants using a 4-μm-band laser source.

    PubMed

    Tokura, A; Tadanaga, O; Nishimiya, T; Muta, K; Kamiyama, N; Yonemura, M; Fujii, S; Tsumura, Y; Abe, M; Takenouchi, H; Kenmotsu, K; Sakai, Y

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated 4-μm-band SO3 absorption lines for in situSO3 detection using a mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation in a quasi-phase-matched LiNbO3 waveguide. In the wavelength range of 4.09400-4.10600 μm, there were strong SO3 absorption lines. The maximum absorption coefficient at a concentration of 170 ppmv was estimated to be about 3.2×10-5  cm-1 at a gas temperature of 190°C. In coexistence with H2O, the reduction of the SO3 absorption peak height was observed, which was caused by sulfuric acid formation. We discuss a method of using an SO3 equilibrium curve to derive the total SO3 molecule concentration. PMID:27607263

  5. Far-Infrared Line Emission from High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D. J.; Cox, P.; Hunter, T. R.; Malhotra, S.; Phillips, T. G.; Yun, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent millimeter and submillimeter detections of line emission in high redshift objects have yielded new information and constraints on star formation at early epochs. Only CO transitions and atomic carbon transitions have been detected from these objects, yet bright far-infrared lines such as C+ at 158 microns and N+ at 205 microns should be fairly readily detectable when redshifted into a submillimeter atmospheric window. We have obtained upper limits for C+ emission &om two high redshift quasars, BR1202-0725 at z=4.69 and BRI1335-0415 at z=4.41. These limits show that the ratio of the C+ line luminosity to the total far-infrared luminosity is less than 0.0l%, ten times smaller than has been observed locally. Additionally, we have searched for emission in the N+ 205 micron line from the Cloverleaf quasar, H1413+117, and detected emission in CO J=7-6. The N+ emission is found to be below the amount predicted based on comparison to the only previous detection of this line, in the starburst galaxy M82.

  6. Unveiling hidden black holes in the cosmic web: Dark matter halos of WISE quasars from Planck CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, Ryan

    The WISE and Planck surveys have now produced groundbreaking data sets which, in concert, can be exploited to obtain revolutionary constraints on the evolution of structure in the Universe. One particularly powerful application of WISE has been to uncover millions of the previously "hidden" obscured quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes that are shrouded in gas and dust and so are not detectable using traditional ground-based optical and near-IR techniques. Recently, Planck has produced the most precise all-sky map to date of dark matter structures via the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose to combine these data sets to obtain a uniquely powerful measurement of the link between rapidly growing black holes and their host dark matter structures, by cross-correlating the density field of WISE-selected quasars with the CMB lensing convergence maps obtained from Planck. This proposal will build on our current ADAP program (NNX12AE38G), which studies the host dark matter halos of WISE-selected quasars via spatial clustering. NNX12AE38G involves a detailed characterization of the redshifts, luminosities, and spectral energy distributions of WISE-selected quasars and uses new techniques to measure how quasars cluster around themselves. NNX12AE38G has contributed to more than 10 journal articles and 5 conference proceedings. Building on our current work, an even more complete understanding of the link between black holes and their host dark matter structures is possible if we employ an independent method for measuring the clustering bias (and thus characteristic halo mass) of the quasar population. This has recently become possible using CMB lensing maps. In the past two years, our team has conducted an initial analysis covering 2500 square degrees using WISE-selected quasars and lensing maps from the South Pole Telescope (Geach, Hickox, Myers et al., 2013), and have implemented this technique with Planck over part of the SDSS region

  7. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  8. Quasars, pulsars, black holes and HEAO's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolitte, R. F.; Moritz, K.; Whilden, R. D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Astronomical surveys are discussed by large X-ray, gamma ray, and cosmic ray instruments carried onboard high-energy astronomy observatories. Quasars, pulsars, black holes, and the ultimate benefits of the new astronomy are briefly discussed.

  9. Spectrophotometry of Michigan-Tololo quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, D. W.; Macalpine, G. M.; Weedman, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Emission-line quasar characteristics are confirmed for 80% of the objects observed, including at least four new quasars with spectral features indicative of supernova-like outflow. Approximately 73% of the redshifts predicted from the discovery plates are found accurate with a mean error in z of 0.03, and a large range of z (from about 0.1 to 3.16) is represented in the sample. The observed redshift distribution for quasars is marginally consistent with a constant co-moving quasar density above z approximately 2.0. The shape of the redshift distribution may be used as an isotropy probe with a cosmic time resolution of a few times one-hundred million years in the early universe; therefore, continued surveys of this sort are important even if accurate magnitudes are not determined.

  10. Quasars as tracers of cosmic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewska, J.; Czerny, B.; Bilicki, M.; Hryniewicz, K.; Krupa, M.; Petrogalli, F.; Pych, W.; Kurcz, A.; Udalski, A.

    2016-10-01

    Quasars, as the most luminous persistent sources in the Universe, have broad applications for cosmological studies. In particular, they can be employed to directly measure the expansion history of the Universe, similarly to SNe Ia. The advantage of quasars is that they are numerous, cover a broad range of redshifts, up to z = 7, and do not show significant evolution of metallicity with redshift. The idea is based on the relation between the time delay of an emission line and the continuum, and the absolute monochromatic luminosity of a quasar. For intermediate redshift quasars, the suitable line is Mg II. Between December 2012 and March 2014, we performed five spectroscopic observations of the QSO CTS C30.10 (z = 0.900) using the South African Large Telesope (SALT), supplemented with photometric monitoring, with the aim of determining the variability of the line shape, changes in the total line intensity and in the continuum. We show that the method is very promising.

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Myers, Adam D.; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; Hirata, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; O'Connell, Ross; Huff, Eric; Schlegel, David; Slosar, Anže; Weinberg, David; Strauss, Michael; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z=0.5 and z=2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans 0~ 11,00 square degrees and probes a volume of 80 h-3 Gpc3. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ~ 25% over a bin width of δl ~ 10-15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (0l ~ 2-3). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of fNL = -113+154-154 (1σ error). We next assume that the bias of quasar and galaxy distributions can be obtained independently from quasar/galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements (such as those in Sherwin et al. (2013)). This can be facilitated by spectroscopic observations of the sources, enabling the redshift distribution to be completely determined, and allowing precise estimates of the bias

  12. Dust in the Quasar Wind (Artist Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dusty grains -- including tiny specks of the minerals found in the gemstones peridot, sapphires and rubies -- can be seen blowing in the winds of a quasar, or active black hole, in this artist's concept. The quasar is at the center of a distant galaxy.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such quasar winds might have forged these dusty particles in the very early universe. The findings are another clue in an ongoing cosmic mystery: where did all the dust in our young universe come from?

    Dust is crucial for efficient star formation as it allows the giant clouds where stars are born to cool quickly and collapse into new stars. Once a star has formed, dust is also needed to make planets and living creatures. Dust has been seen as far back as when the universe was less than a tenth of its current age, but how did it get there? Most dust in our current epoch forms in the winds of evolved stars that did not exist when the universe was young.

    Theorists had predicted that winds from quasars growing in the centers of distant galaxies might be a source of this dust. While the environment close to a quasar is too hot for large molecules like dust grains to survive, dust has been found in the cooler, outer regions. Astronomers now have evidence that dust is created in these outer winds.

    Using Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, scientists found a wealth of dust grains in a quasar called PG2112+059 located at the center of a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. The grains - including corundum (sapphires and rubies); forsterite (peridot); and periclase (naturally occurring in marble) - are not typically found in galaxies without quasars, suggesting they might have been freshly formed in the quasar's winds.

  13. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  14. Luminosity calibration of low redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    European (SERC) were combined with U.S. shifts on the IUE in order to obtain the long integration times required to record spectra of faint quasars. LWR spectra of the nearby giant radio galaxy Centarus A(NGC 5548) was attempted in an effort to determine the chemical composition and stellar populations in this unusual galaxy. The IUE results from the low redshift quasar study, combined with the data from an extensive ground based survey, are described.

  15. Understanding Quasar Variability through Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silano, Daniel; Wiita, P. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Unwin, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    We are monitoring four flat spectrum radio quasars (blazars) and one powerful radio galaxy, Cygnus A, to search for variability on timescales comparable to the light crossing time of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole and the base of the relativistic jet. Kepler's essentially continuous monitoring at 1 min and 30 min cadences allows us to obtain high quality light curves extending for months, something not possible from even semi-dedicated collections of ground based optical telescopes. We can characterize the variability on timescales ranging from several minutes through many days to see if some optical variability in quasars might be due to a bright feature in the accretion disk as it approaches the last stable orbit, or, more likely for blazars, nearly coherent inhomogeneities in the jet, possibly in a helical structure or temporarily dominant turbulent cell. We have analyzed both the raw and "corrected” Kepler data to determine the power spectral densities of the four blazars as well as their structure functions. The principal challenge to our Kepler data analysis is that the automatic pipeline removal of day-to-week-scale drifts also removes real astrophysical brightness variations and so we have concentrated so far on the raw data while we work on better removal of only the instrumental drifts. Our preliminary results on short timescale variations indicate that three of the four blazars showed modest ( 15%) variations and relatively slow variability during three months of monitoring, but the fourth also shows many flares ( 3%) on several-day timescales, particularly during one quarter. While a visual inspection of this light curve gives a hint of a quasi-period, this is not borne out by the structure function and PDS analyses. This work is supported by NASA/Kepler grant GO20018.

  16. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z = 4 (a few 1011 M⊙) to z = 1 (a few 1012 M⊙), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increases with redshift, which is in qualitative agreement with observations. Our bias value is lower than the observed values at high redshifts, implying that we need some mechanisms that make quasars inactive in low-mass haloes and/or that make them more active in high-mass haloes.

  17. A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity.

    PubMed

    Graham, Matthew J; Djorgovski, S G; Stern, Daniel; Glikman, Eilat; Drake, Andrew J; Mahabal, Ashish A; Donalek, Ciro; Larson, Steve; Christensen, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Quasars have long been known to be variable sources at all wavelengths. Their optical variability is stochastic and can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms; it is also well-described statistically in terms of a damped random walk model. The recent availability of large collections of astronomical time series of flux measurements (light curves) offers new data sets for a systematic exploration of quasar variability. Here we report the detection of a strong, smooth periodic signal in the optical variability of the quasar PG 1302-102 with a mean observed period of 1,884 ± 88 days. It was identified in a search for periodic variability in a data set of light curves for 247,000 known, spectroscopically confirmed quasars with a temporal baseline of about 9 years. Although the interpretation of this phenomenon is still uncertain, the most plausible mechanisms involve a binary system of two supermassive black holes with a subparsec separation. Such systems are an expected consequence of galaxy mergers and can provide important constraints on models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  18. Jansky VLA Imaging of Heavily Obscured, Luminous Quasars at Redshifts ~2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, Adam; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Patil, Palavi; Whittle, Mark; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present JVLA A and B array observations in X-band (8-12 GHz) of a sample of radio powerful, bolometrically luminous, but optically obscured quasars. The quasars were selected using a cross-match between WISE mid-IR sources brighter than 7 mJ at 22 mu and NVSS and/or FIRST radio surveys, with a further constraint that the sources were optically faint. The survey aims to select young quasars with young radio sources at redshifts z ~ 1-3. Ultimately, we wish to study the role that radio jets play in quasar driven feedback. Our VLA observations provide fundamental information on radio source size, structure, power and spectral index, all of which shed light on the properties of the young radio source. We will present images and data on 155 objects from our primary sample WISE-NVSS sample of 156.The majority of sources are found to be compact, steep-spectrum, and sub-galactic in scale, with a significant minority of resolved doubles, triples, and core-jets. Using radio data at other wavelengths taken from the literature, we use SED fits to identify or constrain the turn-over frequencies. Combining size and turn-over frequency, the majority of the sources are found to be CSS, GPS or HFPs, consistent with young radio source ages.

  19. What can we learn about quasars and unification scheme with the microlensing technique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.

    2015-09-01

    Our understanding of the gravitational lensing phenomenon has deeply progressed since the discovery of the "first" gravitationally lensed object in 1979 by Walsh and collaborators. With more than hundreds of quasars known to be multiply imaged by a foreground galaxy, gravitational lensing is now a powerful astrophysical and cosmological tool. The stars located in lensing galaxies produce small deflections of the light rays coming from distant quasars which adds to the main deflection from the lensing galaxy. Because the deflection caused by the stars is small, the micro-images they produce remain unresolved. Only a flickering of the flux and spectral deformation of lensed quasars images are observed. I will explain how this micro-lensing effect, can be used to study the inner region of distant quasars. Specifically, I will zoom out from the inner accretion disc up to the torus, and give an overview of the information which can be retrieved at each of these scales. I will give a special emphasis on the constraint we can put on the orientation/geometry of the various emitting regions (i.e. disc, broad line region, torus) at each of these scales.

  20. A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity.

    PubMed

    Graham, Matthew J; Djorgovski, S G; Stern, Daniel; Glikman, Eilat; Drake, Andrew J; Mahabal, Ashish A; Donalek, Ciro; Larson, Steve; Christensen, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Quasars have long been known to be variable sources at all wavelengths. Their optical variability is stochastic and can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms; it is also well-described statistically in terms of a damped random walk model. The recent availability of large collections of astronomical time series of flux measurements (light curves) offers new data sets for a systematic exploration of quasar variability. Here we report the detection of a strong, smooth periodic signal in the optical variability of the quasar PG 1302-102 with a mean observed period of 1,884 ± 88 days. It was identified in a search for periodic variability in a data set of light curves for 247,000 known, spectroscopically confirmed quasars with a temporal baseline of about 9 years. Although the interpretation of this phenomenon is still uncertain, the most plausible mechanisms involve a binary system of two supermassive black holes with a subparsec separation. Such systems are an expected consequence of galaxy mergers and can provide important constraints on models of galaxy formation and evolution. PMID:25561176

  1. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S. G.; Ellison, Sara L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  2. Insights on the X-ray weak quasar phenomenon from XMM-Newton monitoring of PHL 1092

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniutti, Giovanni; Fabian, Andy; Gallo, Luigi; Brandt, Niel; Schneider, Donald

    2012-09-01

    PHL 1092 is a z~0.4 high-luminosity counterpart of the class of Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. In 2008, PHL 1092 was found to be in a remarkably low X-ray flux state during an XMM-Newton observation. Its 2 keV flux density had dropped by a factor of ~260 with respect to a previous observation performed 4.5 yr earlier. The UV flux remained almost constant, resulting in a significant steepening of the optical-to-X-ray slope alpha_ox from -1.57 to -2.51, making PHL 1092 one of the most extreme X-ray weak quasars with no observed broad absorption lines (BALs) in the UV. We have monitored the source since 2008 with XMM-Newton, producing a simultaneous UV and X-ray database spanning almost 10 yr in total in the activity of the source. We apply a series of physically motivated models to the data with the goal of explaining as self-consistently as possible the UV-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and the extreme X-ray and alpha_ox variability. We discuss our results in the context of the class of non-BAL X-ray weak quasars and so-called PHL 1811 analogs.

  3. A Stringent Limit on Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Absorption Line Multiplets in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants have varied throughout the history of the Universe. The standard model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor does it require their constancy over space and time. Here, we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/4πɛ0 ħc by comparing transitions and line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II λ 1608, λ 2344, λ 2374, λ 2383, λ 2587, and λ 2600 observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectrum observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduce a constraint of Δα/α = (-0.157± 0.300)×10-6 at redshift z = 1.15. At present, this represents the tightest limit on Δα/α in early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  4. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF SDSS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jonathan; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Nagai, Daisuke; Zheng Zheng; Shen Yue

    2012-08-10

    We present an estimate of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) over the full range of one- and two-halo scales, 0.02 h{sup -1} Mpc < r{sub p} < 120 h{sup -1} Mpc. This was achieved by combining data from SDSS DR7 on large scales and Hennawi et al. (with appropriate statistical corrections) on small scales. Our combined clustering sample is the largest spectroscopic quasar clustering sample to date, containing {approx}48, 000 quasars in the redshift range 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.5 with median redshift 1.4. We interpret these precise 2PCF measurements within the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework and constrain the occupation functions of central and satellite quasars in dark matter halos. In order to explain the small-scale clustering, the HOD modeling requires that a small fraction of z {approx} 1.4 quasars, f{sub sat} = (7.4 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, be satellites in dark matter halos. At z {approx} 1.4, the median masses of the host halos of central and satellite quasars are constrained to be M{sub cen} = 4.1{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and M{sub sat} = 3.6{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }, respectively. To investigate the redshift evolution of the quasar-halo relationship, we also perform HOD modeling of the projected 2PCF measured by Shen et al. for SDSS quasars with median redshift 3.2. We find tentative evidence for an increase in the mass scale of quasar host halos-the inferred median mass of halos hosting central quasars at z {approx} 3.2 is M{sub cen} = 14.1{sup +5.8}{sub -6.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }. The cutoff profiles of the mean occupation functions of central quasars reveal that quasar luminosity is more tightly correlated with halo mass at higher redshifts. The average quasar duty cycle around the median host halo mass is inferred to be f{sub q

  5. THE PROPERTIES OF QUASAR HOSTS AT THE PEAK OF THE QUASAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kotilainen, Jari K.; Falomo, Renato; Decarli, Roberto; Treves, Aldo; Uslenghi, Michela; Scarpa, Riccardo E-mail: renato.falomo@oapd.inaf.i E-mail: aldo.treves@uninsubria.i E-mail: riccardo.scarpa@gtc.iac.e

    2009-10-01

    We present near-infrared imaging obtained with ESO VLT/ISAAC of a sample of 16 low luminosity radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) at the epoch around the peak of the quasar activity (2 < z < 3), aimed at investigating their host galaxies. For 11 quasars, we are able to detect the host galaxies and derive their properties, while for the other 5 quasars, upper limits to the host luminosity are estimated. The luminosities of the host galaxies of RQQs at high redshift are in the range of those of massive inactive elliptical galaxies. This work complements our previous systematic study of quasar hosts aimed to trace the cosmological luminosity evolution of the host galaxies up to z approx 2 and extends our pilot study of a few luminous quasars at z > 2. The luminosity trend with a cosmic epoch resembles that observed for massive inactive galaxies, suggesting a similar star formation history. In particular, both quasar host galaxies and massive inactive galaxies appear mostly assembled already at the peak age of the quasar activity. This result is of key importance for testing the models of joint formation and evolution of galaxies and their active nuclei.

  6. Are Quasar Jets Matter Or Poynting Flux Dominated?

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Madejski, Greg M.; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Begelman, Mitchell C.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-10-03

    If quasar jets are accelerated by magnetic fields but terminate as matter dominated, where and how does the transition occur between the Poynting-dominated and matter-dominated regimes? To address this question, we study constraints which are imposed on the jet structure by observations at different spatial scales. We demonstrate that observational data are consistent with a scenario where the acceleration of a jet occurs within 10{sup 3-4}R{sub g}. In this picture, the non-thermal flares--important defining attributes of the blazar phenomenon--are produced by strong shocks formed in the region where the jet inertia becomes dominated by matter. Such shocks may be formed due to collisions between the portions of a jet accelerated to different velocities, and the acceleration differentiation is very likely to be related to global MHD instabilities.

  7. SDSS J163459.82+204936.0: A Ringed Infrared-luminous Quasar with Outflows in Both Absorption and Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Xufen; Lyu, Jianwei; Shi, Xiheng; Shu, Xinwen; Jiang, Peng; Ji, Tuo; Wang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Shu-Fen; Sun, Luming

    2016-05-01

    SDSS J163459.82+204936.0 is a local (z = 0.1293) infrared-luminous quasar with L IR = 1011.91 {L}ȯ . We present a detailed multiwavelength study of both the host galaxy and the nucleus. The host galaxy, appearing as an early-type galaxy in the optical images and spectra, demonstrates violent, obscured star formation activities with SFR ≈ 140 {M}ȯ yr‑1, estimated from either the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or IR luminosity. The optical to NIR spectra exhibit a blueshifted narrow cuspy component in Hβ, He i λλ5876, 10830, and other emission lines consistently with an offset velocity of ≈900 {km} {{{s}}}-1, as well as additional blueshifting phenomena in high-ionization lines (e.g., a blueshifted broad component of He i λ10830 and the bulk blueshifting of [O iii]λ5007), while there exist blueshifted broad absorption lines (BALs) in Na i D and He i λλ3889, 10830, indicative of the active galactic nucleus outflows producing BALs and emission lines. Constrained mutually by the several BALs in the photoionization simulations with Cloudy, the physical properties of the absorption line outflow are derived as follows: density 104 < n H ≲ 105 cm‑3, ionization parameter 10‑1.3 ≲ U ≲ 10‑0.7 , and column density 1022.5 ≲ N H ≲ 1022.9 cm‑2, which are similar to those derived for the emission line outflows. This similarity suggests a common origin. Taking advantages of both the absorption lines and outflowing emission lines, we find that the outflow gas is located at a distance of ˜48–65 pc from the nucleus and that the kinetic luminosity of the outflow is 1044–1046 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. J1634+2049 has a off-centered galactic ring on the scale of ˜30 kpc that is proved to be formed by a recent head-on collision by a nearby galaxy for which we spectroscopically measure the redshift. Thus, this quasar is a valuable object in the transitional phase emerging out of dust enshrouding as depicted by the co-evolution scenario invoking galaxy

  8. SDSS J163459.82+204936.0: A Ringed Infrared-luminous Quasar with Outflows in Both Absorption and Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Xufen; Lyu, Jianwei; Shi, Xiheng; Shu, Xinwen; Jiang, Peng; Ji, Tuo; Wang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Shu-Fen; Sun, Luming

    2016-05-01

    SDSS J163459.82+204936.0 is a local (z = 0.1293) infrared-luminous quasar with L IR = 1011.91 {L}⊙ . We present a detailed multiwavelength study of both the host galaxy and the nucleus. The host galaxy, appearing as an early-type galaxy in the optical images and spectra, demonstrates violent, obscured star formation activities with SFR ≈ 140 {M}⊙ yr-1, estimated from either the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or IR luminosity. The optical to NIR spectra exhibit a blueshifted narrow cuspy component in Hβ, He i λλ5876, 10830, and other emission lines consistently with an offset velocity of ≈900 {km} {{{s}}}-1, as well as additional blueshifting phenomena in high-ionization lines (e.g., a blueshifted broad component of He i λ10830 and the bulk blueshifting of [O iii]λ5007), while there exist blueshifted broad absorption lines (BALs) in Na i D and He i λλ3889, 10830, indicative of the active galactic nucleus outflows producing BALs and emission lines. Constrained mutually by the several BALs in the photoionization simulations with Cloudy, the physical properties of the absorption line outflow are derived as follows: density 104 < n H ≲ 105 cm-3, ionization parameter 10-1.3 ≲ U ≲ 10-0.7 , and column density 1022.5 ≲ N H ≲ 1022.9 cm-2, which are similar to those derived for the emission line outflows. This similarity suggests a common origin. Taking advantages of both the absorption lines and outflowing emission lines, we find that the outflow gas is located at a distance of ˜48-65 pc from the nucleus and that the kinetic luminosity of the outflow is 1044-1046 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. J1634+2049 has a off-centered galactic ring on the scale of ˜30 kpc that is proved to be formed by a recent head-on collision by a nearby galaxy for which we spectroscopically measure the redshift. Thus, this quasar is a valuable object in the transitional phase emerging out of dust enshrouding as depicted by the co-evolution scenario invoking galaxy merger (or

  9. A HIGH RESOLUTION VIEW OF THE WARM ABSORBER IN THE QUASAR MR 2251-178

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Turner, T. J.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2013-10-20

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the warm absorber in a nearby quasar, MR 2251-178 (z = 0.06398), is presented. The observations were carried out in 2011 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, with net exposure times of approximately 400 ks each. A multitude of absorption lines from C to Fe are detected, revealing at least three warm absorbing components ranging in ionization parameter from log (ξ/erg cm s{sup –1}) = 1-3 with outflow velocities ∼< 500 km s{sup –1}. The lowest ionization absorber appears to vary between the Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, which implies a radial distance of between 9 and 17 pc from the black hole. Several broad soft X-ray emission lines are strongly detected, most notably from He-like oxygen, with FWHM velocity widths of up to 10,000 km s{sup –1}, consistent with an origin from broad-line region (BLR) clouds. In addition to the warm absorber, gas partially covering the line of sight to the quasar appears to be present, with a typical column density of N{sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}. We suggest that the partial covering absorber may arise from the same BLR clouds responsible for the broad soft X-ray emission lines. Finally, the presence of a highly ionized outflow in the iron K band from both the 2002 and 2011 Chandra HETG observations appears to be confirmed, which has an outflow velocity of –15600 ± 2400 km s{sup –1}. However, a partial covering origin for the iron K absorption cannot be excluded, resulting from low ionization material with little or no outflow velocity.

  10. Ritz wavelengths of Fe I, Si II and Ni II for quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The study of absorption lines in the spectra of galaxies along the line of sight to distant quasars can give important information about the abundances, ionization and kinematics of atoms within these galaxies. They have also been used to study the variability of the fine structure constant at high redshifts. However, the laboratory wavelengths need to be known to better than 6 parts in 108 (20 ms-1). A paper by M. Murphy and J. C. Berengut (2014, MNRAS 438,388) includes a table of spectral lines for which the laboratory wavelength uncertainties are greater than this, including 13 resonance lines of Fe I, 11 lines of Ni II, and 4 lines of Si II.Improved wavelengths for these lines were derived by re-analyzing archival spectra of iron hollow cathode lamps and a silicon carbide Penning discharge lamp. These spectra have previously been used in a comprehensive analysis of the spectrum of Fe I (Nave et al. 1994, ApJS 94, 221) and in a study of Si II, Si IV, and C IV for quasar spectroscopy (Griesmann & Kling, 2000, ApJ 536, L113). By re-optimizing the energy levels of Fe I, the absolute uncertainty of the resonance lines has been reduced by over a factor of 2 and the relative uncertainty by an order of magnitude. A similar analysis for Si II gives a improved values for the resonance lines with wavelength uncertainties of around 4 parts in 108. Analysis of new spectra of Ni II is in progress.

  11. Discovery of a cyclotron absorption line in the spectrum of the binary X-ray pulsar 4U 1538 - 52 observed by Ginga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.; Woo, Jonathan W.; Nagase, Fumiaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakao, Taro

    1990-01-01

    A cyclotron absorption line near 20 keV has been found in the spectrum of the massive eclipsing binary X-ray pulsar 4U 1538 - 52 in observations with the Ginga observatory. The line is detected throughout the 529 s pulse cycle with a variable equivalent width that has its maximum value during the smaller peak of the two-peak pulse profile. It is found that the profile of the pulse and the phase-dependence of the cyclotron line can be explained qualitatively by a pulsar model based on recent theoretical results on the properties of pencil beams emitted by accretion-heated slabs of magnetized plasma at the magnetic poles of a neutron star. The indicated field at the surface of the neutron star is 1.7 (1 + z) x 10 to the 12th G, where z is the gravitational redshift.

  12. Quasar evolution - Not a deficit at 'low' redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, Y.; Schiller, N.

    1983-01-01

    Hawkins and Stewart (1981) have argued that the conventional interpretation of complete quasar samples in terms of a cosmological evolution of quasars is not unique. It has been suggested that these data can also be interpreted as due to a deficit in the density of quasars. Hawkins and Stewart have argued that such a deficit could be either apparent, due to an observational selection which biases against the inclusion of low-z quasars, or real, due to a lower density of quasars at low redshifts. The present investigation is concerned with this new interpretation. In order to test the interpretation of Hawkins and Stewart (1981) as directly as possible, the investigation is restricted to the same type of quasar samples considered by Hawkins and Stewart. It is found that the obtained results contradict clearly Hawkins and Stewart's assertion. Quasar evolution is not just a deficit of quasars at low redshifts, neither apparent nor real.

  13. Beacons in Time: Maarten Schmidt and the Discovery of Quasars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Tells the story of Maarten Schmidt and the discovery of quasars. Discusses the decomposition of light, crucial observations and solving astronomical mysteries. Describes spectroscopic analysis used in astronomy and its application to quasars. (CW)

  14. Discovery of a bright quasar without a massive host galaxy.

    PubMed

    Magain, Pierre; Letawe, Géraldine; Courbin, Frédéric; Jablonka, Pascale; Jahnke, Knud; Meylan, Georges; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2005-09-15

    A quasar is thought to be powered by the infall of matter onto a supermassive black hole at the centre of a massive galaxy. Because the optical luminosity of quasars exceeds that of their host galaxy, disentangling the two components can be difficult. This led in the 1990s to the controversial claim of the discovery of 'naked' quasars. Since then, the connection between quasars and galaxies has been well established. Here we report the discovery of a quasar lying at the edge of a gas cloud, whose size is comparable to that of a small galaxy, but whose spectrum shows no evidence for stars. The gas in the cloud is excited by the quasar itself. If a host galaxy is present, it is at least six times fainter than would normally be expected for such a bright quasar. The quasar is interacting dynamically with a neighbouring galaxy, whose gas might be feeding the black hole.

  15. A METAL-STRONG AND DUST-RICH DAMPED Ly{alpha} ABSORPTION SYSTEM TOWARD THE QUASAR SDSS J115705.52+615521.7

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Ge Jian; Hamann, Fred; Xavier Prochaska, J.

    2012-11-20

    We report the discovery of an unusual, extremely dust-rich and metal-strong damped Ly{alpha} absorption system (DLA) at a redshift z{sub a} = 2.4596 toward the quasar SDSS J115705.52+615521.7 with an emission-line redshift z{sub e} = 2.5125. The quasar spectrum, taken in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, shows a very red color and a number of metal absorption lines, including C II, Al II, Si II, Fe II, and Zn II, which are confirmed and further characterized by follow-up spectroscopy made with the Multiple Mirror Telescope. Its neutral hydrogen column density N {sub HI} = 10{sup 21.8{+-}0.2} cm{sup -2} is among the highest values measured in quasar DLAs. The measured metal column density is N {sub ZnII} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 13.8} cm{sup -2}, which is about 1.5 times larger than the largest value in any previously observed quasar DLAs. We derive the extinction curve of the dusty DLA using a new technique, which is an analog of the 'pair method' widely used to measure extinction curves in the Milky Way (MW). The best-fit curve is an MW-like law with a significant broad feature centered around 2175 A in the rest frame of the absorber. The measured extinction A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.92 mag is unprecedentedly high in quasar DLAs. After applying an extinction correction, the i-band absolute magnitude of the quasar is as high as M{sub i} Almost-Equal-To -29.4 mag, placing it as one of the most luminous quasars ever known. The large gas-phase relative abundance of [Zn/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 1.0 indicates that metals are heavily depleted onto dust grains in the absorber. The dust depletion level is between that of the warm and cool clouds in the MW. This discovery is suggestive of the existence of a rare yet important population of dust-rich DLAs with both high metallicities and high column densities, which may have significant impact on the measurement of the cosmic evolution of neutral gas mass density and metallicity.

  16. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Willott, Chris J.; Im, Myungshin; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  17. A Survey of z>5.8 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Discovery of Three New Quasars and the Spatial Density of Luminous Quasars at z~6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Narayanan, Vijay K.; Lupton, Robert H.; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Pentericci, Laura; Leggett, S. K.; Haiman, Zoltán; Gunn, James E.; Ivezić, Željko; Schneider, Donald P.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brinkmann, J.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Csabai, István; Doi, Mamoru; Fukugita, Masataka; Geballe, Tom; Grebel, Eva K.; Harbeck, Daniel; Hennessy, Gregory; Lamb, Don Q.; Miknaitis, Gajus; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert; Okamura, Sadanori; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Prada, Francisco; Richards, Gordon T.; Szalay, Alex; York, Donald G.

    2001-12-01

    We present the results from a survey of i-dropout objects selected from ~1550 deg2 of multicolor imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to search for luminous quasars at z>~5.8. Objects with i*-z*>2.2 and z*<20.2 are selected, and follow-up J-band photometry is used to separate L- and T-type cool dwarfs from high-redshift quasars. We describe the discovery of three new quasars, SDSSp J083643.85+005453.3 (z=5.82), J130608.26+035626.3 (z=5.99), and J103027.10+052455.0 (z=6.28). The quasar SDSSp J083643.85+005453.3 is a radio source with flux of 1.1 mJy at 20 cm. The spectra of all three quasars show strong and broad Lyα+N V emission lines and very strong Lyα forest absorption, with a mean continuum decrement DA>0.90. The ARC 3.5 m spectrum of SDSSp J103027.10+052455.0 shows that over a range of ~300 Å immediately blueward of the Lyα emission, the average transmitted flux is only 0.003+/-0.020 times that of the continuum level, consistent with zero flux over a ~300 Å range of the Lyα forest region and suggesting a tentative detection of the complete Gunn-Peterson trough. The existence of strong metal lines in the quasar spectra suggests early metal enrichment in the quasar environment. The three new objects, together with the previously published z=5.8 quasar SDSSp J104433.04-012502.2, form a complete color-selected flux-limited sample at z>~5.8. We estimate the selection function of this sample, taking into account the estimated variations in the quasar spectral energy distribution, as well as observational photometric errors. We find that at z=6, the comoving density of luminous quasars at M1450<-26.8 (H0=50 km s-1 Mpc-1, Ω=1) is 1.1×10-9 Mpc-3. This is a factor of ~2 lower than that at z~5 and is consistent with an extrapolation of the observed quasar evolution at z<5. Using the current sample, we discuss the constraint on the shape of the quasar luminosity function and the implications for the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z

  18. SIX MORE QUASARS AT REDSHIFT 6 DISCOVERED BY THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; McLure, Ross J.

    2009-03-15

    We present imaging and spectroscopic observations for six quasars at z {>=} 5.9 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS). The CFHQS contains subsurveys with a range of flux and area combinations to sample a wide range of quasar luminosities at z {approx} 6. The new quasars have luminosities 10-75 times lower than the most luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at this redshift. The least luminous quasar, CFHQS J0216-0455 at z = 6.01, has absolute magnitude M {sub 1450} = -22.21, well below the likely break in the luminosity function. This quasar is not detected in a deep XMM-Newton survey showing that optical selection is still a very efficient tool for finding high-redshift quasars.

  19. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    intervening galaxy can act as a lens," said Bautz. "Now imagine that the distant lensed quasar suddenly became brighter. The mirage images of the quasar will brighten up at different times depending on the difference in the light travel delay." Unlike ordinary galaxies, quasars do vary greatly in their intensity, especially in the X-ray waveband, said Gordon Garmire, Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State. This is caused by the violent and erratic flow of gas into the black hole that is powering the quasar. In quasar RX J0911.4+0551, the astronomers saw a sudden brightening of X-ray intensity that lasted for about 2,000 seconds. This was observed in one of the four mirage images. Measuring the time-delay of the 2,000-second flare--or any flare-- from mirage to mirage can provide the absolute distance to the deflector (intervening galaxy) and can thus be used to estimate the expansion rate of the universe. Sjur Refsdal first proposed this promising method in 1964. The method avoids many uncertainties associated with the classic distance-ladder technique used to measure objects and the Hubble constant. The main difficulty in measuring time-delays is that the brightness of each image has to be carefully monitored over several periods of the time-delay. Also, the quasar has to show sufficient variability over time scales smaller than the time-delay. Most attempts to measure time-delays until now have been made in the optical and radio bands. The modest variability of quasars in these wavebands, however, has made it extremely difficult to place accurate constraints on time-delays. X-ray observations of gravitationally lensed quasars, on the other hand, show strong variability over time scales of hours to days. For example, it has taken almost 20 years of optical and radio monitoring to obtain a universal accepted time-delay for the lensed quasar Q0957+561 to an accuracy of 3percent. Chandra has the potential, the team has found, to determine the time

  20. A new sample of quasars to B = 22.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marano, B.; Zamorani, G.; Zitelli, V.

    1988-01-01

    A new sample of quasars with complete spectroscopic information down to about 22 mag is presented. The candidate selection and preliminary spectroscopic results are reported. Results are reported from the application of color-color diagrams, grism plates, and variability analysis in the quasar selection. The results on quasar counts, redshift distribution, and luminosity function at high redshift are discussed.

  1. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: yshen@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  2. Giant scattering cones in obscured quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obied, Georges; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin

    2016-03-01

    We analyse Hubble Space Telescope observations of scattering regions in 20 luminous obscured quasars at 0.24 < z < 0.65 (11 new observations and nine archival ones) observed at rest frame ˜3000 Å. We find spectacular 5-10 kpc-scale scattering regions in almost all cases. The median scattering efficiency at this wavelength (the ratio of observed to estimated intrinsic flux) is 2.3, and 73 per cent of the observed flux at this wavelength is due to scattered light, which if unaccounted for may strongly bias estimates of quasar hosts' star formation rates. Modelling these regions as illuminated dusty cones, we estimate the radial density distributions of the interstellar medium as well as the geometric properties of circumnuclear quasar obscuration - inclinations and covering factors. Small derived opening angles (median half-angle and standard deviation 27° ± 9°) are inconsistent with a 1:1 type 1/type 2 ratio. We suggest that quasar obscuration is patchy and that the observer has an ˜40 per cent chance of seeing a type 1 source even through the obscuration. We estimate median density profile of the scattering medium to be nH = 0.04-0.5 (1 kpc/r)2 cm-3, depending on the method. Quasars in our sample likely exhibit galaxy-wide winds, but if these consist of optically thick clouds then only a small fraction of the wind mass ( ≲ 10 per cent) contributes to scattering.

  3. Galaxy Clustering Around Nearby Luminous Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Karl B.; Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z approx. less than 0.30) quasars observed with the Wide Field Camera-2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST resolution makes possible galaxy identification brighter than V = 24.5 and as close as 1 min or 2 min to the quasar. We find a significant enhancement of galaxies within a projected separation of approx. less than 100 1/h kpc of the quasars. If we model the QSO/galaxy correlation function as a power law with a slope given by the galaxy/galaxy correlation function, we find that the ratio of the QSO/galaxy to galaxy/galaxy correlation functions is 3.8 +/- 0.8. The galaxy counts within r less than 15 1/h kpc of the quasars are too high for the density profile to have an appreciable core radius (approx. greater than 100 1/h kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  4. Quasar Selection in the Optical + MIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Peters, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i<22 using the combination of optical and mid-IR photometry. Optical photometry is taken from SDSS-III, while mid-IR photometry comes from a combination of data from ALLWISE and several large-area Spitzer-IRAC fields. Selection was based on a training sample of 157,701 spectroscopically-confirmed type 1 quasars with both optical and mid-IR data. Of these candidates, 306,686 lack spectroscopic confirmation, including 8665 quasar candidates with 3.53.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection ``wedges'' and to 2.2quasars than the SDSS-III/BOSS project. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars. This work was supported in part by NASA-ADAP grant NNX12AI49G.

  5. THE QUASAR OUTFLOW CONTRIBUTION TO AGN FEEDBACK: VLT MEASUREMENTS OF SDSS J0318-0600

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jay P.; Bautista, Manuel; Arav, Nahum; Edmonds, Doug; Moe, Max; Korista, Kirk; Costantini, Elisa; Benn, Chris; Ellison, Sara E-mail: arav@vt.ed E-mail: kirk.korista@wmich.ed E-mail: mmoe@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-02-01

    We present high spectral resolution Very Large Telescope observations of the broad absorption line quasar SDSS J0318 - 0600. This high-quality data set allows us to extract accurate ionic column densities and determine an electron number density of n{sub e} = 10{sup 3.3+}-{sup 0.2} cm{sup -3} for the main outflow absorption component. The heavily reddened spectrum of SDSS J0318-0600 requires purely silicate dust with a reddening curve characteristic of predominately large grains, from which we estimate the bolometric luminosity. We carry out photoionization modeling to determine the total column density, ionization parameter, and distance of the gas and find that the photoionization models suggest abundances greater than solar. Due to the uncertainty in the location of the dust extinction, we arrive at two viable distances for the main ouflow component from the central source, 6 and 17 kpc, where we consider the 6 kpc location as somewhat more physically plausible. Assuming the canonical global covering of 20% for the outflow and a distance of 6 kpc, our analysis yields a mass flux of 120 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a kinetic luminosity that is approx0.1% of the bolometric luminosity of the object. Should the dust be part of the outflow, then these values are approx4x larger. The large mass flux and kinetic luminosity make this outflow a significant contributor to active galactic nucleus feedback processes.

  6. Quasar feedback and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-01

    We analyse Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of 568 obscured luminous quasars. The [O III] λ5007 Å emission line shows blueshifts and blue excess, indicating that some of the narrow-line gas is undergoing an organized outflow. The velocity width containing 90 per cent of line power ranges from 370 to 4780 km s-1, suggesting outflow velocities up to ˜2000 km s-1, and is strongly correlated with the radio luminosity among the radio-quiet quasars. We propose that radio emission in radio-quiet quasars is due to relativistic particles accelerated in the shocks within the quasar-driven outflows; star formation in quasar hosts is insufficient to explain the observed radio emission. The median radio luminosity of the sample of νLν[1.4 GHz] = 1040 erg s-1 suggests a median kinetic luminosity of the quasar-driven wind of Lwind = 3 × 1044 erg s-1, or about 4 per cent of the estimated median bolometric luminosity Lbol = 8 × 1045 erg s-1. Furthermore, the velocity width of [O III] is positively correlated with mid-infrared luminosity, which suggests that outflows are ultimately driven by the radiative output of the quasar. Emission lines characteristic of shocks in quasi-neutral medium increase with the velocity of the outflow, which we take as evidence of quasar-driven winds propagating into the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Quasar feedback appears to operate above the threshold luminosity of Lbol ˜ 3 × 1045 erg s-1.

  7. High Resolution Spectroscopy of X-ray Quasars: Searching for the X-ray Absorption from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Taotao; Canizares, Claude R.; Marshall, Herman L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a survey of six low to moderate redshift quasars with Chandra and XMM-Newton. The primary goal is to search for the narrow X-ray absorption lines produced by highly ionized metals in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. All the X-ray spectra can be well fitted by a power law with neutral hydrogen absorption. Only one feature is detected at above 3-sigma level in all the spectra, which is consistent with statistic fluctuation. We discuss the implications in our understanding of the baryon content of the universe. We also discuss the implication of the non-detection of the local (z approx. 0) X-ray absorption.

  8. Re/Os Constraint on the Time Variability of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2003-12-01

    We argue that the accuracy by which the isochron parameters of the decay 187Re→187Os are determined by dating iron meteorites may constrain the possible time dependence of the decay rate and hence of the fine-structure constant α, not directly but only in a model-dependent manner. From this point of view, some of the attempts to analyze the Oklo constraint and the results of the quasistellar-object absorption lines are reexamined.

  9. Re/Os constraint on the time variability of the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2003-12-31

    We argue that the accuracy by which the isochron parameters of the decay 187Re-->187Os are determined by dating iron meteorites may constrain the possible time dependence of the decay rate and hence of the fine-structure constant alpha, not directly but only in a model-dependent manner. From this point of view, some of the attempts to analyze the Oklo constraint and the results of the quasistellar-object absorption lines are reexamined.

  10. THE SUDDEN DEATH OF THE NEAREST QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Virani, Shanil; Megan Urry, C.; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Coppi, Paolo; Evans, Daniel A.; Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna; Lintott, Chris J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Bamford, Steven P.; Jozsa, Gyula I. G.; Garrett, Michael; Van Arkel, Hanny; Gay, Pamela; Fortson, Lucy

    2010-11-20

    Galaxy formation is significantly modulated by energy output from supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies which grow in highly efficient luminous quasar phases. The timescale on which black holes transition into and out of such phases is, however, unknown. We present the first measurement of the shutdown timescale for an individual quasar using X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy IC 2497, which hosted a luminous quasar no more than 70,000 years ago that is still seen as a light echo in 'Hanny's Voorwerp', but whose present-day radiative output is lower by at least two, and more likely by over four, orders of magnitude. This extremely rapid shutdown provides new insight into the physics of accretion in supermassive black holes and may signal a transition of the accretion disk to a radiatively inefficient state.

  11. Doppler interpretation of quasar red shifts.

    PubMed

    Zapolsky, H S

    1966-08-01

    The hypothesis that the quasistellar sources (quasars) are local objects moving with velocities close to the speed of light is examined. Provided there is no observational cutoff on apparent bolometric magnitude for the quasars, the transverse Doppler effect leads to the expectation of fewer blue shifts than red shifts for an isotropic distribution of velocities. Such a distribution also yields a function N(z), the number of objects with red shift less than z which is not inconsistent with the present data. On the basis of two extreme assumptions concerning the origin of such rapidly moving sources, we computed curves of red shift plotted against magnitude. In particular, the curve obtained on the assumption that the quasars originated from an explosion in or nearby our own galaxy is in as good agreement with the observations as the curve of cosmological red shift plotted against magnitude.

  12. Detecting the First Quasars with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, Marco; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2010-05-01

    We show that ALMA is the first telescope that can probe the dust-obscured central region of quasars at z > 5 with a maximum resolution of ~ 30 pc employing the 18 km baseline. We explore the possibility of detecting the first quasars with ALMA (Schleicher, Spaans, & Klessen 2009). For this purpose, we adopt the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as a reference system and calculate the expected fluxes if this galaxy were placed at high redshift. This choice is motivated by the detailed observations available for this system and the absence of any indication for an evolution in metallicity in high-redshift quasars. It is a conservative choice due to the moderate column densities in NGC 1068, leading to moderate fluxes.

  13. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian; Marziani, Paola; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O’Dea, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500–920 Å) of high-luminosity quasars using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (low to intermediate redshift sample) and Sloan Digital sky Survey (SDSS) (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} compared to \\lt 1.5× {10}7 s. Based on an excess variance analysis, for time intervals \\lt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 10% of the quasars (4/40) show evidence of EUV variability. Similarly, for time intervals \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 55% of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between 2.5× {10}7 {{s}} and 3.16× {10}7 {{s}} (1 year). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these timescales. A threshold timescale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall time to the plunge region of the optically thin surface layer of the slim disk that is responsible for the preponderance of the EUV flux emission (primarily within 0–7 black hole radii from the inner edge of the disk) is consistent with the empirically determined variability timescale.

  14. Understanding the near infrared spectrum of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Mateos, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The rest-frame near infrared (NIR) is a key spectral range for understanding the physics of AGN, but progress has been hindered by the difficulty in defining the NIR spectrum of the accretion disk and removing contamination from stellar emission in the host galaxy. In this talk I will present the analysis of a sample of 85 luminous (L3µm>10^45.5 erg/s) quasars with rest-frame NIR spectroscopy from AKARI and Spitzer/IRS. Their high luminosity allows a direct determination of the NIR shape of the quasar spectrum clean from host galaxy emission. We find that the entire UV-to-MIR SED can be accurately reproduced with a semi-empirical disk+dust model that uses a single template for the accretion disk and two blackbody components (hot and warm) for the dust. The observed diversity in individual SEDs can be accounted for by varying levels of extinction affecting the disk component and differences in the relative luminosities of the disk and dust components. We present a new quasar template [0.1-10µm] as well as separate templates for the disk and dust components, and conclude that previous templates based on less luminous quasars suffer from contamination by stellar emission in the host galaxy, which accounts for up to ~30% of the flux at 1µm. We also perform the first ever measurement of the Paschen_α emission in a large sample of luminous quasars and find that the Paschen_α to optical continuum luminosity ratio is boosted in our sample compared to less luminous quasars.

  15. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG RED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Spoon, Henrik; Glikman, Eilat; Petric, Andreea; Schulz, Bernhard E-mail: mlacy@nrao.edu E-mail: eilat.glikman@yale.edu E-mail: bschulz@ipac.caltech.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry of 13 redshift 0.4 < z < 1 dust reddened quasars obtained with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We compare properties derived from their infrared spectral energy distributions (intrinsic active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity and far-infrared luminosity from star formation) to the host luminosities and morphologies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and black hole masses estimated from optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results are broadly consistent with models in which most dust reddened quasars are an intermediate phase between a merger-driven starburst triggering a completely obscured AGN, and a normal, unreddened quasar. We find that many of our objects have high accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit. These objects tend to fall below the black hole mass-bulge luminosity relation as defined by local galaxies, whereas most of our low accretion rate objects are slightly above the local relation, as typical for normal quasars at these redshifts. Our observations are therefore most readily interpreted in a scenario in which galaxy stellar mass growth occurs first by about a factor of three in each merger/starburst event, followed sometime later by black hole growth by a similar amount. We do not, however, see any direct evidence for quasar feedback affecting star formation in our objects, for example, in the form of a relationship between accretion rate and star formation. Five of our objects, however, do show evidence for outflows in the [O III]5007 A emission line profile, suggesting that the quasar activity is driving thermal winds in at least some members of our sample.

  16. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; Sulentic, J. W.; Stirpe, G. M.; Dultzin, D.; Del Olmo, A.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    [OIII]λ 5007 "blue outliers"—that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars—appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40~% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate z sample of 52 sources qualify as "blue outliers" (i.e., quasars with [OIII]λλ 4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of "blue outliers" to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  17. Einstein observations of active galaxies and quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreier, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The radio galaxies Centaurus A and Signus B are discussed. In both these sources, a comparison of the radio and imaged X-ray flux is allowed for the measurement of the magnetic fields. Einstein observations of quasars are discussed. The number of known X-ray emitting QSO's was increased from 3 to 22 and the distances where these QSO's were seen to correspond to an age of 15 billion years. It was shown that these quasars contributed significantly to the X-ray background.

  18. The black hole spins of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bei; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-02-01

    We present the estimates of the black hole spins of five quasars. The peaks of the spectra of the accretion discs surrounding massive black holes in quasars are in the far-UV or soft X-ray band, which are usually not observed. However, in the disc corona model, the soft photons from the disc are Comptonized to high energy in the hot corona, and the hard X-ray spectra (luminosity and spectral shape) contain the information of the incident spectra from the disc. The values of black hole spin parameter a are inferred from the spectral fitting, which spread over a large range, ~ -0.94 to 0.998.

  19. GALACTIC-SCALE ABSORPTION OUTFLOW IN THE LOW-LUMINOSITY QUASAR IRAS F04250-5718: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, Doug; Borguet, Benoit; Arav, Nahum; Dunn, Jay P.; Penton, Steve; Kriss, Gerard A.; Korista, Kirk; Bautista, Manuel; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle; Steenbrugge, Katrien; Ignacio Gonzalez-Serrano, J.; Benn, Chris; Aoki, Kentaro; Behar, Ehud; Micheal Crenshaw, D.; Everett, John; Gabel, Jack; Moe, Maxwell; Scott, Jennifer

    2011-09-20

    We present absorption line analysis of the outflow in the quasar IRAS F04250-5718. Far-ultraviolet data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveal intrinsic narrow absorption lines from high ionization ions (e.g., C IV, N V, and O VI) as well as low ionization ions (e.g., C II and Si III). We identify three kinematic components with central velocities ranging from {approx}-50 to {approx}-230 km s{sup -1}. Velocity-dependent, non-black saturation is evident from the line profiles of the high ionization ions. From the non-detection of absorption from a metastable level of C II, we are able to determine that the electron number density in the main component of the outflow is {approx}<30 cm{sup -3}. Photoionization analysis yields an ionization parameter log U{sub H} {approx} -1.6 {+-} 0.2, which accounts for changes in the metallicity of the outflow and the shape of the incident spectrum. We also consider solutions with two ionization parameters. If the ionization structure of the outflow is due to photoionization by the active galactic nucleus, we determine that the distance to this component from the central source is {approx}>3 kpc. Due to the large distance determined for the main kinematic component, we discuss the possibility that this outflow is part of a galactic wind.

  20. Dust-free quasars in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W N; Carilli, Chris L; Egami, Eiichi; Hines, Dean C; Kurk, Jaron D; Richards, Gordon T; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A; Vestergaard, Marianne; Walter, Fabian

    2010-03-18

    The most distant quasars known, at redshifts z approximately 6, generally have properties indistinguishable from those of lower-redshift quasars in the rest-frame ultraviolet/optical and X-ray bands. This puzzling result suggests that these distant quasars are evolved objects even though the Universe was only seven per cent of its current age at these redshifts. Recently one z approximately 6 quasar was shown not to have any detectable emission from hot dust, but it was unclear whether that indicated different hot-dust properties at high redshift or if it is simply an outlier. Here we report the discovery of a second quasar without hot-dust emission in a sample of 21 z approximately 6 quasars. Such apparently hot-dust-free quasars have no counterparts at low redshift. Moreover, we demonstrate that the hot-dust abundance in the 21 quasars builds up in tandem with the growth of the central black hole, whereas at low redshift it is almost independent of the black hole mass. Thus z approximately 6 quasars are indeed at an early evolutionary stage, with rapid mass accretion and dust formation. The two hot-dust-free quasars are likely to be first-generation quasars born in dust-free environments and are too young to have formed a detectable amount of hot dust around them.

  1. Using quasars as standard clocks for measuring cosmological redshift.

    PubMed

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn D; Stojkovic, Branislav; Stojkovic, Dejan; Weltman, Amanda

    2012-06-01

    We report hitherto unnoticed patterns in quasar light curves. We characterize segments of the quasar's light curves with the slopes of the straight lines fit through them. These slopes appear to be directly related to the quasars' redshifts. Alternatively, using only global shifts in time and flux, we are able to find significant overlaps between the light curves of different pairs of quasars by fitting the ratio of their redshifts. We are then able to reliably determine the redshift of one quasar from another. This implies that one can use quasars as standard clocks, as we explicitly demonstrate by constructing two independent methods of finding the redshift of a quasar from its light curve.

  2. Evidence for Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-shell Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-11-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s-1 and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from ~10,000 km s-1 (~0.03c) up to ~100,000 km s-1 (~0.3c), with a peak and mean value of ~42,000 km s-1 (~0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log ξ ~ 3-6 erg s-1 cm, with a mean value of log ξ ~ 4.2 erg s-1 cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N H ~ 1022-1024 cm-2, with a mean value of N H ~ 1023 cm-2. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can

  3. EVIDENCE FOR ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOWS IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. DETAILED PHOTOIONIZATION MODELING OF Fe K-SHELL ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Tombesi, F.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.

    2011-11-20

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s{sup -1} and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from {approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.03c) up to {approx}100,000 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.3c), with a peak and mean value of {approx}42,000 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log {xi} {approx} 3-6 erg s{sup -1} cm, with a mean value of log {xi} {approx} 4.2 erg s{sup -1} cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 22}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}, with a mean value of N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of

  4. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs. 2; Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-Shell Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Clapp, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet AGNs. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000km/s and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blue shifted FeK absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. In the present paper we report a detailed curve of growth analysis and directly model the FeK absorbers with the Xstar photo-ionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35%. The outflow velocity distribution spans from \\sim10,000km/s (\\sim0.03c) up to \\siml00,000kmis (\\sim0.3c), with a peak and mean value of\\sim42,000km/s (\\sim0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log\\xi 3-6 erg s/cm, with a mean value of log\\xi 4.2 erg s/cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N_H\\siml0(exp 22)-10(exp 24)/sq cm, with a mean value of N_H\\siml0(exp23)/sq cm. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can provide important clues on the connection between accretion disks, winds and jets.

  5. Absorption Line Survey of H3+ toward the Galactic Center Sources. II. Eight Infrared Sources within 30 pc of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Miwa; Usuda, Tomonori; Nagata, Tetsuya; Geballe, T. R.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Indriolo, Nick; Suto, Hiroshi; Henning, Thomas; Morong, Christopher P.; Oka, Takeshi

    2008-11-01

    Infrared absorption lines of H+3, including the metastable R(3,3)l line, have been observed toward eight bright infrared sources associated with hot and massive stars located in and between the Galactic center cluster and the Quintuplet cluster 30 pc to the east. The absorption lines with high-velocity dispersion arise in the Galaxy's central molecular zone (CMZ) as well as in foreground spiral arms. The temperature and density of the gas in the CMZ, as determined from the relative strengths of the H3+ lines, are T = 200-300 K and n <= 50-200 cm-3. The detection of high column densities of H3+ toward all eight stars implies that this warm and diffuse gaseous environment is widespread in the CMZ. The products of the ionization rate and path length for these sight lines are 1000 and 10 times higher than in dense and diffuse clouds in the Galactic disk, respectively, indicating that the ionization rate, ζ, is not less than 10-15 s-1 and that L is at least on the order of 50 pc. The warm and diffuse gas is an important component of the CMZ, in addition to the three previously known gaseous environments: (1) cold molecular clouds observed by radio emission of CO and other molecules; (2) hot (T = 104-106 K) and highly ionized diffuse gas (ne = 10-100 cm-3) seen in radio recombination lines, far infrared atomic lines, and radio-wave scattering; and (3) ultrahot (T = 107-108 K) X-ray emitting plasma. Its prevalence significantly changes the understanding of the environment of the CMZ. The sight line toward GC IRS 3 is unique in showing an additional H3+ absorption component, which is interpreted as being due to either a cloud associated with circumnuclear disk or the "50 km s-1 cloud" known from radio observations. An infrared pumping scheme is examined as a mechanism to populate the (3,3) metastable level in this cloud. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. CHANDRA VIEW OF THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM TOWARD 1ES 1553+113: ABSORPTION-LINE DETECTIONS AND IDENTIFICATIONS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Nicastro, F.; Zappacosta, L.; Elvis, M.; Krongold, Y.; Mathur, S.; Gupta, A.; Danforth, C.; Shull, J. M.; Barcons, X.; Borgani, S.; Branchini, E.; Cen, R.; Dave, R.; Kaastra, J.; Paerels, F.; Piro, L.; Takei, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We present the first results from our pilot 500 ks Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Large Program observation of the soft X-ray brightest source in the z {approx}> 0.4 sky, the blazar 1ES 1553+113, aimed to secure the first uncontroversial detections of the missing baryons in the X-rays. We identify a total of 11 possible absorption lines, with single-line statistical significances between 2.2{sigma} and 4.1{sigma}. Six of these lines are detected at high single-line statistical significance (3.6 {<=} {sigma} {<=} 4.1), while the remaining five are regarded as marginal detections in association with either other X-ray lines detected at higher significance and/or far-ultraviolet (FUV) signposts. Three of these lines are consistent with metal absorption at z {approx_equal} 0, and we identify them with Galactic O I and C II. The remaining eight lines may be imprinted by intervening absorbers and are all consistent with being high-ionization counterparts of FUV H I and/or O VI intergalactic medium signposts. In particular, five of these eight possible intervening absorption lines (single-line statistical significances of 4.1{sigma}, 4.1{sigma}, 3.9{sigma}, 3.8{sigma}, and 2.7{sigma}), are identified as C V and C VI K{alpha} absorbers belonging to three WHIM systems at z{sub X} = 0.312, z{sub X} = 0.237, and (z{sub X} ) = 0.133, which also produce broad H I (and O VI for the z{sub X} = 0.312 system) absorption in the FUV. For two of these systems (z{sub X} = 0.312 and 0.237), the Chandra X-ray data led the a posteriori discovery of physically consistent broad H I associations in the FUV (for the third system the opposite applies), so confirming the power of the X-ray-FUV synergy for WHIM studies. The true statistical significances of these three X-ray absorption systems, after properly accounting for the number of redshift trials, are 5.8{sigma} (z{sub X} = 0.312; 6.3{sigma} if the low-significance O V and C V K{beta} associations are considered), 3.9{sigma} (z

  7. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; Strauss, Michael A.; Haiman, Zoltàn; Richards, Gordon T.; Jiang, Linhua; Schneider, Donald P.

    2014-10-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i {sub AB} = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW{sub 0} ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ∼ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ∼4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y {sub AB} = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i {sub 775} – Y {sub 105} color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short.

  8. Constraining the Lifetime and Opening Angle of Quasars using Fluorescent Lyman α Emission: The Case of Q0420-388

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Elena; Lilly, Simon J.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor

    2016-10-01

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by its lifetime. The model is then applied to the distribution of high-equivalent-width Lyα emitters (with rest-frame equivalent widths above 100 Å, threshold used in, e.g., Trainor & Steidel) identified in a deep narrow-band 36 × 36 arcmin2 image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420–388. These emitters are found near the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, the two most distant objects require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60° or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum of 30°. However, some other expected signatures of boosted fluorescence are not seen at the current survey limits, e.g., a fall off in Lyα brightness, or equivalent width, with distance. Furthermore, to have most of the Lyα emission of the two distant sources to be fluorescently boosted would require the quasar to have been significantly brighter in the past. This suggests that these particular sources may not be fluorescent, invalidating the above lifetime constraints. This would cast doubt on the use of this relatively low equivalent width threshold and thus also on the lifetime analysis in Trainor and Steidel.

  9. The X-ray Spectrum and Spectral Energy Distribution of FIRST J155633.8+351758: A Beamed Radio-Quiet Quasar with a Polar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, Robert C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Ganguly, R.; Shang, Z.; Lacy, M.; Gregg, M. D.; Hall, P. B.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    We report the results of a 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized "FeLoBAL" quasar FIRST J155633.8+351758. Our analyses of the 531 photon spectrum indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Γ = 1.7 or flatter). No iron K-α line is detected, and the X-rays appear to be down by only an order of magnitude below their intrinsic unabsorbed levels. Absorption is present with both partially ionized models and neutral hydrogen models with partial covering providing good fits. The level of partial covering in the latter model is consistent with the rest-frame ultraviolet maximum polarization of 13%, in the sense that light scattered by electrons around the X-ray absorber could account for both results. We present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FIRST J155633.8+351758 from radio through X-ray energies, and make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio-quiet jet, optical dust reddening, and X-ray absorption. The corrected SED appears to be that of a luminous radio-quiet quasar deficient in the mid and far-infrared, suggesting that the dust covering fraction of the quasar is not large and that star formation is not excessive. FIRST J155633.8+351758 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars studied in detail at X-ray wavelengths. We acknowledge support from Chandra Award No. GO6-7105X, from the US NSF (grant AST 05-07781), from NASA under the grant NNG05GD03G, and from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant 10643001). This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by the University of California, LLNL (Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48).

  10. Strong Lyα Emission in the Proximate Damped Lyα Absorption Trough toward the Quasar SDSS J095253.83+011422.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhou, Hongyan; Pan, Xiang; Jiang, Ning; Shu, Xinwen; Wang, Huiyuan; Gu, Qiusheng; Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Maochun; Shi, Xiheng; Ji, Tuo; Tian, Qiguo; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    SDSS J095253.83+011422.0 (J0952+0114) was reported by Hall et al. as an exotic quasar at zem = 3.020. In contrast to prominent broad metal-line emission with FWHM ˜ 9000 km s-1, only a narrow Lyα emission line is present with FWHM ˜ 1000 km s-1. The absence of a broad Lyα emission line has been a mystery for more than a decade. In this paper, we demonstrate that this absence is due to dark proximate damped Lyα absorption (PDLA) at zabs = 3.010 by identifying associated Lyman absorption line series from the damped Lyβ up to Ly9, as well as the Lyman limit absorption edge. The PDLA cloud has a column density of {log}{N}{{H}{{I}}}({{{cm}}}-2)=21.8+/- 0.2, a metallicity of [Zn/H] > -1.0, and a spatial extent exceeding the narrow emission line region (NELR) of the quasar. With a luminosity of {L}{{Ly}α }˜ {10}45 erg s-1, the residual Lyα emission superposed on the PDLA trough is two orders of magnitude stronger than found by previous reports. This is best explained as re-radiated photons arising from the quasar outflowing gas on a larger scale than in the NELR. The PDLA here, acting like a natural coronagraph, provides us with valuable insight into the illuminated gases in the vicinity of the quasar, which are usually hard to resolve due to their small size and the “seeing fuzz” of bright quasars. Notably, J0952+0114 analogs might be easily omitted in the spectroscopic surveys of DLAs and PDLAs because their damped Lyα troughs can be fully filled by additional strong Lyα emissions. Our preliminary survey shows that such systems are not very rare. They could potentially be a unique sample for probing strong quasar feedback phenomena in the early universe.

  11. THE RADIO PROPERTIES OF TYPE 2 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Dharam Vir; Ho, Luis C.

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the first high-resolution and high-sensitivity study of the radio properties of optically selected type 2 quasars. We used the Very Large Array at 8.4 GHz to observe 59 sources drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample of Zakamska et al.. The detection rate of our survey is 59% (35/59), comparable to the detection rate in FIRST at 1.4 GHz. Ongoing star formation, although present, contributes negligible radio emission at the current sensitivity limit. Comparing the radio powers with the [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosities, we find that roughly 15% {+-} 5% of the sample can be considered radio loud. Intriguingly, the vast majority of the detected sources in our sample fall in a region intermediate between those traditionally occupied by radio loud and radio quiet quasars. Moreover, most of these 'radio intermediate' sources tend to have flat or inverted radio spectra, which we speculate may be caused by free-free absorption by ionized gas in the narrow-line region. The incidence of flat-spectrum sources in type 2 quasars appears to be much higher than in type 1 quasars, in apparent violation of the simple orientation-based unified model for active galaxies.

  12. Measuring Distances to Remote Galaxies and Quasars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of spectroscopy and the redshift to measure how far an object is by measuring how fast it is receding from earth. Lists the most distant quasars yet found. Tables include "Redshift vs. Distance" and "Distances to Celestial Objects for Various Cosmologies." (CW)

  13. COLD FLOWS AND THE FIRST QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Di Matteo, T.; Khandai, N.; DeGraf, C.; Feng, Y.; Croft, R. A. C.; Lopez, J.; Springel, V.

    2012-02-15

    Observations of the most distant bright quasars imply that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have to be assembled within the first 800 million years. Under our standard galaxy formation scenario such fast growth implies large gas densities providing sustained accretion at critical or supercritical rates onto an initial black hole seed. It has been a long standing question whether and how such high black hole accretion rates can be achieved and sustained at the centers of early galaxies. Here we use our new MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation covering a volume (0.75 Gpc){sup 3} appropriate for studying the rare first quasars to show that steady high density cold gas flows responsible for assembling the first galaxies produce the high gas densities that lead to sustained critical accretion rates and hence rapid growth commensurate with the existence of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black holes as early as z {approx} 7. We find that under these conditions quasar feedback is not effective at stopping the cold gas from penetrating the central regions and hence cannot quench the accretion until the host galaxy reaches M{sub halo} > or approx. 10{sup 1}2{sup M}{sub Sun }. This cold-flow-driven scenario for the formation of quasars implies that they should be ubiquitous in galaxies in the early universe and that major (proto)galaxy mergers are not a requirement for efficient fuel supply and growth, particularly for the earliest SMBHs.

  14. Quasar H II Regions During Cosmic Reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-03-30

    Cosmic reionization progresses as HII regions form around sources of ionizing radiation. Their average size grows continuously until they percolate and complete reionization. We demonstrate how this typical growth can be calculated around the largest, biased sources of UV emission such as quasars by further developing an analytical model based on the excursion set formalism. This approach allows us to calculate the sizes and growth of the HII regions created by the progenitors of any dark matter halo of given mass and redshift with a minimum of free parameters. Statistical variations in the size of these pre-existing HII regions are an additional source of uncertainty in the determination of very high redshift quasar properties from their observed HII region sizes. We use this model to demonstrate that the transmission gaps seen in very high redshift quasars can be understood from the radiation of only their progenitors and associated clustered small galaxies. The fit requires the epoch of overlap to be at z = 5.8 {+-} 0.1. This interpretation makes the transmission gaps independent of the age of the quasars observed. If this interpretation were correct it would raise the prospects of using radio interferometers currently under construction to detect the epoch of reionization.

  15. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  16. A SPECTACULAR OUTFLOW IN AN OBSCURED QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Smith, Paul S.

    2012-02-10

    SDSS J1356+1026 is a pair of interacting galaxies at redshift z = 0.123 that hosts a luminous obscured quasar in its northern nucleus. Here we present two long-slit Magellan LDSS-3 spectra that reveal a pair of symmetric {approx}10 kpc size outflows emerging from this nucleus, with observed expansion velocities of {approx}250 km s{sup -1} in projection. We present a kinematic model of these outflows and argue that the deprojected physical velocities of expansion are likely {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} and that the kinetic energy of the expanding shells is likely 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1}, with an absolute minimum of >10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Although a radio counterpart is detected at 1.4 GHz, it is faint enough that the quasar is considered to be radio quiet by all standard criteria, and there is no evidence of extended emission due to radio lobes, whether aged or continuously powered by an ongoing jet. We argue that the likely level of star formation is insufficient to power the observed energetic outflow and that SDSS J1356+1026 is a good case for radio-quiet quasar feedback. In further support of this hypothesis, polarimetric observations show that the direction of quasar illumination is coincident with the direction of the outflow.

  17. H2O and O2 Absorption-Line Abundances in the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Measured by the R-Alice Ultraviolet Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeney, Brian A.; Stern, S. Alan; Schindhelm, Eric; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bieler, Andre; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Parker, Joel Wm; Steffl, Andrew Joseph; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    The Alice far-UV spectrograph, aboard the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, has observed emissions in the wavelength range 800-2000 Å from the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since before orbital insertion in September 2014. We present novel observations of the cometary coma in absorption against the stellar continuum of UV-bright stars that were targeted or serendipitously observed near the comet's nucleus between April 2015 and February 2016 at heliocentric radii ranging from 1.2 to 2.4 AU. These spectra show clear signatures of absorption from gaseous H2O and O2. The observed H2O column densities agree well with values found by Rosetta's VIRTIS instrument (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2015, A&A, 583, A6) and can be reasonably described by a simple Haser model. However, the absorption-derived O2/H2O ratio is somewhat larger than the 1-10% range reported by Rosetta's ROSINA mass spectrometer (Bieler et al. 2015, Nature, 526, 678) from September 2014 through March 2015 at heliocentric radii of 2.1-3.2 AU. We explore potential causes for this discrepancy, including systematic biases in the absorption-line measurements and seasonal variations in O2/H2O as the comet approaches perihelion.

  18. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  19. An Fe XXIV Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 +/- 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe xxvi (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition.We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of nu < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 +/- 1)×10(exp 17) /sq. cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >103.6 erg cm/s. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an "atoll" source

  20. AN Fe XXIV ABSORPTION LINE IN THE PERSISTENT SPECTRUM OF THE DIPPING LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 1A 1744-361

    SciTech Connect

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-07-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT {approx} 1.0 keV) plus power law ({Gamma} {approx} 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 {+-} 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km s{sup -1}. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27{sup +2}{sub -3} eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >10{sup 3.6} erg cm s{sup -1}. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an 'atoll' source.

  1. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, C.; Maiolino, R.; Piconcelli, E.; Menci, N.; Aussel, H.; Lamastra, A.; Fiore, F.

    2010-07-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution young star-forming galaxies transform into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched. To explain this transformation, a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole is often invoked. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead the black hole to “suicide” by starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, because outflows previously observed in quasars are generally associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occurrs in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdB Interferometer to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. Thanks to the wide band we detected broad wings of the CO line, with velocities of up to 750 km s-1 and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. These broad CO wings trace a giant molecular outflow of about 700 M_⊙/year, far larger than the ongoing star-formation rate (~200 M_⊙/year) observed in the host galaxy. This wind will totally expel the cold gas reservoir in Mrk 231 in about 107 yrs, therefore halting the star-formation activity on the same timescale. The inferred kinetic energy in the molecular outflow is ~1.2 × 1044 erg/s, corresponding to a few percent of the AGN bolometric luminosity, which is very close to the fraction expected by models ascribing quasar feedback to highly supersonic shocks generated by radiatively accelerated nuclear winds. Instead, the contribution by the SNe associated with the starburst fall short by several orders of magnitude to account for the kinetic energy observed in the outflow. The direct observational evidence for quasar feedback reported here provides solid support to the scenarios ascribing the observed properties of local massive

  2. ACCRETION RATES OF RED QUASARS FROM THE HYDROGEN Pβ LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Glikman, Eilat; Woo, Jong-Hak; Urrutia, Tanya E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-10-10

    Red quasars are thought to be an intermediate population between merger-driven star-forming galaxies in dust-enshrouded phase and normal quasars. If so, they are expected to have high accretion ratios, but their intrinsic dust extinction hampers reliable determination of Eddington ratios. Here, we compare the accretion rates of 16 red quasars at z ∼ 0.7 to those of normal type 1 quasars at the same redshift range. The red quasars are selected by their red colors in optical through near-infrared (NIR) and radio detection. The accretion rates of the red quasars are derived from the Pβ line in NIR spectra, which is obtained by the SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility in order to avoid the effects of dust extinction. We find that the measured Eddington ratios (L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} ≃ 0.69) of red quasars are significantly higher than those of normal type 1 quasars, which is consistent with a scenario in which red quasars are the intermediate population and the black holes of red quasars grow very rapidly during such a stage.

  3. Tracing high redshift cosmic web with quasar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, Maret

    2016-10-01

    We study the cosmic web at redshifts 1.0 <= <= 1.8 using quasar systems based on quasar data from the SDSS DR7 QSO catalogue. Quasar systems were determined with a friend-of-friend (FoF) algorithm at a series of linking lengths. At the linking lengths l <= 30 h -1 Mpc the diameters of quasar systems are smaller than the diameters of random systems, and are comparable to the sizes of galaxy superclusters in the local Universe. The mean space density of quasar systems is close to the mean space density of local rich superclusters. At larger linking lengths the diameters of quasar systems are comparable with the sizes of supercluster complexes in our cosmic neighbourhood. The richest quasar systems have diameters exceeding 500h Mpc. Very rich systems can be found also in random distribution but the percolating system which penetrate the whole sample volume appears in quasar sample at smaller linking length than in random samples showing that the large-scale distribution of quasar systems differs from random distribution. Quasar system catalogues at our web pages (http://www.aai.ee/maret/QSOsystems.html) serve as a database to search for superclusters of galaxies and to trace the cosmic web at high redshifts.

  4. Correlaciones cruzadas quasar-galaxia y AGN-galaxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, H. J.; Merchán, M. E.; Valotto, C. A.; García Lambas, D.

    We compute quasar-galaxy and AGN-galaxy cross-correlation functions for samples taken from the Véron-Cetty & Véron (1998) catalog of quasars and active galaxies, using tracer galaxies taken from the Edinburgh/Durham Southern Catalog. The sample of active galaxy targets shows positive correlation at projected separations rp < 6 h-1 ~Mpc consistent with the usual power-law. On the other hand, we do not find a statistically significant positive quasar-galaxy correlation signal except in the range 3 h-1 Mpc < rp < 6 h-1 Mpc where we find similar AGN-galaxy and quasar-galaxy correlation amplitudes. At separations rp<3~h-1 ~Mpc a strong decline of quasar-galaxy correlations is observed, suggesting a significant local influence of quasars in galaxy formation. In an attempt to reproduce the observed cross-correlation between quasars and galaxies, we have performed CDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulations and tested the viability of a scenario based on the model developed by Silk & Rees (1998). In this scheme a fraction of the energy released by quasars is considered to be transferred into the baryonic component of the intergalactic medium in the form of winds. The results of the simulations suggest that the shape of the observed quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function could be understood in a scenario where a substantial amount of energy is transferred to the medium at the redshift of maximum quasar activity.

  5. Similarity of ionized gas nebulae around unobscured and obscured quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-08-01

    Quasar feedback is suspected to play a key role in the evolution of massive galaxies, by removing or reheating gas in quasar host galaxies and thus limiting the amount of star formation. In this paper, we continue our investigation of quasar-driven winds on galaxy-wide scales. We conduct Gemini Integral Field Unit spectroscopy of a sample of luminous unobscured (type 1) quasars, to determine the morphology and kinematics of ionized gas around these objects, predominantly via observations of the [O III] λ5007 Å emission line. We find that ionized gas nebulae extend out to ˜13 kpc from the quasar, that they are smooth and round, and that their kinematics are inconsistent with gas in dynamical equilibrium with the host galaxy. The observed morphological and kinematic properties are strikingly similar to those of ionized gas around obscured (type 2) quasars with matched [O III] luminosity, with marginal evidence that nebulae around unobscured quasars are slightly more compact. Therefore, in samples of obscured and unobscured quasars carefully matched in [O III] luminosity, we find support for the standard geometry-based unification model of active galactic nuclei, in that the intrinsic properties of the quasars, of their hosts and of their ionized gas appear to be very similar. Given the apparent ubiquity of extended ionized regions, we are forced to conclude that either the quasar is at least partially illuminating pre-existing gas or that both samples of quasars are seen during advanced stages of quasar feedback. In the latter case, we may be biased by our [O III]-based selection against quasars in the early `blow-out' phase, for example due to dust obscuration.

  6. Quasar ionization front Lyα emission in an inhomogeneous intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Frederick B.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; McQuinn, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The conditions within the ionization front of a quasar during reionization (T ˜ 30 000 K, neutral hydrogen fraction x_H I˜ 0.5) are ideal for producing Lyα emission via collisional excitation of hydrogen atoms. Observations of this emission, which could subtend ≳ 10 arcmin2 on the sky, would definitively demonstrate the presence of a neutral intergalactic medium at the observed epoch, placing valuable constraints on the progress of reionization. We find that the expected Lyα surface brightness is significantly weaker than previously determined and may be impossible to observe with current and near-future instruments. Past work calculated the Lyα emission from a quasar ionization front in a homogeneous medium with a clumping factor approximation to account for inhomogeneities. We find using 1D radiative transfer calculations that this approximation overestimates the emission by a factor of ≳ 3. Our calculations model the propagation of ionizing photons and compute the Lyα emission from quasar ionization fronts on sightlines from a hydrodynamic cosmological simulation at z = 7.1. To better understand the physical properties of the emission, we also develop an analytic model that accurately describes the results of the full radiative transfer calculation.

  7. Implications of a primordial origin for the dispersion in D/H in quasar absorption systems

    PubMed Central

    Copi, Craig J.; Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1998-01-01

    We explore the difficulties with a primordial origin of variations of D/H in quasar absorption systems. In particular we examine options such as a very large-scale inhomogeneity in the baryon content of the universe. We show that very large-scale (much larger than 1 Mpc) isocurvature perturbations are excluded by current cosmic microwave background observations. Smaller-scale ad hoc perturbations (∼1 Mpc) still may lead to a large dispersion in primordial abundances but are subject to other constraints. PMID:9501162

  8. Observational Signatures of High-Redshift Quasars and Local Relics of Black Hole Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Comastri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Observational constraints on the birth and early evolution of massive black holes come from two extreme regimes. At high redshift, quasars signal the rapid growth of billion-solar-mass black holes and indicate that these objects began remarkably heavy and/or accreted mass at rates above the Eddington limit. At low redshift, the smallest nuclear black holes known are found in dwarf galaxies and provide the most concrete limits on the mass of black hole seeds. Here, we review current observational work in these fields that together are critical for our understanding of the origin of massive black holes in the Universe.

  9. Implications of a primordial origin for the dispersion in D/H in quasar absorption systems.

    PubMed

    Copi, C J; Olive, K A; Schramm, D N

    1998-03-17

    We explore the difficulties with a primordial origin of variations of D/H in quasar absorption systems. In particular we examine options such as a very large-scale inhomogeneity in the baryon content of the universe. We show that very large-scale (much larger than 1 Mpc) isocurvature perturbations are excluded by current cosmic microwave background observations. Smaller-scale ad hoc perturbations (approximately 1 Mpc) still may lead to a large dispersion in primordial abundances but are subject to other constraints.

  10. Observations of the Ca ii IR Triplet in High Luminosity Quasars: Exploring the Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Marziani, Paola; Dultzin, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new spectroscopic sample of 11 quasars at intermediate redshift observed with the Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (ISAAC) on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), covering O i λ8446 and the Ca ii triplet 8498, 8542, 8662. The new observations - that supplement the sample presented by Martínez-Aldama et al. (2015) - allow us to confirm the constraints on physical conditions and location of the region emitting the low ionization lines, as well as the relation between Ca ii and Fe ii.

  11. LBQS 1429-0053: A binary quasar rather than a lensed quasar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, C.; Alloin, D.; Gras, S.; Courbin, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Hudelot, P.

    2003-07-01

    Very deep ESO/VLT FORS1 and ISAAC images, as well as HST NICMOS2 data are used to infer the nature of the quasar pair LBQS 1429-0053 A and B, either a binary quasar or a doubly-imaged lensed quasar. Direct search of a putative lensing galaxy is unsuccessful down to R=27, J=24, Ks=22.5 and H=22.5. Moreover, no galaxy overdensity close to the quasar pair is found. A weak shear analysis of the FORS1 R-band 6.8 arcmin x 6.8 arcmin field also fails at detecting any concentration of dark matter more massive than sigma =500 km s-1 and weakens the hypothesis of a dark lens. The only sign of a possible lens consists in a group of 5 objects having colors consistent with galaxies at z ~ 1, within a radius of 5 arcsec from the quasar pair. Considering this group as the lensing potential does not allow to reproduce the image position and flux ratio of LBQS 1429-0053 A and B. Our deep R-band image shows a blue, previously unknown, extended object at the position of LBQS 1429-0053 A, which is consistent with either being the lensed quasar A host, or being an intervening galaxy at lower redshift. Unless future very deep optical images demonstrate that this object is actually the lensed host of LBQS 1429-0053, we conclude that there is very little evidence for LBQS 1429-0053 being lensed. Therefore, we are led to declare LBQS 1429-0053 A and B a genuine binary quasar. Based on observations obtained with VLT/ANTU at ESO-Paranal Observatory (program 67.A-0502) and with the Hubble Space Telescope, operated by NASA.