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Sample records for quasar luminosity function

  1. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  2. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  3. The faint quasar luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kron, Richard G.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Smetanka, John J.; Majewski, Steven; Koo, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results of an expanded program to determine the faint-quasar luminosity function are described. Quasars have been selected in four fields totaling 1.2 sq deg from four-band photometry. Out of a total of 130 quasars with good spectroscopy, 37 have J greater than 21.5 and 46 have F greater than 21.0. The spectroscopic sample is representative of all of the color-selected candidates. An estimate of the luminosity function as a function of redshift is derived.

  4. Evolution of the luminosity function of quasar accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David M.; Petrosian, Vahe; Wandel, Amri

    1991-01-01

    Using an accretion-disk model, accretion disk luminosities are calculated for a grid of black hole masses and accretion rates. It is shown that, as the black-hole mass increases with time, the monochromatic luminosity at a given frequency first increases and then decreases rapidly as this frequency is crossed by the Wien cutoff. The upper limit on the monochromatic luminosity, which is characteristic for a given epoch, constrains the evolution of quasar luminosities and determines the evolultion of the quasar luminosity function.

  5. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel; Myers, Adam D.; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  6. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Green, R. F.

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  7. The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution: A comparison of optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution are discussed, based on comparison of available data on optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs. It is assumed that the red shift of quasars is cosmological and the results are expressed in the framework of the Lambda = 0, Q sub Q = 1 cosmological model. The predictions of various density evolution laws are compared with observations of an optically selected sample of quasars and quasar samples from radio catalogs. The differences between the optical luminosity functions, the red shift distributions and the radio to optical luminosity ratios of optically selected quasars and radio quasars rule out luminosity functions where there is complete absence of correlation between radio and optical luminosities. These differences also imply that Schmidt's (1970) luminosity function, where there exists a statistical correlation between radio and optical luminosities, although may be correct for high red shift objects, disagrees with observation at low red shifts. These differences can be accounted for by postulating existence of two classes (1 and 2) of objects.

  8. Exploring the Quasar Luminosity Function with Quasars Selected by both Color and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christina M.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Using a Bayesian selection algorithm, we determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. The color analysis is based on SDSS photometry, and the variability parameters are calculated from power-law fits to the structure functions. Simultaneous color and variability classification improves classification over either color or variability selection alone, with particular improvement in the selection of quasars with colors similar to stars. This method identifies 22,867 new type 1 quasar candidates in SDSS Stripe 82, which can be combined with the WISE and SDSS photometric quasar candidate catalogs. The redshifts of the candidate quasars were estimated using all available bands, weighting each band by smoothing the PDF. We show how to correct the candidate quasar luminosity function (QLF) for the completeness fraction and systematic errors in redshifts. The corrected QLF is comparable to those determined by spectroscopic investigations, suggesting that LSST and other next-generation surveys will be able to accurately determine the QLF in the absence of spectra. Finally, the quasars are divided into high and low Eddington fractions, using delta(g-i) and CIV blueshift as proxies. The candidate QLFs for the two populations are compared to look for changes as a function of redshift. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1411773.

  9. Quasar UV luminosity function evolution up to z = 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, S.; Gallerani, S.; Ferrara, A.; Greig, B.; Feruglio, C.

    2017-04-01

    We study the redshift evolution of the quasar (QSO) UV luminosity function (LF) for 0.5 < z < 6.5, by collecting the most up to date observational data and, in particular, the recently discovered population of faint active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We fit the QSO LF using either a double power-law function or a Schechter function, finding that both forms provide good fits to the data. We derive empirical relations for the LF parameters as a function of redshift and, based on these results, predict the QSO UV LF at z = 8. From the inferred LF evolution, we compute the redshift evolution of the QSO/AGN comoving ionizing emissivity and hydrogen photoionization rate. If faint AGNs are included, the contribution of QSOs to reionization increases substantially. However, their level of contribution critically depends on the detailed shape of the QSO LF, which can be constrained by efficient searches of high-z QSOs. To this aim, we predict the expected (i) number of z > 6 QSOs detectable by ongoing and future near-infrared surveys (as EUCLID and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope), and (ii) number counts for a single radio-recombination line observation with Square Kilometre Array-MID (FoV = 0.49 deg2) as a function of the Hnα flux density, at 0 < z < 8. These surveys (even at z < 6) will be fundamental to better constrain the role of QSOs as reionization sources.

  10. THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; McLure, Ross J.

    2010-03-15

    We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

  11. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Eric; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; and others

    2013-08-10

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i {approx}< 21.8 quasars are selected over an area of 2236 deg{sup 2}, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 < z < 3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. The completeness of the survey is derived through simulated quasar photometry, and this completeness estimate is checked using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar K-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M{sub i} (z = 2.2) Almost-Equal-To -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log {Phi}* - M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of {approx}2.6 while {Phi}* declines by a factor of {approx}8. At z {approx}< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Evolution of quasar luminosity function (Hawkins+ 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, M. R. S.; Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    In an earlier paper (Hawkins & Veron, 1993MNRAS.260..202H) we presented quasar luminosity functions in three redshift bins, derived from a variability selected sample. Here we provide a major extension to this survey, with a view to improving statistics and completeness, and extending the redshift range. The luminosity functions for redshifts of less than 2.2 show a featureless power law of the form φ=10β(M-M0), with no sign of a 'break'. The quasar luminosity function is also derived by the redshift range 2.2quasars, the quasar luminosity functions in all four redshift ranges are consistent with a single power law of index β=0.63. Plots of quasar space density as a function of redshift in three luminosity bins are also presented and show strong evolution at low redshift but nearly constant space density beyond a redshift of 2. (3 data files).

  13. The impact of dust in host galaxies on quasar luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakata, Hikari; Okamoto, Takashi; Enoki, Motohiro; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Makiya, Ryu

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated effects of dust attenuation on quasar luminosity functions at z ˜ 2 using a semi-analytic galaxy formation model combined with a large cosmological N-body simulation. We estimate the dust attenuation of quasars self-consistently with that of galaxies by considering the dust in their host bulges. We find that the luminosity of the bright quasars is strongly dimmed by the dust attenuation, ˜2 mag in the B-band. Assuming the empirical bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by Marconi et al., we find that this dust attenuation is too strong to explain the B-band and X-ray quasar luminosity functions simultaneously. We consider two possible mechanisms that weaken the dust attenuation. As such a mechanism, we introduce a time delay for AGN activity, that is, gas fuelling to a central black hole starts sometime after the beginning of the starburst induced by a major merger. The other is the anisotropy in the dust distribution. We find that in order to make the dust attenuation of the quasars negligible, either the gas accretion into the black holes has to be delayed at least three times the dynamical time-scale of their host bulges or the dust covering factor is as small as ˜0.1.

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 5 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Enoki, M.; Capak, P.; Masters, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Civano, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-09-10

    We present the result of our low-luminosity quasar survey in the redshift range of 4.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 5.5 in the COSMOS field. Using the COSMOS photometric catalog, we selected 15 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 5 that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the same redshift range. We obtained optical spectra for 14 of the 15 candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope and did not identify any low-luminosity type-1 quasars at z {approx} 5, while a low-luminosity type-2 quasar at z {approx} 5.07 was discovered. In order to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5, we calculated the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density of type-1 quasars. As a result, the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits on the quasar space density are {Phi} < 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -24.52 < M{sub 1450} < -23.52 and {Phi} < 2.88 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -23.52 < M{sub 1450} < -22.52. The inferred 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density are then used to provide constraints on the faint-end slope and the break absolute magnitude of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5. We find that the quasar space density decreases gradually as a function of redshift at low luminosity (M{sub 1450} {approx} -23), being similar to the trend found for quasars with high luminosity (M{sub 1450} < -26). This result is consistent with the so-called downsizing evolution of quasars seen at lower redshifts.

  15. The High-Redshift Quasar Luminosity Function from Multi-Epoch Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift z > 4 quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying quasars, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We validate these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 < z < 4.5 for -27.5 < M1450 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity (M*1450 = -26.7) from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z 4. We used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeated imaging of the 275 sq. deg. equatorial region of the sky (-50 < R.A. < +60; -1.26 < Dec. < +1.26), known as Stripe 82, to select a statistical sample of z 4 quasars. We extracted 40 million lightcurves from the imaging using forced photometry on all u, g, r, i, z epochs at the positions of sources detected on a deep i-band co-add. We developed a classification method based on photometric information alone (colors and variability metrics derived from these new multi-band lightcurves), which we validated with a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i < 22.5. We demonstrate that selection functions for ensemble classifiers can be estimated by building generative models of empirical distributions of quasars previously selected with a diverse set of selection criteria. The z 4 QLF contributes to our understanding of supermassive black hole growth and cosmic reionization of both H I and He II which likely began at z 4 as a result of hard UV emissivity from quasars. The resulting QLF measurement is consistent with the previous lower number densities reported from deep, narrow-field surveys (COSMOS); it is not consistent with higher number densities reported from the NDWFS-DLS and CANDELS GOODS-S fields. In the context of recent 2

  16. Optical Variability of Quasars as a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kwon, T.-Y.; Liang, Y.; Scott, J. H.; Wysota, A.

    1987-09-01

    Various models of the "central engine" in quasars make different predictions of how the degree of variability and its timescale vary with luminosity. In the past there have been conflicting claims about the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar variability. We have examined the photographic light curves obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory (U. of Florida) and the Royal Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux) for over a hundred quasars (both radio-loud and radio-quiet). We demonstrate how the previously-reported redshift dependence is a consequence of time dilation, and find that, after allowance for this, there is no luminosity dependence in the amplitude of variability. High-luminosity quasars are not less variable than their low-luminosity counterparts. This creates major difficulties for some classes of quasar model with discrete accretion events (e.g., gas cloud or disrupted stars being "swallowed" directly).

  17. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Variability selection and quasar luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Magneville, Ch.; Yèche, Ch.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Burtin, E.; Dawson, K.; McGreer, I.; Myers, A. D.; Rossi, G.; Schlegel, D.; Schneider, D.; Streblyanska, A.; Tinker, J.

    2016-03-01

    The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) has an extensive quasar program that combines several selection methods. Among these, the photometric variability technique provides highly uniform samples, which are unaffected by the redshift bias of traditional optical-color selections, when z = 2.7-3.5 quasars cross the stellar locus or when host galaxy light affects quasar colors at z< 0.9. We present the variability selection of quasars in eBOSS, focusing on a specific program that led to a sample of 13 876 quasars to gdered = 22.5 over a 94.5 deg2 region in Stripe 82, which has an areal density 1.5 times higher than over the rest of the eBOSS footprint. We use these variability-selected data to provide a new measurement of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) in the redshift range of 0.68 luminosity-function evolution (PLE) with bright-end and faint-end slopes allowed to be different on either side of z = 2.2. The other is a simple PLE at z< 2.2, combined with a model that comprises both luminosity and density evolution (LEDE) at z> 2.2. Both models are constrained to be continuous at z = 2.2. They present a flattening of the bright-end slope at high redshift. The LEDE model indicates a reduction of the break density with increasing redshift, but the evolution of the break magnitude depends on the parameterization. The models are in excellent accord, predicting quasar counts that agree within 0.3% (resp., 1.1%) to g< 22.5 (resp., g< 23). The models are also in good agreement over the entire redshift range with models from previous studies.

  18. PROBING THE WARM DARK MATTER WITH THE HIGH-z QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyunmi; Lee, Jounghun

    2009-09-20

    In a warm dark matter (WDM) cosmology, the first objects to form at z >= 20 are one-dimensional filaments with mean length on the order of the WDM free-streaming scale. Gao and Theuns recently claimed by using high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations that the eventual collapse of these WDM filaments along their longest axes may seed the supermassive black holes that power high-z quasars. In this picture, it is supposed that the high-z quasar luminosity function should reflect how abundant the WDM filaments are in the early universe. We derive analytically the mass function of early-universe filaments with the help of the Zel'dovich approximation. Then, we determine the rate of its decrease in the mass section corresponding to the free-streaming scale of a WDM particle of mass m {sub n}u. Adjusting the value of m{sub n}u, we fit the slope of the analytic model to that of the high-z quasar luminosity function measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR3. A new WDM constraint from this feasibility study is found to be consistent with the lightest super-symmetric partner.

  19. The K-Band Quasar Luminosity Function from an SDSS and UKIDSS Matched Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Michael; Ross, N. P.; Schneider, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We match the 1,015,082 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) DR3 to produce a catalog of 130,827 objects with optical (ugriz) and infrared (YJHK) measurements over an area of 1,200 sq. deg. A matching radius of 1'’ is used; the positional standard deviations of SDSS DR6 quasars and UKIDSS LAS is δRA = 0.137'’ and δDec = 0.131''. The catalog contains 74,351 K-band detections and 42,133 objects have coverage in all four NIR bands. In addition to the catalog, we present optical and NIR color-redshift and color-color plots. The photometric vs. spectroscopic redshift plots demonstrate how unreliable high reported photometric redshifts can be. This forces us to focus on z4.6 quasars are compared to our highest redshift objects. The giK color-color plot demonstrates that stellar contamination only affects a small sample of the objects. Distributions for Y,J,H,K and i-bands reveal insights into the flux limits in each magnitude. We investigate the distribution of redshifts from different data sets and investigate the legitimacy of certain measured photometric redshift regions. For in-depth analysis, we focus on the 300 sq. deg area equatorial SDSS region designated as Stripe 82. We measure the observed K-band quasar luminosity function (QLF) for a subset of 9,872, z<2.2 objects. We find the shape of the K-band QLF is very similar to that of the optical QLF, over the considered redshift ranges. Our calculated K-Band QLFs broadly match previous optical QLFs calculated from the SDSS and 2SLAQ QSO surveys and should provide important constraints linking unobscured optical quasars to Mid-Infrared detected, dusty and obscured AGNs at high-redshift.

  20. A mixture spatial point pattern model for the quasar luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payandeh Najafabadi, Amir T.; Baniasadi, Fatemeh

    2011-10-01

    Consider the problem of estimating the Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF). In a 2007 Ph.D. dissertation, Hugeback considers the QLF as a nonhomogeneous poisson process and estimates the intensity function under SDSS DR3 data (The University of Chicago, AAT 3273021). The present study follows Hugeback's approach but introduces a mixture component which improves Hugeback's model in several respects. Namely, the database is partitioned into two groups according to redshift: z < 2.75 and z ⩾ 2.75. Next, a mixture model for the QLF was derived using the concept of pseudolikelihood, the addition of a K function to allow for inter-point interaction, and evaluation of residuals diagnostic plots. This mixture model (i) improves the deviance of Hugeback's model, and (ii) satisfies residual assumptions that are violated under Hugeback's model. Moreover, this study confirms Hugeback's finding of inhomogeneity in the QLF, and provides stronger evidence for the existence of an interaction between redshift and absolute magnitude.

  1. The Radio luminosity Function of Radio-Loud Quasars from the 7C Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    1998-01-01

    We present a complete sample of 24 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) from the new 7C Redshift Survey. Every quasar with a low-frequency (151 MHz) radio flux-density S(sub 151) > 0.5 Jy in two regions of the sky covering 0.013 sr is included; 23 of these have sufficient extended flux to meet the selection criteria, 18 of these have steep radio spectra (hereafter denoted as SSQs). The key advantage of this sample over most samples of RLQs is the lack of an optical magnitude limit. By combining the 7C and 3CRR samples, we have investigated the properties of RLQs as a function of redshift z and radio luminosity L(sub 151). We derive the radio luminosity function (RLF) of RLQs and find that the data are well fitted by a single power-law with slope alpha(sub 1) = 1.9 +/- 0.1 (for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s.Mpc, OMEGA(sub M) = 1, OMEGA(sub DELTA) = 0). We find that there must be a break in the RLQ RLF at log(sub 10)(L(sub 151)/W Hz.sr) approximately < or = 27, in order for the models to be consistent with the 7C and 6C source counts. The z-dependence of the RLF follows a one-tailed gaussian which peaks at z = 1.7 +/- 0.2. We find no evidence for a decline in the co-moving space density of RLQs at higher redshifts. A positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities of SSQs is observed, confirming a result of Serjeant. We are able to rule out this correlation being due to selection effects or biases in our combined sample. The radio-optical correlation and best-fit model RLF enable us to estimate the distribution of optical magnitudes of quasars in samples selected at low radio frequencies, We con- clude that for samples with S(sub 151) approximately < or = 1 Jy one must use optical data significantly deeper than the POSS-I limit (R approximately equal 20), in order to avoid severe incompleteness.

  2. PROBING THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z{approx} 4 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Trump, J. R.; Comastri, A.; Enoki, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Murayama, T.; Saito, T.; Silverman, J. D.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2011-02-20

    We searched for quasars that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF). Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope and identified eight low-luminosity quasars at z {approx} 4. In order to derive the QLF based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z {approx} 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope ({beta} = -1.67{sup +0.11}{sub -0.17}) than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.

  3. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. II. the Bright End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ≈ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ˜ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ˜ 5. Combining our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ˜ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range of 4.7 ≤ z < 5.4 and -29 < M 1450 ≤ -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/V a method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as α = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope β = -3.58 ± 0.24 and a fainter break magnitude {M}1450* = -26.98 ± 0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution model. Using the best-fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ˜ 5 is found to be 18%-45% with a clumping factor C of 2-5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.

  4. The z~4 Quasar Luminosity Function: Implications for supermassive black hole growth, reionization, and future time domain surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra; Connolly, Andrew J.; McGreer, Ian D.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Fan, Xiaohui; LSST Data Management

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift (z > 4) quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying objects, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We develop these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 < z < 4.5 for -27.5 < M1450 < -23.5. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeated imaging of the 275 sq. deg. equatorial region of the sky (50 < R.A. < +60; -1.26 < Dec. < +1.26) known as Stripe 82, we extracted 40 million new lightcurves using the LSST data management software and selected a statistical sample of z~4 quasars based on colors and variability metrics. We confirmed these using a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i < 22.5. We present the first variability-selected QLF measurement at high redshift (z > 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity M*1450 = -26.7 from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z~4.

  5. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z >~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  6. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  7. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  8. The Luminosity Function of Quasars (active Galactic Nuclei) in a Merging Model with the Eddington Limit Taken Into Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontorovich, V. M.; Krivitsky, D. S.

    The influence of Eddington's limit on the active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity function within the framework of a phenomenological activity model (Kats and Kontorovich, 1990, 1991) based on angular momentum compensation in the process of galaxy merging is investigated. In particular, it is shown that in spite of the essential dependence of the galaxy merging probability on their masses in the most important and interesting case it behaves effectively as a constant, so that the abovementioned (Kats and Kontorovich, 1991) correspondence between the observed galaxy mass function (Binggeli et al., 1988) and quasar luminosity function power exponents (Boyle et al., 1988; Koo and Kron, 1988; Cristiani et al., 1993) for a constant merger probability takes place in reality. A break in the power-law dependence of the luminosity function due to Eddington's restriction (cf. Dibai, 1981; Padovani and Rafanelli, 1988) is obtained in certain cases. Possible correlation between masses of black holes in AGN and masses of their host galaxies is discussed. A more detailed paper containing the results presented at this conference was published in Pis'ma v Astron. Zh. (Kontorovich and Krivitsky, 1995). Here we have added also some additional notes and references.

  9. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  10. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  11. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  12. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF BROAD-LINE QUASARS IN THE MASS-LUMINOSITY PLANE. II. BLACK HOLE MASS AND EDDINGTON RATIO FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Shen, Yue

    2013-02-10

    We employ a flexible Bayesian technique to estimate the black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio functions for Type 1 (i.e., broad line) quasars from a uniformly selected data set of {approx}58, 000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. We find that the SDSS becomes significantly incomplete at M {sub BH} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} or L/L {sub Edd} {approx}< 0.07, and that the number densities of Type 1 quasars continue to increase down to these limits. Both the mass and Eddington ratio functions show evidence of downsizing, with the most massive and highest Eddington ratio BHs experiencing Type 1 quasar phases first, although the Eddington ratio number densities are flat at z < 2. We estimate the maximum Eddington ratio of Type 1 quasars in the observable universe to be L/L {sub Edd} {approx} 3. Consistent with our results in Shen and Kelly, we do not find statistical evidence for a so-called sub-Eddington boundary in the mass-luminosity plane of broad-line quasars, and demonstrate that such an apparent boundary in the observed distribution can be caused by selection effect and errors in virial BH mass estimates. Based on the typical Eddington ratio in a given mass bin, we estimate growth times for the BHs in Type 1 quasars and find that they are comparable to or longer than the age of the universe, implying an earlier phase of accelerated (i.e., with higher Eddington ratios) and possibly obscured growth. The large masses probed by our sample imply that most of our BHs reside in what are locally early-type galaxies, and we interpret our results within the context of models of self-regulated BH growth.

  13. Minor Contribution of Quasars to Ionizing Photon Budget at z ∼ 6: Update on Quasar Luminosity Function at the Faint End with Subaru/Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Willott, Chris J.; Hibon, Pascale; Im, Myungshin; Furusawa, Hisanori; Harikane, Yuichi; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Shogo; Kikuta, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Nagao, Tohru; Niino, Yuu; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Toshikawa, Jun; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2017-10-01

    We constrain the quasar contribution to the cosmic reionization based on our deep optical survey of z ∼ 6 quasars down to z R = 24.15 using Subaru/Suprime-Cam in three UKIDSS-DXS fields covering 6.5 deg2. In Kashikawa et al. (2015), we select 17 quasar candidates and report our initial discovery of two low-luminosity quasars ({M}1450∼ -23) from seven targets, one of which might be a Lyα-emitting galaxy. From an additional optical spectroscopy, none of the four candidates out of the remaining 10 turn out to be genuine quasars. Moreover, the deeper optical photometry provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) shows that, unlike the two already-known quasars, the i ‑ z and z ‑ y colors of the last six candidates are consistent with M- or L-type brown dwarfs. Therefore, the quasar luminosity function (QLF) measurement in the previous paper is confirmed. Compiling the QLF measurements from the literature over a wide magnitude range, including an extremely faint AGN candidate from Parsa et al. (2017), to fit them with a double power law, we find that the best-fit faint-end slope is α =-{2.04}-0.18+0.33 (-{1.98}-0.21+0.48) and characteristic magnitude is {M}1450* =-{25.8}-1.9+1.1 (-{25.7}-1.8+1.0) in the case of two (one) quasar detection. Our result suggests that, if the QLF is integrated down to {M}1450=-18, quasars produce ∼1%–12% of the ionizing photons required to fully ionize the universe at z ∼ 6 with a 2σ confidence level, assuming that the escape fraction is {f}{esc}=1 and the intergalactic medium clumpy factor is C = 3. Even when the systematic uncertainties are taken into account, our result supports the scenario that quasars are the minor contributors of the reionization.

  14. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections - III. [O iii] bolometric corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Alison; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present quasar bolometric corrections using the [O III] λ 5007 narrow emission line luminosity based on the detailed spectral energy distributions of 53 bright quasars at low to moderate redshift (0.0345 < z < 1.0002). We adopted two functional forms to calculate Liso, the bolometric luminosity determined under the assumption of isotropy: {L_{iso}}=A {L_{[O III]}} for comparison with the literature and {log(L_{iso})}=B+C log(L_{[O III]}), which better characterizes the data. We also explored whether 'Eigenvector 1 (EV1)', which describes the range of quasar spectral properties and quantifies their diversity, introduces scatter into the L_{[O III]}-Liso relationship. We found that the {[O III]} bolometric correction can be significantly improved by adding a term including the equivalent width ratio R_{Fe II} ≡ EW_{{Fe II}}/EW_{Hβ }, which is an EV1 indicator. Inclusion of R_{Fe II} in predicting Liso is significant at nearly the 3σ level and reduces the scatter and systematic offset of the luminosity residuals. Typically, {[O III]} bolometric corrections are adopted for Type 2 sources where the quasar continuum is not observed and in these cases, R_{Fe II} cannot be measured. We searched for an alternative measure of EV1 that could be measured in the optical spectra of Type 2 sources but were unable to identify one. Thus, the main contribution of this work is to present an improved {[O III]} bolometric correction based on measured bolometric luminosities and highlight the EV1 dependence of the correction in Type 1 sources.

  15. The Similarity of Luminosity in Quasar Doppelganger Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, Michael S.; Rochais, Thomas Bernard; Singh, Vikram; Chick, William T.; Maithil, Jaya; Sutter, Jessica; Shang, Zhaohui

    2017-01-01

    Quasars, the accreting supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies, are among the most luminous objects in the universe and in principle ideal for use as so-called "standard candles" with applications in cosmology. Despite possessing a number of spectral features long known to correlate with luminosity, quasars have failed to realize their potential. We have employed spectral principal component analysis to identify more than 1000 quasar pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with virtually identical ultraviolet spectra, which we call doppelgangers, in order to understand the limits of determining luminosity from spectral features alone. While the majority of doppelgangers have very similar luminosity, there exists a surprisingly large scatter and objects with identical spectra can differ in luminosity by factors of four or larger. We offer some possible physical explanations for this large variance and how it quantifies the problem of ever using quasars as standard candles based on spectral features.

  16. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs): New z > 6 Quasar Survey with Subaru/HSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; SHELLQs Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at high redshift are an important and unique probe of the distant Universe, for understanding the origin and progress of cosmic reionization, the early growth of supermassive black holes, and the evolution of quasar host galaxies and their dark matter halos, among other topics. We are currently carrying out a new spectroscopic survey, called SHELLQs (Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars), to search for low-luminosity quasars at z > 6. By exploiting the exquisite imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we aim to probe quasar luminosities down to M1450 ~ -22 mag, i.e., below the classical threshold between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. Candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm. A large spectroscopic observing program is underway, using Subaru/FOCAS, GTC/OSIRIS, and Gemini/GMOS; in particular, SHELLQs has been approved as a Subaru intensive program to use 20 nights in the coming four semesters. As of August 2016, we have discovered ~40 quasars and bright galaxies at z ~ 6 and beyond, from the first 100 deg2 of the HSC survey (Matsuoka et al. 2016, ApJ, 828, 26). Surprisingly, we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of high-z galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~ 24 mag. Multi-wavelength follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  17. Measuring Lensing Magnification of Quasars by Large Scale Structure Using the Variability-Luminosity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Anne H.; Seitz, Stella; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R 200) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  18. Evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric procedure for determination of the evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects and use of this for prediction of expected redshift and luminosity distribution of objects is described. The relation between this statistical evolution of the population and their physical evolution, such as the variation with cosmological epoch of their luminosity and formation rate is presented. This procedure when applied to a sample of optically selected quasars with redshifts less than two shows that the luminosity function evolves more strongly for higher luminosities, indicating a larger quasar activity at earlier epochs and a more rapid evolution of the objects during their higher luminosity phases. It is also shown that absence of many quasars at redshifts greater than three implies slowing down of this evolution in the conventional cosmological models, perhaps indicating that this is near the epoch of the birth of the quasar (and galaxies).

  19. Cross-correlation of SDSS DR7 quasars and DR10 BOSS galaxies: The weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at z ∼ 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; McBride, Cameron K.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; White, Martin; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam D.; Guo, Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present the measurement of the two-point cross-correlation function (CCF) of 8198 Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasars and 349,608 Data Release 10 CMASS galaxies from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey at 0.3 < z < 0.9. The CCF can be reasonably well fit by a power-law model ξ{sub QG}(r) = (r/r {sub 0}){sup –γ} on projected scales of r{sub p} = 2-25 h {sup –1} Mpc with r {sub 0} = 6.61 ± 0.25 h {sup –1} Mpc and γ = 1.69 ± 0.07. We estimate a quasar linear bias of b{sub Q} = 1.38 ± 0.10 at (z) = 0.53 from the CCF measurements, which corresponds to a characteristic host halo mass of ∼4 × 10{sup 12} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}, compared with a ∼10{sup 13} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} characteristic host halo mass for CMASS galaxies. Based on the clustering measurements, most quasars at z-bar ∼0.5 are not the descendants of their higher luminosity counterparts at higher redshift, which would have evolved into more massive and more biased systems at low redshift. We divide the quasar sample in luminosity and constrain the luminosity dependence of quasar bias to be db{sub Q} /dlog L = 0.20 ± 0.34 or 0.11 ± 0.32 (depending on different luminosity divisions) for quasar luminosities –23.5 > M{sub i} (z = 2) > –25.5, implying a weak luminosity dependence of clustering for luminous quasars at z-bar ∼0.5. We compare our measurements with theoretical predictions, halo occupation distribution (HOD) models, and mock catalogs. These comparisons suggest that quasars reside in a broad range of host halos. The host halo mass distributions significantly overlap with each other for quasars at different luminosities, implying a poor correlation between halo mass and instantaneous quasar luminosity. We also find that the quasar HOD parameterization is largely degenerate such that different HODs can reproduce the CCF equally well, but with different satellite fractions and host halo mass distributions. These results highlight the limitations

  20. Cross-correlation of SDSS DR7 Quasars and DR10 BOSS Galaxies: The Weak Luminosity Dependence of Quasar Clustering at z ~ 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; McBride, Cameron K.; White, Martin; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam D.; Guo, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Zehavi, Idit; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    We present the measurement of the two-point cross-correlation function (CCF) of 8198 Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasars and 349,608 Data Release 10 CMASS galaxies from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey at 0.3 < z < 0.9. The CCF can be reasonably well fit by a power-law model ξQG(r) = (r/r 0)-γ on projected scales of rp = 2-25 h -1 Mpc with r 0 = 6.61 ± 0.25 h -1 Mpc and γ = 1.69 ± 0.07. We estimate a quasar linear bias of bQ = 1.38 ± 0.10 at langzrang = 0.53 from the CCF measurements, which corresponds to a characteristic host halo mass of ~4 × 1012 h -1 M ⊙, compared with a ~1013 h -1 M ⊙ characteristic host halo mass for CMASS galaxies. Based on the clustering measurements, most quasars at \\bar{z}\\sim 0.5 are not the descendants of their higher luminosity counterparts at higher redshift, which would have evolved into more massive and more biased systems at low redshift. We divide the quasar sample in luminosity and constrain the luminosity dependence of quasar bias to be dbQ /dlog L = 0.20 ± 0.34 or 0.11 ± 0.32 (depending on different luminosity divisions) for quasar luminosities -23.5 > Mi (z = 2) > -25.5, implying a weak luminosity dependence of clustering for luminous quasars at \\bar{z}\\sim 0.5. We compare our measurements with theoretical predictions, halo occupation distribution (HOD) models, and mock catalogs. These comparisons suggest that quasars reside in a broad range of host halos. The host halo mass distributions significantly overlap with each other for quasars at different luminosities, implying a poor correlation between halo mass and instantaneous quasar luminosity. We also find that the quasar HOD parameterization is largely degenerate such that different HODs can reproduce the CCF equally well, but with different satellite fractions and host halo mass distributions. These results highlight the limitations and ambiguities in modeling the distribution of quasars with the standard HOD approach.

  1. The Protostellar Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-07-01

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee & Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 ± 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical "luminosity problem" in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  2. THE PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-07-20

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee and Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 {+-} 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  3. Electromagnetic luminosity function of superconducting cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    1988-08-01

    The luminosity function (LF) of electromagnetically radiating closed loops of superconducting cosmic strings (SCS) is calculated in a cosmological context. The LF has a peak as a function of luminosity and a cutoff at the low-luminosity end, and increases with increasing redshift. Some questions concerning a hypothetical model of quasars in which SCS loops act as the ``central engines'' are discussed.

  4. Heavily reddened type 1 quasars at z > 2 - I. Evidence for significant obscured black hole growth at the highest quasar luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Manda; Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new population of z > 2 dust-reddened, type 1 quasars with 0.5 ≲ E(B - V) ≲ 1.5, selected using near-infrared (NIR) imaging data from the UKIDSS-LAS (Large Area Survey), ESO-VHS (European Southern Obseratory-VISTA Hemisphere Survey) and WISE surveys. NIR spectra obtained using the Very Large Telescope for 24 new objects bring our total sample of spectroscopically confirmed hyperluminous (>1013 L⊙), high-redshift dusty quasars to 38. There is no evidence for reddened quasars having significantly different Hα equivalent widths relative to unobscured quasars. The average black hole masses (˜109-1010 M⊙) and bolometric luminosities (˜1047 erg s-1) are comparable to the most luminous unobscured quasars at the same redshift, but with a tail extending to very high luminosities of ˜1048 erg s-1. 66 per cent of the reddened quasars are detected at >3σ at 22 μm by WISE. The average 6-μm rest-frame luminosity is log10(L6 μm/ erg s-1) = 47.1 ± 0.4, making the objects among the mid-infrared brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) currently known. The extinction-corrected space density estimate now extends over three magnitudes (-30 < Mi < -27) and demonstrates that the reddened quasar luminosity function is significantly flatter than that of the unobscured quasar population at z = 2-3. At the brightest magnitudes, Mi ≲ -29, the space density of our dust-reddened population exceeds that of unobscured quasars. A model where the probability that a quasar becomes dust reddened increases at high luminosity is consistent with the observations and such a dependence could be explained by an increase in luminosity and extinction during AGN-fuelling phases. The properties of our obscured type 1 quasars are distinct from the heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN that have been identified at much fainter luminosities and we conclude that they likely correspond to a brief evolutionary phase in massive galaxy formation.

  5. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  6. A Flexible Method of Estimating Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2008-08-01

    We describe a Bayesian approach to estimating luminosity functions. We derive the likelihood function and posterior probability distribution for the luminosity function, given the observed data, and we compare the Bayesian approach with maximum likelihood by simulating sources from a Schechter function. For our simulations confidence intervals derived from bootstrapping the maximum likelihood estimate can be too narrow, while confidence intervals derived from the Bayesian approach are valid. We develop our statistical approach for a flexible model where the luminosity function is modeled as a mixture of Gaussian functions. Statistical inference is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, and we describe a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to perform the MCMC. The MCMC simulates random draws from the probability distribution of the luminosity function parameters, given the data, and we use a simulated data set to show how these random draws may be used to estimate the probability distribution for the luminosity function. In addition, we show how the MCMC output may be used to estimate the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, such as the peak in the space density of quasars. The Bayesian method we develop has the advantage that it is able to place accurate constraints on the luminosity function even beyond the survey detection limits, and that it provides a natural way of estimating the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, including those that rely on information beyond the survey detection limits.

  7. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ -22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  8. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING WEAK Mg II QUASAR ABSORBERS AND A CURIOUS DEPENDENCE ON QUASAR LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jessica L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Klimek, Elizabeth S.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2013-05-01

    We have identified 469 Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet systems having W{sub r} {>=} 0.02 A in 252 Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer and UVES/Very Large Telescope quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 2.6. Using the largest sample yet of 188 weak Mg II systems (0.02 A {<=}W{sub r} < 0.3 A), we calculate their absorber redshift path density, dN/dz. We find clear evidence of evolution, with dN/dz peaking at z {approx} 1.2, and that the product of the absorber number density and cross section decreases linearly with increasing redshift; weak Mg II absorbers seem to vanish above z {approx_equal} 2.7. If the absorbers are ionized by the UV background, we estimate number densities of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} Mpc{sup -3} for spherical geometries and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} Mpc{sup -3} for more sheetlike geometries. We also find that dN/dz toward intrinsically faint versus bright quasars differs significantly for weak and strong (W{sub r} {>=} 1.0 A) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is {approx}25% higher than toward faint quasars (10{sigma} at low redshift, 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, and 4{sigma} at high redshift, 1.4 < z {<=} 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being {approx}20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10{sigma} at low redshift and 4{sigma} at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  9. The Redshift Distribution of Intervening Weak Mg II Quasar Absorbers and a Curious Dependence on Quasar Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jessica L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael T.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Klimek, Elizabeth S.

    2013-05-01

    We have identified 469 Mg II λλ2796, 2803 doublet systems having Wr >= 0.02 Å in 252 Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer and UVES/Very Large Telescope quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 2.6. Using the largest sample yet of 188 weak Mg II systems (0.02 Å <=Wr < 0.3 Å), we calculate their absorber redshift path density, dN/dz. We find clear evidence of evolution, with dN/dz peaking at z ~ 1.2, and that the product of the absorber number density and cross section decreases linearly with increasing redshift; weak Mg II absorbers seem to vanish above z ~= 2.7. If the absorbers are ionized by the UV background, we estimate number densities of 106-109 Mpc-3 for spherical geometries and 102-105 Mpc-3 for more sheetlike geometries. We also find that dN/dz toward intrinsically faint versus bright quasars differs significantly for weak and strong (Wr >= 1.0 Å) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is ~25% higher than toward faint quasars (10σ at low redshift, 0.4 <= z <= 1.4, and 4σ at high redshift, 1.4 < z <= 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being ~20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10σ at low redshift and 4σ at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  10. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  11. INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald; Lebouteiller, Vianney

    2012-12-20

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L

  12. The 2QDES Pilot: the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehade, Ben; Shanks, T.; Findlay, J.; Metcalfe, N.; Sawangwit, U.; Irwin, M.; González-Solares, E.; Fine, S.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Croom, S.; Jurek, R. J.; Parkinson, D.; Bielby, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new redshift survey, the 2dF Quasar Dark Energy Survey pilot (2QDESp), which consists of ≈10 000 quasars from ≈150 deg2 of the southern sky, based on VST-ATLAS imaging and 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy. Combining our optical photometry with the WISE (W1,W2) bands we can select essentially contamination free quasar samples with 0.8 < z < 2.5 and g < 20.5. At fainter magnitudes, optical UVX selection is still required to reach our g ≈ 22.5 limit. Using both these techniques we observed quasar redshifts at sky densities up to 90 deg-2. By comparing 2QDESp with other surveys (SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ) we find that quasar clustering is approximately luminosity independent, with results for all four surveys consistent with a correlation scale of r0 = 6.1 ± 0.1 h-1 Mpc, despite their decade range in luminosity. We find a significant redshift dependence of clustering, particularly when BOSS data with r0 = 7.3 ± 0.1 h-1 Mpc are included at z ≈ 2.4. All quasars remain consistent with having a single host halo mass of ≈2 ± 1 × 1012 h-1 M⊙. This result implies that either quasars do not radiate at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity or AGN black hole and dark matter halo masses are weakly correlated. No significant evidence is found to support fainter, X-ray selected quasars at low redshift having larger halo masses as predicted by the `hot halo' mode AGN model of Fanidakis et al. (2013). Finally, although the combined quasar sample reaches an effective volume as large as that of the original SDSS LRG sample, we do not detect the BAO feature in these data.

  13. The Radio-loud Fraction of Quasars with Faint Optical Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. J.; Impey, C. D.; Foltz, C. B.; Hewett, P. C.

    1994-12-01

    The observed radio-loud fraction of optically selected quasars decreases for absolute blue magnitudes fainter than M_B ~ -24, a phenomenon which has been attributed to a selection effect in quasar surveys (e.g., Peacock et al. 1986, MNRAS, 218, 265). A similar decrease was found (Hooper et al. 1995, ApJ, submitted) in a sample of the optically selected Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS; Hewett et al. 1995, in preparation) observed at radio wavelengths. The change in radio-loud fraction within the LBQS cannot be explained by the proposed selection bias against quasars with large radio luminosities and small optical luminosities, implying that the effect is a real physical change in the quasar population. An additional sample of LBQS quasars was observed with the VLA and combined with the earlier data to verify this effect and to better determine the form of the change in radio-loud fraction. The radio-loud (8.4 GHz luminosity > 10^25 W/Hz) fraction is 2/70 (3%) for M_B fainter than -24, compared to 30/289 (10%) among the more optically luminous objects, a difference significant at the 98% confidence level.

  14. Synchrotron peak luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio for SDSS flat-spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Minfeng; Chen, Zhaoyu

    2010-01-01

    For a sample of 185 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) constructed from the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog, we found a significant correlation between the synchrotron peak luminosity and both the black hole mass and Eddington ratio. This implies that the physics of its jet formation is not only tightly related with the black hole mass, but also with the accretion rate. We verify that the synchrotron peak luminosity can be a better indicator of jet emission than 5 GHz luminosity, through comparing the relationships between each of these two parameters and both black hole mass and Eddington ratio. The fundamental plane of black hole activity for our FSRQs is established as L r ∝ L {x/0.80±0.06} M {bh/-0.04±0.09} with a weak dependence on black hole mass, however, the scatter is significant.

  15. Dependence of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar Fraction on Radio Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Dai, Xinyu; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2008-11-01

    We find that the fraction of classical broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) among the FIRST radio sources in the Sloan Data Release 3, is 20.5+ 7.3-5.9% at the faintest radio powers detected (L1.4 GHz ~ 1032 erg s-1), and rapidly drops to lesssim8% at L1.4 GHz ~ 3 × 1033 erg s-1. Similarly, adopting the broader absorption index (AI) definition of Trump et al., we find the fraction of radio BALQSOs to be 44+ 8.1-7.8%, reducing to 23.1+ 7.3-6.1% at high luminosities. While the high fraction at low radio power is consistent with the recent near-IR estimates by Dai et al., the lower fraction at high radio powers is intriguing and confirms previous claims based on smaller samples. The trend is independent of the redshift range, the optical and radio flux selection limits, or the exact definition of a radio match. We also find that at fixed optical magnitude, the highest bins of radio luminosity are preferentially populated by non-BALQSOs, consistent with the overall trend. We do find, however, that those quasars identified as AI-BALQSOs but not under the classical definition do not show a significant drop in their fraction as a function of radio power, further supporting independent claims that these sources, characterized by lower equivalent width, may represent an independent class from the classical BALQSOs. We find the balnicity index, a measure of the absorption trough in BALQSOs, and the mean maximum wind velocity to be roughly constant at all radio powers. We discuss several plausible physical models which may explain the observed fast drop in the fraction of the classical BALQSOs with increasing radio power, although none is entirely satisfactory. A strictly evolutionary model for the BALQSO and radio emission phases requires a strong fine-tuning to work, while a simple geometric model, although still not capable of explaining polar BALQSOs and the paucity of FRII BALQSOs, is statistically successful in matching the data if part of the apparent radio

  16. The Luminosity Function of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Casertano, Stefano; Turnshek, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present some results from our HST archival image study of 71 QSO host galaxies. The objects are selected to have z less than or equal to 0.46 and total absolute magnitude M(sub v) less than or equal to -23 in our adopted cosmology (H(sub 0) = 50 kilometers per second Mpc(sup-1), q(sub 0) = 0.5, lambda = 0)). The aim of this initial study is to investigate the composition of the sample with respect to host morphology and radio loudness, as well as derive the QSO host galaxy luminosity function. We have analyzed available WFPC2 images in R or I band (U in one case), using a uniform set of procedures. The host galaxies span a narrow range of luminosities and are exceptionally bright, much more so than normal galaxies, usually L greater than L*(sub v). The QSOs are almost equally divided among three subclasses: radio-loud QSOs with elliptical hosts, radio-quiet QSOs with elliptical hosts, and radio-quiet QSOs with spiral hosts. Radio-loud QSOs with spiral hosts are extremely rare. Using a weighting procedure, we derive the combined luminosity function of QSO host galaxies. We find that the luminosity function of QSO hosts differs in shape from that of normal galaxies but that they coincide at the highest luminosities. The ratio of the number of quasar hosts to the number of normal galaxies at a luminosity L*(sub v) is R = (Lv/11.48L*(sub v))(sup 2.46), where L*(sub v) corresponds to M*(sub v)= -22.35, and a QSO is defined to be an object with total nuclear plus host light M(sub v) less than or equal to -23. This ratio can be interpreted as the probability that a galaxy with luminosity L(sub V) will host a QSO at redshift z approximately equal to 0.26.

  17. Multiwavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I have developed a technique for measuring multi-variate luminosity functions of galaxies. Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principle component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multiwavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and show that the results are consistent with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  18. Herschel-ATLAS: the link between accretion luminosity and star formation in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfield, D. G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cooray, A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Page, M. J.; Stevens, J. A.; de Zotti, G.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Dariush, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E. E.; Rodighiero, G.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.

    2011-09-01

    We use the science demonstration field data of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey to study how star formation, traced by the far-infrared Herschel data, is related to both the accretion luminosity and redshift of quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the 2dF-SDSS luminous red galaxy (LRG) and Quasar Spectroscopic Catalogue survey. By developing a maximum-likelihood estimator to investigate the presence of correlations between the far-infrared and optical luminosities, we find evidence that the star formation in quasar hosts is correlated with both redshift and quasar accretion luminosity. Assuming a relationship of the form LIR∝LθQSO(1 +z)ζ, we find θ= 0.22 ± 0.08 and ζ= 1.6 ± 0.4, although there is substantial additional uncertainty in ζ of the order of ±1, due to uncertainties in the host galaxy dust temperature. We find evidence for a large intrinsic dispersion in the redshift dependence, but no evidence for intrinsic dispersion in the correlation between LQSO and LIR, suggesting that the latter may be due to a direct physical connection between star formation and black hole accretion. This is consistent with the idea that both the quasar activity and star formation are dependent on the same reservoir of cold gas, so that they are both affected by the influx of cold gas during mergers or heating of gas via feedback processes. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. The white dwarf luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Berro, Enrique; Oswalt, Terry D.

    2016-06-01

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for ∼ 10 Gyr. Their observed properties provide information about the history of the Galaxy, its dark matter content and a host of other interesting astrophysical problems. Examples of these include an independent determination of the past history of the local star formation rate, identification of the objects responsible for the reported microlensing events, constraints on the rate of change of the gravitational constant, and upper limits to the mass of weakly interacting massive particles. To carry on these tasks the essential observational tools are the luminosity and mass functions of white dwarfs, whereas the theoretical tools are the evolutionary sequences of white dwarf progenitors, and the corresponding white dwarf cooling sequences. In particular, the observed white dwarf luminosity function is the key manifestation of the white dwarf cooling theory, although other relevant ingredients are needed to compare theory and observations. In this review we summarize the recent attempts to empirically determine the white dwarf luminosity function for the different Galactic populations. We also discuss the biases that may affect its interpretation. Finally, we elaborate on the theoretical ingredients needed to model the white dwarf luminosity function, paying special attention to the remaining uncertainties, and we comment on some applications of the white dwarf cooling theory. Astrophysical problems for which white dwarf stars may provide useful leverage in the near future are also discussed.

  20. The Host Galaxies of High-Luminosity Obscured Quasars at 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; Strauss, M. A.; Greene, J. E.; Zakamska, N. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexandroff, R.; Liu, G.; Smith, P. S.; The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. However, very little is known about the host galaxies of the most luminous quasars at redshift 2.5, the epoch when massive black hole growth peaked. The brightness of the quasar itself, which can easily outshine a galaxy by a large factor, makes it very difficult to study emission from extended gas or stars in the host galaxy. However, we have imaged the extended emission from the host galaxies of a unique sample of six optically extinguished (Type II) luminous quasars with 2.5, with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 20, GO 13014) using ACS/F814W to access the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, and WFC3/F160W for the rest-frame optical longward of 4000A. These objects are selected from the spectroscopic database of the SDSS/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to have strong, narrow emission lines and weak continua. With these images, we have quantified the luminosity, morphology, and dynamical state of the host galaxies, and searched for extended scattered light from the obscured central engine. These observations are the first comprehensive study of both host galaxy light and scattered light in high-luminosity quasars at the epoch of maximum black hole growth, and give insights into the relationship between host galaxies and black holes during this important, and yet largely unexplored period.

  1. Optical Variability of Two High-Luminosity Radio-Quiet Quasars, PDS 456 and PHL 1811

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Benker, A. J.; Campbell, J. S.; Crowley, K. A.; George, T. A.; Hedrick, C. H.; Hiller, M. E.; Klimek, E. S.; Leonard, J. P.; Peterson, B. W.; Sanders, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    PDS 456 and PHL 1811 are two of the highest luminosity low-redshift quasars. Both have optical luminosities comparable to 3C 273, but they have low radio luminosities. PDS 456 is a broad line object but PHL 1811 could be classified as a high-luminosity Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) object. We present the results of optical (V-band) continuum monitoring of PDS 456 and PHL 1811. We compare the variability properties of these two very different AGNs compared with the radio-loud AGN 3C 273, and we discuss the implications for the origin of the optical continuum variability in AGNs. This research has been supported in part by the Howard Hughes Foundation, Nebraska EPSCoR, the University of Nebraska Layman Fund, the University of Nebraska Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experiences, Pepsi-Cola, and the National Science Foundation through grant AST 03-07912.

  2. Ultraviolet Fe II emission in fainter quasars: luminosity dependences, and the influence of environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowes, Roger G.; Haberzettl, Lutz; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Williger, Gerard M.; Mitchell, Sophia M.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Campusano, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the strength of ultraviolet Fe II emission in fainter quasars compared with brighter quasars for 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.8, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7QSO catalogue and spectra of Schneider et al., and the SDSS Faint Quasar Survey (SFQS) catalogue and spectra of Jiang et al. We quantify the strength of the UV Fe II emission using the W2400 equivalent width of Weymann et al., which is defined between two rest-frame continuum windows at 2240-2255 and 2665-2695 Å. The main results are the following. (1) We find that for W2400 ≳ 25 Å there is a universal (i.e. for quasars in general) strengthening of W2400 with decreasing intrinsic luminosity, L3000. (2) In conjunction with previous work by Clowes et al., we find that there is a further, differential, strengthening of W2400 with decreasing L3000 for those quasars that are members of Large Quasar Groups (LQGs). (3) We find that increasingly strong W2400 tends to be associated with decreasing full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the neighbouring Mg II λ2798 broad emission line. (4) We suggest that the dependence of W2400 on L3000 arises from Lyα fluorescence. (5) We find that stronger W2400 tends to be associated with smaller virial estimates from Shen et al. of the mass of the central black hole, by a factor of ˜2 between the ultrastrong emitters and the weak. Stronger W2400 emission would correspond to smaller black holes that are still growing. The differential effect for LQG members might then arise from preferentially younger quasars in the LQG environments.

  3. Line and continuum variability of two intermediate-redshift, high-luminosity quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevese, D.; Paris, D.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vagnetti, F.; Zitelli, V.

    2007-08-01

    Context: It has been shown that the luminosity of active galactic nuclei and the size of their broad line region obey a simple relation of the type R_BLR=a Lγ, from faint Seyfert nuclei to bright quasars, allowing single-epoch determination of the central black hole mass M_BH= b Lγ Δ^2_Hβ from their luminosity L and width of Hβ emission line. Adopting this mass determination for cosmological studies requires the extrapolation to high redshift and luminosity of a relation whose calibration relies so far on reverberation mapping measurements performed for L ⪉ 1046 erg s-1 and redshift z ⪉ 0.4. Aims: We initiated a campaign for the spectrophotometric monitoring of a few luminous, intermediate redshift quasars whose apparent magnitude, V < 15.7, allows observations with a 1.8 m telescope, aimed at proving that emission lines vary and respond to continuum variations even for luminosities ⪆1047 erg s-1, and determining eventually their M_BH from reverberation mapping. Methods: We have repeatedly performed simultaneous spectrophotometric observations of quasars and reference stars to determine relative variability of continuum and emission lines. We describe the observations and methods of analysis. Results: For the quasars PG 1634+706 and PG 1247+268 we obtain light-curves respectively for CIII] (λλ1909 Å), MgII(λλ2798 Å) and for CIV(λλ1549 Å), CIII] (λλ1909 Å) emission lines with the relevant continua. During 3.2 years of observation, in the former case no continuum variability was detected and the evidence for line variability is marginal, while in the latter case both continuum and line variability are detected with high significance and the line variations appear correlated with continuum variations. Conclusions: The detection of the emission line variability in a quasar with L ~ 1047 erg s-1 encourages the continuation of the monitoring campaign which should provide a black hole mass estimate in another 5-6 years, constraining the mass-luminosity

  4. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF BROAD-LINE QUASARS IN THE MASS-LUMINOSITY PLANE. I. TESTING FWHM-BASED VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Kelly, Brandon C.

    2012-02-20

    We jointly constrain the luminosity function (LF) and black hole mass function (BHMF) of broad-line quasars with forward Bayesian modeling in the quasar mass-luminosity plane, based on a homogeneous sample of {approx}58, 000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 quasars at z {approx} 0.3-5. We take into account the selection effect of the sample flux limit; more importantly, we deal with the statistical scatter between true BH masses and FWHM-based single-epoch virial mass estimates, as well as potential luminosity-dependent biases of these mass estimates. The LF is tightly constrained in the regime sampled by SDSS and makes reasonable predictions when extrapolated to {approx}3 mag fainter. Downsizing is seen in the model LF. On the other hand, we find it difficult to constrain the BHMF to within a factor of a few at z {approx}> 0.7 (with Mg II and C IV-based virial BH masses). This is mainly driven by the unknown luminosity-dependent bias of these mass estimators and its degeneracy with other model parameters, and secondly driven by the fact that SDSS quasars only sample the tip of the active BH population at high redshift. Nevertheless, the most likely models favor a positive luminosity-dependent bias for Mg II and possibly for C IV, such that at fixed true BH mass, objects with higher-than-average luminosities have overestimated FWHM-based virial masses. There is tentative evidence that downsizing also manifests itself in the active BHMF, and the BH mass density in broad-line quasars contributes an insignificant amount to the total BH mass density at all times. Within our model uncertainties, we do not find a strong BH mass dependence of the mean Eddington ratio, but there is evidence that the mean Eddington ratio (at fixed BH mass) increases with redshift.

  5. The X-Ray and Mid-infrared Luminosities in Luminous Type 1 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Harrison, Chris M.; Hainline, Kevin N.; Alberts, Stacey; Alexander, David M.; Brodwin, Mark; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel

    2017-03-01

    Several recent studies have reported different intrinsic correlations between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) mid-IR luminosity ({L}{MIR}) and the rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity (L X) for luminous quasars. To understand the origin of the difference in the observed {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations, we study a sample of 3247 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 AGNs collected from Boötes, XMM-COSMOS, XMM-XXL-North, and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the Swift/XRT footprint spanning over four orders of magnitude in luminosity. We carefully examine how different observational constraints impact the observed {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations, including the inclusion of X-ray-nondetected objects, possible X-ray absorption in type 1 AGNs, X-ray flux limits, and star formation contamination. We find that the primary factor driving the different {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations reported in the literature is the X-ray flux limits for different studies. When taking these effects into account, we find that the X-ray luminosity and mid-IR luminosity (measured at rest-frame 6 μ {{m}}, or {L}6μ {{m}}) of our sample of type 1 AGNs follow a bilinear relation in the log-log plane: {log}{L}{{X}}=(0.84+/- 0.03)× {log}{L}6μ {{m}}/{10}45 erg s-1 + (44.60 ± 0.01) for {L}6μ {{m}}< {10}44.79 erg s-1, and {log}{L}{{X}}=(0.40+/- 0.03)× {log}{L}6μ {{m}}/{10}45 erg s-1 + (44.51 ± 0.01) for {L}6μ {{m}} ≥slant {10}44.79 erg s-1. This suggests that the luminous type 1 quasars have a shallower {L}{{X}}{--}{L}6μ {{m}} correlation than the approximately linear relations found in local Seyfert galaxies. This result is consistent with previous studies reporting a luminosity-dependent {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relation and implies that assuming a linear {L}{{X}}{--}{L}6μ {{m}} relation to infer the neutral gas column density for X-ray absorption might overestimate the column densities in luminous quasars.

  6. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-GALAXY LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Salviander, S.; Shields, G. A.; Bonning, E. W. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M {sub BH}, and the host galaxy luminosity, L {sub gal}, in a sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We use composite quasar spectra binned by black hole mass and redshift to assess galaxy features that would otherwise be overwhelmed by noise in individual spectra. The black hole mass is calculated using the photoionization method, and the host galaxy luminosity is inferred from the depth of the Ca II H+K features in the composite spectra. We evaluate the evolution in the M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship by examining the redshift dependence of Δ log M {sub BH}, the offset in M {sub BH} from the local M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship. There is little systematic trend in Δ log M {sub BH} out to z = 0.8. Using the width of the [O III] emission line as a proxy for the stellar velocity dispersion, σ{sub *}, we find agreement of our derived host luminosities with the locally observed Faber-Jackson relation. This supports the utility of the width of the [O III] line as a proxy for σ{sub *} in statistical studies.

  7. The Local [CII] Emission Line Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh

    2017-01-01

    I present, for the first time, the local [CII]158 $\\mu$m emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the RBGS. [CII] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the LIRGs in the GOALS survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-IR luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at $S_{60\\mu m} > 5.24 Jy$. We calculated the completeness as a function of [CII] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [CII] luminosity function is constrained in the range $\\sim 10^{7-9} \\ L_{\\odot}$ from both the 1/Vmax and the STY maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [CII] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [CII] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [CII]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [CII] high redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions, are suggestive of an evolution in the [CII] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. ALMA with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  8. MAD Adaptive Optics Imaging of High-luminosity Quasars: A Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Paiano, S.; Treves, A.; Uslenghi, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Baruffolo, A.; Diolaiti, E.; Farinato, J.; Lombini, M.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z ˜ 2 and one at z ˜ 4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these nonoptimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ˜ 0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for two sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with AO systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2-3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for quasi-stellar objects at z = 2 with nucleus K-magnitude spanning from 15 to 20 (corresponding to absolute magnitude -31 to -26) and host galaxies that are 4 mag fainter than their nuclei.

  9. Construction of luminosity function for galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godłowski, Włodzimierz; Popiela, Joanna; Bajan, Katarzyna; Biernacka, Monika; Flin, Piotr; Panko, Elena

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity function is an important quantity for analysis of large scale structure statistics, interpretation of galaxy counts (Lin & Kirshner 1996). We investigate the luminosity function of galaxy clusters. This is performed by counting the brightness of galaxies belonging to clusters in PF Catalogue. The obtained luminosity function is significantly different than that obtained both for optical and radiogalaxies (Machalski & Godowski 2000). The implications of this result for theories of galaxy formation are discussed as well.

  10. A high-redshift IRAS galaxy with huge luminosity - Hidden quasar or protogalaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Oliver, S. J.; Taylor, A. N.; Lawrence, A.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P. B.; Conrow, T.

    1991-01-01

    An emission line galaxy with the enormous far-IR luminosity of 3 x 10 to the 14th solar has been found at z = 2.286. The spectrum is very unusual, showing lines of high excitation but with very weak Lyman-alpha emission. A self-absorbed synchrotron model for the IR energy distribution cannot be ruled out, but a thermal origin seems more plausible. A radio-quiet quasar embedded in a very dusty galaxy could account for the IR emission, as might a starburst embedded in 1-10 billion solar masses of dust. The latter case demands so much dust that the object would probably be a massive galaxy in the process of formation. The presence of a large amount of dust in an object of such high redshift implies the generation of heavy elements at an early cosmological epoch.

  11. Early black holes in cosmological simulations: luminosity functions and clustering behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Khandai, Nishikanta; Croft, Rupert; Lopez, Julio; Springel, Volker

    2012-08-01

    We examine predictions for the quasar luminosity functions (QLFs) and quasar clustering at high redshift (z ≥ 4.75) using MassiveBlack, our new hydrodynamic cosmological simulation which includes a self-consistent model for black hole (BH) growth and feedback. We show that the model reproduces the Sloan QLF within observational constraints at z ≥ 5. We find that the high-z QLF is consistent with a redshift-independent occupation distribution of BHs among dark matter haloes (which we provide) such that the evolution of the QLF follows that of the halo mass function. The sole exception is the bright end at z = 6 and 7, where BHs in high-mass haloes tend to be unusually bright due to extended periods of Eddington growth caused by high-density cold flows into the halo centre. We further use these luminosity functions to make predictions for the number density of quasars in upcoming surveys, predicting that there should be ˜119 ± 28 (˜87 ± 28) quasars detectable in the F125W band of the WIDE (DEEP) fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) from z = 5 to 6, ˜19 ± 7 (˜18 ± 9) from z = 6 to 7 and ˜1.7 ± 1.5 (˜1.5 ± 1.5) from z = 7 to 8. We also investigate quasar clustering, finding that the correlation length is fully consistent with current constraints for Sloan quasars (r0 ˜ 17 h-1 Mpc at z = 4 for quasars above mi = 20.2) and grows slowly with redshift up to z = 6 (r0 ˜ 22 h-1 Mpc). Finally, we note that the quasar clustering strength depends weakly on luminosity for low LBH, but gets stronger at higher LBH as the BHs are found in higher mass haloes.

  12. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  13. Cosmological tests with the FSRQ gamma-ray luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Melia, Fulvio; Zhang, Li

    2016-11-01

    The extensive catalogue of gamma-ray selected flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) produced by Fermi during a four-year survey has generated considerable interest in determining their gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) and its evolution with cosmic time. In this paper, we introduce the novel idea of using this extensive database to test the differential volume expansion rate predicted by two specific models, the concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and Rh = ct cosmologies. For this purpose, we use two well-studied formulations of the GLF, one based on pure luminosity evolution (PLE) and the other on a luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on one-parameter cumulative distributions (in luminosity, redshift, photon index and source count), we confirm the results of earlier works showing that these data somewhat favour LDDE over PLE; we show that this is the case for both ΛCDM and Rh = ct. Regardless of which GLF one chooses, however, we also show that model selection tools very strongly favour Rh = ct over ΛCDM. We suggest that such population studies, though featuring a strong evolution in redshift, may none the less be used as a valuable independent check of other model comparisons based solely on geometric considerations.

  14. A Compton-thick Wind in the High Luminosity Quasar, PDS 456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Behar, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaspi, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    PDS 456 is a nearby (z=0.184), luminous (L(sub bol) approximately equal to 10(exp 47) ergs(exp -1) type I quasar. A deep 190 ks Suzaku observation in February 2007 revealed the complex, broad band X-ray spectrum of PDS 456. The Suzaku spectrum exhibits highly statistically significant absorption features near 9 keV in the quasar rest-frame. We show that the most plausible origin of the absorption is from blue-shifted resonance (1s-2p) transitions of hydrogen-like iron (at 6.97 keV in the rest frame). This indicates that a highly ionized outflow may be present moving at near relativistic velocities (0.26-0.31c). A possible hard X-ray excess is detected above 15 keV with HXD (at 99.8% confidence), which may arise from high column density gas (N(sub H) greater than 10(exp 24)cm(exp -2) partially covering the X-ray emission, or through strong Compton reflection. Here we propose that the iron K-shell absorption in PDS 456 is associated with a thick, possibly clumpy outflow, covering about 20% of 4(pi) steradian solid angle. The outflow is likely launched from the inner accretion disk, within 15-100 gravitational radii of the black hole. The kinetic power of the outflow may be similar to the bolometric luminosity of PDS 456. Such a powerful wind could have a significant effect on the co-evolution of the host galaxy and its supermassive black hole, through feedback.

  15. Modelling the luminosities and sizes of radio sources: radio luminosity function at z = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, A.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rigby, E. E.

    2017-08-01

    We present a model to predict the luminosity function for radio galaxies and their linear size distribution at any redshift. The model takes a black hole mass function and Eddington ratio distribution as input and tracks the evolution of radio sources, taking into account synchrotron, adiabatic and inverse Compton energy losses. We first test the model at z = 2 where plenty of radio data are available and show that the radio luminosity function (RLF) is consistent with observations. We are able to reproduce the break in luminosity function that separates locally the Fanaroff-Riley class I and Fanaroff-Riley class I radio sources. Our prediction for linear size distribution at z = 2 matches the observed distribution too. We then use our model to predict an RLF and linear size distribution at z = 6, as this is the epoch when radio galaxies can be used as probes of reionization. We demonstrate that higher inverse Compton losses lead to shorter source lifetimes and smaller sizes at high redshifts. The predicted sizes are consistent with the generally observed trend with redshift. We evolve the z = 2 RLF based on observed quasar space densities at high redshifts, and show that our RLF prediction at z = 6 is consistent. Finally, we predict the detection of 0.63, 0.092 and 0.0025 z ≥ 6 sources deg2 at flux density limits of 0.1, 0.5 and 3.5 mJy. We assess the trade-off between coverage area and depth and show that LOFAR surveys with flux density limits of 0.1 and 0.5 mJy are the most efficient at detecting a large number of z ≥ 6 radio sources.

  16. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  17. A direct measurement of the mean occupation function of quasars: Breaking degeneracies between halo occupation distribution models

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Nguyen, My L.; Myers, Adam D.; Zheng, Zheng

    2013-12-20

    Recent work on quasar clustering suggests a degeneracy in the halo occupation distribution constrained from two-point correlation functions. To break this degeneracy, we make the first empirical measurement of the mean occupation function (MOF) of quasars at z ∼ 0.2 by matching quasar positions with groups and clusters identified in the MaxBCG sample. We fit two models to the MOF, a power law and a four-parameter model. The number distribution of quasars in host halos is close to Poisson, and the slopes of the MOF obtained from our best-fit models (for the power-law case) favor an MOF that monotonically increases with halo mass. The best-fit slopes are 0.53 ± 0.04 and 1.03 ± 1.12 for the power-law model and the four-parameter model, respectively. We measure the radial distribution of quasars within dark matter halos and find it to be adequately described by a power law with a slope –2.3 ± 0.4. We measure the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of quasars and show that there is no evidence that quasar luminosity depends on host halo mass, similar to the inferences drawn from clustering measurements. We also measure the conditional black hole mass function (CMF) of our quasars. Although the results are consistent with no dependence on halo mass, we observe a slight indication of downsizing of the black hole mass function. The lack of halo mass dependence in the CLF and CMF shows that quasars residing in galaxy clusters have characteristic luminosity and black hole mass scales.

  18. Correlation function of the luminosity distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biern, Sang Gyu; Yoo, Jaiyul

    2017-09-01

    We present the correlation function of the luminosity distances in a flat ΛCDM universe. Decomposing the luminosity distance fluctuation into the velocity, the gravitational potential, and the lensing contributions in linear perturbation theory, we study their individual contributions to the correlation function. The lensing contribution is important at large redshift (z gtrsim 0.5) but only for small angular separation (θ lesssim 3°), while the velocity contribution dominates over the other contributions at low redshift or at larger separation. However, the gravitational potential contribution is always subdominant at all scale, if the correct gauge-invariant expression is used. The correlation function of the luminosity distances depends significantly on the matter content, especially for the lensing contribution, thus providing a novel tool of estimating cosmological parameters.

  19. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  20. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  1. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  2. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y.; Watson, L. C.; Bentz, M. C.; Dasyra, K. M.; Dietrich, M.; Ferrarese, L.

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  3. A Statistical Method for Estimating Luminosity Functions Using Truncated Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Chad M.

    2007-06-01

    The observational limitations of astronomical surveys lead to significant statistical inference challenges. One such challenge is the estimation of luminosity functions given redshift (z) and absolute magnitude (M) measurements from an irregularly truncated sample of objects. This is a bivariate density estimation problem; we develop here a statistically rigorous method which (1) does not assume a strict parametric form for the bivariate density; (2) does not assume independence between redshift and absolute magnitude (and hence allows evolution of the luminosity function with redshift); (3) does not require dividing the data into arbitrary bins; and (4) naturally incorporates a varying selection function. We accomplish this by decomposing the bivariate density φ(z,M) vialogφ(z,M)=f(z)+g(M)+h(z,M,θ), where f and g are estimated nonparametrically and h takes an assumed parametric form. There is a simple way of estimating the integrated mean squared error of the estimator; smoothing parameters are selected to minimize this quantity. Results are presented from the analysis of a sample of quasars.

  4. Luminosity Functions Of Xxl Clusters Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Marina; Maurogordato, Sophie; Benoist, Christophe; XXL Consortium

    2017-06-01

    The galaxy luminosity function (LF) is a powerful statistical tool to investigate galaxy evolution. In particular the study of cluster galaxies LFs gives information about environmental effects and how galaxies populate their parent dark matter halos. In this poster we present our work on the galaxy LF of X-ray detected galaxy clusters from the XXL survey. The sample consists of 173 galaxy groups/clusters spanning a wide range in both mass (M500 from 1013 to 1015 solar masses ) and redshit (0.03 < z < 1.22). The main goal is to investigate the effect of evolution and cluster masses on the luminosity distribution of cluster galaxies.

  5. Luminosity Function Statistics Applied in GRB Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Luis Juracy Rangel; Bianco, Carlo L.; Ruffini, Remo

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied in data of GRBs detected by GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We produced, by LF statistics, the GRB predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fpk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk). We also used different GRB rates. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with more then 250 GRBs with known redshifts. We estimated the effects of the Malmquist bias in all samples, and we looked for a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy.

  6. Near-infrared spectra and intrinsic luminosities of candidate type II quasars at 2 < z < 3.4

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Lang, Dustin; Hamann, Frederick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Brandt, W. Niel; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald

    2014-06-10

    We present JHK near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 25 candidate Type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using Triplespec on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette at the Magellan/Baade 6.5 m telescope, and the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph on Gemini. At redshifts of 2 < z < 3.4, our NIR spectra probe the rest-frame optical region of these targets, which were initially selected to have strong lines of C IV and Ly α, with FWHM < 2000 km s{sup –1} from the SDSS pipeline. We use the [O III] λ5007 line shape as a model for the narrow-line region emission and find that Hα consistently requires a broad component with FWHMs ranging from 1000 to 7500 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the C IV lines also require broad bases, but with considerably narrower widths of 1000-4500 km s{sup –1}. Estimating the extinction using the Balmer decrement and also the relationship in lower-z quasars between rest equivalent width and luminosity in the [O III] line, we find typical A{sub V} values of 0-2 mag, which naturally explains the attenuated C IV lines relative to Hα. We propose that our targets are moderately obscured quasars. We also describe one unusual object with three distinct velocity peaks in its [O III] spectrum.

  7. Determining Quasar Black Hole Mass Functions from their Broad Emission Lines: Application to the Bright Quasar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan, Xiaohui

    2009-02-01

    We describe a Bayesian approach to estimating quasar black hole mass functions (BHMF) using the broad emission lines to estimate black hole mass. We show how using the broad-line mass estimates in combination with statistical techniques developed for luminosity function estimation (e.g., the 1/Va correction) leads to statistically biased results. We derive the likelihood function for the BHMF based on the broad-line mass estimates, and derive the posterior distribution for the BHMF, given the observed data. We develop our statistical approach for a flexible model where the BHMF is modeled as a mixture of Gaussian functions. Statistical inference is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, and we describe a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to perform the MCMC. The MCMC simulates random draws from the probability distribution of the BHMF parameters, given the data, and we use a simulated data set to show how these random draws may be used to estimate the probability distribution for the BHMF. In addition, we show how the MCMC output may be used to estimate the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the BHMF, such as the peak in the space density of quasars. Our method has the advantage that it is able to constrain the BHMF even beyond the survey detection limits at the adopted confidence level, accounts for measurement errors and the intrinsic uncertainty in broad-line mass estimates, and provides a natural way of estimating the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the BHMF. We conclude by using our method to estimate the local active BHMF using the z < 0.5 Bright Quasar Survey sources. At z ~ 0.2, the quasar BHMF falls off approximately as a power law with slope ~2 for M BH gsim 108 M sun. Our analysis implies that at a given M BH, z < 0.5 broad-line quasars have a typical Eddington ratio of ~0.4 and a dispersion in Eddington ratio of lsim0.5 dex.

  8. EVOLUTION OF THE Halpha LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, Eduard; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a window on the star formation history over the last 4 Gyr. SHELS is a spectroscopically complete survey for R{sub tot} < 20.3 over 4 square{sup 0}. We use the 10k spectra to select a sample of pure star-forming galaxies based on their Halpha emission line. We use the spectroscopy to determine extinction corrections for individual galaxies and to remove active galaxies in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. We use the large volume of SHELS with the depth of a narrowband survey for Halpha galaxies at z approx 0.24 to make a combined determination of the Halpha luminosity function at z approx 0.24. The large area covered by SHELS yields a survey volume big enough to determine the bright end of the Halpha luminosity function from redshift 0.100 to 0.377 for an assumed fixed faint-end slope alpha = -1.20. The bright end evolves: the characteristic luminosity L* increases by 0.84 dex over this redshift range. Similarly, the star formation density increases by 0.11 dex. The fraction of galaxies with a close neighbor increases by a factor of 2-5 for L{sub Ha}lpha approx> L* in each of the redshift bins. We conclude that triggered star formation is an important influence for star-forming galaxies with Halpha emission.

  9. Avoiding Spurious Breaks in Binned Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, M.; Lister, M. L.

    2008-10-01

    We show that using either the method of Page & Carrera or the well-known 1/Va method to construct the binned luminosity function (LF) of a flux limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce an artificial flattening (or steepening in the case of negative evolution) of the binned LF for bins intersected by the flux cutoff of the sample. This effect is more pronounced for samples with steep and strongly evolving parent LFs but is still present even for non-evolving LFs. As a result of this distortion of the true LF, fitting a model LF to binned data may lead to errors in the estimation of the parameters and may even prompt the erroneous use of broken power-law functions. We compute the expected positions of apparent breaks in the binned LF. We show that these spurious breaks in the binned LFs can be avoided if the binning is done in the flux-redshift plane instead of the typically used luminosity-redshift plane. Binning in the flux-redshift plane can be used in conjunction with the binning in the luminosity-redshift plane to test for real breaks in the binned LFs and to identify the features that are the result of binning biases. We illustrate this effect for most typical forms of luminosity dependence and redshift evolution and show how the proposed method helps address this problem. We also apply this method to the MOJAVE AGN sample and show that it eliminates an apparent break in the binned LF.

  10. Untangling the White Dwarf Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The inversion of the white dwarf luminosity function provides an independent way to prove the past star formation history of the Milky Way independent of any cosmological models. In Rowell & Hambly (2011), the effective volume method uses the average properties of all the objects in a given bin, so a significant amount of information is lost in the early stage of the analysis. In this work, I explore the possibility of assigning objects individually in a probabilistic way using the generalised Schmidt density estimator (1/Vmax).

  11. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2016-09-01

    A population of quasars at z ˜ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities νL ν (7.8 μm) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio νL ν (0.25 μm)/νL ν (7.8 μm) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust that produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest-frame 7.8 μm are determined for quasars in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 μm sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far-infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest-frame 7.8 μm, but the ratio L ν (100 μm)/L ν (7.8 μm) is about three times higher for obscured quasars than for unobscured, so that far-infrared or submillimeter quasar detections are dominated by obscured quasars. We find that only ˜5% of high-redshift submillimeter sources are quasars and that existing 850 μm surveys or 2 mm surveys should already have detected sources at z ˜ 10 if quasar and starburst luminosity functions remain the same from z = 2 until z = 10.

  12. NLC Luminosity as a Function of Beam Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2002-06-06

    Realistic calculation of NLC luminosity has been performed using particle tracking in DIMAD and beam-beam simulations in GUINEA-PIG code for various values of beam emittance, energy and beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP). Results of the simulations are compared with analytic luminosity calculations. The optimum range of IP beta functions for high luminosity was identified.

  13. NLC Luminosity as a Function of Beam Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2002-06-01

    Realistic calculation of NLC luminosity has been performed using particle tracking in DIMAD and beam-beam simulations in GUINEA-PIG code for various values of beam emittance, energy and beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP). Results of the simulations are compared with analytic luminosity calculations. The optimum range of IP beta functions for high luminosity was identified.

  14. Observations of the Ca ii IR Triplet in High Luminosity Quasars: Exploring the Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Marziani, Paola; Dultzin, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new spectroscopic sample of 11 quasars at intermediate redshift observed with the Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (ISAAC) on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), covering O i λ8446 and the Ca ii triplet 8498, 8542, 8662. The new observations - that supplement the sample presented by Martínez-Aldama et al. (2015) - allow us to confirm the constraints on physical conditions and location of the region emitting the low ionization lines, as well as the relation between Ca ii and Fe ii.

  15. Galaxy luminosity functions in WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Vulcani, B.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Couch, W. J.; Moles, M.; Kjærgaard, P.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Using V band photometry of the WINGS survey, we derive galaxy luminosity functions (LF) in nearby clusters. This sample is complete down to MV = -15.15, and it is homogeneous, thus facilitating the study of an unbiased sample of clusters with different characteristics. Methods: We constructed the photometric LF for 72 out of the original 76 WINGS clusters, excluding only those without a velocity dispersion estimate. For each cluster we obtained the LF for galaxies in a region of radius = 0.5 × r200, and fitted them with single and double Schechter's functions. We also derive the composite LF for the entire sample, and those pertaining to different morphological classes. Finally, we derive the spectroscopic cumulative LF for 2009 galaxies that are cluster members. Results: The double Schechter fit parameters are correlated neither with the cluster velocity dispersion nor with the X-ray luminosity. Our median values of the Schechter's fit slope are, on average, in agreement with measurements of nearby clusters, but are less steep that those derived from large surveys, such as the SDSS. Early-type galaxies out number late-types at all magnitudes, but both early and late types contribute equally to the faint end of the LF. Finally, the spectroscopic LF is in excellent agreement with the one derived for A2199, A85 and Virgo, and with the photometric LF at the bright magnitudes (where both are available). Conclusions: There is a large spread in the LF of different clusters, however, this spread is not caused by correlation of the LF shape with cluster characteristics such as X-ray luminosity or velocity dispersions. The faint end is flatter than previously derived (αf = -1.7), which is at odds with that predicted from numerical simulations. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile. Progs. ID 67.A-0030, 68.A-0139, and 69.A-0119.Table 1 and full Fig. 1 (Fig. A.1) are available in

  16. Interpreting the H II Region Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, M. S.; Clarke, C. J.

    1998-12-01

    We construct Monte Carlo simulations of the H II region luminosity function (H II LF), drawing ionizing stars from a constant stellar IMF, and the number of ionizing stars from a power-law distribution of constant slope. We find that observed variations in the form of the H II LF across the Hubble sequence can be explained by a trend in the maximum number of ionizing stars per nebula. In addition, variations in the form of the H II LF between arm and interarm populations of spiral galaxies can be explained by evolutionary effects. The H II LF can thus reveal features in the most recent (< 10 Myr) star formation history of the host galaxies.

  17. Protostellar Luminosity Functions in 11 Diverse Star Forming Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukova, Erin; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.; Pipher, J.; Allen, T. S.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.; Cygnus-X Legacy Team

    2012-01-01

    Protostars exist in a variety of environments, ranging from clouds with dispersed low-mass stars, such as Taurus, to clustered regions in clouds forming high-mass stars, like Orion. The effect these different environments have on protostar properties such as mass or luminosity is uncertain. One way to probe the effects of cloud environment on the observable property, protostar luminosity is to compare protostellar luminosity functions of clouds hosting varied populations of protostars. In this dissertation talk I will discuss the protostellar luminosity functions from 11 star forming clouds including Lupus, Chamaeleon, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Serpens, Orion, Cep OB3, Mon R2, Cygnus-X, and Maddalena's Cloud, which encompass a wide range of star forming environments. The luminosity functions are constructed from Spitzer surveys of these molecular clouds. I employ a new technique for estimating the bolometric luminosity from near and mid-IR fluxes alone and for subtracting contamination from galaxies, reddened pre-main sequence stars with disks, and edge-on disk systems. The clouds which are forming massive stars show a significant peak at low luminosity and a tail extending toward luminosities above 10 solar luminosities, while the luminosity functions of clouds which are not forming massive stars have no significant peak down to the sensitivity limit and do not exhibit the tail. I compare these luminosity functions to existing models of protostellar evolution. I also compare the luminosity functions of protostars in distributed and clustered environments, as determined using nearest-neighbor distances. In Orion and Cygnus-X, the clouds which contain the largest populations of protostars there is a clear difference in luminosity functions between protostars incrowded and distributed regions, with the luminosity function biased towards higher luminosities in more luminous regions. I will discuss the implications of these variations and the possibility that the IMF is

  18. On quasar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavaliere, A.; Morrison, P.; Wood, K.

    1971-01-01

    We examine the consequences for quasar statistics of a class of models describing the evolution of individual strong sources. The continuity equation for the change of density and luminosity with cosmological epoch determines the population, once a model for the evolution of an individual object is chosen. A dynamical model of spinning objects seems to agree satisfactorily with the present observational sample, both in density and in luminosity function; such a model requires that an individual object strongly brightens as time goes on. A genetic relationship between quasars and radio galaxies which qualitatively fits the observations is suggested by the model.

  19. a New Luminosity Function for Galaxies as Given by the Mass-Luminosity Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaninetti, Lorenzo

    2008-04-01

    The search for a luminosity function for galaxies both alternative or companion to a Schechter function is a key problem in the reduction of data from catalogs of galaxies. Two luminosity functions for galaxies can be built starting from two distributions of mass as given by the fragmentation. A first overall distribution function is the Kiang function, which represents a useful description of the area and volume distribution of the Poisson Voronoi diagrams. The second distribution, which covers the case of low-mass galaxies, is the truncated Pareto distribution: in this model we have a natural bound due to the minimum mass/luminosity observed and an upper bound (function of the considered environment) represented by the boundary with the observed mass/luminosity overall behavior. The mass distribution is then converted into a luminosity distribution through a standard mass-luminosity relationship. The mathematical rules to convert the probability density function are used and the two new functions are normalized to the total number of galaxies per unit volume. The test of the two new luminosity functions for galaxies that cover different ranges in magnitude was made on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in five different bands; the results are comparable to those of the Schechter function. A new parameter, which indicates the stellar content, is derived. The joint distribution in redshift and flux, the mean redshift and the number density connected with the first luminosity function for galaxies are obtained by analogy with the Schechter function. A new formula, which allows us to express the mass as a function of the absolute magnitude, is derived.

  20. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR QUASAR DEMOGRAPHICS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; White, Martin

    2013-01-10

    We present a simple model for the relationship between quasars, galaxies, and dark matter halos from 0.5 < z < 6. In the model, black hole (BH) mass is linearly related to galaxy mass, and galaxies are connected to dark matter halos via empirically constrained relations. A simple 'scattered' light bulb model for quasars is adopted, wherein BHs shine at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity during accretion episodes, and Eddington ratios are drawn from a lognormal distribution that is redshift independent. This model has two free, physically meaningful parameters at each redshift: the normalization of the M {sub BH}-M {sub gal} relation and the quasar duty cycle; these parameters are fit to the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) over the interval 0.5 < z < 6. This simple model provides an excellent fit to the LF at all epochs and also successfully predicts the observed projected two-point correlation of quasars from 0.5 < z < 2.5. It is significant that a single quasar duty cycle at each redshift is capable of reproducing the extant observations. The data are therefore consistent with a scenario wherein quasars are equally likely to exist in galaxies, and therefore dark matter halos, over a wide range in masses. The knee in the quasar LF is a reflection of the knee in the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. Future constraints on the quasar LF and quasar clustering at high redshift will provide strong constraints on the model. In the model, the autocorrelation function of quasars becomes a strong function of luminosity only at the very highest luminosities and will be difficult to observe because such quasars are so rare. Cross-correlation techniques may provide useful constraints on the bias of such rare objects. The simplicity of the model allows for rapid generation of quasar mock catalogs from N-body simulations that match the observed LF and clustering to high redshift.

  1. Luminosity enhancement in relativistic jets and altered luminosity functions for beamed objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Due to relativistic effects, the observed emission from relativistic jets is quite different from the rest frame emission. Systematic differences between the observed and intrinsic intensities of sources in which jet phenomena are occurring are discussed. Assuming that jets have a power law luminosity function of a slope B, the observed luminosity distribution as a function of the velocity of the jet, the spectral index of the rest frame emission, and the range of angles of the jets relative to our line of sight are calculated. The results is well-approximated by two power laws, the higher luminosity end having the original power law index X and the lower luminosity end having a flattened exponent independent of B and only slightly greater than 1. A model consisting of beamed emission from a jet and unbeamed emission from a stationary central component is investigated. The luminosity functions for these two-component sources are calculated for two ranges of angles. For sources in which beaming is important, the luminosity function is much flatter. Because of this, the relative numbers of ""beamed'' and ""unbeamed'' sources detected on the sky depend strongly on the luminosity at which the comparison is made.

  2. SDSS J013127.34–032100.1: A NEWLY DISCOVERED RADIO-LOUD QUASAR AT z = 5.18 WITH EXTREMELY HIGH LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; and others

    2014-11-10

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34–032100.1 (J0131–0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131–0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ∼100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L {sub bol} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1}, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131–0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  3. SDSS J013127.34-032100.1: A Newly Discovered Radio-loud Quasar at z = 5.18 with Extremely High Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei-Min; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Bai, Jin-Ming; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Xin, Yu-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34-032100.1 (J0131-0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131-0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ~100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L bol ~ 1.1 × 1048 erg s-1, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131-0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 109 M ⊙, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  4. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution stretching back to z~5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function -- all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is illustrated at z≈0 and 0.9 using the limited data that is currently available, and a clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both, supporting the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering. In addition, the CLF predicts that z≈0.9 quasars may be commonly hosted by haloes with Mh ~ 1014 M⊙. These `young cluster' environments may provide the necessary interactions between gas-rich galaxies to fuel luminous accretion. The results derived from this method will be useful to populate AGNs of different luminosities in cosmological simulations.

  5. The luminosity function of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Madore, B. F.; Neugebauer, G.; Persson, C. J.; Persson, S. E.; Rice, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a study of the far infrared properties of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey are described. There is a correlation between the infrared luminosity and the infrared to optical luminosity ratio and between the infrared luminosity and the far infrared color temperature in these galaxies. The infrared bright galaxies represent a significant component of extragalactic objects in the local universe, being comparable in space density to the Seyferts, optically identified starburst galaxies, and more numerous than quasars at the same bolometric luminosity. The far infrared luminosity in the local universe is approximately 25% of the starlight output in the same volume.

  6. On the completeness of the Medium Sensitivity Survey quasar sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.

    1986-01-01

    The Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS) quasar sample is being used more and more to study quasar properties in general and to analyze the relationship between X-ray-selected and optically selected quasars in particular. These studies have recently shown that current knowledge of the properties of optically selected quasars (luminosity function, evolution, X-ray to optical luminosity ratio) leads to the prediction that many more X-ray-selected quasars should have been detected than are actually observed. Prompted by this fact, a detailed examination of possible causes of incompleteness of the MSS quasar sample has been undertaken, paying particular attention to the problem of photoelectric absorption due to the interstellar medium within the Galaxy. It is found that there is no evidence of a loss of sources due to the effects considered, and that the MSS quasar sample is statistically complete.

  7. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  8. Luminosity function and jet structure of Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Nappo, F.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. The jet of GRBs could be uniform, with constant energy per unit solid angle within the jet aperture, or it could be structured, namely with energy and velocity that depend on the angular distance from the axis of the jet. We try to get some insight about the still unknown structure of GRBs by studying their luminosity function. We show that low (1046-48 erg s-1) and high (i.e. with L ≥ 1050 erg s-1) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique luminosity function, which is also consistent with current lower limits in the intermediate luminosity range (1048-50 erg s-1). We derive analytical expressions for the luminosity function of GRBs in uniform and structured jet models and compare them with the data. Uniform jets can reproduce the entire luminosity function with reasonable values of the free parameters. A structured jet can also fit adequately the current data, provided that the energy within the jet is relatively strongly structured, i.e. E ∝ θ-k with k ≥ 4. The classical E ∝ θ-2 structured jet model is excluded by the current data.

  9. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  10. Quasars Outflows As A Function of SED - An Empirical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph M.; Ganguly, Rajib

    2015-08-01

    Feedback from quasars (jets, outflows, and luminosity) is now recognized as a vital phase in describing galaxy evolution, growth, and star formation efficiency. Regarding outflows, roughly 60% are observed to have outflowing gas appearing at large velocities and with a variety of velocity dispersions. The most extreme observed form of these outflows appears in the ultraviolet spectrum of 15-20% of objects. Understanding the physics of these outflows is important for both astrophysical and cosmological reasons. Establishing empirical relationships to test the theoretical models of how these outflows are driven (and hence, how they impact their surroundings) is currently plagued by having too few objects, where other parameters like the black hole mass or accretion rate, may add to the scatter. We aim to fix this by using a systematic study of a large sample of objects. As a follow up to a previous study, we have identified a sample of nearly 11000 z=1.7-2 quasars using archived data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7), of which roughly 4400 appear to show outflows according to the visual inspection. The specific redshift range is chosen to feature both the Mg II 2800 emission line as well as wavelengths extending to nearly 20,000 km/s blueward of the C IV 1549 emission line. Our goals for this study are: (1) To temper our visual inspection schemes with a more automated, computer-driven scheme; (2) To measure the properties of the outflows (velocity, velocity dispersion, equivalent width, ionization); (3) To supplement the SDSS spectra with photometric measurements from GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE to further characterize the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and dust content; (4) To form spectral composites to investigate possible SED changes with outflow properties; and (5) To use published estimates of the quasar physical properties (black hole mass, accretion rate, etc.) to fully establish in an empirical way the complex dependencies between the

  11. 1. 4 gigahertz luminosity function and its evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J. J.

    1989-03-01

    The local luminosity function was determined at v = 1.4 GHz from radio observations of two low-redshift galaxy samples: (1) spiral and irregular galaxies with apparent blue magnitudes and declinations and (2) galaxies of all morphologies with blue angular diameters of 1.0 arcmin or greater in the declination range between -2.5 deg and +82 deg. Separate luminosity functions for the radio source populations powered by 'starbursts' and 'monsters' were obtained from the latter sample. The amount of evolution required for the local luminosity function to account for the faint sources is discussed. The cosmological evolution of extragalactic radio sources appears to be so strong at all observed luminosities that the local luminosity function and counts of all sources between S of roughly 10 micro-Jy and S of roughly 10 Jy at v = 1.4 GHz can be matched with a model in which most sources are confined to a hollow shell with z of roughly 0.8. 36 refs.

  12. The K-band luminosity functions of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    We derive the galaxy luminosity function in the Ks band for galaxies in 24 clusters to provide a local reference for higher redshift studies and to analyse how and if the luminosity function varies according to environment and cluster properties. We use new, deep K-band imaging and match the photometry to available redshift information and to optical photometry from the SDSS or the UKST/POSS: More than 80 per cent of the galaxies to K ∼ 14.5 have measured redshifts. We derive composite luminosity functions, for the entire sample and for cluster subsamples. We consider the luminosity functions for red-sequence and blue cloud galaxies. The full composite luminosity function has K* = 12.79 ± 0.14 (MK = -24.81) and α = -1.41 ± 0.10. We find that K* is largely unaffected by the environment, but that the slope α increases towards lower mass clusters and clusters with Bautz-Morgan type < II. The red-sequence luminosity function seems to be approximately universal (within errors) in all environments: It has parameters K* = 13.16 ± 0.15 (MK = -24.44) and α = -1.00 ± 0.12 (for all galaxies). Blue galaxies do not show a good fit to a Schechter function, but the best values for its parameters are K* = 13.51 ± 0.41 (MK = -24.09) and α = -1.60 ± 0.29: We do not have enough statistics to consider environmental variations for these galaxies. We find some evidence that K* in clusters is brighter than in the field and α is steeper, but note that this comparison is based (for the field) on 2MASS photometry, while our data are considerably deeper.

  13. The luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; De Carvalho, R. R.; Zepf, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We use counts of faint galaxies in the regions of compact groups to extend the study of the luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups to absolute magnitudes as faint as M(sub B) = -14.5 + 5 log h. We find a slope of the faint end of the luminosity function of approximately alpha = -0.8, with a formal uncertainty of 0.15. This slope is not significantly different from that found for galaxies in other environments. Our results do not support previous suggestions of a dramatic underabundance of intrinsically faint galaxies in compact groups, which were based on extrapolations from fits at brighter magnitudes. The normal faint-end slope of the luminosity function in compact groups is in agreement with previous evidence that most galaxies in compact groups have not been dramatically affected by recent merging.

  14. The rate and luminosity function of long gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Ghisellini, G.; Vergani, S. D.; Nappo, F.; Salafia, O. S.; Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Götz, D.

    2016-03-01

    We derive, adopting a direct method, the luminosity function and the formation rate of long Gamma Ray Bursts through a complete, flux-limited, sample of Swift bursts which has a high level of completeness in redshift z (~82%). We parametrise the redshift evolution of the GRB luminosity as L = L0(1 + z)k and we derive k = 2.5, consistently with recent estimates. The de-evolved luminosity function φ(L0) of GRBs can be represented by a broken power law with slopes a = -1.32 ± 0.21 and b = -1.84 ± 0.24 below and above, respectively, a break luminosity L0,b = 1051.45±0.15 erg/s. Under the hypothesis of luminosity evolution we find that the GRB formation rate increases with redshift up to z ~ 2, where it peaks, and then decreases in agreement with the shape of the cosmic star formation rate. We test the direct method through numerical simulations and we show that if it is applied to incomplete (both in redshift and/or flux) GRB samples it can misleadingly result in an excess of the GRB formation rate at low redshifts.

  15. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.

  16. The WISSH quasars project. II. Giant star nurseries in hyper-luminous quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duras, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Piconcelli, E.; Bianchi, S.; Pappalardo, C.; Valiante, R.; Bischetti, M.; Feruglio, C.; Martocchia, S.; Schneider, R.; Vietri, G.; Vignali, C.; Zappacosta, L.; La Franca, F.; Fiore, F.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Studying the coupling between the energy output produced by the central quasar and the host galaxy is fundamental to fully understand galaxy evolution. Quasar feedback is indeed supposed to dramatically affect the galaxy properties by depositing large amounts of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM). Aims: In order to gain further insights on this process, we study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of sources at the brightest end of the quasar luminosity function, for which the feedback mechanism is assumed to be at its maximum, given their high efficiency in driving powerful outflows. Methods: We modelled the rest-frame UV-to-far-IR SEDs of 16 WISE-SDSS Selected Hyper-luminous (WISSH) quasars at 1.8 < z < 4.6 based on SDSS, 2MASS, WISE and Herschel/SPIRE data. Through an accurate SED-fitting procedure, we separate the different emission components by deriving physical parameters of both the nuclear component (i.e. bolometric and monochromatic luminosities) and the host galaxy (i.e. star formation rate, mass, and temperature of the cold dust). We also use a radiative transfer code to account for the contribution of the quasar-related emission to the far-IR fluxes. Results: Most SEDs are well described by a standard combination of accretion disc plus torus and cold dust emission. However, about 30% of SEDs require an additional emission component in the near-IR, with temperatures peaking at 750 K, which indicates that a hotter dust component is present in these powerful quasars. We measure extreme values of both AGN bolometric luminosity (LBOL > 1047 erg/s) and star formation rate (up to 2000 M⊙/yr) based on the quasar-corrected, IR luminosity of the host galaxy. A new relation between quasar and star formation luminosity is derived (LSF ∝ L0.73QSO) by combining several Herschel-detected quasar samples from z 0 to 4. WISSH quasars have masses ( 108M⊙) and temperatures ( 50 K) of cold dust in agreement with those found for other

  17. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

  18. Systematic properties of CO emission from galaxies. I - Luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verter, Frances

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive survey of normal galaxies covering a wide range of luminosities and morphological types is combined with galaxy observations in the literature to provide a sample for statistical study. The global CO emission of these galaxies is extrapolated by modeling the galaxies with an exponential radial profile. The maximum-likelihood distribution functions of CO luminosity and CO/H I flux ratio are similar in behavior. Both have long tails of bright galaxies. However, the typical galaxy has a CO luminosity of about 10 to the 6th Jy km/s Mpc-squared or less and a CO/H I ratio of the order of 10 or less. Averages of the distributions of CO luminosity and CO/H I flux ratio are higher for galaxies of Hubble type Sb-Sbc than for groups of earlier or later types. Quantitative estimates of the possible error sources in the conversion of CO luminosity to molecular mass indicates that the peaking of CO emission at intermediate types is a fairly confident result.

  19. The Luminosity Functions of Low Redshift Field and Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, I.; Hill, G. J.; Bergmann, M. P.; Elston, R.; Vanden Berk, D.; Jurcevic, J. S.

    1999-12-01

    We present a comparison of the luminosity functions for low redshift field and cluster galaxies. The luminosity functions are established for field galaxies in UBVRI, and for galaxies in the Coma cluster in UBRI. The field galaxy sample is drawn from The Texas Deep Sky Survey (TDSS) of a 2.1 by 2.1 sq. deg. area around the North Galactic Pole. More than 40000 objects have been detected in our survey of this area. We have obtained spectra of approximately 700 galaxies, making the redshift information complete to a total R magnitude of 18.5 mag. We have surveyed the central square degree of the Coma cluster in UBRI. Approximately 16000 objects have been detected in our survey. We have obtained spectra for 220 galaxies in the area with no previous measurements. Together with published data these observations make the redshift information complete for galaxies brighter than a total R magnitude of 17.5. A total of 480 members of the cluster have measured redshifts, while 180 background and foreground galaxies in the field have measured redshifts. The accurate determination of the luminosity functions for low redshift galaxies is important for the interpretation of luminosity functions established for higher redshift galaxies, both in clusters and in the field. This research was supported in part by NASA through grant number HF-01073.01.94A to IJ from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  20. QUASAR-GALAXY CLUSTERING THROUGH PROJECTED GALAXY COUNTS AT z = 0.6-1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shaohua; Zhou Hongyan; Wang Tinggui; Wang Huiyuan E-mail: twang@ustc.edu.cn

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies around quasars at z = 0.6-1.2 using photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. The quasar and galaxy cross-correlation functions are measured through the projected galaxy number density n(r{sub p} ) on scales of 0.05 < r{sub p} < 20 h {sup -1} Mpc around quasars for a sample of 2300 quasars from Schneider et al. We detect strong clustering signals at all redshifts and find that the clustering amplitude increases significantly with redshift. We examine the dependence of quasar-galaxy clustering on quasar and galaxy properties and find that the clustering amplitude is significantly larger for quasars with more massive black holes or with bluer colors, while there is no dependence on quasar luminosity. We also show that quasars have a stronger correlation amplitude with blue galaxies than with red galaxies. We finally discuss the implications of our findings.

  1. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): ugriz galaxy luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Peacock, J. A.; Bamford, S. P.; Liske, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cameron, E.; Conselice, C. J.; Croom, S. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Gunawardhana, M.; Hill, D. T.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L. S.; Kuijken, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Parkinson, H. R.; Phillipps, S.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sharp, R. G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Taylor, E. N.; Thomas, D.; Tuffs, R. J.; van Kampen, E.; Wijesinghe, D.

    2012-02-01

    Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) is a project to study galaxy formation and evolution, combining imaging data from ultraviolet to radio with spectroscopic data from the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using data from Phase 1 of GAMA, taken over three observing seasons, and correcting for various minor sources of incompleteness, we calculate galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) and their evolution in the ugriz passbands. At low redshift, z < 0.1, we find that blue galaxies, defined according to a magnitude-dependent but non-evolving colour cut, are reasonably well fitted over a range of more than 10 magnitudes by simple Schechter functions in all bands. Red galaxies, and the combined blue plus red sample, require double power-law Schechter functions to fit a dip in their LF faintwards of the characteristic magnitude M* before a steepening faint end. This upturn is at least partly due to dust-reddened disc galaxies. We measure the evolution of the galaxy LF over the redshift range 0.002 < z < 0.5 both by using a parametric fit and by measuring binned LFs in redshift slices. The characteristic luminosity L* is found to increase with redshift in all bands, with red galaxies showing stronger luminosity evolution than blue galaxies. The comoving number density of blue galaxies increases with redshift, while that of red galaxies decreases, consistent with prevailing movement from blue cloud to red sequence. As well as being more numerous at higher redshift, blue galaxies also dominate the overall luminosity density beyond redshifts z≃ 0.2. At lower redshifts, the luminosity density is dominated by red galaxies in the riz bands, and by blue galaxies in u and g.

  2. Disk Luminosity Function Based on the Lowell Proper Motion Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mee-Jeong; Lee, Sang-Gak

    1991-12-01

    Disk stellar luminosity function has been derived with stars in the Lowell Proper Motion Survey which contains about 9000 stars with mu => 0.27" of arc/yr, 8 < m_pg < 17 and with bright stars in the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Star Catalogue. Luminosity function has been obtained with stars within 20 pc by Luyten's mean absolute magnitudes method using Reduced Proper Motion Diagram to select disk stars. Magnitudes and colors, in the SAO Star Catalogue as well as in the Lowell Proper Motion Survey have been transformed to the UBV system from the published UBV data. It has been found that stars which have higher proper motion than the original limit of the proper motion survey are missed, when the relation between the absolute magnitude and reduced proper motion is applied to sample stars without considering the dispersion in magnitude. Correction factors for missing stars have been estimated according to their limits of proper motion which are dependent on the absolute magnitude. Resulting lumi- nosity function shows Wielen's dip at M_B ~ 10, and systematic enhancement of stars on the average of about delta log Phi(M_B) ~ 0.2 compared with Luyten's luminosity function.

  3. Clustering, cosmology and a new era of black hole demographics- I. The conditional luminosity function of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution stretching back to z ˜ 5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGN inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGN and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, this paper presents a method to observationally constrain the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of AGN at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function- all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is illustrated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9 using the limited data that are currently available, and a clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z, supporting the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering. In addition, the CLF predicts that z ≈ 0.9 quasars may be commonly hosted by haloes with Mh ˜ 1014 M⊙. These `young cluster' environments may provide the necessary interactions between gas-rich galaxies to fuel luminous accretion. The results derived from this method will be useful to populate AGN of different luminosities in cosmological simulations.

  4. The Ultimate Multiwavelength Quasar Survey (ROSES-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon

    Our objective is to create the ultimate multi-wavelength quasar catalog by combining moderatelydeep, wide-field data in the NASA archives (from GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and WISE) with public optical imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This catalog will extend from deep samples with signficant multi-wavelength coverage in a small area (e.g., SDSS "Stripe 82"), to shallower samples over a larger area with less multiwavelength coverage. Our efforts are a crucial step to bridging between existing spectroscopic surveys and future photometric surveys. Using this catalog, we will investigate the clustering and luminosity function of faint (i »21-23), high-redshift (z > 2.5) quasars in order to break degeneracies between different models of "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our approach is unique in its application of a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm that has been demonstrated to out-perform standard methods and that has been tested on multi-wavelength data. Once quasars have been identified, we will apply our existing photometric redshift algorithms. Richards and Myers are among the world's experts in finding quasars and using their clustering and luminosity function to do cutting-edge science. Quasar clustering analysis will make use of the team's existing algorithms, which are designed to handle the inherently photometric nature of the quasar sample. The quasar luminosity function algorithms are already in place, allowing for timely completion of this project once the multi-wavelength NASA data have been incorporated. As with all quasar catalogs that represent the next generation in improvements, this multi-wavelength quasar catalog will have an impact that extends far beyond our own science goals. This time is ripe for the construction of such a catalog as only in the past year has this dataset covered such a large range of wavelengths and area. In terms of our own science, understanding the form of AGN feedback and the extent to which it

  5. X-ray studies of quasars with the Einstein Observatory. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Maccacaro, T.; Henry, J. P.; Tananbaum, H.; Soltan, A.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Smith, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray observations of 107 quasars have been carried out with the Einstein Observatory, and 79 have been detected. A correlation between optical emission and X-ray emission is found; and for radio-loud quasars, the data show a correlation between radio emission and X-ray emission. For a given optical luminosity, the average X-ray emission of radio-loud quasars is about three times higher than that of radio-quiet quasars. The data also suggest that the ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is decreasing with increasing redshift and/or optical luminosity. The data support the picture in which luminosity evolution, rather than pure density evolution, describes the quasar behavior as a function of redshift.

  6. What BOSS has taught us about Quasars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Science Working Group

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents science highlights from the SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Survey, which has obtained spectra for over 300,000 quasars, 200,000 of which are at redshift z>2. Using this dataset, new measurements of the luminosity function have been made, with the faint end of the luminosity function now measured to z~5. New clustering results from DR12 are presented, and the weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at z~0.5 is also discussed.New studies of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar population have also been performed, with a sample of BAL quasars from the original SDSS being re-observed. These new data have shown the disappearance of CIV BAL troughs and indeed the transformation of BAL QSOs to non-BAL QSOs. BAL disappearance, and emergence, events appear to be extremes of general BAL variability, and have shed light on accretion-disk wind models.We highlight the discovery of new classes of quasars including: a population of broad-line Mg II emitters found in a passive galaxy sample; objects with extremely red optical-to-mid infrared colors; objects with very curious UV line (LyA:NV) ratios and potentially the long-sought after high-redshift Type 2 Quasar population.Finally, we describe two new dedicated programs, one focusing on reverberation mapping, the other on X-ray selected quasars.A full list of papers connected to the BOSS Quasar Survey is given at: http://www.sdss3.org/science/publications.php

  7. Ultra-compact structure in intermediate-luminosity radio quasars: building a sample of standard cosmological rulers and improving the dark energy constraints up to z 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Zheng, Xiaogang; Biesiada, Marek; Qi, Jingzhao; Chen, Yun; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Context. Ultra-compact structure in radio sources (especially in quasars that can be observed up to very high redshifts), with milliarcsecond angular sizes measured by very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI), is becoming an important astrophysical tool for probing both cosmology and the physical properties of AGN. Aims: We present a newly compiled data set of 120 milliarcsec. compact radio sources representing intermediate-luminosity quasars covering the redshift range 0.46 < z < 2.76 and check the possibility of using these sources as independent cosmological probes. These quasars observed at 2.29 GHz show negligible dependence on redshifts and intrinsic luminosity, and thus represent a fixed comoving-length of standard ruler. Methods: For a cosmological ruler with intrinsic length lm, the angular size-redshift relation can be written as θ(z) = lm/DA(z, where θ(z) is the angular size at redshift z, and DA(z) is the corresponding angular diameter distance. We use a compilation of angular size and redshift data for ultra-compact radio sources from a well-known VLBI survey, and implement a new cosmology-independent technique to calibrate the linear size of this standard ruler, which is also used to test different cosmological models with and without the flat universe assumption. Results: We determine the linear size of this standard ruler as lm = 11.03 ± 0.25 pc, which is the typical radius at which AGN jets become opaque at the observed frequency ν 2 GHz. Our measurement of this linear size is also consistent with the previous and recent radio observations at other different frequencies. In the framework of flat ΛCDM model, we find a high value of the matter density parameter, Ωm = 0.322+0.244-0.141, and a low value of the Hubble constant, H0 = 67.6+7.8-7.4 km s-1 Mpc-1, which is in excellent agreement with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements by Planck. We obtain Ωm = 0.309+0.215-0.151, w = -0.970+0.500-1.730 at 68.3% CL for the

  8. The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral-Rogers, A.; Willingale, R.; O'Brien, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    The complete Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-Ray Telescope light curves of 118 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts were fitted using the physical model of GRB pulses by Willingale et al. to produce a total of 607 pulses. We compute the pulse luminosity function utilizing three GRB formation rate models: a progenitor that traces the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) with either a single population of GRBs, coupled to various evolutionary parameters, or a bimodal population of high- and low-luminosity GRBs; and a direct fit to the GRB formation rate excluding any a priori assumptions. We find that a single population of GRB pulses with an evolving luminosity function is preferred over all other univariate evolving GRB models, or bimodal luminosity functions in reproducing the observed GRB pulse L-z distribution and that the magnitude of the evolution in brightness is consistent with studies that utilize only the brightest GRB pulses. We determine that the appearance of a GRB formation rate density evolution component is an artefact of poor parametrization of the CSFRD at high redshifts rather than indicating evolution in the formation rate of early epoch GRBs. We conclude that the single brightest region of a GRB light curve holds no special property; by incorporating pulse data from the totality of GRB emission we boost the GRB population statistics by a factor of 5, rule out some models utilized to explain deficiencies in GRB formation rate modelling, and constrain more tightly some of the observed parameters of GRB behaviour.

  9. The Co-Formation of Spheroids and Quasars Traced in their Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Lidz, Adam; Hernquist, Lars; Coil, Alison L.; Myers, Adam D.; Cox, Thomas J.; Spergel, David N.

    2007-06-01

    We compare observed clustering of quasars and galaxies as a function of redshift, mass, luminosity, and color/morphology, to constrain models of quasar fueling and the co-evolution of spheroids and supermassive black holes (BHs). High-redshift quasars are shown to be drawn from the progenitors of local early-type galaxies, with the characteristic quasar luminosity L* reflecting a characteristic mass of ``active'' BH/host populations at each epoch. Evolving observed high-z quasar clustering to z=0 predicts a trend of clustering in ``quasar remnants'' as a function of stellar mass identical to that observed for early types. However, quasar clustering does not simply reflect observed early (or late) type populations; at each redshift, quasars cluster as an ``intermediate'' population. Comparing with the age of elliptical stellar populations as a function of mass reveals that this ``intermediate'' population represents those ellipticals undergoing or terminating their final significant star formation activity at the given epoch. Assuming that quasar triggering is associated with the formation/termination epoch of ellipticals predicts quasar clustering at all observed redshifts without any model dependence or assumptions about quasar light curves, lifetimes, or accretion rates. This is not true for disks or quasar halos; i.e., quasars do not generically trace star formation or halo assembly. Quasar clustering at all redshifts is consistent with ~4×1012 h-1 Msolar, similar to group scales. This supports scenarios in which major mergers dominate the bright, high-redshift quasar populations. We show how improved clustering measurements can be used to constrain lower luminosity AGN fueling and whether or not accretion/star formation can ``shut down'' at z>3.

  10. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W.; Marshall, P. J.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Busha, Michael T.

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  11. The CLASS BL Lac sample: the radio luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchã, M. J. M.; Caccianiga, A.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new sample of BL Lac objects selected from a deep (30 mJy) radio survey of flat spectrum radio sources (the CLASS blazar survey). The sample is one of the largest well-defined samples in the low-power regime with a total of 130 sources of which 55 satisfy the `classical' optical BL Lac selection criteria, and the rest have indistinguishable radio properties. The primary goal of this study is to establish the radio luminosity function (RLF) on firm statistical ground at low radio luminosities where previous samples have not been able to investigate. The gain of taking a peek at lower powers is the possibility to search for the flattening of the luminosity function which is a feature predicted by the beaming model but which has remained elusive to observational confirmation. In this study, we extend for the first time the BL Lac RLF down to very low radio powers ˜1022 W Hz-1, i.e. two orders of magnitude below the RLF currently available in the literature. In the process, we confirm the importance of adopting a broader, and more physically meaningful set of classification criteria to avoid the systematic missing of low-luminosity BL Lacs. Thanks to the good statistics we confirm the existence of weak but significant positive cosmological evolution for the BL Lac population, and we detect, for the first time the flattening of the RLF at L ˜ 1025 W Hz-1 in agreement with the predictions of the beaming model.

  12. Applying the luminosity function statistics in the fireshell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Lemos, L. J.; Bianco, C. L.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied to the data of BATSE, GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We applied the tool of the LF statistics to three GRB classes predicted by the Fireshell model. We produced, by LF statistics, predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fph pk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk) for the three GRB classes predicted by Fireshell model; we also used three GRB rates. We looked for differences among the distributions, and in fact we found. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with 217 GRBs with known redshifts. Our goal is transform the GRBs in a standard candle, where a alternative is find a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy (Liso - Epk).

  13. Generalized Continuity Equation Solutions for the QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caditz, David M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized continuity equation that describes the relationship between the statistical and physical evolution of populations of astronomical objects. This equation allows us to parameterize the luminosity function (LF) in terms of physically meaningful quantities, such as creation timescale, τs, object evolutionary timescale, τg, and lifetime, am. The shape and evolution of the LF are shown to be sensitive to these physical parameters, with large regions of the parameter space producing relatively simple evolutionary scenarios such as density evolution (DE) or luminosity evolution (LE). Regions of parameter space where τs ≲ 0.3tH and τg ≲ 0.5tH, where tH is the Hubble time, may be characterized by more complex evolution including the natural formation of a double power-law shape and mixed density and luminosity evolution (ME). This result has important consequences for the interpretation of the quasi-stellar object (QSO) LF, implying that the timescales for creation and physical evolution may fall near the above range. A fit to QSO survey data for redshifts 0.68 < z < 4 implies that τs ˜ 0.2tH and τg ˜ 0.05tH with QSOs having a maximum lifetime of am ˜ 0.25tH.

  14. Study of the luminosity function for field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nine determinations of the luminosity function (LF) for field galaxies are adjusted, analyzed, and compared. Adjustments are made for differences in definitions as well as in assumptions regarding magnitude systems, the Hubble constant, and galactic absorption. Eight of the nine adjusted determinations are found to be in fairly good agreement, and the discrepancy in the ninth is attributed to incompleteness effects. A large-scale normalization of the LF is performed using the method and some integral counts of Gott and Turner (1976); the large-scale mean LF of (mostly field) galaxies is found to be about 2.3 times less than a previously derived 'local' LF. The large-scale luminosity density in space arising from sources within the B(0) isophotes of galaxies is evaluated, and a value of 86 million (H/50) suns per cu Mpc is obtained for a galactic absorption coefficient of 0.25 magnitude. It is noted that the true large-scale luminosity density is probably within a factor of 1.6 of the reported value.

  15. z ~ 1 Lyα Emitters. I. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak G. B.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a flux-limited sample of 135 candidate z ~ 1 Lyα emitters (LAEs) from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data using a new data cube search method. These LAEs have luminosities comparable to those at high redshifts and lie within a 7 Gyr gap present in existing LAE samples. We use archival and newly obtained optical spectra to verify the UV redshifts of these LAEs. We use the combination of the GALEX UV spectra, optical spectra, and X-ray imaging data to estimate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and its dependence on Lyα luminosity. We remove the AGNs and compute the luminosity function (LF) from 60 z ~ 1 LAE galaxies. We find that the best-fit LF implies a luminosity density increase by a factor of ~1.5 from z ~ 0.3 to z ~ 1 and ~20 from z ~ 1 to z ~ 2. We find a z ~ 1 volumetric Lyα escape fraction of 0.7% ± 0.4%. Based in part on data obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NNX09AF08G and by other grants and contracts. Based in part on zCOSMOS observations carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under Program ID: LP175.A-0839.

  16. The luminosity function of the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, R. O.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We use the CfA Reshift Survey of galaxies with m(sub z) less than or equal to 15.5 to calculate the galaxy luminosity function over the range -13 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -22. The sample includes 9063 galaxies distributed over 2.1 sr. For galaxies with velocities cz greater or equal to 2500 km per sec, where the effects of peculiar velocities are small, the luminosity function is well represented by a Schechter function with parameters phi(sub star) = 0.04 +/- 0.01 per cu Mpc, M(sub star) = -18.8 +/- 0.3, and alpha = -1.0 +/- 0.2. When we include all galaxies with cz greater or equal to 500 km per sec, the number of galaxies in the range -16 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -13 exceeds the extrapolation of the Schechter function by a factor of 3.1 +/- 0.5. This faint-end excess is not caused by the local peculiar velocity field but may be partially explained by small scale errors in the Zwicky magnitudes. Even with a scale error as large as 0.2 mag per mag, which is unlikely, the excess is still a factor of 1.8 +/- 0.3. If real, this excess affects the interpretation of deep counts of field galaxies.

  17. The bright end of the luminosity function at z ~ 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, N.; Pelló, R.; Hayes, M.; Schaerer, D.; Boone, F.; Richard, J.; Le Borgne, J. F.; Kneib, J. P.; Combes, F.

    2012-06-01

    Context. We present additional constraints on the galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 9 based on observations carried out with ESO/VLT FORS2, HAWK-I, and X-Shooter around the lensing cluster A2667, as part of our project designed to select z ~ 7-10 candidates accessible to spectroscopy. We find that only one selected J-dropout source in this field fulfills the color and magnitude criteria. This source was recently confirmed as a mid-z interloper based on X-Shooter spectroscopy. Aims: Owing to the considerable depth and area covered by our survey, we are able to set strong constraints on the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function and hence on the star formation history at very high redshift. Methods: We used our non-detection of reliable J-dropout sources over the ~36 arcmin2 field of view towards A2667 to carefully determine the lens-corrected effective volume and the corresponding upper limit to the density of sources. Results: Our strongest limit is obtained for Φ(M1500 = -21.4 ± 0.50) < 6.70 × 10-6 Mpc-3 mag-1 at z ~ 9. A maximum-likelihood fit of the luminosity function to all available data points including the present new result yields M⋆ > -19.7 with fixed α = -1.74 and Φ⋆ = 1.10 × 10-3 Mpc-3. The corresponding star-formation rate density should be ρSFR < 5.97 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc3 at z ~ 9. These results are in good agreement with the most recent estimates already published for this range of redshift and luminosity domain. Conclusions: This new result confirms previously measured decreases in the density of luminous galaxies at very high redshift, hence provides strong constraints on the design of future surveys aiming to explore the very high-redshift Universe. Based on observations collected at The European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, as part of the ESO 082.A-0163 and 087.A-0118.

  18. The Final SDSS High-redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Bañados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H.; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L.; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at z∼ 6 identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of z∼ 6 quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at 5.7\\lt z≤slant 6.4, including 29 quasars with {z}{AB}≤slant 20 mag selected from 11,240 deg2 of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with 20≤slant {z}{AB}≤slant 20.5 selected from 4223 deg2 of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to {z}{AB}≈ 22 mag from the 277 deg2 in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of -29.0≤slant {M}1450≤slant -24.5. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z∼ 6. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ({M}1450≥slant -23 mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope β of the QLF is well constrained to be β =-2.8+/- 0.2. Due to the small number of low-luminosity quasars, the faint-end slope α and the characteristic magnitude {M}1450* are less well constrained, with α =-{1.90}-0.44+0.58 and {M}* =-{25.2}-3.8+1.2 mag. The spatial density of luminous quasars, parametrized as ρ ({M}1450\\lt -26,z)=ρ (z=6){10}k(z-6), drops rapidly from z∼ 5 to 6, with k=-0.72+/- 0.11. Based on our fitted QLF and assuming an intergalactic medium (IGM) clumping factor of C = 3, we find that the observed quasar population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the z∼ 6 IGM at ∼90% confidence. Quasars may still provide a significant fraction of the required photons, although much larger samples of faint quasars are needed for more stringent constraints on the quasar contribution to reionization.

  19. Feedback from AGN: The Kinetic/Radio Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melini, Gabriele; La Franca, Fabio; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    We have measured the probability distribution function of the ratio RX = log L1.4/LX, where L1.4/LX = ν Lν(1.4 GHz)/LX(2-10 keV), between the 1.4 GHz and the unabsorbed 2-10 keV luminosities and its dependence on LX and z. We have used a complete sample of ~1800 hard X-ray selected AGN, observed in the 1.4 GHz band, cross-correlated in order to exclude FR II-type objects, and thus obtain a contemporaneous measure of the radio and X-ray emission. The distribution P(RX|LX,z) is shown in Figure 1. Convolution of the distribution P(RX|LX,z) with the 2-10 keV X-ray AGN luminosity function from La Franca et al. (2005) and the relations between radio power and kinetic energy from Best et al. (2006) and Willott et al. (1999) allows us to derive the AGN kinetic power and its evolution. As shown in Figure 1, our results are in good agreement with the predictions of the most recent models of galaxy formation and evolution (e.g., Croton et al. 2006), where AGN radio feedback is required to quench the star formation.

  20. Host Galaxies Of Luminous Z ˜ 0.6 Quasars: Major Mergers Are Not Prevalent At The Highest Agn Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villforth, Carolin; Hamilton, T.; Pawlik, M. M.; Hewlett, T.; Rowlands, K.; Herbst, H.; Shankar, F.; Fontana, A.; Hamann, F.; Koekemoer, A.; Pforr, J.; Trump, J.; Wuyts, S.

    2017-06-01

    Galaxy interactions are thought to be one of the main triggers of active galactic nuclei (AGN), especially at high luminosities, where the accreted gas mass during the AGN lifetime is substantial. Evidence for a connection between mergers and AGN, however, remains mixed. Possible triggering mechanisms remain particularly poorly understood for luminous AGN, which are thought to require triggering by major mergers, rather than secular processes. We analyse the host galaxies of a sample of 20 optically and X-ray selected luminous AGN (log(Lbol [erg s-1]) > 45) at z ˜ 0.6 using Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 data in the F160W/H band. 15/20 sources have resolved host galaxies. We create a control sample of mock AGN by matching the AGN host galaxies to a control sample of non-AGN galaxies. Visual signs of disturbances are found in about 25 per cent of sources in both the AGN hosts and control galaxies. Using both visual classification and quantitative morphology measures, we show that the levels of disturbance are not enhanced when compared to a matched control sample. We find no signs that major mergers play a dominant role in triggering AGN at high luminosities, suggesting that minor mergers and secular processes dominate AGN triggering up to the highest AGN luminosities. The upper limit on the enhanced fraction of major mergers is ≤20 per cent. While major mergers might increase the incidence of luminous AGN, they are not the prevalent triggering mechanism in the population of unobscured AGN.

  1. Host galaxies of luminous z ∼ 0.6 quasars: major mergers are not prevalent at the highest AGN luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villforth, C.; Hamilton, T.; Pawlik, M. M.; Hewlett, T.; Rowlands, K.; Herbst, H.; Shankar, F.; Fontana, A.; Hamann, F.; Koekemoer, A.; Pforr, J.; Trump, J.; Wuyts, S.

    2017-04-01

    Galaxy interactions are thought to be one of the main triggers of active galactic nuclei (AGN), especially at high luminosities, where the accreted gas mass during the AGN lifetime is substantial. Evidence for a connection between mergers and AGN, however, remains mixed. Possible triggering mechanisms remain particularly poorly understood for luminous AGN, which are thought to require triggering by major mergers, rather than secular processes. We analyse the host galaxies of a sample of 20 optically and X-ray selected luminous AGN (log(Lbol [erg s-1]) > 45) at z ∼ 0.6 using Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 data in the F160W/H band. 15/20 sources have resolved host galaxies. We create a control sample of mock AGN by matching the AGN host galaxies to a control sample of non-AGN galaxies. Visual signs of disturbances are found in about 25 per cent of sources in both the AGN hosts and control galaxies. Using both visual classification and quantitative morphology measures, we show that the levels of disturbance are not enhanced when compared to a matched control sample. We find no signs that major mergers play a dominant role in triggering AGN at high luminosities, suggesting that minor mergers and secular processes dominate AGN triggering up to the highest AGN luminosities. The upper limit on the enhanced fraction of major mergers is ≤20 per cent. While major mergers might increase the incidence of luminous AGN, they are not the prevalent triggering mechanism in the population of unobscured AGN.

  2. MEASURING THE LUMINOSITY AND VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS DEPENDENCE OF QUASAR–GALAXY CLUSTERING AT z ∼ 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Krolewski, Alex G.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-04-10

    We study the dependence of quasar clustering on quasar luminosity and black hole mass by measuring the angular overdensity of photometrically selected galaxies imaged by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) about z ∼ 0.8 quasars from SDSS. By measuring the quasar–galaxy cross-correlation function and using photometrically selected galaxies, we achieve a higher density of tracer objects and a more sensitive detection of clustering than measurements of the quasar autocorrelation function. We test models of quasar formation and evolution by measuring the luminosity dependence of clustering amplitude. We find a significant overdensity of WISE galaxies about z ∼ 0.8 quasars at 0.2–6.4 h{sup −1} Mpc in projected comoving separation. We find no appreciable increase in clustering amplitude with quasar luminosity across a decade in luminosity, and a power-law fit between luminosity and clustering amplitude gives an exponent of −0.01 ± 0.06 (1 σ error). We also fail to find a significant relationship between clustering amplitude and black hole mass, although our dynamic range in true mass is suppressed due to the large uncertainties in virial black hole mass estimates. Our results indicate that a small range in host dark matter halo mass maps to a large range in quasar luminosity.

  3. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h˜ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h˜ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5-2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  4. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Willott, Chris J.; Im, Myungshin; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  5. The X-Ray Background and the AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasinger, G.

    The deepest X-ray surveys performed with ROSAT were able to resolve as much as 70-80% of the 1-2 keV X-ray background into resolved sources. Optical follow-up observations were able to identify the majority of faint X-ray sources as active galactic nuclei (AGN) out to redshifts of 4.5 as well as a sizeable fraction as groups of galaxies out to redshifts of 0.7. A new population of X-ray luminous, optically innocent narrow emission line galaxies (NELGs) at the faintest X-ray fluxes is still a matter of debate, most likely many of them are also connected to AGN. First deep surveys with the Japanese ASCA satellite give us a glimpse of the harder X-ray background where the bulk of the energy density resides. Future X-ray observatories (XMM and AXAF) will be able to resolve the harder X-ray background. For the first time we are now in a position to study the cosmological evolution of the X-ray luminosity function of AGN, groups of galaxies and galaxies and simultaneously constrain their total luminosity output over cosmic time.

  6. Volume-limited SDSS/First quasars and the radio dichotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester; R.G. Kron

    2004-03-12

    Much evidence has been presented in favor of and against the existence of two distinct populations of quasars, radio-loud and radio-quiet. The SDSS differs from earlier optically selected quasar surveys in the large number of quasars and the targeting of FIRST radio source counterparts as quasar candidates. This allows a qualitatively different approach of constructing a series of samples at different redshifts which are volume-limited with respect to both radio and optical luminosity. This technique avoids any biases from the strong evolution of quasar counts with redshift and potential redshift-dependent selection effects. We find that optical and radio luminosities of quasars detected in both SDSS and FIRST are not well correlated within each redshift shell, although the fraction of radio detections among optically selected quasars remains roughly constant at 10% for z {le} 3.2. The distribution in the luminosity-luminosity plane does not appear to be strongly bimodal. The optical luminosity function is marginally flatter at higher radio luminosities.

  7. A simple model to link the properties of quasars to the properties of dark matter haloes out to high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croton, Darren J.

    2009-04-01

    We present a simple model of how quasars occupy dark matter haloes from z = 0 to 5 using the observed mBH-σ relation and quasar luminosity functions. This provides a way for observers to statistically infer host halo masses for quasar observations using luminosity and redshift alone. Our model is deliberately simple and sidesteps any need to explicitly describe the physics. In spite of its simplicity, the model reproduces many key observations and has predictive power: (i) model quasars have the correct luminosity function (by construction) and spatial clustering (by consequence); (ii) we predict high-redshift quasars of a given luminosity live in less massive dark matter haloes than the same luminosity quasars at low redshifts; (iii) we predict a factor of ~5 more 108.5Msolar black holes at z ~ 2 than is currently observed; (iv) we predict a factor of ~20 evolution in the amplitude of the mBH-Mhalo relation between z = 5 and the present day; (v) we expect luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes of between tQ ~ 107 and 108yr, but which may become as short as 105-6yr for quasars brighter than L* and (vi) while little luminosity-dependent clustering evolution is expected at z <~ 1, increasingly strong evolution is predicted for L > L* quasars at higher redshifts. These last two results arise from the narrowing distribution of halo masses that quasars occupy as the Universe ages. We also deconstruct both `downsizing' and `upsizing' trends predicted by the model at different redshifts and space densities. Importantly, this work illustrates how current observations cannot distinguish between more complicated physically motivated quasar models and our simple phenomenological approach. It highlights the opportunities such methodologies provide.

  8. A SURVEY OF z {approx} 6 QUASARS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DEEP STRIPE. II. DISCOVERY OF SIX QUASARS AT z {sub AB}>21

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Linhua; Fan Xiaohui; Bian Fuyan; Annis, James; Lin Huan; Chiu, Kuenley; Jester, Sebastian; Lupton, Robert H.; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Schneider, Donald P.

    2009-07-15

    We present the discovery of six new quasars at z {approx} 6 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the celestial equator. The six quasars are about 2 mag fainter than the luminous z {approx} 6 quasars found in the SDSS main survey and 1 mag fainter than the quasars reported in Paper I. Four of them comprise a complete flux-limited sample at 21 < z {sub AB} < 21.8 over an effective area of 195 deg{sup 2}. The other two quasars are fainter than z {sub AB} = 22 and are not part of the complete sample. The quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 6 is well described as a single power law {phi}(L {sub 1450}) {proportional_to} L {sup {beta}} {sub 1450} over the luminosity range -28 < M {sub 1450} < -25. The best-fitting slope {beta} varies from -2.6 to -3.1, depending on the quasar samples used, with a statistical error of 0.3-0.4. About 40% of the quasars discovered in the SDSS southern survey have very narrow Ly{alpha} emission lines, which may indicate small black hole masses and high Eddington luminosity ratios, and therefore short black hole growth timescales for these faint quasars at early epochs.

  9. Maximum likelihood random galaxy catalogues and luminosity function estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Shaun

    2011-09-01

    We present a new algorithm to generate a random (unclustered) version of an magnitude limited observational galaxy redshift catalogue. It takes into account both galaxy evolution and the perturbing effects of large-scale structure. The key to the algorithm is a maximum likelihood (ML) method for jointly estimating both the luminosity function (LF) and the overdensity as a function of redshift. The random catalogue algorithm then works by cloning each galaxy in the original catalogue, with the number of clones determined by the ML solution. Each of these cloned galaxies is then assigned a random redshift uniformly distributed over the accessible survey volume, taking account of the survey magnitude limit(s) and, optionally, both luminosity and number density evolution. The resulting random catalogues, which can be employed in traditional estimates of galaxy clustering, make fuller use of the information available in the original catalogue and hence are superior to simply fitting a functional form to the observed redshift distribution. They are particularly well suited to studies of the dependence of galaxy clustering on galaxy properties as each galaxy in the random catalogue has the same list of attributes as measured for the galaxies in the genuine catalogue. The derivation of the joint overdensity and LF estimator reveals the limit in which the ML estimate reduces to the standard 1/Vmax LF estimate, namely when one makes the prior assumption that the are no fluctuations in the radial overdensity. The new ML estimator can be viewed as a generalization of the 1/Vmax estimate in which Vmax is replaced by a density corrected Vdc, max.

  10. Relativistic cosmology number densities and the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A. S.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, ApJ, 657, 760), where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z = 1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, ApJ, 592, 1), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Methods: Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy LF obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS deep field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 5.0 for its blue bands and 0.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 for its red ones. Differential number counts, densities and other related observables are obtained, and then used with the calculated selection functions to study the empirical radial distribution of the galaxies in a fully relativistic framework. Results: The redshift range of the dataset used in this work, which is up to five times larger than the one used in previous studies, shows an increased relevance of the relativistic effects of expansion when compared to the evolution of the LF at the higher redshifts. The results also agree with the preliminary ones presented in Albani et al., suggesting a power-law behavior of relativistic densities at high redshifts when they are defined in terms of the luminosity distance.

  11. X-ray spectral evolution of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Jill; Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Olga; Cutri, Roc M.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Rieke, Marcia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1994-01-01

    At z approx. equals 3, the x-ray spectra of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are different. High-redshift radio-quiet quasars either have large absorbing columns, N(sub H), and steeper power law spectral indices, alpha(sub epsilon), than low redshift quasars, or no absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s. In contrast, the radio-loud quasars at high redshift have substantial absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s to low redshift quasars. Implications for the interpretation of the evolution of the luminosity function of quasars are discussed. If the absorption arises outside the central engine for both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, then radio-quiet quasars differ from the radio-loud quasars in that their emitted power law spectrum has evolved with redshift. We argue that this favors models where quasars are numerous and short-lived, rather than rare and long-lived.

  12. X-ray spectral evolution of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Jill; Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Olga; Cutri, Roc M.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Rieke, Marcia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1994-01-01

    At z approx. equals 3, the x-ray spectra of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are different. High-redshift radio-quiet quasars either have large absorbing columns, N(sub H), and steeper power law spectral indices, alpha(sub epsilon), than low redshift quasars, or no absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s. In contrast, the radio-loud quasars at high redshift have substantial absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s to low redshift quasars. Implications for the interpretation of the evolution of the luminosity function of quasars are discussed. If the absorption arises outside the central engine for both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, then radio-quiet quasars differ from the radio-loud quasars in that their emitted power law spectrum has evolved with redshift. We argue that this favors models where quasars are numerous and short-lived, rather than rare and long-lived.

  13. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. I. Luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Dariush, A.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Jones, A. P.; Madden, S.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) and the first data obtained as part of the science demonstration phase (SDP). The data cover a central 4×4 sq deg region of the cluster. We use SPIRE and PACS photometry data to produce 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm luminosity functions (LFs) for optically bright galaxies that are selected at 500 μm and detected in all bands. We compare these LFs with those previously derived using IRAS, BLAST and Herschel-ATLAS data. The Virgo cluster LFs do not have the large numbers of faint galaxies or examples of very luminous galaxies seen previously in surveys covering less dense environments. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  14. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function before the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Trenti, Michele; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass-dependent, but redshift-independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at z > 10 (lookback time ≲500 Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations (0 ≲ z ≲ 10). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond z ˜ 8 is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth τ ={0.056}-0.010+0.007, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at z={7.84}-0.98+0.65. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with L ≲ L* in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at z > 10 we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope (α ˜ -3.5 at z ˜ 16). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and predict that galaxies out to z ˜ 14 will be observed. Galaxies at z > 15 will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.

  15. Tracing galaxy evolution by their present-day luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2011-04-01

    Galaxies, which are complex objects containing up to several tens of billions stars, as well as gas and dust, are remarkable objects. The Universe contains a very diverse "zoo" of galaxies: there are galaxies with a discy shape and spiral structure, elliptical galaxies, and even galaxies, which show no sign of structure. This variety of galaxies leads to the basic question: how the galaxies form and evolve and which processes shape the structure of galaxies? Due to the complexity of galaxy formation and evolution, this question is still an unresolved puzzle and it is one of the biggest challenges in modern cosmology. The present thesis is based on large galaxy surveys and concentrates on the large-scale structure: how galaxy evolution is related to the surrounding large-scale environment of superclusters and voids. To study the evolution of galaxies, we use the luminosity function, which is in this respect one of the most fundamental of all cosmological observables. One of the principal results of the present study was the conclusion that the evolution of spiral galaxies is almost independent of the global environment, especially for blue and red spirals separately, showing that the formation of spiral galaxies has to be similar in all environments. Meanwhile, the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies depends strongly on the environment. This shows that the global environmental density is an important factor (via merging history) in the formation of elliptical galaxies. The results of the present study show clearly, that besides the local/group environment, the global (supercluster-void) environment plays also an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Accounting for the role of global environment can help to solve several problems in the present picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. The Quasar Fraction in Low-Frequency Selected Complete Samples and Implications for Unified Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Low-frequency radio surveys are ideal for selecting orientation-independent samples of extragalactic sources because the sample members are selected by virtue of their isotropic steep-spectrum extended emission. We use the new 7C Redshift Survey along with the brighter 3CRR and 6C samples to investigate the fraction of objects with observed broad emission lines - the 'quasar fraction' - as a function of redshift and of radio and narrow emission line luminosity. We find that the quasar fraction is more strongly dependent upon luminosity (both narrow line and radio) than it is on redshift. Above a narrow [OII] emission line luminosity of log(base 10) (L(sub [OII])/W) approximately > 35 [or radio luminosity log(base 10) (L(sub 151)/ W/Hz.sr) approximately > 26.5], the quasar fraction is virtually independent of redshift and luminosity; this is consistent with a simple unified scheme with an obscuring torus with a half-opening angle theta(sub trans) approximately equal 53 deg. For objects with less luminous narrow lines, the quasar fraction is lower. We show that this is not due to the difficulty of detecting lower-luminosity broad emission lines in a less luminous, but otherwise similar, quasar population. We discuss evidence which supports at least two probable physical causes for the drop in quasar fraction at low luminosity: (i) a gradual decrease in theta(sub trans) and/or a gradual increase in the fraction of lightly-reddened (0 approximately < A(sub V) approximately < 5) lines-of-sight with decreasing quasar luminosity; and (ii) the emergence of a distinct second population of low luminosity radio sources which, like M8T, lack a well-fed quasar nucleus and may well lack a thick obscuring torus.

  17. The Quasar Fraction in Low-Frequency Selected Complete Samples and Implications for Unified Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Low-frequency radio surveys are ideal for selecting orientation-independent samples of extragalactic sources because the sample members are selected by virtue of their isotropic steep-spectrum extended emission. We use the new 7C Redshift Survey along with the brighter 3CRR and 6C samples to investigate the fraction of objects with observed broad emission lines - the 'quasar fraction' - as a function of redshift and of radio and narrow emission line luminosity. We find that the quasar fraction is more strongly dependent upon luminosity (both narrow line and radio) than it is on redshift. Above a narrow [OII] emission line luminosity of log(base 10) (L(sub [OII])/W) approximately > 35 [or radio luminosity log(base 10) (L(sub 151)/ W/Hz.sr) approximately > 26.5], the quasar fraction is virtually independent of redshift and luminosity; this is consistent with a simple unified scheme with an obscuring torus with a half-opening angle theta(sub trans) approximately equal 53 deg. For objects with less luminous narrow lines, the quasar fraction is lower. We show that this is not due to the difficulty of detecting lower-luminosity broad emission lines in a less luminous, but otherwise similar, quasar population. We discuss evidence which supports at least two probable physical causes for the drop in quasar fraction at low luminosity: (i) a gradual decrease in theta(sub trans) and/or a gradual increase in the fraction of lightly-reddened (0 approximately < A(sub V) approximately < 5) lines-of-sight with decreasing quasar luminosity; and (ii) the emergence of a distinct second population of low luminosity radio sources which, like M8T, lack a well-fed quasar nucleus and may well lack a thick obscuring torus.

  18. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6+/-0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  19. The Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function at the dawn of Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin

    2012-09-01

    The [O iii] λ5007 Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function (PNLF) is an excellent extragalactic standard candle. In theory, the PNLF method should not work at all, since the luminosities of the brightest planetary nebulae (PNe) should be highly sensitive to the age of their host stellar population. Yet the method appears robust, as it consistently produces ≲10 % distances to galaxies of all Hubble types, from the earliest ellipticals to the latest-type spirals and irregulars. It is therefore uniquely suited for cross-checking the results of other techniques and finding small offsets between the Population I and Population II distance ladders. We review the calibration of the method and show that the zero points provided by Cepheids and the Tip of the Red Giant Branch are in excellent agreement. We then compare the results of the PNLF with those from Surface Brightness Fluctuation measurements, and show that, although both techniques agree in a relative sense, the latter method yields distances that are ˜15 % larger than those from the PNLF. We trace this discrepancy back to the calibration galaxies and argue that, due to a small systematic error associated with internal reddening, the true distance scale likely falls between the extremes of the two methods. We also demonstrate how PNLF measurements in the early-type galaxies that have hosted Type Ia supernovae can help calibrate the SN Ia maximum magnitude-rate of decline relation. Finally, we discuss how the results from space missions such as Kepler and Gaia can help our understanding of the PNLF phenomenon and improve our knowledge of the physics of local planetary nebulae.

  20. Surveys of Luminous Quasars in the Post-reionization Universe at z=5-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Feige; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Green, Richard F.; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Ran; Yi, Weimin; UHS Team

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at z ~ 5 to 6, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium (IGM), quasar evolution and the early super-massive black hole growth. The quasar luminosity function (QLF) and its evolution at z >~ 5 is also needed to estimate the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background during and after the reionization epoch. McGreer et al. (2013) provided the first complete measurement of the z ~ 5 QLF. However, their work focused on faint quasars over a small sky area; there were only 8 quasars with M1450 < -27.3. We have carried out a new quasar survey of luminous quasars at 4.7 < z < 5.4 over 14555 deg^2 with high completeness, selected using a combination of SDSS and WISE optical/NIR colors . Using this luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample, we present a new determination of the z ~ 5 QLF and discuss the evolution model of QLF at high redshift. Based on surveys of luminous quasars at z > 4, previous studies have concluded that the number density evolution steepens at high redshift, such that luminous quasars decline as a population more steeply at higher redshift (z ~ 5.5) than from z=4 to 5. However, quasars at redshifts 5.3 < z < 5.7 have been very challenging to select using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distribution. We have developed a new selection technique for z ~ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near- and mid-infrared photometric data. Up to date, we have constructed an uniform luminous z ~ 5.5 quasar sample with 26 new quasars. Our final completed sample of quasars at z=5-6 will be used to study QLF, evolution model and IGM evolution in the post-deionization universe.

  1. The luminosity function of nearby thick-disk sub-dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifyanto, M. I.

    2008-07-01

    We derived the luminosity function of thick disk using V/Vmax method for nearby sub-dwarf stars based on the sample stars of Carney et al. (1994). Hipparcos parallaxes and proper motions and Tycho2 proper motions were combined with radial velocities and metallicities from CLLA. We found that the luminosity function in the absolute magnitude range MV = 4 6 mag agree well with the luminosity function derived from the initial mass function (Reyle & Robin 2001).

  2. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  3. A physical model for the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Bressan, Alessandro; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Danese, Luigi; Negrello, Mattia

    2014-04-10

    pointing to a rapid drop of the ionization degree above z ≅ 6, such as indications of a decrease of the comoving emission rate of ionizing photons at z ≅ 6, a decrease of sizes of quasar near zones, and a possible decline of the Lyα transmission through the intergalactic medium at z > 6. On the other hand, the electron scattering optical depth, τ{sub es}, inferred from cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments favor an ionization degree close to unity up to z ≅ 9-10. Consistency with CMB data can be achieved if M {sub crit} ≅ 10{sup 8.5} M {sub ☉}, implying that the UV luminosity functions extend to M {sub UV} ≅ –13, although the corresponding τ{sub es} is still on the low side of CMB-based estimates.

  4. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of \

  5. SDSS DR4: Progress on the Hot Wire Dwarf Luminosity Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    SDSS DR4: Progress on the hot white dwarf luminosity function This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full...TITLE AND SUBTITLE SDSS DR4: progress on the hot white dwarf luminosity function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Sloan Digital Sky Survey ( SDSS ) data release 4 (DR4) WD catalog data allowed us to obtain a luminosity function (LF)for the hottest WDs. The LF was

  6. THE MID-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z < 0.3 FROM 5MUSES: UNDERSTANDING THE STAR FORMATION/ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS BALANCE FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC VIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanling; Shi Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A.; Papovich, Casey; Rahman, Nurur; Dasyra, Kalliopi E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-10

    We present rest-frame 15 and 24 {mu}m luminosity functions (LFs) and the corresponding star-forming LFs at z < 0.3 derived from the 5MUSES sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for {approx}98% of the objects and the median redshift is {approx}0.12. The 5-35 {mu}m Infrared Spectrograph spectra allow us to estimate accurately the luminosities and build the LFs. Using a combination of starburst and quasar templates, we quantify the star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributions in the mid-IR spectral energy distribution. We then compute the SF LFs at 15 and 24 {mu}m, and compare with the total 15 and 24 {mu}m LFs. When we remove the contribution of AGNs, the bright end of the LF exhibits a strong decline, consistent with the exponential cutoff of a Schechter function. Integrating the differential LF, we find that the fractional contribution by SF to the energy density is 58% at 15 {mu}m and 78% at 24 {mu}m, while it goes up to {approx}86% when we extrapolate our mid-IR results to the total IR luminosity density. We confirm that the AGNs play more important roles energetically at high luminosities. Finally, we compare our results with work at z {approx} 0.7 and confirm that evolution on both luminosity and density is required to explain the difference in the LFs at different redshifts.

  7. The luminosity function for the CfA redshift survey slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, Valerie; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The luminosity function for two complete slices of the extension of the CfA redshift survey is calculated. The nonparametric technique of Lynden-Bell (1971) and Turner (1979) is used to determine the shape for the luminosity function of the 12 deg slice of the redshift survey. The amplitude of the luminosity function is determined, taking large-scale inhomogeneities into account. The effects of the Malmquist bias on a magnitude-limited redshift survey are examined, showing that the random errors in the magnitudes for the 12 deg slice affect both the determination of the luminosity function and the spatial density constrast of large scale structures.

  8. The VIMOS VLT deep survey. The ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function and luminosity density at 3 ≤ z ≤ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltani, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J.-P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Lamareille, F.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Temporin, S.; Vergani, D.; Walcher, C. J.

    2007-03-01

    Aims:We study the luminosity function of the high-redshift galaxy population with redshifts 3≤ z ≤ 4 using a purely I-band magnitude-selected spectroscopic sample obtained in the framework of the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). Methods: We determine the luminosity function from the VVDS, taking care to add as few assumptions and as simple corrections as possible, and compare our results with those obtained from photometric studies, based on Lyman-break selections or photometric-redshift measurements. Results: We find that in the redshift range 3≤ z ≤ 4, the VVDS luminosity function is parameterized by φ^*=1.24+0.48-0.50×10-3 mag-1 Mpc-3 and M^*=-21.49+0.19-0.19, assuming a slope α=-1.4 consistent with most previous studies. While φ* is comparable to previously found values, M* is significantly brighter by about 0.5 mag at least. Using the conservative slope α=-1.4, we find a luminosity density at 1700 Å L1700(M<-18.5)=2.4×1019 W Mpc-3 and L1700Total=3.1×1019 W Mpc-3, comparable to that estimated in other studies. Conclusions: .The unexpectedly large number of very bright galaxies found in the VVDS indicates that the color-selection and photometric-redshift techniques that are generally used to build high-redshift galaxy samples may be affected by a significant fraction of color-measurement failures or by incomplete modelling of the mix of stellar emission, AGN contribution, dust absorption and intergalactic extinction assumed to identify high-redshift galaxies, making pure magnitude selection better able to trace the full population. Because of the difficulty to identify all low-luminosity galaxies in a spectroscopic survey, the luminosity density could still be significantly underestimated. We also find that the relative contribution of the most luminous galaxies compared to the fainter ones is at least twice as large in the VVDS compared to former estimates. Therefore, the VVDS paints a quite different picture of the role of the most actively star

  9. The Local [C ii] 158 μm Emission Line Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Yan, Lin; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Armus, Lee; Capak, Peter; Faisst, Andreas; Masters, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We present, for the first time, the local [C ii] 158 μm emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. [C ii] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-infrared (far-IR) luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S60 μm > 5.24 Jy. We calculate the completeness as a function of [C ii] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [C ii] luminosity function is constrained in the range ∼107–9 L⊙ from both the 1/Vmax and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [C ii] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [C ii] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [C ii]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [C ii] high-redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions are suggestive of an evolution in the [C ii] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. Deep surveys using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  10. The Environments of Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kristen M.; Lacy, Mark; Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) feedback is prescribed for driving the high-end shape of the galaxy luminosity function, clearing the circumnuclear environment during the end stages of mergers, and eventually turning off its own accretion. Yet the dominant processes and characteristics of active galactic nuclei are indistinct. Chief among this confusion is how significant the role of dust is in each galaxy. Orientation of the dusty torus is attributed to causing the differences between Sy1 and Sy2, but whether obscured quasars are found in particularly dusty host galaxies, if they exist at a different stage in the merger process (early on, before the dust is blown out), or if they are merely oriented differently than optical quasars is not yet so well distinguished. With obscured quasars now observed to make up 50% or greater of the population of quasars, the question of what causes obscuration becomes vital to address. With this in mind, I study matched samples of obscured and unobscured quasars to characterize their environments, with the intent of addressing what contribution environment has to obscuration levels. I investigate the megaparsec-scale environments of SIRTF Wide-field Infra-Red Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) quasars at z ˜ 1-3 by cross-correlating the sample with 3.8 million galaxies from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). Optically obscured quasars are compared to a control sample of optically-bright quasars via selection in the mid-infrared. Environments were observed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm to a depth of ≈ 2 μJy (AB = 23.1). Recent work has found diverse results in such studies, with dependence of environmental richness on both redshift and level of obscuration. I find that, within reasonable error, on average there is no distinct difference between the level of clustering for obscured and normal quasars, and that there is no dependence on redshift of this result within the range of 1.3 < z < 2.5. I compare our results

  11. Two to Tango? Binary Quasars, their Environments, and the Merger Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Merger/feedback scenarios linking AGN and galaxy evolution to cosmological structure formation seem wildly successful. Close quasar pairs, which are rare but show a significant excess over the extrapolated large-scale quasar correlation function, are the strongest candidates for merger triggering we have. But a competing theory posits that their excess is only due to their inhabiting locally overdense environments. To address this controversy, we propose to observe 9 close quasar pairs. Their X-ray luminosity, spectra, and broadband SEDs will be compared to hundreds of isolated SDSS quasars already imaged and analyzed. Proposed NOAO 4-meter imaging provides complementary tests for environmental overdensities.

  12. THE COLOR VARIABILITY OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Knecht, Matthias; Hogg, David W.; Shields, Joseph C.; Maoz, Dan; Bovy, Jo

    2012-01-10

    We quantify quasar color variability using an unprecedented variability database-ugriz photometry of 9093 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, observed over 8 years at {approx}60 epochs each. We confirm previous reports that quasars become bluer when brightening. We find a redshift dependence of this blueing in a given set of bands (e.g., g and r), but show that it is the result of the flux contribution from less-variable or delayed emission lines in the different SDSS bands at different redshifts. After correcting for this effect, quasar color variability is remarkably uniform, and independent not only of redshift, but also of quasar luminosity and black hole mass. The color variations of individual quasars, as they vary in brightness on year timescales, are much more pronounced than the ranges in color seen in samples of quasars across many orders of magnitude in luminosity. This indicates distinct physical mechanisms behind quasar variability and the observed range of quasar luminosities at a given black hole mass-quasar variations cannot be explained by changes in the mean accretion rate. We do find some dependence of the color variability on the characteristics of the flux variations themselves, with fast, low-amplitude, brightness variations producing more color variability. The observed behavior could arise if quasar variability results from flares or ephemeral hot spots in an accretion disk.

  13. The WISSH Quasars Project: Probing the AGN-Galaxy Coevolution In the Most Luminous Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischetti, Manuela; Piconcelli, E.; Vietri, G.; Bongiorno, A.; Fiore, F.; Duras, F.; Martocchia, S.; Zappacosta, L.; Brusa, M.; Vignali, C.; Marconi, A.; Cresci, G.; WISSH Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The WISE/SDSS selected hyper-luminous (WISSH) quasars survey is an extensive multiband observing program (from millimeter wavelengths to hard X rays) to investigate the role of nuclear activity in SMBH-galaxy self-regulated growth via extended outflows. Our ongoing project is designed to accurately constrain both AGN and host galaxy ISM properties in a large sample of 90 broad-line quasars at the brightest end of the AGN luminosity function (L_bol > 1e14 L_sun) and at the peak of their number density (z 2 - 4)I will review the most relevant results obtained to date with emphasis on the discovery of extremely powerful (up to 4% of L_bol) ionized outflows, the relation between AGN properties (obscuration, luminosity and Eddington ratio) and large-scale winds, and the SED of these hyper-luminous quasars.

  14. Optical and Radio Properties of QSOS as a Function of Absolute Luminosity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Andrew Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Photometric data for nearly 250 quasars, BL Lacertids, and active galaxies have been obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory during a continuous 13-year monitoring program. Long-term optical records for 130 of these sources are employed in an effort to assess the physical and cosmological properties of quasi-stellar objects. Photographic P and B magnitudes were obtained with the 76- and 46-cm telescopes at Rosemary Hill. Corrections for galactic absorption, emission lines, and the K-term are applied to the raw data yielding monochromatic flux densities at a standard emitted wavelength of 2500 (ANGSTROM). Long -term light curves are compiled for all objects and 3 levels of activity are determined for each individual source. The MEAN, BASE, and MAX brightness levels are then used to study QSOs in their average, quiescent, and active phases, respectively. Absolute intrinsic luminosities of all sources in the sample are computed from the monochromatic flux densities based on relativistic cosmological models. Radio -emitting quasars, radio-quiet QSOs, and active galaxies fall into 3 distinct groups and are examined separately. The cosmological properties of QSOs are studied by plotting apparent magnitude vs. redshift, the so-called Hubble diagram. Scatter in the diagram due to variability is substantially reduced by plotting log z vs. the MEAN, BASE, and MAX flux densities. The brightest QSOs at each redshift are then chosen as "standard candles" in an effort to determine if quasars obey Hubble's law for expanding universe. It is found that they fit the Hubble relation quite well if certain selection effects are accounted for. Other evidence for the cosmological origin of QSOs is briefly discussed. Variability provides a test as to whether individual quasars are essentially multiple in nature (the "Christmas Tree" model), or are single coherent sources (such as a massive black hole). The amplitude of variability vs. absolute luminosity relation is used to discriminate

  15. A CONSTRAINT ON QUASAR CLUSTERING AT z = 5 FROM A BINARY QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.

    2016-03-15

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ∼135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5; the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r{sub 0}){sup −2}, this discovery implies a correlation length of r{sub 0} ≳ 20h{sup −1} Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift.

  16. A Constraint on Quasar Clustering at z = 5 from a Binary Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ˜135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5 the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r0)-2, this discovery implies a correlation length of r0 ≳ 20h-1 Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  17. Changing Look Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.; MacLeod, Chelsea; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes (BH) illuminates fascinating physics from the stellar mass BHs in Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) to the supermassive black holes (SMBH) in Seyferts and quasars. Alas, BH accretion regions are too compact to be spatially resolved. Temporal changes in XRB spectral states have gone a long way to unravel the accretion physics in XRBs, and suggest powerful theoretical and observational analogies to quasars. However, simple mass scaling to SMBHs suggests impractically long timescales (millenia) for accretion state transitions in quasars. However, large spectral state changes in quasars have now been detected that both inform and invigorate debates about accretion theory and the nature of historical quasar classes (e.g., Type 1 vs Type 2). In the last couple of years, a dozen luminous "changing-look quasars" (CLQs) were discovered to exhibit strong, persistent changes in luminosity, accompanied by the dramatic emergence or disappearance of broad emission-line (BEL) components. The availability of repeat spectroscopy for large samples of quasars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its ongoing Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) now extend this rare and remarkable phenomenon to regimes of luminosity and redshift that overlap the huge cosmological samples of quasars in the SDSS. We review the current understanding of these events, and upcoming possibilities for their detection, characterization and modeling.

  18. The Herschel ATLAS: Evolution of the 250 Micrometer Luminosity Function Out to z = 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A. W.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bremer, M.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Frayer, D.; Leeuw, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the luminosity function of 250 micrometer-selected galaxies detected in the approximately equal to 14 deg(sup 2) science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z = 0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250 micrometer luminosity density out to z = 0.2 where it is 3.6(sup +1.4) (sub -0.9) times higher than the local value.

  19. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  20. Clustering of quasars in SDSS-IV eBOSS: study of potential systematics and bias determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Pierre; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Myers, Adam; Burtin, Etienne; White, Martin; Ross, Ashley J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Bautista, Julian; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Comparat, Johan; Dawson, Kyle; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McGreer, Ian D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David; Yèche, Christophe; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-07-01

    We study the first year of the eBOSS quasar sample in the redshift range 0.9quasars. We show that the main source of systematics in the evaluation of the correlation function arises from inhomogeneities in the quasar target selection, particularly related to the extinction and depth of the imaging data used for targeting. We propose a weighting scheme that mitigates these systematics. We measure the quasar correlation function and provide the most accurate measurement to date of the quasar bias in this redshift range, bQ = 2.45 ± 0.05 at bar z=1.55, together with its evolution with redshift. We use this information to determine the minimum mass of the halo hosting the quasars and the characteristic halo mass, which we find to be both independent of redshift within statistical error. Using a recently-measured quasar-luminosity-function we also determine the quasar duty cycle. The size of this first year sample is insufficient to detect any luminosity dependence to quasar clustering and this issue should be further studied with the final ~500,000 eBOSS quasar sample.

  1. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  2. Joint Bayesian Estimation of Quasar Continua and the Lyα Forest Flux Probability Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, Anna-Christina; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2017-08-01

    We present a new Bayesian algorithm making use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling that allows us to simultaneously estimate the unknown continuum level of each quasar in an ensemble of high-resolution spectra, as well as their common probability distribution function (PDF) for the transmitted Lyα forest flux. This fully automated PDF regulated continuum fitting method models the unknown quasar continuum with a linear principal component analysis (PCA) basis, with the PCA coefficients treated as nuisance parameters. The method allows one to estimate parameters governing the thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM), such as the slope of the temperature-density relation γ -1, while marginalizing out continuum uncertainties in a fully Bayesian way. Using realistic mock quasar spectra created from a simplified semi-numerical model of the IGM, we show that this method recovers the underlying quasar continua to a precision of ≃ 7 % and ≃ 10 % at z = 3 and z = 5, respectively. Given the number of principal component spectra, this is comparable to the underlying accuracy of the PCA model itself. Most importantly, we show that we can achieve a nearly unbiased estimate of the slope γ -1 of the IGM temperature-density relation with a precision of +/- 8.6 % at z = 3 and +/- 6.1 % at z = 5, for an ensemble of ten mock high-resolution quasar spectra. Applying this method to real quasar spectra and comparing to a more realistic IGM model from hydrodynamical simulations would enable precise measurements of the thermal and cosmological parameters governing the IGM, albeit with somewhat larger uncertainties, given the increased flexibility of the model.

  3. The connection between galaxy environment and the luminosity function slopes of star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65 000 star-forming regions (i.e. FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artefact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  4. Implications of the Observed Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn; Soria, Roberto; Yukita, Mihoko

    2012-01-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of ultraluminous X-ray (ULX) sources with 0.3-10.0 keV luminosities in excess of 10(sup 39) erg/s in a complete sample of nearby galaxies. The XLF shows a break or cut-off at high luminosities that deviates from its pure power law distribution at lower luminosities. The cut-off is at roughly the Eddington luminosity for a 90-140 solar mass accretor. We examine the effects on the observed XLF of sample biases, of small-number statistics (at the high luminosity end) and of measurement uncertainties. We consider the physical implications of the shape and normalization of the XLF. The XLF is also compared and contrasted to results of other recent surveys.

  5. UVUDF: UV Luminosity Functions at the Cosmic High Noon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Rafelski, Marc; Gburek, Timothy; Teplitz, Harry I.; Alavi, Anahita; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Finkelstein, Steven; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Kurczynski, Peter; Siana, Brian; Codoreanu, Alex; de Mello, Duilia F.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Soto, Emmaris

    2017-03-01

    We present the rest-1500 Å UV luminosity functions (LF) for star-forming galaxies during the cosmic high noon—the peak of cosmic star formation rate at 1.5< z< 3. We use deep NUV imaging data obtained as part of the Hubble Ultra-Violet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) program, along with existing deep optical and NIR coverage on the HUDF. We select F225W, F275W, and F336W dropout samples using the Lyman break technique, along with samples in the corresponding redshift ranges selected using photometric redshifts, and measure the rest-frame UV LF at z∼ 1.7,2.2,3.0, respectively, using the modified maximum likelihood estimator. We perform simulations to quantify the survey and sample incompleteness for the UVUDF samples to correct the effective volume calculations for the LF. We select galaxies down to {M}{UV}=-15.9,-16.3,-16.8 and fit a faint-end slope of α =-{1.20}-0.13+0.10,-{1.32}-0.14+0.10,-{1.39}-0.12+0.08 at 1.4< z< 1.9, 1.8< z< 2.6, and 2.4< z< 3.6, respectively. We compare the star formation properties of z∼ 2 galaxies from these UV observations with results from Hα and UV+IR observations. We find a lack of high-SFR sources in the UV LF compared to the Hα and UV+IR, likely due to dusty SFGs not being properly accounted for by the generic {IRX}{--}β relation used to correct for dust. We compute a volume-averaged UV-to-Hα ratio by abundance matching the rest-frame UV LF and Hα LF. We find an increasing UV-to-Hα ratio toward low-mass galaxies ({M}\\star ≲ 5× {10}9 {M}ȯ ). We conclude that this could be due to a larger contribution from starbursting galaxies compared to the high-mass end.

  6. The galaxy luminosity function and the redshift-distance controversy (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Salpeter, E. E.; Hoffman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The mean relation between distance and redshift for galaxies is reviewed as an observational question. The luminosity function for galaxies is an important ingredient and is given explicitly. We discuss various observational selection effects that are important for comparison of the linear and quadratic distance-redshift laws. Several lines of evidence are reviewed, including the distribution of galaxy luminosities in various redshift ranges, the luminosities of brightest galaxies in groups and clusters at various redshifts, and the Tully-Fisher correlation between neutral hydrogen velocity widths and luminosity. All of these strongly favor the linear law over the quadratic. PMID:16593693

  7. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  8. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT QUASAR AT z ∼ 6 AND IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongjung; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Duho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Kim, Minjin; Park, Won-Kee; Karouzos, Marios; Kim, Ji Hoon; Pak, Soojong E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies suggest that faint active galactic nuclei may be responsible for the reionization of the universe. Confirmation of this scenario requires spectroscopic identification of faint quasars (M{sub 1450} > −24 mag) at z ≳ 6, but only a very small number of such quasars have been spectroscopically identified so far. Here, we report the discovery of a faint quasar IMS J220417.92+011144.8 at z ∼ 6 in a 12.5 deg{sup 2} region of the SA22 field of the Infrared Medium-deep Survey (IMS). The spectrum of the quasar shows a sharp break at ∼8443 Å, with emission lines redshifted to z = 5.944 ± 0.002 and rest-frame ultraviolet continuum magnitude M{sub 1450} = −23.59 ± 0.10 AB mag. The discovery of IMS J220417.92+011144.8 is consistent with the expected number of quasars at z ∼ 6 estimated from quasar luminosity functions based on previous observations of spectroscopically identified low-luminosity quasars. This suggests that the number of M{sub 1450} ∼ −23 mag quasars at z ∼ 6 may not be high enough to fully account for the reionization of the universe. In addition, our study demonstrates that faint quasars in the early universe can be identified effectively with a moderately wide and deep near-infrared survey such as the IMS.

  9. The CFHT (MOS/PUMA) faint quasar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, David

    A multi-aperture spectroscopic survey for faint quasars has been carried out at Canada-France-Hawaii telescope. The survey is capable of reaching two magnitudes deeper into the luminosity function at redshifts greater than 3 than the deepest existing surveys. The technique is discussed and preliminary results are presented.

  10. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-Detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-11

    would result in a loss of information. Thus, we decided to apply the maximum-likelihood ( ML ) algorithm first introduced by Marshall et al. (1983) and...2010d, and Section 5). However, detection of sources in Fermi is performed by means of an ML fit (to the source and background photons) by modeling...uncertainties connected with this hypothesis. The best-fit LF is found by comparing, through an ML estimator, the number of expected objects (for a given model

  11. Cosmic evolution of Quasar radio structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the results of a survey of Quasar radio structures over redshifts from 0.6 to 3.7. There are clear evolutionary trends in size and luminosity, which suggest that the duty cycle of individual Quasars has increased over cosmic time. This affects source count statistics and gives clues on the evolution of Quasar environments.

  12. Black Holes in Galaxy Mergers: Evolution of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Hernquist, Lars; Cox, Thomas J.; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Martini, Paul; Robertson, Brant; Springel, Volker

    2005-09-01

    Based on numerical simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers, we discuss a model in which quasar activity is tied to the self-regulated growth of supermassive black holes in galaxies. The nuclear inflow of gas attending a galaxy collision triggers a starburst and feeds black hole growth, but for most of the duration of the starburst, the black hole is ``buried,'' being heavily obscured by surrounding gas and dust, limiting the visibility of the quasar, especially at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. As the black hole grows, feedback energy from accretion heats the gas and eventually expels it in a powerful wind, leaving behind a ``dead quasar.'' Between the buried and dead phases, there is a window in time during which the galaxy would be seen as a luminous quasar. Because the black hole mass, radiative output, and distribution of obscuring gas and dust all evolve strongly with time, the duration of this phase of observable quasar activity depends on both the waveband and imposed luminosity threshold. We determine the observed and intrinsic lifetimes as a function of luminosity and frequency, and calculate observable lifetimes ~10 Myr for bright quasars in the optical B band, in good agreement with empirical estimates and much smaller than our estimated black hole growth timescales ~100 Myr, naturally producing a substantial population of buried quasars. However, the observed and intrinsic energy outputs converge in the IR and hard X-ray bands as attenuation becomes weaker and chances of observation greatly increase. We also obtain the distribution of column densities along sight lines in which the quasar is seen above a given luminosity, and find that our result agrees remarkably well with observed estimates of the column density distribution from the SDSS for the appropriate luminosity thresholds. Our model reproduces a wide range of quasar phenomena, including observed quasar lifetimes, intrinsic lifetimes, column density distributions, and differences between

  13. The Truncated Lognormal Distribution as a Luminosity Function for SWIFT-BAT Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaninetti, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    The determination of the luminosity function (LF) in gamma ray bursts (GRBs) depends on the adopted cosmology, each one characterized by its corresponding luminosity distance. Here we analyse three cosmologies: the standard cosmology, the plasma cosmology, and the pseudo-Euclidean universe. The LF of the GRBs is firstly modeled by the lognormal distribution and the four broken power law, and secondly by a truncated lognormal distribution. The truncated lognormal distribution fits acceptably the range in luminosity of GRBs as a function of the redshift.

  14. The luminosity functions of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers are presented and used to derive luminosity functions for the 288 Perseids and 56 Orionids detected. Visual counts were performed under very good to excellent seeing conditions at the times of peak activities, and the brightnesses of the meteors were estimated to the nearest magnitude by comparison with the magnitudes of known objects. Maximum likelihood estimates of the power law index of the luminosity function of 1.56 + or - 0.06 for the Perseids and of 1.85 + or - 0.1 for the Orionids are obtained which are lower than the values found by other investigators. Under the assumption that the luminosity of visual meteors is proportional to their mass, the luminosity function power law may also be used to characterize the mass function.

  15. Consistency between the luminosity function of resolved millisecond pulsars and the galactic center excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeg, Harrison; Gordon, Chris; Crocker, Roland; Macias, Oscar

    2017-08-01

    Fermi Large Area Telescope data reveal an excess of GeV gamma rays from the direction of the Galactic Center and bulge. Several explanations have been proposed for this excess including an unresolved population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and self-annihilating dark matter. It has been claimed that a key discriminant for or against the MSP explanation can be extracted from the properties of the luminosity function describing this source population. Specifically, is the luminosity function of the putative MSPs in the Galactic Center consistent with that characterizing the resolved MSPs in the Galactic disk? To investigate this we have used a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo to evaluate the posterior distribution of the parameters of the MSP luminosity function describing both resolved MSPs and the Galactic Center excess. At variance with some other claims, our analysis reveals that, within current uncertainties, both data sets can be well fit with the same luminosity function.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VIPERS: galaxy colours and luminosity function (Fritz+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Ilbert, O.; Bolzonella, M.; Davidzon, I.; Coupon, J.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Zamorani, G.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; de Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fevre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Malek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-11-01

    Completeness numbers, redshifts, colour intercept evolution, dispersion, Schechter parameters and number densities of the luminosity function are presented for ~45000 galaxies between 0.4luminosity function are presented for the sub-samples of Red and Red-SED galaxies. Completeness numbers are given for both the parent photometric sample and the spectroscopic VIPERS sample. (3 data files).

  17. Clustering, cosmology and a new era of black hole demographics- II. The conditional luminosity functions of Type 2 and Type 1 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    The orientation-based unification model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) posits that the principle difference between obscured (Type 2) and unobscured (Type 1) AGNs is the line of sight into the central engine. If this model is correct then there should be no difference in many of the properties of AGN host galaxies (e.g. the mass of the surrounding dark matter haloes). However, recent clustering analyses of Type 1 and Type 2 AGNs have provided some evidence for a difference in the halo mass, in conflict with the orientation-based unified model. In this work, a method to compute the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs is presented. The CLF allows many fundamental halo properties to be computed as a function of AGN luminosity, which we apply to the question of the host halo masses of Type 1 and 2 AGNs. By making use of the total AGN CLF, the Type 1 X-ray luminosity function, and the luminosity-dependent Type 2 AGN fraction, the CLFs of Type 1 and 2 AGNs are calculated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9. At both z, there is no statistically significant difference in the mean halo mass of Type 2 and 1 AGNs at any luminosity. There is marginal evidence that Type 1 AGNs may have larger halo masses than Type 2s, which would be consistent with an evolutionary picture where quasars are initially obscured and then subsequently reveal themselves as Type 1s. As the Type 1 lifetime is longer, the host halo will increase somewhat in mass during the Type 1 phase. The CLF technique will be a powerful way to study the properties of many AGNs subsets (e.g. radio-loud, Compton-thick) as future wide-area X-ray and optical surveys substantially increase our ability to place AGNs in their cosmological context.

  18. The level of agreement between theoretical and observed globular cluster luminosity functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    degl'Innocenti, S.; Weiss, A.; Leone, L.

    1997-03-01

    Luminosity functions from theoretical stellar evolution calculations are compared with observed ones of several galactic globular clusters (M 30, M 92, M 68, NGC 6397, M 4, M 80, NGC 6352, NGC 1851). Contrary to earlier results of Faulkner & Swenson (1993ApJ...411..200F) and Bolte (1994ApJ...431..223B) we find no significant discrepancy that could indicate the neglect of important physical effects in the models. However, it is confirmed that the subgiant branch is the most sensitive part and shows the largest deviations in the luminosity function comparison, if parameters are inappropriate. We also find that the main sequence is suited less than the Red Giant Branch for the calibration of theoretical luminosity functions, mainly because of apparent completeness problems. While for individual clusters different changes in the model assumptions might resolve mismatches, there is no systematic trend visible. It rather appears that the quality of the luminosity function in the subgiant part is insufficient and that improved observations of this particular region are necessary for a better comparison. At the present quality of luminosity functions theory is in agreement with observations and a postulation of WIMPs acting in stellar cores does not seem to be justified. However, we conclude that improved data for the main sequence and subgiant branch are clearly needed to exploit the potential of luminosity functions as a diagnostic means for stellar evolution theory.

  19. A New Model for Dark Matter Halos Hosting Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue; Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher

    2015-01-01

    A new model for quasar-hosting dark matter halos, meeting two physical conditions, is put forth. First, significant interactions are taken into consideration to trigger quasar activities. Second, satellites in very massive halos at low redshift are removed from consideration due to their deficiency in cold gas. We analyze the Millennium Simulation to find halos that meet these two conditions and simultaneously match two-point auto-correlation functions of quasars and cross-correlation functions between quasars and galaxies at z = 0.5-3.2. The masses of the quasar hosts found decrease with decreasing redshift, with the mass thresholds being [(2-5) × 1012, (2-5) × 1011, (1-3) × 1011] M ⊙ for median luminosities of ~[1046, 1046, 1045] erg s-1 at z = (3.2, 1.4, 0.53), respectively, an order of magnitude lower than those inferred based on halo occupation distribution modeling. In this model, quasar hosts are primarily massive central halos at z >= 2-3 but increasingly dominated by lower mass satellite halos experiencing major interactions toward lower redshift. However, below z = 1, satellite halos in groups more massive than ~2 × 1013 M ⊙ do not host quasars. Whether for central or satellite halos, imposing the condition of significant interactions substantially boosts the clustering strength compared to the total population with the same mass cut. The inferred lifetimes of quasars at z = 0.5-3.2 of 3-30 Myr are in agreement with observations. Quasars at z ~ 2 would be hosted by halos of mass ~5 × 1011 M ⊙ in this model, compared to ~3 × 1012 M ⊙ previously thought, which would help reconcile with the observed, otherwise puzzling high covering fractions for Lyman limit systems around quasars.

  20. The WISSH quasars project. I. Powerful ionised outflows in hyper-luminous quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischetti, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Vietri, G.; Bongiorno, A.; Fiore, F.; Sani, E.; Marconi, A.; Duras, F.; Zappacosta, L.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Feruglio, C.; Giallongo, E.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Martocchia, S.; Ricci, F.; Schneider, R.; Testa, V.; Vignali, C.

    2017-02-01

    Models and observations suggest that both the power and effects of AGN feedback should be maximised in hyper-luminous (LBol > 1047 erg s-1) quasars, i.e. objects at the brightest end of the AGN luminosity function. In this paper, we present the first results of a multiwavelength observing programme, focusing on a sample of WISE/SDSS selected hyper-luminous (WISSH) broad-line quasars at z ≈ 1.5-5. The WISSH quasars project has been designed to reveal the most energetic AGN-driven outflows, estimate their occurrence at the peak of quasar activity, and extend the study of correlations between outflows and nuclear properties up to poorly investigated, extreme AGN luminosities, i.e. LBol 1047 - 1048 erg s-1. We present near-infrared, long-slit LBT/LUCI1 spectroscopy of five WISSH quasars at z ≈ 2.3 - 3.5, showing prominent [OIII] emission lines with broad (FWHM 1200-2200 km s-1) and skewed profiles. The luminosities of these broad [OIII] wings are the highest measured so far, with L[OIII]broad ≳ 5 × 1044 erg s-1, and reveal the presence of powerful ionised outflows with associated mass outflow rates Ṁ ≳ 1700M⊙ yr-1 and kinetic powers Ėkin ≳ 1045 erg s-1. Although these estimates are affected by large uncertainties because of the use of [OIII] as a tracer of ionised outflows and the very basic outflow model adopted here, these results suggest that in our hyper-luminous targets the AGN is highly efficient at pushing large amounts of ionised gas outwards. Furthermore, the mechanical outflow luminosities measured for WISSH quasars correspond to higher percentages ( 1-3%) of LBol than those derived for AGN with lower LBol. Our targets host very massive (MBH ≳ 2 × 109M⊙) black holes that are still accreting at a high rate (i.e. a factor of 0.4-3 of the Eddington limit). These findings clearly demonstrate that WISSH quasars offer the opportunity to probe the extreme end of both luminosity and supermassive black holes (SMBH) mass functions and revealing

  1. The faintest stars - The luminosity and mass functions at the bottom of the main sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    We present IR K-band photometry of complete samples of VLM candidates constructed from IIIaF and IVN plates in 10 fields taken as part of the POSSII and UKSRC surveys. Using the I-K colors constructed for these stars we estimate a bolometric luminosity function which extends to M(Bol) = 13.75. We find significant evidence for a luminosity function decreasing toward these luminosities. We also find that our results are consistent with those of studies based on the Nearby Star sample, when those data are presented as a bolometric luminosity function. We convert our observed luminosity function into a mass function, which extends with reasonable statistics to 0.08 solar masses - the H-burning minimum mass. We find significant evidence for features in the mass function at these masses. Specifically, the mass function 'turns over' at 0.25 solar mass, goes through a local minimum at about 0.15 solar mass, and may increase again below 0.1 solar mass - none of these features are predicted by any of the current theories of star formation. Lastly, the mass density we observe just above the H-burning minimum mass makes it difficult to envisage brown dwarfs contributing significant quantities of missing mass without invoking either a mass function in this region significantly steeper than that seen for main-sequence stars, or an extremely low cutoff mass to the mass function.

  2. Probing the Ultraviolet Luminosity Function of the Earliest Galaxies with the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich AMR calculations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. These simulations contain hundreds of well-resolved galaxies at z˜ 25-8, and make several novel, testable predictions. Most critically, we show that the ultraviolet luminosity function of our simulated galaxies is consistent with observations of high-z galaxy populations at the bright end of the luminosity function ({M}1600≤slant -17), but at lower luminosities is essentially flat rather than rising steeply, as has been inferred by Schechter function fits to high-z observations, and has a clearly defined lower limit in UV luminosity. This behavior of the luminosity function is due to two factors: (i) the strong dependence of the star formation rate (SFR) on halo virial mass in our simulated galaxy population, with lower-mass halos having systematically lower SFRs and thus lower UV luminosities; and (ii) the fact that halos with virial masses below ≃ 2× {10}8 {M}⊙ do not universally contain stars, with the fraction of halos containing stars dropping to zero at ≃ 7× {10}6 {M}⊙ . Finally, we show that the brightest of our simulated galaxies may be visible to current and future ultra-deep space-based surveys, particularly if lensed regions are chosen for observation.

  3. Effects of Formation Epoch Distribution on X-Ray Luminosity and Temperature Functions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, Motohiro; Takahara, Fumio; Fujita, Yutaka

    2001-07-01

    We investigate statistical properties of galaxy clusters in the context of a hierarchical clustering scenario, taking into account their formation epoch distribution; this study is motivated by the recent finding by Fujita and Takahara that X-ray clusters form a fundamental plane in which the mass and the formation epoch are regarded as two independent parameters. Using the formalism that discriminates between major mergers and accretion, the epoch of a cluster formation is identified with that of the last major merger. Since tiny mass accretion following formation does not much affect the core structure of clusters, the properties of X-ray emission from clusters are determined by the total mass and density at their formation time. Under these assumptions, we calculate X-ray luminosity and temperature functions of galaxy clusters. We find that the behavior of the luminosity function differs from the model that does not take into account formation epoch distribution; the behavior of the temperature function, however, is not much different. In our model, the luminosity function is shifted to a higher luminosity and shows no significant evolution up to z~1, independent of cosmological models. The clusters are populated on the temperature-luminosity plane, with a finite dispersion. Since the simple scaling model in which the gas temperature is equal to the virial temperature fails to reproduce the observed luminosity-temperature relation, we also consider a model that takes into account the effects of preheating. The preheating model reproduces the observations much more accurately.

  4. Heavily obscured quasar host galaxies at z ∼ 2 are discs, not major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Urry, C. Megan; Treister, Ezequiel; Glikman, Eilat

    2012-09-01

    We explore the nature of heavily obscured quasar host galaxies at z˜ 2 using deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3/infrared imaging of 28 dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) to investigate the role of major mergers in driving black hole growth. The high levels of obscuration of the quasars selected for this study act as a natural coronagraph, blocking the quasar light and allowing a clear view of the underlying host galaxy. The sample of heavily obscured quasars represents a significant fraction of the cosmic mass accretion on supermassive black holes as the quasars have inferred bolometric luminosities around the break of the quasar luminosity function. We find that only a small fraction (4 per cent, at most 11-25 per cent) of the quasar host galaxies are major mergers. Fits to their surface brightness profiles indicate that 90 per cent of the host galaxies are either disc dominated, or have a significant disc. This disc-like host morphology, and the corresponding weakness of bulges, is evidence against major mergers and suggests that secular processes are the predominant driver of massive black hole growth. Finally, we suggest that the coincidence of mergers and active galactic nucleus activity is luminosity dependent, with only the most luminous quasars being triggered mostly by major mergers. a MUSYC catalogue ID, see Cardamone et al. (2010). Objects with X-ray detections are marked with *. b See images shown in Fig. 1. c The ratio of the host luminosity to the point source luminosity, reported only when GALFIT requires an unresolved object to yield a physical fit. This may be due to an AGN point source (in the case of the X-ray-detected DOGs) or an unresolved bulge or central concentration, i.e. a central bulge. d See Fig. 2.

  5. QUASAR OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN THE PALOMAR-QUEST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne; Baltay, Charles; Coppi, Paolo; Ellman, Nancy; Jerke, Jonathan; Rabinowitz, David; Scalzo, Richard

    2009-05-10

    The ensemble variability properties of nearly 23,000 quasars are studied using the Palomar-QUEST Survey. The survey has covered 15,000 deg{sup 2} multiple times over 3.5 years using seven optical filters, and has been calibrated specifically for variability work. Palomar-QUEST allows for the study of rare objects using multiple epochs of consistently calibrated, homogeneous data, obviating the common problem of generating comparable measurements from disparate data sets. A power-law fit to the quasar structure function versus time yields an index of 0.432 {+-} 0.024 for our best measured sample. We see the commonly reported anticorrelation between average optical variability amplitude and optical luminosity, and measure the logarithmic decrease in variability amplitude to scale as the logarithm of the luminosity times 0.205 {+-} 0.002. Black hole mass is positively correlated with variability amplitude over three orders of magnitude in mass. Quasar variability amplitude is seen to decrease with Eddington ratio as a step function with a transition around Eddington ratio of 0.5. The higher variability at low Eddington ratios is due to excess power at timescales shorter than roughly 300 days. X-ray and radio measurements exist for subsets of the quasar sample. We observe an anticorrelation between optical variability amplitude and X-ray luminosity. No significant correlation is seen between average optical variability properties and radio luminosity. The timescales of quasar fluctuations are suggestive of accretion disk instabilities. The relationships seen between variability, Eddington ratio, and radio and X-ray emission are discussed in terms of a possible link between the behavior of quasars and black hole X-ray binaries.

  6. Distribution and evolution of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, S.; Rezania, V.

    In this paper we investigate: a) The evolution of quasars on the basis of gravitational contraction model of proto-galaxies. This is done by studying the number density of quasars given by Veron catalogue [1] in different luminosity classes. The order of classes increase with increasing the luminosity of corresponding quasars. It is shown that the ``decay'' of quasars is more sensible to their luminosities as expected by assuming that they are evolved from the contraction of slowly rotating proto-galaxies. The role of the angular momentum in the evolution of galaxies is emphasized by the results obtained from the size-luminosity relation of about 40,000 normal galaxies given by LEDA database [2]. In the model mentioned above the normal galaxies are assumed to be evolved from the contraction of relatively fast rotating proto-galaxies. b) The filamentary structures and voids of the large scale universe by plotting the entire sky map of quasars in the galactic coordinate. This is done by assuming that these objects are at cosmological distances. The result seems to show some spatial correlations of quasars distribution. References: 1. Veron, M. P. and Veron, P., ``A catalogue of quasars and active nuclei'', 5th edition, Scientific report, European Southern Observatory, No. 10, 1991. 2. Paturel, G., Bottinelli, L., Di Nella, H., Durand, N., Garnier, R., Gouguenheim, L., Marthinet, M. C., petit, C., Rousseau, J., Therreau, G., Vauglin, L., ``Lyon-Meudon Extragalctic Database (LEDA), For 100,000 galaxies'', Observatoire de Lyon, 1996.

  7. The GRB luminosity function: predictions from the internal shock model and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovich, R.; Zerguini, T. H.

    2008-05-01

    We compute the expected luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the context of the internal shock model. We assume that GRB central engines generate relativistic outflows characterized by the respective distributions of injected kinetic power and contrast in Lorentz factor κ = Γmax/Γmin. We find that if the distribution of contrast extends down to values close to unity (i.e. if both highly variable and smooth outflows can exist), then the luminosity function has two branches. At high luminosity it follows the distribution of while at low luminosity it is close to a power law of slope -0.5. We then examine if existing data can constrain the luminosity function. Using the logN-logP curve, the Ep distribution of bright Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) bursts and the X-ray flash (XRF)/GRB ratio obtained by High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), we show that single and broken power laws can provide equally good fits of these data. Present observations are therefore unable to favour one form or the other. However, when a broken power law is adopted they clearly indicate a low-luminosity slope ~= -0.6 +/- 0.2, compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  8. In the neighbourhood of Tame Monsters. A study of galaxies near low-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, B.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The impact of quasars on their galaxy neighbours is an important factor in the understanding of galaxy evolution models. Aims: The aim of this work is to characterize the intermediate-scale environments of quasars at low redshift (z < 0.2) with the most statistically complete sample to date using the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Methods: We have used 305 quasar-galaxy associations with spectroscopically measured redshifts within the projected distance range of 350 kpc, to calculate how surface densities of galaxies, colors, degree of ionization, dust extinction and star-formation rates change as a function of the distance to our quasar sample. We also identify the companion active galactic nuclei from our main galaxy sample and calculate surface density for different galaxy types. We have done this in three different quasar-galaxy redshift difference ranges |Δz| < 0.001, 0.006, and 0.012. Results: Our results suggest that there is a significant increase of the surface density of blue neighbours around our low-redshift quasar sample that is steeper than around non-active field galaxies of the same luminosity and redshift range. This may indicate that quasar formation is accomplished via a merging scenario. No significant changes in star formation rate, dust extinction, degree of ionization or color as a function of distance from the quasars was observed. We could not observe any direct effects from quasars on the their companion galaxies.

  9. Causes and effects of the first quasars.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, M J

    1993-01-01

    The light we observe from the most distant known quasars set out when the Universe was about 200 times denser than it is now and less than one-tenth of its present age. The existence of these objects implies that galaxy formation had already, at that early epoch, proceeded to the stage when massive (>10(8)M[symbol, see text]) objects had accumulated in the centers of at least some young galaxies. A specific model is presented to show that the evolution and luminosity function of quasars are compatible with the cold dark matter cosmogony. Most big galaxies probably passed through a quasar phase; the remnant black holes in nearby galaxies may reveal themselves via the flares that occur whenever a star passes too close to them and gets tidally disrupted. The rich absorption spectra of quasars serve as a probe of the intervening medium. The gas responsible for the Lyman alpha absorption lines may be due to primordial gas gravitationally confined in minihalos of dark matter--shallow potential wells whose evolution and relation to dwarf galaxies are briefly discussed. The patchy heat input into the intergalactic medium from early quasars could modulate the environment in which galaxies form, leading to large-scale spatial correlations in the galaxy distribution. This review concludes with general comments on the prospects for a fully quantitative understanding of galaxy formation. PMID:11607397

  10. First Discoveries of z > 6 Quasars with the DECam Legacy Survey and UKIRT Hemisphere Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Qian; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D.; Li, Jiang-Tao; Li, Zefeng; Ding, Jiani; Dey, Arjun; Dye, Simon; Findlay, Joseph R.; Green, Richard; James, David; Jiang, Linhua; Lang, Dustin; Lawrence, Andy; Myers, Adam D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Shanks, Tom

    2017-04-01

    We present the first discoveries from a survey of z ≳ 6 quasars using imaging data from the DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) in the optical, the UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS) in the near-IR, and ALLWISE in the mid-IR. DECaLS will image 9000 deg2 of sky down to z AB ˜ 23.0, and UKIDSS and UHS will map the northern sky at 0 < decl. < +60°, reaching J VEGA ˜ 19.6 (5-σ). The combination of these data sets allows us to discover quasars at redshift z ≳ 7 and to conduct a complete census of the faint quasar population at z ≳ 6. In this paper, we report on the selection method of our search, and on the initial discoveries of two new, faint z ≳ 6 quasars and one new z = 6.63 quasar in our pilot spectroscopic observations. The two new z ˜ 6 quasars are at z = 6.07 and z = 6.17 with absolute magnitudes at rest-frame wavelength 1450 Å being M 1450 = -25.83 and M 1450 = -25.76, respectively. These discoveries suggest that we can find quasars close to or fainter than the break magnitude of the Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF) at z ≳ 6. The new z = 6.63 quasar has an absolute magnitude of M 1450 = -25.95. This demonstrates the potential of using the combined DECaLS and UKIDSS/UHS data sets to find z ≳ 7 quasars. Extrapolating from previous QLF measurements, we predict that these combined data sets will yield ˜200 z ˜ 6 quasars to z AB < 21.5, ˜1000 z ˜ 6 quasars to z AB < 23, and ˜30 quasars at z > 6.5 to J VEGA < 19.5.

  11. First Discoveries of z > 6 Quasars with the DECam Legacy Survey and UKIRT Hemisphere Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; ...

    2017-04-11

    In this paper, we present the first discoveries from a survey of z ≳ 6 quasars using imaging data from the DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) in the optical, the UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS) in the near-IR, and ALLWISE in the mid-IR. DECaLS will image 9000 deg2 of sky down to z AB ~ 23.0, and UKIDSS and UHS will map the northern sky at 0 < decl. < +60°, reaching J VEGA ~ 19.6 (5-σ). The combination of these data sets allows us to discover quasars at redshiftmore » z ≳ 7 and to conduct a complete census of the faint quasar population at z ≳ 6. In this paper, we report on the selection method of our search, and on the initial discoveries of two new, faint z ≳ 6 quasars and one new z = 6.63 quasar in our pilot spectroscopic observations. The two new z ~ 6 quasars are at z = 6.07 and z = 6.17 with absolute magnitudes at rest-frame wavelength 1450 Å being M 1450 = -25.83 and M 1450 = -25.76, respectively. These discoveries suggest that we can find quasars close to or fainter than the break magnitude of the Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF) at z ≳ 6. The new z = 6.63 quasar has an absolute magnitude of M 1450 = -25.95. This demonstrates the potential of using the combined DECaLS and UKIDSS/UHS data sets to find z ≳ 7 quasars. Finally, extrapolating from previous QLF measurements, we predict that these combined data sets will yield ~200 z ~ 6 quasars to z AB < 21.5, ~1000 z ~ 6 quasars to z AB < 23, and ~30 quasars at z > 6.5 to J VEGA < 19.5.« less

  12. The Hubble relation for nonstandard candles and the origin of the redshift of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the magnitude-log (redshift) relation for brightest quasars can have a slope different from the value expected for standard candles. The value of this slope depends on the luminosity function and its evolution. Therefore the difference of this slope from the expected value cannot be used as evidence against the cosmological origin of the redshift of the quasars. It is shown that the observed variation of the luminosity of the brightest objects with redshift is consistent with the cosmological hypothesis and that it agrees with (and perhaps could be used to complement) the luminosity function obtained from V/Vm analysis. It is also shown that the nonzero slope of the magnitude-log (redshift) relation rules out the local quasar hypothesis, where it is assumed that the sources are nearby (less than 500 Mpc), that the bulk of their redshift is intrinsic, and that there is no dependence on distance of the intrinsic properties of the sources.

  13. Luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams for three OB associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioia-Eastwood, K.; Meyers, R. P.; Jones, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    Using the point spread function photometry program DAOPHOT, we have used UBV CCD photometry to construct color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions for three OB associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The region LH 76 appears to be completely coeval; the region LH 13 shows some evidence for noncoevality which will need to be checked with spectra of the stars in question. The region LH 105, which lies on the southern edge of 30 Doradus, shows significant contamination by an underlying older population, possibly from previous star forming events. The luminosity functions, which serve as the first step toward determining the initial mass function in these regions, are calculated.

  14. Cosmic reionization on computers: The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    DOE PAGES

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions atmore » $$z\\gtrsim 6$$. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}\\sim -13$$ provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}$$ is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. Here, an analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.« less

  15. Cosmic reionization on computers: The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions at $z\\gtrsim 6$. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at ${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}\\sim -13$ provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut ${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}$ is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. Here, an analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.

  16. Cosmic reionization on computers: The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions at $z\\gtrsim 6$. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at ${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}\\sim -13$ provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut ${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}$ is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. Here, an analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.

  17. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: The Faint End of the Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions at z≳ 6. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at {M}{{cut}}˜ -13 provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut {M}{{cut}} is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. An analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.

  18. Introducing the FirstLight project: UV luminosity function and scaling relations of primeval galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2017-09-01

    We introduce the FirstLight project, which aims to generate a large data base of high-resolution, zoom-in simulations of galaxy formation around the epoch of reionization (z ≥ 6). The first results of this programme agree well with recent observational constraints at z = 6-8, including the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function and galaxy stellar mass function, as well as the scaling relationships between halo mass, stellar mass and UV magnitude. The UV luminosity function starts to flatten below MUV > -14 due to stellar feedback in haloes with maximum circular velocities of V = 30-40 km s-1. The power-law slope of the luminosity function evolves rapidly with redshift, reaching a value of α ≃ -2.5 at z = 10. On the other hand, the galaxy stellar mass function evolves slowly with time between z = 8 and 10, in particular, at the low-mass end.

  19. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  20. The faint end of the 250 μm luminosity function at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Bethermin, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Cowley, W.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Viero, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the 250 μm luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods: We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 μm LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 μm luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results: We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (~ 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution L*250(z)∝(1+z)4.89±1.07 and moderate negative density evolution Φ*250(z)∝(1+z)-1.02±0.54 over the redshift range 0.02

  1. MID-INFRARED GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, X.; Assef, R. J.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brodwin, M.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Brown, M. J. I.; Caldwell, N.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Cool, R. J.; Eisenstein, D.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.

    2009-05-20

    We present galaxy luminosity functions at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m measured by combining photometry from the IRAC Shallow Survey with redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field. The well defined IRAC samples contain 3800-5800 galaxies for the 3.6-8.0 {mu}m bands with spectroscopic redshifts and z < 0.6. We obtained relatively complete luminosity functions in the local redshift bin of z < 0.2 for all four IRAC channels that are well fitted by Schechter functions. After analyzing the samples for the whole redshift range, we found significant evolution in the luminosity functions for all four IRAC channels that can be fitted as an evolution in M {sub *} with redshift, {delta}M {sub *} = Qz. While we measured Q = 1.2 {+-} 0.4 and 1.1 {+-} 0.4 in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands consistent with the predictions from a passively evolving population, we obtained Q = 1.8 {+-} 1.1 in the 8.0 {mu}m band consistent with other evolving star formation rate estimates. We compared our luminosity functions with the predictions of semianalytical galaxy formation and found the best agreement at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, rough agreement at 8.0 {mu}m, and a large mismatch at 5.8 {mu}m. These models also predicted a comparable Q-value to our luminosity functions at 8.0 {mu}m, but predicted smaller values at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. We also measured the luminosity functions separately for early- and late-type galaxies. While the luminosity functions of late-type galaxies resemble those for the total population, the luminosity functions of early-type galaxies in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands indicate deviations from the passive evolution model, especially from the measured flat luminosity density evolution. Combining our estimates with other measurements in the literature, we found 53 {+-} 18% of the present stellar mass of early-type galaxies was assembled at z = 0.7.

  2. On the luminosity function, lifetimes, and origin of blue stragglers in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailyn, Charles D.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1995-01-01

    We compute theoretical evolutionary tracks of blue stragglers created by mergers. Two formation scenarios are considered: mergers of primordial binaries, and stellar collisions. These two scenarios predict strikingly different luminosity functions, which are potentially distinguishable observationally. Tabulated theoretical luminosity functions and lifetimes are presented for blue stragglers formed under a variety of input conditions. We compare our results with observations of the blue straggler sequences in 47 Tucanae and M3. In the case of 47 Tuc, the luminosity function and the formation rate are compatible with the hypothesis that the blue stragglers formed through the collision of single stars. Mergers of primordial binaries are only marginally cosistent with the data, and a significant enhancement of the collision cross section by binary-single-star encounters appears to be ruled out. In the case of M3, we find that the innermost blue stragglers have a luminosity function significantly different from that of the outer stragglers, thus confirming earlier suggestions that there are two distinct populations of blue stragglers in this cluster. The inner stragglers are preferentially brighter and bluer, as would be expected if they were made by collisions, but there are so many of them that the collision rate would need to be enhanced by interactions involving wide binaries. The luminosity function of the outer stragglers is almost identical to the predictions of mergers from primordial binaries and is inconsistent with the collision hypothesis.

  3. Kinematics of nearby subdwarfs and the luminosity function of the Galactic thick disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifyanto, Mochamad Ikbal

    2005-12-01

    We present an analysis of the space motions of 740 subdwarf stars based on the sample stars of Carney et al. (1994; CLLA). Hipparcos parallaxes and proper motion and Tycho2 proper motions were combined with radial velocities and metallicities from CLLA. The kinematical behavior is discussed in particular in relation to their metallicities. For stars with metallicity -1.0<[Fe/H]<-0.4, the velocity distribution represent the thick disk population. We derived the luminosity function of thick disk using 1/Vmax method. We found that the luminosity function in absolute magnitude of MV = 4 - 5 mag, agree well with the Luminosity function derived from the stellar initial function (Reyle & Robin 2001). We analayzed the kinematics in our thick disk sample and found substructure in the thick disk population.

  4. Quasar Variability - Selection of and Physics in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, H.

    2012-01-01

    Quasars vary intrinsically by 10% over timescales of year(s). This variability has the potential of becoming an extremely powerful tool for quasar identification in the near future due to present (the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1; Pan-STARRS1) and future (the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope; LSST) wide-area multi-epoch surveys. Describing the variability of more than 9000 quasars from SDSS Stripe 82, the largest variability sample of quasars to date, by a power-law structure function we have illustrated how samples of quasar candidates with completeness and purity well above 90% is straightforwardly obtained. Applying our variability selection algorithm to data without u-band photometry that is crucial in color selection, as is the case for Pan-STARRS1 data, shows that variability selection of quasars is still capable of selecting complete and pure quasar candidate samples. Variability selection of quasars out-performs the usual color selection at redshifts where quasars have the same colors as stars. We find that at z 2.7 variability selection of quasars is up to 10 times more effective than color selection. Not only does the intrinsic quasar variability aid in quasar selection, it also contains vital information about the quasar/AGN accretion disk physics, which still has to be fully understood. Through robust fitting, including outlier pruning, we determined the color variability of the 9000 Stripe 82 quasars, i.e., the change of quasar color as their brightness changes on year time-scales. We found a strong redshift dependence of this color variability and showed that it is caused by the quasar's emission lines. Furthermore, we found that the characteristic color variability of the individual quasars is substantially stronger than the change of mean quasar color with L/Ledd, implying that changes in the overall accretion rate cannot explain the observed color variability.

  5. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF SDSS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jonathan; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Nagai, Daisuke; Zheng Zheng; Shen Yue

    2012-08-10

    We present an estimate of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) over the full range of one- and two-halo scales, 0.02 h{sup -1} Mpc < r{sub p} < 120 h{sup -1} Mpc. This was achieved by combining data from SDSS DR7 on large scales and Hennawi et al. (with appropriate statistical corrections) on small scales. Our combined clustering sample is the largest spectroscopic quasar clustering sample to date, containing {approx}48, 000 quasars in the redshift range 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.5 with median redshift 1.4. We interpret these precise 2PCF measurements within the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework and constrain the occupation functions of central and satellite quasars in dark matter halos. In order to explain the small-scale clustering, the HOD modeling requires that a small fraction of z {approx} 1.4 quasars, f{sub sat} = (7.4 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, be satellites in dark matter halos. At z {approx} 1.4, the median masses of the host halos of central and satellite quasars are constrained to be M{sub cen} = 4.1{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and M{sub sat} = 3.6{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }, respectively. To investigate the redshift evolution of the quasar-halo relationship, we also perform HOD modeling of the projected 2PCF measured by Shen et al. for SDSS quasars with median redshift 3.2. We find tentative evidence for an increase in the mass scale of quasar host halos-the inferred median mass of halos hosting central quasars at z {approx} 3.2 is M{sub cen} = 14.1{sup +5.8}{sub -6.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }. The cutoff profiles of the mean occupation functions of central quasars reveal that quasar luminosity is more tightly correlated with halo mass at higher redshifts. The average quasar duty cycle around the median host halo mass is inferred to be f{sub q

  6. The nearby Abell clusters. III. Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oegerle, W.R.; Hoessel, J.G. Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI )

    1989-11-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies. 40 refs.

  7. The nearby Abell clusters. III - Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hoessel, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies.

  8. X-ray luminosity functions of different morphological and X-ray type AGN populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Pérez García, A. M.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Fernández Lorenzo, M.; Lara-López, M. A.; Gallego, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Alfaro, E.; Castañeda, H.; González-Serrano, J. I.; González, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Luminosity functions are one of the most important observational clues when studying galaxy evolution over cosmic time. In this paper we present the X-ray luminosity functions for X-ray detected AGN in the SXDS and GWS fields. The limiting fluxes of our samples are 9.0 ×10-15 and 4.8 ×10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV band in the two fields, respectively. We carried out analysis in three X-ray bands and in two redshift intervals up to z≤1.4. Moreover, we derive the luminosity functions for different optical morphologies and X-ray types. We confirm strong luminosity evolution in all three bands, finding the most luminous objects at higher redshift. However, no signs of density evolution are found in any tested X-ray band. We obtain similar results for compact and early-type objects. Finally, we observe the ``Steffen effect'', where X-ray type-1 sources are more numerous at higher luminosities in comparison with type-2 sources.

  9. Fossil group origins. V. The dependence of the luminosity function on the magnitude gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarattini, S.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Barrena, R.; Boschin, W.; del Burgo, C.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Corsini, E. M.; D'Onghia, E.; Girardi, M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kundert, A.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. In nature we observe galaxy aggregations that span a wide range of magnitude gaps between the two first-ranked galaxies of a system (Δm12). Thus, there are systems with gaps close to zero (e.g., the Coma cluster), and at the other extreme of the distribution, the largest gaps are found among the so-called fossil systems. The observed distribution of magnitude gaps is thought to be a consequence of the orbital decay of M∗ galaxies in massive halos and the associated growth of the central object. As a result, to first order the amplitude of this gap is a good statistical proxy for the dynamical age of a system of galaxies. Fossil and non-fossil systems could therefore have different galaxy populations that should be reflected in their luminosity functions. Aims: In this work we study, for the first time, the dependence of the luminosity function parameters on Δm12 using data obtained by the fossil group origins (FOGO) project. Methods: We constructed a hybrid luminosity function for 102 groups and clusters at z ≤ 0.25 using both photometric data from the SDSS-DR7 and redshifts from the DR7 and the FOGO surveys. The latter consists of ~1200 new redshifts in 34 fossil system candidates. We stacked all the individual luminosity functions, dividing them into bins of Δm12, and studied their best-fit Schechter parameters. We additionally computed a "relative" luminosity function, expressed as a function of the central galaxy luminosity, which boosts our capacity to detect differences - especially at the bright end. Results: We find trends as a function of Δm12 at both the bright and faint ends of the luminosity function. In particular, at the bright end, the larger the magnitude gap, the fainter the characteristic magnitude M∗. The characteristic luminosity in systems with negligible gaps is more than a factor three brighter than in fossil-like ones. Remarkably, we also find differences at the faint end. In this region, the larger the gap, the flatter

  10. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-03-20

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey, a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 deg{sup 2} in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z){sup (0.54{+-}0.64)} for red galaxies and (1 + z){sup (1.64{+-}0.39)} for blue galaxies.

  11. MIR Luminosity Function of Galaxies in the Nep-Wide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Jeong, Woong-Seob; NEP Team

    2017-03-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity function (LF) of local (z < 0.3) star-forming (SF) galaxies in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field. This work is based on the NEP-Wide point source catalogue and the spectroscopic redshift (z) data for ∼1700 galaxies obtained by the optical follow-up survey with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra. The AKARI's continuous 2-24 μm coverage and the spectroscopic redshifts enable us to determine the spectral energy distribution (SED) in the mid-infrared and derive the luminosity functions of galaxies. Our 8 μm LF finds good agreements with the results from SWIRE field over the wide luminosity range, while showing significant difference from the NOAO deep data in the faint end. The comparison with higher-z sample shows significant luminosity evolution from z > 0.3 to local universe. 12 μm LF also shows a clear indication of luminosity evolution.

  12. Imprints of the super-Eddington accretion on the quasar clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Shirakata, Hikari

    2017-10-01

    Super-Eddington mass accretion has been suggested as an efficient mechanism to grow supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We investigate the imprint left by the radiative efficiency of the super-Eddington accretion process on the clustering of quasars using a new semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation based on large-volume cosmological $N$-body simulations. Our model includes a simple model for the radiative efficiency of a quasar, which imitates the effect of photon trapping for a high mass accretion rate. We find that the model of radiative efficiency affects the relation between the quasar luminosity and the quasar host halo mass. The quasar host halo mass has only weak dependence on quasar luminosity when there is no upper limit for quasar luminosity. On the other hand, it has significant dependence on quasar luminosity when the quasar luminosity is limited by its Eddington luminosity. In the latter case, the quasar bias also depends on the quasar luminosity, and the quasar bias of bright quasars is in agreement with observations. Our results suggest that the quasar clustering studies can provide a constraint on the accretion disc model.

  13. Quasar X-Ray Spectra At z=1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2001-01-01

    The predicted counts for ASCA observation was much higher than actually observed counts in the quasar. However, there are three weak hard x-ray sources in the GIS field. We are adding them to the source counts in modeling of hard x-ray background. The work is in progress. We have published a paper in Ap.J. on the luminosity function and the quasar evolution. Based on the theory described in this paper we are predicting a number of sources and their contribution to the x-ray background at different redshifts. These model predictions will be compared to the observed data in the final paper.

  14. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  15. Groups, concentrations and associations of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, H.

    1983-06-01

    The available observations on high redshift quasars have been analyzed by Oort et al. (1982). If the quasars are at their redshift distances and belong to superclusters, there must exist far less than one quasar per average supercluster. The present investigation is concerned with a review of evidence for quasars occurring in small groups, in larger concentrations, and in association with other kinds of objects. Tight groupings of quasars are examined, taking into account the Group SW of NGC 450, the Group SE of NGC 2639, NGC 1097 NE, NGC 520, and a discussion of dense groups. In connection with a discussion of quassars in larger concentrations, attention is given to quasars in a complete field around NGC 1097, and quasars near NGC 520. The redshift-luminosity relation for quasars is considered along with questions concerning alignments, triples, and redshift pairing across galaxies.

  16. DISCLOSING THE RADIO LOUDNESS DISTRIBUTION DICHOTOMY IN QUASARS: AN UNBIASED MONTE CARLO APPROACH APPLIED TO THE SDSS-FIRST QUASAR SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Balokovic, M.; Smolcic, V.; Ivezic, Z.; Zamorani, G.; Schinnerer, E.; Kelly, B. C.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modeling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with (12 {+-} 1)% of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for its existence were probably affected by the incompleteness of the FIRST survey close to its faint limit. We also investigate the redshift and luminosity dependence of the radio loudness distribution and find tentative evidence that at high redshift radio-loud quasars were rarer, on average louder, and exhibited a smaller range in radio loudness. In agreement with other recent work, we conclude that the SDSS-FIRST sample strongly suggests that the radio loudness distribution of quasars is not a universal function, and that more complex models than presented here are needed to fully explain available observations.

  17. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  18. Bayesian High-redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Peters, Christina M.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Riegel, Ryan N.

    2015-08-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i≲ 22 using the combination of optical and mid-IR photometry. Optical photometry is taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III/BOSS), while mid-IR photometry comes from a combination of data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) “AllWISE” data release and several large-area Spitzer Space Telescope fields. Selection is based on a Bayesian kernel density algorithm with a training sample of 157,701 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars with both optical and mid-IR data. Of the quasar candidates, 733,713 lack spectroscopic confirmation (and 305,623 are objects that we have not previously classified as photometric quasar candidates). These candidates include 7874 objects targeted as high-probability potential quasars with 3.5\\lt z\\lt 5 (of which 6779 are new photometric candidates). Our algorithm is more complete to z\\gt 3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection “wedges” and to 2.2\\lt z\\lt 3.5 quasars than the SDSS-III/BOSS project. Number counts and luminosity function analysis suggest that the resulting catalog is relatively complete to known quasars and is identifying new high-z quasars at z\\gt 3. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine-learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  19. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-Ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Elvis, M.; Brunner, H.; Fotopoulou, S.; Ueda, Y.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Akiyama, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2-10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field South. We use ˜3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two-power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z ≳0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have also been revealed, where the number density curves have two clear breaks at all luminosity classes above log {{L}X}\\gt 43. The two-break structure is suggestive of two-phase AGN evolution, consisting of major merger triggering and secular processes.

  20. X-Ray Properties Of Hyper-Luminous Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piconcelli, Enrico; Martocchia, S.; Zappacosta, L.; Bischetti, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Duras, F.; Fiore, F.; Vietri, G.; Vignali, C.; Lanzuisi, G.; Brusa, M.; Bianchi, S.; Feruglio, C.; The Wissh Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The systematic exploration of hyper-luminous (log LBol > 47) quasars shining at the golden epoch of AGN activity (i.e. z 2-4) offer the opportunity of overcoming the luminosity bias in the exploration of the accretion phenomenon. The WISE All-Sky Survey allowed to spot the most luminous quasars in the universe. In this talk, we will present the results of our on-going study of the XMM/Chandra/NuSTAR observations of WISE-selected hyper-luminous quasars regardless of the amount of their obscuration (i.e. both blue and heavily reddened). We report on the correlations between the X-ray and Optical, UV and MIR properties, and on the behavior of the X-ray bolometric correction at the brightest end of the luminosity function. We find that WISE-selected hyper-luminous quasars show much lower X/Opt flux and X/MIR luminosity ratios than those of AGN typically studied so far. This "X-ray weakness" can be a key ingredient for accelerating powerful ionized outflows (pervasively detected in the UV/optical band) and, furthermore, radiation-driven winds can be effective in destroying the X-ray corona and quenching the X-ray emission.

  1. The Luminosity Function and Mean Galaxy Density from the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Elena; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    We summarise the main results obtained over the last two years by the ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey, concerning the luminosity function and mean density of galaxies, and their implications for the galaxy number counts at bright magnitudes. The bj-band luminosity function is characterised by a steep faint-end, which raises above a "global" Schechter fit for M_bj > -17 + 5log(h) and is well described by a power-law with slope ~ -1.6. This steepening is mostly produced by galaxies with emission lines, with a clear trend for galaxies with larger [OII] equivalent widths to show a steeper faint end (and a fainter M*). The normalization of the luminosity function is about a factor of 1.6 higher that that from the Stromlo-APM survey. We find that, in fact, the mean density can be seen to increase out to ~140/h Mpc. If we take this into account when computing the expected cumulative number counts from the observed luminosity function, we are able to reproduce the observed steep counts at bright (bj<17) magnitudes very accurately.

  2. The radio luminosity function of spiral galaxies - Correlations with aggregation and Hubble type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Trinchieri, G.

    1981-04-01

    The Radio Luminosity Function of spiral galaxies is derived from the Arecibo observations of UGC galaxies at 2380 MHz. It is found that the average radio power and the optical luminosity are linearly correlated (αL1) and that, at any given radio power, the probability for a spiral galaxy to become a radio source scales with the optical luminosity as L1.3. Both results confirm the analysis of Hummel (1980, b) who studied with the Westerbork radio telescope (WSRT) the 1415 MHz continuum emission from nearby spiral galaxies. It is also attempted to correlate the radio emission from spiral galaxies with their detailed Hubble type and cluster membership. A weak evidence is found that early type galaxies and cluster members are slightly deficient in radio emission with respect to late type or isolated galaxies, particularly among the optically brightest objects.

  3. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): maximum-likelihood determination of the luminosity function and its evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Driver, S. P.; Kelvin, L. S.; Phillipps, S.

    2015-08-01

    We describe modifications to the joint stepwise maximum-likelihood method of Cole in order to simultaneously fit the Galaxy and Mass Assembly II galaxy luminosity function (LF), corrected for radial density variations, and its evolution with redshift. The whole sample is reasonably well fitted with luminosity (Qe) and density (Pe) evolution parameters Qe, Pe ≈ 1.0, 1.0 but with significant degeneracies characterized by Qe ≈ 1.4 - 0.4Pe. Blue galaxies exhibit larger luminosity density evolution than red galaxies, as expected. We present the evolution-corrected r-band LF for the whole sample and for blue and red subsamples, using both Petrosian and Sérsic magnitudes. Petrosian magnitudes miss a substantial fraction of the flux of de Vaucouleurs profile galaxies: the Sérsic LF is substantially higher than the Petrosian LF at the bright end.

  4. Quasars Probing Quasars: The quasar pair catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, Joseph; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, Jason X.; Fumagalli, Michele; Myers, Adam D.; Bartle, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    The rare close projection of two quasars on the sky provides the opportunity to study the host galaxy environment of a foreground quasar in absorption against the Lyman-alpha emission of a background quasar. For over a decade the "Quasars probing quasars" series has utilized this technique to further the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution in the presence of a quasar at z>2, resolving scales as small as a galactic disc, where the UV ionizing flux from the quasar can exceed ~104 times the ambient UV background. This poster presents the public release of the quasar pair catalog utilized in these studies. In addition, the catalog also includes quasar pair members at z<2, gravitational lens candidates and quasars closely separated in redshift that are useful for small-scale clustering studies. We outline the key contributions made by this series over the last ten years, summarize the imaging and spectroscopic data used for target selection, discuss the target selection methodologies, describe the catalog content, and explore some avenues for future work. This poster was partially supported by NSF grants 1515404 and AST-1412981.

  5. The Luminosity Function at z ~ 8 from 97 Y-band Dropouts: Inferences about Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Treu, Tommaso; Trenti, Michele; Bradley, Larry D.; Kelly, Brandon C.; Oesch, Pascal A.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Shull, J. Michael; Stiavelli, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    We present the largest search to date for Y-band dropout galaxies (z ~ 8 Lyman break galaxies, LBGs) based on 350 arcmin2 of Hubble Space Telescope observations in the V, Y, J, and H bands from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. In addition to previously published data, the BoRG13 data set presented here includes approximately 50 arcmin2 of new data and deeper observations of two previous BoRG pointings, from which we present 9 new z ~ 8 LBG candidates, bringing the total number of BoRG Y-band dropouts to 38 with 25.5 <= mJ <= 27.6 (AB system). We introduce a new Bayesian formalism for estimating the galaxy luminosity function, which does not require binning (and thus smearing) of the data and includes a likelihood based on the formally correct binomial distribution as opposed to the often-used approximate Poisson distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the new method on a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts that combines the bright BoRG galaxies with the fainter sources published in Bouwens et al. from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Early Release Science programs. We show that the z ~ 8 luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function over its full dynamic range with a characteristic magnitude M^\\star = -20.15^{+0.29}_{-0.38}, a faint-end slope of \\alpha = -1.87^{+0.26}_{-0.26}, and a number density of log _{10} \\phi ^\\star [{Mpc}^{-3}] = -3.24^{+0.25}_{-0.24}. Integrated down to M = -17.7, this luminosity function yields a luminosity density log _{10} \\epsilon [erg\\, s^{-1\\, Hz^{-1}\\, Mpc^{-3}}] = 25.52^{+0.05}_{-0.05}. Our luminosity function analysis is consistent with previously published determinations within 1σ. The error analysis suggests that uncertainties on the faint-end slope are still too large to draw a firm conclusion about its evolution with redshift. We use our statistical framework to discuss the implication of our study for the physics of reionization. By assuming theoretically motivated priors on the clumping

  6. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  7. Constraining the rate and luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Coward, D. M.; Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Zhou, H.

    2014-10-01

    We compute the intrinsic isotropic peak luminosity function (LF) and formation rate of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a novel approach. We complement a standard log N-log P brightness distribution and Vmax estimations with two observation-time relations: a redshift-observation-time relation (log z-log T) and a new luminosity-observation-time relation (log L-log T). We show that this approach reduces degeneracies that exist between the rate and LF of a brightness distribution. To account for the complex triggering algorithm employed by Swift, we use recent results of Lien et al. (2014) to produce a suite of efficiency functions. Using these functions with the above methods, we show that a log L-log T method can provide good constraints on the form of the LF, particularly the high end. Using a sample of 175 peak luminosities determined from redshifts with well-defined selection criteria, our results suggest that LGRBs occur at a local rate (without beaming corrections) of [0.7 < ρ0 < 0.8] Gpc-3 yr-1. Within this range, assuming a broken power-law LF, we find best estimates for the low- and high-energy indices of -0.95 ± 0.09 and -2.59 ± 0.93, respectively, separated by a break luminosity 0.80 ± 0.43 × 1052 erg s-1.

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Velocity Shifts of Quasar Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Richards, Gordon T.; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Grier, C. J.; Ho, Luis C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P.; Tao, Charling; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2016-11-01

    Quasar emission lines are often shifted from the systemic velocity due to various dynamical and radiative processes in the line-emitting region. The level of these velocity shifts depends both on the line species and on quasar properties. We study velocity shifts for the line peaks (not the centroids) of various narrow and broad quasar emission lines relative to systemic using a sample of 849 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. The coadded (from 32 epochs) spectra of individual quasars have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to measure stellar absorption lines to provide reliable systemic velocity estimates, as well as weak narrow emission lines. The large dynamic range in quasar luminosity (∼2 dex) of the sample allowed us to explore potential luminosity dependence of the velocity shifts. We derive average line peak velocity shifts as a function of quasar luminosity for different lines, and quantify their intrinsic scatter. We further quantify how well the peak velocity can be measured as a function of continuum S/N, and demonstrate that there is no systematic bias in the velocity measurements when S/N is degraded to as low as ∼3 per SDSS pixel (∼ 69 {km} {{{s}}}-1). Based on the observed line shifts, we provide empirical guidelines on redshift estimation from [O ii] λ 3727, [O iii] λ 5007, [Ne v] λ 3426, Mg ii, C iii], He ii λ 1640, broad Hβ, C iv, and Si iv, which are calibrated to provide unbiased systemic redshifts in the mean, but with increasing intrinsic uncertainties of 46, 56, 119, 205, 233, 242, 400, 415, and 477 {km} {{{s}}}-1, in addition to the measurement uncertainties. These results demonstrate the infeasibility of measuring quasar redshifts to better than ∼ 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1 with only broad lines.

  9. Quasars in radio source catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Durand, D.; Pazder, J.

    1991-01-01

    A cross correlation between the Hewitt-Burbidge QSO catalog and the Dixon radio source catalog was performed. Two thousand ten position coincidences were found within about 60 arcsec, of which 23 are not noted as radio quasars in Hewitt-Burbidge. The accuracy of the radio source positions of various catalogs is examined, and the previously unidentified radio sources are discussed. An absence of radio quasars of low luminosity at redshifts greater than about 2.5 is noted.

  10. Evidence for Quasar Activity Triggered by Galaxy Mergers in HST Observations of Dust-reddened Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Becker, Robert H.

    2008-02-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope ACS images of 13 dust-reddened type 1 quasars selected from the FIRST/2MASS Red Quasar Survey. These quasars have high intrinsic luminosities after correction for dust obscuration (-23.5 >= MB >= - 26.2 from K-magnitude). The images show strong evidence of recent or ongoing interaction in 11 of the 13 cases, even before the quasar nucleus is subtracted. None of the host galaxies are well fit by a simple elliptical profile. The fraction of quasars showing interaction is significantly higher than the 30% seen in samples of host galaxies of normal, unobscured quasars. There is a weak correlation between the amount of dust reddening and the magnitude of interaction in the host galaxy, measured using the Gini coefficient and the concentration index. Although few host galaxy studies of normal quasars are matched to ours in intrinsic quasar luminosity, no evidence has been found for a strong dependence of merger activity on host luminosity in samples of the host galaxies of normal quasars. We thus believe that the high merger fraction in our sample is related to their obscured nature, with a significant amount of reddening occurring in the host galaxy. The red quasar phenomenon seems to have an evolutionary explanation, with the young quasar spending the early part of its lifetime enshrouded in an interacting galaxy. This might be further indication of a link between AGNs and starburst galaxies.

  11. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  12. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s-1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s-1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s-1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s-1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s-1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of -1.6.

  13. Flamingos 2 Spectroscopy of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Susan; Lacy, Mark; Urrutia, Tanya; Petric, Andreea

    2013-08-01

    We will use Flamingos-2 to obtain spectra of luminous AGN and quasars selected in the mid-infrared. Mid-infrared selection is much less biased with respect to obscuration than optical and X-ray techniques, and hence allows for finding obscured (Type-2) quasars as well as Type-1 quasars. Our survey so far has been very successful and has provided an unique opportunity to construct luminosity functions for both Type-1 and Type-2 quasars selected in the same way and covering similar redshifts and luminosities. We have quantifed the change in the obscured fraction with luminosity and redshift for the first time, and find interesting indications that at high redshift the obscured fraction rises, consistent with models for the joint formation of the galaxy and black hole populations. Our samples are, however, still quite incomplete at low fluxes (and therefore lower luminosities at a given redshift), particularly in the southern hemisphere. Near-infrared spectroscopy, such as that we have previously obtained with NIRI at Gemini N, offers us the best possibility of bringing these southern samples to a reasonable completeness level, and will greatly increase the number of high z quasars in our sample. This will allow us to better judge our tantalizing initial results on the redshift evolution of the obscured fraction. In addition, these southern targets can be followed up with ALMA and GEMS/GSAOI to study the morphologies and star-formation properties of the hosts, allowing further exploration of the relationship between the formation of massive bulges and supermassive blackholes in the early universe.

  14. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. II. The luminosity function and mean galaxy density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-10-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude b_J_=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams: spanning a volume of ~5x10^4^h^-3^Mpc^3^ at the sensitivity peak (z~0.1), it provides an accurate determination of the "local" luminosity function and the mean galaxy density. We find that, although a Schechter function (with α=-1.22, M^*^_bJ_=-19.61+5logh and φ^*^=0.020h^3^/Mpc^3^) is an acceptable representation of the luminosity function over the entire range of magnitudes (M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh), our data suggest the presence of a steepening of the luminosity function for M_bJ_>=-17+5logh. Such a steepening at the faint end of the luminosity function, well fitted by a power law with slope β~-1.6, is almost completely due to galaxies with emission lines: in fact, dividing our galaxies into two samples, i.e. galaxies with and without emission lines, we find significant differences in their luminosity functions. In particular, galaxies with emission lines show a significantly steeper slope and a fainter M^*^. The amplitude and the α and M^*^ parameters of our luminosity function are in good agreement with those of the AUTOFIB redshift survey (Ellis et al. 1996). Vice-versa, our amplitude is significantly higher, by a factor ~1.6 at M~M^*^, than that found for both the Stromlo-APM (Loveday et al. 1992) and the Las Campanas (Lin et al. 1996) redshift surveys. Also the faint end slope of our luminosity function is significantly steeper than that found in these two surveys. The galaxy number density for M_bJ_<=-16+5logh is well determined (n{bar}=0.08+/-0.015h^3^/Mpc^3^). Its estimate for M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh is more uncertain, ranging from n{bar}=0.28h

  15. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William E.; O'Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ≳ 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ≳ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ∼ R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  16. Discovery of a narrow line quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J.; Liebert, J.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Steiner, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A stellar object is reported which, while having X-ray and optical luminosities typical of quasars, has narrow permitted and forbidden emission lines over the observed spectral range. The narrow-line spectrum is high-excitation, the Balmer lines seem to be recombinational, and a redder optical spectrum than that of most quasars is exhibited, despite detection as a weak radio source. The object does not conform to the relationships between H-beta parameters and X-ray flux previously claimed for a large sample of the active galactic nuclei. Because reddish quasars with narrow lines, such as the object identified, may not be found by the standard techniques for the discovery of quasars, the object may be a prototype of a new class of quasars analogous to high-luminosity Seyfert type 2 galaxies. It is suggested that these objects cannot comprise more than 10% of all quasars.

  17. Quasar Black Hole Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Amanda; Carlton, A. K.; Kashkanova, A.; Kennefick, J.; Kennefick, D.; Seigar, M. S.; Lacy, C. H.; Galaxy Evolution Survey, Arkansas

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the mass of the central black hole in 145 quasars chosen from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) DR3. The objects were chosen to sample the peak in quasar evolution and have redshifts in the range 1.85 < z < 4.26. Masses were computed using standard gas dynamics techniques with the luminosity at 1350Å and the width (FWHM) of the Doppler broadened Carbon IV emission line. Also, we were able to compare masses calculated from the CIV line with those calculated from the MgII line for one third of our data set. We will discuss how the mass of the SMBHs change over the range of redshifts and how this may be correlated with other quasar properties. This project is funded by a grant from NASA.

  18. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mabasher, Bahram; Brudgesm Terrry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 (mu)Jy per 4.4" beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22 (equivalent to M(sub r) = -13 for cluster member galaxies). Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are restricted to radio luminosities between about 10(exp 21) and 10(exp 22) W/Hz, an interesting result given that star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions below about 10(exp 23) W/Hz. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (Mr less than or equals -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high (> approx. 3x10(exp 22) W/Hz) and low (< approx. 10(exp 21) W/Hz) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically-bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3x10(exp 19) W/Hz. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M(sub r) approx. equals -14) dwarf ellipticals hosting strong radio AGN.

  19. Predicting the Redshift 2 H-Alpha Luminosity Function Using [OIII] Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Colbert, James W.; Dai, Y. S.; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matt; Rafelski, Marc; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Upcoming space-based surveys such as Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA plan to measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) in order to study dark energy. These surveys will use IR slitless grism spectroscopy to measure redshifts of a large number of galaxies over a significant redshift range. In this paper, we use the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) to estimate the expected number of H-alpha emitters observable by these future surveys. WISP is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope slitless spectroscopic survey, covering the 0.8 - 1.65 micrometers wavelength range and allowing the detection of H-alpha emitters up to z approximately equal to 1.5 and [OIII] emitters to z approximately equal to 2.3. We derive the H-alpha-[OIII] bivariate line luminosity function for WISP galaxies at z approximately equal to 1 using a maximum likelihood estimator that properly accounts for uncertainties in line luminosity measurement, and demonstrate how it can be used to derive the H-alpha luminosity function from exclusively fitting [OIII] data. Using the z approximately equal to 2 [OIII] line luminosity function, and assuming that the relation between H-alpha and [OIII] luminosity does not change significantly over the redshift range, we predict the H-alpha number counts at z approximately equal to 2 - the upper end of the redshift range of interest for the future surveys. For the redshift range 0.7 less than z less than 2, we expect approximately 3000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of 3 x 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the proposed depth of Euclid galaxy redshift survey) and approximately 20,000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of approximately 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the baseline depth of WFIRST galaxy redshift survey).

  20. The luminosity function for different morphological types in the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, Ronald O.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.; Corwin, Harold G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We derive the luminosity function for different morphological types in the original CfA Redshift Survey (CfA1) and in the first two slices of the CfA Redshift Survey Extension (CfA2). CfA1 is a complete sample containing 2397 galaxies distributed over 2.7 steradians with m(sub z) less than or equal 14.5. The first two complete slices of CfA2 contain 1862 galaxies distributed over 0.42 steradians with m(sub z)=15.5. The shapes of the E-S0 and spiral luminosity functions (LF) are indistinguishable. We do not confirm the steeply decreasing faint end in the E-S0 luminosity function found by Loveday et al. for an independent sample in the southern hemisphere. We demonstrate that incomplete classification in deep redshift surveys can lead to underestimates of the faint end of the elliptical luminosity function and could be partially responsible for the difference between the CfA survey and other local field surveys. The faint end of the LF for the Magellanic spirals and irregulars is very steep. The Sm-Im luminosity function is well fit by a Schechter function with M*=-18.79, alpha=-1.87, and phi*=0.6x10(exp -3) for M(sub z) less than or equal to -13. These galaxies are largely responsible for the excess at the faint end of the general CfA luminosity function. The abundance of intrinsically faint, blue galaxies nearby affects the interpretation of deep number counts. The dwarf population increases the expected counts at B=25 in a no-evolution, q(sub 0)=0.05 model by a factor of two over standard no-evolution estimates. These dwarfs change the expected median redshift in deep redshift surveys by less than 10 percent . Thus the steep Sm-Im LF may contribute to the reconciliation of deep number counts with deep redshift surveys.

  1. The Main-Sequence Luminosity Function of Palomar 5 from THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, Carl J.; Smith, Graeme H.

    2001-12-01

    A low mass, large core radius, low central concentration, and strong tidal tails suggest that the globular cluster Palomar 5 has lost a large fraction of its initial mass over time. If the dynamical evolution of Pal 5 has been dominated by the effects of mass loss, then theoretical arguments suggest that the luminosity function should be deficient in low-mass stars. Using deep WFPC2 F555W and F814W photometry, we determine the main-sequence luminosity functions both near the cluster center and in a field near the half-light radius. A comparison of these luminosity functions yields no compelling evidence of mass segregation within the cluster, in accord with expectations for low-concentration clusters. On the other hand, a comparison of the global mass function of Pal 5 with that of ω Cen and M55 indicates an increasing deficiency of stars with progressively lower masses. A fit of the observed luminosity function to theoretical models indicates a mass function for Pal 5 of dN/dm~m-0.5, which is notably more deficient in low-mass stars than other globular clusters that have been studied with the Hubble Space Telescope. The flatness of the mass function is consistent with models of the dynamical evolution of globular clusters that have lost ~90% of their original stellar mass. We suggest that, like NGC 6712, Pal 5 has lost a large percentage of its original stellar content as a result of tidal shocking. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. Formation of the first stars and quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiman, Z.

    We examine various observable signatures of the first generation of stars and low-luminosity quasars, including the metal enrichment, radiation background, and dust opacity/emission that they produce. We calculate the formation history of collapsed baryonic halos, based on an extension of the Press-Schechter formalism, incorporating the effects of pressure and H2-dissociation. We then use the observed CH ratio at z=3 in the Lyman-α forest clouds to obtain an average the star formation efficiency in these halos. Similarly, we fit the efficiency of black-hole formation, and the shape of quasar light curves, to match the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) between z=2-4, and use this fit to extrapolate the quasar LF to faint magnitudes and high redshifts. To be consistent with the lack of faint point-sources in the Hubble Deep Field, we impose a lower limit of ~ 75 km s-1 for the circular velocities of halos harboring central black holes. We find that in a λCDM model, stars reionize the IGM at zreion=9-13, and quasars at z=12. Observationally, zreion can be measured by the forthcoming MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites, via the damping of CMB anisotropies by ~10% on small angular scales due to electron scattering. We show that if reionization occurs later, at 5 <~ zreion <~ 10, then it can be measured from the spectra of individual sources. We also find that the Next Generation Space Telescope will be able to directly image about 1-40 star clusters, and a few faint quasars, from z > 10 per square arcminute. The amount of dust produced by the first supernovae has an optical depth of τ=0.1-1 towards high redshift sources, and the reprocessed UV flux of stars and quasars distorts the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) by a Compton y-parameter comparable to the COBE limit, y ~ 1.5 × 10-5.

  3. Constructing a bivariate distribution function with given marginals and correlation: application to the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2010-08-01

    We provide an analytic method to construct a bivariate distribution function (DF) with given marginal distributions and correlation coefficient. We introduce a convenient mathematical tool, called a copula, to connect two DFs with any prescribed dependence structure. If the correlation of two variables is weak (Pearson's correlation coefficient |ρ| < 1/3), the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) copula provides an intuitive and natural way to construct such a bivariate DF. When the linear correlation is stronger, the FGM copula cannot work anymore. In this case, we propose using a Gaussian copula, which connects two given marginals and is directly related to the linear correlation coefficient between two variables. Using the copulas, we construct the bivariate luminosity function (BLF) and discuss its statistical properties. We focus especially on the far-infrared-far-ulatraviolet (FUV-FIR) BLF, since these two wavelength regions are related to star-formation (SF) activity. Though both the FUV and FIR are related to SF activity, the univariate LFs have a very different functional form: the former is well described by the Schechter function whilst the latter has a much more extended power-law-like luminous end. We construct the FUV-FIR BLFs using the FGM and Gaussian copulas with different strengths of correlation, and examine their statistical properties. We then discuss some further possible applications of the BLF: the problem of a multiband flux-limited sample selection, the construction of the star-formation rate (SFR) function, and the construction of the stellar mass of galaxies (M*)-specific SFR (SFR/M*) relation. The copulas turn out to be a very useful tool to investigate all these issues, especially for including complicated selection effects.

  4. The H alpha Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate at Z approximately 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresse, Laurence; Maddox, Steve J.

    1998-03-01

    We have measured the Hα + [N II] fluxes of the I-selected Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS) galaxies lying at a redshift z below 0.3 and hence derived the Hα luminosity function. The magnitude limits of the CFRS mean that only the galaxies with MB >~ -21 mag were observed at these redshifts. We obtained a total Hα luminosity density of at least 1039.44+/-0.04 ergs s-1 Mpc-3 at a mean z = 0.2 for galaxies with rest-frame EW(Hα + [N II]) >~ 10 Å. This is twice the value found in the local universe by Gallego et al. Our Hα star formation rate, derived from Madau, is higher than the UV observations at the same z, implying a UV dust extinction of ~1 mag. We found a strong correlation between the Hα luminosity and the absolute magnitude in the B band: M(BAB) = 46.7 - 1.6 log L(Hα). This work will serve as a basis of future studies of Hα luminosity distributions measured from optically selected spectroscopic surveys of the distant universe, and it will provide a better understanding of the physical processes responsible for the observed galaxy evolution.

  5. DETERMINING THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH PSEUDO-REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Weiwei; Yu Yunwei; Cao Xiaofeng

    2013-07-20

    The determination of the luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is an important role for the cosmological applications of the GRBs, which, however, is seriously hindered by some selection effects due to redshift measurements. In order to avoid these selection effects, we suggest calculating pseudo-redshifts for Swift GRBs according to the empirical L-E{sub p} relationship. Here, such a L-E{sub p} relationship is determined by reconciling the distributions of pseudo- and real redshifts of redshift-known GRBs. The values of E{sub p} taken from Butler's GRB catalog are estimated with Bayesian statistics rather than observed. Using the GRB sample with pseudo-redshifts of a relatively large number, we fit the redshift-resolved luminosity distributions of the GRBs with a broken-power-law LF. The fitting results suggest that the LF could evolve with redshift by a redshift-dependent break luminosity, e.g., L{sub b} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51}(1 + z){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The low- and high-luminosity indices are constrained to 0.8 and 2.0, respectively. It is found that the proportional coefficient between the GRB event rate and the star formation rate should correspondingly decrease with increasing redshifts.

  6. The VVDS type-1 AGN sample: the faint end of the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Zamorani, G.; Gavignaud, I.; Marano, B.; Paltani, S.; Mathez, G.; Møller, P.; Picat, J. P.; Cirasuolo, M.; Lamareille, F.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zucca, E.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Polletta, M.; Bondi, M.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Gregorini, L.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Temporin, S.; Vergani, D.; Walcher, C. J.

    2007-09-01

    In a previous paper (Gavignaud et al. 2006, A&A, 457, 79), we presented the type-1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) sample obtained from the first epoch data of the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). The sample consists of 130 faint, broad-line AGN with redshift up to z=5 and 17.5Luminosity Function up to z=3.6 derived from this sample, we compare our results with previous results from brighter samples both at low and at high redshift and finally, through the estimate of the bolometric luminosity function, we compare them also with the results from X-ray and mid-IR selected samples. Our data, more than one magnitude fainter than previous optical surveys, allow us to constrain the faint part of the luminosity function up to high redshift. A comparison of our data with the 2dF sample at low redshift (1 < z < 2.1) shows that the VVDS data can not be well fitted with the PLE models derived by previous samples. Qualitatively, this appears to be due to the fact that our data suggest the presence of an excess of faint objects at low redshift (1.0luminosity functions, over a wide range of redshift and luminosity, is a luminosity dependent density evolution (LDDE) model, similar to those derived from the major X-surveys. Such a parameterization allows the redshift of the AGN space density peak to change as a function of luminosity and explains the excess of faint AGN that we find at 1.0 < z < 1.5. On the basis of this model we find, for the

  7. Optical environments of radio quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    CCD images of 36 radio-loud quasars in the redshift range 0.1-0.75 are discussed. The objects were chosen to represent the full range of radio structure found with VLA A-configuration observations. Measured quantities are compared and correlated from both radio and optical observations. At least 70 percent of the quasars show evidence for current or recent interaction. Consideration is given to host galaxy sizes and luminosities, states of tidal interaction and numbers of companions, radio morphology, and luminosity.

  8. Luminosity and Stellar Mass Functions of Local Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Gallego, Jesús; Zamorano, Jaime; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Gil de Paz, Armando; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2003-04-01

    We present the optical and near-infrared luminosity and mass functions of the local star-forming galaxies in the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) Survey. A bivariate method that explicitly deals with the Hα selection of the survey is used when estimating these functions. Total stellar masses have been calculated on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis taking into account differences in star formation histories. The main difference between the luminosity distributions of the UCM sample and the luminosity functions of the local galaxy population is a lower normalization (φ*), indicating a lower global volume density of UCM galaxies. The typical near-infrared luminosity (L*) of local star-forming galaxies is fainter than that of normal galaxies. This is a direct consequence of the lower stellar masses of our objects. However, at optical wavelengths (B and r), the luminosity enhancement arising from the young stars leads to M* values that are similar to those of normal galaxies. The fraction of the total optical and near-infrared luminosity density in the local universe associated with star-forming galaxies is 10%-20%. Fitting the total stellar mass function using a Schechter parameterization, we obtain α=-1.15+/-0.15, logM*=10.82+/-0.17 Msolar, and logφ*=-3.04+/-0.20 Mpc-3. This gives an integrated total stellar mass density of 107.83+/-0.07 Msolar Mpc-3 in local star-forming galaxies (H0=70 km s-1 Mpc-1, ΩM=0.3, and Λ=0.7). The volume-averaged burst strength of the UCM galaxies is b=0.04+/-0.01, defined as the ratio of the mass density of stars formed in recent bursts (with an age of <10 Myr) to the total stellar mass density in UCM galaxies. Finally, we derive that in the local universe, 13%+/-3% of the total baryon mass density in the form of stars is associated with star-forming galaxies.

  9. Effect of long-term intensity variations on pulsar searches and the pulsar luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamohan, S.

    1981-01-01

    Long-term intensity data for five pulsars are used to obtain the probability density distribution of intensities for each pulsar, and it is found that they are described satisfactorily by chi-squared distributions. Based on these distributions, the number of new pulsars expected to be found on repeatedly searching the same region of the sky with the same sensitivity is given. Nearly 25 percent more new pulsars are expected to be found on the first repeat search. It is also shown that the luminosity function deduced from either a single survey or surveys with very different sensitivities is not affected by the omission of flux density variations in the calculation of selection effects. Finally, a method is proposed for deriving the luminosity function by combining the different searches of a given area on the basis of a probabilistic approach to the evaluation of selection effects.

  10. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND POINT-SOURCE PROPERTIES FROM MULTIPLE CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF M81

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, P. H.; Pooley, D.; Heinz, S.; Zezas, A.; Homan, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2011-07-01

    We present an analysis of 15 Chandra observations of the nearby spiral galaxy M81 taken over the course of six weeks in 2005 May-July. Each observation reaches a sensitivity of {approx}10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. With these observations and one previous deeper Chandra observation, we compile a master source list of 265 point sources, extract and fit their spectra, and differentiate basic populations of sources through their colors. We also carry out variability analyses of individual point sources and of X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in multiple regions of M81 on timescales of days, months, and years. We find that, despite measuring significant variability in a considerable fraction of sources, snapshot observations provide a consistent determination of the XLF of M81. We also fit the XLFs for multiple regions of M81 and, using common parameterizations, compare these luminosity functions to those of two other spiral galaxies, M31 and the Milky Way.

  11. The UV Luminosity Function at 6 < z < 10 from the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields program has obtained deep optical and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging of six galaxy clusters and associated parallel fields. The depth of the imaging (m_AB ~ 29) means we can identify faint galaxies at z > 6, and those in the cluster fields also benefit from magnification due to strong gravitational lensing that allows us to reach intrinsic absolute magnitudes of M_UV ~ -12.5 at z ~ 6. Here, we present the UV luminosity functions at 6 < z < 10 from the complete Hubble Frontier Fields data, revealing a steep faint-end slope that extends to the limits of the data. The lack of any apparent turnover in the luminosity functions means that faint galaxies in the early Universe may have provided sufficient ionizing radiation to sustain reionization.

  12. COMBO-17 measurements of the effect of environment on the type-dependent galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phleps, S.; Wolf, C.; Peacock, J. A.; Meisenheimer, K.; van Kampen, E.

    2007-06-01

    We have developed a method to calculate overdensities in multicolour surveys, facilitating a direct comparison of the local density contrast measured using galaxy samples that have different redshift error distributions, i.e. for red and blue, or bright and faint galaxies, respectively. We calculate overdensities in small redshift slices (Δ z =0.02, which at z=0.3 corresponds roughly to Δ r_comoving=53~h-1 Mpc) for 9176 galaxies with R≤23.65, MB(Vega)-5log h≤-18, and z≤ 0.7, in three COMBO-17 fields (measuring 31'×31' each). The mean redshift errors of this sample are approximately σ_z/(1+z)≃ 0.015. In the Chandra Deep Field South we identify a region that is underdense by almost a factor 2 compared to the other two fields in the same redshift range (0.25⪉ z ⪉ 0.4). This can be used for an investigation of the variation of the colour-dependent luminosity function with environment: We calculate the luminosity function in this redshift range for red sequence and blue cloud galaxies (as defined by Bell et al. 2004) in each of the fields separately. While the luminosity function of the blue galaxies remains unaffected by different density contrasts, the luminosity function of the red galaxies clearly has a more positive faint-end slope in the Chandra Deep Field South as compared to the other two COMBO-17 fields. The underdensity there is thus mainly due to a deficiency of faint red galaxies. This result is in qualitative agreement with the trends seen at z=0.1, e.g. in the 2dFGRS (Croton et al. 2005), or in the SDSS (Zandivarez et al. 2006).

  13. THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mobasher, Bahram; Bridges, Terry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 {mu}Jy per 4.''4 beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22. For cluster galaxies, these correspond to L {sub 1.4} = 1.7 x 10{sup 20} W Hz{sup -1}(for a 5{sigma} source) and M{sub r} = -13. Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are the dominant population only at radio luminosities between about 10{sup 21} and 10{sup 22} W Hz{sup -1}, an interesting result given star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions for all luminosities lower than about 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (M{sub r} {<=} -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high ({approx}>3x10{sup 22} W Hz{sup -1}) and low ({approx}<10{sup 21} W Hz{sup -1}) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3 x 10{sup 19} W Hz{sup -1}. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M{sub r} {approx} -14

  14. Quasar microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. W.; Wambsganss, J.

    2010-09-01

    Quasar microlensing deals with the effect of compact objects along the line of sight on the apparent brightness of the background quasars. Due to the relative motion between quasar, lenses and observer, the microlensing magnification changes with time which results in uncorrelated brightness variations in the various images of multiple quasar systems. The amplitudes of the signal can be more than a magnitude with time scales of weeks to months to years. The effect is due to the “granular” nature of the gravitational microlenses—stars or other compact objects in the stellar mass range. Quasar microlensing allows to study the quasar accretion disk with a resolution of tens of microarcseconds, hence quasar microlensing can be used to explore an astrophysical field that is hardly accessible by any other means. Quasar microlensing can also be used to study the lensing objects in a statistical sense, their nature (compact or smoothly distributed, normal stars or dark matter) as well as transverse velocities. Quasar microlensing light curves are now being obtained from monitoring programs across the electromagnetic spectrum from the radio through the infrared and optical range to the X-ray regime. Recently, spectroscopic microlensing was successfully applied, it provides quantitative comparisons with quasar/accretion disk models. There are now more than a handful of systems with several-year long light curves and significant microlensing signal, lending to detailed analysis. This review summarizes the current state of the art of quasar microlensing and shows that at this point in time, observational monitoring programs and complementary intense simulations provide a scenario where some of the early promises of quasar microlensing can be quantitatively applied. It has been shown, e.g., that smaller sources display more violent microlensing variability, first quantitative comparison with accretion disk models has been achieved, and quasar microlensing has been used to

  15. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: spectral types and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Simon; Ronen, Shai; Price, Ian; Lahav, Ofer; Colless, Matthew; Maddox, Steve; Deeley, Kathryn; Glazebrook, Karl; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Driver, Simon P.; Dalton, Gavin; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kaiser, Nick; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Peacock, John; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    1999-09-01

    We describe the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the current status of the observations. In this exploratory paper, we apply a principal component analysis to a preliminary sample of 5869 galaxy spectra and use the two most significant components to split the sample into five spectral classes. These classes are defined by considering visual classifications of a subset of the 2dF spectra, and also by comparison with high-quality spectra of local galaxies. We calculate a luminosity function for each of the different classes and find that later-type galaxies have a fainter characteristic magnitude, and a steeper faint-end slope. For the whole sample we find M*=-19.7 (for Ω=1, H_0=100kms^-1Mpc^-1), α=-1.3, φ*=0.017. For class 1 (`early-type') we find M*=-19.6, α=-0.7, while for class 5 (`late-type') we find M*=-19.0, α=-1.7. The derived 2dF luminosity functions agree well with other recent luminosity function estimates.

  16. The luminosity functions of embedded stellar clusters. 1: Method of solution and analytic results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Andre B.; Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for computing the history of the luminosity function in a young cluster still forming within a molecular cloud complex. Our method, which utilizes detailed results from stellar evolution theory, assumes that clusters arise from the continuous collapse of dense cloud cores over a protracted period of time. It is also assumed that stars reaching the main sequence are distributed in mass according to a prescribed initial mass function (IMF). We keep track separately of the contributions to the luminosity function from the populations of protostars, pre-main-sequence stars, and main-sequence stars. We derive expressions for the fractional contribution of these populations to both the total number of stars produced and the total cluster luminosity. In our model, the number of protostars rises quickly at first, but then levels off to a nearly constant value, which it maintains until the dispersal of the cloud complex. The number fraction of protostars always decreases with time. Averaged over the life of the parent cloud, this fraction is typically a few percent. The protostar mass distribution can be expressed as an integral over the IMF.

  17. SurveySim: a new MCMC code to explore the evolution of the IR luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Matteo; Kurinsky, Noah; Sajina, Anna; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Silva, Andrea; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel and Spitzer space telescopes have been crucial in furthering our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. However key questions, such as the role of SF and AGN in powering the IR output of galaxies remain unanswered. The large numbers of high redshift galaxies detected by recent IR surveys make individual spectroscopic follow-up impractical. However statistical trends in SED and luminosity function evolution in an entire population can be realized. We present a new open source Markov-Chain Monte Carlo code, SurveySim. It is built to constrain the spectral energy distribution and luminosity function evolution required to produce a given multi-wavelength survey. Its very general design allow us to use a wide range of different dusty galaxy populations (including SFGs, AGNs and Composites), luminosity function forms and SED templates. The code employs a multidimensional color-color diagnostic to determine goodness of fit. It simulates observational errors and takes into account incompleteness. Here, dusty high-z galaxies at different parts of the IR SED have been considered to analyze the relative selection biases.

  18. THE PROPERTIES OF QUASAR HOSTS AT THE PEAK OF THE QUASAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kotilainen, Jari K.; Falomo, Renato; Decarli, Roberto; Treves, Aldo; Uslenghi, Michela; Scarpa, Riccardo E-mail: renato.falomo@oapd.inaf.i E-mail: aldo.treves@uninsubria.i E-mail: riccardo.scarpa@gtc.iac.e

    2009-10-01

    We present near-infrared imaging obtained with ESO VLT/ISAAC of a sample of 16 low luminosity radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) at the epoch around the peak of the quasar activity (2 < z < 3), aimed at investigating their host galaxies. For 11 quasars, we are able to detect the host galaxies and derive their properties, while for the other 5 quasars, upper limits to the host luminosity are estimated. The luminosities of the host galaxies of RQQs at high redshift are in the range of those of massive inactive elliptical galaxies. This work complements our previous systematic study of quasar hosts aimed to trace the cosmological luminosity evolution of the host galaxies up to z approx 2 and extends our pilot study of a few luminous quasars at z > 2. The luminosity trend with a cosmic epoch resembles that observed for massive inactive galaxies, suggesting a similar star formation history. In particular, both quasar host galaxies and massive inactive galaxies appear mostly assembled already at the peak age of the quasar activity. This result is of key importance for testing the models of joint formation and evolution of galaxies and their active nuclei.

  19. The Seven Sisters DANCe. I. Empirical isochrones, luminosity, and mass functions of the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouy, H.; Bertin, E.; Sarro, L. M.; Barrado, D.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Berihuete, A.; Olivares, J.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The DANCe survey provides photometric and astrometric (position and proper motion) measurements for approximately 2 million unique sources in a region encompassing ~80 deg2 centered on the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at deriving a complete census of the Pleiades and measure the mass and luminosity functions of the cluster. Methods: Using the probabilistic selection method previously described, we identified high probability members in the DANCe (i ≥ 14 mag) and Tycho-2 (V ≲ 12 mag) catalogues and studied the properties of the cluster over the corresponding luminosity range. Results: We find a total of 2109 high-probability members, of which 812 are new, making it the most extensive and complete census of the cluster to date. The luminosity and mass functions of the cluster are computed from the most massive members down to ~0.025 M⊙. The size, sensitivity, and quality of the sample result in the most precise luminosity and mass functions observed to date for a cluster. Conclusions: Our census supersedes previous studies of the Pleiades cluster populations, in terms of both sensitivity and accuracy. Based on service observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Table 1 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgDANCe catalogs (Tables 6 and 7) and full Tables 2-5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A148

  20. Modeling the luminosity function of galactic low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranov, A. G.; Postnov, K. A.; Revnivtsev, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the family of binaries with a low-mass star and a compact neutron star companion (low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron stars) ismodeled by the method of population synthesis. Continuous Roche-lobe filling by the optical star in LMXBs is assumed to be maintained by the removal of orbital angular momentum from the binary by a magnetic stellar wind from the optical star and the radiation of gravitational waves by the binary. The developed model of LMXB evolution has the following significant distinctions: (1) allowance for the effect of the rotational evolution of a magnetized compact remnant on themass transfer scenario in the binary, (2) amore accurate allowance for the response of the donor star to mass loss at the Roche-lobe filling stage. The results of theoretical calculations are shown to be in good agreement with the observed orbital period-X-ray luminosity diagrams for persistent Galactic LMXBs and their X-ray luminosity function. This suggests that the main elements of binary evolution, on the whole, are correctly reflected in the developed code. It is shown that most of the Galactic bulge LMXBs at luminosities L x > 1037 erg s-1 should have a post-main-sequence Roche-lobe-filling secondary component (low-mass giants). Almost all of the models considered predict a deficit of LMXBs at X-ray luminosities near ˜1036.5 erg s-1 due to the transition of the binary from the regime of angular momentum removal by a magnetic stellar wind to the regime of gravitational waves (analogous to the widely known period gap in cataclysmic variables, accreting white dwarfs). At low luminosities, the shape of the model luminosity function for LMXBs is affected significantly by their transient behavior-the accretion rate onto the compact companion is not always equal to the mass transfer rate due to instabilities in the accretion disk around the compact object. The best agreement with observed binaries is achieved in the models suggesting that heavy

  1. The Bivariate Luminosity--HI Mass Distribution Function of Galaxies based on the NIBLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Zhon; Schneider, Stephen E.; van Driel, Wim; Lehnert, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We use 21cm HI line observations for 2610 galaxies from the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) to derive a bivariate luminosity--HI mass distribution function. Our HI survey was selected to randomly probe the local (900 < cz < 12,000 km/s) galaxy population in each 0.5 mag wide bin for the absolute z-band magnitude range of -13.5 < Mz < -24 without regard to morphology or color. This targeted survey allowed more on-source integration time for weak and non-detected sources, enabling us to probe lower HI mass fractions and apply lower upper limits for non-detections than would be possible with the larger blind HI surveys. Additionally, we obtained a factor of four higher sensitivity follow-up observations at Arecibo of 90 galaxies from our non-detected and marginally detected categories to quantify the underlying HI distribution of sources not detected at Nançay. Using the optical luminosity function and our higher sensitivity follow up observations as priors, we use a 2D stepwise maximum likelihood technique to derive the two dimensional volume density distribution of luminosity and HI mass in each SDSS band.

  2. THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF YOUNG, EARLY M-TYPE DWARF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ansdell, Megan; Baranec, Christoph; Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.; Lépine, Sebastien; James, David; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo; Petrucci, Romina; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magnetohydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lépine and Gaidos catalog of bright M dwarfs with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalog of NUV (1771-2831 Å) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (>2.5σ) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these ''false positives'' (FPs) as ∼16%. We constructed an NUV luminosity function that accounted for FPs, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.

  3. A finer view of the conditional galaxy luminosity function and magnitude-gap statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, M.; Mamon, G. A.

    2017-10-01

    The gap between first- and second-ranked galaxy magnitudes in groups is often considered a tracer of their merger histories, which in turn may affect galaxy properties, and also serves to test galaxy luminosity functions (LFs). We remeasure the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of the Main Galaxy Sample of the SDSS in an appropriately cleaned subsample of groups from the Yang catalogue. We find that, at low group masses, our best-fitting CLF has steeper satellite high ends, yet higher ratios of characteristic satellite to central luminosities in comparison with the CLF of Yang et al. The observed fractions of groups with large and small magnitude gaps as well as the Tremaine & Richstone statistics are not compatible with either a single Schechter LF or with a Schechter-like satellite plus lognormal central LF. These gap statistics, which naturally depend on the size of the subsamples, and also on the maximum projected radius, Rmax, for defining the second brightest galaxy, can only be reproduced with two-component CLFs if we allow small gap groups to preferentially have two central galaxies, as expected when groups merge. Finally, we find that the trend of higher gap for higher group velocity dispersion, σv, at a given richness, discovered by Hearin et al., is strongly reduced when we consider σv in bins of richness, and virtually disappears when we use group mass instead of σv. This limits the applicability of gaps in refining cosmographic studies based on cluster counts.

  4. Galaxy luminosity functions, M/L ratios, and closure of the Universe - Numbers and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the luminosity function (LF) of galaxies are reviewed and compared, and the result of Kirshner et al. (1983) giving a 'standard LF' is chosen as a best guess. Departures from the 'standard LF' for specific galaxy types and environments (clusters, groups, field) are discussed briefly. A luminosity density of about 1.4 x 10 to the -2nd h 'galaxies' per cubic megaparsec is obtained. The mean M/L ratio needed to give critical cosmological density (Omega sub 0 = 1) is then 920 h in solar units on the face-on magnitude system. Comparison with measured M/L ratios for galaxies and clusters, and with constraints imposed by inflation and nucleosynthesis, poses two problems of 'invisible mass'.

  5. CO luminosity function from Herschel-selected galaxies and the contribution of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosity function (LF) for different rotational transitions [i.e. (1-0), (3-2), (5-4)] starting from the Herschel LF by Gruppioni et al. and using appropriate LCO-LIR conversions for different galaxy classes. Our predicted LFs fit the data so far available at z ≈ 0 and 2. We compare our results with those obtained by semi-analytical models (SAMs): while we find a good agreement over the whole range of luminosities at z ≈ 0, at z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 2, the tension between our LFs and SAMs in the faint and bright ends increases. We finally discuss the contribution of luminous active galactic nucleus (LX > 1044 erg s- 1) to the bright end of the CO LF concluding that they are too rare to reproduce the actual CO LF at z ≈ 2.

  6. MODELING THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE NORMAL GALAXY X-RAY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tremmel, M.; Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.; Farr, W. M.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.

    2013-03-20

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales ({approx}10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to {approx}20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris and Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L{sub x} > 10{sup 41}) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10{sup 40} and 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}.

  7. Modeling the Redshift Evolution of the Normal Galaxy X-Ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremmel, M.; Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Farr, W. M.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales (approximately 10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to approximately 20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris & Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 41)) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10(exp 40) and 10(exp 41) erg s(exp -1).

  8. PRIMUS: Galaxy Clustering as a Function of Luminosity and Color at 0.2 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(rp , π) and wp (rp ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ~130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg2 of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h -1 < rp < 1 Mpc h -1) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b gal ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ~ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that "cosmic variance" can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  9. Probabilistic Selection of High-redshift Quasars with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masafusa

    High-redshift quasars are an important probe of the distant Universe. They enable observational studies of the early growth of supermassive blackholes, cosmic reionization, chemical enrichment of host galaxies, and so on. Through pioneering optical and near-infrared wide-area surveys such as the SDSS and the VIKING Survey, about one hundred quasars have been found at z > 6 (e.g., Fan et al. (2006b), Venemans et al. (2013)). However, its current small sample size and the fact that most of them are the most luminous (M 1450 <~ -24) population in this epoch prevents one from constraining statistics on high-redshift quasars, namely quasar luminosity function (QLF), and redshift evolution of IGM neutral fraction. Thus, discovery of large number of z > 6 quasars, especially low-luminous or z > 7 quasars, is highly desired for further understanding of the early universe. We are now starting a new ground-breaking survey of high-redshift (z > 6) quasars using the exquisite imaging data provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) Survey. Thanks to its extremely wide coverage and its high sensitivity thorough five optical bands (1,400 deg2 to the depth of r ~ 26 in HSC-Wide layer), it is one of the most powerful contemporary surveys that makes it possible for us to increase the number of z > 6 quasars by almost an order of magnitude, i.e., 300 at z ~ 6 and 50 at z ~ 7, based on the current estimate of the QLF at z > 6 by Willott et al. (2010b). One of the biggest challenges in z > 6 quasar candidate selection is contamination of Galactic brown dwarfs, which have the same point-like appearance as and similarly red colors to the quasars. To overcome this issue and maximize the selection efficiency, we apply a double-layered approach to the HSC survey products, namely combination of two probabilistic selections: SED-fitting and Bayesian selection. In particular, we have developed a template SED fitting method optimized to high-redshift quasars

  10. The luminosity function at z ∼ 8 from 97 Y-band dropouts: Inferences about reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Treu, Tommaso; Kelly, Brandon C.; Trenti, Michele; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Oesch, Pascal A.; Shull, J. Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present the largest search to date for Y-band dropout galaxies (z ∼ 8 Lyman break galaxies, LBGs) based on 350 arcmin{sup 2} of Hubble Space Telescope observations in the V, Y, J, and H bands from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. In addition to previously published data, the BoRG13 data set presented here includes approximately 50 arcmin{sup 2} of new data and deeper observations of two previous BoRG pointings, from which we present 9 new z ∼ 8 LBG candidates, bringing the total number of BoRG Y-band dropouts to 38 with 25.5 ≤ m{sub J} ≤ 27.6 (AB system). We introduce a new Bayesian formalism for estimating the galaxy luminosity function, which does not require binning (and thus smearing) of the data and includes a likelihood based on the formally correct binomial distribution as opposed to the often-used approximate Poisson distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the new method on a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts that combines the bright BoRG galaxies with the fainter sources published in Bouwens et al. from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Early Release Science programs. We show that the z ∼ 8 luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function over its full dynamic range with a characteristic magnitude M{sup ⋆}=−20.15{sub −0.38}{sup +0.29}, a faint-end slope of α=−1.87{sub −0.26}{sup +0.26}, and a number density of log{sub 10} ϕ{sup ⋆}[Mpc{sup −3}]=−3.24{sub −0.24}{sup +0.25}. Integrated down to M = –17.7, this luminosity function yields a luminosity density log{sub 10} ϵ[erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1} Mpc{sup −3}]=25.52{sub −0.05}{sup +0.05}. Our luminosity function analysis is consistent with previously published determinations within 1σ. The error analysis suggests that uncertainties on the faint-end slope are still too large to draw a firm conclusion about its evolution with redshift. We use our statistical framework to discuss the implication of our study for the physics of

  11. A study of the luminosity function for field galaxies. [non-rich-cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nine determinations of the luminosity function (LF) for field galaxies are analyzed and compared. Corrections for differences in Hubble constants, magnitude systems, galactic absorption functions, and definitions of the LF are necessary prior to comparison. Errors in previous comparisons are pointed out. After these corrections, eight of the nine determinations are in fairly good agreement. The discrepancy in the ninth appears to be mainly an incompleteness effect. The LF data suggest that there is little if any distinction between field galaxies and those in small groups.

  12. X-ray Luminosity Functions of Subgalactic Regions in the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Larissa; Lehmer, Bret; Eufrasio, Rafael; Basu-Zych, Antara; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Ptak, Andrew; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Zezas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We present X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of X-ray binary (XRB) populations in subgalactic regions in M51, which were selected to have varying levels of low-mass XRBs (LMXBs) and high-mass XRBs (HMXBs). Previous studies have found that the total X-ray luminosity of a galaxy is correlated with its star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*) according to the equation Lx = αM* + βSFR, where α and β are scaling constants. This result is based on integrated galaxy-wide X-ray luminosities, SFRs, and stellar masses. Here, our goal is to determine this relationship using XLFs within multiple subregions, selected by specific star-formation rate (SFR/M*), of one galaxy (M51). This selection allows us to decompose contributions from LMXB and HMXB populations separately. From this decomposition, we find similar scaling relations to Lehmer et al. (2010), and also find XLF shapes and normalizations that are consistent with past studies of elliptical galaxies (LMXB XLF) and star-forming active galaxies (HMXB XLF). This suggests that our technique is effective and that the star formation history of M51 does not deviate significantly from the average galaxy in the local Universe.

  13. Differential Density Statistics of the Galaxy Distribution and the Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, V. V. L.; Iribarrem, A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2007-03-01

    This paper uses data obtained from the galaxy luminosity function (LF) to calculate two types of radial number density statistics of the galaxy distribution as discussed in Ribeiro, namely, the differential density γ and the integral differential density γ*. By applying the theory advanced by Ribeiro & Stoeger, which connects the relativistic cosmology number counts with the astronomically derived LF, the differential number counts dN/dz are extracted from the LF and used to calculate both γ and γ* with various cosmological distance definitions, namely, area distance, luminosity distance, galaxy area distance, and redshift distance. LF data are taken from the CNOC2 galaxy redshift survey, and γ and γ* are calculated for two cosmological models: Einstein-de Sitter and an Ωm0=0.3, ΩΛ0=0.7 standard cosmology. The results confirm the strong dependency of both statistics on the distance definition, as predicted in Ribeiro, as well as showing that plots of γ and γ* against the luminosity and redshift distances indicate that the CNOC2 galaxy distribution follows a power-law pattern for redshifts higher than 0.1. These findings support Ribeiro's theoretical proposition that using different cosmological distance measures in statistical analyses of galaxy surveys can lead to significant ambiguity in drawing conclusions about the behavior of the observed large-scale distribution of galaxies.

  14. Chandra Observations of 12 Luminous Red Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, T; Lacy, M; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H

    2005-03-11

    The authors present results of a study of 12 dust-reddened quasars with 0.4 < z < 2.65 and reddenings in the range 0.15 < E(B-V) < 1.7. They obtained ACIS-S X-ray spectra of these quasars, estimated the column densities towards them, and hence obtained the gas:dust ratios in the material obscuring the quasar. They detect all but one of the red quasars in the X-rays. Even though there is no obvious correlation between the X-ray determined column densities of the sources and their optical color or reddening, all of the sources show absorbed X-ray spectra. When they correct the luminosity for absorption, they can be placed among luminous quasars; therefore their objects belong to the group of high luminosity analogues of the sources contributing to the X-ray background seen in deep X-ray observations. Such sources are also found in serendipitous shallow X-ray surveys. There is a hint that the mean spectral slope of the red quasar is higher than that of normal, unobscured quasars, which could be an indication for higher accretion rates and/or an evolutionary effect. They investigate the number density of these sources compared to type 2 AGN based on the X-ray background and estimate how many moderate luminosity red quasars may be found in deep X-ray fields.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Images of Nearby Luminous Quasars. 2; Results for Eight Quasars and Tests of the Detection Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1995-01-01

    galaxies brighter than, on average, about L*, would have been detected. These upper limits, or possible detections, are consistent with, for example, the eight luminous quasars studied in this paper, occurring in host galaxies that have a Shechter luminosity function with a lower cutoff in the range 0.01-0.1 L*. Tests are performed to determine if our failure to detect, in some cases, luminous host galaxies could be an artifact caused by our analysis procedures. These tests include comparing the measured point-spread function (PSF) for our HST observations with the PSFs used in previous ground-based studies of host galaxies, measuring the fluctuations in the sky signals that were subtracted from the quasar images, evaluating empirically the effects of using different stellar PSFs in the analysis, carrying out the subtraction of the stellar (nuclear) source in different ways, creating and analyzing artificial active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with known surface brightnesses, and fitting the observed quasar light to an analytic model that includes a host galaxy.

  16. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  17. The Effect of Variability on X-Ray Binary Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Breanna A.; Gross, Jacob; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2017-08-01

    X-ray binaries are inherently variable X-ray sources, particularly at low luminosities (<1036 erg s-1). Despite this intrinsic variability, the resulting X-ray luminosity functions of X-ray binary populations in star-forming galaxies are remarkably stable across galaxies and across multiple epochs in time. We have obtained three epochs of Chandra ACIS-I observations (totaling ~184 ks) of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300 to study the logN-logS distributions of its X-ray point-source population down to 0.35-8 keV luminosities of ~1036 erg s-1. The individual epoch differential logN-logS distributions are best described as the sum of a component made up of background active galactic nuclei (AGN), a simple power law, and a broken power law.We find the shape of the logN-logS distributions sometimes varies between observations. The simple power law and AGN components produce a good fit for “persistent” sources (i.e., with fluxes that remain constant within a factor of ~2). The power-law index of ~1.2 and high fluxes suggest that the persistent sources intrinsic to NGC 300 are dominated by Roche-lobe-overflowing low-mass X-ray binaries. The variable X-ray sources are described by a broken power law, with a faint-end power-law index of ~1.7, a bright-end index of ~2.8-4.9, and a break luminosity of ~4 × 1036 erg s-1. This suggests that these variable sources are mostly outbursting, wind-fed high-mass X-ray binaries, although the logN-logS distribution of variable sources likely also contains low-mass X-ray binaries. We generate model logN-logS distributions for synthetic X-ray binaries and constrain the distribution of maximum X-ray fluxes attained during outburst. Our observations suggest that the majority of X-ray binaries outburst at sub-Eddington luminosities, where mass transfer likely occurs through direct wind accretion at ~1%-3% of the Eddington rate.

  18. Lyα luminosity functions at redshift z ≈ 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finkelstein, Keely; Tilvi, Vithal; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Wang, Jun-Xian; Miller, Neal; Hibon, Pascale; Xia, Lifang

    2013-06-01

    We present a spectroscopically confirmed sample of Lyman α emitting galaxies (LAEs) at z ˜ 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS), which we combine with a sample of z ˜ 4.5 LAEs from previous narrow-band surveys from the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey to build a unified Lyα luminosity function. We spectroscopically observed 64 candidate LAEs in the ECDFS, confirming 46 objects as z ˜ 4.5 LAEs based on single-line detections with no continuum emission bluewards of the line, resulting in a Lyα confirmation rate of ˜70 per cent. We did not detect significant flux from neither the C IV λ1549 Å emission line nor the He II λ1640 Å emission line in individual LAE spectra. These lines were also undetected in a co-added spectrum, with the co-added line ratio of He II to Lyα constraining the Population III star formation rate (SFR) to be <0.3 per cent of the total SFR and <1.25 per cent of the observed SFR (both at the 2σ level). We combine the optical spectra with deep X-ray and radio images to constrain the AGN fraction in the sample. Only LAE was detected in both the X-ray and radio, while the other objects remained undetected, even when stacked. The Lyα luminosity functions in our two deepest narrow-band filters in the ECDFS differ at greater than 2σ significance, and the product L*Φ* differs by a factor of >3. Similar luminosity function differences have been used to infer evolution in the neutral gas fraction in the intergalactic medium at z > 6, yet here the difference is likely due to cosmic variance, given that the two samples are from adjoining line-of-sight volumes. Combining our new sample of LAEs with those from previous LALA narrow-band surveys at z = 4.5, we obtain one of the best measured Lyα luminosity functions to date, with our sample of over 200 spectroscopically confirmed Lyα galaxies yielding log10(L*) = 42.83 ± 0.06 (erg s-1) and log10(Φ*) = -3.48 ± 0.09 (Mpc-3). We compare our new luminosity function to others

  19. A NEW MODEL FOR DARK MATTER HALOS HOSTING QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue; Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher

    2015-01-10

    A new model for quasar-hosting dark matter halos, meeting two physical conditions, is put forth. First, significant interactions are taken into consideration to trigger quasar activities. Second, satellites in very massive halos at low redshift are removed from consideration due to their deficiency in cold gas. We analyze the Millennium Simulation to find halos that meet these two conditions and simultaneously match two-point auto-correlation functions of quasars and cross-correlation functions between quasars and galaxies at z = 0.5-3.2. The masses of the quasar hosts found decrease with decreasing redshift, with the mass thresholds being [(2-5) × 10{sup 12}, (2-5) × 10{sup 11}, (1-3) × 10{sup 11}] M {sub ☉} for median luminosities of ∼[10{sup 46}, 10{sup 46}, 10{sup 45}] erg s{sup –1} at z = (3.2, 1.4, 0.53), respectively, an order of magnitude lower than those inferred based on halo occupation distribution modeling. In this model, quasar hosts are primarily massive central halos at z ≥ 2-3 but increasingly dominated by lower mass satellite halos experiencing major interactions toward lower redshift. However, below z = 1, satellite halos in groups more massive than ∼2 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} do not host quasars. Whether for central or satellite halos, imposing the condition of significant interactions substantially boosts the clustering strength compared to the total population with the same mass cut. The inferred lifetimes of quasars at z = 0.5-3.2 of 3-30 Myr are in agreement with observations. Quasars at z ∼ 2 would be hosted by halos of mass ∼5 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} in this model, compared to ∼3 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} previously thought, which would help reconcile with the observed, otherwise puzzling high covering fractions for Lyman limit systems around quasars.

  20. A MUSE View of the HDFS: The Lyα Luminosity Function out to z~6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Alyssa B.; Guiderdoni, Bruno; Blaizot, Jérémy; Richard, Johan; Bacon, Roland; Garel, Thibault; Hashimoto, Takuya

    We present preliminary results from MUSE on the Lyα luminosity function in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS). Using a large homogeneous sample of LAEs selected through blind spectroscopy, we utilise the unprecedented detection power of MUSE to study the progenitors of L* galaxies back to when the Universe was just ~2 Gyr old. We present these results in the context of the current literature, and highlight the importance of the forthcoming Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) study with MUSE, which will increase the size of our sample by a factor of ~ 10.

  1. Mining the Infrared Sky for High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon

    The Spitzer and WISE satellites have opened up new avenues for the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) by peering through the dust shrouding half (or more) of AGNs. However, despite being more sensitive to shrouded AGNs, current selection methods being used in the mid-IR are still largely blind to the highest redshift quasars-both those that are shrouded and those that are not (and should therefore be easy to find). We describe projects to identify both unobscured (at z>3) and obscured quasars (at z>2) that have heretofore been missed in significant numbers. Finding the high-z obscured quasars in large numbers is crucial for fulfilling the legacy of NASA missions in the IR and X-ray. With these quasars we will be able to perform clustering analyses that break the degeneracy of models describing how black holes can ``feed back" energy to the large-scale host galaxy, significantly influencing its evolution. We will further trace the luminosity function of galaxies undergoing active accretion from low-luminosity AGNs to luminous quasars—probing the growth of the supermassive black holes that we see today in the local universe. Our new insights come about from leveraging new Spitzer data, primarily from the PI's SpitzerIRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES). The Spitzer data are 2.5 magnitudes deeper than the "AllWISE" survey in a 125 square degree, multiwavelength-rich, equatorial region known as SDSS "Stripe 82". These data are crucial for extending mid-IR investigations to higher redshifts, both for unobscured and obscured sources. The PI's team are among the world's experts in using the proposed machine learning techniques to find both unobscured (type-1) and obscured (type- 2) quasars and in using quasar clustering and luminosity functions to do cutting-edge science. The luminosity function and clustering algorithms are already in place, allowing for timely completion of this project once the multi-wavelength NASA data have been incorporated. This project is directly

  2. HOST GALAXIES OF LUMINOUS TYPE 2 QUASARS AT z {approx} 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Krolik, Julian H.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2009-09-10

    We present deep Gemini GMOS optical spectroscopy of nine luminous quasars at redshifts z {approx} 0.5, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey type 2 quasar sample. Our targets were selected to have high intrinsic luminosities (M{sub V} < -26 mag) as indicated by the [O III] {lambda}5007 A emission-line luminosity (L[{sub OIII}]). Our sample has a median black hole mass of {approx}10{sup 8.8} M{sub sun} inferred assuming the local M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation and a median Eddington ratio of {approx}0.7, using stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} measured from the G band. We estimate the contamination of the stellar continuum from scattered quasar light based on the strength of broad H{beta}, and provide an empirical calibration of the contamination as a function of L {sub [OIII]}; the scattered-light fraction is {approx}30% of L{sub 5100} for objects with L {sub [OIII]} = 10{sup 9.5} L{sub sun}. Population synthesis indicates that young poststarburst populations (<0.1 Gyr) are prevalent in luminous type 2 quasars, in addition to a relatively old population (>1 Gyr) which dominates the stellar mass. Broad emission complexes around He II {lambda}4686 A with luminosities up to 10{sup 8.3} L{sub sun} are unambiguously detected in three out of the nine targets, indicative of Wolf-Rayet (WR) populations. Population synthesis shows that {approx}5 Myr poststarburst populations contribute substantially to the luminosities (>50% of L{sub 5100}) of all three objects with WR detections. We find two objects with double cores and four with close companions. Our results may suggest that luminous type 2 quasars trace an early stage of galaxy interaction, perhaps responsible for both the quasar and the starburst activity.

  3. Clustering of intermediate redshift quasars using the final SDSS III-BOSS sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; White, Martin; Weinberg, David H.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ross, Nicholas P.; Paris, Isabelle; Streblyanska, Alina

    2015-11-01

    We measure the two-point clustering of spectroscopically confirmed quasars from the final sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) on comoving scales of 4 ≲ s ≲ 22 h-1 Mpc. The sample covers 6950 deg2 [ ˜ 19 (h- 1Gpc)3] and, over the redshift range 2.2 ≤ z ≤ 2.8, contains 55 826 homogeneously selected quasars, which is twice as many as in any similar work. We deduce bQ = 3.54 ± 0.10; the most precise measurement of quasar bias to date at these redshifts. This corresponds to a host halo mass of ˜2 × 1012 h-1 M⊙ with an implied quasar duty cycle of ˜1 per cent. The real-space projected correlation function is well fitted by a power law of index 2 and correlation length r0 = (8.12 ± 0.22) h- 1 Mpc over scales of 4 ≲ rp ≲ 25 h-1 Mpc. To better study the evolution of quasar clustering at moderate redshift, we extend the redshift range of our study to z ˜ 3.4 and measure the bias and correlation length of three subsamples over 2.2 ≤ z ≤ 3.4. We find no significant evolution of r0 or bias over this range, implying that the host halo mass of quasars decreases somewhat with increasing redshift. We find quasar clustering remains similar over a decade in luminosity, contradicting a scenario in which quasar luminosity is monotonically related to halo mass at z ≈ 2.5. Our results are broadly consistent with previous BOSS measurements, but they yield more precise constraints based upon a larger and more uniform data set.

  4. Evolution Of The Cluster Optical Galaxy Luminosity Function In The Cfhtls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarron, Florian; Martinet, Nicolas; Adami, Christophe; Durret, Florence

    2017-06-01

    There is some disagreement in the literature concerning the evolution with redshift of the galaxy luminosity function (GLF) in galaxy clusters. Indeed, it is still unclear whether the red sequence (RS) is enriched by efficient quenching of blue late-type galaxies inside the cluster from z of about 1, or if this RS is built at higher redshift. Solving this contradiction is important to understand the physical processes driving the quenching of galaxies. However, the study of the GLF evolution has been limited to small samples and these different conclusions could be due to cluster to cluster variations. To explore this possibility, we applied our new version of the Adami and MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI) to the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) W1 field. We thus built a catalogue of thousands of cluster candidates up to z of about 1. We present the selection function of our detection algorithm. We study the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function of galaxy clusters with both redshift and cluster mass, and show preliminary results. Taking advantage of our large sample of clusters, we shall be able to break the degeneracy between redshift and mass dependence in the near future.

  5. The Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey. III. The Luminosity Function of the M101 Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Shany; van Dokkum, Pieter; Merritt, Allison; Abraham, Roberto; Zhang, Jielai; Karachentsev, I. D.; Makarova, L. N.

    2017-03-01

    We obtained follow-up HST observations of the seven low surface brightness galaxies discovered with the Dragonfly Telephoto Array in the field of the massive spiral galaxy M101. Out of the seven galaxies, only three were resolved into stars and are potentially associated with the M101 group at D = 7 Mpc. Based on HST ACS photometry in the broad F606W and F814W filters, we use a maximum likelihood algorithm to locate the Tip of the Red Giant Branch in galaxy color–magnitude diagrams. Distances are {6.38}-0.35+0.35,{6.87}-0.30+0.21 and {6.52}-0.27+0.25 {Mpc} and we confirm that they are members of the M101 group. Combining the three confirmed low-luminosity satellites with previous results for brighter group members, we find the M101 galaxy group to be a sparsely populated galaxy group consisting of seven group members, down to M V = ‑9.2 mag. We compare the M101 cumulative luminosity function to that of the Milky Way and M31. We find that they are remarkably similar; in fact, the cumulative luminosity function of the M101 group gets even flatter for fainter magnitudes, and we show that the M101 group might exhibit the two known small-scale flaws in the ΛCDM model, namely “the missing satellite” problem and the “too big to fail” problem. Kinematic measurements of M101's satellite galaxies are required to determine whether the “too big to fail” problem does in fact exist in the M101 group.

  6. Observational constraints on the structure and evolution of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Brandon C.

    2008-01-01

    I use X-ray and optical data to investigate the structure of quasars, and its dependence on luminosity, redshift, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio. In order to facilitate my work, I develop new statistical methods of accounting for measurement error, non-detections, and survey selection functions. The main results of this thesis follow. (1) The statistical uncertainty in the broad line mass estimates can lead to significant artificial broadening of the observed distribution of black hole mass. (2) The z = 0.2 broad line quasar black hole mass function falls off approximately as a power law with slope ~ 2 for M BH [Special characters omitted.] 10 8 [Special characters omitted.] . (3) Radio-quiet quasars become more X-ray quiet as their optical/UV luminosity, black hole mass, or Eddington ratio increase, and more X-ray loud at higher redshift. These correlations imply that quasars emit a larger fraction of their bolometric luminosity through the accretion disk component, as compared to the corona component, as black hole mass and Eddington ratio increase. (4) The X- ray spectral slopes of radio-quiet quasars display a non-monotonic trend with Eddington ratio, where the X-ray continuum softens with increasing Eddington ratio until L/L Edd ~ 0.3, and then begins to harden. This observed non- monotonic trend may be caused by a change in the structure of the disk/corona system at L/L Edd ~ 0.3, possibly due to increased radiation pressure. (5) The characteristic time scales of quasar optical flux variations increase with increasing M BH , and are consistent with disk orbital or thermal time scales. In addition the amplitude of short time scale variability decreases with increasing M BH . I interpret quasar optical light curves as being driven by thermal fluctuations, which in turn are driven by some other underlying stochastic process with characteristic time scale long compared to the disk thermal time scale. The stochastic model I use is able to explain both short

  7. CONSTRAINTS ON BLACK HOLE GROWTH, QUASAR LIFETIMES, AND EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTIONS FROM THE SDSS BROAD-LINE QUASAR BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Hernquist, Lars; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan Xiaohui; Hopkins, Philip

    2010-08-20

    We present an estimate of the black hole mass function of broad-line quasars (BLQSOs) that self-consistently corrects for incompleteness and the statistical uncertainty in the mass estimates, based on a sample of 9886 quasars at 1 < z < 4.5 drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find evidence for 'cosmic downsizing' of black holes in BLQSOs, where the peak in their number density shifts to higher redshift with increasing black hole mass. The cosmic mass density for black holes seen as BLQSOs peaks at z {approx} 2. We estimate the completeness of the SDSS as a function of the black hole mass and Eddington ratio, and find that at z > 1 it is highly incomplete at M {sub BH} {approx}< 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} and L/L{sub Edd} {approx}< 0.5. We estimate a lower limit on the lifetime of a single BLQSO phase to be t {sub BL} > 150 {+-} 15 Myr for black holes at z = 1 with a mass of M {sub BH} = 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, and we constrain the maximum mass of a black hole in a BLQSO to be {approx}3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. Our estimated distribution of BLQSO Eddington ratios peaks at L/L {sub Edd} {approx} 0.05 and has a dispersion of {approx}0.4 dex, implying that most BLQSOs are not radiating at or near the Eddington limit; however, the location of the peak is subject to considerable uncertainty. The steep increase in number density of BLQSOs toward lower Eddington ratios is expected if the BLQSO accretion rate monotonically decays with time. Furthermore, our estimated lifetime and Eddington ratio distributions imply that the majority of the most massive black holes spend a significant amount of time growing in an earlier obscured phase, a conclusion which is independent of the unknown obscured fraction. These results are consistent with models for self-regulated black hole growth, at least for massive systems at z > 1, where the BLQSO phase occurs at the end of a fueling event when black hole feedback unbinds the accreting gas, halting the accretion flow.

  8. PRIMUS: Galaxy clustering as a function of luminosity and color at 0.2 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Cool, Richard J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(r{sub p} , π) and w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ∼130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg{sup 2} of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h {sup –1} < r{sub p} < 1 Mpc h {sup –1}) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b {sub gal} ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ∼ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  9. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  10. COSMOLOGICAL DEPENDENCE OF THE MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, PROJECTED CLUSTERING AND GALAXY-GALAXY LENSING SIGNAL

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2013-11-10

    Observables such as the galaxy luminosity function, Φ(M), projected galaxy clustering, w {sub p}(r {sub p}), and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal, ΔΣ(r {sub p}), are often measured from galaxy redshift surveys assuming a fiducial cosmological model for calculating distances to, and between galaxies. There are a growing number of studies that perform joint analyses of these measurements and constrain cosmological parameters. We quantify the amount by which such measurements systematically vary as the fiducial cosmology used for the measurements is changed, and show that these effects can be significant at high redshifts (z ∼ 0.5). Cosmological analyses (or halo occupation distribution analyses) that use the luminosity function, clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal but ignore such systematic effects may bias the inference of the parameters. We present a simple way to account for the differences in the cosmological model used for the measurements and those used for the prediction of observables, thus allowing a fair comparison between models and data.

  11. Spitzer Local Volume Legacy (LVL) Star-Forming Regions: Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; LVL Team

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of gas into stars is one of the most fundamental processes in the universe, yet the effects of environmental conditions are poorly constrained. Observations of star-forming regions (young star clusters and HII regions) have shown evidence of a fractal pattern in their mass and luminosity distributions. The Mass Function (MF), and similarly the Luminosity Function (LF), of star-forming regions can be approximated as a power-law and is characterized by the power-law slope. A consistent slope of -2 has been observed across numerous galaxies, however, systematic deviations from this canonical slope have been measured across different environments. We present the LF slopes for 258 nearby galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) sample utilizing tens of thousands of Hα- and FUV-selected sources. We test any relationships between LF slope and global galaxy properties to quantify the effect of environment on the star formation process. In addition, we combine the entire star-forming region sample in an attempt to characterize a previously proposed break in the HII region LF power-law at L˜38.6 erg/s.

  12. A Heuristic Prediction of the Cosmic Evolution of the Co-luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Rawlings, S.

    2009-09-01

    We predict the emission line luminosity functions (LFs) of the first 10 rotational transitions of 12C16O in galaxies at redshift z = 0 to z = 10. This prediction relies on a recently presented simulation of the molecular cold gas content in ~3 × 107 evolving galaxies based on the Millennium Simulation. We combine this simulation with a model for the conversion between molecular mass and CO-line intensities, which incorporates the following mechanisms: (1) molecular gas is heated by the cosmic microwave background (CMB), starbursts (SBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGNs); (2) molecular clouds in dense or inclined galaxies can overlap; (3) compact gas can attain a smooth distribution in the densest part of disks; (4) CO luminosities scale with metallicity changes between galaxies; and (5) CO luminosities are always detected against the CMB. We analyze the relative importance of these effects and predict the cosmic evolution of the CO-LFs. The most notable conclusion is that the detection of regular galaxies (i.e., no AGN, no massive SB) at high z gsim 7 in CO emission will be dramatically hindered by the weak contrast against the CMB, in contradiction to earlier claims that CMB heating will ease the detection of high-redshift CO. The full simulation of extragalactic CO lines and the predicted CO-LFs at any redshift can be accessed online (http://s-cubed.physics.ox.ac.uk/, go to "S3-SAX") and they should be useful for the modeling of CO-line surveys with future telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array or the Square Kilometre Array.

  13. Quasar feedback and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-01

    We analyse Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of 568 obscured luminous quasars. The [O III] λ5007 Å emission line shows blueshifts and blue excess, indicating that some of the narrow-line gas is undergoing an organized outflow. The velocity width containing 90 per cent of line power ranges from 370 to 4780 km s-1, suggesting outflow velocities up to ˜2000 km s-1, and is strongly correlated with the radio luminosity among the radio-quiet quasars. We propose that radio emission in radio-quiet quasars is due to relativistic particles accelerated in the shocks within the quasar-driven outflows; star formation in quasar hosts is insufficient to explain the observed radio emission. The median radio luminosity of the sample of νLν[1.4 GHz] = 1040 erg s-1 suggests a median kinetic luminosity of the quasar-driven wind of Lwind = 3 × 1044 erg s-1, or about 4 per cent of the estimated median bolometric luminosity Lbol = 8 × 1045 erg s-1. Furthermore, the velocity width of [O III] is positively correlated with mid-infrared luminosity, which suggests that outflows are ultimately driven by the radiative output of the quasar. Emission lines characteristic of shocks in quasi-neutral medium increase with the velocity of the outflow, which we take as evidence of quasar-driven winds propagating into the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Quasar feedback appears to operate above the threshold luminosity of Lbol ˜ 3 × 1045 erg s-1.

  14. UNIFICATION OF LUMINOUS TYPE 1 QUASARS THROUGH C IV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Gordon T.; Kruczek, Nicholas E.; Deo, Rajesh P.; Kratzer, Rachael M.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hewett, Paul C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Shen, Yue

    2011-05-15

    Using a sample of {approx}30,000 quasars from the 7th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we explore the range of properties exhibited by high-ionization, broad emission lines, such as C IV {lambda}1549. Specifically, we investigate the anti-correlation between continuum luminosity and emission-line equivalent width (the Baldwin Effect (BEff)) and the 'blueshifting' of the high-ionization emission lines with respect to low-ionization emission lines. Employing improved redshift determinations from Hewett and Wild, the blueshift of the C IV emission line is found to be nearly ubiquitous, with a mean shift of {approx}810 km s{sup -1} for radio-quiet (RQ) quasars and {approx}360 km s{sup -1} for radio-loud (RL) quasars. The BEff is present in both RQ and RL samples. We consider these phenomena within the context of an accretion disk-wind model that is modulated by the nonlinear correlation between ultraviolet and X-ray continuum luminosity. Composite spectra are constructed as a function of C IV emission-line properties in an attempt to reveal empirical relationships between different line species and the continuum. Within a two-component disk+wind model of the broad emission-line region (BELR), where the wind filters the continuum seen by the disk component, we find that RL quasars are consistent with being dominated by the disk component, while broad absorption line quasars are consistent with being dominated by the wind component. Some RQ objects have emission-line features similar to RL quasars; they may simply have insufficient black hole (BH) spin to form radio jets. Our results suggest that there could be significant systematic errors in the determination of L{sub bol} and BH mass that make it difficult to place these findings in a more physical context. However, it is possible to classify quasars in a paradigm where the diversity of BELR parameters is due to differences in an accretion disk wind between quasars (and over time); these differences are

  15. Correlation function of quasars in real and redshift space from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, G.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Tugay, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    We analyse the quasar two-point correlation function (2pCF) within the redshift interval 0.8 < z < 2.2 using a sample of 52 303 quasars selected from the recent Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. Our approach to the 2pCF uses the concept of a local Lorentz (Fermi) frame, for the determination of the distance between objects, and the permutation method of random catalogue generation. Assuming a spatially flat cosmological model with ΩΛ= 0.726, we have found that the real-space 2pCF is fitted well with the power-law model within the distance range 1 < σ < 35 h-1 Mpc with the correlation length r0= 5.85 ± 0.33 h-1 Mpc and the slope γ= 1.87 ± 0.07. The redshift-space 2pCF is approximated with s0= 6.43 ± 0.63 h-1 Mpc and γ= 1.21 ± 0.24 for 1 < s < 10 h-1 Mpc, and s0= 7.37 ± 0.81 h-1 Mpc and γ= 1.90 ± 0.24 for 10 < s < 35 h-1 Mpc. For distances s > 10 h-1 Mpc, the parameter describing the large-scale infall to density inhomogeneities is β= 0.63 ± 0.10 with the linear bias b = 1.44 ± 0.22, which marginally (within 2σ) agrees with the linear theory of cosmological perturbations. We discuss possibilities to obtain a statistical estimate of the random component of quasar velocities (different from the large-scale infall). We note a slight dependence of the quasar velocity dispersion upon the 2pCF parameters in the region r < 2 Mpc.

  16. Evolution of the u-band luminosity function from redshift 1.2 to 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Matthew; Baldry, Ivan K.; James, Phil A.

    2009-07-01

    We produce and analyse u-band (λ ~ 355 nm) luminosity functions (LFs) for the red and blue populations of galaxies using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-band Galaxy Survey (uGS) and Deep Evolutionary Exploratory Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. From a spectroscopic sample of 41575 SDSS uGS galaxies and 24561 DEEP2 galaxies, we produce colour magnitude diagrams and make use of the colour bimodality of galaxies to separate red and blue populations. LFs for eight redshift slices in the range 0.01 < z < 1.2 are determined using the 1/Vmax method and fitted with Schechter functions showing that there is significant evolution in M*, with a brightening of 1.4 mag for the combined population. The integration of the Schechter functions yields the evolution in the u-band luminosity density (LD) out to z ~ 1. By parametrizing the evolution as ρ ~ (1 + z)β, we find that β = 1.36 +/- 0.2 for the combined populations and β = 2.09 +/- 0.2 for the blue population. By removing the contribution of the old stellar population to the u-band LD and correcting for dust attenuation, we estimate the evolution in the star formation rate (SFR) of the Universe to be βSFR = 2.5 +/- 0.3. Discrepancies between our result and higher evolution rates measured using the infrared and far-UV can be reconciled by considering possibilities such as an underestimated dust correction at high redshifts or evolution in the stellar initial mass function.

  17. A Deep Multicolor Survey. II. Initial Spectroscopy and Comparison with Expected Quasar Number Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Patrick B.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Green, Richard F.; Porter, Alain C.; Warren, Stephen J.

    1996-05-01

    We have used the KPNO 4 m Mayall telescope to image 0.83 deg^2^ of sky in six fields at high Galactic latitude in six filters spanning 3000- 10000 A to magnitude limits ranging from 22.1 to 23.8. As a first use of this database, we have conducted a multicolor survey for quasars. We discuss various methods of selecting outliers in different color-color diagrams and multicolor space that have been used to identify quasars at all redshifts from their colors alone. We discuss the initial results of our program of spectroscopic identification which has so far resulted in the identification of over 40 faint quasars, including one at z > 4, a similar number of compact narrow emission-line galaxies, and a number of unusual and potentially interesting stars. We use these spectroscopic results, along with extensive simulations of quasar spectra, to study the efficiency of our candidate selection procedures. Finally, we compare the number counts of our quasars and quasar candidates to the expected numbers based on previous studies of the quasar luminosity function. The agreement of our observations with these expectations is good in most cases. However, we do estimate that our survey contains more quasars with B < 21 and z < 2.3 than expected from the results published by Koo & Kron in 1988 and more z > 3 quasars than expected from the results published by Warren, Hewett, & Osmer in 1994, both at the 3 σ level. Additional spectroscopic observations will be required to confirm or refute these excesses.

  18. THE FAINT END OF THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: adiaferio@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-04-15

    Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a dense redshift survey covering a 4 deg{sup 2} region to a limiting R = 20.6. In the construction of the galaxy catalog and in the acquisition of spectroscopic targets, we paid careful attention to the survey completeness for lower surface brightness dwarf galaxies. Thus, although the survey covers a small area, it is a robust basis for computation of the slope of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function to a limiting M{sub R} = -13.3 + 5log h. We calculate the faint-end slope in the R band for the subset of SHELS galaxies with redshifts in the range 0.02 {<=}z < 0.1, SHELS{sub 0.1}. This sample contains 532 galaxies with R < 20.6 and with a median surface brightness within the half-light radius of SB{sub 50,R} = 21.82 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We used this sample to make one of the few direct measurements of the dependence of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function on surface brightness. For the sample as a whole the faint-end slope, {alpha} = -1.31 {+-} 0.04, is consistent with both the Blanton et al. analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Liu et al. analysis of the COSMOS field. This consistency is impressive given the very different approaches of these three surveys. A magnitude-limited sample of 135 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts with mean half-light surface brightness, SB{sub 50,R} {>=} 22.5 mag arcsec{sup -2} is unique to SHELS{sub 0.1}. The faint-end slope is {alpha}{sub 22.5} = -1.52 {+-} 0.16. SHELS{sub 0.1} shows that lower surface brightness objects dominate the faint-end slope of the luminosity function in the field, underscoring the importance of surface brightness limits in evaluating measurements of the faint-end slope and its evolution.

  19. Galaxy luminosities, stellar masses, sizes, velocity dispersions as a function of morphological type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, M.; Shankar, F.; Hyde, J. B.; Mei, S.; Marulli, F.; Sheth, R. K.

    2010-06-01

    We provide fits to the distribution of galaxy luminosity, size, velocity dispersion and stellar mass as a function of concentration index Cr and morphological type in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). (Our size estimate, a simple analogue of the SDSS cmodel magnitude, is new: it is computed using a combination of seeing-corrected quantities in the SDSS data base, and is in substantially better agreement with results from more detailed bulge/disc decompositions.) We also quantify how estimates of the fraction of `early'- or `late'-type galaxies depend on whether the samples were cut in colour, concentration or light profile shape, and compare with similar estimates based on morphology. Our fits show that ellipticals account for about 20 per cent of the r-band luminosity density, , and 25 per cent of the stellar mass density, ρ* including S0s and Sas increases these numbers to 33 per cent and 40 per cent, and 50 per cent and 60 per cent, respectively. The values of and ρ*, and the mean sizes, of E, E+S0 and E+S0+Sa samples are within 10 per cent of those in the Hyde & Bernardi, Cr >= 2.86 and Cr >= 2.6 samples, respectively. Summed over all galaxy types, we find ρ* ~ 3 × 108MsolarMpc-3 at z ~ 0. This is in good agreement with expectations based on integrating the star formation history. However, compared to most previous work, we find an excess of objects at large masses, up to a factor of ~10 at M* ~ 5 × 1011Msolar. The stellar mass density further increases at large masses if we assume different initial mass functions for elliptical and spiral galaxies, as suggested by some recent chemical evolution models, and results in a better agreement with the dynamical mass function. We also show that the trend for ellipticity to decrease with luminosity is primarily because the E/S0 ratio increases at large L. However, the most massive galaxies, M* >= 5 × 1011Msolar, are less concentrated and not as round as expected if one extrapolates from lower L, and they are

  20. A Luminosity Function of Lyα-emitting Galaxies at z ~ 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Steve; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel; Wang, JunXian; Dey, Arjun; Spinrad, Hyron; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2007-12-01

    We present a catalog of 59 z~4.5 Lyα-emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed in a campaign of Keck DEIMOS follow-up observations to candidates selected in the Large Area Lyα (LALA) narrowband imaging survey. We targeted 97 candidates for spectroscopic follow-up by accounting for the variety of conditions under which we performed spectroscopy, we estimate a selection reliability of ~76%. Together with our previous sample of Keck LRIS confirmations, the 59 sources confirmed herein bring the total catalog to 73 spectroscopically confirmed z~4.5 Lyα-emitting galaxies in the ~0.7 deg2 covered by the LALA imaging. As with the Keck LRIS sample, we find that a nonnegligible fraction of the confirmed Lyα lines have rest-frame equivalent widths (Wrestλ) that exceed the maximum predicted for normal stellar populations: 17%-31% (93% confidence) of the detected galaxies show Wrestλ>190 Å, and 12%-27% (90% confidence) show Wrestλ>240 Å. We construct a luminosity function of z~4.5 Lyα emission lines for comparison to Lyα luminosity functions spanning 3.1luminosity function evolution from z~3 to z~6. This result supports the conclusion that the intergalactic medium remains largely reionized from the local universe out to z~6.5. It is somewhat at odds with the pronounced drop in the cosmic star formation rate density recently measured between z~3 and z~6 in continuum-selected Lyman-break galaxies, and therefore potentially sheds light on the relationship between the two populations. Based in part on observations made at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Our data were obtained using community access telescope time made available under the National

  1. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way. V. Integrated JHKS magnitudes and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Röser, S.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we determine absolute integrated magnitudes in the J,H,KS passbands for Galactic star clusters from the Milky Way Star Clusters survey. In the wide solar neighbourhood, we derive the open cluster luminosity function (CLF) for different cluster ages. Methods: The integrated magnitudes are based on uniform cluster membership derived from the 2MAst catalogue (a merger of the PPMXL and 2MASS) and are computed by summing up the individual luminosities of the most reliable cluster members. We discuss two different techniques of constructing the CLF, a magnitude-limited and a distance-limited approach. Results: Absolute J,H,KS integrated magnitudes are obtained for 3061 open clusters, and 147 globular clusters. The integrated magnitudes and colours are accurate to about 0.8 and 0.2 mag, respectively. Based on the sample of open clusters we construct the general cluster luminosity function in the solar neighbourhood in the three passbands. In each passband the CLF shows a linear part covering a range of 6 to 7 mag at the bright end. The CLFs reach their maxima at an absolute magnitude of -2 mag, then drop by one order of magnitude. During cluster evolution, the CLF changes its slope within tight, but well-defined limits. The CLF of the youngest clusters has a steep slope of about 0.4 at bright magnitudes and a quasi-flat portion for faint clusters. For the oldest population, we find a flatter function with a slope of about 0.2. The CLFs at Galactocentric radii smaller than that of the solar circle differ from those in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. The CLF in the inner area is flatter and the cluster surface density higher than the local one. In contrast, the CLF is somewhat steeper than the local one in the outer disk, and the surface density is lower. The corresponding catalogue of integrated magnitudes is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. Discovery of a bright quasar without a massive host galaxy.

    PubMed

    Magain, Pierre; Letawe, Géraldine; Courbin, Frédéric; Jablonka, Pascale; Jahnke, Knud; Meylan, Georges; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2005-09-15

    A quasar is thought to be powered by the infall of matter onto a supermassive black hole at the centre of a massive galaxy. Because the optical luminosity of quasars exceeds that of their host galaxy, disentangling the two components can be difficult. This led in the 1990s to the controversial claim of the discovery of 'naked' quasars. Since then, the connection between quasars and galaxies has been well established. Here we report the discovery of a quasar lying at the edge of a gas cloud, whose size is comparable to that of a small galaxy, but whose spectrum shows no evidence for stars. The gas in the cloud is excited by the quasar itself. If a host galaxy is present, it is at least six times fainter than would normally be expected for such a bright quasar. The quasar is interacting dynamically with a neighbouring galaxy, whose gas might be feeding the black hole.

  3. The WARPS Survey - VIII. Evolution of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koens, L. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Jones, L. R.; Ebeling, H.; Horner, D. J.; Perlman, E. S.; Phillipps, S.; Scharf, C. A.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) from the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS) and quantify its evolution. WARPS is a serendipitous survey of the central region of ROSAT pointed observations and was carried out in two phases (WARPS-I and WARPS-II). The results here are based on a final sample of 124 clusters, complete above a flux limit of 6.5 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, with members out to redshift z ˜ 1.05, and a sky coverage of 70.9 deg2. We find significant evidence for negative evolution of the XLF, which complements the majority of X-ray cluster surveys. To quantify the suggested evolution, we perform a maximum likelihood analysis and conclude that the evolution is driven by a decreasing number density of high-luminosity clusters with redshift, while the bulk of the cluster population remains nearly unchanged out to redshift z ≈ 1.1, as expected in a low-density universe. The results are found to be insensitive to a variety of sources of systematic uncertainty that affect the measurement of the XLF and determination of the survey selection function. We perform a Bayesian analysis of the XLF to fully account for uncertainties in the local XLF on the measured evolution, and find that the detected evolution remains significant at the 95 per cent level. We observe a significant excess of clusters in the WARPS at 0.1 < z < 0.3 and LX ≈ 2 × 1043 erg s-1 compared with the reference low-redshift XLF, or our Bayesian fit to the WARPS data. We find that the excess cannot be explained by sample variance, or Eddington bias, and is unlikely to be due to problems with the survey selection function.

  4. High redshift quasars monitoring campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Ismael; Lira, Paulina; Martinez, Jorge; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai

    2014-07-01

    We present an update of the monitoring campaign we have undertaken to probe the most massive black holes in powerful quasars at high redshift through the reverberation mapping technique. Once this campaign has finished, we will be able to directly measure broad line region (BLR) sizes of quasars at z ~ 2-3, improving dramatically the BLR size-luminosity relation, and therefore, black hole mass estimates based on this relationship. So far, we have identified a dozen highly variable sources suitable for future cross-correlation analysis and reverberation measurements.

  5. Characterizing the Properties of Clusters of Galaxies As a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, K.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.; Goobar, A.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC

    2009-02-24

    We report the application of the new Monte Carlo method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI, described in a pair of companion papers), towards analysis and interpretation of X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies with the XMM-Newton satellite. Our sample consists of publicly available well-exposed observations of clusters at redshifts z > 0.069, totaling 101 objects. We determine the luminosity and temperature structure of the X-ray emitting gas, with the goal to quantify the scatter and the evolution of the L{sub X} - T relation, as well as to investigate the dependence on cluster substructure with redshift. This work is important for the establishment of the potential robustness of mass estimates from X-ray data which in turn is essential towards the use of clusters for measurements of cosmological parameters. We use the luminosity and temperature maps derived via the SPI technique to determine the presence of cooling cores, via measurements of luminosity and temperature contrast. The L{sub X}-T relation is investigated, and we confirm that L{sub X} {proportional_to} T{sup 3}. We find a weak redshift dependence ({proportional_to} (1 + z){sup {beta}{sub LT}}, {beta}{sub LT} = 0.50 {+-} 0.34), in contrast to some Chandra results. The level of dynamical activity is established using the 'power ratios' method, and we compare our results to previous application of this method to Chandra data for clusters. We find signs of evolution in the P{sub 3}/P{sub 0} power ratio. A new method, the 'temperature two-point correlation function', is proposed. This method is used to determine the 'power spectrum' of temperature fluctuations in the X-ray emitting gas as a function of spatial scale. We show how this method can be fruitfully used to identify cooling core clusters as well as those with disturbed structures, presumably due to on-going or recent merger activity.

  6. The HerMES submillimetre local and low-redshift luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, L.; Vaccari, M.; Franceschini, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Farrah, D.; Feltre, A.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-02-01

    We used wide-area surveys over 39 deg2 by the HerMES (Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey) collaboration, performed with the Herschel Observatory SPIRE multiwavelength camera, to estimate the low-redshift, 0.02 < z < 0.5, monochromatic luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 250, 350 and 500 μm. Within this redshift interval, we detected 7087 sources in five independent sky areas, ˜40 per cent of which have spectroscopic redshifts, while for the remaining objects photometric redshifts were used. The SPIRE LFs in different fields did not show any field-to-field variations beyond the small differences to be expected from cosmic variance. SPIRE flux densities were also combined with Spitzer photometry and multiwavelength archival data to perform a complete spectral energy distribution fitting analysis of SPIRE detected sources to calculate precise k-corrections, as well as the bolometric infrared (IR; 8-1000 μm) LFs and their low-z evolution from a combination of statistical estimators. Integration of the latter prompted us to also compute the local luminosity density and the comoving star formation rate density (SFRD) for our sources, and to compare them with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. The LFs show significant and rapid luminosity evolution already at low redshifts, 0.02 < z < 0.2, with L_{IR}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{6.0± 0.4} and Φ _{IR}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{-2.1± 0.4}, L_{250}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{5.3± 0.2} and Φ _{250}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{-0.6± 0.4} estimated using the IR bolometric and the 250 μm LFs, respectively. Converting our IR LD estimate into an SFRD assuming a standard Salpeter initial mass function and including the unobscured contribution based on the UV dust-uncorrected emission from local galaxies, we estimate an SFRD scaling of SFRD0 + 0.08z, where SFRD0 ≃ (1.9 ± 0.03) × 10-2 [M⊙ Mpc-3] is our total SFRD estimate at z ˜ 0.02.

  7. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  8. The Radio and IR Luminosity Function of compact Galactic HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, R.; De Zotti, G.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the radio luminosity function (LF) of compact Galactic HII regions, derived by using ˜ 200 sources from the recombination line survey by Caswell & Haynes (1987). The data set is complete for Speak > 1.3 Jy at 5 GHz, corresponding to an integrated flux density of ˜ 3 Jy. The LF is reconstructed by means of a generalized Schmidt's estimator which takes into account the actual spatial distribution of the HII regions along the plane of the Galaxy. The resulting LF is described by a two-component power-law, with a cut-off at log L(α) = ˜ 38.3 erg/sec. This work will be complemented with the derivation, by means of the MIPSGAL data set, of the IR counterpart of the radio LF here presented. An extension of this work will consist in deriving the IR counterpart of the radio LF here obtained, by making use of the MIPSGAL data set.

  9. Constraining Neutrino Cooling Using the Hot White Dwarf Luminosity Function in the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Brad M. S.; Richer, Harvey; Kalirai, Jason; Goldsbury, Ryan; Frewen, Shane; Heyl, Jeremy

    2015-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope observations of the upper part ({T}{eff}\\gt {10}4 K) of the white dwarf cooling sequence in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae and measure a luminosity function of hot white dwarfs. Comparison with previous determinations from large-scale field surveys indicates that the previously determined plateau at high effective temperatures is likely a selection effect, as no such feature is seen in this sample. Comparison with theoretical models suggests that the current estimates of white dwarf neutrino emission (primarily by the plasmon channel) are accurate, and variations are restricted to no more than a factor of two globally, at 95% confidence. We use these constraints to place limits on various proposed exotic emission mechanisms, including a nonzero neutrino magnetic moment, formation of axions, and emission of Kaluza-Klein modes into extra dimensions.

  10. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrainedby PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, C.

    The stellar phase of Thermally-Pulsating Asymptotic giant branch is the last major evolutionary stage of intermediate-mass stars which afterwards evolve into planetary nebulae. The TP-AGB phase is affected by mass-loss and instabilities which notoriously make its theoretical modelling uncertain. This review focuses on the effects such modelling has on stellar population models for galaxies, with particular focus on the high-z Universe where galaxies are young and contain a large number of short-living TP-AGB stars. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescriptions for the treatment of the TP-AGB affect the theoretical integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function stemming from the various assumptions. Finally I shall discuss the inclusion of hot evolved stars on stellar population models and how they compare to data for old galaxies at our present time.

  11. Luminosity function of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Park, KwangHo; Khandai, Nishikanta; Matteo, Tiziana Di; ...

    2015-09-18

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [OII] emission line luminosity L([OII]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [OII] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([OII]) = 1043.0 erg s–1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excessmore » in the prediction of bright [OII] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([OII]) = 1041.6 erg s–1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [OII] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [OII] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from –3 to –2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)–1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ~3(z + 1)–1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [OIII] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. As a result, we show that the auto-correlation function of [OII] and [OIII] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.« less

  12. Luminosity function of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, KwangHo; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-11-01

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [O II] emission line luminosity L([O II]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [O II] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([O II]) = 1043.0 erg s-1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [O II] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([O II]) = 1041.6 erg s-1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [O II] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [O II] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from -3 to -2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)-1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ˜3(z + 1)-1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [O III] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Finally, we show that the auto-correlation function of [O II] and [O III] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  13. A new psychophysical method for determining the photopic spectral-luminosity function of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Rovamo, J; Koljonen, T; Näsänen, R

    1996-09-01

    Using an 8 mm pupil, 2AFC-method, and 2 x 2 deg2 grating at 2 c/deg we measured contrast sensitivity as a function of integrated radiance for a series of interference filters with peak wavelengths at 400-700 nm. Irrespective of the radiance level, contrast sensitivity was highest when wavelength was at and around 550 nm. It decreased towards longer and shorter wavelengths, reflecting the variation of the probability of quantal catch with light wavelength. When contrast sensitivity functions plotted in double logarithmic coordinates were shifted horizontally by multiplying the integrated radiances of each filter by an appropriate scaling factor, the functions superimposed onto a single curve. Contrast sensitivity at lower levels of relative radiance (R) increased in proportion to square root of R, obeying DeVries-Rose law, but at higher levels contrast sensitivity was constant, obeying Weber's law. Scaling factors plotted as a function of wavelength provided an estimate of V(lambda) quite similar to the standard 2 deg photopic spectral-luminosity function of CIE 1924.

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the 325 MHz radio luminosity function of AGN and star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Matthew; Mauch, T.; Jarvis, M. J.; McAlpine, K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Fine, S.; Johnston, R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Baldry, I. K.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Bremer, M. N.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Obreschkow, D.; Sadler, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of the evolution of both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-formation in galaxies underpins our understanding of galaxy evolution over cosmic time. Radio continuum observations can provide key information on these two processes, in particular via the mechanical feedback produced by radio jets in AGN, and via an unbiased dust-independent measurement of star formation rates. In this paper, we determine radio luminosity functions at 325 MHz for a sample of AGN and star-forming galaxies by matching a 138 deg2 radio survey conducted with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, with optical imaging and redshifts from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We find that the radio luminosity function at 325 MHz for star-forming galaxies closely follows that measured at 1.4 GHz. By fitting the AGN radio luminosity function out to z = 0.5 as a double power law, and parametrizing the evolution as Φ ∝ (1 + z)k, we find evolution parameters of k = 0.92 ± 0.95 assuming pure density evolution and k = 2.13 ± 1.96 assuming pure luminosity evolution. We find that the Low Excitation Radio Galaxies are the dominant population in space density at lower luminosities. Comparing our 325 MHz observations with radio continuum imaging at 1.4 GHz, we determine separate radio luminosity functions for steep- and flat-spectrum AGN, and show that the beamed population of flat-spectrum sources in our sample can be shifted in number density and luminosity to coincide with the unbeamed population of steep-spectrum sources, as is expected in the orientation-based unification of AGN.

  15. Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 7 IN THE SUBARU/XMM-NEWTON DEEP SURVEY FIELD: PHOTOMETRIC CANDIDATES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Kazuaki; Ouchi, Masami; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Totani, Tomonori; Nagashima, Masahiro; Harayama, Atsushi; Kodaka, Natsuki; Tajitsu, Akito; Hattori, Takashi

    2010-10-10

    We conducted a deep narrowband NB973 (FWHM = 200 A centered at 9755 A) survey of z = 7 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field, using the fully depleted CCDs newly installed on the Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam, which is twice more sensitive to z = 7 Ly{alpha} at {approx}1 {mu}m than the previous CCDs. Reaching the depth 0.5 mag deeper than our previous survey in the Subaru Deep Field that led to the discovery of a z = 6.96 LAE, we detected three probable z = 7 LAE candidates. Even if all the candidates are real, the Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) at z = 7 shows a significant deficit from the LF at z = 5.7 determined by previous surveys. The LAE number and Ly{alpha} luminosity densities at z = 7 are {approx}7.7%-54% and {approx}5.5%-39%, respectively, of those at z = 5.7, to the Ly{alpha} line luminosity limit of L(Ly{alpha}) {approx}> 9.2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. This could be due to evolution of the LAE population at these epochs as a recent galaxy evolution model predicts that the LAE modestly evolves from z = 5.7 to 7. However, even after correcting for this effect of galaxy evolution on the decrease in LAE number density, the z = 7 Ly{alpha} LF still shows a deficit from z = 5.7 LF. This might reflect the attenuation of Ly{alpha} emission by neutral hydrogen remaining at the epoch of reionization and suggests that reionization of the universe might not be complete yet at z = 7. If we attribute the density deficit to reionization, the intergalactic medium transmission for Ly{alpha} photons at z = 7 would be 0.4 {<=} T {sup IGM}{sub Ly{alpha} {<=}} 1, supporting the possible higher neutral fraction at the earlier epochs at z > 6 suggested by the previous surveys of z = 5.7-7 LAEs, z {approx} 6 quasars, and z > 6 gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Lyα Emitters at z = 7 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field: Photometric Candidates and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Totani, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Nagashima, Masahiro; Harayama, Atsushi; Kodaka, Natsuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Tajitsu, Akito; Hattori, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a deep narrowband NB973 (FWHM = 200 Å centered at 9755 Å) survey of z = 7 Lyα emitters (LAEs) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field, using the fully depleted CCDs newly installed on the Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam, which is twice more sensitive to z = 7 Lyα at ~1 μm than the previous CCDs. Reaching the depth 0.5 mag deeper than our previous survey in the Subaru Deep Field that led to the discovery of a z = 6.96 LAE, we detected three probable z = 7 LAE candidates. Even if all the candidates are real, the Lyα luminosity function (LF) at z = 7 shows a significant deficit from the LF at z = 5.7 determined by previous surveys. The LAE number and Lyα luminosity densities at z = 7 are ~7.7%-54% and ~5.5%-39%, respectively, of those at z = 5.7, to the Lyα line luminosity limit of L(Lyα) >~ 9.2 × 1042 erg s-1. This could be due to evolution of the LAE population at these epochs as a recent galaxy evolution model predicts that the LAE modestly evolves from z = 5.7 to 7. However, even after correcting for this effect of galaxy evolution on the decrease in LAE number density, the z = 7 Lyα LF still shows a deficit from z = 5.7 LF. This might reflect the attenuation of Lyα emission by neutral hydrogen remaining at the epoch of reionization and suggests that reionization of the universe might not be complete yet at z = 7. If we attribute the density deficit to reionization, the intergalactic medium transmission for Lyα photons at z = 7 would be 0.4 <= T IGM Lyα <= 1, supporting the possible higher neutral fraction at the earlier epochs at z > 6 suggested by the previous surveys of z = 5.7-7 LAEs, z ~ 6 quasars, and z > 6 gamma-ray bursts. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  17. A MULTIVARIATE FIT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND WORLD MODEL FOR LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmoradi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    It is proposed that the luminosity function, the rest-frame spectral correlations, and distributions of cosmological long-duration (Type-II) gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may be very well described as a multivariate log-normal distribution. This result is based on careful selection, analysis, and modeling of LGRBs' temporal and spectral variables in the largest catalog of GRBs available to date: 2130 BATSE GRBs, while taking into account the detection threshold and possible selection effects. Constraints on the joint rest-frame distribution of the isotropic peak luminosity (L{sub iso}), total isotropic emission (E{sub iso}), the time-integrated spectral peak energy (E{sub p,z}), and duration (T{sub 90,z}) of LGRBs are derived. The presented analysis provides evidence for a relatively large fraction of LGRBs that have been missed by the BATSE detector with E{sub iso} extending down to {approx}10{sup 49} erg and observed spectral peak energies (E{sub p} ) as low as {approx}5 keV. LGRBs with rest-frame duration T{sub 90,z} {approx}< 1 s or observer-frame duration T{sub 90} {approx}< 2 s appear to be rare events ({approx}< 0.1% chance of occurrence). The model predicts a fairly strong but highly significant correlation ({rho} = 0.58 {+-} 0.04) between E{sub iso} and E{sub p,z} of LGRBs. Also predicted are strong correlations of L{sub iso} and E{sub iso} with T{sub 90,z} and moderate correlation between L{sub iso} and E{sub p,z}. The strength and significance of the correlations found encourage the search for underlying mechanisms, though undermine their capabilities as probes of dark energy's equation of state at high redshifts. The presented analysis favors-but does not necessitate-a cosmic rate for BATSE LGRBs tracing metallicity evolution consistent with a cutoff Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.2-0.5, assuming no luminosity-redshift evolution.

  18. The local stellar luminosity function and mass-to-light ratio in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Fuchs, B.; Jahreiß, H.; Flynn, C.; Dettbarn, C.; Rybizki, J.

    2015-07-01

    A new sample of stars, representative of the solar neighbourhood luminosity function (LF), is constructed from the Hipparcos catalogue and the Fifth Catalogue of Nearby Stars. We have cross-matched to sources in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalogue so that for all stars individually determined near-infrared (NIR) photometry is available on a homogeneous system (typically Ks). The spatial completeness of the sample has been carefully determined by statistical methods, and the NIR LF of the stars has been derived by direct star counts. We find a local volume luminosity of 0.121 ± 0.004 LK⊙ pc-3, corresponding to a volumetric mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of M/L_K = 0.31 ± 0.02 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}, where giants contribute 80 per cent to the light but less than 2 per cent to the stellar mass. We derive the surface brightness of the solar cylinder with the help of a vertical disc model. We find a surface brightness of 99 LK⊙ pc-2 with an uncertainty of approximately 10 per cent. This corresponds to an M/L for the solar cylinder of M/L_K = 0.34 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}. The M/L for the solar cylinder is only 10 per cent larger than the local value despite the fact that the local population has a much larger contribution of young stars. It turns out that the effective scaleheights of the lower main sequence carrying most of the mass is similar to that of the giants, which are dominating the NIR light. The corresponding colour for the solar cylinder is V - K = 2.89 mag compared to the local value of V - K = 2.46 mag. An extrapolation of the local surface brightness to the whole Milky Way yields a total luminosity of MK = -24.2 mag. The Milky Way falls in the range of K band Tully-Fisher relations from the literature.

  19. Discovery of three z > 6.5 quasars in the VISTA kilo-degree infrared galaxy (VIKING) survey

    SciTech Connect

    Venemans, B. P.; Findlay, J. R.; Sutherland, W. J.; De Rosa, G.; McMahon, R. G.; González-Solares, E. A.; Lewis, J. R.; Simcoe, R.; Kuijken, K.

    2013-12-10

    Studying quasars at the highest redshifts can constrain models of galaxy and black hole formation, and it also probes the intergalactic medium in the early universe. Optical surveys have to date discovered more than 60 quasars up to z ≅ 6.4, a limit set by the use of the z-band and CCD detectors. Only one z ≳ 6.4 quasar has been discovered, namely the z = 7.08 quasar ULAS J1120+0641, using near-infrared imaging. Here we report the discovery of three new z ≳ 6.4 quasars in 332 deg{sup 2} of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey, thus extending the number from 1 to 4. The newly discovered quasars have redshifts of z = 6.60, 6.75, and 6.89. The absolute magnitudes are between –26.0 and –25.5, 0.6-1.1 mag fainter than ULAS J1120+0641. Near-infrared spectroscopy revealed the Mg II emission line in all three objects. The quasars are powered by black holes with masses of ∼(1-2) × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. In our probed redshift range of 6.44 < z < 7.44 we can set a lower limit on the space density of supermassive black holes of ρ(M {sub BH} > 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) > 1.1 × 10{sup –9} Mpc{sup –3}. The discovery of three quasars in our survey area is consistent with the z = 6 quasar luminosity function when extrapolated to z ∼ 7. We do not find evidence for a steeper decline in the space density of quasars with increasing redshift from z = 6 to z = 7.

  20. Constraining the cosmic evolution of supermassive black holes with statistical quasar samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue

    N-body simulations, this simple model can reproduce the observed luminosity function, clustering, Eddington ratio distributions of quasars, and make predictions for future observations. iv

  1. Statistics and properties of H II regions in a sample of grand design galaxies I. Luminosity functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas, M.; Beckman, J. E.; Knapen, J. H.

    1996-03-01

    We present new high quality continuum-subtracted Hα images of the grand-design galaxies NGC 157, NGC 3631, NGC 6764 and NGC 6951. We have determined the positions, angular sizes, and fluxes of their individual HII regions, and describe statistical properties of the HII region samples. We construct luminosity functions for all the HII regions in the disc and separately for arm and interarm zones for each galaxy. The slopes of the luminosity functions for the complete sample agree well with values published for other spiral galaxies of comparable morphological type. For three galaxies we determined the slopes of the luminosity functions for the spiral arm and interarm zones separately. We find that for NGC 157, NGC 3631, and NGC 6951 these slopes are equal within the errors of determination. We compare our results to those found from earlier work, specifically for M51 and NGC 6814, and discuss implications for massive star forming processes.

  2. The rest-frame K-band luminosity function of galaxies in clusters to z = 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, R; Stanford, S A; Eisenhardt, P R; Holden, B P; Rosati, P

    2007-03-20

    We derive the rest-frame K-band luminosity function for galaxies in 32 clusters at 0.6 < z < 1.3 using deep 3.6 {micro}m and 4.5 {micro}m imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The luminosity functions approximate the stellar mass function of the cluster galaxies. Their dependence on redshift indicates that massive cluster galaxies (to the characteristic luminosity M*{sub K}) are fully assembled at least at z {approx} 1.3 and that little significant accretion takes place at later times. The existence of massive, highly evolved galaxies at these epochs is likely to represent a significant challenge to theories of hierarchical structure formation where such objects are formed by the late accretion of spheroidal systems at z < 1.

  3. THE EVOLUTION OF THE DUSTY TORUS COVERING FACTOR IN QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Minfeng

    2013-08-20

    We have assembled a large sample of 5996 quasars at 2.0 {<=} z {<=} 2.4 (high-z) or 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.1 (low-z) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ninth and seventh data release and quasar catalogs. The spectral energy distributions of quasars were constructed by collecting WISE, UKIDSS, and GALEX photometric data in addition to SDSS data, from which the IR luminosity at 1-7 {mu}m and bolometric luminosity at 1100 A-1 {mu}m were calculated. A red tail is clearly seen in the distribution of the spectral index over 1100 A-1 {mu}m for both the high-z and low-z sources; this tail is likely due to red or reddened quasars. The covering factor (CF) of the dusty torus is estimated as the ratio of the IR luminosity to the bolometric luminosity. We find significant anti-correlations between the CF and the bolometric luminosity, in both the high-z and low-z quasars; however, these two groups follow different tracks. At overlapping bolometric luminosities, the CF of high-z quasars is systematically larger than those of low-z quasars, implying an evolution of the CF with redshift.

  4. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF NEARBY MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y. Q.; Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Mao, S.; Li, Cheng

    2013-08-10

    We perform photometric analyses of a bright early-type galaxy sample with 2949 galaxies (M{sub r} < -22.5 mag) in the redshift range of 0.05-0.15, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 with morphological classification from Galaxy Zoo 1. We measure the Petrosian and isophotal magnitudes, as well as the corresponding half-light radius for each galaxy. We find that for the brightest galaxies (M{sub r} < -23 mag), our Petrosian magnitudes and isophotal magnitudes to 25 mag arcsec{sup -2} and 1% of the sky brightness are on average 0.16 mag, 0.20 mag, and 0.26 mag brighter than the SDSS Petrosian values, respectively. In the first case, the underestimations are caused by overestimations in the sky background by the SDSS PHOTO algorithm, while the latter two are also due to deeper photometry. Similarly, the typical half-light radii (r{sub 50}) measured by the SDSS algorithm are smaller than our measurements. As a result, the bright end of the r-band luminosity function is found to decline more slowly than previous works. Our measured luminosity densities at the bright end are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of Blanton et al., and the stellar mass densities at M{sub *} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} and M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are a few tenths and a factor of a few higher than those of Bernardi et al. These results may significantly alleviate the tension in the assembly of massive galaxies between observations and predictions of the hierarchical structure formation model.

  5. THE FAINT END OF THE CLUSTER-GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Mancone, Conor L.; Baker, Troy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Snyder, Greg; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wright, Edward L.

    2012-12-20

    We measure the faint-end slope of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) for cluster galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 using Spitzer IRAC data. We investigate whether this slope, {alpha}, differs from that of the field LF at these redshifts, and with the cluster LF at low redshifts. The latter is of particular interest as low-luminosity galaxies are expected to undergo significant evolution. We use seven high-redshift spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey to measure the cluster-galaxy LF down to depths of M* + 3 (3.6 {mu}m) and M* + 2.5 (4.5 {mu}m). The summed LF at our median cluster redshift (z = 1.35) is well fit by a Schechter distribution with {alpha}{sub 3.6{mu}m} = -0.97 {+-} 0.14 and {alpha}{sub 4.5{mu}m} = -0.91 {+-} 0.28, consistent with a flat faint-end slope and is in agreement with measurements of the field LF in similar bands at these redshifts. A comparison to {alpha} in low-redshift clusters finds no statistically significant evidence of evolution. Combined with past studies which show that M* is passively evolving out to z {approx} 1.3, this means that the shape of the cluster LF is largely in place by z {approx} 1.3. This suggests that the processes that govern the buildup of the mass of low-mass cluster galaxies have no net effect on the faint-end slope of the cluster LF at z {approx}< 1.3.

  6. The SDSS u-band Galaxy Survey: Luminosity functions and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baldry, Ivan K.; Glazebrook, K.; Budavari, T.; Eisenstein, D.J.; Annis, J.; Bahcall, N.A.; Blanton, M.R.; Brinkmann, J.; Csabai, I.; Heckman, T.M.; Lin, H.; Loveday, J.; Nichol, R.C.; Schneider, D.P.; /Johns Hopkins U. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Princeton U. /CCPP, New York /Apache Point Observ. /Eotvos U. /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Portsmouth U., ICG /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2005-01-01

    We construct and analyze a u-band selected galaxy sample from the SDSS Southern Survey, which covers 275 deg{sup 2}. The sample includes 43223 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.005 < z < 0.3 and with 14.5 < u < 20.5. The S/N in the u-band Petrosian aperture is improved by coadding multiple epochs of imaging data and by including sky-subtraction corrections. Luminosity functions for the near-UV {sup 0.1}u band ({lambda} {approx} 322 {+-} 26 nm) are determined in redshift slices of width 0.02, which show a highly significant evolution in M* of -0.8 {+-} 0.1 mag between z = 0 and 0.3; with M* - 5 log h{sub 70} = -18.84 {+-} 0.05 (AB mag), log {phi}* = -2.06 {+-} 0.03 (h{sub 70}{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3}) and log {rho}{sub L} = 19.11 {+-} 0.02 (h{sub 70} W Hz{sup -1}Mpc{sup -3}) at z = 0.1. The faint-end slope determined for z < 0.06 is given by {alpha} = -1.05 {+-} 0.08. This is in agreement with recent determinations from GALEX at shorter wavelengths. Comparing our z < 0.3 luminosity density measurements with 0.2 < z < 1.2 from COMBO-17, we find that the 280-nm density evolves as {rho}{sub L} {proportional_to} (1+z){sup {beta}} with {beta} = 2.1 {+-} 0.2; and find no evidence for any change in slope over this redshift range. By comparing with other measurements of cosmic star formation history, we estimate that the effective dust attenuation at 280 nm has increased by 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mag between z = 0 and 1.

  7. Heavily reddened quasars at z ˜ 2 in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey: a transitional phase in AGN evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard G.; Hewett, Paul C.; Alaghband-Zadeh, Susannah; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Venemans, Bram P.; Hawthorn, Melanie J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new sample of purely near-infrared-selected KVega < 16.5 [KAB < 18.4] extremely red [(J - K)Vega > 2.5] quasar candidates at z ˜ 2 from ≃900 deg2 of data in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS). Five of these are spectroscopically confirmed to be heavily reddened type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with broad emission lines bringing our total sample of reddened quasars from the UKIDSS-LAS to 12 at z = 1.4-2.7. At these redshifts, Hα (6563 Å) is in the K band. However, the mean Hα equivalent width of the reddened quasars is only 10 per cent larger than that of the optically selected population and cannot explain the extreme colours. Instead, dust extinction of AV ˜ 2-6 mag is required to reproduce the continuum colours of our sources. This is comparable to the dust extinctions seen in submillimetre galaxies at similar redshifts. We argue that the AGN are likely being observed in a relatively short-lived breakout phase when they are expelling gas and dust following a massive starburst, subsequently turning into UV-luminous quasars. Some of our quasars show direct evidence for strong outflows (v ˜ 800-1000 km s-1) affecting the Hα line consistent with this scenario. We predict that a larger fraction of reddened quasar hosts are likely to be submillimetre bright compared to the UV-luminous quasar population. We use our sample to place new constraints on the fraction of obscured type 1 AGN likely to be missed in optical surveys. Taken at face value our findings suggest that the obscured fraction depends on quasar luminosity. The space density of obscured quasars is approximately five times that inferred for UV-bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminosity function at Mi < -30 but seems to drop at lower luminosities even accounting for various sources of incompleteness in our sample. We find that at Mi ˜ -28 for example, this fraction is unlikely to be larger than ˜20 per cent although these fractions are highly uncertain at

  8. Optical spectroscopy and the UV luminosity function of galaxies in the Abell 1367, Coma and Virgo clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Carrasco, L.

    2003-04-01

    Optical spectroscopy of 93 galaxies, 60 projected in the direction of Abell 1367, 21 onto the Coma cluster and 12 on Virgo, is reported. The targets were selected because they were detected in previous Hα , UV or r' surveys. The present observations bring to 100% the redshift completeness of Hα selected galaxies in the Coma region and to 75% in Abell 1367. All observed galaxies except one show Hα emission and belong to the clusters. This confirms previous determinations of the Hα luminosity function of the two clusters that were based on the assumption that all Hα detected galaxies were cluster members. Using the newly obtained data we re-determine the UV luminosity function of Coma and we compute for the first time the UV luminosity function of A1367. Their faint end slopes remain uncertain (-2.00luminosity function will be alpha ~ -1.35, in agreement with the UV luminosity function of the field (Sullivan et al. \\cite{Sullivan}) and with the Hα luminosity functions of the two clusters (Iglesias-Paramo et al. \\cite{lha}). We discover a point-like Hα source in the Virgo cluster, associated with the giant galaxy VCC873, possibly an extragalactic HII region similar to the one recently observed in Virgo by Gerhard et al. (\\cite{Gerhard}). Based on observations obtained with the Loiano telescope belonging to the University of Bologna (Italy), with the G. Haro telescope of the INAOE (Mexico) and with the Calar Alto observatory operated by the Centro Astronomico Hispano Aleman (Spain).

  9. The luminosity function of galactic X-ray sources - A cutoff and a 'standard candle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the 2- to 10-kev luminosity distribution of 36 X-ray sources in the Local Group having known or estimated distances, showing that there exists a luminosity cutoff of approximately 10 to the 37.7th ergs/sec in agreement with the theoretical (Eddington) limit for the luminosity of an approximately 1 solar mass star. Furthermore, among the complete sample of high-luminosity sources, there appears to be a statistically significant group of X-ray 'standard candles' at (within less than 0.8 mag) the critical luminosity. This finding (which is in agreement with the self-consistent mass flow accretion models) presents the possibility that X-ray sources may be used as extragalactic distance indicators in the next generation of X-ray astronomy experiments.

  10. Is the dependence of spectral index on luminosity real in optically selected AGN samples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Su Min; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-05-01

    We critically examine the dependence of spectral index on luminosity in optically selected AGN samples. An analysis of optically selected high-z quasars showed an anticorrelation of αOX, the spectral index between the rest-frame 2500 Å and 2 keV, with optical luminosity. We examine this relationship by means of Monte Carlo simulations and conclude that a constant αOX independent of optical luminosity is still consistent with this high-z sample. We further find that contributions of large dispersions and narrow range of optical luminosity are most important for the apparent, yet artificial, αOX-lo correlation reported. We also examine another, but more complete, low-z optical selected AGN sub-sample from Steffen et al., and our analysis shows that a constant αOX independent of optical luminosity is also consistent with the data. By comparing X-ray and optical luminosity functions, we find that a luminosity-independent αOX is in fact more preferred than the luminosity-dependent αOX model. We also discuss the selection effects caused by flux limits, which might systematically bias the lX-lo relation and cause discrepancy in optically selected and X-ray selected AGN samples. To correctly establish a dependence of αOX of AGNs on their luminosity, a larger and more complete sample is needed and consequences of luminosity dispersions and selection effects in flux-limited samples must be taken into account properly.

  11. Low-Ionization Emission Regions in Quasars: Gas Properties Probed with Broad O I and Ca II Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Kawara, K.; Oyabu, S.

    2008-01-01

    We have compiled the emission-line fluxes of O I λ8446, O I λ11287, and the near-infrared (IR) Ca II triplet (λ8579) observed in 11 quasars. These lines are considered to emerge from the same gas as do the Fe II lines in the low-ionized portion of the broad emission line region (BELR). The compiled quasars are distributed over wide ranges of redshift (0.06 <= z<= 1.08) and of luminosity (-29.8 <= MB <= - 22.1), thus providing a useful sample to investigate the line-emitting gas properties in various quasar environments. The measured line strengths and velocities, as functions of the quasar properties, are analyzed using photoionization model calculations. We found that the flux ratio between the Ca II triplet and O I λ8446 is hardly dependent on the redshift or luminosity, indicating similar gas densities in the emission region from quasar to quasar. On the other hand, a scatter of the O I λ11287/λ8446 ratios appears to imply the diversity of the ionization parameter. These facts invoke a picture of the line-emitting gases in quasars that have similar densities and are located at regions exposed to various ionizing radiation fluxes. The observed O I line widths are found to be remarkably similar over more than 3 orders of magnitude in luminosity, which indicates a kinematically determined location of the emission region and is in clear contrast to the case of H I lines. We also argue about the dust presence in the emission region since the region is suggested to be located near the dust sublimation point at the outer edge of the BELR.

  12. Characterizing the evolving K -band luminosity function using the UltraVISTA, CANDELS and HUDF surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortlock, Alice; McLure, Ross J.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; McLeod, Derek J.; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther; Parsa, Shaghayegh; Dunlop, James S.; Bruce, Victoria A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a new study of the K-band galaxy luminosity function (KLF) at redshifts z ≤ 3.75, based on a nested combination of the UltraVISTA, Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Legacy Extragalactic Survey and HUDF surveys. The large dynamic range in luminosity spanned by this new data set (3-4 dex over the full redshift range) is sufficient to clearly demonstrate for the first time that the faint-end slope of the KLF at z ≥ 0.25 is relatively steep (-1.3 ≤ α ≤ -1.5 for a single Schechter function), in good agreement with recent theoretical and phenomenological models. Moreover, based on our new data set, we find that a double Schechter function provides a significantly improved description of the KLF at z ≤ 2. At redshifts z ≥ 0.25, the evolution of the KLF is remarkably smooth, with little or no evolution evident at faint (MK ≥ -20.5) or bright magnitudes (MK ≤ -24.5). Instead, the KLF is seen to evolve rapidly at intermediate magnitudes, with the number density of galaxies at MK ≃-23 dropping by a factor of ≃5 over the redshift interval 0.25 ≤ z ≤ 3.75. Motivated by this, we explore a simple description of the evolving KLF based on a double Schechter function with fixed faint-end slopes (α1 = -0.5, α2 = -1.5) and a shared characteristic magnitude (MK^{star }). According to this parametrization, the normalization of the component which dominates the faint end of the KLF remains approximately constant, with φ ^{star }2 decreasing by only a factor of ≃2 between z ≃0 and 3.25. In contrast, the component which dominates the bright end of the KLF at low redshifts evolves dramatically, becoming essentially negligible by z ≃3. Finally, we note that within this parametrization, the observed evolution of MK^{star } between z ≃0 and 3.25 is entirely consistent with MK^{star } corresponding to a constant stellar mass of M⋆ ≃5 × 1010 M⊙ at all redshifts.

  13. Constraints on dark matter scenarios from measurements of the galaxy luminosity function at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corasaniti, P. S.; Agarwal, S.; Marsh, D. J. E.; Das, S.

    2017-04-01

    We use state-of-the-art measurements of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) at z =6 , 7, and 8 to derive constraints on warm dark matter (WDM), late-forming dark matter, and ultralight axion dark matter models alternative to the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. To this purpose, we have run a suite of high-resolution N -body simulations to accurately characterize the low-mass end of the halo mass function and derive dark matter (DM) model predictions of the high-z luminosity function. In order to convert halo masses into UV magnitudes, we introduce an empirical approach based on halo abundance matching, which allows us to model the LF in terms of the amplitude and scatter of the ensemble average star formation rate halo mass relation, ⟨SFR (Mh ,z )⟩, of each DM model. We find that, independent of the DM scenario, the average SFR at fixed halo mass increases from z =6 to 8, while the scatter remains constant. At halo mass Mh≳1012 M⊙ h-1 , the average SFR as a function of halo mass follows a double power law trend that is common to all models, while differences occur at smaller masses. In particular, we find that models with a suppressed low-mass halo abundance exhibit higher SFR compared to the CDM results. Thus, different DM models predict a different faint-end slope of the LF which causes the goodness of fit to vary within each DM scenario for different model parameters. Using deviance statistics, we obtain a lower limit on the WDM thermal relic particle mass, mWDM≳1.5 keV at 2 σ . In the case of LFDM models, the phase transition redshift parameter is bounded to zt≳8 ×105 at 2 σ . We find ultralight axion dark matter best-fit models with axion mass ma≳1.6 ×10-22 eV to be well within 2 σ of the deviance statistics. We remark that measurements at z =6 slightly favor a flattening of the LF at faint UV magnitudes. This tends to prefer some of the non-CDM models in our simulation suite, although not at a statistically significant level to distinguish

  14. How do Super Star Clusters Form?: The Anomalous Luminosity Function of Natal Clusters in Henize 2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, I.; Johnson, K. E.

    2005-12-01

    Super Star Clusters (SSCs) are the most extreme star forming environments in the local universe. Results from optical observations have suggested that SSCs are simply the statistical tail of a power law luminosity (mass) distribution of index ˜ -2. However, optical luminosity functions are complicated by evolution effects and extinction. Free of these constraints, centimeter wave radio observations pin down the cluster luminosity function to the first few Myrs when natal SSCs are still embedded in ultradense H II regions. We investigate the earliest stages of SSCs in the starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 using high resolution Very Large Array observations at 5, 8.3, 15, and 23 GHz. We use the Pie Town link at lower frequencies to obtain relatively well matched beams to obtain a linear resolution of ˜ 10 pc. Such a high resolution should allow us to detect natal clusters with masses ˜ 104 M⊙ as 10σ detections. The 23 GHz flux (high frequency emission is dominated by optically thin, thermal emission) indicates that all of the detected SSCs in Henize 2-10 have a mass greater than ˜ 105 M⊙. We rule out the possibility of the clusters being self gravitating from the H92α line width of ˜ 200 km s-1. The absence of the formation of lower mass clusters is inconsistent with a power law luminosity function, which we verify with a KS test. Thus, the luminosity function of natal clusters, which we dub the Initial Cluster Luminosity Function (ICLF), suggests that SSCs require a special mode of star formation. We plan follow-up radio observations to investigate the behavior of the ICLF in a variety of starburst and merger environments.

  15. A CONDITIONAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION MODEL OF THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPY POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Cooray, Asantha

    2012-11-20

    The cosmic far-infrared background (CFIRB) is expected to be generated by faint, dusty star-forming galaxies during the peak epoch of galaxy formation. The anisotropy power spectrum of the CFIRB captures the spatial distribution of these galaxies in dark matter halos and the spatial distribution of dark matter halos in the large-scale structure. Existing halo models of CFIRB anisotropy power spectrum either are incomplete or lead to halo model parameters that are inconsistent with the galaxy distribution selected at other wavelengths. Here, we present a conditional luminosity function approach to describe the far-IR bright galaxies. We model the 250 {mu}m luminosity function and its evolution with redshift and model-fit the CFIRB power spectrum at 250 {mu}m measured by the Herschel Space Observatory. We introduce a redshift-dependent duty cycle parameter so that we are able to estimate the typical duration of the dusty star formation process in the dark matter halos as a function of redshifts. We find that the duty cycle of galaxies contributing to the far-IR background is 0.3-0.5 with a dusty star formation phase lasting for {approx}0.3-1.6 Gyr. This result confirms the general expectation that the far-IR background is dominated by star-forming galaxies in an extended phase, not bright starbursts that are driven by galaxy mergers and last {approx}10-100 Myr. The halo occupation number for satellite galaxies has a power-law slope that is close to unity over 0 < z < 4. We find that the minimum halo mass for dusty, star-forming galaxies with L {sub 250} > 10{sup 10} L {sub Sun} is 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun} and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} at z = 1 and 2, respectively. Integrating over the galaxy population with L {sub 250} > 10{sup 9} L {sub Sun }, we find that the cosmic density of dust residing in the dusty, star-forming galaxies is responsible for the background anisotropies {Omega}{sub dust} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup

  16. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  17. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  18. Liners and Low Luminosity AGN in the ROSAT Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This program has led to a series of papers being written and published in the Astrophysical Journal. Together these papers try to explain major parts of the LINER and low luminosity AGN puzzle. One paper ('Accretion Disk Instabilities, Cold Dark Matter Models, and Their Role in Quasar Evolution', Hatziminaoglou E., Siemiginowska A., & Elvis M., 2001, ApJ, 547, 90) describes an analytical model for the evolution of the quasar luminosity function. By combining the Press-Schechter formalism for the masses of initial structures with the luminosity distribution for a population of single mass black holes given by an unstable accretion disk an almost complete end-to-end physics-based model of quasar evolution is produced. In this model black holes spend 75% of their time in a low accretion state (at L(Edd)). This low state population of black holes is likely to be observed as the LINER and low luminosity AGNs in the local universe. Another paper ('Broad Emission Line Regions in AGN: the Link with the Accretion Power', Nicastro F., 2000, ApJ Letters, 530, L65) gives a physical basis for why low state black holes appear as LINERS. By linking the Lightman-Eardley instability in an accretion disk to the ori.gin of a wind that contains the broad emission line cloud material this model explains the large widths seen in these lines as being the Keplerian velocity of the disk at the instability radius. For LINERS the key is that below an accretion rate of 10(exp -3)M(sub Edd)the Lightman-Eardley instability falls within the innermost stable orbit of the disk, and so leaves the entire disk stable. No wind occurs, and so no broad emission lines are seen. Most LINERS are likely to be black holes in this low state. Tests of this model are being considered.

  19. AGN radiative feedback in dusty quasar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, W.; Banerji, M.; Fabian, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    New populations of hyper-luminous, dust-obscured quasars have been recently discovered around the peak epoch of galaxy formation (z ∼ 2-3), in addition to similar sources found at lower redshifts. Such dusty quasars are often interpreted as sources 'in transition', from dust-enshrouded starbursts to unobscured luminous quasars, along the evolutionary sequence. Here we consider the role of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiative feedback, driven by radiation pressure on dust, in high-luminosity, dust-obscured sources. We analyse how the radiation pressure-driven dusty shell models, with different shell mass configurations, may be applied to the different populations of dusty quasars reported in recent observations. We find that expanding shells, sweeping up matter from the surrounding environment, may account for prolonged obscuration in dusty quasars, e.g. for a central luminosity of L ∼ 1047 erg s-1, a typical obscured phase (with extinction in the range AV ∼ 1-10 mag) may last a few ∼106 yr. On the other hand, fixed-mass shells, coupled with high dust-to-gas ratios, may explain the extreme outflows recently discovered in red quasars at high redshifts. We discuss how the interaction between AGN radiative feedback and the ambient medium at different temporal stages in the evolutionary sequence may contribute to shape the observational appearance of dusty quasar populations.

  20. Extremely red quasars in BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T.; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W. Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual `wingless' line profiles, large N V/Lyα, N V/C IV, Si IV/C IV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [O III] λ5007. Here we present a new catalogue of C IV and N V emission-line data for 216 188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR colour, secondarily on REW(C IV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a `core' sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 ≥ 4.6 (AB) and REW(C IV) ≥ 100 Å at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity ˜ 47.1, sky density 0.010 deg-2, surprisingly flat/blue UV spectra given their red UV-to-mid-IR colours, and common outflow signatures including BALs or BAL-like features and large C IV emission-line blueshifts. Their SEDs and line properties are inconsistent with normal quasars behind a dust reddening screen. We argue that the core ERQs are a unique obscured quasar population with extreme physical conditions related to powerful outflows across the line-forming regions. Patchy obscuration by small dusty clouds could produce the observed UV extinctions without substantial UV reddening.

  1. The optical luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts deduced from ROTSE-III observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, X. H.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W. K.; Liang, E. W.; Akerlof, C. W.; McKay, T. A.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Flewelling, H. A.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Pandey, S. B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Yost, S. A. E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: fang.yuan@anu.edu.au E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

    2014-11-10

    We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs) and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). We derive R-band fluxes for these two sub-samples 100 s after the onset of the burst. The optical LFs at 100 s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star formation rate. While fitting the optical LFs using Monte Carlo simulations, we take into account the detection function of ROTSE-III. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100 s is well described by an exponential rise and power-law decay, a broken power law,and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.

  2. THE GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS DOWN TO M{sub R} = -10 IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, Hitomi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Yagi, Masafumi; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Okamura, Sadanori; Takata, Tadafumi; Furusawa, Hisanori; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2012-08-15

    We derived the luminosity function (LF) of dwarf galaxies in the Coma Cluster down to M{sub R} = -10 at three fields located at the center, intermediate, and outskirt of the cluster. The LF (-19 < M{sub R} < -10) shows no significant differences among the three fields. It shows a clear dip at M{sub R} {approx} -13 and is composed of two distinct components of different slopes; the bright component with -19 < M{sub R} < -13 has a flatter slope than the faint component with -13 < M{sub R} < -10 which has a steep slope. The bright component (-19 < M{sub R} < -13) consists mostly of red extended galaxies including few blue galaxies whose colors are typical of late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the faint component (-13 < M{sub R} < -10) consists largely of point-spread-function-like compact galaxies. We found that both these compact galaxies and some extended galaxies are present in the center while only compact galaxies are seen in the outskirt. In the faint component, the fraction of blue galaxies is larger in the outskirt than in the center. We suggest that the dwarf galaxies in the Coma Cluster, which make up the two components in the LF, are heterogeneous with some different origins.

  3. Globular Cluster Luminosity Functions and Specific Frequencies in Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. W.; Lotz, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    We present the final results on the globular cluster luminosity functions (GCLFs) and specific frequencies (SN) from 69 dwarf elliptical galaxies in the HST Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy Snapshot Survey (Lotz et al. 2004). The GCLFs for the Virgo and Fornax clusters are well fit by a t5 function with a peak at MV0=-7.25 ± 0.2 and an equivalent Gaussian sigma of 1.2 magnitudes. These values are very similar to those of globular clusters systems in giant elliptical galaxies. We also confirm our previous results (Miller et al. 1998) that SN in nucleated dwarfs is about a factor of two higher than in non-nucleated dwarfs. We also discuss the fraction of the stellar mass in dwarf elliptical galaxies that is currently found in globular clusters. Supported by the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., on behalf of the international Gemini partnership of Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

  4. Luminosity function of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, KwangHo; Khandai, Nishikanta; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu

    2015-09-18

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [OII] emission line luminosity L([OII]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [OII] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([OII]) = 1043.0 erg s–1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [OII] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([OII]) = 1041.6 erg s–1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [OII] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [OII] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from –3 to –2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)–1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ~3(z + 1)–1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [OIII] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. As a result, we show that the auto-correlation function of [OII] and [OIII] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  5. The rate, luminosity function and time delay of non-Collapsar short GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderman, David; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-04-01

    We estimate the rate and the luminosity function of short (hard) Gamma-Ray Bursts (sGRBs) that are non-Collapsars, using the peak fluxes and redshifts of BATSE, Swift and Fermi GRBs. Following Bromberg et al., we select a sub-sample of Swift bursts which are most likely non-Collapsars. We find that these sGRBs are delayed relative to the global star formation rate (SFR) with a typical delay time of a 3-4 Gyr (depending on the SFR model). However, if two or three sGRB at high redshifts have been missed because of selection effects, a distribution of delay times of ∝ 1/t would be also compatible. The current event rate of these non-Collapsar sGRBs with Liso > 5 × 1049 erg s-1 is 4.1_{-1.9}^{+2.3} Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1}. The rate was significantly larger around z ˜ 1 and it declines since that time. The luminosity function we find is a broken power law with a break at 2.0_{-0.4}^{+1.4} × 10^{52} erg s^{-1} and power-law indices 0.95_{-0.1 2}^{+0.12} and 2.0_{-0.8}^{+1.0}. When considering the whole Swift sGRB sample we find that it is composed of two populations: one group (≈60-80 per cent of Swift sGRBs) with the above rate and time delay and a second group (≈20-40 per cent of Swift sGRBs) of potential `impostors' that follow the SFR with no delay. These two populations are in very good agreement with the division of sGRBs to non-Collapsars and Collapsars suggested recently by Bromberg et al. If non-Collapsar sGRBs arise from neutron star merger this rate suggest a detection rate of 3-100 yr-1 by a future gravitational wave detectors (e.g. Advanced Ligo/Virgo with detection horizon on 300 Mpc), and a co-detection with Fermi (Swift ) rate of 0.1-1 yr-1 (0.02-0.14 yr-1). We estimate that about 4 × 10^5 (f_b^{-1}/30) mergers took place in the Milky Way. If 0.025M⊙ were ejected in each event this would have been sufficient to produce all the heavy r-process material in the Galaxy.

  6. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r˜ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color-magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r˜ 18.5 mag ({M}r˜ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  7. An empirical model for the galaxy luminosity and star formation rate function at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Oesch, Pascal A.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z ˜ 4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z > 8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass Mh by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z ˜ 4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-Mh relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 ≲ z ≲ 8 and also derive the expected UV LFs at higher redshifts. At z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 these model LFs are in excellent agreement with current observed estimates. Our predicted number densities and UV LFs at z > 10 indicate that James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect galaxies out to z ˜ 15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and associated reionization history by galaxies. Models which integrate down to the current HUDF12/XDF detection limit (MUV ˜ -17.7 mag) result in a SFRD that declines as (1 + z)-10.4 ± 0.3 at high redshift and fail to reproduce the observed cosmic microwave background electron scattering optical depth, τ ≃ 0.066, to within 1σ. On the other hand, we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit (MUV < -5.7 mag) leads to a fully reionized universe by z ˜ 6.5 and an optical depth of τ ≃ 0.054, consistent with the recently derived Planck value at the 1σ level.

  8. Luminous, High-z, Type-2 Quasars are Still Missing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rivera, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    A simple unified model suggests that there should be roughly equal numbers of type-1 (unobscured) and type 2 (obscured) quasars. However, we argue that the expected population of luminous, high-z, type-2 quasars are still missing. While large numbers of type-2 AGNs have now been identified (both via spectroscopy and through color-based arguments in the optical, IR, and X-ray), the vast majority of these are low-luminosity objects at z<1, whereas only handfuls of bonafide type-2 quasars are confirmed at redshifts z~2 with bolometric luminosities that are comparable to the typical luminosity of SDSS type-1 quasars. Although some analyses find the density of high-z, type-2 candidates to be much higher than the type-1 population (at similar bolometric luminosity), our revisiting of the problem through an archival spectroscopic search reveals that the confirmed high-z, type-2 population is only a fraction of the high-z, type-1 quasar population to a depth of WISE W4<8. As most interpretations of the "unified model" predict similar numbers of type-1 and type-2 quasars, this conspicuous lack of luminous type-2 quasars at high-redshift constitutes a major unsolved problem. To uncover these missing type-2 quasars, we explore a candidate selection algorithm that utilizes the sky area of AllWISE, the depth/resolution of large-area Spitzer-IRAC surveys, and optical data from the SDSS.

  9. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  10. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V.

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no

  11. Revisiting the axion bounds from the Galactic white dwarf luminosity function

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, M.M. Miller; Melendez, B.E.; Althaus, L.G.

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that the shape of the luminosity function of white dwarfs (WDLF) is a powerful tool to check for the possible existence of DFSZ-axions, a proposed but not yet detected type of weakly interacting particles. With the aim of deriving new constraints on the axion mass, we compute in this paper new theoretical WDLFs on the basis of WD evolving models that incorporate the feedback of axions on the thermal structure of the white dwarf. We find that the impact of the axion emission into the neutrino emission can not be neglected at high luminosities M{sub  Bol}∼< 8) and that the axion emission needs to be incorporated self-consistently into the evolution of the white dwarfs when dealing with axion masses larger than m{sub a} cos {sup 2}β∼> 5 meV (i.e. axion-electron coupling constant g{sub ae}∼> 1.4× 10{sup -13}). We went beyond previous works by including 5 different derivations of the WDLF in our analysis. Then we have performed χ{sup 2}-tests to have a quantitative measure of the agreement between the theoretical WDLFs — computed under the assumptions of different axion masses and normalization methods --- and the observed WDLFs of the Galactic disk. While all the WDLF studied in this work disfavour axion masses in the range suggested by asteroseismology m{sub a} cos {sup 2}β∼> 10 meV; g{sub ae}∼> 2.8× 10{sup -13}) lower axion masses can not be discarded from our current knowledge of the WDLF of the Galactic Disk. A larger set of completely independent derivations of the WDLF of the galactic disk as well as a detailed study of the uncertainties of the theoretical WDLFs is needed before quantitative constraints on the axion-electron coupling constant can be made.

  12. Effect of primordial non-Gaussianities on the far-UV luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies: implications for cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Silk, Joseph; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Habouzit, Melanie; Mamon, Gary A.; Peirani, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) was reionized at z ≳ 6 is one of the big challenges of current high-redshift astronomy. It requires modelling the collapse of the first astrophysical objects (Pop III stars, first galaxies) and their interaction with the IGM, while at the same time pushing current observational facilities to their limits. The observational and theoretical progress of the last few years have led to the emergence of a coherent picture in which the budget of hydrogen-ionizing photons is dominated by low-mass star-forming galaxies, with little contribution from Pop III stars and quasars. The reionization history of the Universe therefore critically depends on the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshift. In this work, we explore how changes in the cosmological model, and in particular in the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations, affect the formation of early galaxies. Following Habouzit et al. (2014), we run five different N-body simulations with Gaussian and (scale-dependent) non-Gaussian initial conditions, all consistent with Planck constraints. By appealing to a phenomenological galaxy formation model and to a population synthesis code, we compute the far-UV galaxy luminosity function down to MFUV = -14 at redshift 7 ≤ z ≤ 15. We find that models with strong primordial non-Gaussianities on ≲ Mpc scales show a far-UV luminosity function significantly enhanced (up to a factor of 3 at z = 14) in low-mass galaxies. We adopt a reionization model calibrated from state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations and show that such scale-dependent non-Gaussianities leave a clear imprint on the Universe reionization history and electron Thomson scattering optical depth τe. Although current uncertainties in the physics of reionization and on the determination of τe still dominate the signatures of non-Gaussianities, our results suggest that τe could ultimately be used to constrain the statistical properties

  13. Towards a New Distance Scale and Luminosity Function for Nearby Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.; Parker, Q. A.

    The local planetary nebula (PN) census is dominated by extremely evolved examples, and until recently, was incomplete. New discoveries from the AAO/UKST Hα Survey and SHASSA, have partially remedied this problem. In addition, we find that some currently accepted nearby PNe are in fact Strömgren spheres in the ISM ionised by a hot white dwarf. Distance estimates for a robust sample of calibrating PNe from the literature, plus new distances for a number of highly evolved PNe, have allowed a new Hα surface brightness - radius relationship to be devised as a useful distance indicator. It covers >6 dex in SB, and while the spread in SB is ˜1 dex at a given radius, optically thick (mainly bipolar and bipolar-core) PNe tend to populate the upper bound of the trend, while common-envelope PNe and very high-excitation PNe form a sharp lower boundary. Hence, distances can be estimated for all remaining local PNe, allowing the definition of a relatively complete census of PNe in the solar neighbourhood within 1.0 kpc. This provides a first look at the faint end of the PN luminosity function, and new estimates of the space density, scale height, total number, and birth rate of Galactic PNe.

  14. Evolution of the Mass and Luminosity Functions of Globular Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Fall, S. Michael

    2016-12-01

    We reexamine the dynamical evolution of the mass and luminosity functions of globular star clusters (GCMF and GCLF). Fall & Zhang (2001, FZ01) showed that a power-law MF, as commonly seen among young cluster systems, would evolve by dynamical processes over a Hubble time into a peaked MF with a shape very similar to the observed GCMF in the Milky Way and other galaxies. To simplify the calculations, the semi-analytical FZ01 model adopted the “classical” theory of stellar escape from clusters, and neglected variations in the M/L ratios of clusters. Kruijssen & Portegies Zwart (2009, KPZ09) modified the FZ01 model to include “retarded” and mass-dependent stellar escape, the latter causing significant M/L variations. KPZ09 asserted that their model was compatible with observations, whereas the FZ01 model was not. We show here that this claim is not correct; the FZ01 and KPZ09 models fit the observed Galactic GCLF equally well. We also show that there is no detectable correlation between M/L and L for GCs in the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies, in contradiction with the KPZ09 model. Our comparisons of the FZ01 and KPZ09 models with observations can be explained most simply if stars escape at rates approaching the classical limit for high-mass clusters, as expected on theoretical grounds.

  15. A Revised Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function Distance to NGC 628 Using MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, K.; Groves, B.; Bigiel, F.; Blanc, G. A.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Hughes, A.; Schruba, A.; Schinnerer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Distance uncertainties plague our understanding of the physical scales relevant to the physics of star formation in extragalactic studies. The planetary nebulae luminosity function (PNLF) is one of very few techniques that can provide distance estimates to within ˜10% however, it requires a planetary nebula (PN) sample that is uncontaminated by other ionizing sources. We employ optical integral field unit spectroscopy using the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer on the Very Large Telescope to measure [O iii] line fluxes for sources unresolved on 50 pc scales within the central star-forming galaxy disk of NGC 628. We use diagnostic line ratios to identify 62 PNe, 30 supernova remnants, and 87 H ii regions within our fields. Using the 36 brightest PNe, we determine a new PNLF distance modulus of {29.91}-0.13+0.08 mag (9.59{}-0.57+0.35 Mpc), which is in good agreement with literature values, but significantly larger than the previously reported PNLF distance. We are able to explain the discrepancy and recover the previous result when we reintroduce SNR contaminants to our sample. This demonstrates the power of full spectral information over narrowband imaging in isolating PNe. Given our limited spatial coverage within the Galaxy, we show that this technique can be used to refine distance estimates, even when IFU observations cover only a fraction of a galaxy disk.

  16. Semi-transparent Perovskite Solar Cells Developed by Considering Human Luminosity Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyu Min; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2017-09-06

    Semi-transparent solar cells draw a great deal of attention because their applications include, for instance, photovoltaic windows. General approach to semi-transparent cells is using thin active layers or island-type structures. Here we take human luminosity function into account, and develop solar cells that harvest photons in the wavelength regions in which human eyes are less sensitive to light. We used an organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite, which is sensitive to light particularly in the blue and deep-blue regions, and plasmonic silver nanocubes that enhance light harvesting in the red and deep-red ranges. In order to tune the plasmonic wavelength to that range, we took advantage of electrode-coupled plasmons (ECPs). We prepared non-plasmonic semi-transparent solar cells, and reduced the active layer thickness and introduced ECPs, so that the visual transparency index and power conversion efficiency of the cell were improved by 28% and 6%, respectively, of the initial values.

  17. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  18. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function and the Age of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Oswalt, T. D.

    1996-12-01

    We present the results for the White Dwarf Luminosity Function (WDLF) derived from our entire sample of common proper motion binaries (CPMBs) containing white dwarfs (WDs). Approximately 170 WDs are contained in our study which makes it one of the largest samples ever used in the determination of the WDLF. We will discuss our sample selection and completion techniques and the constraint this sample places on the debate about the age of the Galaxy and ultimately the Universe. The WDs in this study were identified spectroscopically [Oswalt et al. in White Dwarfs, ed. G. Wegner, (Springer: Berlin), (1990)] and satisfy the limits [V < 18.50, mu > 0.10 "/yr] over which the sample's incompleteness is well-behaved (and hence correctible). The size of this sample allows us to set firm limits on the age of Galactic disk, making use of the latest interior [Wood, in White Dwarfs, eds. D. Koester & K. Werner (Kluwer: Dordrecht), 1995] and atmosphere [Bergeron, P., et al. Astrophys. J. 449, 258-279, 1995] models. Our new results, which strengthen the >= 9.5(+1.1}_{-0.8) Gyr(1 sigma ) age for the Galactic disk [Oswalt et al. Nature 382, 692 (1996)], will be presented. JAS gratefully acknowledges support from the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program, grant NGT-51086 and TDO gratefully acknowledges support from NSF grant AST 90-16284.

  19. Correcting the z ˜ 8 Galaxy Luminosity Function for Gravitational Lensing Magnification Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Treu, Tommaso; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Collett, Thomas E.; Trenti, Michele; Marshall, Philip J.; Barone-Nugent, Robert; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Wyithe, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    We present a Bayesian framework to account for the magnification bias from both strong and weak gravitational lensing in estimates of high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions (LFs). We illustrate our method by estimating the z ˜ 8 UV LF using a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts (Lyman break galaxies) found in the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey and from the literature. We find the LF is well described by a Schechter function with characteristic magnitude of {{M}\\star }=-19.85-0.35+0.30, faint-end slope of α =-1.72-0.29+0.30, and number density of {{log }10}{{{\\Psi }}\\star }(Mp{{c}-3})=-3.00-0.31+0.23. These parameters are consistent within the uncertainties with those inferred from the same sample without accounting for the magnification bias, demonstrating that the effect is small for current surveys at z ˜ 8, and cannot account for the apparent overdensity of bright galaxies compared to a Schechter function found recently by Bowler et al. and Finkelstein et al. We estimate that the probability of finding a strongly lensed z ˜ 8 source in our sample is in the range ˜3-15% depending on limiting magnitude. We identify one strongly lensed candidate and three cases of intermediate lensing in BoRG (estimated magnification μ > 1.4) in addition to the previously known candidate group-scale strong lens. Using a range of theoretical LFs we conclude that magnification bias will dominate wide field surveys—such as those planned for the Euclid and WFIRST missions—especially at z > 10. Magnification bias will need to be accounted for in order to derive accurate estimates of high-redshift LFs in these surveys and to distinguish between galaxy formation models.

  20. Quasars Are Not Light Bulbs: Testing Models of Quasar Lifetimes with the Observed Eddington Ratio Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Hernquist, Lars

    2009-06-01

    We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of quasar/active galactic nucleus (AGN) lifetimes and light curves. Given the observed (well constrained) AGN luminosity function, a particular model for AGN light curves L(t) or, equivalently, the distribution of AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity t(>L)) translates directly and uniquely (without further assumptions) to a predicted distribution of Eddington ratios at each BH mass. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a self-regulating "decay" or "blowout" phase after the AGN reaches some peak luminosity/BH mass and begins to expel gas and shut down accretion, make specific predictions for the light curves/lifetimes, distinct from, e.g., the expected distribution if AGN simply shut down by gas starvation (without feedback) and very different from the prediction of simple phenomenological "light bulb" scenarios. We show that the present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning nearly 5 orders of magnitude in Eddington ratio, 3 orders of magnitude in BH mass, and redshifts z = 0-1, agree well with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out phenomenological "light bulb" or pure exponential models, as well as gas starvation models, at high significance (~5σ). We also compare with observations of the distribution of Eddington ratios at a given AGN luminosity, and find similar good agreement (but show that these observations are much less constraining). We fit the functional form of the quasar lifetime distribution and provide these fits for use, and show how the Eddington ratio distributions place precise, tight limits on the AGN lifetimes at various luminosities, in agreement with model predictions. We compare with independent estimates of episodic lifetimes and use this to constrain the shape of the typical AGN light curve, and provide simple analytic fits to these for use in

  1. The VIMOS-VLT deep survey. Evolution of the galaxy luminosity function up to z = 2 in first epoch data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Tresse, L.; Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Arnouts, S.; Zamorani, G.; Pozzetti, L.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J.-P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pello, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Ciliegi, P.; Lamareille, F.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-09-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) from the present to z = 2 in five (U, B, V, R and I) rest-frame band-passes. We use the first epoch VVDS deep sample of 11 034 spectra selected at 17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24.0, on which we apply the Algorithm for Luminosity Function (ALF), described in this paper. We observe a substantial evolution with redshift of the global luminosity functions in all bands. From z = 0.05 to z = 2, we measure a brightening of the characteristic magnitude M* included in the magnitude range 1.8-2.5, 1.7-2.4, 1.2-1.9, 1.1-1.8 and 1.0-1.6 in the U, B, V, R and I rest-frame bands, respectively. We confirm this differential evolution of the luminosity function with rest-frame wavelength from the measurement of the comoving density of bright galaxies (M ≤ M*(z = 0.1)). This density increases by a factor of around 2.6, 2.2, 1.8, 1.5, 1.5 between z=0.05 and z=1 in the U, B, V, R, I bands, respectively. We also measure a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the luminosity functions, with Δα ˜ -0.3 between z=0.05 and z=1, similar in all bands.

  2. Luminosity and mass functions of the three main sequences of the globular cluster NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Cassisi, S.; Anderson, J.; Marino, A. F.; Pietrinferni, A.; Aparicio, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-precision HST photometry has revealed that the globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 hosts a triple main sequence (MS) corresponding to three stellar populations with different helium abundances. We carried out photometry on ACS/WFC HST images of NGC 2808 with the main purpose of measuring the luminosity function (LF) of stars in the three different MSs, and the binary fraction in the cluster. We used isochrones to transform the observed LFs into mass functions (MFs). We estimate that the fraction of binary systems in NGC 2808 is fbin ≃ 0.05, and find that the three MSs have very similar LFs. The slopes of the corresponding MFs are α = -1.2 ± 0.3 for the red MS, α = -0.9 ± 0.3 for the middle MS, and α = -0.9 ± 0.4 for the blue one, the same, to within the errors. There is marginal evidence of a MF flattening for masses ℳ ≤ 0.6ℳ⊙ for the the reddest (primordial) MS. These results represent the first direct measurement of the present-day MF and LF in distinct stellar populations of a GC, and provide constraints on models of the formation and evolution of multiple generations of stars in these objects. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, under the programs GO-9899 and GO-10922.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. The luminosity and stellar mass functions of red W1-W2 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. A.; Rosenberg, J. L.; Satyapal, S.; Secrest, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of nearby galaxies as a function of their [3.4]-[4.6] colour. Galaxies that are red in their [3.4]-[4.6] colour contain heated dust and the reddest systems ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.5) are classified as active galactic nuclei (AGN) by some selection criteria. The sample discussed here includes nearby galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that are also in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogue. We calculate the number density of galaxies, in the form of the luminosity and mass functions, using the V/Vmax method and a stepwise maximum likelihood method that has been modified to account for the additional colour selection. The reddest galaxies which have [3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8 and are sometimes classified as AGN by their colour make up 0.2 per cent of nearby galaxies. However, the reddest galaxies are a rising fraction of the low-mass galaxy population. Identifying the lowest mass (M < 108 M⊙) red ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8) galaxies as AGN is surprising given that none are optical AGN or composites, in contrast with their more massive (M > 1010 M⊙) red galaxy counterparts that are dominated by optical AGN and composites (86.4 per cent). We also show that these low-mass red galaxies are associated with higher specific star formation rates than their bluer counterparts. While the properties of this relatively rare segment of nearby low-mass galaxies are intriguing, particularly if they are associated with AGN activity, there is not yet enough evidence to determine whether it is AGN or unusual star formation that is driving red colours in these systems.

  4. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. The Luminosity Function of Globular Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; McLaughlin, Dean E.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Peng, Eric W.; Mei, Simona; Villegas, Daniela; Merritt, David; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the luminosity function of the globular clusters (GCs) belonging to the early-type galaxies observed in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We have obtained maximum likelihood estimates for a Gaussian representation of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) for 89 galaxies. We have also fit the luminosity functions with an ``evolved Schechter function'', which is meant to reflect the preferential depletion of low-mass GCs, primarily by evaporation due to two-body relaxation, from an initial Schechter mass function similar to that of young massive clusters in local starbursts and mergers. We find a highly significant trend of the GCLF dispersion σ with galaxy luminosity, in the sense that the GC systems in smaller galaxies have narrower luminosity functions. The GCLF dispersions of our Galaxy and M31 are quantitatively in keeping with this trend, and thus the correlation between σ and galaxy luminosity would seem more fundamental than older notions that the GCLF dispersion depends on Hubble type. We show that this narrowing of the GCLF in a Gaussian description is driven by a steepening of the cluster mass function above the classic turnover mass, as one moves to lower luminosity host galaxies. In a Schechter function description, this is reflected by a steady decrease in the value of the exponential cutoff mass scale. We argue that this behavior at the high-mass end of the GC mass function is most likely a consequence of systematic variations of the initial cluster mass function rather than long-term dynamical evolution. The GCLF turnover mass MTO is roughly constant, at MTO~=(2.2+/-0.4)×105 Msolar in bright galaxies, but it decreases slightly (by ~35% on average, with significant scatter) in dwarf galaxies with MB,gal>~-18. It could be important to allow for this effect when using the GCLF as a distance indicator. We show that part, although perhaps not all, of the variation could arise from the shorter dynamical friction timescales in less

  5. Inclination-dependent Luminosity Function of Spiral Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Implications for Dust Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhengyi; Xiao, Quanbao; Shen, Shiyin; Mo, H. J.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Deng, Zugan

    2007-04-01

    Using a sample of 61,506 spiral galaxies selected from the SDSS DR2, we examine the luminosity function (LF) of spiral galaxies with different inclination angles. We find that the characteristic luminosity of the LF, L*, decreases with increasing inclination, while the faint-end slope, α, depends only weakly on it. The inclination dependence of the LF is consistent with that expected from a simple model in which the optical depth is proportional to the cosine of the inclination angle, and we use a likelihood method to recover both the coefficient in front of the cosine, γ, and the LF for galaxies viewed face-on. The value of γ is quite independent of galaxy luminosity in a given band, and the values of γ obtained in this way for the five SDSS bands give an extinction curve that is a power law of wavelength (τ~λ-n), with a power index of n=0.96+/-0.04. Using the dust extinction for galaxies obtained by Kauffmann and coworkers, we derive an ``extinction-corrected'' luminosity function for spiral galaxies. Dust extinction makes M* dimmer by ~0.5 mag in the z band and by ~1.2 mag in the u band. Since our analysis is based on a sample in which selection effects are well under control, the dimming of edge-on galaxies relative to face-on galaxies is best explained by assuming that galaxy disks are optically thick in dust absorption.

  6. THE COSMIC RATE, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND INTRINSIC CORRELATIONS OF LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2010-03-01

    We calculate durations and spectral parameters for 207 Swift bursts detected by the Burst Alert Telescope from 2007 April to 2009 August, including 67 events with measured redshifts. This is the first supplement to our catalog of 425 Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; 147 with redshifts) starting from GRB 041220. This complete and extensive data set, analyzed with a unified methodology, allows us to conduct an accurate census of intrinsic GRB energetics, hardnesses, durations, and redshifts. The GRB world model we derive reproduces well the observables from both Swift and pre-Swift satellites. Comparing to the cosmic star formation rate, we estimate that only about 0.1% of massive stars explode as bright GRBs. There is strong evidence for evolution in the Swift population at intermediate and high-z, and we can rule out (at the 5sigma level) that this is due to evolution in the luminosity function of GRBs. Instead, the Swift sample suggests a modest propensity for low metallicity, evidenced by an increase in the rate density with redshift. Treating the multivariate data and selection effects rigorously, we find a real, intrinsic correlation between E{sub iso} and E{sub pk} (and possibly also T{sub r45,z}); however, the correlation is not a narrow log-log relation and its observed appearance is strongly detector-dependent. We also estimate the high-z rate (3%-9% of GRBs at z beyond 5) and discuss the extent of a large missing population of low-E{sub pk,obs} X-ray flashes as well as a potentially large missing population of short-duration GRBs that will be probed by EXIST.

  7. High–frequency cluster radio galaxies: Luminosity functions and implications for SZE–selected cluster samples

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, Nikhel; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; ...

    2017-01-15

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the meta-catalogue of X-ray-detected clusters of galaxies (MCXC; < z > = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multifrequency catalogue of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which ismore » negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogues. We find that the high-frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass–observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 per cent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. As a result, allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 per cent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.« less

  8. The global 21-cm signal in the context of the high- z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sun, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    We build a new model for the global 21-cm signal that is calibrated to measurements of the high-z galaxy luminosity function (LF) and further tuned to match the Thomson scattering optical depth of the cosmic microwave background, τe. Assuming that the z ≲ 8 galaxy population can be smoothly extrapolated to higher redshifts, the recent decline in best-fitting values of τe and the inefficient heating induced by X-ray binaries (the presumptive sources of the high-z X-ray background) imply that the entirety of cosmic reionization and reheating occurs at z ≲ 12. In contrast to past global 21-cm models, whose z ˜ 20 (ν ˜ 70 MHz) absorption features and strong ˜25 mK emission features were driven largely by the assumption of efficient early star formation and X-ray heating, our new models peak in absorption at ν ˜ 110 MHz at depths ˜-160 mK and have negligible emission components. Current uncertainties in the faint-end of the LF, binary populations in star-forming galaxies, and UV and X-ray escape fractions introduce ˜20 MHz (˜50 mK) deviations in the trough's frequency (amplitude), while emission signals remain weak (≲10 mK) and are confined to ν ≳ 140 MHz. These predictions, which are intentionally conservative, suggest that the detection of a 21-cm absorption minimum at frequencies below ˜90 MHz and/or emission signals stronger than ˜10mK at ν ≲ 140 MHz would provide strong evidence for `new' sources at high redshifts, such as Population III stars and their remnants.

  9. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  10. On the faint-end of the high-z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Bin; Ferrara, Andrea; Xu, Yidong

    2016-12-01

    Recent measurements of the luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, z ≳ 6) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass haloes can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parametrization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude ˜-9. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in haloes with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s-1, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude ˜-15, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at z ˜ 5. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than ˜-13 and smaller than ˜-8 are typically older. Hence, the stellar age-UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.

  11. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 percent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  12. DEEP ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT THE INFALL REGION OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Jenkins, L.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2012-02-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M{sub UV} = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes ({alpha} Almost-Equal-To -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parameterization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of {alpha} Almost-Equal-To -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than {alpha} = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star-forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star-forming galaxies show a turnover at M{sub UV} Almost-Equal-To -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star-forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M{sub *} = 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star-forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star-forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star-forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  13. High-frequency cluster radio galaxies: luminosity functions and implications for SZE-selected cluster samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-05-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the meta-catalogue of X-ray-detected clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multifrequency catalogue of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogues. We find that the high-frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 per cent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 per cent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  14. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  15. Properties of galaxies at the faint end of the Hα luminosity function at z ~ 0.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Gallego, Jesús; Villar, Víctor; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Clément, Benjamin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Context. Studies measuring the star formation rate density, luminosity function, and properties of star-forming galaxies are numerous. However, it exists a gap at 0.5 < z < 0.8 in Hα-based studies. Aims: Our main goal is to study the properties of a sample of faint Hα emitters at z ~ 0.62. We focus on their contribution to the faint end of the luminosity function and derived star formation rate density, characterising their morphologies and basic photometric and spectroscopic properties. Methods: We use a narrow-band technique in the near-infrared, with a filter centred at 1.06 μm. The data come from ultra-deep VLT/HAWK-I observations in the GOODS-S field with a total of 31.9 h in the narrow-band filter. In addition to our survey, we mainly make use of ancillary data coming from the CANDELS and Rainbow Cosmological Surveys Database, from the 3D-HST for comparison, and also spectra from the literature. We perform a visual classification of the sample and study their morphologies from structural parameters available in CANDELS. In order to obtain the luminosity function, we apply a traditional V/Vmax method and perform individual extinction corrections for each object to accurately trace the shape of the function. Results: Our 28 Hα-selected sample of faint star-forming galaxies reveals a robust faint-end slope of the luminosity function α = - 1.46-0.08+0.16 . The derived star formation rate density at z ~ 0.62 is ρSFR = 0.036-0.008+0.012 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 . The sample is mainly composed of disks, but an important contribution of compact galaxies with Sérsic indexes n ~ 2 display the highest specific star formation rates. Conclusions: The luminosity function at z ~ 0.62 from our ultra-deep data points towards a steeper α when an individual extinction correction for each object is applied. Compact galaxies are low-mass, low-luminosity, and starburst-dominated objects with a light profile in an intermediate stage from early to late types. Based on observations

  16. X-ray properties of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, W. H.-M.; Helfand, D. J.; Lucy, L. B.

    1980-01-01

    The X-ray properties of 111 catalogued quasars have been examined with the imaging proportional counter on board the Einstein Observatory. Thirty-five of the objects, of redshift between 0.064 and 3.53, were detected as X-ray sources. The 0.5-4.5-keV X-ray properties of these quasars are correlated with their optical and radio continuum properties and with their redshifts and variability characteristics. The X-ray luminosity of quasars tends to be highest for those objects which are bright in the optical and radio regimes and which exhibit optically violent variability. These observations suggest that quasars should be divided into two classes on the basis of radio luminosities, spectra, evolution and underlying morphology and that quasars can make up a significant portion of the diffuse soft X-ray background only if the slope of the optical quasar log N-log S relation is steeper than 2 to m sub b of about 21.5.

  17. The kinetically dominated quasar 3C 418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian; Kharb, Preeti

    2017-06-01

    The existence of quasars that are kinetically dominated, where the jet kinetic luminosity, Q, is larger than the total (infrared to X-ray) thermal luminosity of the accretion flow, Lbol, provides a strong constraint on the fundamental physics of relativistic jet formation. Since quasars have high values of Lbol by definition, only ˜10 kinetically dominated quasars (with \\overline{Q}/L_{bol}>1) have been found, where \\overline{Q} is the long-term time-averaged jet power. We use low-frequency (151 MHz-1.66 GHz) observations of the quasar 3C 418 to determine \\overline{Q}≈ 5.5 ± 1.3 × 10^{46} {erg s^{-1}}. Analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum indicates that this equates to 0.57 ± 0.28 times the Eddington luminosity of the central supermassive black hole and \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} ≈ 4.8 ± 3.1, making 3C 418 one of the most kinetically dominated quasars found to date. It is shown that this maximal \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} is consistent with models of magnetically arrested accretion of jet production in which the jet production reproduces the observed trend of a decrement in the extreme ultraviolet continuum as the jet power increases. This maximal condition corresponds to an almost complete saturation of the inner accretion flow with vertical large-scale magnetic flux (maximum saturation).

  18. Hard X-ray luminosity function of tidal disruption events: First results from the MAXI extragalactic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Hori, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Mihara, Tatehiro

    2016-08-01

    We derive the first hard X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), which gives an occurrence rate of TDEs per unit volume as a function of peak luminosity and redshift, utilizing an unbiased sample observed by the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). On the basis of the light curves characterized by a power-law decay with an index of -5/3, a systematic search using the MAXI data detected four TDEs in the first 37 months of observations, all of which have been found in the literature. To formulate the TDE XLF, we consider the mass function of SMBHs, that of disrupted stars, the specific TDE rate as a function of SMBH mass, and the fraction of TDEs with relativistic jets. We perform an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the MAXI TDE list and check the consistency with the observed TDE rate in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The results suggest that the intrinsic fraction of the jet-accompanying events is 0.0007%-34%. We confirm that at z ≲ 1.5 the contamination of the hard X-ray luminosity functions of active galactic nuclei by TDEs is not significant and hence that their contribution to the growth of SMBHs is negligible at the redshifts.

  19. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  20. First discoveries of z ˜ 6 quasars with the Kilo-Degree Survey and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venemans, B. P.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Mwebaze, J.; Valentijn, E. A.; Bañados, E.; Decarli, R.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Findlay, J. R.; Kuijken, K. H.; Barbera, F. La; McFarland, J. P.; McMahon, R. G.; Napolitano, N.; Sikkema, G.; Sutherland, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of our first year of quasar search in the ongoing ESO public Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) surveys. These surveys are among the deeper wide-field surveys that can be used to uncover large numbers of z ˜ 6 quasars. This allows us to probe a more common population of z ˜ 6 quasars that is fainter than the well-studied quasars from the main Sloan Digital Sky Survey. From this first set of combined survey catalogues covering ˜250 deg2 we selected point sources down to ZAB = 22 that had a very red i - Z (i - Z > 2.2) colour. After follow-up imaging and spectroscopy, we discovered four new quasars in the redshift range 5.8 < z < 6.0. The absolute magnitudes at a rest-frame wavelength of 1450 Å are between -26.6 < M1450 < -24.4, confirming that we can find quasars fainter than M*, which at z = 6 has been estimated to be between M* = -25.1 and M* = -27.6. The discovery of four quasars in 250 deg2 of survey data is consistent with predictions based on the z ˜ 6 quasar luminosity function. We discuss various ways to push the candidate selection to fainter magnitudes and we expect to find about 30 new quasars down to an absolute magnitude of M1450 = -24. Studying this homogeneously selected faint quasar population will be important to gain insight into the onset of the co-evolution of the black holes and their stellar hosts.

  1. THE FAINT-END SLOPE OF THE REDSHIFT 5.7 Ly{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Alaina L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick; Sawicki, Marcin

    2012-01-10

    Using new Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy, we examine the origin of the steep number counts of ultra-faint emission-line galaxies recently reported by Dressler et al. We confirm six Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs), three of which have significant asymmetric line profiles with prominent wings extending 300-400 km s{sup -1} redward of the peak emission. With these six LAEs, we revise our previous estimate of the number of faint LAEs in the Dressler et al. survey. Combining these data with the density of bright LAEs in the Cosmic Evolution Survey and Subaru Deep Field provides the best constraints to date on the redshift 5.7 LAE luminosity function (LF). Schechter function parameters, {phi}* = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}, L* = 9.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, and {alpha} = -1.70, are estimated using a maximum likelihood technique with a model for slit-losses. To place this result in the context of the UV-selected galaxy population, we investigate how various parameterizations of the Ly{alpha} equivalent width distribution, along with the measured UV-continuum LF, affect shape and normalization of the Ly{alpha} LF. The nominal model, which uses z {approx} 6 equivalent widths from the literature, falls short of the observed space density of LAEs at the bright end, possibly indicating a need for higher equivalent widths. This parameterization of the equivalent width distribution implies that as many as 50% of our faintest LAEs should have M{sub UV} > -18.0, rendering them undetectable in even the deepest Hubble Space Telescope surveys at this redshift. Hence, ultra-deep emission-line surveys find some of the faintest galaxies ever observed at the end of the reionization epoch. Such faint galaxies likely enrich the intergalactic medium with metals and maintain its ionized state in the post-reionization era. Observations of these objects provide a glimpse of the building blocks of present-day galaxies at an early time.

  2. STAR FORMATION IN THE BULLET CLUSTER. I. THE INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE ,

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Mi Chung; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Markevitch, Maxim; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2010-12-20

    The Bullet Cluster is a massive galaxy cluster at z = 0.297 undergoing a major supersonic (Mach 3) merger event. Using data from Spitzer MIPS and the Infrared Array Camera, optical imaging, and optical spectroscopy, we present the global star formation rate (SFR) of this unique cluster. Using a 90% spectroscopically complete sample of 37 star-forming MIPS confirmed cluster members out to R < 1.7 Mpc, and the Rieke et al. relation to convert from 24 {mu}m flux to SFR, we calculate an integrated obscured SFR of 267 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a specific SFR of 28 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} per 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. The cluster mass normalized integrated SFR of the Bullet Cluster is among the highest in a sample of eight other clusters and cluster mergers from the literature. Five LIRGs and one ULIRG contribute 30% and 40% of the total SFR of the cluster, respectively. To investigate the origin of the elevated specific SFR, we compare the infrared luminosity function (IR LF) of the Bullet Cluster to those of Coma (evolved to z = 0.297) and CL1358+62. The Bullet Cluster IR LF exhibits an excess of sources compared to the IR LFs of the other massive clusters. A Schechter function fit of the Bullet Cluster IR LF yields L* = 44.68 {+-} 0.11 erg s{sup -1}, which is {approx}0.25 and 0.35 dex brighter than L* of evolved Coma and CL1358+62, respectively. The elevated IR LF of the Bullet Cluster relative to other clusters can be explained if we attribute the 'excess' star-forming IR galaxies to a population associated with the infalling group that has not yet been transformed into quiescent galaxies. In this case, the timescale required for quenching star formation in the cluster environment must be longer than the timescale since the group's accretion-a few hundred million years. We suggest that 'strangulation' is likely to be an important process in the evolution of star formation in clusters.

  3. X-ray studies of quasars with the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Branduardi, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Feigelson, E.; Giacconi, R.; Henry, J. P.; Avni, Y.; Elvis, M.; Pye, J. P.; Soltan, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the X-ray properties of quasars conducted using the Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2) are reported. The positions, fluxes and luminosities of 35 known quasars were observed by the Einstein high-resolution imaging detector and the imaging proportional counter. Assuming optical redshifts as valid distance indicators, 0.5-4.5 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 10 to the 43rd to 10 to the 47 ergs/sec are obtained, with evidence of very little cold gas absorption. Flux variability on a time scale of less than 10,000 sec is observed for the quasar OX 169, which implies a mass between 8 x 10 to the 5th and 2 x 10 to the 8th solar masses for the black hole assumed to be responsible for the emission. Preliminary results of the quasar survey also indicate that quasars contribute significantly to the diffuse X-ray background.

  4. The Evolution of the Galaxy Rest-Frame Ultraviolet Luminosity Function Over the First Two Billion Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Papovich, Casey; Dickinson, Mark; Song, Mimi; Somerville, Rachel; Ferguson, Henry C.; Salmon, Brett; Giavalisco, Mauro; Koekomoer, Anton M.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Behroozi, Peter; Castellano, Marco; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Fontana, Adriano; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Jaacks, Jason; Kocevski, Dale D.; Livermore, Rachael; McLure, Ross J.; Merlin, Emiliano; Rafelski, Marc Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function at z = 4 to 8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the CANDELS/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations near the Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1- 2403 clusters. The combination of these surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 ×10(exp 6) Mpc(exp 3) over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for bright (M(sub UV) less than -21) and faint (M(sub UV) = -18) galaxies. We select galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 galaxies at 3.5 less than z less than 8.5, with more than 1000 galaxies at z of approximately 6 - 8. We measure both a stepwise luminosity function for galaxies in our redshift samples, as well as a Schechter function, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end our UV luminosity functions agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright galaxies at z of greater than or equal to 6. Our bestfit value of the characteristic magnitude M* is consistent with -21 at z of greater than or equal to 5, different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift. At z = 8, a single power-law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z = 6 and 7, an exponential cutoff at the bright-end is moderately preferred. We compare our luminosity functions to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in M* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright-end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift, though a decreasing impact of feedback may also be possible. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) density by integrating our observed luminosity functions to M(sub UV) = -17, correcting for dust attenuation, and find that

  5. The Evolution of the Galaxy Rest-frame Ultraviolet Luminosity Function over the First Two Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Papovich, Casey; Dickinson, Mark; Song, Mimi; Somerville, Rachel S.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Salmon, Brett; Giavalisco, Mauro; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Behroozi, Peter; Castellano, Marco; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Fontana, Adriano; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Jaacks, Jason; Kocevski, Dale D.; Livermore, Rachael; McLure, Ross J.; Merlin, Emiliano; Mobasher, Bahram; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rafelski, Marc; Tilvi, Vithal; Willner, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions at z = 4-8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and the Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations near the Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1-2403 clusters. The combination of these surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 × 106 Mpc3 over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for faint ({M}{UV}=-18) and bright (M{}{UV}\\lt -21) high-redshift galaxies. We select candidate galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 candidate galaxies at 3.5 \\lt z \\lt 8.5, with >1000 galaxies at z ≈ 6-8. We measure both a stepwise luminosity function for candidate galaxies in our redshift samples, and a Schechter function, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end, our UV luminosity functions agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright candidate galaxies at z ≥slant 6. Our best-fit value of the characteristic magnitude {M}{UV}* is consistent with -21 at z ≥slant 5, which is different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift, and brighter at ˜2σ significance than previous measures at z = 6 and 7. At z = 8, a single power law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z = 6 and 7 an exponential cutoff at the bright end is moderately preferred. We compare our luminosity functions to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in {M}{UV}* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift, although a decreasing impact of feedback may also be possible. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) density by

  6. Infrared observations of the X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared observations of the recently discovered X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178 are reported. Broadband photometry of both quasars was conducted in the 1.25 to 20 micron range and spectrophotometry of 0241+622 was carried out from 1.5 to 2.5 microns. The IR energy distributions of 0241+622, MR2251-178 and the X-ray quasar 3C273 are presented, noting that for wavelengths less than 10 microns, the energy distributions of all three quasars are similar and cannot be distinguished from those of other low redshift quasars. The observed IR, visual and X-ray luminosities of the three quasars are compared and are found not to be strongly correlated. It is remarked, however, that the three X-ray quasars are the brightest known quasars at IR and visual wavelengths, which supports the suggestion that all quasars are bright X-ray emitters.

  7. The 2-10 keV unabsorbed luminosity function of AGN from the LSS, CDFS, and COSMOS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-05-01

    The XMM-Large scale structure (XMM-LSS), XMM-Cosmological evolution survey (XMM-COSMOS), and XMM-Chandra deep field south (XMM-CDFS) surveys are complementary in terms of sky coverage and depth. Together, they form a clean sample with the least possible variance in instrument effective areas and point spread function. Therefore this is one of the best samples available to determine the 2-10 keV luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their evolution. The samples and the relevant corrections for incompleteness are described. A total of 2887 AGN is used to build the LF in the luminosity interval 1042-1046 erg s-1 and in the redshift interval 0.001-4. A new method to correct for absorption by considering the probability distribution for the column density conditioned on the hardness ratio is presented. The binned luminosity function and its evolution is determined with a variant of the Page-Carrera method, which is improved to include corrections for absorption and to account for the full probability distribution of photometric redshifts. Parametric models, namely a double power law with luminosity and density evolution (LADE) or luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE), are explored using Bayesian inference. We introduce the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion (WAIC) to compare the models and estimate their predictive power. Our data are best described by the LADE model, as hinted by the WAIC indicator. We also explore the recently proposed 15-parameter extended LDDE model and find that this extension is not supported by our data. The strength of our method is that it provides unabsorbed, non-parametric estimates, credible intervals for luminosity function parameters, and a model choice based on predictive power for future data. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and NASA.Tables with the samples of the posterior probability distributions

  8. Spectral analysis of the Stromlo-APM Survey - II. Galaxy luminosity function and clustering by spectral type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, J.; Tresse, L.; Maddox, S.

    1999-11-01

    We study the luminosity function and clustering properties of subsamples of local galaxies selected from the Stromlo-APM Survey by the rest-frame equivalent widths of their Hα and [Oii] emission lines. The bJ luminosity function of star-forming galaxies has a significantly steeper faint-end slope than that for quiescent galaxies: the majority of sub-L* galaxies are currently undergoing significant star formation. Emission-line galaxies are less strongly clustered, both amongst themselves and with the general galaxy population, than are quiescent galaxies. Thus as well as being less luminous, star-forming galaxies also inhabit lower density regions of the Universe than quiescent galaxies.

  9. The gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars and implications for the GeV excess

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang E-mail: gopolang.mohlabeng@ku.edu

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs) could potentially account for the excess of GeV-scale gamma-rays observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. The viability of this scenario depends critically on the gamma-ray luminosity function of this source population, which determines how many MSPs Fermi should have already detected as resolved point sources. In this paper, we revisit the gamma-ray luminosity function of MSPs, without relying on uncertain distance measurements. Our determination, based on a comparison of models with the observed characteristics of the MSP population, suggests that Fermi should have already detected a significant number of sources associated with such a hypothesized Inner Galaxy population. We cannot rule out a scenario in which the MSPs residing near the Galactic Center are systematically less luminous than those present in the Galactic Plane or within globular clusters.

  10. The gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars and implications for the GeV excess

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-03-29

    It has been proposed that a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs) could potentially account for the excess of GeV-scale gamma-rays observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. The viability of this scenario depends critically on the gamma-ray luminosity function of this source population, which determines how many MSPs Fermi should have already detected as resolved point sources. In this paper, we revisit the gamma-ray luminosity function of MSPs, without relying on uncertain distance measurements. Our determination, based on a comparison of models with the observed characteristics of the MSP population, suggests that Fermi should have already detected a significant number of sources associated with such a hypothesized Inner Galaxy population. As a result, we cannot rule out a scenario in which the MSPs residing near the Galactic Center are systematically less luminous than those present in the Galactic Plane or within globular clusters.

  11. The gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars and implications for the GeV excess

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-03-29

    It has been proposed that a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs) could potentially account for the excess of GeV-scale gamma-rays observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. The viability of this scenario depends critically on the gamma-ray luminosity function of this source population, which determines how many MSPs Fermi should have already detected as resolved point sources. In this paper, we revisit the gamma-ray luminosity function of MSPs, without relying on uncertain distance measurements. Our determination, based on a comparison of models with the observed characteristics of the MSP population, suggests that Fermi should have already detectedmore » a significant number of sources associated with such a hypothesized Inner Galaxy population. As a result, we cannot rule out a scenario in which the MSPs residing near the Galactic Center are systematically less luminous than those present in the Galactic Plane or within globular clusters.« less

  12. THE LARGE SKY AREA MULTI-OBJECT FIBER SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE QUASAR SURVEY: QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Shen, S.-Y.; Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Yang, M.; Wu, H.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B.; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; and others

    2016-02-15

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical–infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  13. The Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope Quasar Survey: Quasar Properties from the First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Zuo, Wenwen; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Yang, M.; -Wu, H.; Shen, S.-Y.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B.; Luo, A.-L.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Zhang, H.-T.

    2016-02-01

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical-infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  14. Quasars as tracers of cosmic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewska, J.; Czerny, B.; Bilicki, M.; Hryniewicz, K.; Krupa, M.; Petrogalli, F.; Pych, W.; Kurcz, A.; Udalski, A.

    2016-10-01

    Quasars, as the most luminous persistent sources in the Universe, have broad applications for cosmological studies. In particular, they can be employed to directly measure the expansion history of the Universe, similarly to SNe Ia. The advantage of quasars is that they are numerous, cover a broad range of redshifts, up to z = 7, and do not show significant evolution of metallicity with redshift. The idea is based on the relation between the time delay of an emission line and the continuum, and the absolute monochromatic luminosity of a quasar. For intermediate redshift quasars, the suitable line is Mg II. Between December 2012 and March 2014, we performed five spectroscopic observations of the QSO CTS C30.10 (z = 0.900) using the South African Large Telesope (SALT), supplemented with photometric monitoring, with the aim of determining the variability of the line shape, changes in the total line intensity and in the continuum. We show that the method is very promising.

  15. Broad Absorption Line Quasars and Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Luminous QSOs are signposts to galaxy evolution. Local supermassive black holes are the faded relics of quasars in their heyday at redshifts ˜2. Relationships between the masses of these local supermassive black holes and their host galaxy bulges reveal an intimate link, fundamental to galaxy evolution: the newly evolving galaxy fuels the seed black hole through its accretion disk and by loss of angular momentum and energy in the form of outflowing winds. As the central engine approaches Eddington luminosities, winds drive away dusty gas, revealing a luminous QSO and halting star formation in the galaxy bulge. Relativistic winds are manifested in powerful radio jets in ˜10% of quasars, and sub-relativistic winds are revealed by broad blueshifted absorption troughs in the “broad absorption line” (BAL) quasars. Historically, BALs avoid powerful radio quasars. Here we examine the BALs to investigate this inverse connection.

  16. Confirmation of a Steep Luminosity Function for Ly alpha Emitters at z 5.7: a Major Component of Reionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Sawicki, Marcin; McCarthy, Patrick; Villaneuva, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct and robust measurement of the faint-end slope of the Ly-alpha emitter (LAE) luminosity function at z = 5.7. Candidate LAEs from a low-spectral-resolution blind search with IMACS on Magellan- Baade were targeted at higher resolution to distinguish high redshift LAEs from foreground galaxies. All but 2 of our 42 single-emission-line systems are fainter than F = 2.0×10(exp-17) ergs s(exp-1) cm(exp-2), making these the faintest emission-lines observed for a z = 5.7 sample with known completeness, an essential property for determining the faint end slope of the LAE luminosity function. We find 13 LAEs as compared to 29 foreground galaxies, in very good agreement with the modeled foreground counts predicted in Dressler et al. (2011a) that had been used to estimate a faint-end slope of alpha = -2.0 for the LAE luminosity function. A 32% LAE fraction, LAE/(LAE+foreground) within the flux interval F = 2-20 × 10(exp-18) ergs s(exp-1) cm(exp-2) constrains the faint end slope of the luminosity function to -1.95 greater than alpha greater than -2.35 (1 delta). We show how this steep LF should provide, to the limit of our observations, more than 20% of the flux necessary to maintain ionization at z = 5.7, with a factor-of-ten extrapolation in flux reaching more than 55%. We suggest that this bodes well for a comparable contribution by similar, low-mass star forming galaxies at higher-redshift - within the reionization epoch at z greater than approximately 7, only 250 Myr earlier - and that such systems provide a substantial, if not dominant, contribution to the late-stage reionization of the IGM.

  17. H II Regions in Spiral Galaxies: Size Distribution, Luminosity Function, and New Isochrone Diagnostics of Density-Wave Kinematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    conjecture to physical galaxies , placing the corotation where the distribution of H ii regions is seen to end. Tremaine & Weinberg (1984) developed an...H ii REGIONS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES : SIZE DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND NEW ISOCHRONE DIAGNOSTICS OF DENSITY-WAVE KINEMATICS M. S. Oey Lowell...Department of Physics and Astronomy, JohnsHopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 and Xiaolei Zhang Remote Sensing Division

  18. A critical analysis of the UV luminosity function at redshift ~7 from deep WFC3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Testa, V.; Boutsia, K.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Santini, P.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The study of the luminosity function (LF) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 7 is very important for ascertaining their role in the reionization of the Universe. These galaxies can be used also to investigate in detail the processes of formation and evolution of galactic structures in the infancy of our Universe. Aims: In this work we plan to perform a detailed and critical analysis of the statistical and systematic errors in the z ~ 7 LF determination. Methods: To this aim, we have assembled a large sample of candidate LBGs at z ~ 7 from different surveys, spanning a large variety of areas and depths. In particular, we have combined data from the deep (J < 27.4) and ultradeep (J < 29.2) surveys recently acquired with the new WFC3 NIR camera on HST, over the GOODS-ERS (~40 sq. arcmin) and the HUDF (~4 sq. arcmin) fields, with ground based surveys in wide and shallow areas from Hawk-I@VLT and HyperSuprimecam@Subaru. We have used public ACS images in the z band to select z-dropout galaxies, and other public data both in the blue (BVI) and in the red bands to reject possible low-redshift interlopers. We have compared our results with extensive Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the observational effects of our selection criteria as well as the effects of photometric scatter, color selections or the morphology of the candidates. Results: We have found that the number density of faint LBGs at z ~ 7 is only marginally sensitive to the color selection adopted, but it is strongly dependent from the assumption made on the half light distributions of the simulated galaxies, used to correct the observed sample for incompleteness. The slope of the faint end of the LBGs LF has thus a rather large uncertainty, due to the unknown distribution of physical sizes of the z ~ 7 LBGs. The implications of these uncertainties have been neglected by previous works. Conclusions: We conclude that galaxies at z ~ 7 are unable to reionize the Universe unless there is a

  19. The Faint-End Slopes of Galaxy Luminosity Functions in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Charles T.; Capak, Peter; Mobasher, Bahram; Paglione, Timothy A. D.; Rich, R. Michael; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Tribiano, Shana M.; Tyson, Neil D.

    2008-01-01

    We examine the faint-end slope of the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF), with respect to galaxy spectral type, of field galaxies with redshift z < 0.5, using a sample of 80,820 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the 2 deg2 Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. For all galaxy spectral types combined, the LF slope ranges from -1.24 to -1.12, from the lowest redshift bin to the highest. In the lowest redshift bin (0.02 < z < 0.1), where the magnitude limit is MVlesssim - 13, the slope ranges from α ~ - 1.1 for galaxies with early-type spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to α ~ - 1.9 for galaxies with low-extinction starburst SEDs. In each galaxy SED category (early-type, Sbc, Scd+Irr, and starburst), the faint-end slopes grow shallower with increasing redshift; in the highest redshift bin (0.4 < z < 0.5), α ~ - 0.5 and -1.3 for early types and starbursts, respectively. The steepness of α at lower redshifts could be qualitatively explained by LF evolution, or by large numbers of faint dwarf galaxies, perhaps of low surface brightness, that are not detected at higher redshifts. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555; also based on data collected at Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which are operated by AURA, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; at the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope with MegaPrime/MegaCam, operated as a joint project by the CFHT

  20. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG RED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Spoon, Henrik; Glikman, Eilat; Petric, Andreea; Schulz, Bernhard E-mail: mlacy@nrao.edu E-mail: eilat.glikman@yale.edu E-mail: bschulz@ipac.caltech.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry of 13 redshift 0.4 < z < 1 dust reddened quasars obtained with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We compare properties derived from their infrared spectral energy distributions (intrinsic active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity and far-infrared luminosity from star formation) to the host luminosities and morphologies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and black hole masses estimated from optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results are broadly consistent with models in which most dust reddened quasars are an intermediate phase between a merger-driven starburst triggering a completely obscured AGN, and a normal, unreddened quasar. We find that many of our objects have high accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit. These objects tend to fall below the black hole mass-bulge luminosity relation as defined by local galaxies, whereas most of our low accretion rate objects are slightly above the local relation, as typical for normal quasars at these redshifts. Our observations are therefore most readily interpreted in a scenario in which galaxy stellar mass growth occurs first by about a factor of three in each merger/starburst event, followed sometime later by black hole growth by a similar amount. We do not, however, see any direct evidence for quasar feedback affecting star formation in our objects, for example, in the form of a relationship between accretion rate and star formation. Five of our objects, however, do show evidence for outflows in the [O III]5007 A emission line profile, suggesting that the quasar activity is driving thermal winds in at least some members of our sample.

  1. The Luminosity Function of Star Clusters in 20 Star-Forming Galaxies Based on Hubble Legacy Archive Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Ariel; Whitmore, B. C.; Chandar, R.; Larsen, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Luminosity functions have been determined for star cluster populations in 20 nearby (4 - 30 Mpc), star-forming galaxies based on ACS source lists generated by the Hubble Legacy Archive (http://hla.stsci.edu). These cluster catalogs provide one of the largest sets of uniform, automatically-generated cluster candidates available in the literature at present. Comparisons are made with other recently generated cluster catalogs demonstrating that the HLA-generated catalogs are of similar quality, but in general do not go as deep. A typical cluster luminosity function can be approximated by a power-law, dN/dL ∝ Lα, with an average value for α of -2.37 and rms scatter = 0.18. A comparison of fitting results based on methods which use binned and unbinned data shows good agreement, although there may be a systematic tendency for the unbinned (maximum-likelihood) method to give slightly more negative values of α for galaxies with steper luminosity functions. Our uniform database results in a small scatter (0.5 magnitude) in the correlation between the magnitude of the brightest cluster (Mbrightest) and Log of the number of clusters brighter than MI = -9 (Log N). We also examine the magnitude of the brightest cluster vs. Log SFR for a sample including LIRGS and ULIRGS.

  2. The characteristic halo masses of half-a-million WISE-selected quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Eftekharzadeh, S.; Myers, A. D.

    2017-08-01

    Recent work has found evidence for a difference in the bias and dark matter halo masses of WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer)-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, implying a distinction between these populations beyond random line-of-sight effects. However, the significance of this difference in the most up-to-date measurements is relatively weak, at ˜2σ for individual measurements, but bolstered by agreement from different techniques, including angular clustering and cross-correlations with cosmic microwave background lensing maps. Here, we expand the footprint of previous work, aiming to improve the precision of both methods. In this larger area, we correct for position-dependent selection effects, in particular fluctuations of the WISE-selected quasar density as a function of Galactic latitude. We also measure the cross-correlation of the obscured and unobscured samples and confirm that they are well matched in redshift, both centred at z = 1. Combined with very similar detection fractions and magnitude distributions in the long-wavelength WISE bands, this redshift match strongly supports the fact that infrared selection identifies obscured and unobscured quasars of similar bolometric luminosity. Finally, we perform cross-correlations with confirmed spectroscopic quasars, again confirming the results from other methods - obscured quasars reside in haloes a factor of 3 times more massive than unobscured quasars. This difference is significant at the ˜5σ level when the measurements are combined, providing strong support for the idea that obscuration in at least some quasars is tied to the larger environment, and may have an evolutionary component.

  3. FAR-IR/SUBMILLIMETER SPECTROSCOPIC COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS: PREDICTIONS OF INFRARED LINE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS FOR z < 4 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Dasyra, Kalliopi M.; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Valiante, Elisabetta; Isaak, Kate

    2012-02-01

    Star formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies are the two most energetic processes in the universe, producing the bulk of the observed emission throughout its history. We simulated the luminosity functions of star-forming and active galaxies for spectral lines that are thought to be good spectroscopic tracers of either phenomenon, as a function of redshift. We focused on the infrared (IR) and submillimeter domains, where the effects of dust obscuration are minimal. Using three different and independent theoretical models for galaxy formation and evolution, constrained by multi-wavelength luminosity functions, we computed the number of star-forming and active galaxies per IR luminosity and redshift bin. We converted the continuum luminosity counts into spectral line counts using relationships that we calibrated on mid- and far-IR spectroscopic surveys of galaxies in the local universe. Our results demonstrate that future facilities optimized for survey-mode observations, i.e., the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope, will be able to observe thousands of z > 1 galaxies in key fine-structure lines, e.g., [Si II], [O I], [O III], [C II], in a half-square-degree survey, with 1 hr integration time per field of view. Fainter lines such as [O IV], [Ne V], and H{sub 2} (0-0)S1 will be observed in several tens of bright galaxies at 1 < z < 2, while diagnostic diagrams of active nucleus versus star formation activity will be feasible even for normal z {approx} 1 galaxies. We discuss the new parameter space that these future telescopes will cover and that strongly motivates their construction.

  4. Evidence for evolution of the luminosity function of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, A. C.; Stewart, G. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    From an all sky, X-ray flux limited sample of clusters of galaxies evidence for a significant deficit in the number of high luminosity clusters is found in the redshift range z approximately 0.1 to 0.2 compared with numbers of nearby clusters. This indicates that the X-ray luminous clusters are undergoing strong evolution. The strength of the effect is consistent with hierarchical merging models. The implications of such strong evolution for clusters are discussed.

  5. Evidence for evolution of the luminosity function of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, Alastair C.; Stewart, G. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    From an all sky, x-ray flux limited sample of clusters of galaxies evidence for a significant deficit in the number of high luminosity clusters is found in the redshift range z approximately 0.1 to 0.2 compared with numbers of nearby clusters. This indicates that the x-ray luminous clusters are undergoing strong evolution. The strength of the effect is consistent with hierarchical merging models. The implications of such strong evolution for clusters are discussed.

  6. Quasar Variability in the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Assef, Roberto J.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Stern, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The Decadal IRAC Boötes Survey is a mid-IR variability survey of the ˜9 sq. deg. of the NDWFS Boötes Field and extends the time baseline of its predecessor, the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS), from 4 to 10 years. The Spitzer Space Telescope visited the field five times between 2004 and 2014 at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We provide the difference image analysis photometry for a half a million mostly extragalactic sources. In mid-IR color-color plane, sources with quasar colors constitute the largest variability class (75%), 16% of the variable objects have stellar colors and the remaining 9% have the colors of galaxies. Adding the fifth epoch doubles the number of variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for the same false positive rates as in SDWFS, or increases the number of sources by 20% while decreasing the false positive rates by factors of 2-3 for the same variability amplitude. We quantify the ensemble mid-IR variability of ˜1500 spectroscopically confirmed AGNs using single power-law structure functions (SFs), which we find to be steeper (index γ ≈ 0.45) than in the optical (γ ≈ 0.3), leading to much lower amplitudes at short time-lags. This provides evidence for large emission regions, smoothing out any fast UV/optical variations, as the origin of infrared quasar variability. The mid-IR AGN SF slope γ seems to be uncorrelated with both the luminosity and rest-frame wavelength, while the amplitude shows an anti-correlation with the luminosity and a correlation with the rest-frame wavelength.

  7. A Deep Proper Motion Catalog Within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Footprint. II. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; von Hippel, Ted; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGennaro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Dame, Kyra; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2017-01-01

    A catalog of 8472 white dwarf (WD) candidates is presented, selected using reduced proper motions from the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al. Candidates are selected in the magnitude range 16< r< 21.5 over 980 square degrees, and 16< r< 21.3 over an additional 1276 square degrees, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging footprint. Distances, bolometric luminosities, and atmospheric compositions are derived by fitting SDSS ugriz photometry to pure hydrogen and helium model atmospheres (assuming surface gravities {log} {\\text{}}g=8). The disk white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) is constructed using a sample of 2839 stars with 5.5< {M}{bol}< 17, with statistically significant numbers of stars cooler than the turnover in the luminosity function. The WDLF for the halo is also constructed, using a sample of 135 halo WDs with 5< {M}{bol}< 16. We find space densities of disk and halo WDs in the solar neighborhood of 5.5+/- 0.1× {10}-3 {{pc}}-3 and 3.5+/- 0.7× {10}-5 {{pc}}-3, respectively. We resolve the bump in the disk WDLF due to the onset of fully convective envelopes in WDs, and see indications of it in the halo WDLF as well.

  8. Erratum: ``The Luminosity Function of IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey Galaxies'' (ApJ, 587, L89 [2003])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Yoshikawa, Kohji; Ishii, Takako T.

    2004-05-01

    We have mentioned that we normalized the parameters for the luminosity function by the Hubble constant H0=100 km s-1 Mpc-1 however, for the characteristic luminosity L* we erroneously normalized it by H0=70 km s-1 Mpc-1. As a result, we have proposed wrong numerical factors for L*. In addition, there is a typographic error in the exponent of equation (6) of the published manuscript. Correct values are as follows: L*=(4.34+/-0.86)×108 h-2 [Lsolar] for equation (4), and L*=(2.50+/-0.44)×109 h-2 [Lsolar] and L*=(9.55+/-0.20)×108 h-2 [Lsolar] for equations (5) and (6), respectively. All the other parameters are correct. The errors have occurred only in the final conversion, and they do not affect our discussions and conclusions at all. We thank P. Ranalli for pointing out the errors.

  9. Does the evolution of the radio luminosity function of star-forming galaxies match that of the star formation rate function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Matteo; Negrello, Mattia; Mancuso, Claudia; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Massardi, Marcella; Bonaldi, Anna; Sajina, Anna; Smolc̆ić, Vernesa; Schinnerer, Eva

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the relationship between radio continuum luminosity and star formation rate (SFR) is of crucial importance to make reliable predictions for the forthcoming ultra-deep radio surveys and to allow a full exploitation of their results to measure the cosmic star formation history. We have addressed this issue by matching recent accurate determinations of the SFR function up to high redshifts with literature estimates of the 1.4 GHz luminosity functions of star-forming galaxies (SFGs). This was done considering two options, proposed in the literature, for the relationship between the synchrotron emission (Lsynch), that dominates at 1.4 GHz, and the SFR: a linear relation with a decline of the Lsynch/SFR ratio at low luminosities or a mildly non-linear relation at all luminosities. In both cases, we get good agreement with the observed radio luminosity functions but, in the non-linear case, the deviation from linearity must be small. The luminosity function data are consistent with a moderate increase of the Lsynch/SFR ratio with increasing redshift, indicated by other data sets, although a constant ratio cannot be ruled out. A stronger indication of such increase is provided by recent deep 1.4-GHz counts, down to μJy levels. This is in contradiction with models predicting a decrease of that ratio due to inverse Compton cooling of relativistic electrons at high redshifts. Synchrotron losses appear to dominate up to z ≃ 5. We have also updated the Massardi et al. evolutionary model for radio loud AGNs.

  10. THE LBT BOOeTES FIELD SURVEY. I. THE REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET AND NEAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND CLUSTERING OF BRIGHT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dave, Romeel; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard F.; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U{sub spec}-band imaging survey (9 deg{sup 2}) covering the NOAO Booetes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by {>=}3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z {approx} 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z {approx} 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 {mu}m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity.

  11. Spectrophotometry of 2 complete samples of flat radio spectrum quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, E. J.; Gaskell, C. M.; Burke, W. L.; Baldwin, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of two complete samples of flat-spectrum radio quasars show that for these objects there is a strong correlation between the equivalent width of the CIV wavelength 1550 emission line and the luminosity of the underlying continuum. Assuming Friedmann cosmologies, the scatter in this correlation is a minimum for q (sub o) is approximately 1. Alternatively, luminosity evolution can be invoked to give compact distributions for q (sub o) is approximately 0 models. A sample of Seyfert galaxies observed with IUE shows that despite some dispersion the average equivalent width of CIV wavelength 1550 in Seyfert galaxies is independent of the underlying continuum luminosity. New redshifts for 4 quasars are given.

  12. Powerful Winds in Extreme RBS quasars (POWER)