Science.gov

Sample records for quasi static strength

  1. Quasi-static puncture resistance behaviors of high-strength polyester fabric for soft body armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu-Shi; Sun, Run-Jun; Tian, Xiao; Yao, Mu; Feng, Yan

    A series of economical and flexible fabrics were prepared using high-strength polyester yarns with different fabric structures, weft density and number of layers. The effect of these factors on quasi-static puncture resistance was comparatively studied. The failure mode of the fabrics was analyzed with SEM photographs. Findings indicate that the structure and the weft density affected the quasi-static puncture resistance property of the fabrics, the plain fabrics had better puncture resistance property than twill and satin fabrics. The max puncture force and puncture energy of the plain fabrics with 160 yarn/10 cm reached the max values which were 107.43 N and 0.44 J, respectively. The number of layers had a linear relationship to quasi-static puncture resistance. The contact pressure and friction of the probe against the fibers were the main hindrance during the quasi-static puncture process and the breakage of the fibers during the penetration was caused by the bend and tensile deformation.

  2. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  3. Influence of hydrogen on the strength and ductility of 30KhGSA and EI659 steels in quasi-static and shock-loading tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikov, V. A.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Mochalov, M. A.; Andramanov, A. V.; Baurin, A. Yu.; Blikov, A. O.; Boitsov, I. E.; Erunov, S. V.; Maksimkin, I. P.; Malkov, I. L.; Pupkov, A. S.; Shevnin, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the strength and ductility of 30KhGSA and EI659 steels in quasi-static and shock-loading tests was studied experimentally. The sensitivity of the steels to hydrogenation in air under normal pressure or in hydrogen at a pressure of 25 MPa was determined from the results of tests of as-received and pre-hydrogenated samples at a temperature of 773 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 MPa for 24 h. It is found that EI659 steel doped with tungsten and vanadium is less sensitive to hydrogenation than 30KhGSA steel doped with manganese and chromium.

  4. Nonlinear quasi-static finite element simulations predict in vitro strength of human proximal femora assessed in a dynamic sideways fall setup.

    PubMed

    Varga, Peter; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K; Fliri-Hofmann, Ladina; Widmer, Daniel; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Osteoporotic proximal femur fractures are caused by low energy trauma, typically when falling on the hip from standing height. Finite element simulations, widely used to predict the fracture load of femora in fall, usually include neither mass-related inertial effects, nor the viscous part of bone׳s material behavior. The aim of this study was to elucidate if quasi-static non-linear homogenized finite element analyses can predict in vitro mechanical properties of proximal femora assessed in dynamic drop tower experiments. The case-specific numerical models of 13 femora predicted the strength (R(2)=0.84, SEE=540N, 16.2%), stiffness (R(2)=0.82, SEE=233N/mm, 18.0%) and fracture energy (R(2)=0.72, SEE=3.85J, 39.6%); and provided fair qualitative matches with the fracture patterns. The influence of material anisotropy was negligible for all predictions. These results suggest that quasi-static homogenized finite element analysis may be used to predict mechanical properties of proximal femora in the dynamic sideways fall situation.

  5. Equipment and Protocols for Quasi-Static and Dynamic Tests of Very-High-Strength Concrete (VHSC) and High-Strength High-Ductility Concrete (HSHDC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    Compressive strength tests were conducted on VHSC and HSHDC. VHSC specimens were cast as 102x203 mm (4x8 in.) cylinders due to the size of steel ...compressive stress of HSHDC cubes as 166 MPa (24.1 ksi) (Ranade et al. 2013). Based on the data presented in Table 5.1, average compressive strength is 6.6...thicknesses of aluminum or steel with rupture pressures estimated based on material strengths and thicknesses. Although this provides a uniform pressure

  6. Quasi-Static Electric Field Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A generator for producing an electric field for with an inspection technology system is provided. The generator provides the required variable magnitude quasi-static electric fields for the "illumination" of objects, areas and volumes to be inspected by the system, and produces human-safe electric fields that are only visible to the system. The generator includes a casing, a driven, non-conducting and triboelectrically neutral rotation shaft mounted therein, an ungrounded electrostatic dipole element which works in the quasi-static range, and a non-conducting support for mounting the dipole element to the shaft. The dipole element has a wireless motor system and a charging system which are wholly contained within the dipole element and the support that uses an electrostatic approach to charge the dipole element.

  7. Quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longcope, D. W.; Sudan, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    A formalism is developed to describe the purely quasi-static part of the evolution of a coronal loop driven by its footpoints. This is accomplished under assumptions of a long, thin loop. The quasi-static equations reveal the possibility for sudden 'loss of equilibrium' at which time the system evolves dynamically rather than quasi-statically. Such quasi-static crises produce high-frequency Alfven waves and, in conjunction with Alfven wave dissipation models, form a viable coronal heating mechanism. Furthermore, an approximate solution to the quasi-static equations by perturbation method verifies the development of small-scale spatial current structure.

  8. Anisotropy in Quasi-Static Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2017-08-01

    In this review we summarise the current status of the quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The energy spectrum is steeper than Kolmogorov’s k -5/3 spectrum due to the decrease of the kinetic energy flux with wavenumber k as a result of Joule dissipation. The spectral index decreases with the increase of interaction parameter. The flow is quasi two-dimensional with strong {{\\mathbf{U}}\\bot} at small k and weak {{U}\\parallel} at large k, where {{\\mathbf{U}}\\bot} and {{U}\\parallel} are the perpendicular and parallel components of velocity relative to the external magnetic field. For small k, the energy flux of {{\\mathbf{U}}\\bot} is negative, but for large k, the energy flux of {{U}\\parallel} is positive. Pressure mediates the energy transfer from {{\\mathbf{U}}\\bot} to {{U}\\parallel} .

  9. Virtual Breast Quasi-static Elastography (VBQE).

    PubMed

    Rosen, David; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Viscoelasticity Imaging (VEI) has been proposed to measure relaxation time constants for characterization of in vivo breast lesions. In this technique, an external compression force on the tissue being imaged is maintained for a fixed period of time to induce strain creep. A sequence of ultrasound echo signals is then utilized to generate time-resolved strain measurements. Relaxation time constants can be obtained by fitting local time-resolved strain measurements to a viscoelastic tissue model (e.g., a modified Kevin-Voigt model). In this study, our primary objective is to quantitatively evaluate the contrast transfer efficiency (CTE) of VEI, which contains useful information regarding image interpretations. Using an open-source simulator for virtual breast quasi-static elastography (VBQE), we conducted a case study of contrast transfer efficiency of VEI. In multiple three-dimensional (3D) numerical breast phantoms containing various degrees of heterogeneity, finite element (FE) simulations in conjunction with quasi-linear viscoelastic constitutive tissue models were performed to mimic data acquisition of VEI under freehand scanning. Our results suggested that there were losses in CTE, and the losses could be as high as -18 dB. FE results also qualitatively corroborated clinical observations, for example, artifacts around tissue interfaces.

  10. Characterization and Performance Optimization of a Cementitious Composite for Quasi-Static and Dynamic Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    rapid-set, high-strength geopolymer cement under quasi-static and dynamic loads. Four unique tensile experiments were conducted to characterize and...review under responsibility of ICM11 Keywords: Material characterization, fiber reinforced concrete, geopolymer cement 1. Introduction A mission... geopolymer cement under quasi-static and dynamic loads. Four unique tensile experiments were conducted to characterize and optimize material response of the

  11. Quasi-static winds from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, Paul C.; Melia, Fulvio

    1987-01-01

    A series of numerical models is constructed for radiatively driven, quasi-static winds from the surfaces of hot neutron stars. A mathematical technique is devised that in many cases facilitates the integration of the fluid equations in the vicinity of the sonic point, and an improved treatment of radiative transfer is developed that is appropriate to the exotic physical conditions encountered in the models. Boundary conditions which are more realistic than previous ones are used in these models. In agreement with earlier studies, it is found that radiatively driven winds are likely to be directly relevant to the existence of precursors in fast X-ray transients and to apparent radius variations during the course of some type I bursts, and that the presence of such a wind should prevent the bolometric luminosity of a neutron star from exceeding the Eddington limit by more than a small fractional amount. Formulas describing the wind models are presented which are usable as boundary conditions for calculations of the evolution of the deeper, hydrostatic layers of a neutron-star envelope.

  12. Quasi-static winds from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, Paul C.; Melia, Fulvio

    1987-01-01

    A series of numerical models is constructed for radiatively driven, quasi-static winds from the surfaces of hot neutron stars. A mathematical technique is devised that in many cases facilitates the integration of the fluid equations in the vicinity of the sonic point, and an improved treatment of radiative transfer is developed that is appropriate to the exotic physical conditions encountered in the models. Boundary conditions which are more realistic than previous ones are used in these models. In agreement with earlier studies, it is found that radiatively driven winds are likely to be directly relevant to the existence of precursors in fast X-ray transients and to apparent radius variations during the course of some type I bursts, and that the presence of such a wind should prevent the bolometric luminosity of a neutron star from exceeding the Eddington limit by more than a small fractional amount. Formulas describing the wind models are presented which are usable as boundary conditions for calculations of the evolution of the deeper, hydrostatic layers of a neutron-star envelope.

  13. Quasi-static and dynamic mechanical properties of a granite and a sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The quasi-static failure criteria, elastic constants, and p-wave velocities have been determined for a granite and a sandstone in which blasting experiments are being carried out by the Advanced Technology Division (6258). In addition, the dynamic strength of the granite was measured using a Kolsky bar. Both rocks show a linear increase in strength with increasing confining pressure. The dynamic strength of the granite is as much as 330% greater than the quasi-static value. The strength of the granite was also dependent on the angle between the foliation and the loading direction. There was a 20% difference in the p-wave velocity between that measured parallel to and perpendicular to the bedding in the sandstone. 4 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Quasi-static and dynamic analysis of viscoelastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aköz, Ahmet Yalçın; Kadıoğlu, Fethi; Tekin, Gülçin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the quasi-static and dynamic behavior of viscoelastic Kirchhoff plates is studied numerically by using the mixed finite element method in transformed Laplace-Carson space. In the transformed Laplace-Carson space, a new functional has been constructed for viscoelastic Kirchhoff plates through a systematic procedure based on the Gâteaux differential. For numerical inversion, the Maximum Degree of Precision (MDOP), Dubner and Abate's, and Durbin's transform techniques are employed. The developed solution technique is applied to several quasi-static and dynamic example problems.

  15. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle θ≈(π)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  16. Analysis of the quasi-static approximation for calculating potentials generated by neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bossetti, Chad A; Birdno, Merrill J; Grill, Warren M

    2008-03-01

    In models of electrical stimulation of the nervous system, the electric potential is typically calculated using the quasi-static approximation. The quasi-static approximation allows Maxwell's equations to be simplified by ignoring capacitive, inductive and wave propagation contributions to the potential. While this simplification has been validated for bioelectric sources, its application to rapid stimulation pulses, which contain more high-frequency power, may not be appropriate. We compared the potentials calculated using the quasi-static approximation with those calculated from the exact solution to the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. The mean absolute errors between the two potential calculations were limited to 5-13% for pulse widths commonly used for neural stimulation (25 micros-1 ms). We also quantified the excitation properties of extracellular point source stimulation of a myelinated nerve fiber model using potentials calculated from each method. Deviations between the strength-duration curves for potentials calculated using the quasi-static (sigma = 0.105 S m(-1)) and Helmholtz approaches ranged from 3 to 16%, with the minimal error occurring for 100 micros pulses. Differences in the threshold-distance curves for the two calculations ranged from 0 to 9%, for the same value of quasi-static conductivity. A sensitivity analysis of the material parameters revealed that the potential was much more strongly dependent on the conductivity than on the permittivity. These results indicate that for commonly used stimulus pulse parameters, the exact solution for the potential can be approximated by quasi-static simplifications only for appropriate values of conductivity.

  17. Damage Instability and Transition From Quasi-Static to Dynamic Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    In a typical mechanical test, the loading phase is intended to be a quasi-static process, while the failure and collapse is usually a dynamic event. The structural strength and modes of damage can seldom be predicted without accounting for these two aspects of the response. For a proper prediction, it is therefore essential to use tools and methodologies that are capable of addressing both aspects of responses. In some cases, implicit quasi-static models have been shown to be able to predict the entire response of a structure, including the unstable path that leads to fracture. However, is it acceptable to ignore the effect of inertial forces in the formation of damage? In this presentation we examine aspects of the damage processes that must be simulated for an accurate prediction of structural strength and modes of failure.

  18. Eigenmodes of quasi-static magnetic islands in current sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Cai Xiaohui; Chai Lihui; Wang Shui; Zheng Huinan; Shen Chao

    2011-12-15

    As observation have shown, magnetic islands often appear before and/or after the onset of magnetic reconnections in the current sheets, and they also appear in the current sheets in the solar corona, Earth's magnetotail, and Earth's magnetopause. Thus, the existence of magnetic islands can affect the initial conditions in magnetic reconnection. In this paper, we propose a model of quasi-static magnetic island eigenmodes in the current sheet. This model analytically describes the magnetic field structures in the quasi-static case, which will provide a possible approach to reconstructing the magnetic structures in the current sheet via observation data. This model is self-consistent in the kinetic theory. Also, the distribution function of charged particles in the magnetic island can be calculated.

  19. Calculation of quasi-static helium triplet diffuse line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Calculated spectral line profiles (intensity distributions) of the helium triplet diffuse series were obtained using the quasi-static approximation for ions and electrons. In these calculations, Doppler broadening, although negligible in most of the cases, was included as a device to avoid singularities. Plots and tabulations of the calculated profiles are presented, in addition to a discussion of the computational procedure and the validity of the calculations.

  20. Quasi-static self-powered sensing and data logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajnef, Nizar; Chakrabartty, Shantanu; Burgueño, Rigoberto; Borchani, Wassim

    2014-04-01

    Many signals of interest in the assessment of structural systems lie in the quasi-static range (frequency << 1Hz). This poses a significant challenge for the development of self-powered sensors that are required not only to monitor these events but also to harvest the energy for sensing, computation and storage from the signal being monitored. This paper combines the use of mechanically-equivalent frequency modulators and piezo-powered threshold detection modules capable of computation and data storage with a total current less than 10nA. The system is able to achieve events counting for input deformations at frequencies lower than 0.1Hz. The used mechanically-equivalent frequency modulators allow the transformation of the low-amplitude and low-rate quasi-static deformations into an amplified input to a piezoelectric transducer. The sudden transitions in unstable mode branch switching, during the elastic postbuckling response of slender columns and plates, are used to generate high-rate deformations. Experimental results show that an oscillating semi-crystalline plastic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), attached to the up-converting modules, is able to generate a harvestable energy at levels between 0.8μJ to 2μJ. In this work, we show that a linear injection response of our combined frequency up-converter / piezo-floating-gate sensing system can be used for self-powered measurement and recording of quasi-static deformations levels. The experimental results demonstrate that a sensor fabricated in a 0.5- μm CMOS technology can count and record the number of quasi-static input events, while operating at a power level significantly lower than 1μW.

  1. Quasi-Static Viscoelasticity Loading Measurements of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.; Tanner, John A.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    1997-01-01

    Stair-step loading, cyclic loading, and long-term relaxation tests were performed on an aircraft tire to observe the quasi-static viscoelastic response of the tire. The data indicate that the tire continues to respond viscoelastically even after it has been softened by deformation. Load relaxation data from the stair-step test at the 15,000-lb loading was fit to a monotonically decreasing Prony series.

  2. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of PBXN-5 and comp-B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Ten Cate, James A; Deluca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Todd, Steven N

    2009-03-12

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of PBXN-5 and Comp-B explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on a load frame. Hopkinson bar and quasistatic testing was done at five temperatures from -50{sup o}C to 50{sup o}C. Our results were dominated by the low density of the samples and showed up as low acoustic velocities and lower strengths, as compared to other materials of the same or similar formulations. The effects seem to be consistent with the high porosity of the materials. The data do provide useful input to models that include density as a parameter and suggest caution when using measurements of ideal materials to predict behavior of damaged materials.

  3. Quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delache, A.; Favier, B.; Godeferd, F. S.; Cambon, C.; Bos, W. J. T.

    2011-12-01

    We analyse the anisotropy of turbulence in an electrically conducting fluid submitted to a uniform magnetic field, for low magnetic Reynolds number, using the quasi-static approximation. In the linear limit, the kinetic energy of velocity components normal to the magnetic field decays faster than the kinetic energy of the component along the magnetic field (Moffatt, 1967). However, numerous numerical studies predict a different behaviour, wherein the final state is characterised by dominant horizontal energy. We investigate the corresponding nonlinear phenomenon using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and spectral closures based on Eddy Damping Quasi-Normal Markovian (EDQNM) models. The initial temporal evolution of the decaying flow indicates that the turbulence is very similar to the so-called "two-and-a-half-dimensional" flow (Montgomery & Turner, 1982) which explains the observations in numerical studies. EDQNM models confirm this statement at higher Reynolds number.

  4. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Longitudinal static compressive strength. 238.405... II Passenger Equipment § 238.405 Longitudinal static compressive strength. (a) To form an effective... shall resist a minimum longitudinal static compressive force of 2,100,000 pounds without...

  5. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Longitudinal static compressive strength. 238.405... II Passenger Equipment § 238.405 Longitudinal static compressive strength. (a) To form an effective... shall resist a minimum longitudinal static compressive force of 2,100,000 pounds without...

  6. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Longitudinal static compressive strength. 238.405... II Passenger Equipment § 238.405 Longitudinal static compressive strength. (a) To form an effective... shall resist a minimum longitudinal static compressive force of 2,100,000 pounds without...

  7. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Longitudinal static compressive strength. 238.405... II Passenger Equipment § 238.405 Longitudinal static compressive strength. (a) To form an effective... shall resist a minimum longitudinal static compressive force of 2,100,000 pounds without...

  8. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Longitudinal static compressive strength. 238.405... II Passenger Equipment § 238.405 Longitudinal static compressive strength. (a) To form an effective... shall resist a minimum longitudinal static compressive force of 2,100,000 pounds without...

  9. Modeling Quasi-Static and Fatigue-Driven Delamination Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Carvalho, N. V.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    An approach was proposed and assessed for the high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials. It combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration were captured failure and migration criteria based on fracture mechanics. Quasi-static and fatigue loading were modeled within the same overall framework. The methodology proposed was illustrated by simulating the delamination migration test, showing good agreement with the available experimental data.

  10. Quasi-Static Analysis of LaRC THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to predict the shape and displacement with voltage in the quasi-static limit of LaRC Thunder Actuators. The problem is treated with classical lamination theory and Von Karman non-linear analysis. In the case of classical lamination theory exact analytic solutions are found. It is shown that classical lamination theory is insufficient to describe the physical situation for large actuators but is sufficient for very small actuators. Numerical results are presented for the non-linear analysis and compared with experimental measurements. Snap-through behavior, bifurcation, and stability are presented and discussed.

  11. Quasi-Static Indentation Analysis of Carbon-Fiber Laminates.

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Timothy; English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle

    2015-12-01

    A series of quasi - static indentation experiments are conducted on carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates with a systematic variation of thicknesses and fixture boundary conditions. Different deformation mechanisms and their resulting damage mechanisms are activated b y changing the thickn ess and boundary conditions. The quasi - static indentation experiments have been shown to achieve damage mechanisms similar to impact and penetration, however without strain rate effects. The low rate allows for the detailed analysis on the load response. Moreover, interrupted tests allow for the incremental analysis of various damage mechanisms and pr ogressions. The experimentally tested specimens are non - destructively evaluated (NDE) with optical imaging, ultrasonics and computed tomography. The load displacement responses and the NDE are then utilized in numerical simulations for the purpose of model validation and vetting. The accompanying numerical simulation work serves two purposes. First, the results further reveal the time sequence of events and the meaning behind load dro ps not clear from NDE . Second, the simulations demonstrate insufficiencies in the code and can then direct future efforts for development.

  12. Simulated bioprosthetic heart valve deformation under quasi-static loading.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Abad, Ajay; Sacks, Michael S

    2005-11-01

    For more than 40 years, the replacement of diseased natural heart valves with prosthetic devices has dramatically extended the quality and length of the lives of millions of patients worldwide. However, bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) continue to fail due to structural failure resulting from poor tissue durability and faulty design. Clearly, an in-depth understanding of the biomechanical behavior of BHV at both the tissue and functional prosthesis levels is essential to improving BHV design and to reduce rates of failure. In this study, we simulated quasi-static BHV leaflet deformation under 40, 80, and 120 mm Hg quasi-static transvalvular pressures. A Fung-elastic material model was used that incorporated material parameters and axes derived from actual leaflet biaxial tests and measured leaflet collagen fiber structure. Rigorous experimental validation of predicted leaflet strain field was used to validate the model results. An overall maximum discrepancy of 2.36% strain between the finite element (FE) results and experiment measurements was obtained, indicating good agreement between computed and measured major principal strains. Parametric studies utilizing the material parameter set from one leaflet for all three leaflets resulted in substantial variations in leaflet stress and strain distributions. This result suggests that utilization of actual leaflet material properties is essential for accurate BHV FE simulations. The present study also underscores the need for rigorous experimentation and accurate constitutive models in simulating BHV function and design.

  13. Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and Failed Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-30

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6794--16-9710 Quasi-Static Evolution , Catastrophe, and “Failed” Eruption of Solar Flux...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Quasi-Static Evolution , Catastrophe... evolution of solar flux ropes subject to slowly increasing magnetic energy, encompassing quasi-static evolution , “catastrophic” transition to an eruptive

  14. Biomagnetic localization from transient quasi-static events

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA . Signal and Image Processing Inst.)

    1993-01-01

    Sensory stimuli, such as auditory, visual, or somatosensory, evoke neural responses in very localized regions of the brain. A SQUID biomagnetometer can measure the very weak fields that are generated outside of the head by this response. A simple source and head model of current dipoles inside a conducting sphere is typically used to interpret these magnetic field measurements or magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Locating dipole sources using data recorded from an array of biomagnetic sensors is distinguished from conventional array source localization techniques by the quasi-static transient nature of the data. Here, the basic MEG model is reviewed, then a localization example is given to motivate the need for partitioning the data to improve estimator performance. Tune-eigenspectrum analysis is introduced as a means of partitioning and interpreting spatio-temporal biomagnetic data. Examples using both simulated and somatosensory data are presented.

  15. Biomagnetic localization from transient quasi-static events

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S. |

    1993-02-01

    Sensory stimuli, such as auditory, visual, or somatosensory, evoke neural responses in very localized regions of the brain. A SQUID biomagnetometer can measure the very weak fields that are generated outside of the head by this response. A simple source and head model of current dipoles inside a conducting sphere is typically used to interpret these magnetic field measurements or magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Locating dipole sources using data recorded from an array of biomagnetic sensors is distinguished from conventional array source localization techniques by the quasi-static transient nature of the data. Here, the basic MEG model is reviewed, then a localization example is given to motivate the need for partitioning the data to improve estimator performance. Tune-eigenspectrum analysis is introduced as a means of partitioning and interpreting spatio-temporal biomagnetic data. Examples using both simulated and somatosensory data are presented.

  16. Quasi-Static Probabilistic Structural Analyses Process and Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B.; Verderaime, V.

    1999-01-01

    Current deterministic structural methods are easily applied to substructures and components, and analysts have built great design insights and confidence in them over the years. However, deterministic methods cannot support systems risk analyses, and it was recently reported that deterministic treatment of statistical data is inconsistent with error propagation laws that can result in unevenly conservative structural predictions. Assuming non-nal distributions and using statistical data formats throughout prevailing stress deterministic processes lead to a safety factor in statistical format, which integrated into the safety index, provides a safety factor and first order reliability relationship. The embedded safety factor in the safety index expression allows a historically based risk to be determined and verified over a variety of quasi-static metallic substructures consistent with the traditional safety factor methods and NASA Std. 5001 criteria.

  17. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, John Compton

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  18. Uniaxial and triaxial compression tests of silicon carbide ceramics under quasi-static loading condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Lee, Moo Yul; Bronowski, David R.

    2005-02-01

    To establish mechanical properties and failure criteria of silicon carbide (SiC-N) ceramics, a series of quasi-static compression tests has been completed using a high-pressure vessel and a unique sample alignment jig. This report summarizes the test methods, set-up, relevant observations, and results from the constitutive experimental efforts. Results from the uniaxial and triaxial compression tests established the failure threshold for the SiC-N ceramics in terms of stress invariants (I{sub 1} and J{sub 2}) over the range 1246 < I{sub 1} < 2405. In this range, results are fitted to the following limit function (Fossum and Brannon, 2004) {radical}J{sub 2}(MPa) = a{sub 1} - a{sub 3}e -a{sub 2}(I{sub 1}/3) + a{sub 4} I{sub 1}/3, where a{sub 1} = 10181 MPa, a{sub 2} = 4.2 x 10{sup -4}, a{sub 3} = 11372 MPa, and a{sub 4} = 1.046. Combining these quasistatic triaxial compression strength measurements with existing data at higher pressures naturally results in different values for the least-squares fit to this function, appropriate over a broader pressure range. These triaxial compression tests are significant because they constitute the first successful measurements of SiC-N compressive strength under quasistatic conditions. Having an unconfined compressive strength of {approx}3800 MPa, SiC-N has been heretofore tested only under dynamic conditions to achieve a sufficiently large load to induce failure. Obtaining reliable quasi-static strength measurements has required design of a special alignment jig and load-spreader assembly, as well as redundant gages to ensure alignment. When considered in combination with existing dynamic strength measurements, these data significantly advance the characterization of pressure-dependence of strength, which is important for penetration simulations where failed regions are often at lower pressures than intact regions.

  19. Quasi-static energy absorption of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Jacobsen, AJ; Chen, X

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive modeling and numerical study focusing on the energy quasi-static crushing behavior and energy absorption characteristics of hollow tube microlattice structures. The peak stress and effective plateau stress of the hollow microlattice structures are deduced for different geometrical parameters which gives volume and mass densities of energy absorption, D-v and D-m, scale with the relative density, (rho) over bar, as D-v similar to (rho) over bar (1) (5) and D-m similar to (rho) over bar (0 5), respectively, fitting very well to the experimental results of both 60 degrees inclined and 90 degrees predominately microlattices. Then the strategies for energy absorption enhancement are proposed for the engineering design of microlattice structures. By introducing a gradient in the thickness or radius of the lattice members, the buckle propagation can be modulated resulting in an increase in energy absorption density that can exceed 40%. Liquid filler is another approach to improve energy absorption by strengthening the microtruss via circumference expansion, and the gain may be over 100% in terms of volume density. Insight into the correlations between microlattice architecture and energy absorption performance combined with the high degree of architecture control paves the way for designing high performance microlattice structures for a range of impact and impulse mitigation applications for vehicles and structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic helical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Beytullah; Fırat Çalim, Faruk; Tütüncü, Naki

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviour of cylindrical helical rods made of linear viscoelastic materials are investigated in the Laplace domain. The governing equations for naturally twisted and curved spatial rods obtained using the Timoshenko beam theory are rewritten for cylindrical helical rods. The curvature of the rod axis, effect of rotary inertia, and shear and axial deformations are considered in the formulation. The material of the rod is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and linear viscoelastic. In the viscoelastic material case, according to the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. Ordinary differential equations in scalar form obtained in the Laplace domain are solved numerically using the complementary functions method to calculate the dynamic stiffness matrix of the problem. In the solutions, the Kelvin model is employed. The solutions obtained are transformed to the real space using the Durbin's numerical inverse Laplace transform method. Numerical results for quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic models are presented in the form of graphics.

  1. A planar quasi-static constraint mode tyre model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Ferris, John B.; Reid, Alexander A.; Gorsich, David J.

    2015-12-01

    The fast-paced, iterative, vehicle design environment demands efficiency when simulating suspension loads. Towards that end, a computationally efficient, linear, planar, quasi-static tyre model is developed in this work that accurately predicts a tyre's lower frequency, reasonably large amplitude, nonlinear stiffness relationship. The axisymmetric, circumferentially isotropic, stiffness equation is discretised into segments, then parameterised by a single stiffness parameter and two shape parameters. The tyre's deformed shape is independent of the overall tyre stiffness and the forces acting on the tyre. Constraint modes capture enveloping and bridging properties and a recursive method yields the set of active constraints at the tyre-road interface. The nonlinear stiffness of a tyre is captured by enforcing unidirectional geometric boundary conditions. The model parameters are identified semi-empirically; simulated cleat test loads match experiments within 7% including nonlinear stiffness when simulating a flat plate test and a discontinuous stiffness when simulating a cleat test. This work was conducted at the Vehicle Terrain Performance Laboratory of Virginia Tech.

  2. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCredie, A. J.; Stride, E.; Saffari, N.

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  3. Quasi-static magnetic measurements to predict specific absorption rates in magnetic fluid hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coral, D. F.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; de Sousa, M. E.; Muraca, D.; Lassalle, V.; Nicolás, P.; Ferreira, M. L.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the issue on whether dynamic magnetic properties of polydispersed magnetic colloids modeled using physical magnitudes derived from quasi-static magnetic measurement can be extrapolated to analyze specific absorption rate data acquired at high amplitudes and frequencies of excitation fields is addressed. To this end, we have analyzed two colloids of magnetite nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and chitosan in water displaying, under a radiofrequency field, high and low specific heat power release. Both colloids are alike in terms of liquid carrier, surfactant and magnetic phase composition but differ on the nanoparticle structuring. The colloid displaying low specific dissipation consists of spaced magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 4.8 nm inside a large chitosan particle of 52.5 nm. The one displaying high specific dissipation consists of clusters of magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 9.7 nm inside a chitosan particle of 48.6 nm. The experimental evaluation of Néel and Brown relaxation times (˜10-10 s and 10-4 s, respectively) indicate that the nanoparticles in both colloids magnetically relax by Néel mechanism. The isothermal magnetization curves analysis for this mechanism show that the magnetic nanoparticles behave in the interacting superparamagnetic regime. The specific absorption rates were determined calorimetrically at 260 kHz and up to 52 kA/m and were well modeled within linear response theory using the anisotropy density energy retrieved from quasi-static magnetic measurement, validating their use to predict heating ability of a given polydispersed particle suspension. Our findings provide new insight in the validity of quasi-static magnetic characterization to analyze the high frequency behavior of polydispersed colloids within the framework of the linear response and Wohlfarth theories and indicate that dipolar interactions play a key role being their strength larger for the colloid displaying higher dissipation, i

  4. Quasi-static compression and tensile stress-strain curves, tantalum - 10% tungsten and 300 grade maraging steel. Final memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Benck, R.F.; Silsby, G.F.

    1986-05-01

    The results of quasi-static compression and tension tests of tantalum -10% tungsten alloy and Vascomax 300 CVM 300 trade maraging steel are presented. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield strength and ultimate strength were determined at test temperatures of 23.9 C. Results provide engineering properties documentation for materials used in several terminal ballistic tests.

  5. Static and Dynamic Handgrip Strength Endurance: Test-Retest Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Psychou, Dimitra; Vasilopoulou, Theodora; Zafeiridis, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the reliability of static and dynamic handgrip strength endurance using different protocols and indicators for the assessment of strength endurance. Forty young, healthy men and women (age, 18-22 years) performed 2 handgrip strength endurance protocols: a static protocol (sustained submaximal contraction at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) and a dynamic one (8, 10, and 12 maximal repetitions). The participants executed each protocol twice to assess the test-retest reproducibility. Total work and total time were used as indicators of strength endurance in the static protocol; the strength recorded at each maximal repetition, the percentage change, and fatigue index were used as indicators of strength endurance in the dynamic protocol. The static protocol showed high reliability irrespective of sex and hand for total time and work. The 12-repetition dynamic protocol exhibited moderate-high reliability for repeated maximal repetitions and percentage change; the 8- and 10-repetition protocols demonstrated lower reliability irrespective of sex and hand. The fatigue index was not a reliable indicator for the assessment of dynamic handgrip endurance. Static handgrip endurance can be measured reliably using the total time and total work as indicators of strength endurance. For the evaluation of dynamic handgrip endurance, the 12-repetition protocol is recommended, using the repeated maximal repetitions and percentage change as indicators of strength endurance. Practitioners should consider the static (50% maximal voluntary contraction) and dynamic (12 repeated maximal repetitions) protocols as reliable for the assessment of handgrip strength endurance. The evaluation of static endurance in conjunction with dynamic endurance would provide more complete information about hand function. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Meso-Scale Damage Simulation of 3D Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Axial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Chunjian; Zhou, Yexin

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of 3D braided composites is composed of three phases: braiding yarn, matrix and interface. In this paper, a representative unit-cell (RUC) model including these three phases is established. Coupling with the periodical boundary condition, the damage behavior of 3D braided composites under quasi-static axial tension is simulated by using finite element method based on this RUC model. An anisotropic damage model based on Murakami damage theory is proposed to predict the damage evolution of yarns and matrix; a damage-friction combination interface constitutive model is adopted to predict the interface debonding behavior. A user material subroutine (VUMAT) involving these damage models is developed and implemented in the finite element software ABAQUS/Explicit. The whole process of damage evolution of 3D braided composites under quasi-static axial tension with typical braiding angles is simulated, and the damage mechanisms are revealed in detail in the simulation process. The tensile strength properties of the braided composites are predicted from the calculated stress-strain curves. Numerical results agree with the available experiment data and thus validates the proposed damage analysis model. The effects of certain material parameters on the predicted stress-strain responses are also discussed by numerical parameter study.

  7. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of C-4 and primasheet P1000 explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; De Luca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Todd, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of C-4 and Primasheet P1000 explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Primasheet P1000 is a pentaerythritol tetranitrate-based rubberized explosive. C-4 is a RDX-based moldable explosive. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on load frames and on a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Split-Hopkinson and quasi-static tests were done at five temperatures from -50 C to 50 C. Acoustic velocities were measured at, above, and below room temperature.

  8. Static Strength of Adhesively-bonded Woven Fabric Kenaf Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Ahmad; Lee, Sim Yee; Supar, Khairi

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibers are potentially used as reinforcing materials and combined with epoxy resin as matrix system to form a superior specific strength (or stiffness) materials known as composite materials. The advantages of implementing natural fibers such as kenaf fibers are renewable, less hazardous during fabrication and handling process; and relatively cheap compared to synthetic fibers. The aim of current work is to conduct a parametric study on static strength of adhesively bonded woven fabric kenaf composite plates. Fabrication of composite panels were conducted using hand lay-up techniques, with variation of stacking sequence, over-lap length, joint types and lay-up types as identified in testing series. Quasi-static testing was carried out using mechanical testing following code of practice. Load-displacement profiles were analyzed to study its structural response prior to ultimate failures. It was found that cross-ply lay-up demonstrates better static strength compared to quasi-isotropic lay-up counterparts due to larger volume of 0° plies exhibited in cross-ply lay-up. Consequently, larger overlap length gives better joining strength, as expected, however this promotes to weight penalty in the joining structure. Most samples showed failures within adhesive region known as cohesive failure modes, however, few sample demonstrated interface failure. Good correlations of parametric study were found and discussed in the respective section.

  9. Quasi-static rotor morphing concepts for rotorcraft performance improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Mihir

    The current research is focused on two separate quasi-static rotor morphing concepts: Variable span and variable camber. Both concepts were analyzed from the perspective of the performance improvements they allow for, as well as their design requirements. The goal of this body of work is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and implementation challenges of both systems. For the case of the variable span rotor concept, the effects on aircraft performance were evaluated for a UH-60A type aircraft. The parametric analysis included the performance effects of the rotor span and rotor speed variation, both individually as well as in combination. The design space considered the effect of three different gross weights (16000 lbs, 18300 lbs and 24000 lbs), for a window of +/-11% variation of the rotor speed and a range between +17% to --16% of radius variation (about the baseline) for a range of altitudes. The results of the analysis showed that variable span rotors by themselves are capable of reducing the power requirement of the helicopter by up to 20% for high altitude and gross weight conditions. However, when combined with rotor speed variation, it was possible to reduce the overall power required by the aircraft by up to 30%. Complimentary to the performance analysis, an analytical study of actuation concepts for a variable span rotor was also conducted. This study considered the design of two active actuation systems: Hydraulic pistons and threaded rods (jackscrews), and two passive systems which employed the use of an internal spring type restraining device. For all the configurations considered, it was determined that the design requirements could not be satisfied when considering the constraints defined. The performance improvements due to a variable camber system were evaluated for a BO-105 type rotor in hover. The design space considered included three different thrust levels (4800 lbs, 5500 lbs and 6400 lbs) for a range of altitudes and

  10. Strain rate sensitivity of autoclaved aerated concrete from quasi-static regime to shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mespoulet, Jérôme; Plassard, Fabien; Hereil, Pierre Louis

    2015-09-01

    The quasi-static mechanical behavior of autoclaved aerated concrete is well-known and can be expressed as a function of its density. There are however not much studies dealing with its dynamic behavior and its damping ability when subjected to a mechanical shock or a blast. This study presents experimental results obtained at the Shock Physics Laboratory of THIOT INGENIERIE company. The test specimens are made of YTONG(TM ) cellular concrete with porosity in the range of 75 to 80%. Experimental tests cover a large strain rate amplitude (higher than 104 s-1) for specimens up to 250 mm. They were carried out with a small compression press and with two facilities dedicated to dynamic material characterization: JUPITER dynamic large press (2 MN, 3 ms rising time) and TITAN multi-caliber single-stage gas gun. Results in un-confined conditions show an increase of the compressive strength when strain rate increases (45% increase at 5.102 s-1) but dynamic tests induce damage early in the experiment. This competition between dynamic strength raise and specimen fracture makes the complete compaction curve determination not to be done in unconfined dynamic condition. A 25% increase of the compressive strength has been observed between unconfined and confined condition in Q.S. regime.

  11. Static and quasi-static analysis of lobed-pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Saito, Yoshitaka; Izutsu, Naoki

    The present study is motivated by the need to improve design methodology for super pressure balloon with 3D gore design concept, currently being developed at the Scientific Balloon Center of ISAS/JAXA. The distinctive feature of the 3-D gore design is that the balloon film has excess materials not only in the circumferential direction but also in the meridional direction; the meridional excess is gained by attaching the film boundaries to the corresponding tendons of a shorter length with a controlled shortening rate. The resulting balloon shape is a pumpkin-like shape with large bulges formed between adjacent tendons. The balloon film, when fully inflated, develops wrinkles in the circumferential direction over its entire region, so that the stresses in the film are limited to a small amount of uniaxial tension in the circumferential direction while the high meridional loads are carried by re-enforced tendons. Naturally, the amount of wrinkling in the film is dominated by the shortening rate between the film boundaries and the tendon curve. In the 3-D gore design, as a consequence, the shortening rate becomes a fundamental design parameter along with the geometric parameters of the gore. In view of this, we have carried out a series of numerical study of the lobed-pumpkin balloon with varying gore geometry as well as with varying shortening rate. The numerical simula-tions were carried out with a nonlinear finite element code incorporating the wrinkling effect. Numerical results show that there is a threshold value for the shortening rate beyond which the stresses in the balloon film increases disproportionately. We have also carried out quasi-static simulations of the inflation process of the lobed-pumpkin balloon, and have obtained asymmetric deformations when the balloon films are in uniaxial tension state.

  12. The influence of hole size in static strength and fatigue for CFRP composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, M.C.; Perng, T.B.

    1993-12-31

    The influence of hole size in static strength and fatigue property will be investigated. Carbon/Epoxy laminate is selected as testing materials which are widely used in aircraft industry. The arrangement of fiber orientation is [0{sup 0}/+45{sup 0}/{minus}45{sup 0}/90{sup 0}]{sub 2s}. The basic mechanical properties of smooth and notched specimens were detected. The strength of notched specimens are applied to compare with Whitney-Nuismer stress criterion. For average stress criteria, the theoretical value is in good agreement with experimental data for the parameter a{sub 0} is chosen 1.5 mm. For point stress criteria, the best choice of parameter do is 2.4 mm, but the agreement of experimental data is poorer than the average stress one. The characteristic curve of tension-tension fatigue for smooth and notched laminate were investigated. The notched specimens has a 1 mm diameter circular hole at the center, the stress ratio of fatigue test is 0.1. It is obvious that the data distribution of smooth specimens is more scatter than notched specimens. On the other hand, the reduction of modulus during fatigue process was inspected. After fatigue damage, the influence of hole size on residual strength for a quasi-isotropic laminate was investigated. It is found that residual strength of damaged specimens are higher than undamaged one in some fatigue damage range. When the maximum applied load of fatigue test is chosen 90 percent of static strength, it is seen that the influence is obviously in residual strength. The increment of strength decreases with hole size increasing. When the maximum applied load of fatigue test is chosen 80 percent of static strength, the influence is less than the previous case. The Whitney-Nuismer Average Stress Criteria is extended to predict the residual strength after fatigue. A good prediction can be shown by using the extended criteria.

  13. Quasi-Static Compaction Studies for DDT Investigations: Inert Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    and Identify by block number) Compaction Melamine Porous Beds Sound Velocity Deflagration to Detonation Vickers Hardness Transition Shore Hardness...porous beds of two powdered inert materials: Teflon 7C, a highly crystalline polvmer and melamine , a molecular crystal. These two materials were...compaction measurements on melamine were funded by the NAVSEA 6.2 Explosives Block. The results and conclusions given in this report regarding the quasi

  14. Quasi-static multiaxial testing of PBX 9501: Creep effects on Estane molecular weight

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.D.; Idar, D.J.; Rabie, R.; Fugard, C.S.; King, W.; Buntain, G.A.; Crane, N.B.

    1999-02-01

    High explosives (HE) can be subjected to low level loading due to weapon design. As with other materials, loads well below the elastic limit may still lead to material property changes over time. PBX 9501, a conventional high explosive, has been used in several system designs. To evaluate potential environmental aging effects on HE, it is necessary to characterize material-flow and mechanical-property changes occurring in PBX 9501. Low-level loads may bring about material changes if creep related phenomena, such as polymer disentanglement or uncrosslinking, occur in the material. Recently, several studies on HE have increased understanding of the effects of density and the relative percentage of constituents on materials properties, e.g. elastic modulus, ultimate strength, and strain at ultimate strength, at low strain rates ({approx} 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). However, the authors are only beginning to understand the effects of quasi-static multiaxial loading on PBX 9501 and Estane molecular weight (MW) changes. The results of these experiments are presented in this report.

  15. Quasi-static and dynamic magnetic tension forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2016-11-22

    Solar eruptions are often driven by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the torus and kink instabilities that act on line-tied magnetic flux ropes. We designed our recent laboratory experiments to study these eruptive instabilities which have demonstrated the key role of both dynamic (Myers et al 2015 Nature 528 526) and quasi-static (Myers et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 112102) magnetic tension forces in contributing to the equilibrium and stability of line-tied magnetic flux ropes. In our paper, we synthesize these laboratory results and explore the relationship between the dynamic and quasi-static tension forces. And while the quasi-static tension force is found to contribute to the flux rope equilibrium in a number of regimes, the dynamic tension force is substantial mostly in the so-called failed torus regime where magnetic self-organization events prevent the flux rope from erupting.

  16. Quasi-static and dynamic magnetic tension forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Solar eruptions are often driven by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the torus and kink instabilities that act on line-tied magnetic flux ropes. We designed our recent laboratory experiments to study these eruptive instabilities which have demonstrated the key role of both dynamic (Myers et al 2015 Nature 528 526) and quasi-static (Myers et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 112102) magnetic tension forces in contributing to the equilibrium and stability of line-tied magnetic flux ropes. In our paper, we synthesize these laboratory results and explore the relationship between the dynamic and quasi-static tension forces. And while the quasi-static tension force ismore » found to contribute to the flux rope equilibrium in a number of regimes, the dynamic tension force is substantial mostly in the so-called failed torus regime where magnetic self-organization events prevent the flux rope from erupting.« less

  17. Quasi-static and dynamic magnetic tension forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2017-01-01

    Solar eruptions are often driven by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the torus and kink instabilities that act on line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Recent laboratory experiments designed to study these eruptive instabilities have demonstrated the key role of both dynamic (Myers et al 2015 Nature 528 526) and quasi-static (Myers et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 112102) magnetic tension forces in contributing to the equilibrium and stability of line-tied magnetic flux ropes. In this paper, we synthesize these laboratory results and explore the relationship between the dynamic and quasi-static tension forces. While the quasi-static tension force is found to contribute to the flux rope equilibrium in a number of regimes, the dynamic tension force is substantial mostly in the so-called failed torus regime where magnetic self-organization events prevent the flux rope from erupting.

  18. Scaling Effects in Carbon/Epoxy Laminates Under Transverse Quasi-Static Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Douglas, Michael J.; Estes, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Scaling effects were considered for 8, 16, 32, and 64 ply IM-7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy composites plates transversely loaded to the first significant load drop by means of both a quasi-static and an equivalent impact force. The resulting damage was examined by x-ray and photomicroscopy analysis. Load-deflection curves were generated for the quasi-static tests and the resulting indentation depth was measured. Results showed that the load-deflection data scaled well for most of the various thicknesses of plates. However, damage did not scale as well. No correlation could be found between dent depth and any of the other parameters measured in this study. The impact test results showed that significantly less damage was formed compared to the quasi- static results for a given maximum transverse load. The criticality of ply-level scaling (grouping plies) was also examined.

  19. Improved Quasi-Static Method: IQS Method Implementation for CFEM Diffusion in Rattlesnake

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, Zachary M.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Wang, Yaqi

    2016-02-29

    The improved quasi-static (IQS) method is a transient spatial kinetics method that involves factorizing flux into space- and time-dependent components. These components include the flux’s power and shape. Power is time-dependent, while the shape is both space- and time-dependent. However, the impetus of the method is the assumption that the shape is only weakly dependent on time; therefore, the shape may not require computation at every time step, invoking the quasi-static nature. This paper describes the implementation and testing of IQS as an alternative kinetics solver within Rattlesnake to provide improved time performance with minimal reduction in accuracy.

  20. Radiation Belt Dynamic and Quasi-Static Modeling Based on CRRES Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    project and its original objectives. Summaries of substantial achievements under the contract are given as separate technical sections of this final...qualify against the most severe environments, which may not even be relevant over a mission of short duration. This project was conceived in response to...upgrade of static models into quasi-static models. A corollary benefit of dynamic modeling is that it 3 provides a method for projection of data

  1. A quasi-static polynomial nodal method for nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    Modern nodal methods are currently available which can accurately and efficiently solve the static and transient neutron diffusion equations. Most of the methods, however, are limited to two energy groups for practical application. The objective of this research is the development of a static and transient, multidimensional nodal method which allows more than two energy groups and uses a non-linear iterative method for efficient solution of the nodal equations. For both the static and transient methods, finite-difference equations which are corrected by the use of discontinuity factors are derived. The discontinuity factors are computed from a polynomial nodal method using a non-linear iteration technique. The polynomial nodal method is based upon a quartic approximation and utilizes a quadratic transverse-leakage approximation. The solution of the time-dependent equations is performed by the use of a quasi-static method in which the node-averaged fluxes are factored into shape and amplitude functions. The application of the quasi-static polynomial method to several benchmark problems demonstrates that the accuracy is consistent with that of other nodal methods. The use of the quasi-static method is shown to substantially reduce the computation time over the traditional fully-implicit time-integration method. Problems involving thermal-hydraulic feedback are accurately, and efficiently, solved by performing several reactivity/thermal-hydraulic updates per shape calculation.

  2. Single-asperity friction during quasi-static sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Tristan; Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The static friction of an asperity is investigated using atomic-scale simulations. We explore scale effects by varying the sphere radius R and the contact radius a from nanometers to micrometers. We first consider commensurate contact between bare lattices with repulsive interactions across the interface. In small contacts, all contacting atoms move coherently and the friction coefficient μ is independent of contact radius and load. In larger contacts, interfacial slip is mediated by localized dislocations, and the static friction coefficient μ ~ (Ra0/a2) 2 / 3 , where a0 is the nearest-neighbor spacing. In very large contacts μ stops decreasing and begins to increase with a, at fixed R. The results are in sharp contrast to Cattaneo-Mindlin continuum theory where μ is independent of contact size. Separate simulations are performed to connect the results to the dislocation-based models of contact-size effects due to Hurtado and Kim, and Gao, which assume adhesive interactions between surfaces and find μ ~ (a0/a)1/2. Simulations for incommensurate contacts show a transition from superlubricity for rigid contacts to a finite friction associated with the Peierls stress in very large contacts. Support from: DMR-1006805; NSF IGERT-0801471; OCI-0963185; CMMI-0923018

  3. Effect of adherend steel strength on static and fatigue strength of adhesive/rivet combined joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Makoto; Haraga, Kosuke; Nishikawa, Tetsuya

    1992-02-01

    Adhesive/rivet combined bonding has attracted special interest recently as a joining technique of high-strength steel because of its high joint efficiency. In this study, the effects of steel strength on the tensile and fatigue strength of adhesive/rivet combined and adhesive joints were investigated. In addition, the stress distributions of these joints were analyzed by finite-element methods, taking into consideration the plastic deformation of adherend steels. With the increase of steel strength, the tensile strength of combined and adhesive joints increased and tensile strength was improved by the combination with the rivet. However, irrespective of the steel strength, the fatigue strength of combined and adhesive joints was constant and the fatigue strength of the combined joint was similar to that of the adhesive joint. These findings could be explained from the difference of stress distribution between static and fatigue load conditions.

  4. Terapascal static pressure generation with ultrahigh yield strength nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Solopova, Natalia A; Abakumov, Artem; Turner, Stuart; Hanfland, Michael; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Chuvashova, Irina; Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Studies of materials' properties at high and ultrahigh pressures lead to discoveries of unique physical and chemical phenomena and a deeper understanding of matter. In high-pressure research, an achievable static pressure limit is imposed by the strength of available strong materials and design of high-pressure devices. Using a high-pressure and high-temperature technique, we synthesized optically transparent microballs of bulk nanocrystalline diamond, which were found to have an exceptional yield strength (~460 GPa at a confining pressure of ~70 GPa) due to the unique microstructure of bulk nanocrystalline diamond. We used the nanodiamond balls in a double-stage diamond anvil cell high-pressure device that allowed us to generate static pressures beyond 1 TPa, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Outstanding mechanical properties (strain-dependent elasticity, very high hardness, and unprecedented yield strength) make the nanodiamond balls a unique device for ultrahigh static pressure generation. Structurally isotropic, homogeneous, and made of a low-Z material, they are promising in the field of x-ray optical applications.

  5. Terapascal static pressure generation with ultrahigh yield strength nanodiamond

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Solopova, Natalia A.; Abakumov, Artem; Turner, Stuart; Hanfland, Michael; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Chuvashova, Irina; Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Studies of materials’ properties at high and ultrahigh pressures lead to discoveries of unique physical and chemical phenomena and a deeper understanding of matter. In high-pressure research, an achievable static pressure limit is imposed by the strength of available strong materials and design of high-pressure devices. Using a high-pressure and high-temperature technique, we synthesized optically transparent microballs of bulk nanocrystalline diamond, which were found to have an exceptional yield strength (~460 GPa at a confining pressure of ~70 GPa) due to the unique microstructure of bulk nanocrystalline diamond. We used the nanodiamond balls in a double-stage diamond anvil cell high-pressure device that allowed us to generate static pressures beyond 1 TPa, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Outstanding mechanical properties (strain-dependent elasticity, very high hardness, and unprecedented yield strength) make the nanodiamond balls a unique device for ultrahigh static pressure generation. Structurally isotropic, homogeneous, and made of a low-Z material, they are promising in the field of x-ray optical applications. PMID:27453944

  6. Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Response of Injection-Molded Cenosphere/HDPE Syntactic Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath Kumar, B. R.; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    High strain rate compressive properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix syntactic foams containing cenosphere filler are investigated. Thermoplastic matrix syntactic foams have not been studied extensively for high strain rate deformation response despite interest in them for lightweight underwater vehicle structures and consumer products. Quasi-static compression tests are conducted at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1 and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. Further, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized for characterizing syntactic foams for high strain rate compression. The compressive strength of syntactic foams is higher than that of HDPE resin at the same strain rate. Yield strength shows an increasing trend with strain rate. The average yield strength values at high strain rates are almost twice the values obtained at 10-4 s-1 for HDPE resin and syntactic foams. Theoretical models are used to estimate the effectiveness of cenospheres in reinforcing syntactic foams.

  7. Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

  8. Insulator polarization effect in quasi-static and high-frequency C(V) curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tüttő, P.; Balázs, J.

    1982-01-01

    A new method is given to evaluate quasi-static and high frequency C(V) curves. Surface state density distribution and insulator polarization can be obtained simultaneously without the need of other measurements. Measurements of MNOS structures indicate that there are "free" charge carriers in the Si 3N 4 layer which move in a rather inhomogeneous electric field.

  9. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-02-20

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%.

  10. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  11. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%. PMID:28230743

  12. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-01

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance.

  13. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-07

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance.

  14. The Assessing of the Failure Behavior of Glass/Polyester Composites Subject to Quasi Static Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, M. D.; Savin, A.; Teodorescu-Drăghicescu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Using glass fabric reinforced composites for structure of wind turbine blades requires high mechanical strengths especially to cyclic stresses. Studies have shown that approximately 50% of composite material failure occurs because of fatigue. Composites behavior to cyclic stresses involves three stages regarding to stiffness variation: the first stage is characterized by the accelerated decline of stiffness with micro-cracks, the second stage - a slight decrease of stiffness characterized by the occurrence of delamination and third stage characterized by higher decreases of resistance and occurrence of fracture thereof. The aim of the paper is to analyzed the behavior of composites reinforced with glass fibers fabric type RT500 and polyester resin subjected to tensile cyclic loading with pulsating quasi-static regime with asymmetry coefficient R = 0. The samples were tested with the universal tensile machine LS100 Lloyd Instruments Plus, with a load capacity of 100 kN. The load was applied with different speeds of 1 mm/min, 10 mm/min and 20 mm/min. After tests, it was observed that the greatest permanent strains were recorded in the first load cycles when the total energy storage by material was lost due to internal friction. With increasing number of cycles, the glass/polyester composites ability to store energy of deformation decreases, the flow phenomenon characterized by large displacements to smaller loading forces appearing.

  15. Simulated Hail Ice Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanism at Quasi-Static Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan M.

    Hail is a significant threat to aircraft both on the ground and in the air. Aeronautical engineers are interested in better understanding the properties of hail to improve the safety of new aircraft. However, the failure mechanism and mechanical properties of hail, as opposed to clear ice, are not well understood. A literature review identifies basic mechanical properties of ice and a failure mechanism based upon the state of stress within an ice sphere is proposed. To better understand the properties of Simulated Hail Ice (SHI), several tests were conducted using both clear and cotton fiber reinforced ice. Pictures were taken to show the internal crystal structure of SHI. SHI crush tests were conducted to identify the overall force-displacement trends at various quasi-static strain rates. High speed photography was also used to visually track the failure mechanism of spherical SHI. Compression tests were done to measure the compression strength of SHI and results were compared to literature data. Fracture toughness tests were conducted to identify the crack resistance of SHI. Results from testing clear ice samples were successfully compared to previously published literature data to instill confidence in the testing methods. The methods were subsequently used to test and characterize the cotton fiber reinforced ice.

  16. Relationship between Alfvén Wave and Quasi-Static Acceleration in Earth's Auroral Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2016-02-01

    There are two main categories of acceleration processes in the Earth's auroral zone: those based on quasi-static structures, and those based on Alfvén wave (AW). AWs play a nonnegligible role in the global energy budget of the plasma surrounding the Earth because they participate in auroral acceleration, and because auroral acceleration conveys a large portion of the energy flux across the magnetosphere. Acceleration events by double layers (DLs) and by AW have mostly been investigated separately, but many studies cited in this chapter show that they are not independent: these processes can occur simultaneously, and one process can be the cause of the other. The quasi-simultaneous occurrences of acceleration by AW and by quasi-static structures have been observed predominantly at the polar cap boundary of auroral arc systems, where often new bright arcs develop or intensify.

  17. Effect of Microscopic Damage Events on Static and Ballistic Impact Strength of Triaxial Braid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial-braided carbon-fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Methods to characterize the material properties used in the analytical models from a systematically obtained set of test data are also lacking. A macroscopic finite element based analytical model to analyze the impact response of these materials has been developed. The stiffness and strength properties utilized in the material model are obtained from a set of quasi-static in-plane tension, compression and shear coupon level tests. Full-field optical strain measurement techniques are applied in the testing, and the results are used to help in characterizing the model. The unit cell of the braided composite is modeled as a series of shell elements, where each element is modeled as a laminated composite. The braided architecture can thus be approximated within the analytical model. The transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA is utilized to conduct the finite element simulations, and an internal LS-DYNA constitutive model is utilized in the analysis. Methods to obtain the stiffness and strength properties required by the constitutive model from the available test data are developed. Simulations of quasi-static coupon tests and impact tests of a represented braided composite are conducted. Overall, the developed method shows promise, but improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  18. Resistance training vs. static stretching: effects on flexibility and strength.

    PubMed

    Morton, Sam K; Whitehead, James R; Brinkert, Ronald H; Caine, Dennis J

    2011-12-01

    Morton, SK, Whitehead, JR, Brinkert, RH, and Caine, DJ. Resistance training vs. static stretching: Effects on flexibility and strength. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3391-3398, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine how full-range resistance training (RT) affected flexibility and strength compared to static stretching (SS) of the same muscle-joint complexes in untrained adults. Volunteers (n = 25) were randomized to an RT or SS training group. A group of inactive volunteers (n = 12) served as a convenience control group (CON). After pretesting hamstring extension, hip flexion and extension, shoulder extension flexibility, and peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, subjects completed 5-week SS or RT treatments in which the aim was to stretch or to strength train the same muscle-joint complexes over similar movements and ranges. Posttests of flexibility and strength were then conducted. There was no difference in hamstring flexibility, hip flexion, and hip extension improvement between RT and SS, but both were superior to CON values. There were no differences between groups on shoulder extension flexibility. The RT group was superior to the CON in knee extension peak torque, but there were no differences between groups on knee flexion peak torque. The results of this preliminary study suggest that carefully constructed full-range RT regimens can improve flexibility as well as the typical SS regimens employed in conditioning programs. Because of the potential practical significance of these results to strength and conditioning programs, further studies using true experimental designs, larger sample sizes, and longer training durations should be conducted with the aim of confirming or disproving these results.

  19. Biomechanics of the incudo-malleolar-joint - Experimental investigations for quasi-static loads.

    PubMed

    Ihrle, S; Gerig, R; Dobrev, I; Röösli, C; Sim, J H; Huber, A M; Eiber, A

    2016-10-01

    Under large quasi-static loads, the incudo-malleolar joint (IMJ), connecting the malleus and the incus, is highly mobile. It can be classified as a mechanical filter decoupling large quasi-static motions while transferring small dynamic excitations. This is presumed to be due to the complex geometry of the joint inducing a spatial decoupling between the malleus and incus under large quasi-static loads. Spatial Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) displacement measurements on isolated malleus-incus-complexes (MICs) were performed. With the malleus firmly attached to a probe holder, the incus was excited by applying quasi-static forces at different points. For each force application point the resulting displacement was measured subsequently at different points on the incus. The location of the force application point and the LDV measurement points were calculated in a post-processing step combining the position of the LDV points with geometric data of the MIC. The rigid body motion of the incus was then calculated from the multiple displacement measurements for each force application point. The contact regions of the articular surfaces for different load configurations were calculated by applying the reconstructed motion to the geometry model of the MIC and calculate the minimal distance of the articular surfaces. The reconstructed motion has a complex spatial characteristic and varies for different force application points. The motion changed with increasing load caused by the kinematic guidance of the articular surfaces of the joint. The IMJ permits a relative large rotation around the anterior-posterior axis through the joint when a force is applied at the lenticularis in lateral direction before impeding the motion. This is part of the decoupling of the malleus motion from the incus motion in case of large quasi-static loads.

  20. Damage and fracture in fabric-reinforced composites under quasi-static and dynamic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Fabric-reinforced polymer composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large deformations caused by quasi-static and dynamic loading. Composite materials subjected to such bending loads can demonstrate various damage modes - matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution in composites affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. Such behaviour needs adequate means of analysis and investigation, the main approaches being experimental characterisation and non-destructive examination of internal damage in composite laminates. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in carbon fabric-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates caused by quasi-static and dynamic bending. Experimental tests were carried out to characterise the behaviour of a CFRP material under large-deflection bending, first in quasi-static and then in dynamic conditions. Izod-type impact bending tests were performed on un-notched specimens of CFRP using a Resil impactor to assess the transient response and energy absorbing capability of the material. X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) was used to analyse various damage modes in the tested specimens. X-ray tomographs revealed that through-thickness matrix cracking, inter-ply and intra-ply delamination such as tow debonding, and fabric fracture were the prominent damage modes both in quasi-static and dynamic test specimens. However, the inter-ply damage was localised at impact location in dynamically tested specimens, whereas in the quasi-static specimens, it spread almost over the entire interface.

  1. Longitudinal quasi-static stability predicts changes in dog gait on rough terrain.

    PubMed

    Wilshin, Simon; Reeve, Michelle A; Haynes, G Clark; Revzen, Shai; Koditschek, Daniel E; Spence, Andrew J

    2017-05-15

    Legged animals utilize gait selection to move effectively and must recover from environmental perturbations. We show that on rough terrain, domestic dogs, Canis lupus familiaris, spend more time in longitudinal quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Here, longitudinal refers to the rostro-caudal axis. We used an existing model in the literature to quantify the longitudinal quasi-static stability of gaits neighbouring the walk, and found that trot-like gaits are more stable. We thus hypothesized that when perturbed, the rate of return to a stable gait would depend on the direction of perturbation, such that perturbations towards less quasi-statically stable patterns of movement would be more rapid than those towards more stable patterns of movement. The net result of this would be greater time spent in longitudinally quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Limb movement patterns in which diagonal limbs were more synchronized (those more like a trot) have higher longitudinal quasi-static stability. We therefore predicted that as dogs explored possible limb configurations on rough terrain at walking speeds, the walk would shift towards trot. We gathered experimental data quantifying dog gait when perturbed by rough terrain and confirmed this prediction using GPS and inertial sensors (n=6, P<0.05). By formulating gaits as trajectories on the n-torus we are able to make tractable the analysis of gait similarity. These methods can be applied in a comparative study of gait control which will inform the ultimate role of the constraints and costs impacting locomotion, and have applications in diagnostic procedures for gait abnormalities, and in the development of agile legged robots. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Longitudinal quasi-static stability predicts changes in dog gait on rough terrain

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Michelle A.; Haynes, G. Clark; Revzen, Shai; Koditschek, Daniel E.; Spence, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legged animals utilize gait selection to move effectively and must recover from environmental perturbations. We show that on rough terrain, domestic dogs, Canis lupus familiaris, spend more time in longitudinal quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Here, longitudinal refers to the rostro-caudal axis. We used an existing model in the literature to quantify the longitudinal quasi-static stability of gaits neighbouring the walk, and found that trot-like gaits are more stable. We thus hypothesized that when perturbed, the rate of return to a stable gait would depend on the direction of perturbation, such that perturbations towards less quasi-statically stable patterns of movement would be more rapid than those towards more stable patterns of movement. The net result of this would be greater time spent in longitudinally quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Limb movement patterns in which diagonal limbs were more synchronized (those more like a trot) have higher longitudinal quasi-static stability. We therefore predicted that as dogs explored possible limb configurations on rough terrain at walking speeds, the walk would shift towards trot. We gathered experimental data quantifying dog gait when perturbed by rough terrain and confirmed this prediction using GPS and inertial sensors (n=6, P<0.05). By formulating gaits as trajectories on the n-torus we are able to make tractable the analysis of gait similarity. These methods can be applied in a comparative study of gait control which will inform the ultimate role of the constraints and costs impacting locomotion, and have applications in diagnostic procedures for gait abnormalities, and in the development of agile legged robots. PMID:28264903

  3. Quasi-statically Self-chosen Faulting Path Modeling in Heterogeneous Medium: FEM-beta Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kame, N.; Oguni, K.

    2005-12-01

    We apply FEM-β, a newly proposed Finite Element Method (Hori, Oguni and Sakaguchi, JMPS, 2005), to quasi-statically self-chosen faulting path modeling. The method, FEM-β, is based on particle discretization of a displacement field with non-overlapping shape function and it provides an easy way to express displacement discontinuities between any two adjacent nodes: This is an advantage of FEM-β for self-chosen failure path modeling. FEM-β, originally developed for the analysis on tensile failure within a structural material containing local imperfection, is here tested for earthquake shear faulting in strongly heterogeneous medium. In order to investigate the effect of elastic heterogeneity in the crust on the formation of geometrically complex fault traces, we first analyze the static stress field in a heterogeneous medium containing a shear crack and then simulate the quasi-static crack growth for which rupture path is self-chosen.

  4. 3-D Gaussian beam scattering from a gyromagnetic perforated layer: Quasi-static approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachin, Vladimir V.; Zinenko, Tatiana L.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the scattering of a three-dimensional (3-D) Gaussian beam with the circular cross section from a double periodic perforated gyromagnetic layer with polarization independent unit-cell, in the quasi-static approximation. We used the plane-wave spectrum representation for Gaussian beam field representation and reduced it to a single integral representation. The phenomena of the lateral beam shift influenced by Faraday rotation and the nearly total beam transmission when passing through gyromagnetic slab biased with an external static magnetic field in the Faraday configuration were considered.

  5. Guiding and collimating fast electron beam by the quasi-static electromagnetic field array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; He, W. H.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    A guidance and collimation scheme for fast electron beam in a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array is proposed with the semi-analytic method and the particle-in-cell simulation. The sheath electric fields on the surfaces of nanowires and the magnetic fields around the nanowires form a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array. Therefore, most of the fast electrons are confined at the nanowire surfaces and transport forward. More importantly, due to the divergent property of the beams, the magnitudes of the generated fields decrease with the target depth. The lateral momenta of the electrons convert into the forward momenta through Lorenz force, and they cannot recover their initial values. Therefore, the fast electrons can be guided and collimated efficiently in the gaps between the nanowires. In our particle-in-cell simulations, the observed guiding efficiency exceeds 80% compared with the reference target.

  6. Bridging the Quasi-Static and the Physical Optics Approximations: An Elliptic Disk Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Mostafa A.

    1998-03-01

    A reformulated integral equation is solved inside an elliptic disk particle for an electromagnetic field formulation bridging the quasi-static and the physical optics approximations. The scattering amplitude tensor elements associated with such a field formulation are derived and then used to formulate the extinction cross sections. It is shown that the extinction cross sections have a frequency dependence and an incidence angle dependence similar to those associated with the physical optics approximation, and they have a particle shape dependence similar to that associated with the quasi-static approximation. Furthermore, at the high-frequency limits, it is shown that those cross sections could reach the value known in the literature by the extinction paradox, namely, twice the particle geometric shadow area.

  7. The plasma wave and quasi-static electric field instrument /PWI/ for dynamics Explorer-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Odem, D. L.; Helliwell, R. A.; Park, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    It is explained that the Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI) on Dynamics Explorer-A measures both plasma wave phenomena and quasi-static electric fields. The quasi-static electric fields are measured parallel to the spin axis of the spacecraft in a range of 2 mV/m to 2 V/m and perpendicular to the spin axis 0.5 mV/m to 2 V/m at 16 samples/s. The ac electric field sensors include a 200-m tip-to-tip long wire antenna and a 0.6-m short electric antenna, both of which are perpendicular to the spin axis, and a 9-m tip-to-tip tubular antenna parallel to the spin axis. AC electric wave fields are measured over a frequency range of 1 Hz to 2 MHz and over an amplitude range of 0.03 microvolt/m to 100 mV/m.

  8. Application of genetic algorithm in quasi-static fiber grating wavelength demodulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Feng-Cheng; Yin, Wen-Wen; Wu, Fei; Li, Zhi-Quang; Wu, Ti-Hua

    2007-07-01

    A modified genetic algorithm (GA) has been proposed, which was used to wavelength demodulation in quasi-static fiber grating sensing system. The modification method of GA has been introduced and the relevant mathematical model has been established. The objective function and individual fitness evaluation strategy interrelated with GA are also established. The influence of population size, chromosome size, generations, crossover probability and mutation probability on the GA has been analyzed, and the optimal parameters of modified GA have been obtained. The simulations and experiments, show that the modified GA can be applied to quasi-static fiber grating sensing system, and the wavelength demodulation precision is equal to or less than 3 pm.

  9. Modeling energy dissipation induced by quasi-static compaction of granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, K.A.; Menikoff, R.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-07-01

    A simple extension of a conventional two-phase continuum model of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT) in energetic granular material is given to account for energy dissipation induced by quasi-static compaction. To this end, the conventional model equations are supplemented by a relaxation equation that accounts for irreversible changes in solid volume fraction due to intergranular friction, plastic deformation of granules, and granule fracture. The proposed model, which is consistent with the Second Law of Thermodynamics for a two-phase mixture, is demonstrated by applying it to the quasi-static compaction of granular HMX. The model predicts results commensurate with experimental data including stress relaxation and substantial dissipation; such phenomena have not been previously accounted for by two-phase DDT models. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. High-resolution absolute frequency referenced fiber optic sensor for quasi-static strain sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; Chow, Jong H.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Littler, Ian C. M.; Gagliardi, Gianluca; Gray, Malcolm B.; McClelland, David E.

    2010-07-20

    We present a quasi-static fiber optic strain sensing system capable of resolving signals below nanostrain from 20 mHz. A telecom-grade distributed feedback CW diode laser is locked to a fiber Fabry-Perot sensor, transferring the detected signals onto the laser. An H{sup 13}C{sup 14}N absorption line is then used as a frequency reference to extract accurate low-frequency strain signals from the locked system.

  11. Using the ALEGRA Code for Analysis of Quasi-Static Magnetization of Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Michael Grinfeld and Andrew Porwitzky Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL John Niederhaus Center for Computing Research, Sandia National...provide a useful basis for verification of numerical methods. The second goal is not computational but physical – it is to explore in the quasi-static...Effect 23 8.4 Compute Times 25 iii 9. Conclusions 26 10. References 28 List of Symbols 30 Distribution List 31 iv List of Figures Fig. 1 Schematic

  12. A spatial bending fluidic actuator: fabrication and quasi-static characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Benjamin; Chew, Allison; Naghshineh, Nastaran; Menon, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a novel silicone-based, millimeter-scale, fluidic actuator able to bend about two orthogonal axes. The implemented molding fabrication procedure is discussed and the quasi-static performance of the developed prototypes is experimentally investigated. The relationship between the pressurized working fluid and the position of the actuator tip is determined by using a stereovision measurement system. Such a relationship is mapped through a regression model, which is used to implement a minimalist position controller.

  13. Scaling the final deposits of dry cohesive granular columns after collapse and quasi-static fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mériaux, Catherine; Triantafillou, Trent

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on laboratory experiments that were designed to investigate the collapse and quasi-static fall of dry cohesive granular columns. These experiments were compared with similar experiments that were performed with non-cohesive dry sand columns. A powder of gypsum (calcium sulphate dihydrate) was used to represent cohesive granular material. In all the experiments, the cohesive granular columns fractured and flowed in coherent blocks but, while faults remained steep in the quasi-static fall experiments, they flattened in the collapse experiments as the initial aspect ratio of the columns increased. Dilation was seen in the quasi-static fall experiments, while some air entrapment within the columns occurred in the collapse experiments. The final deposits of the cohesive granular columns were found to satisfy power law relationships as a function of the initial aspect ratio of the columns. Two asymptotes were found for the lower and higher range of initial aspect ratios, which varied between 0.5 and 8, respectively. When compared with the power law relationships found for dry noncohesive columns, the power dependence of the ratio of initial to final height and final runout to initial length with the aspect ratio of the columns was found to be similar. The prefactors of the power laws were found to slightly decrease with the increase of the cohesion or, equivalently, the decrease in grain size. Similar to the dry noncohesive case, the prefactors for the runout length were found to increase by a factor 2 with the increase of flow rate. When the collapse experiments were compared with the quasi-static fall experiments, a shift towards higher aspect ratios of the transition between the two asymptotic power laws was found.

  14. Comparative Electromagnetic and Quasi-Static Simulations of a Shortpulse Propagation along Microstrip Meander Delay Lines with Design Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Pavel; Gazizov, Talgat; Zabolotsky, Aleksander

    2016-09-01

    A numerical analysis of microstrip meander delay lines is considered. Results of quasi-static and electromagnetic simulations are given. It is shown that when increasing a number of turns and proportionally reducing their length, distortions of a pulse signal in the line are reduced. At the same time, despite structure's electrical width increase, the agreement between the results of quasi-static and electromagnetic analyses is improved. Thus, it is demonstrated that when designing the microstrip meander delay lines with minimal distortions, the quasi-static analysis is relevant.

  15. (In)stability of quasi-static paths of some finite dimensional smooth or elastic-plastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. A. C.; Monteiro Marques, M. D. P.; Petrov, A.; Rebrova, N. V.; Sobolev, V. A.; Coelho, I.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss some mathematical issues related to the stability of quasistatic paths of finite dimensional mechanical systems that have a smooth or an elastic-plastic behavior. The concept of stability of quasi-static paths used here is essentially a continuity property relatively to the size of the initial perturbations (as in Lyapunov stability) and to the smallness of the rate of application of the external forces (which here plays the role of the small parameter in singular perturbation problems). A related concept of attractiveness is also proposed. Sufficient conditions for attractiveness or for instability of quasi-static paths of smooth systems are presented. The Ziegler column and other examples illustrate these situations. Mathematical formulations (plus existence and uniqueness results) for dynamic and quasi-static elastic-plastic problems with linear hardening are recalled. A stability result is proved for the quasi-static evolution of these systems.

  16. Geometric multigrid to accelerate the solution of the quasi-static electric field problem by tetrahedral finite elements.

    PubMed

    Hollaus, K; Weiss, B; Magele, Ch; Hutten, H

    2004-02-01

    The acceleration of the solution of the quasi-static electric field problem considering anisotropic complex conductivity simulated by tetrahedral finite elements of first order is investigated by geometric multigrid.

  17. Investigation of Quasi-Static Indentation Response of Inkjet Printed Sandwich Structures under Various Indenter Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Nagalingam, Arun Prasanth; Yap, Yee Ling; Sing, Swee Leong; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the quasi-static indentation response and failure mode in three-dimensional (3D) printed trapezoidal core structures, and to characterize the energy absorbed by the structures. In this work, the trapezoidal sandwich structure was designed in the following two ways. Firstly, the trapezoidal core along with its facesheet was 3D printed as a single element comprising a single material for both core and facesheet (type A); Secondly, the trapezoidal core along with facesheet was 3D printed, but with variation in facesheet materials (type B). Quasi-static indentation was carried out using three different indenters, namely standard hemispherical, conical, and flat indenters. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was used to capture brittle cracking in the specimens during indentation. The major failure modes were found to be brittle failure and quasi-brittle fractures. The measured indentation energy was at a maximum when using a conical indenter at 9.40 J and 9.66 J and was at a minimum when using a hemispherical indenter at 6.87 J and 8.82 J for type A and type B series specimens respectively. The observed maximum indenter displacements at failure were the effect of material variations and composite configurations in the facesheet. PMID:28772649

  18. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor - formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements - confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected.

  19. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor – formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements – confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected. PMID:26234929

  20. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S; Smith, David R; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-08-03

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor - formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements - confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected.

  1. Subsonic Maneuvering Effectiveness of High Performance Aircraft Which Employ Quasi-Static Shape Change Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Scott, Michael A.; Weston, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper represents an initial study on the use of quasi-static shape change devices in aircraft maneuvering. The macroscopic effects and requirements for these devices in flight control are the focus of this study. Groups of devices are postulated to replace the conventional leading-edge flap (LEF) and the all-moving wing tip (AMT) on the tailless LMTAS-ICE (Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems - Innovative Control Effectors) configuration. The maximum quasi-static shape changes are 13.8% and 7.7% of the wing section thickness for the LEF and AMT replacement devices, respectively. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) panel code is used to determine the control effectiveness of groups of these devices. A preliminary design of a wings-leveler autopilot is presented. Initial evaluation at 0.6 Mach at 15,000 ft. altitude is made through batch simulation. Results show small disturbance stability is achieved, however, an increase in maximum distortion is needed to statically offset five degrees of sideslip. This only applies to the specific device groups studied, encouraging future research on optimal device placement.

  2. Development of Benchmark Examples for Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation and Fatigue Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation and cyclic delamination onset and growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for Abaqus/Standard. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double-Cantilever Beam specimen. The example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation, onset and growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, a quasi-static benchmark example was created for the specimen. Second, based on the static results, benchmark examples for cyclic delamination growth were created. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Fourth, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the automated analysis and compared to the benchmark examples. Again, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  3. Quasi-Static and Shock Induced Mechanical Response of an Aluminium-Zinc-Magnesium Alloy as a Function of Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. R.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    Samples of an aluminium-zinc-magnesium alloy, typical of high strength weldable aluminium alloys, have been heat treated to produce two different microstructural conditions, these being peak-aged and under-aged. Mechanical tests have been performed, both at quasi-static strain rates and under shock loading conditions to determine how the mechanical properties change with heat treatment. Results indicate that the material has its highest strength when peak aged. Properties are discussed in relation to observed features within the microstructure, as recorded by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Electrical and thermal response of carbon nanotube composites under quasi-static and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Christopher D.

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have attracted much interest due to their possible technical applications as conductive polymers and sensory materials. This study will consist of two major objectives: 1.) to investigate the thermal conductivity and thermal response of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites under quasi-static loading, and 2.) to investigate the electrical response of carboxyl-terminated butadiene (CTBN) rubber-reinforced MWCNT/Epoxy composites under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Similar studies have shown that the electrical conductivity of CNT/Epoxy composites dramatically increases with compressive strains up to 15%. Part 1 seeks to find out if thermal conductivity show a similar response to electrical conductivity under an applied load. Part 2 seeks to investigate how the addition of rubber affects the mechanical and electrical response of the composite subjected to quasi-static and dynamic loading. By knowing how thermal and electrical properties change under a given applied strain, we attempt to broaden the breadth of understanding of CNT/epoxy composites and inqure the microscopic interactions occurring between the two. Electrical experiments sought to investigate the electrical response of rubber-reinforced carbon nanotube epoxy composites under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Specimens were fabricated with CTBN rubber content of 10 parts per hundredth resin (phr), 20 phr, 30 phr and 0 phr for a basis comparison. Both quasi-static and dynamic mechanical response showed a consistent decrease in peak stress and Young's modulus with increasing rubber content. Trends in the electrical response between each case were clearly observed with peak resistance changes ranging from 58% to 73% and with each peak occurring at a higher value with increasing rubber content, with the exception of the rubber-free specimens. It was concluded that among the rubber-embedded specimens, the addition of rubber helped to delay micro-cracking and

  5. Dynamic versus static bond-strength testing of adhesive interfaces.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Mine, Atsushi; Peumans, Marleen; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-11-01

    A static bond-strength test is often regarded as clinically less relevant, since such abrupt loading of the adhesive-tooth bond clinically never occurs. Therefore, dynamic fatigue testing is often claimed to better predict the clinical effectiveness of adhesives. To measure the micro-tensile fatigue resistance (μTFR) of adhesives bonded to dentin, and to compare their μTFR to their micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS). The bonding effectiveness (including fracture analysis) of three adhesives (OptiBond FL, Kerr: 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive or 3-E&Ra; Clearfil SE, Kuraray: 2-step self-etch adhesive or 2-SEa; G-Bond, GC: 1-step self-etch adhesive or 1-SEa) was measured by means of both a dynamic μTFR and a static μTBS approach. Preparation and test set-up of the micro-specimens were identical for both tests. In fatigue, specimens were tested with a wide range of selected loads at 2Hz and at 10Hz until failure, or until 10(4) cycles were reached. At 2Hz, the μTFR was also measured after 3-month water storage. The μTFR was determined using a logistic regression model. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparisons test were used to determine statistical differences in μTBS. The 1-SEa recorded significantly lower values in μTFR at 10Hz and in μTBS than the 2-SEa and 3-E&Ra. The 1-SEa and the 2-SEa performed significantly lower in μTFR than the 3-E&Ra, when tested at 2Hz after 3-month water storage. Fatigue testing at 2Hz after 1-week water storage did not reveal any differences in μTFR between the three adhesives. The 3-E&Ra performed best in terms of bonding effectiveness, irrespective of the experimental condition or test used. The μTBS test proved once more to be a reliable laboratory test in ranking contemporary adhesives on their bonding effectiveness. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ORNL Quasi-Static Mechanical Characterization and Analysis: FY09 Annual Report to TARDEC

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Kirkland, Timothy Philip; Strong, Kevin T; Holmquist, Timothy

    2009-12-01

    target ceramic compliance. More so than any other produced damage mechanism. This suggests that a ballistically induced median crack in an armor ceramic may be associated with the dwell penetration event. (7) Glass exhibits tensile strength that is very much dependent on the amount of material, the side being tested (air versus tin if a float glass), and where it is being tensile stressed (in the middle or near an edge). The management of these effects will improve ballistic resistance of transparent armor (or any ceramic armor that is undergoing deflection as a consequence of a ballistic impact). (8) Plasma-arc heat treatment is a quick and relatively inexpensive method to improve the strength of glass. It is implementable into the production line for the mass production of glass. Increased strain-to-failure and bending deflections are concomitant with increased strength, and therefore, ballistic resistance is improvable using this method. (9) The Hertzian stress field at high contact stresses is very similar to the stress field from a ballistic impact. This is significant because the results from Hertzian indentation measurements have the prospect of being used as input in ballistic models to predict dwell conditions. (10) The understanding of glass densification and fragmentation behaviors are aided by piezo-Raman spectroscopy and quasi-static, high-energy fracture. Continued refinement of these test methods will improve the understanding of glass impact resistance. (11) In addition to glass, strength-size scaling was evident in SiC and B{sub 4}C. Previously proposed strength dependencies on rate from shock experiments may instead be explained by this strength-size scaling effect. (12) The quantification of strength-size scaling in armor ceramics clearly shows there is no single strength value that can be used to describe that ceramic. A ballistic modeler can therefore use more appropriate failure stress value(s) as input to predict deflection and expanding cavity

  7. Quasi-static and Dynamic Nanoindentation of Soft and Spatially Distinct Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Nannan

    Quasi-static nanoindentation has been used to assess the mechanical properties of soft and spatially distinct materials for several years. Most of the soft materials exhibit time-dependent (viscoelastic) behavior; thereby dynamic nanoindentation analysis increased the possibility of obtaining an accurate mechanical response from the materials. Normally, the heterogonous microstructure of specimens can result in experimental error when analyzing nanoindentation results. The accurate assessment of nanoindentation on soft materials with spatially distinct structures is not fully understood in previous studies. Some existing features in specimens, such as the residual stresses generated during polymer parts processing, also significantly influences nanoindentation data analysis. The objective of this study is to systematically consider some of the uncertainties when it comes to characterize soft materials by nanoindentation and thus develop several improved characterization methods, and provide guidance for future measurement. The study sought to clear out four main uncertainties within nanoindentation analysis for viscoelastic and heterogeneous materials: 1. Does the free edge close to the indents affect the dynamic nanoindentation results? How can we improve the analysis method? 2. How should indentation results be utilized to estimate the potential residual stresses? 3. Could we perform the statistical nanoindnentation to obtain the comparable results of volume fraction of individual phases in heterogeneous materials? 4. During nanoindentation, what is the appropriate combination of the loading rate, unloading rate and the holding time setup in terms of viscoelastic materials? In this dissertation, the correlation of quasi-static nanoindentation analysis methods with the structural compliance, residual stress, sampling volume and various relaxation processes will be covered in the following chapters. Dynamic nanoindentation will be used to access the time

  8. A quasi-static analysis of open-ended coaxial lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Devendra K.

    1987-10-01

    A quasi-static analysis of an open-ended coaxial line terminated by a semi-infinite medium on ground plane is presented in this paper. The analysis is based on a variation formulation of the problem. A comparison of results obtained by this method with the experimental and the other theoretical approaches shows an excellent agreement. This analysis is expected to be helpful in the inverse problem of calculating the permittivity of materials in vivo for a given input impedance of the coaxial line.

  9. Quasi-static electromagnetic dosimetry: from basic principles to examples of applications.

    PubMed

    Andreuccetti, Daniele; Zoppetti, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    An overview of quasi-static electromagnetic dosimetry is presented. After an introductive description of quantities and standards and a quick look at experimental and analytical approaches, attention is focused on numerical dosimetry. The process that leads to the calculation of results is analyzed in its basic steps, including the representation of the human body by means of a realistic voxel phantom. The most popular numerical methods are then described. An analysis of different methods in the same framework emphasizes common features and differences. This can help in choosing a more suitable method to solve a particular problem. An example of an application is finally reported.

  10. Wafer charging monitored by high frequency and quasi-static C- V measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Bill; Cheung, Nathan W.

    1993-04-01

    A combined high frequency and quasi-static C- V technique is used to monitor wafer charging of MOS structures during plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The test chip used consists of MOS capacitors spanning over five decades of area (25 μm 2 to 4 × 10 6 μm 2). Measured interface trap density ( Qit) is found to be dependent exponentially on plasma exposure time and linearly on the plasma ion density. The PIII pulsed bias voltage has no effect on wafer charging.

  11. Quasi-Static Analysis of Round LaRC THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to predict the shape and displacement with voltage in the quasi-static limit of round LaRC Thunder Actuators. The problem is treated with classical lamination theory and Von Karman non-linear analysis. In the case of classical lamination theory exact analytic solutions are found. It is shown that classical lamination theory is insufficient to describe the physical situation for large actuators but is sufficient for very small actuators. Numerical results are presented for the non-linear analysis and compared with experimental measurements. Snap-through behavior, bifurcation, and stability are presented and discussed.

  12. Mode Jumping of an Isogrid Panel Under Quasi-Static Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muheim, Danniella M.; Johnson, Eric R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide column test of a composite isogrid panel subjected to quasi-static, axial compression is modeled with a hybrid-static dynamic computational method. The data from the test panel exhibited discontinuous responses in the compressive load for slowly increased end-shortening. The computational model was developed to corroborate these discontinuities with the phenomenon of mode jumping. Mode jumping refers to the transient response of the panel from an unstable bifurcation point on a postbuckled equilibrium path to a second stable equilibrium state on a new equilibrium path. On the new equilibrium path, both the analysis and test show that the panel can resist increased endshortening beyond that of the unstable critical point. Fair agreement is achieved between the analysis and test.

  13. Quasi-Static Analysis for Subsidence of Stacked B-25 Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tsu-te; Jones, William E.; Phifer, Mark A.

    2005-05-24

    This paper presents a quasi-static technique to evaluate the structural deformation of the four stacked B-25 boxes subjected to the static loads of overlaying soil and to determine the effect of corrosion on the deformation. Although the boxes are subjected to a static load, the structural responses of the boxes vary with time. The analytical results indeed show that the deflection, buckling and post buckling of the components of the stacked boxes occur in sequence rather than simultaneously. Therefore, it is more appropriate to treat the problems considered as quasistatic rather than static; namely, the structural response of the stacked boxes are dynamic but with very long duration. Furthermore, the finite-element model has complex contact and slide conditions between the interfaces of the adjoining components, and thus its numerical solution is more tractable by using explicit time integration schemes. The analysis covers the three corrosion scenarios following various time lengths of initial burial under an interim soil cover. The results qualitatively agree with expected differences in deformation for different degrees of corrosion subsidence potential reduction that can be achieved.

  14. Influence of Waste Tyre Crumb Rubber on Compressive Strength, Static Modulus of Elasticity and Flexural Strength of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridharan, M. K.; Bharathi Murugan, R.; Natarajan, C.; Muthukannan, M.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the experimental investigations was carried out to find the compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and flexural strength of concrete mixtures, in which natural sand was partially replaced with Waste Tyre Crumb Rubber (WTCR). River sand was replaced with five different percentages (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%) of WTCR by volume. The main objective of the experimental investigation is to find the relationship between static modulus of elasticity and flexural strength with compressive strength of concrete with WTCR. The experimentally obtainedstatic modulus of elasticity and flexural strength results comparing with the theoretical values (various country codes recommendations).

  15. Plasma wakefield acceleration studies using the quasi-static code WAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Palastro, John; Antonsen, T. M.; Mori, Warren B.; An, Weiming

    2015-02-15

    The quasi-static code WAKE [P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] is upgraded to model the propagation of an ultra-relativistic charged particle beam through a warm background plasma in plasma wakefield acceleration. The upgraded code is benchmarked against the full particle-in-cell code OSIRIS [Hemker et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 3, 061301 (2000)] and the quasi-static code QuickPIC [Huang et al., J. Comput. Phys. 217, 658 (2006)]. The effect of non-zero plasma temperature on the peak accelerating electric field is studied for a two bunch electron beam driver with parameters corresponding to the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams. It is shown that plasma temperature does not affect the energy gain and spread of the accelerated particles despite suppressing the peak accelerating electric field. The role of plasma temperature in improving the numerical convergence of the electric field with the grid resolution is discussed.

  16. Fracto-emission in lanthanum-based metallic glass microwires under quasi-static tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Jiang, Chenchen; Lohiya, Lokesh; Yang, Yong; Lu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Plastic deformation in metallic glasses is highly localized and often associated with shear banding, which may cause momentary release of heat upon fracture. Here, we report an explosive fracture phenomenon associated with momentary (˜10 ms) light emission (flash) in Lanthanum-based (LaAlNi) metallic glass microwires (dia. ˜50 μm) under quasi-static tensile loading. The load-displacement data as well as the visual information of the tensile deformation process were acquired through an in situ measurement set-up, which clearly showed nonlinear stress (σ)-strain ( ɛ) curves prior to yielding and also captured the occurrence of the flash at high fracture stresses (˜1 GPa). Through the postmortem fractographic analysis, it can be revealed that the fracto-emission upon quasi-static loading could be mainly attributed to the localized adiabatic work accumulated at a very large elastic strain confined within the microscale sample volume, followed by a localized high temperature rise up to ˜1000 K at the fracture surface through localized energy dissipation. Our findings suggest that the La-based metallic glass microwires could be useful for energetic microchips, micro-ignition devices, and other functional applications.

  17. Quasi-static stop band with flexural metamaterial having zero rotational stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials realizing stop bands have attracted much attentions recently since they can break-through the well-known mass law. However, achieving the stop band at extremely low frequency has been still a big challenge in the fields of elastic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a new metamaterial based on the idea of the zero rotational stiffness, to achieve extremely low frequency stop band for flexural elastic waves. Unlike the previous ways to achieve the stop band, we found that the zero rotational stiffness can provide a broad stop band at extremely low frequency, which starts from even almost zero frequency. To achieve the zero rotational stiffness, we propose a new elastic metamaterial consisting of blocks and links with the hinge connection. Analytic developments as well as numerical simulations evidence that this new metamaterial can exhibit extremely low and broad stop band, even at the quasi-static ranges. In addition, the metamaterial is shown to exhibit the negative group velocity at extremely low frequency ranges, as well as the quasi-static stop band, if it is properly designed.

  18. Reflection and diffraction corrections for nonlinear materials characterization by quasi-static pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Peter B.; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-18

    A harmonic acoustic tone burst propagating through an elastic solid with quadratic nonlinearity produces not only a parallel burst of second harmonic but also an often neglected quasi-static pulse associated with the acoustic radiation-induced eigenstrain. Although initial analytical and experimental studies by Yost and Cantrell suggested that the pulse might have a right-angled triangular shape with the peak displacement at the leading edge being proportional to the length of the tone burst, more recent theoretical, analytical, numerical, and experimental studies proved that the pulse has a flat-top shape and the peak displacement is proportional to the propagation length. In this paper, analytical and numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate two types of finite-size effects. First, the finite axial dimension of the specimen cannot be simply accounted for by a linear reflection coefficient that neglects the nonlinear interaction between the combined incident and reflected fields. Second, the quasistatic pulse generated by a transducer of finite aperture suffers more severe divergence than both the fundamental and second harmonic pulses generated by the same transducer. These finite-size effects can make the top of the quasi-static pulse sloped rather than flat and therefore must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of experimental data.

  19. Quasi-static stop band with flexural metamaterial having zero rotational stiffness.

    PubMed

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-09-21

    Metamaterials realizing stop bands have attracted much attentions recently since they can break-through the well-known mass law. However, achieving the stop band at extremely low frequency has been still a big challenge in the fields of elastic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a new metamaterial based on the idea of the zero rotational stiffness, to achieve extremely low frequency stop band for flexural elastic waves. Unlike the previous ways to achieve the stop band, we found that the zero rotational stiffness can provide a broad stop band at extremely low frequency, which starts from even almost zero frequency. To achieve the zero rotational stiffness, we propose a new elastic metamaterial consisting of blocks and links with the hinge connection. Analytic developments as well as numerical simulations evidence that this new metamaterial can exhibit extremely low and broad stop band, even at the quasi-static ranges. In addition, the metamaterial is shown to exhibit the negative group velocity at extremely low frequency ranges, as well as the quasi-static stop band, if it is properly designed.

  20. Micromechanical definition of an entropy for quasi-static deformation of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenburg, L.; Kruyt, N. P.

    2009-03-01

    A micromechanical theory is formulated for quasi-static deformation of granular materials, which is based on information theory. A reasoning is presented that leads to the definition of an information entropy that is appropriate for quasi-static deformation of granular materials. This definition is based on the hypothesis that relative displacements at contacts with similar orientations are independent realisations of a random variable. This hypothesis is made plausible based on the results of Discrete Element simulations. The developed theory is then used to predict the elastic behaviour of granular materials in terms of micromechanical quantities. The case considered is that of two-dimensional assemblies consisting of non-rotating particles with an elastic contact constitutive relation. Applications of this case are the initial elastic (small-strain) deformation of granular materials. Theoretical results for the elastic moduli, relative displacements, energy distribution and probability density functions are compared with results obtained from the Discrete Element simulations for isotropic assemblies with various average numbers of contacts per particle and various ratios of tangential to normal contact stiffness. This comparison shows that the developed information theory is valid for loose systems, while a theory based on the uniform-strain assumption is appropriate for dense systems.

  1. MSC/NASTRAN Stress Analysis of Complete Models Subjected to Random and Quasi-Static Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.

    2000-01-01

    Space payloads, such as those which fly on the Space Shuttle in Spacelab, are designed to withstand dynamic loads which consist of combined acoustic random loads and quasi-static acceleration loads. Methods for computing the payload stresses due to these loads are well known and appear in texts and NASA documents, but typically involve approximations such as the Miles' equation, as well as possible adjustments based on "modal participation factors." Alternatively, an existing capability in MSC/NASTRAN may be used to output exact root mean square [rms] stresses due to the random loads for any specified elements in the Finite Element Model. However, it is time consuming to use this methodology to obtain the rms stresses for the complete structural model and then combine them with the quasi-static loading induced stresses. Special processing was developed as described here to perform the stress analysis of all elements in the model using existing MSC/NASTRAN and MSC/PATRAN and UNIX utilities. Fail-safe and buckling analyses applications are also described.

  2. Reflection and diffraction corrections for nonlinear materials characterization by quasi-static pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter B.; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-01

    A harmonic acoustic tone burst propagating through an elastic solid with quadratic nonlinearity produces not only a parallel burst of second harmonic but also an often neglected quasi-static pulse associated with the acoustic radiation-induced eigenstrain. Although initial analytical and experimental studies by Yost and Cantrell suggested that the pulse might have a right-angled triangular shape with the peak displacement at the leading edge being proportional to the length of the tone burst, more recent theoretical, analytical, numerical, and experimental studies proved that the pulse has a flat-top shape and the peak displacement is proportional to the propagation length. In this paper, analytical and numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate two types of finite-size effects. First, the finite axial dimension of the specimen cannot be simply accounted for by a linear reflection coefficient that neglects the nonlinear interaction between the combined incident and reflected fields. Second, the quasistatic pulse generated by a transducer of finite aperture suffers more severe divergence than both the fundamental and second harmonic pulses generated by the same transducer. These finite-size effects can make the top of the quasi-static pulse sloped rather than flat and therefore must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of experimental data.

  3. Protein folding by a quasi-static-like process: A first-order state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Su, Ya-Chi; Cheng, Ming-Sung; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2002-08-01

    In this paper we report that quasi-static-like processes, in which stable intermediates were introduced carefully and deliberately, may be used to reversibly unfold and refold purified native porcine growth hormone. Through circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), we were able to study the secondary structure conformational changes, tertiary structure thermal stabilities, and the particle size distributions of both the intermediates and the final folded product. The CD data showed that the secondary structure was restored in the initial folding stage, whereas the tertiary structure within the protein was restored one step before the last folding stage, as elucidated by thermal stability experiments. DLS analysis suggested that the average hydrodynamic radii of the folding intermediates shrunk to nativelike size immediately after the first folding stage. Our data suggested that the denaturant-containing protein folding reaction is a first-order-like state transition process. This quasi-static-like process may be useful in the prevention of aggregate formation in protein purification and thus can be used in protein engineering to improve the overall yield from harvesting proteins.

  4. Quasi-static stop band with flexural metamaterial having zero rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials realizing stop bands have attracted much attentions recently since they can break-through the well-known mass law. However, achieving the stop band at extremely low frequency has been still a big challenge in the fields of elastic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a new metamaterial based on the idea of the zero rotational stiffness, to achieve extremely low frequency stop band for flexural elastic waves. Unlike the previous ways to achieve the stop band, we found that the zero rotational stiffness can provide a broad stop band at extremely low frequency, which starts from even almost zero frequency. To achieve the zero rotational stiffness, we propose a new elastic metamaterial consisting of blocks and links with the hinge connection. Analytic developments as well as numerical simulations evidence that this new metamaterial can exhibit extremely low and broad stop band, even at the quasi-static ranges. In addition, the metamaterial is shown to exhibit the negative group velocity at extremely low frequency ranges, as well as the quasi-static stop band, if it is properly designed. PMID:27651146

  5. Hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes under the influence of quasi-static ac-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theory of hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where both dc electric field (Ez), and a quasi-static ac field exist simultaneously (i.e. when the frequency ω of ac field is much less than the scattering frequency v (ω ≪ v or ωτ ≪ 1, v =τ-1) where τ is relaxation time) is studied. The investigation is done theoretically by solving semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons source to derive the current densities. Plots of the normalized current density versus dc field (Ez) applied along the axis of the CNTs in the presence and absence of hot electrons reveal ohmic conductivity initially and finally negative differential conductivity (NDC) provided ωτ ≪ 1 (i.e. quasi- static case). With strong enough axial injection of the hot electrons, there is a switch from NDC to positive differential conductivity (PDC) about Ez ≥ 75 kV / cm and Ez ≥ 140 kV / cm for a zigzag CNT and an armchair CNT respectively. Thus, the most important tough problem for NDC region which is the space charge instabilities can be suppressed due to the switch from the NDC behaviour to the PDC behaviour predicting a potential generation of terahertz radiations whose applications are relevance in current-day technology, industry, and research.

  6. Numerical characterization of quasi-static ultrasound elastography for the detection of deep tissue injuries.

    PubMed

    Hamaluik, Kenton; Moussa, Walied; Ferguson-Pell, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Deep tissue injuries are subcutaneous regions of tissue breakdown associated with excessive mechanical pressure for extended period of time. These wounds are currently clinically undetectable in their early stages and result in severe burdens on not only the patients who suffer from them, but the health care system as well. The goal of this work was to numerically characterize the use of quasi-static ultrasound elastography for detecting formative and progressive deep tissue injuries. In order to numerically characterize the technique, finite-element models of sonographic B-mode imaging and tissue deformation were created. These models were fed into a local strain-estimation algorithm to determine the detection sensitivity of the technique on various parameters. Our work showed that quasi-static ultrasound elastography was able to detect and characterize deep tissue injuries over a range of lesion parameters. Simulations were validated using a physical phantom model. This work represents a step along the path to developing a clinically relevant technique for detecting and diagnosing early deep tissue injuries.

  7. Determination of quasi-static microaccelerations onboard a satellite using video images of moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levtov, V. L.; Romanov, V. V.; Boguslavsky, A. A.; Sazonov, V. V.; Sokolov, S. M.; Glotov, Yu. N.

    2009-12-01

    A space experiment aimed at determination of quasi-static microaccelerations onboard an artificial satellite of the Earth using video images of the objects executing free motion is considered. The experiment was carried out onboard the Foton M-3 satellite. Several pellets moved in a cubic box fixed on the satellite’s mainframe and having two transparent adjacent walls. Their motion was photographed by a digital video camera. The camera was installed facing one of the transparent walls; a mirror was placed at an angle to another transparent wall. Such an optical system allowed us to have in a single frame two images of the pellets from differing viewpoints. The motion of the pellets was photographed on time intervals lasting 96 s. Pauses between these intervals were also equal to 96 s. A special processing of a separate image allowed us to determine coordinates of the pellet centers in the camera’s coordinate system. The sequence of frames belonging to a continuous interval of photography was processed in the following way. The time dependence of each coordinate of every pellet was approximated by a second degree polynomial using the least squares method. The coefficient of squared time is equal to a half of the corresponding microacceleration component. As has been shown by processing made, the described method of determination of quasi-static microaccelerations turned out to be sufficiently sensitive and accurate.

  8. Algorithms for Quantitative Quasi-static Elasticity Imaging using Force Data

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Mohit; Goenezen, Sevan; Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-static elasticity imaging can improve diagnosis and detection of diseases that affect the mechanical behavior of tissue. In this methodology images of the shear modulus of the tissue are reconstructed from the measured displacement field. This is accomplished by seeking the spatial distribution of mechanical properties that minimizes the difference between the predicted and the measured displacement fields, where the former is required to satisfy a finite element approximation to the equations of equilibrium. In the absence of force data, the shear modulus is determined only up to a multiplicative constant. In this manuscript we address the problem of calibrating quantitative elastic modulus reconstructions created from measurements of quasi-static deformations. We present two methods that utilize the knowledge of the applied force on a portion of the boundary. The first involves rescaling the shear modulus of the original minimization problem to best match the measured force data. This approach is easily implemented but neglects the spatial distribution of tractions. The second involves adding a force-matching term to the original minimization problem and a change of variables, wherein we seek the log of the shear modulus. We present numerical results that demonstrate the usefulness of both methods. PMID:25073623

  9. MHD Forces in Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and ``Failed'' Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the first unified theoretical model of flux rope dynamics---a single set of flux-rope equations in ideal MHD---to describe as one dynamical process the quasi-static evolution, catastrophic transition to eruption, cessation (``failure'') of eruption, and the post-eruption quasi-equilibria. The model is defined by the major radial {\\it and} minor radial equations of motion including pressure. The initial equilibrium is a flux rope in a background plasma with pressure $p_c(Z)$ and an overlying magnetic field $B_c(Z)$. The flux rope is initially force-free, but theevolution is not required to be force- free. A single quasi-static control parameter, the rate of increase in poloidal flux, is used for the entire process. As this parameter is slowly increased, the flux rope rises, following a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope rises past a critical height $Z_{crt}$, it expands on a dynamical (Alfvénic) timescale. The eruption rapidly ceases, as the stored magnetic energy of eruption is exhausted, and a new equilibrium is established at height $Z_1 > Z_{crt}$. The calculated velocity profile resembles the observed velocity profiles in ``failed'' eruptions including a damped oscillation. In the post-eruption equilibria, the outward hoop force is balanced by the tension of the toroidal self magnetic field and pressure gradient force. Thus, the flux rope does not evolve in a force-free manner. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficient amount of poloidal flux is injected on the timescale of eruption. This scenario results in a full CME eruption. It is shown that the minor radial expansion critically couples the evolution of the toroidal self-field and pressure gradient force. No parameter regime is found in which the commonly used simplifications---near-equilibrium minor radial expansion, force-free expansion, and constant aspect ratio $R/a$ (e.g., the torus instability equation

  10. Quasi-static and multi-site high velocity impact response of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Lakshya

    Understanding of low and high velocity transverse impact of laminated fiber reinforced composites is of interest in military, aerospace, marine and civilian structures. Recent advances in the field of numerical simulation provide a means of predicting the performance characteristics of layered materials for impact protection. The overall objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of laminated composites which include both thermoplastic and thermoset systems subjected to quasi-static, low and high velocity impact; both from an experimental and numerical modeling view point. To analyze this problem, a series of quasi-static, low and high velocity impact tests have been performed on laminated composite plates namely E-glass/polypropylene, S2-glass/epoxy and carbon/polyphenylene sulphide. To analyze the perforation mechanism, ballistic limit and damage evolution, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code LS-DYNA is used. Selecting proper material models and contact definition is one of the major criteria for obtaining accurate numerical simulation. Material model 162 (MAT 162), a progressive failure model based on modified Hashin's criteria and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) has been assigned to predict failure of the laminate. This approach is used because during transverse impact, a composite laminate undergoes progressive damage. The laminate and the projectile are meshed using brick elements with single integration points. The impact velocity ranges from 180 to 400 m s -1. This work focuses on three main aspects; (i) To obtain static and dynamic material properties to incorporate into the finite element model and predict the ballistic limit of a composite laminate based on the information from quasi-static punch shear test; (ii) To understand penetration, material erosion, ballistic limit and delamination mechanisms for single and multi-site high velocity (or ballistic) impact of composite laminates; (iii) To investigate the different failure

  11. Static and quasi-static behavior of an adaptive system to compensate path errors for smart fiber placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, M.; Monner, H. P.; Krombholz, C.; Kruse, F. F.

    2015-04-01

    Smart fiber placement is an ambitious topic in current research for automated manufacturing of large-scale composite structures, e.g. wing covers. Adaptive systems get in focus to obtain a high degree of observability and controllability of the manufacturing process. In particular, vibrational issues and material failure have to be studied to significantly increase the production rate with no loss in accuracy of the fiber layup. As one contribution, an adaptive system has been developed to be integrated into the fiber placement head. It decouples the compaction roller from disturbances caused by misalignments, varying components' behavior over a large work area and acceleration changes during operation. Therefore, the smart system axially adapts the position of the compaction roller in case of disturbances. This paper investigates the behavior of the system to compensate quasi-static deviations from the desired path. In particular, the compensation efficiency of a constant offset, a linear drift with constant gradient and a single-curved drift is studied. Thus, the test bed with measurement devices and scenarios is explained. Based on the knowledge obtained by the experimental data, the paper concludes with a discussion of the proposed approach for its use under operating conditions and further implementation.

  12. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2017-08-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  13. Comparisons between the dynamic and quasi-static performances of a dissipative dielectric elastomer under pure shear mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. E.; He, Z. C.; Li, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Based on the Helmholtz free energy function of the dielectric elastomer (DE) with consideration of the dissipation processes and thermal effects, the dynamic equations derived from the work done by the inertia forces and Euler–Lagrange equation along with the quasi-static equation can be established. Under typical loading patterns, including linear and sinusoidal voltages and a sinusoidal force coupled with a constant voltage, the distinctions between the performances of DE induced by the two different governing equations can be fully discussed. Therefore, the effects of the inertia forces in both plane and thickness directions can also be revealed in detail. Furthermore, the mechanisms of failures are briefly studied. The numerical results have indicated that the deformations calculated from the quasi-static and dynamic models are identical under small amplitudes and frequencies of actuation. However, when the external loading is large enough to cause failures, obvious distinction appears and the DE suffers from rupture sooner using the quasi-static model, especially under linear actuation. In addition, no resonance can be detected via the quasi-static equation and the mean stretch calculated from the dynamic equation coincides with the stretch obtained from the equivalent voltage (static) of the applied sinusoidal voltage in some extents. Under a sinusoidal force with a static voltage, the stretch calculated from the dynamic equation oscillates around the curve induced by the quasi-static model at first and finally coincides with it. When power source is cut off, the current leakage lowers the mean stretch of the oscillation.

  14. Quasi-static analysis of parachute textile with fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Yulin

    2005-02-01

    Quasi-static testing of the fabric material mechanically with a novel embedded strain measurement system, which aimed at mechanical analysis of the dynamic characteristics of the parachute canopy textile with fiber optic technology, and using a tensile tester were aimed at correlating the results obtained by using the fiber optic sensors to the mechanical parameters, and in calibrating the system. To achieve better and more consistent results, FBG sensor took part in fabric samples testing in the warp, fill, and 45° directions. The mechanical tensile tests provided a traditional correlation between the loads and the elongation of the fabric structure, and were correlated to the fiber optic sensor output calibration. The comparison shows clearly that the two curves converged in the loading region before the structural failure started. The achieved results were consistent with each other, which dues primarily to the consistency in the fiber embedded technique, and will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  15. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-31

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  16. A Matlab library for solving quasi-static volume conduction problems using the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Stenroos, M; Mäntynen, V; Nenonen, J

    2007-12-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is commonly used in the modeling of bioelectromagnetic phenomena. The Matlab language is increasingly popular among students and researchers, but there is no free, easy-to-use Matlab library for boundary element computations. We present a hands-on, freely available Matlab BEM source code for solving bioelectromagnetic volume conduction problems and any (quasi-)static potential problems that obey the Laplace equation. The basic principle of the BEM is presented and discretization of the surface integral equation for electric potential is worked through in detail. Contents and design of the library are described, and results of example computations in spherical volume conductors are validated against analytical solutions. Three application examples are also presented. Further information, source code for application examples, and information on obtaining the library are available in the WWW-page of the library: (http://biomed.tkk.fi/BEM).

  17. The Breakdown Process of Hexadecane Films Induced by Quasi-Static Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Kazuyoshi; Nakano, Ken

    A novel experimental method has been developed to quantify the breakdown processes of thin oil films induced by quasi-static loading. The method uses a steel-oil-mercury system along with complex impedance analysis, which provides the simultaneous measurement of the film thickness and breakdown ratio. In the case of hexadecane, the relationship between thickness and the breakdown ratio is represented by a single master curve independently of the indentation speed. Every breakdown process of hexadecane traces on the same master curve, and its final point is determined by the indentation load. The breakdown process of hexadecane includes two stages: one is the decrement of the film thickness without breakdown, and the other is the decrement of the film thickness with the drastic progress of breakdown.

  18. Behavior of tunnel form buildings under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuksel, S.B.; Kalkan, E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, experimental investigations on the inelastic seismic behavior of tunnel form buildings (i.e., box-type or panel systems) are presented. Two four-story scaled building specimens were tested under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading in longitudinal and transverse directions. The experimental results and supplemental finite element simulations collectively indicate that lightly reinforced structural walls of tunnel form buildings may exhibit brittle flexural failure under seismic action. The global tension/compression couple triggers this failure mechanism by creating pure axial tension in outermost shear-walls. This type of failure takes place due to rupturing of longitudinal reinforcement without crushing of concrete, therefore is of particular interest in emphasizing the mode of failure that is not routinely considered during seismic design of shear-wall dominant structural systems.

  19. Automated in-vivo measurement of quasi-static lung compliance in the rat.

    PubMed

    LaBrie, L J; Palladino, J L; Grant, E J; Bronzino, J D; Thrall, R S

    1996-01-01

    Instrumentation to automate quasi-static lung compliance measurement in the rat was developed and values obtained with it were compared with manual measurements by a trained technician. Designed to be used during mechanical ventilation, this system interrupts ventilation to inflate and deflate the lungs and measures lung transmural pressure and volume as functions of time. Animal experiments demonstrated that the automated system is capable of generating correctly shaped volume-pressure curves. These curves yielded reproducible lung compliance values that compare favorably with those obtained by the manual method. No statistically significant difference was observed comparing the two methods when evaluating either inter- or intra-animal variation. This automated system thereby obviates the need for highly trained personnel to perform the test.

  20. Modeling the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA): an algorithm for quasi-static field solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Briggs, R J; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Waldron, W L

    2007-06-18

    The Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA) is a helical distributed transmission line. A rising pulse applied to the upstream end appears as a moving spatial voltage ramp, on which an ion pulse can be accelerated. This is a promising approach to acceleration and longitudinal compression of an ion beam at high line charge density. In most of the studies carried out to date, using both a simple code for longitudinal beam dynamics and the Warp PIC code, a circuit model for the wave behavior was employed; in Warp, the helix I and V are source terms in elliptic equations for E and B. However, it appears possible to obtain improved fidelity using a ''sheath helix'' model in the quasi-static limit. Here we describe an algorithmic approach that may be used to effect such a solution.

  1. Axial quasi-static crushing behaviour of cylindrical woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Noorhaslinda; Ismail, Al Emran

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the crushing responses of cylindrical woven kenaf fibre reinforced composites under quasi-static compression. Kenaf fiber in the form of yarn is weaved into woven mat. It is then submerged into polyester bath before it is wrapped into a cylindrical shape. There are two important parameters investigated such as number of layers and fiber orientations. According to the experimental results, as expected increasing the number of layers increased the energy absorption performances. However, increasing the fibre orientations from 0o to 45o capable to decrease the energy absorption capability. It is also observed that during progressive collapses, localized buckling is the dominant failure mechanism where there is no large composite fragmentation occurred.

  2. Balanced calibration of resonant piezoelectric RL shunts with quasi-static background flexibility correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høgsberg, Jan; Krenk, Steen

    2015-04-01

    Resonant RL shunt circuits constitute a robust approach to piezoelectric damping, where the performance with respect to damping of flexible structures requires a precise calibration of the corresponding circuit components. The balanced calibration procedure of the present paper is based on equal damping of the two modes associated with the resonant vibration form of the structure, when including a quasi-static contribution from non-resonant vibration modes via a single background flexibility parameter. Explicit calibration formulae are presented, and it is demonstrated by a numerical example that the procedure leads to equal modal damping and effective response reduction, even for rather indirect placement of the transducer, provided that the correction for background flexibility is included in the calibration procedure.

  3. Propagation of quasi-static modes in anisotropic transmission lines: application to MIC lines

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, R.; Horno, M.

    1985-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the field propagation in a general N-conductor transmission line embedded in an inhomogeneous and anisotropic medium, through the series expansion of the field in powers of frequency. The quasi-static approach is deducted as a zero-order approach upon the field and a first-order approach for the propagation constant. It is shown that it is even possible to decompose the field into a sum of propagating modes with a scalar propagation factor. The special case of transmission lines in nonmagnetic media is explicitly considered. A method to find out the mode characteristics of any open planar MIC line with anisotropic dielectric substrates is developed and applied to some MIC structures of interest, specifically broadside edgecoupled microstrips with inverted and noninverted substrates.

  4. Wide-angle planar microtracking for quasi-static microcell concentrating photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jared S.; Sheng, Xing; Meulblok, Bram M.; Rogers, John A.; Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-02-01

    Concentrating photovoltaics offer a way to lower the cost of solar power. However, the existing paradigm based on precise orientation of large-area concentrator modules towards the Sun limits their deployment to large, open land areas. Here, we explore an alternate approach using high-efficiency microcell photovoltaics embedded between a pair of plastic lenslet arrays to demonstrate quasi-static concentrating photovoltaic panels <1 cm thick that accomplish full-day tracking with >200x flux concentration ratio through small (<1 cm) lateral translation at fixed latitude tilt. Per unit of installed land area, cosine projection loss for fixed microtracking concentrating photovoltaic panels is ultimately offset by improved ground coverage relative to their conventional dual-axis counterparts, enabling a ~1.9x increase in daily energy output that may open up a new opportunity for compact, high-efficiency concentrating photovoltaics to be installed on rooftops and other limited-space urban environments.

  5. Quasi-static electromagnetic fields due to dipole antennas in bounded conducting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habashy, T. M.; Kong, J. A.; Tsang, L.

    1985-05-01

    Several techniques are employed to model dipole fields in a two-layer dissipative medium. The upper layer is assumed lossless, the lower lossy. Attention is limited to solutions of integrals over the vertical field by quasi-static approximation (QSA), steepest descent image-source (SDIS), residue and hybrid solution approaches. A comparison of the solutions with experimental data delineates the realms of effectiveness for each computational technique: QSA is good for frequencies below 100 kHz and measurements of less than 1/30 wavelength; SDIS is valid at high frequencies on thick layers; and, normal mode residue is applicable for low frequency thin layers. Finally, intermediate conditions require all three techniques.

  6. Wide-angle planar microtracking for quasi-static microcell concentrating photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Price, Jared S; Sheng, Xing; Meulblok, Bram M; Rogers, John A; Giebink, Noel C

    2015-02-05

    Concentrating photovoltaics offer a way to lower the cost of solar power. However, the existing paradigm based on precise orientation of large-area concentrator modules towards the Sun limits their deployment to large, open land areas. Here, we explore an alternate approach using high-efficiency microcell photovoltaics embedded between a pair of plastic lenslet arrays to demonstrate quasi-static concentrating photovoltaic panels <1 cm thick that accomplish full-day tracking with >200x flux concentration ratio through small (<1 cm) lateral translation at fixed latitude tilt. Per unit of installed land area, cosine projection loss for fixed microtracking concentrating photovoltaic panels is ultimately offset by improved ground coverage relative to their conventional dual-axis counterparts, enabling a ~1.9x increase in daily energy output that may open up a new opportunity for compact, high-efficiency concentrating photovoltaics to be installed on rooftops and other limited-space urban environments.

  7. Study of the quasi-static motion of a droplet expelled from a pipe in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qian; Huang, Yi-Yong; Chen, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a theoretical and numerical study of the quasi-static motion of a large droplet pushed out of a pipe in microgravity environment was presented. For the existence of surface force, an external force is needed to push the droplet out of the pipe. Methods to calculate the external force, the surface force, and the pressure drops were established in theoretical model and numerical simulation, respectively. The changes of the free energy, the surface force, as well as the pressure drops during a droplet being pushed out of a pipe were discussed in this work. The surface force reaches its maximal value, when the radii of upside contact line equals to the radius of the pipe. At last, a comparison of the two methods was made based on the results.

  8. A stochastic filtering approach to recover strain images from quasi-static ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Model-based reconstruction algorithms have shown potentials over conventional strain-based methods in quasi-static elastographic image by using realistic finite element (FE) or bio-mechanical model constraints. However, it is still difficult to properly handle the discrepancies between the model constraint and ultrasound data, and the measurement noise. Methods In this paper, we explore the usage of Kalman filtering algorithm for the estimation of strain imaging in quasi-static ultrasound elastography. The proposed strategy formulates the displacement distribution through biomechanical models, and the ultrasound-derived measurements through observation equations. Through this filtering strategy, the discrepancies are quantitatively modelled as one Gaussian white noise, and the measurement noise of ultrasound data is modelled as another independent Gaussian white noise. The optimal estimation of kinematic functions, i.e. the full displacement and velocity field, are computed through this Kalman filter. Then the strain images can be easily calculated from the estimated displacement field. Results The accuracy and robustness of our proposed framework is first evaluated in synthetic data in controlled conditions, and the performance of this framework is then evaluated in the real data collected from elastography phantoms and patients with favourable results. Conclusions The potential of our algorithm is to provide the distribution of mechanically meaningful strain under a proper biomechanical model constraint. We address the model-data discrepancy and measurement noise by introducing process noise and measurement noise in our framework, and then the mechanically meaningful strain is estimated through the Kalman filter in the minimum mean square error (MMSE) sense. PMID:24521481

  9. Self-similar evolution of magnetized plasmas. I - Quasi-static solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wei-Hong

    1992-01-01

    The concept of linear expansion suggested by Wei-Hong (1989 and 1990), describes the self-similar evolution of a magnetic structure. Linear expansion can be represented by a single function which connects the evolving physical parameters of the plasma with their initial values in explicit forms. A general self-similar dynamic equation, therefore, is derived. As the first step toward more general consideration, the quasi-static solution is investigated in this paper. It is shown that a gamma = 4/3 polytrope may evolve through consecutive equilibria if its magnetic field expands self-similarly. The change of the energy everywhere inside the plasma equals the work done by the internal plasma pressure and magnetic field for the expansion. For the special case of an expanding force-free magnetic field, the self-similar expansion is a clean expansion. No free magnetic energy is left anywhere inside the magnetic structure. The approximation in quasi-state modeling of a pressure confined magnetized plasmoid is analyzed.

  10. Distinguishing Between Quasi-static and Alfvénic Auroral Acceleration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, R. L.; Song, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Models for the acceleration of auroral particles fall into two general classes. Quasi-static processes, such as double layers or magnetic mirror supported potential drops, produce a nearly monoenergetic beam of precipitating electrons and upward flowing ion beams. Time-dependent acceleration processes, often associated with kinetic Alfvén waves, can produce a broader range of energies and often have a strongly field-aligned pitch angle distribution. Both processes are associated with strong perpendicular electric fields as well as the parallel electric fields that are largely responsible for the particle acceleration. These electric fields and the related magnetic perturbations can be characterized by the ratio of the electric field to a perpendicular magnetic perturbation, which is related to the Pedersen conductivity in the static case and the Alfvén velocity in the time-dependent case. However, these considerations can be complicated by the interaction between upward and downward propagating waves. The relevant time and space scales of these processes will be assessed and the consequences for observation by orbiting spacecraft and ground-based instrumentation will be determined. These features will be illustrated by numerical simulations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling with emphasis on what a virtual spacecraft passing through the simulation would be expected to observe.

  11. Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and "Failed" Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the first unified theoretical model of solar flux rope dynamics—a single set of flux-rope equations in ideal MHD—to describe as one integrated process the quasi-static evolution, catastrophic transition to eruption, cessation ("failure") of eruption, and the post-eruption quasi-equilibria. The model is defined by the major radial and minor radial equations of motion including pressure. The initial equilibrium is a flux rope in a background plasma with pressure pc(Z) and an overlying magnetic field Bc(Z). The flux rope may be initially force-free, but the evolution is not required to be force-free. As the poloidal flux is slowly increased, the flux rope rises through a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope expands past a critical height Zcrt, it erupts on a dynamical (Alfvénic) timescale. Mathematically, the onset of eruption is shown to be explosive, not exponential. The acceleration is rapidly quenched due to the geometrical effects of the stationary footpoints, and a new equilibrium is established at height Z1 > Zcrt. The calculated velocity profile resembles the observed velocity profiles in "failed" eruptions including a damped oscillation. In the post-eruption equilibria, the outward hoop force is balanced by the tension of the toroidal self magnetic field and pressure gradient force. Thus, the flux rope does not evolve in a force-free manner. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficient amount of poloidal flux is injected on the timescale of eruption. This scenario results in a full CME eruption. It is shown that the minor radial expansion critically couples the evolution of the toroidal self-field and pressure gradient force. No parameter regime is found in which the commonly used simplifications—near-equilibrium minor radial expansion, force-free expansion, and constant aspect ratio R/a (e.g., the torus instability equation)—are valid. Work supported by the

  12. Effects of grain size on the quasi-static mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligda, Jonathan Paul

    The increase in strength due to the Hall-Petch effect, reduced strain hardening capacity, a reduced ductility, and changes in deformation mechanisms are all effects of reducing grain size (d) into the ultrafine-grained (UFG, 100 < d < 1000 nm) and nanocrystalline (NC, d<100 nm) state. However, most of the studies on the mechanical behavior of UFG/NC metals have been on face-centered cubic (FCC) metals. Of the few reports on UFG/NC body-centered cubic (BCC) metals, the interest is related to their increase in strength and reduced strain rate sensitivity. This combination increases their propensity to deform via adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) at high strain rates, which is a desired response for materials being considered as a possible replacement for depleted uranium in kinetic energy penetrators. However, an ideal replacement material must also plastically deform in tension under quasi-static rates to survive initial launch conditions. This raises the question: if the material forms ASBs at dynamic rates, will it also form shear bands at quasi-static isothermal rates? As well as, is there a specific grain size for a material that will plastically deform in tension at quasi-static rates but form adiabatic shear bands at dynamic rates? Using high pressure torsion, a polycrystalline bulk tantalum disk was refined into the UFG/NC regime. Using microscale mechanical testing techniques, such as nanoindentation, microcompression, and microtension, it is possible to isolate locations with a homogeneous grain size within the disk. Pillars are compressed using a nanoindenter with a flat punch tip, while "dog-bone" specimens were pulled in tension using a custom built in-situ tension stage within a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The observed mechanical behavior is related to the microstructure by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on the as-processed material and tested specimens. Synchrotron X-ray based texture analysis was also conducted on the disk to

  13. Baseline-free damage localization method for statically determinate beam structures using dual-type response induced by quasi-static moving load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-Yu; Ren, Wei-Xin; Zhu, Songye

    2017-07-01

    Structural damage could be localized through comparing the quasi-static moving load induced response before (taken as baseline) and after damage. However, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to obtain the baseline (information from the undamaged structure) for some structures. On this hand, structural response in damaged state only is not sufficient for such methods. On the other hand, only single type response (acceleration, strain or displacement) is employed for moving load based damage localization, i.e., multi-type response is inefficiently utilized. In this paper, a baseline-free damage localization method for statically determinate beam structures is proposed by using dual-type response (strain and displacement) excited by quasi-static moving load. It makes full use of the property that local damage causes no change on the static strain response of statically determinate beam structures except the damaged regions. The baseline displacement response in undamaged state is estimated through the strain response in damaged state. Then the measured displacement response in damaged state is compared with the estimated baseline displacement response, and the area change of the zone encircled by the displacement response and each sub-region (ADRC) is calculated to localize damage. Only the strain response and the displacement response in damaged state are required, and their comprehensive utilization avoids the need for a baseline. Numerical and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the feasibility, effectiveness, and limitations of the proposed method.

  14. Local Viscoelastic Properties of Live Cells Investigated Using Dynamic and Quasi-Static Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena, Alexander; Raman, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of viscoelasticity of cells in physiological environments with high spatio-temporal resolution is a key goal in cell mechanobiology. Traditionally only the elastic properties have been measured from quasi-static force-distance curves using the atomic force microscope (AFM). Recently, dynamic AFM-based methods have been proposed to map the local in vitro viscoelastic properties of living cells with nanoscale resolution. However, the differences in viscoelastic properties estimated from such dynamic and traditional quasi-static techniques are poorly understood. In this work we quantitatively reconstruct the local force and dissipation gradients (viscoelasticity) on live fibroblast cells in buffer solutions using Lorentz force excited cantilevers and present a careful comparison between mechanical properties (local stiffness and damping) extracted using dynamic and quasi-static force spectroscopy methods. The results highlight the dependence of measured viscoelastic properties on both the frequency at which the chosen technique operates as well as the interactions with subcellular components beyond certain indentation depth, both of which are responsible for differences between the viscoelasticity property maps acquired using the dynamic AFM method against the quasi-static measurements. PMID:24606928

  15. Quasi-Static Compression and Rolling Contact Analysis of Maxxis Victra MA-Z1 Tire on Dry Roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenq, S. T.; Ting, Yucheng; Liang, S. M.; Lin, David; Shih, Mike

    Quasi-static contact behavior of an inflated MAXXIS VICTRA MA-Z1 (235/45/R17) radial tire is reported in this work. Compressional response of the inflated tire with a prescribed weight loaded quasi-statically was examined. Both experimental and numerical results were obtained and compared. In addition, dynamic contact simulation of the tire rolling on a dry-flat roadway was also studied. A commercial finite element commercial Code (LS-DYNA) was used to construct the complex tire model and to perform both quasi-static contact and dynamic rolling simulations. The Mooney-Rivlin constitutive relationship was adopted to describe the non-linear elastic behavior of rubber material, and the classical laminated theory was used to model the stress-strain behavior of the fiber reinforced composite layers of tire. Quasi-static contact force and compression displacement of tire were measured and numerically simulated. Contact pressure distribution of the tire tread in touch with simulated rigid dry-flat road surface was also numerically and experimentally obtained. Good relationship between the test findings and simulated results were reported. In addition, the dynamic contact simulations of the inflated tire rolling on a dry-flat rigid roadway with a prescribed weight loaded are presented, and the deformation pattern and local contact stress distribution are also reported.

  16. Effects of microstructural morphology on quasi-static and dynamic deformation behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Geon; Kim, Sangho; Lee, Sunghak; Soo Lee, Chong

    2001-02-01

    The effects of microstructural morphology on quasi-static and dynamic deformation behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy were investigated in this study. Quasi-static and dynamic torsional tests were conducted using a torsional Kolsky bar for Widmanstätten, equiaxed, and bimodal microstructures, which were processed by different heat treatments, and then, the test data were analyzed in relation to microstructures, tensile properties, and fracture mode. Quasi-static torsional properties showed a tendency similar to tensile properties and ductile fracture occurred in all three microstructures. Under dynamic torsional loading, maximum shear stress of the three microstructures was higher and fracture shear strain was lower than those under quasi-static loading, but the overall tendency was similar. In the Widmanstätten and equiaxed microstructures, adiabatic shear bands were found in the deformed region of the fractured specimens. The possibility of the adiabatic shear band formation under dynamic loading was quantitatively analyzed, depending on how plastic deformation energy was distributed to either void initiation or adiabatic shear banding. It was found to be most likely in the equiaxed microstructure, whereas it was least likely in the bimodal microstructure.

  17. Experimental study on energy absorption of foam filled kraft paper honeycomb subjected to quasi-static uniform compression loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Kadir, N.; Aminanda, Y.; Ibrahim, M. S.; Mokhtar, H.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of factor and to obtain the optimum configuration of Kraft paper honeycomb. The factors considered in this study include density of paper, thickness of paper and cell size of honeycomb. Based on three level factorial design, two-factor interaction model (2FI) was developed to correlate the factors with specific energy absorption and specific compression strength. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA), the most influential factor on responses and the optimum configuration was identified. After that, Kraft paper honeycomb with optimum configuration is used to fabricate foam-filled paper honeycomb with five different densities of polyurethane foam as filler (31.8, 32.7, 44.5, 45.7, 52 kg/m3). The foam-filled paper honeycomb is subjected to quasi-static compression loading. Failure mechanism of the foam-filled honeycomb was identified, analyzed and compared with the unfilled paper honeycomb. The peak force and energy absorption capability of foam-filled paper honeycomb are increased up to 32% and 30%, respectively, compared to the summation of individual components.

  18. Effect of Microscopic Damage Events on Static and Ballistic Impact Strength of Triaxial Braid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Roberts, Gary d.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    In previous work, the ballistic impact resistance of triaxial braided carbon/epoxy composites made with large flat tows (12k and 24k) was examined by impacting 2 X2 X0.125" composite panels with gelatin projectiles. Several high strength, intermediate modulus carbon fibers were used in combination with both untoughened and toughened matrix materials. A wide range of penetration thresholds were measured for the various fiber/matrix combinations. However, there was no clear relationship between the penetration threshold and the properties of the constituents. During some of these experiments high speed cameras were used to view the failure process, and full-field strain measurements were made to determine the strain at the onset of failure. However, these experiments provided only limited insight into the microscopic failure processes responsible for the wide range of impact resistance observed. In order to investigate potential microscopic failure processes in more detail, quasi-static tests were performed in tension, compression, and shear. Full-field strain measurement techniques were used to identify local regions of high strain resulting from microscopic failures. Microscopic failure events near the specimen surface, such as splitting of fiber bundles in surface plies, were easily identified. Subsurface damage, such as fiber fracture or fiber bundle splitting, could be identified by its effect on in-plane surface strains. Subsurface delamination could be detected as an out-of-plane deflection at the surface. Using this data, failure criteria could be established at the fiber tow level for use in analysis. An analytical formulation was developed to allow the microscopic failure criteria to be used in place of macroscopic properties as input to simulations performed using the commercial explicit finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test methods developed to investigate microscopic failure will be presented along with methods for determining local failure criteria

  19. Detection of quasi-static displacement components of LP seismic sources near the volcanic summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Johannes; Bean, Christopher J.; Lokmer, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Seismic long-period (LP) events are still not completely understood, but widely accepted source models involve fluids and fluid-driven resonance processes. Due to the difficulties related to installing seismometers in summit regions of volcanoes, the observations of volcanic seismicity are usually performed at distances not closer than 1-2 km from the hypocentre of a seismic event. Observations from high-density network experiments on different volcanoes lead to a new model proposed by Bean et al. (Nature Geoscience, January 2014). Therein LP events are explained as a consequence of a brittle-ductile failure occurring under the low-stress conditions in the shallow volcanic edifice, rather than fluid-driven resonance. One consequence of this model is a static displacement associated with these LP events. Unfortunately, the expected amplitude of the static shift is only several micrometres, i.e. not detectable by typical deformation measurements. Therefore, we try to develop methods for using seismometers as static shift detecting sensors. Our current inability to recover the full spectrum of recorded displacement results in a band-limited representation of the true process derived from moment-tensor inversions. If the actual source process is of a broadband character, our narrow-band results can be quite misleading. In this study we are focusing on quasi-static displacements we observed on seismometer data from Turrialba Volcano (Costa Rica) and Mt Etna (Italy). These appear as ramp-like signals on displacement traces of LP events, most commonly on all three seismometer components, and have a magnitude of a few micrometres. Laboratory tests confirm that the seismometers used in our field experiments can indeed measure step-like signals, but they also show that long period noise can be a problem when trying to interpret these. Normal high pass filters suitable to remove this noise cannot be applied without losing the signal we are interested in. Therefore special

  20. Strength of thin chemtempered lenses: static load testing.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, W H; Rosenfield, A R; Gulati, S T; Rieger, R A; Hoekstra, K E

    1979-01-01

    Static load tests were conducted on heat-tempered and chemtempered plano white crown glass lenses from five different optical laboratories. With both ball-on-ring and ring-on-ring loading, chemtempered lenses considerably thinner than 2.0 mm were found to be as failure resistant as 2.0-mm-thick heat-tempered lenses. A similar result was obtained previously using the drop-ball test. It is shown that the theory of brittle fracture can be used to relate the results of different tests and provides a rational basis for comparing the relative performance of chemtempered and heat-tempered lenses.

  1. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on hamstring eccentric isokinetic strength and unilateral hamstring to quadriceps strength ratios.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco; De Ste Croix, Mark; Sainz De Baranda, Pilar; Santonja, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to investigate the acute effects of static and dynamic lower limb stretching routines: (a) on peak torque, total external work and joint angle at peak torque of the hamstrings during maximal eccentric isokinetic leg flexion; (b) on unilateral hamstring to quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios; as well as (c) to determine whether static and dynamic routines elicit similar responses. A total of 49 active adults completed the following intervention protocols in a randomised order on separate days: (a) non-stretching (control condition), (b) static stretching, and (c) dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, eccentric isokinetic peak torque, the angle of peak torque and total external work were assessed with participants prone at 1.04 and 3.14 rad · s(-1). Unilateral strength ratios of the knee were also recorded. Measures were compared via a fully-within-groups factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no main effects for eccentric isokinetic peak torque, angle of peak torque, total external work and unilateral H/Q strength ratios. The results suggest that dynamic and static stretching has no influence on eccentric strength profile and unilateral H/Q strength ratios and hence both forms of stretching do not reduce these two primary risk factors for muscle injury.

  2. Static Strength Characteristics of Mechanically Fastened Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. E.; Swaim, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of mechanically fastened composite joints presents a great challenge to structural analysts because of the large number of parameters that influence strength. These parameters include edge distance, width, bolt diameter, laminate thickness, ply orientation, and bolt torque. The research presented in this report investigates the influence of some of these parameters through testing and analysis. A methodology is presented for estimating the strength of the bolt-hole based on classical lamination theory using the Tsai-Hill failure criteria and typical bolthole bearing analytical methods.

  3. Static Dielectric Breakdown Strength of Condensed Heterogeneous High Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    3-1 TRIPLE JUNCTION . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * .3-2 SURFACE FLASHOVER ...enhancement at dielectric interfaces, surface flashover , humidity, surrounding atmosphere, temperature, pressure, and excitation time), which are...discussed in Chapter 3. To obtain meaningful critical field strengths, it is necessary to suppress surface flashover around the insulator sides and

  4. Quasi-static extension of a tensile crack contained in a viscoelastic-plastic solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Final stretch criterion of failure is applied to the problem of quasi-static extension of a crack embedded in an elastic-plastic or viscoelastic-plastic matrix. The slow growth under subcritical conditions in a rate-sensitive Tresca solid is shown to be a superposition of creep rupture and McClintock's ductile growth. This type of growth occurs at subcritical magnitude of the imposed K-factor and can be accounted for only through a recognition of inelastic properties of solids. In the subcritical range there is no unique value for K sub c independent of geometrical configuration and flaw size. Not only the produced states of stress and strain are dependent on the loading path, but also the material resistance to fracture turns out to be a function of the history of loading that precedes catastrophic failure. A nonlinear integro-differential equation of motion is derived for a crack progressing through a viscoelastic medium with some limited ability to plastic flow. Examples of numerical integration are given incorporating both monotonic and cyclic loading programs.

  5. Estimation of the quasi-static Young's modulus of the eardrum using a pressurization technique.

    PubMed

    Ghadarghadar, Nastaran; Agrawal, Sumit K; Samani, Abbas; Ladak, Hanif M

    2013-06-01

    The quasi-static Young's modulus of the eardrum's pars tensa is an important modeling parameter in computer simulations. Recent developments in indentation testing and inverse modeling allow estimation of this parameter with the eardrum in situ. These approaches are challenging because of the curved shape of the pars tensa which requires special care during experimentation to keep the indenter perpendicular to the local surface at the point of contact. Moreover, they involve complicated contact modeling. An alternative computer-based method is presented here in which pressurization is used instead of indentation. The Young's modulus of a thin-shell model of the eardrum with subject-specific geometry is numerically optimized such that simulated pressurized shapes match measured counterparts. The technique was evaluated on six healthy rat eardrums, resulting in a Young's modulus estimate of 22.8±1.5MPa. This is comparable to values estimated using indentation testing. The new pressurization-based approach is simpler to use than the indentation-based method for the two reasons noted above. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quasi-static characterisation and impact testing of auxetic foam for sports safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Olly; Foster, Leon; Senior, Terry; Alderson, Andrew; Allen, Tom

    2016-05-01

    This study compared low strain rate material properties and impact force attenuation of auxetic foam and the conventional open-cell polyurethane counterpart. This furthers our knowledge with regards to how best to apply these highly conformable and breathable auxetic foams to protective sports equipment. Cubes of auxetic foam measuring 150 × 150 × 150 mm were fabricated using a thermo-mechanical conversion process. Quasi-static compression confirmed the converted foam to be auxetic, prior to being sliced into 20 mm thick cuboid samples for further testing. Density, Poisson’s ratio and the stress-strain curve were all found to be dependent on the position of each cuboid from within the cube. Impact tests with a hemispherical drop hammer were performed for energies up to 6 J, on foams covered with a polypropylene sheet between 1 and 2 mm thick. Auxetic samples reduced peak force by ˜10 times in comparison to the conventional foam. This work has shown further potential for auxetic foam to be applied to protective equipment, while identifying that improved fabrication methods are required.

  7. Ionospheric Joule heating and Poynting flux in quasi-static approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanhamäKi, H.; Yoshikawa, A.; Amm, O.; Fujii, R.

    2012-08-01

    Energy flow is an important aspect of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Electromagnetic energy is transported as Poynting flux from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere, where it is dissipated as Joule heating. Recently Richmond derived an "Equipotential Boundary Poynting Flux (EBPF) theorem", that the Poynting flux within a flux tube whose boundary is an equipotential curve is dissipated inside the ionospheric foot point of the flux tube. In this article we study Richmond's EBPF theorem more closely by considering the curl-free and divergence-free parts as well as the Hall and Pedersen parts of the ionospheric current system separately. Our main findings are that i) divergence-free currents are on average dissipationless, ii) the curl-free Pedersen current is responsible for the whole ionospheric Joule heating and iii) pointwise match between vertical Poynting flux and ionospheric Joule heating is broken by gradients of Hall and Pedersen conductances. Results i) and ii) hold when integrated over the whole ionosphere or any area bounded by an equipotential curve. The present study is limited to quasi-static phenomena. The more general topic of electrodynamic Joule heating and Poynting flux, including inductive effects, will be addressed in a future study.

  8. Numerical modeling of quasi-static coronal loops. I - Uniform energy input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Antiochos, S. K.; Underwood, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-static numerical model for coronal loops is considered for the case of a uniform energy input per unit volume into the loops. A line dipole model is used to represent the loop magnetic field, and the variations in loop cross section observed in X-ray photographs are parameterized by the ratio between the cross-sectional areas at the loop apex and base. The results of numerical modeling indicate that for an area ratio greater than unity, increases in the area ratio of a loop with a given length and apex area cause a general rise in electron density and a fall in the temperature gradient, leading to large increases in the differential emission factor at high temperatures. The differential function obtained is significantly different from that predicted by analytical models; however, analytical predictions for the temperature-electron density relations are comparable to numerical results. It is also concluded that even a symmetrical loop may have a maximum temperature away from the apex.

  9. Murine pulmonary acinar mechanics during quasi-static inflation using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sera, Toshihiro; Yokota, Hideo; Tanaka, Gaku; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Schroter, Robert C

    2013-07-15

    We visualized pulmonary acini in the core regions of the mouse lung in situ using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and evaluated their kinematics during quasi-static inflation. This CT system (with a cube voxel of 2.8 μm) allows excellent visualization of not just the conducting airways, but also the alveolar ducts and sacs, and tracking of the acinar shape and its deformation during inflation. The kinematics of individual alveoli and alveolar clusters with a group of terminal alveoli is influenced not only by the connecting alveolar duct and alveoli, but also by the neighboring structures. Acinar volume was not a linear function of lung volume. The alveolar duct diameter changed dramatically during inflation at low pressures and remained relatively constant above an airway pressure of ∼8 cmH2O during inflation. The ratio of acinar surface area to acinar volume indicates that acinar distension during low-pressure inflation differed from that during inflation over a higher pressure range; in particular, acinar deformation was accordion-like during low-pressure inflation. These results indicated that the alveoli and duct expand differently as total acinar volume increases and that the alveolar duct may expand predominantly during low-pressure inflation. Our findings suggest that acinar deformation in the core regions of the lung is complex and heterogeneous.

  10. Nonlinear quasi-static analysis of ultra-deep-water top-tension riser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guanghai; Qiu, Xingqi; Wang, Ke; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-09-01

    In order to analyse the ultra-deep-water top-tension riser deformation in drilling conditions, a nonlinear quasi-static analysis model and equation are established. The riser in this model is regarded as a simply supported beam located in the vertical plane and is subjected to non-uniform axial and lateral forces. The model and the equation are solved by the finite element method. The effects of riser outside diameter, top tension ratio, sea surface current velocity, drag force coefficient, floating system drift distance and water depth on the riser lateral displacement are discussed. Results show that the riser lateral displacement increase with the increase in the sea surface current velocity, drag force coefficient and water depth, whereas decrease with the increase in the riser outside diameter, top tension ratio. The top tension ratio has an important influence on the riser deformation and it should be set reasonably under different circumstances. The drift of the floating system has a complicated influence on the riser deformation and it should avoid a large drift distance in the proceedings of drilling and production.

  11. Mechanical response of common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seeds under quasi-static compression: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Hasseldine, Benjamin P J; Gao, Chao; Collins, Joseph M; Jung, Hyun-Do; Jang, Tae-Sik; Song, Juha; Li, Yaning

    2017-01-06

    The common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seedcoat has a fascinating complex microstructure, with jigsaw puzzle-like epidermis cells articulated via wavy intercellular sutures to form a compact layer to protect the kernel inside. However, little research has been conducted on linking the microstructure details with the overall mechanical response of this interesting biological composite. To this end, an integrated experimental-numerical-analytical investigation was conducted to both characterize the microstructure and ascertain the microscale mechanical properties and to test the overall response of kernels and full seeds under macroscale quasi-static compression. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to examine the microstructure of the outer seedcoat and nanoindentation was performed to obtain the material properties of the seedcoat hard phase material. A multiscale computational strategy was applied to link the microstructure to the macroscale response of the seed. First, the effective anisotropic mechanical properties of the seedcoat were obtained from finite element (FE) simulations of a microscale representative volume element (RVE), which were further verified from sophisticated analytical models. Then, macroscale FE models of the individual kernel and full seed were developed. Good agreement between the compression experiments and FE simulations were obtained for both the kernel and the full seed. The results revealed the anisotropic property and the protective function of the seedcoat, and showed that the sutures of the seedcoat play an important role in transmitting and distributing loads in responding to external compression.

  12. Control of layer stacking in CVD graphene under quasi-static condition.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Kiran M; Sharma, Indu; Dhakate, Sanjay R

    2015-09-14

    The type of layer stacking in bilayer graphene has a significant influence on its electronic properties because of the contrast nature of layer coupling. Herein, different geometries of the reaction site for the growth of bilayer graphene by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and their effects on the nature of layer stacking are investigated. Micro-Raman mapping and curve fitting analysis confirmed the type of layer stacking for the CVD grown bilayer graphene. The samples grown with sandwiched structure such as quartz/Cu foil/quartz along with a spacer, between the two quartz plates to create a sealed space, resulted in Bernal or AB stacked bilayer graphene while the sample sandwiched without a spacer produced the twisted bilayer graphene. The contrast difference in the layer stacking is a consequence of the difference in the growth mechanism associated with different geometries of the reaction site. The diffusion dominated process under quasi-static control is responsible for the growth of twisted bilayer graphene in sandwiched geometry while surface controlled growth with ample and continual supply of carbon in sandwiched geometry along with a spacer, leads to AB stacked bilayer graphene. Through this new approach, an efficient technique is presented to control the nature of layer stacking.

  13. A quasi-static model of wheel-tissue interaction for surgical robotics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sliker, Levin J; Qi, H Jerry; Rentschler, Mark E

    2013-09-01

    Wheel-driven mobile in vivo robotic devices can provide an unconstrained platform for visualization and task performance. Careful understanding of the wheel-tissue interaction is necessary to predict in vivo performance of medical mobility systems. Here, an analytical study of the friction involving rolling contact of a surgical wheel, moving at constant velocities over soft tissue, is presented and verified. A quasi-static frictionless solution is first derived from existing theory, and newly developed theory considering frictional effects is later introduced. In this analysis, the effect of friction on wheel mobility over a viscoelastic substrate is analyzed with wheel velocity as the only changing variable. The analytical model is later verified by experiments and Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations. A simple application of this model to help design a surgical robot is also presented. Additional results indicate that the resistance force, which arises from the tissue viscosity, approaches zero for small and very large wheel velocities. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A quasi-static continuum model describing interactions between plasmons and non-absorbing biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salary, Mohammad Mahdi; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between the plasmons of noble metal nanoparticles and non-absorbing biomolecules forms the basis of the plasmonic sensors, which have received much attention. Studying these interactions can help to exploit the full potentials of plasmonic sensors in quantification and analysis of biomolecules. Here, a quasi-static continuum model is adopted for this purpose. We present a boundary-element method for computing the optical response of plasmonic particles to the molecular binding events by solving the Poisson equation. The model represents biomolecules with their molecular surfaces, thus accurately accounting for the influence of exact binding conformations as well as structural differences between different proteins on the response of plasmonic nanoparticles. The linear systems arising in the method are solved iteratively with Krylov generalized minimum residual algorithm, and the acceleration is achieved by applying precorrected-Fast Fourier Transformation technique. We apply the developed method to investigate interactions of biotinylated gold nanoparticles (nanosphere and nanorod) with four different types of biotin-binding proteins. The interactions are studied at both ensemble and single-molecule level. Computational results demonstrate the ability of presented model for analyzing realistic nanoparticle-biomolecule configurations. The method can provide comprehensive study for wide variety of applications, including protein structures, monitoring structural and conformational transitions, and quantification of protein concentrations. In addition, it is suitable for design and optimization of the nano-plasmonic sensors.

  15. Quasi-static extension of a tensile crack contained in a viscoelastic-plastic solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Final stretch criterion of failure is applied to the problem of quasi-static extension of a crack embedded in an elastic-plastic or viscoelastic-plastic matrix. The slow growth under subcritical conditions in a rate-sensitive Tresca solid is shown to be a superposition of creep rupture and McClintock's ductile growth. This type of growth occurs at subcritical magnitude of the imposed K-factor and can be accounted for only through a recognition of inelastic properties of solids. In the subcritical range there is no unique value for K sub c independent of geometrical configuration and flaw size. Not only the produced states of stress and strain are dependent on the loading path, but also the material resistance to fracture turns out to be a function of the history of loading that precedes catastrophic failure. A nonlinear integro-differential equation of motion is derived for a crack progressing through a viscoelastic medium with some limited ability to plastic flow. Examples of numerical integration are given incorporating both monotonic and cyclic loading programs.

  16. Study of an athermal quasi static plastic deformation in a 2D granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Jie

    2016-11-01

    In crystalline materials, the plasticity has been well understood in terms of dynamics of dislocation, i.e. flow defects in the crystals where the flow defects can be directly visualized under a microscope. In a contrast, the plasticity in amorphous materials, i.e. glass, is still poorly understood due to the disordered nature of the materials. In this talk, I will discuss the recent results we have obtained in our ongoing research of the plasticity of a 2D glass in the athermal quasi static limit where the 2D glass is made of bi-disperse granular disks with very low friction. Starting from a densely packed homogeneous and isotropic initial state, we apply pure shear deformation to the system. For a sufficiently small strain, the response of the system is linear and elastic like; when the strain is large enough, the plasticity of the system gradually develops and eventually the shear bands are fully developed. In this study, we are particularly interested in how to relate the local plastic deformation to the macroscopic response of the system and also in the development of the shear bands.

  17. Role of multiscale heterogeneity in fault slip from quasi-static numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ide, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    Quasi-static numerical simulations of slip along a fault interface characterized by multiscale heterogeneity (fractal patch model) are carried out under the assumption that the characteristic distance in the slip-dependent frictional law is scale-dependent. We also consider slip-dependent stress accumulation on patches prior to the weakening process. When two patches of different size are superposed, the slip rate of the smaller patch is reduced when the stress is increased on the surrounding large patch. In the case of many patches over a range of scales, the slip rate on the smaller patches becomes significant in terms of both its amplitude and frequency. Peaks in slip rate are controlled by the surrounding larger patches, which may also be responsible for the segmentation of slip sequences. The use of an explicit slip-strengthening-then-weakening frictional behavior highlights that the strengthening process behind small patches weakens their interaction and reduces the peaks in slip rate, while the slip deficit continues to accumulate in the background. Therefore, it may be possible to image the progress of slip deficit at larger scales if the changes in slip activity on small patches are detectable.

  18. Quasi-static evolution of the magnetosphere: The substorm growth phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotkin, A. P.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1995-09-01

    The growth phase of a substorm is marked by ``energy loading'' in the magnetosphere prior to energy dissipation in the substorm expansion phase. This loading takes place primarily in the geomagnetic tail and is identified by the growth of total magnetic flux in the tail lobes, the increase of magnetic field intensity in the near-Earth portion of the tail, and the field line stretching leading to thinning of the plasma sheet in that region where a ``neck'' is thus formed. The last two processes are shown here to be natural consequences of the magnetic flux accumulation by considering theoretically a quasi-static evolution of tail equilibrium. One of the model inferences in the growth phase is a strong diminishment of the dimension of the transition region in the nightside where field lines change from dipolar to tail-like. This accounts for the growth phase development often seen in the near-synchronous region. This study also reveals a qualitative difference between the growth phase and the ``quiet'' condition or the ``ground state:'' the tail lobe flux should exceed a certain threshold for the neck formation to occur and the size of the transition region to diminish.

  19. Quasi-static modeling of human limb for intra-body communications with experiments.

    PubMed

    Pun, Sio Hang; Gao, Yue Ming; Mak, PengUn; Vai, Mang I; Du, Min

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of wearable devices on human has been witnessed as a trend. These devices can serve for many purposes: personal entertainment, communication, emergency mission, health care supervision, delivery, etc. Sharing information among the devices scattered across the human body requires a body area network (BAN) and body sensor network (BSN). However, implementation of the BAN/BSN with the conventional wireless technologies cannot give optimal result. It is mainly because the high requirements of light weight, miniature, energy efficiency, security, and less electromagnetic interference greatly limit the resources available for the communication modules. The newly developed intra-body communication (IBC) can alleviate most of the mentioned problems. This technique, which employs the human body as a communication channel, could be an innovative networking method for sensors and devices on the human body. In order to encourage the research and development of the IBC, the authors are favorable to lay a better and more formal theoretical foundation on IBC. They propose a multilayer mathematical model using volume conductor theory for galvanic coupling IBC on a human limb with consideration on the inhomogeneous properties of human tissue. By introducing and checking with quasi-static approximation criteria, Maxwell's equations are decoupled and capacitance effect is included to the governing equation for further improvement. Finally, the accuracy and potential of the model are examined from both in vitro and in vivo experimental results.

  20. Quasi-Static Viscoelastic Finite Element Model of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An elastic large displacement thick-shell mixed finite element is modified to allow for the calculation of viscoelastic stresses. Internal strain variables are introduced at the element's stress nodes and are employed to construct a viscous material model. First order ordinary differential equations relate the internal strain variables to the corresponding elastic strains at the stress nodes. The viscous stresses are computed from the internal strain variables using viscous moduli which are a fraction of the elastic moduli. The energy dissipated by the action of the viscous stresses is included in the mixed variational functional. The nonlinear quasi-static viscous equilibrium equations are then obtained. Previously developed Taylor expansions of the nonlinear elastic equilibrium equations are modified to include the viscous terms. A predictor-corrector time marching solution algorithm is employed to solve the algebraic-differential equations. The viscous shell element is employed to computationally simulate a stair-step loading and unloading of an aircraft tire in contact with a frictionless surface.

  1. FEMSA: A Finite Element Simulation Tool for Quasi-static Seismic Deformation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, M.; Melini, D.; Piersanti, A.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling postseismic deformation is an increasingly valuable tool in earthquake seismology. In particular, the Finite Element (FE) numerical method allows accurate modeling of complex faulting geometry, inhomogeneous materials and realistic viscous flow, appearing an excellent tool to investigate a lot of specific phenomena related with earthquakes. We developed a FE simulation tool, FEMSA (Finite Element Modeling for Seismic Applications), to model quasi-static deformation generated by faulting sources. The approach allows to automatically implement arbitrary faulting sources and calculate displacement and stress fields induced by slip on the fault. The package makes use of the capabilities of CalculiX, a non commercial FE software designed to solve field problems, and is freely distributed. The main advantages of the method are: reliability, wide diffusion and flexibility, allowing geometrical and/or rheological heterogeneities to be included in a mechanical analysis. We carried out an optimization study on boundary conditions as well as a series of benchmark simulations on test cases and we also verified the capability of our approach to face the presence of 3D heterogeneities within the domain. Here, we present our package and show some simple examples of application.

  2. A translation micromirror with large quasi-static displacement and high surface quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuan; He, Siyuan

    2017-01-01

    A large displacement with high surface quality translation micromirror is presented. The micromirror consists of a magnetic actuator and a mirror plate. The actuator and the mirror plate are fabricated separately using two processes and then bonded together. The actuator consists of a moving film which is a 20 µm thick nickel film fabricated by MetalMUMPs and a solenoid located underneath the moving film. The moving film is designed to curve up through the residual stress gradient in the nickel film and a curve-up mechanism which includes four trapezoidal plates and anchoring springs. The mirror plate is simply diced from a polished silicon wafer and coated with a metal thin film. The mirror plate is bonded onto the central ring of the moving film. A solenoid attracts the moving film along with the mirror plate downwards to realize translation. A quasi-static displacement of 123 µm is achieved at a driving current of 400 mA. A high mirror surface quality is realized, e.g. 15.6 m of curvature radius and 2 nm surface roughness.

  3. Correlation between quasi-static and dynamic experiments for a practical torsional device with multiple discontinuous nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krak, Michael D.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Vehicle clutch dampers belong to a family of torsional devices or isolators that contain multi-staged torsional springs, pre-load features, clearances, and multi-staged dry friction elements. Estimation of elastic and dissipative parameters is usually carried out under quasi-static loading and then these static parameters are often assumed when predicting dynamic responses. For the purpose of comparison, this article proposes a new time domain parameter estimation method under dynamic, transient loading conditions. The proposed method assumes a priori knowledge of few nonlinear features based on the design and quasi-static characterization. Angular motion measurements from a component-level laboratory experiment under dynamic loading are utilized. Elastic parameters are first estimated through an instantaneous stochastic linearization technique. A model-based approach and energy balance principle are employed to estimate a combination of viscous and Coulomb damping parameters for seven local (stage-dependent) and global damping formulations for a practical device. The proposed method is validated by comparing time domain predictions from nonlinear models to dynamic measurements. Nonlinear models that utilize the proposed damping formulations are found to be superior to those that solely rely on parameters from a quasi-static experiment.

  4. A Comparison of the Quasi-static Mechanical and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Properties of the Human Semitendinosus and Gracilis Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Abramowitch, Steven D.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Curran, Molly; Kilger, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Over fifty-percent of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are performed using semitendinosus and gracilis tendon autografts. Despite their increased use, there remains little quantitative data on their mechanical behavior. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the quasi-static mechanical and nonlinear viscoelastic properties of human semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, as well as the variation of these properties along their length. Methods Specimens were subjected to a series of uniaxial tensile tests: one-hour static stress-relaxation test, 30-cycle cyclic stress-relaxation test and load to failure test. To describe the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior, the quasi-linear viscoelastic theory was utilized to model data from the static stress relaxation experiment. Findings The constants describing the viscoelastic behavior were similar between the proximal and distal halves of the gracilis tendon. The proximal half of the semitendinosus tendon, however, had a greater viscous response than its distal half, which was also significantly higher than the proximal gracilis tendon. In terms of the quasi-static mechanical properties, the properties were similar between the proximal and distal halves of the semitendinosus tendon. However, the distal gracilis tendon showed a significantly higher tangent modulus and ultimate stress compared to its proximal half, which was also significantly higher than the distal semitendinosus tendon. Interpretation The results of this study demonstrate differences between the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons in terms of their quasi-static mechanical and nonlinear viscoelastic properties. These results are important for establishing surgical preconditioning protocols and graft selection. PMID:20092917

  5. Measurement of Shear-Strength in Quasi-Isentropic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2001-06-01

    Recent work has indicated that an FCC material loaded at lower strain rate can exhibit higher strength than one loaded under shock. This result is puzzling given the hardening mechanisms involving dislocation pile-up usually accepted as occurring during shock. The effect may be followed by loading to a shocked state and then ringing up on an isentrope so that the loading departs from the Hugoniot after the first bounce. As a means of observing the strength of a material the lateral stress in the sample may be monitored along with the longitudinal stress so allowing a direct measurement in uniaxial strain as the difference between these two values. This relies on the development of an analysis to convert the voltage recorded in the gauge to lateral stress that must be checked for the step loading. The materials that are tested are iron and copper that are representative of BCC and FCC materials to give an insight as to the mechanism responsible for the observed phenomena. A mechanism is suggested to explain observations.

  6. Static strength and failure mechanism of CFRP under biaxial loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Hwang, W.; Park, H. C.; Han, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Tests of cross-ply composite tubes were performed under combined axial and torsional loading up to failure. Strength properties and failure mechanisms were evaluated with reference to the biaxiality ratio of the loading. The scattering of the biaxial strength data was analyzed using the Weibull distribution. The axial contraction of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubes under biaxial loading was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Artificial neural networks were introduced to predict the failure strength using the algorithm of the error back-propagation. The prediction was also made by the Tsai-Wu theory using the experimental data and by the combined optimized tensor-polynomial theory. A comparison shows that the artificial neural network has the smallest root-mean square (RMS) error of the three prediction methods. The prediction of the axial contraction of the tubes correlates well with the results of a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) of the testing machine. From the phenomenological analysis of the failure and the fractographic observations of the fracture surface, three types of failure modes and microscopic failure were investigated, depending on the biaxiality ratio, and the corresponding failure mechanisms are suggested.

  7. Dynamical Generation of Quasi-Stationary Alfvenic Double Layers and Charge Holes and Unified Theory of Quasi-Static and Alfvenic Auroral Arc Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Lysak, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel E-fields play a crucial role for the acceleration of charged particles, creating discrete aurorae. However, once the parallel electric fields are produced, they will disappear right away, unless the electric fields can be continuously generated and sustained for a fairly long time. Thus, the crucial question in auroral physics is how to generate such a powerful and self-sustained parallel electric fields which can effectively accelerate charge particles to high energy during a fairly long time. We propose that nonlinear interaction of incident and reflected Alfven wave packets in inhomogeneous auroral acceleration region can produce quasi-stationary non-propagating electromagnetic plasma structures, such as Alfvenic double layers (DLs) and Charge Holes. Such Alfvenic quasi-static structures often constitute powerful high energy particle accelerators. The Alfvenic DL consists of localized self-sustained powerful electrostatic electric fields nested in a low density cavity and surrounded by enhanced magnetic and mechanical stresses. The enhanced magnetic and velocity fields carrying the free energy serve as a local dynamo, which continuously create the electrostatic parallel electric field for a fairly long time. The generated parallel electric fields will deepen the seed low density cavity, which then further quickly boosts the stronger parallel electric fields creating both Alfvenic and quasi-static discrete aurorae. The parallel electrostatic electric field can also cause ion outflow, perpendicular ion acceleration and heating, and may excite Auroral Kilometric Radiation.

  8. Effect of preload on the fatigue and static strength of composite laminates with defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.; Smith, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of a preload cycle on the structural performance of three graphite/epoxy composite laminates was studied. The layups studied were a laminate typical of general purpose structures (L1), a laminate representative of a filament wound tank (L2), and a laminate representative of turboengine fan blades. The effects of three sizes of simulated initial defects were studied. The tests developed static strength data, fatigue to failure data, and residual static data after application of a predetermined number of fatigue cycles. For L1 specimens, there was a slight trend for the static strength to be greater for preloaded specimens. After application of cyclic loading, however, the influence of preloading was insignificant. In L2 and L3 specimens there was no consistent difference in the static or fatigue results between preloaded and nonpreloaded specimens.

  9. Quasi-Static and Dynamic Response Characteristics of F-4 Bias-Ply and Radial-Belted Main Gear Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics of F-4 military fighter 30x11.5-14.5/26PR bias-ply and radial-belted main gear tires. Tire properties were measured by the application of vertical, lateral, and fore-and-aft loads. Mass moment-of-inertia data were also obtained. The results of the study include quasi-static load-deflection curves, free-vibration time-history plots, energy loss associated with hysteresis, stiffness and damping characteristics, footprint geometry, and inertia properties of each type of tire. The difference between bias-ply and radial-belted tire construction is given, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each tire design. Three simple damping models representing viscous, structural, and Coulomb friction are presented and compared with the experimental data. The conclusions discussed contain a summary of test observations.

  10. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  11. An Investigation Into the Quasi-Static Phase of the Surface Burst Source Region EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    limitations, and as a result, the linear interpolation method used is sometimes inadequate in hand- ling rapidly changing data values (i.e. sharp contour...attended the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Science in Basic Sciences...AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE QUASI-STATIC PHASE OF THE SURFACE BURST SOURCE REGION EMP. Thesis Advisor: John H. Erkkila, Lt. Colonel, USAF ;K 1u.b ; mei

  12. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Knepley, M.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.3), combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to hundreds of years. PyLith is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault ruptures, Dirichlet (displacement or velocity), Neumann (traction), and absorbing boundary conditions, linear elastic, generalized Maxwell, and Maxwell linear viscoelastic materials, gravitational body forces, and automatic time step selection for quasi-static problems. Future releases will add dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models), additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials, and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation (each using subsets of the software), (2) coupling a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation to a global wave propagation simulation, or (3) coupling a short-term crustal deformation simulation to a mantle convection

  13. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Knepley, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith version 1.1, combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation and spontaneous rupture modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to hundreds of years. PyLith is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and runs on a wide variety of platforms, from laptops to Beowulf clusters. It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault interface conditions, Dirichlet (displacement or velocity), Neumann (traction), and absorbing boundary conditions, linear elastic, generalized Maxwell, and Maxwell linear viscoelastic materials, and quasi-static and dynamic time-stepping. Future releases will add dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models), additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials, and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation (each using subsets of the software), (2) coupling a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation to a global wave propagation simulation, or (3) coupling a short-term crustal deformation simulation to a mantle convection simulation and an orogenesis and basin

  14. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C. A.; Knepley, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.6) can be used for quasi-static viscoelastic modeling, dynamic spontaneous rupture and/or ground-motion modeling. Unstructured and structured finite-element discretizations allow for spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales in dynamic problems ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales in quasi-static problems ranging from minutes to thousands of years. PyLith development is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and the software runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). Binaries (Linux, Darwin, and Windows systems) and source code are available from geodynamics.org. PyLith uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current PyLith features include prescribed fault ruptures with multiple earthquakes and aseismic creep, spontaneous fault ruptures with a variety of fault constitutive models, time-dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, time-dependent point forces, and gravitational body forces. PyLith supports infinitesimal and small strain formulations for linear elastic rheologies, linear and generalized Maxwell viscoelastic rheologies, power-law viscoelastic rheologies, and Drucker-Prager elastoplastic rheologies. Current software development focuses on coupling quasi-static and dynamic simulations to resolve multi-scale deformation across the entire seismic cycle and the coupling of elasticity to heat and/or fluid flow.

  15. Rotation elastogram: a novel method to visualize local rigid body rotation under quasi-static compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmiya, C.; Kothawala, Ali Arshad; Thittai, Arun K.

    2016-04-01

    During manual palpation of breast masses, the perception of its stiffness and slipperiness are the two commonly used information by the physician. In order to reliably and quantitatively obtain this information several non-invasive elastography techniques have been developed that seek to provide an image of the underlying mechanical properties, mostly stiffness-related. Very few approaches have visualized the "slip" at the lesion-background boundary that only occurs for a loosely-bonded benign lesion. It has been shown that axial-shear strain distribution provides information about underlying slip. One such feature, referred to as "fill-in" was interpreted as a surrogate of the rotation undergone by an asymmetrically-oriented-loosely bonded-benign-lesion under quasi-static compression. However, imaging and direct visualization of the rotation itself has not been addressed yet. In order to accomplish this, the quality of lateral displacement estimation needs to be improved. In this simulation study, we utilize spatial compounding approach and assess the feasibility to obtain good quality rotation elastogram. The angular axial and lateral displacement estimates were obtained at different insonification angles from a phantom containing an elliptical inclusion oriented at 45°, subjected to 1% compression from the top. A multilevel 2D-block matching algorithm was used for displacement tracking and 2D-least square compounding of angular axial and lateral displacement estimates was employed. By varying the maximum steering angle and incremental angle, the improvement in the lateral motion tracking accuracy and its effects on the quality of rotational elastogram were evaluated. Results demonstrate significantly-improved rotation elastogram using this technique.

  16. Dynamic delamination in curved composite laminates under quasi-static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyar, I.; Gozluklu, B.; Coker, D.

    2014-06-01

    In the wind energy industry, new advances in composite manufacturing technology and high demand for lightweight structures are fostering the use of composite laminates in a wide variety of shapes as primary load carrying elements. However, once a moderately thick laminate takes highly curved shape, such as an L-shape, Interlaminar Normal Stresses (ILNS) are induced together with typical Interlaminar Shear Stresses (ILSS) on the interfaces between the laminas. The development of ILNS promotes mode-I type of delamination propagation in the curved part of the L-shaped structure, which is a problem that has recently raised to the forefront in in-service new composite wind turbines. Delamination propagation in L-shaped laminates can be highly dynamic even though the loading is quasistatic. An experimental study to investigate dynamic delamination under quasi-static loading is carried out using a million fps high speed camera. Simulations of the experiments are conducted with a bilinear cohesive zone model implemented in user subroutine of the commercial FEA code ABAQUS/explicit. The experiments were conducted on a 12-layered woven L-shaped CFRP laminates subjected to shear loading perpendicular to the arm of the specimen with a free-sliding fixture to match the boundary conditions used in the FEA. A single delamination is found to initiate at the 5th interface during a single drop in the load. The delamination is then observed to propagate to the arms at intersonic speed of 2200m/s. The results obtained using cohesive zone models in the numerical simulations were found to be in good agreement with experimental results in terms of load displacement behavior and delamination history.

  17. Simulation of quasi-static hydraulic fracture propagation in porous media with XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Lien Ramirez, Alina; Neuweiler, Insa; Löhnert, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is the injection of a fracking fluid at high pressures into the underground. Its goal is to create and expand fracture networks to increase the rock permeability. It is a technique used, for example, for oil and gas recovery and for geothermal energy extraction, since higher rock permeability improves production. Many physical processes take place when it comes to fracking; rock deformation, fluid flow within the fractures, as well as into and through the porous rock. All these processes are strongly coupled, what makes its numerical simulation rather challenging. We present a 2D numerical model that simulates the hydraulic propagation of an embedded fracture quasi-statically in a poroelastic, fully saturated material. Fluid flow within the porous rock is described by Darcy's law and the flow within the fracture is approximated by a parallel plate model. Additionally, the effect of leak-off is taken into consideration. The solid component of the porous medium is assumed to be linear elastic and the propagation criteria are given by the energy release rate and the stress intensity factors [1]. The used numerical method for the spatial discretization is the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) [2]. It is based on the standard Finite Element Method, but introduces additional degrees of freedom and enrichment functions to describe discontinuities locally in a system. Through them the geometry of the discontinuity (e.g. a fracture) becomes independent of the mesh allowing it to move freely through the domain without a mesh-adapting step. With this numerical model we are able to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation with different initial fracture geometries and material parameters. Results from these simulations will also be presented. References [1] D. Gross and T. Seelig. Fracture Mechanics with an Introduction to Micromechanics. Springer, 2nd edition, (2011) [2] T. Belytschko and T. Black. Elastic crack growth in finite elements with minimal

  18. Design and quasi-static characterization of SMASH (SMA stabilizing handgrip)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Anupam; Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; LaVigna, Chris; Kwatny, Harry

    2007-04-01

    Due to physiologically induced body tremors, there is a need for active stabilization in many hand-held devices such as surgical tools, optical equipment (cameras), manufacturing tools, and small arms weapons. While active stabilization has been achieved with electromagnetic and piezoceramics actuators for cameras and surgical equipment, the hostile environment along with larger loads introduced by manufacturing and battlefield environments make these approaches unsuitable. Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators are capable of alleviating these limitations with their large force/stroke generation, smaller size, lower weight, and increased ruggedness. This paper presents the actuator design and quasi-static characterization of a SMA Stabilizing Handgrip (SMASH). SMASH is an antagonistically SMA actuated two degree-of-freedom stabilizer for disturbances in the elevation and azimuth directions. The design of the SMASH for a given application is challenging because of the difficulty in accurately modeling systems loads such as friction and unknown shakedown SMA material behavior (which is dependent upon the system loads). Thus, an iterative empirical design process is introduced that provides a method to estimate system loads, a SMA shakedown procedure using the system loads to reduce material creep, and a final selection and prediction for the full SMASH system performance. As means to demonstrate this process, a SMASH was designed, built and experimentally characterized for the extreme case study of small arms stabilization for a US Army M16 rifle. This study successfully demonstrated the new SMASH technology along with the unique design procedure that can be applied to small arms along with a variety of other hand-held devices.

  19. Efficiencies of power plants, quasi-static models and the geometric-mean temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Ramandeep S.

    2017-02-01

    Observed efficiencies of industrial power plants are often approximated by the square-root formula: 1 - √T-/T+, where T+(T-) is the highest (lowest) temperature achieved in the plant. This expression can be derived within finite-time thermodynamics, or, by entropy generation minimization, based on finite rates for the processes. In these analyses, a closely related quantity is the optimal value of the intermediate temperature for the hot stream, given by the geometric-mean value: √T+/T-. In this paper, instead of finite-time models, we propose to model the operation of plants by quasi-static work extraction models, with one reservoir (source/sink) as finite, while the other as practically infinite. No simplifying assumption is made on the nature of the finite system. This description is consistent with two model hypotheses, each yielding a specific value of the intermediate temperature, say T1 and T2. The lack of additional information on validity of the hypothesis that may be actually realized, motivates to approach the problem as an exercise in inductive inference. Thus we define an expected value of the intermediate temperature as the equally weighted mean: (T1 + T2)/2. It is shown that the expected value is very closely given by the geometric-mean value for almost all of the observed power plants.

  20. Comparison of quasi-classical and quasi-static quantum approaches to the ionization of helium by a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, P.B.; LaGattuta, K.; Cohen, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Employing the quasi-classical Fermi molecular dynamics (FMD) method, we find no evidence for the existence of a nonsequential double-ionization mechanism for helium interacting with a pulse of circularly polarized, high-intensity laser radiation. This contrasts with our earlier research, for linearly polarized laser light [Phys. Rev. A {bold 49,} R12 (1994)], in which effects of the nonsequential double ionization of helium were noted. We also compute emitted-electron kinetic energy spectra by FMD and compare these with spectra derived from a quasi-static tunneling model calculation. In this context we discuss the applicability of the FMD approach to simulations of the photoionization of multielectron systems by intense pulsed laser fields. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  1. Comparison of quasi-classical and quasi-static quantum approaches to the ionization of helium by a circularly polarized laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, P. B.; Lagattuta, K.; Cohen, James S.

    1996-01-01

    Employing the quasi-classical Fermi molecular dynamics (FMD) method, we find no evidence for the existence of a nonsequential double-ionization mechanism for helium interacting with a pulse of circularly polarized, high-intensity laser radiation. This contrasts with our earlier research, for linearly polarized laser light [Phys.Rev.A 49, R12 (1994)], in which effects of the nonsequential double ionization of helium were noted. We also compute emitted-electron kinetic energy spectra by FMD and compare these with spectra derived from a quasi-static tunneling model calculation. In this context we discuss the applicability of the FMD approach to simulations of the photoionization of multielectron systems by intense pulsed laser fields.

  2. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented. The example is based on a finite element model of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen for 50% mode II. The benchmarking is demonstrated for Abaqus/Standard, however, the example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, a quasi-static benchmark example was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement as well as delamination length versus applied load/displacement relationships from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall, the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  3. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The examples are based on finite element models of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen. The examples are independent of the analysis software used and allow the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, quasi-static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Good agreement between the results obtained from the automated propagation analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting input parameters that had previously been determined during analyses of mode I Double Cantilever Beam and mode II End Notched Flexure specimens. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  4. Analyses of quasi-isotropic composite plates under quasi-static point loads simulating low-velocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    In thin composite laminates, the first level of visible damage occurs in the back face and is called back face spalling. A plate-membrane coupling model, and a finite element model to analyze the large deformation behavior of eight-ply quasi-isotropic circular composite plates under impact type point loads are developed. The back face spalling phenomenon in thin composite plates is explained by using the plate-membrane coupling model and the finite element model in conjunction with the fracture mechanics principles. The experimental results verifying these models are presented. Several conclusions concerning the deformation behavior are reached and discussed in detail.

  5. Comparison of Static and Dynamic Elastic Modules of Different Strength Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyanık, Osman; Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the static and dynamic elastic (Young) modules of concrete with different strength was intended to compare. For this purpose 150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples prepared and they were subjected to water cure during 28 days. After Seismic Ultrasonic P and S wave travel time measurements of samples, P and S wave velocities and taking advantage of elasticity theory the dynamic elastic modules were calculated. Concrete strength was obtained from the uniaxial compression tests in order to calculate the static elastic modules of the samples. The static elastic modulus is calculated by using the empirical relationships used in international standards. The obtained static and dynamic elastic modules have been associated. A curve was obtained from this association result that approximately similar to the stress-strain curve of obtaining at failure criterion of the sample. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete Strength, P and S wave Velocities, Static, Dynamic, Young Modules

  6. An improved iteration loop for the three dimensional quasi-static particle-in-cell algorithm: QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    An, Weiming; Decyk, Viktor K.; Mori, Warren B.; Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2013-10-01

    We present improvements to the three-dimensional (3D) quasi-static particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm, which is used to efficiently model short-pulse laser and particle beam–plasma interactions. In this algorithm the fields including the index of refraction created by a static particle/laser beam are calculated. These fields are then used to advance the particle/laser beam forward in time (distance). For a 3D quasi-static code, calculating the wake fields is done using a two-dimensional (2D) PIC code where the time variable is ξ=ct-z and z is the propagation direction of the particle/laser beam. When calculating the wake, the fields, particle positions and momenta are not naturally time centered so an iterative predictor corrector loop is required. In the previous iterative loop in QuickPIC (currently the only 3D quasi-static PIC code), the field equations are derived using the Lorentz gauge. Here we describe a new algorithm which uses gauge independent field equations. It is found that with this new algorithm, the results converge to the results from fully explicitly PIC codes with far fewer iterations (typically 1 iteration as compared to 2–8) for a wide range of problems. In addition, we describe a new deposition scheme for directly depositing the time derivative of the current that is needed in one of the field equations. The new deposition scheme does not require message passing for the particles inside the iteration loop, which greatly improves the speed for parallelized calculations. Comparisons of results from the new and old algorithms and to fully explicit PIC codes are also presented.

  7. Analysis of the Static Strength and Relative Endurance of Women Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian; McCreary, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    Investigations of static strength and relative endurance of the grip muscles of women athletes revealed that mean endurance time was significantly greater than for men. Results were discussed in light of evidence suggesting possible sex differences in muscle hypertrophy, capillarization of muscle tissue, critical occluding tension level, and…

  8. Effect of a Hippotherapy Intervention Program on Static Balance and Strength in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Dipla, Konstantina; Liga, Maria; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a hippotherapy program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 9). The experimental group attended a 10-week hippotherapy program. To assess…

  9. Analysis of the Static Strength and Relative Endurance of Women Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian; McCreary, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    Investigations of static strength and relative endurance of the grip muscles of women athletes revealed that mean endurance time was significantly greater than for men. Results were discussed in light of evidence suggesting possible sex differences in muscle hypertrophy, capillarization of muscle tissue, critical occluding tension level, and…

  10. Effect of a Hippotherapy Intervention Program on Static Balance and Strength in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Dipla, Konstantina; Liga, Maria; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a hippotherapy program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 9). The experimental group attended a 10-week hippotherapy program. To assess…

  11. Recent Developments on the Numerical Upscaling and Homogenization of the Quasi-Static Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudillo Mata, L.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Luz Angelica Caudillo-Mata, Eldad Haber Geophysics Department, The University of British Columbia. 4013-2207 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Z. C. V6R 1Z4 Key words: Finite Volume, Quasi-static Maxwell's Equations, Optimization, Upscaling, Homogenization, Exploration Geophysics. Abstract: Mineral exploration has exploited the application of mathematical modelling and inversion methods to electromagnetic data by creating a thoughtful workflow that assists in the identification of potential geological targets, the understanding of the larger scale stratigraphy and structure in which a deposit might be located, or delineating finer scale detail in an existing deposit. [1] In recent years, electromagnetic modelling and inversion techniques based on finite volume and finite elements have been studied extensively due to their usefulness in theory as well as in practice [2]. Although the theoretical foundation for these methods is straight-forward, it can face major difficulties when used to simulate realistic situations. One of the fundamental issues is modelling the vast heterogeneity of geological targets in terms of scale, magnitude and anisotropy. Robust and accurate simulations require very fine meshes, especially when the earth is highly heterogeneous. Such meshes are difficult-to-work-with and may lead to very expensive-to-compute simulations when considering large earth-multiscale scenarios. For instance, geological characterizations typically contain on the order of 1e7 to 1e8 cells. These models, which are referred as fine models, represent geological variations on very fine scales vertically, though their areal resolution is still relatively coarse [3]. Numerical upscaling is a mathematical procedure that strive to develop coarse scale models to accurately approximate fine scale ones. Therefore, it is a useful resource to alleviate the computational cost. Upscaling of Maxwell's equations presents big challenges such as choosing the appropriate upscaling

  12. Some remarks on static, creep and fatigue flexural strength of satin woven CFRP laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Miyano, Y.; McMurry, M.K.; Muki, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the time-temperature dependent flexural strength of a satin-woven CFRP laminate having a matrix resin with a high glass transition temperature of T{sub g} = 236/C under static, creep and fatigue loading by 3-point bending tests. Static tests were conducted at various points in a wide range of deflection rates and temperatures. The creep and fatigue tests were carried out at various constant temperatures; the fatigue test was conducted at two frequencies. The results of the experimental study are as follows. The flexural strength of the CFRP laminates for all three loading types is time-temperature dependent even near room temperature well below T{sub g}. The time and temperature superposition principle for the matrix resin also holds for the flexural strength of the CFRP laminates. The fracture modes are almost the same for the three loading types under all conditions tested. Finally, we propose a method for predicting the flexural fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure at an arbitrary temperature, frequency and stress ratio based on the current experimental findings and considering the relationships among the static, creep and fatigue flexural strengths.

  13. Experience in resistance training does not prevent reduction in muscle strength evoked by passive static stretching.

    PubMed

    Serra, Andrey J; Silva, José A; Marcolongo, Alessandra A; Manchini, Martha T; Oliveira, João V A; Santos, Luis F N; Rica, Roberta L; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2013-08-01

    This study examined whether passive static stretching reduces the maximum muscle strength achieved by different body segments in untrained and resistance-trained subjects. Twenty adult men were assigned to 1 of the following groups: untrained (UT, N = 9) and resistance-trained (RT, N = 11) groups. The subjects performed six 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load tests of the following exercises: horizontal bench press, lat pull-downs, bicep curls, and 45° leg press. The results achieved in the last two 1RM tests were used for statistical analyses. A passive static stretching program was incorporated before the sixth 1RM test. The body fat content was significantly higher in the UT group compared with the RT group (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the RT group showed significantly higher proportion of lean body mass compared with the UT group (p < 0.0001). Maximum muscle strength on all 4 exercises was significantly reduced in both groups after stretching (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the magnitude of muscle strength reduction was similar for the UT and the RT groups. The exception was for barbell curls, in which the muscle strength depression was significantly higher in the UT group compared with the RT group (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the passive static stretching program was detrimental to upper- and lower-body maximal muscle strength performance in several body segments. The negative effects of stretching were similar for subjects participating in resistance training regimens.

  14. Effect of microstructure on static and dynamic mechanical properties of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinbo

    The high speed deformation behavior of a commercially available dual phase (DP) steel was studied by means of split Hopkinson bar apparatus in shear punch (25m/s) and tension (1000s-1) modes with an emphasis on the influence of microstructure. The cold rolled sheet material was subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to produce several different microstructures, namely ferrite plus pearlite, ferrite plus bainite and/or acicular ferrite, ferrite plus bainite and martensite, and ferrite plus different fractions of martensite. Static properties (0.01mm/s for shear punch and 0.001s -1 for tension) of all the microstructures were also measured by an MTS hydraulic machine and compared to the dynamic properties. The effects of low temperature tempering and bake hardening were investigated for some ferrite plus martensite microstructures. In addition, two other materials, composition designed as high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, were heat treated and tested to study the effect of alloy chemistry on the microstructure and property relationship. A strong effect of microstructure on both static and dynamic properties and on the relationship between static and dynamic properties was observed. According to the variation of dynamic factor with static strength, three groups of microstructures with three distinct behaviors were identified, i.e. classic dual phase (ferrite plus less than 50% martensite), martensite-matrix dual phase (ferrite plus more than 50% martensite), and non-dual phase (ferrite plus non-martensite). Under the same static strength level, the dual phase microstructure was found to absorb more dynamic energy than other microstructures. It was also observed that the general dependence of microstructure on static and dynamic property relationship was not strongly influenced by chemical composition, except the ferrite plus martensite microstructures generated by the TRIP chemistry, which exhibited

  15. Compensation of high-order quasi-static aberrations on SPHERE with the coronagraphic phase diversity (COFFEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Mugnier, L. M.; Dohlen, K.; Petit, C.; Fusco, T.; Mouillet, D.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Ferrari, M.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The second-generation instrument SPHERE, dedicated to high-contrast imaging, will soon be in operation on the European Very Large Telescope. Such an instrument relies on an extreme adaptive optics system coupled with a coronagraph that suppresses most of the diffracted stellar light. However, the coronagraph performance is strongly limited by quasi-static aberrations that create long-lived speckles in the scientific image plane, which can easily be mistaken for planets. Aims: The wavefront analysis performed by SPHERE's adaptive optics system uses a dedicated wavefront sensor. The ultimate performance is thus limited by the unavoidable differential aberrations between the wavefront sensor and the scientific camera, which have to be estimated and compensated for. In this paper, we use the COFFEE approach to measure and compensate for SPHERE's quasi-static aberrations. Methods: COronagraphic Focal-plane waveFront Estimation for Exoplanet detection (COFFEE), which consists in an extension of phase diversity to coronagraphic imaging, estimates the quasi-static aberrations, including the differential ones, using only two focal plane images recorded by the scientific camera. In this paper, we use coronagraphic images recorded from SPHERE's infrared detector IRDIS to estimate the aberrations upstream of the coronagraph, which are then compensated for using SPHERE's extreme adaptive optics loop SAXO. Results: We first validate the ability of COFFEE to estimate high-order aberrations by estimating a calibrated influence function pattern introduced upstream of the coronagraph. We then use COFFEE in an original iterative compensation process to compensate for the estimated aberrations, leading to a contrast improvement by a factor that varies from 1.4 to 4.7 between 2λ/D and 15λ/D on IRDIS. The performance of the compensation process is also evaluated through simulations. An excellent match between experimental results and these simulations is found.

  16. Quasi-static evolution of force-free magnetic fields and a model for two-ribbon solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that a two-dimensional force-free field in the solar corona can evolve in a quasi-static manner toward an open configuration, assuming the coronal field is invariant with respect to translations parallel to the x-axis. The theoretical result is applied to the quantitative theory of the evolution of two-ribbon solar flares of Kopp and Pneuman (1976), and the results are discussed. It is concluded that the two-dimensional force is the principal mechanism for the opening of the coronal magnetic field prior to reconnection during a solar flare.

  17. Criteria for initiation of delamination in quasi-static punch-shear tests of a carbon-fiber composite material.

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Eric Brian; English, Shawn Allen; Briggs, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    V arious phenomenological delamination initiation criteria are analyzed in quasi - static punch - shear tests conducted on six different geometries. These six geometries are modeled and analyzed using elastic, large - deformation finite element analysis. Analysis output is post - processed to assess different delamination initiation criteria, and their applicability to each of the geometries. These criteria are compared to test results to assess whether or not they are appropriate based on what occurred in testing. Further, examinations of CT scans and ultrasonic images o f test specimens are conducted in the appendix to determine the sequence of failure in each test geometry.

  18. Generation of Non-Propagating Electromagnetic-Plasma Structures and Formation of Quasi-Static and Alfvenic Discrete Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Lysak, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The nonlinear interaction of incident and reflected Alfven wave packets in auroral acceleration regions can create non-propagating electromagnetic-plasma structures, such as transverse Alfvenic double layers and charge holes. These dynamical structures are often characterized by localized strong electrostatic electric fields, localized density cavities and enhanced magnetic or mechanical stresses, and are responsible for auroral particle acceleration and the formation of both Alfvenic and quasi-static inverted-V discrete auroras. Similar electromagnetic-plasma structures should also be generated in other cosmic plasmas, and would constitute effective high energy accelerators of charged particles in cosmic plasmas.

  19. Modeling and quasi-static hybrid position/force control of constrained planar two-link flexible manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Fumitoshi . Dept. of Computer and Systems Engineering); Asano, Toshio; Sakawa, Yoshiyuki . Dept. of Systems Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed whereby both contact force exerted by a flexible manipulator and position of end-effector while in contact with a surface are controlled. The authors derive dynamic equations of joint angles, vibrations of flexible links, and contact force by means of Hamilton's principle. On the basis of some assumptions the authors derive the quasi-static equations and design the hybrid position/force controller of the flexible manipulator. A set of experiments for the hybrid control of the flexible manipulator using a force sensor has been carried out. Several experimental results are shown.

  20. TORO II: A finite element computer program for nonlinear quasi-static problems in electromagnetics: Part 1, Theoretical background

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, TORO II, is presented in detail. TORO II is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear, electromagnetic field problems described by the quasi-static form of Maxwell`s equations. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in TORO II are also outlined. Instructions for the use of the code are documented in SAND96-0903; examples of problems analyzed with the code are also provided in the user`s manual. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  1. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation to Low-Velocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Douglas, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    A static test method for modeling low-velocity foreign object impact events to composites would prove to be very beneficial to researchers since much more data can be obtained from a static test than from an impact test. In order to examine if this is feasible, a series of static indentation and low-velocity impact tests were carried out and compared. Square specimens of many sizes and thicknesses were utilized to cover the array of types of low velocity impact events. Laminates with a pi/4 stacking sequence were employed since this is by far the most common type of engineering laminate. Three distinct flexural rigidities -under two different boundary conditions were tested in order to obtain damage ranging from that due to large deflection to contact stresses and levels in-between to examine if the static indentation-impact comparisons are valid under the spectrum of damage modes that can be experienced. Comparisons between static indentation and low-velocity impact tests were based on the maximum applied transverse load. The dependent parameters examined included dent depth, back surface crack length, delamination area, and to a limited extent, load-deflection behavior. Results showed that no distinct differences could be seen between the static indentation tests and the low-velocity impact tests, indicating that static indentation can be used to represent a low-velocity impact event.

  2. A comparative study of mineralized biocomposites: Hierarchical structure, quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior, and toughening mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Yu

    Antlers have a primary function in combat and are designed for sustaining high impact loading and bending moment without fracture. Learning from antler may shed a new light on traumatic bone fracture prevention and development of novel fracture-resistant, impact-absorbent materials. Antlers have a similar microstructure as bones, composed mainly of type-I collagen fibrils and carbonated apatite crystals, arranged in osteons in the compact bone and trabeculae in the cancellous bone. However, antlers have lower mineral content and consist mainly of primary osteons. The structure of antler at various hierarchical levels was thoroughly characterized and examined using various techniques and compared with bovine femur. Quasi-static mechanical tests (three-point bending, compression, and nanoindentation) were conducted on elk antlers and the results were compared to reported data. The flexural strength and elastic modulus are similar to other antlers but lower than bovine femur. However, the antler has much higher work of fracture and fracture toughness compared with bone. Dynamic behavior of antler was investigated using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar system. Results showed that antler can sustain large amount of deformation without catastrophic fracture. In situ mechanical testing under ESEM was performed to examine crack propagation in the longitudinal and transverse orientations in compact antler. Nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics were applied to determine R-curves. The fracture toughness in the transverse orientation is much higher than that in the longitudinal orientation due to crack deflections/twists at the hypermineralized interface and the rising R-curve behavior was observed. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography and SEM images showed toughening mechanisms, including crack deflections/twists, uncracked ligament and collagen fiber bridging. The structure and compressive mechanical properties of the mineral and protein constituents in cancellous antler and

  3. Effects of quadriceps strength after static and dynamic whole-body vibration exercise.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jill A; Blog, Gabriel L; Kang, Jie; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2015-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown performance benefits including whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training modality or an acute exercise protocol when used as a component of the resistance training program. Some studies have indicated that performing dynamic exercises as compared with static position exercises while exposed to WBV might be beneficial; however, evidence is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if an acute bout of dynamic versus static squats performed during WBV results in increase in quadriceps force production by means of dynamic isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercise. Nonresistance-trained healthy young men and women (N = 21) of 18-25 years participated in 4 protocols with 2-week rest in-between. Protocol 1 consisted of 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats without vibration; Protocol 2: 5 sets of 30-second static squats without vibration; Protocol 3: 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes; and Protocol 4: 5 sets of 30-second static squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes. Prestrength tests (1 set of 4 repetitions at 100° · s(-1) for the knee extension exercise) was performed within 5 minutes of starting each protocol, and poststrength testing was performed within 1 minute of completing each protocol. Strength outcomes were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a significance level set at p ≤ 0.05. A significant decrease in strength was observed after dynamic and static squats without WBV (p = 0.002); an increase in strength after dynamic squats with WBV (p = 0.003); and a decrease in strength after static squats with WBV (p = 0.003). The inclusion of WBV to dynamic resistance exercise can be an added modality to increase strength. Whole-body vibration can have varied effects in altering muscle strength in untrained individuals according to the type of resistance training performed. As a dynamic squat with WBV seems to immediately potentiate neuromuscular functioning, the

  4. An approach to scaling size effect on strength of quasi-brittle biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei-Sheng; Su, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Two-parameter Weibull statistics is commonly used for characterizing and modeling strength distribution of biomedical materials and its size dependence. The calibrated scale parameter and shape factor are usually sensitive to specimen size. Since Weibull statistics is subject to the weakest link postulate, this work proposed to directly resort to the weakest-link formulation for the cumulative failure probability to characterize size effect on strength distribution of quasi-brittle biomedical materials. As a preliminary examination, the approach was assessed by two sets of published strength data. It shows that the resultant expression for the cumulative probability follows either Weibull distribution or other type of distributions. The calibrated model parameters are independent of specimen size, so they can be used to transfer strength distribution from one set of specimens to another set of specimens with geometrical similarity under same loading mode. These initial results motivate a more comprehensive validation of the proposed approach to proceed via a larger set of case studies covering different quasi-brittle biomedical materials over a wider range of size variation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy harvesting from localized dynamic transitions in post-buckled elastic beams under quasi-static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchani, Wassim

    The deployability of structural health monitoring self-powered sensors relies on their capability to harvest energy from signals being monitored. Many of the signals required to assess the structure condition are quasi-static events which limits the levels of power that can be extracted. Several vibration-based techniques have been proposed to increase the transferred level of power and broaden the harvester operating bandwidth. However, these techniques require vibration input excitations at frequencies higher than dominant structural response frequencies which makes them inefficient and not suitable for ambient quasi-static excitations. This research proposes a novel sensing and energy harvesting technique at low frequencies using mechanical energy concentrators and triggers. These mechanisms consist of axially-loaded bilaterally-constrained beams with attached piezoelectric energy harvesters. When the quasi-static axial load reaches a certain mechanical threshold, a sudden snap-through mode-switching occurs. These transitions excite the attached piezoelectric scavengers with high-rate input accelerations, generating then electric power. The main objectives are to understand and model the post-buckling behavior of bilaterally-constrained beams, control it by tailoring geometry and material properties of the buckled elements or stacking them into system assemblies, and finally characterize the energy harvesting and sensing capability of the system under quasi-static excitations. The fundamental principle relies on the following concept. Under axial load, a straight slender beam buckles in the first buckling mode. The increased transverse deformations from a buckled shape lead to contact interaction with the lateral boundaries. The contact interaction generates transverse forces that induce the development of higher order buckling configurations. Transitions between the buckled configurations occur not only during loading, but also unloading. In this work, the post

  6. Speckle temporal stability in XAO coronagraphic images. II. Refine model for quasi-static speckle temporal evolution for VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, P.; Kasper, M.; Costille, A.; Sauvage, J. F.; Dohlen, K.; Puget, P.; Beuzit, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Observing sequences have shown that the major noise source limitation in high-contrast imaging is the presence of quasi-static speckles. The timescale on which quasi-static speckles evolve is determined by various factors, mechanical or thermal deformations, among others. Aims: Understanding these time-variable instrumental speckles and, especially, their interaction with other aberrations, referred to as the pinning effect, is paramount for the search for faint stellar companions. The temporal evolution of quasi-static speckles is, for instance, required for quantifying the gain expected when using angular differential imaging (ADI) and to determining the interval on which speckle nulling techniques must be carried out. Methods: Following an early analysis of a time series of adaptively corrected, coronagraphic images obtained in a laboratory condition with the high-order test bench (HOT) at ESO Headquarters, we confirm our results with new measurements carried out with the SPHERE instrument during its final test phase in Europe. The analysis of the residual speckle pattern in both direct and differential coronagraphic images enables the characterization of the temporal stability of quasi-static speckles. Data were obtained in a thermally actively controlled environment reproducing realistic conditions encountered at the telescope. Results: The temporal evolution of the quasi-static wavefront error exhibits a linear power law, which can be used to model quasi-static speckle evolution in the context of forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments, with implications for instrumentation (design, observing strategies, data reduction). Such a model can be used for instance to derive the timescale on which non-common path aberrations must be sensed and corrected. We found in our data that quasi-static wavefront error increases with ~0.7 Å per minute.

  7. A new analysis for the static strength of bolted joint in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Kaida

    1992-04-01

    A new finite element program was developed for analyzing the static strength of bolted joint in composite laminates. Two fracture models were introduced in estimating the failure of mechanical joints. Theoretical results of ultimate stress as well as failure propagation were given for 21 different orientations of T300/648 Carbon/epoxy composite laminates. These results are in satisfactory agreement with the test data.

  8. Quasi-static motion of microparticles at the depinning contact line of an evaporating droplet on PDMS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ying-Song; Xia, Xue-Lian; Zheng, Xu; Huang, Xianfu; Zhou, Jin-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, evaporation of sessile water droplets containing fluorescent polystyrene (PS) microparticles on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with different curing ratios was studied experimentally using laser confocal microscopy. At the beginning, there were some microparticles located at the contact line and some microparticles moved towards the line. Due to contact angle hysteresis, at first both the contact line and the microparticles were pinned. With the depinning contact line, the microparticles moved together spontaneously. Using the software ImageJ, the location of contact lines at different time were acquired and the circle centers and radii of the contact lines were obtained via the least square method. Then the average distance of two neighbor contact lines at a certain time interval was obtained to characterize the motion of the contact line. Fitting the distance-time curve at the depinning contact line stage with polynomials and differentiating the polynomials with time, we obtained the velocity and acceleration of both the contact line and the microparticles located at the line. The velocity and the maximum acceleration were, respectively, of the orders of 1 μm/s and 20-200 nm/s2, indicating that the motion of the microparticles located at the depinning contact line was quasi-static. Finally, we presented a theoretical model to describe the quasi-static process, which may help in understanding both self-pinning and depinning of microparticles.

  9. Quasi-static Tensile and Compressive Behavior of Nanocrystalline Tantalum Based on Miniature Specimen Testing—Part II: Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligda, J.; D'Antuono, D. Scotto; Taheri, M. L.; Schuster, B. E.; Wei, Q.

    2016-11-01

    In Part I of this work (this issue), we presented the microstructure of tantalum processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT). In this part, we will present results based on site-specific micro-mechanical testing. The experimental techniques were used due to the intrinsic microstructure gradient associated with HPT processing. The primary objective is to explore the grain size effect on the quasi-static mechanical properties of HPT processed tantalum with ultrafine grained (UFG, grain size d < 1000 nm and d > 100 nm) and nanocrystalline (NC, d < 100 nm) microstructure. Two distinct deformation modes are observed, i.e. a homogeneous (non-shearing) region and a localized (shear banding) region. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) show that the shear bands form by grain rotation. Comparing d in these two regions to the mechanism proposed in the literature shows that reduced d in the shear banding region is more susceptible to localized shearing via grain rotation. This work unifies, or at least further substantiates, the notion that body-centered cubic metals with UFG/NC microstructure tend to have localized shear band even under quasi-static uniaxial compression.

  10. Stochastic emergence of multiple intermediates detected by single-molecule quasi-static mechanical unfolding of protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukagawa, Akihiro; Hiroshima, Michio; Sakane, Isao; Tokunaga, Makio

    2009-01-01

    Experimental probing of a protein-folding energy landscape can be challenging, and energy landscapes comprising multiple intermediates have not yet been defined. Here, we quasi-statically unfolded single molecules of staphylococcal nuclease by constant-rate mechanical stretching with a feedback positioning system. Multiple discrete transition states were detected as force peaks, and only some of the multiple transition states emerged stochastically in each trial. This finding was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, and agreed with another result of the simulations which showed that individual trajectories took highly heterogeneous pathways. The presence of Ca2+ did not change the location of the transition states, but changed the frequency of the emergence. Transition states emerged more frequently in stabilized domains. The simulations also confirmed this feature, and showed that the stabilized domains had rugged energy surfaces. The mean energy required per residue to disrupt secondary structures was a few times the thermal energy (1–3 kBT), which agreed with the stochastic feature. Thus, single-molecule quasi-static measurement has achieved notable success in detecting stochastic features of a huge number of possible conformations of a protein. PMID:27857576

  11. Small quasi-static displacements associated with shallow LP seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, J.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic long-period (LP) events are still not completely understood, in part because our source models are poorly constrained. In particular individual LP events are usually inverted using a very limited bandwidth, which might mask important aspects of the source. Following advances from earthquake seismology where sources are inverted using joint static and dynamic data we investigate the possibility of using seismometers as deformation sensors, where 'static' displacements are hypothesised to be in the micrometre range (Bean et al. 2014). We use data from high-density networks on a variety of volcanoes. The first component of this study focuses on the extraction of small static displacement steps from seismometer data. The main challenges we face include low signal-to-noise ratios and ambiguity of the extracted ground motion due to the tilt-sensitivity of the instruments. We use a combination of laboratory experiments on seismometers and numerical simulations to investigate the processing steps needed to perform the 'step' extraction task and to guide the interpretation of the resulting data. The method is applied to signals recorded near the summits of Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica) and Mt Etna (Italy), which exhibit ramp-like displacement waveforms, coincidently associated by 'dynamic' LP recordings. Our interim conclusion is that these LP sources likely have a measurable static component in the source. Our next step is to use this static component to better constrain LP source inversions.

  12. Comparison of quasi-static and dynamic squats: a three-dimensional kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic study of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Hagemeister, Nicola; Aissaoui, Rachid; de Guise, Jacques A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have described 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and electromyography (EMG) of the lower limbs during quasi-static or dynamic squatting activities. One study compared these two squatting conditions but only at low speed on healthy subjects, and provided no information on kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. The purpose of the present study was to contrast simultaneous recordings of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs during quasi-stat ic and fast-dynamic squats in healthy and pathological subjects. Ten subjects were recruited: five healthy and five osteoarthritis subjects. A motion-capture system, force plate, and surface electrodes respectively recorded 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. Each subject performed a quasi-static squat and several fast-dynamic squats from 0° to 70° of knee flexion. The two squatting conditions were compared for positions where quasi-static and fast-dynamic knee flexion-extension angles were similar. Mean differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were 1.5° for rotations, 1.9 mm for translations, 2.1% of subjects' body weight for ground reaction forces, 6.6 Nm for torques, 11.2 mm for center of pressure, and 6.3% of maximum fast-dynamic electromyographic activities for EMG. Some significant differences (p<0.05) were found in internal rotation, anterior translation, vertical force and EMG. All differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were small. 69.5% of compared data were equivalent. In conclusion, this study showed that quasi-static and fast-dynamic squatting activities are comparable in terms of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG, although some reservations still remain.

  13. Static and Fatigue Strength Evaluations for Bolted Composite/Steel Joints for Heavy Vehicle Chassis Components

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-09-14

    In May 2003, ORNL and PNNL began collaboration on a four year research effort focused on developing joining techniques to overcome the technical issues associated with joining lightweight materials in heavy vehicles. The initial focus of research is the development and validation of joint designs for a composite structural member attached to a metal member that satisfy the structural requirements both economically and reliably. Huck-bolting is a common joining method currently used in heavy truck chassis structures. The initial round of testing was conducted to establish a performance benchmark by evaluating the static and fatigue behavior of an existing steel/steel chassis joint at the single huck-bolt level. Both tension and shear loading conditions were considered, and the resulting static and fatigue strengths will be used to guide the joint design for a replacement composite/steel joint. A commercially available, pultruded composite material was chosen to study the generic issues related to composite/steel joints. Extren is produced by STRONGWELL, and it is a combination of fiberglass reinforcement and thermosetting polyester or vinyl ester resin systems. Extren sheets of 3.2 mm thick were joined to 1.4 mm SAE1008 steel sheets with a standard grade 5 bolt with 6.35 mm diameter. Both tension and shear loading modes were considered for the single hybrid joint under static and fatigue loading conditions. Since fiberglass reinforced thermoset polymer composites are a non-homogenous material, their strengths and behavior are dependent upon the design of the composite and reinforcement. The Extren sheet stock was cut along the longitudinal direction to achieve maximum net-section strength. The effects of various manufacturing factors and operational conditions on the static and fatigue strength of the hybrid joint were modeled and experimentally verified. It was found that loading mode and washer size have significant influence on the static and fatigue strength of

  14. Hysteresis effects of the subjective visual vertical during continuous quasi-static whole-body roll rotation.

    PubMed

    Palla, A; Tatalias, M; Straumann, D

    2008-01-01

    Healthy human subjects, when roll tilted in darkness, make systematic errors in estimating subjective visual vertical (SVV). Typically, roll tilt underestimation occurs at angles beyond 60 degrees (A-effect). At smaller tilt angles, overestimation may occur (E-effect). At approximately 135 degrees whole-body roll tilt, Kaptein and Van Gisbergen (2004, 2005) found an abrupt A/E transition, the exact location of which depended on the preceding rotation direction indicating hysteresis. Since this was observed using relatively fast roll velocity, it remains unclear whether the described hysteresis is dynamic or static. To clarify this uncertainty, we continuously rotated nine healthy subjects about the earth-horizontal naso-occipital axis, while they performed SVV adjustments every 2 s. Starting from the upright position, three full quasi-static constant velocity rotations (2 degrees/s) were completed in both directions (CW: clockwise; CCW: counterclockwise). SVV deviation from earth-verticality was plotted as a function of whole-body roll position. A bimodal Gaussian distribution function was fitted to SVV differences between CW and CCW rotations. A-effects (peaks at 88 degrees and 257 degrees chair position) at identical whole-body positions were larger after rotations from upside-down than after rotations from upright (average peak difference: 26 degrees). These results demonstrate static hysteresis for SVV estimation.

  15. Effect of a hippotherapy intervention program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Dipla, Konstantina; Liga, Maria; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a hippotherapy program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either an experimental group (n=10) or a control group (n=9). The experimental group attended a 10-week hippotherapy program. To assess static balance, three tasks of increasing difficulty (Double-Leg Stance with opened or closed eyes, and One-Leg Stance with opened eyes) were performed while standing on an EPS pressure platform (Loran Engineering S.r.I., Bologna, Italy). The strength measurements consisted of three maximal isometric half-squats from the seating position (knee joint at 90°). The hippotherapy intervention program resulted in significant improvements in strength parameters, and on the more complex balance task (i.e. standing on one leg). In conclusion, this study provides evidence that hippotherapy can be used as an effective intervention for improving balance and strength in individuals with ID, and could thus influence functional activities and quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-Pressure Strength Determination via Quasi-Elastic Optimization Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin; Vogler, Tracy; Asay, Jim

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of unloading profiles from ramp wave experiments on Sandia's Z machine for the purposes of extracting strength information can be greatly influenced by the presence of a window. An impedance mismatch between the sample and the window generates a reflected ramp wave which perturbs the incoming wave, particularly at later times when, during unloading, the material strength becomes evident. In an effort to analyze the waveforms for an accurate estimate of the strength, the experimental data is coupled with optimized numerical simulations. Simulations were performed with LASLO, a one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics code. The deviatoric response was calculated using a modified rate-independent Steinberg - Guinan model in which a quasi-elastic response was implemented during unloading by linearly varying the shear modulus. A best fit of relevant parameters in this strength model along with the magnetic field at the drive surface were estimated over the course of thousands of simulations using the Dakota optimization package. These results may then be used to estimate the in situ wave profiles from which the strength can be extracted. Initial results will be presented for ramp wave compression of tantalum with a lithium fluoride window to peak stresses of ˜120 GPa. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Elastic properties and fracture strength of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    A research program is described which was devised to determine experimentally the elastic properties in tension and bending of quasi-isotropic laminates made from high-modulus graphite fiber and epoxy. Four laminate configurations were investigated, and determinations were made of the tensile modulus, Poisson's ratio, bending stiffness, fracture strength, and fracture strain. The measured properties are compared with those predicted by laminate theory, reasons for scatter in the experimental data are discussed, and the effect of fiber misalignment on predicted elastic tensile properties is examined. The results strongly suggest that fiber misalignment in combination with variation in fiber volume content is responsible for the scatter in both elastic constants and fracture strength.

  18. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Aagaard, B.; Knepley, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.4), combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to thousands of years. PyLith development is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and the software runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). Binaries and source code are available from geodynamics.org. It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault ruptures with multiple sequential earthquakes and aseismic creep, time-dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, time-dependent point forces, linear elastic rheologies, generalized Maxwell and Maxwell linear viscoelastic rheologies, power-law rheologies, and gravitational body forces. Current development focuses on implementing dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models) and additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials. Future development plans include support for large deformation and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture

  19. A domain decomposition approach to implementing fault slip in finite-element models of quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, B.T.; Knepley, M.G.; Williams, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a domain decomposition approach with Lagrange multipliers to implement fault slip in a finite-element code, PyLith, for use in both quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation applications. This integrated approach to solving both quasi-static and dynamic simulations leverages common finite-element data structures and implementations of various boundary conditions, discretization schemes, and bulk and fault rheologies. We have developed a custom preconditioner for the Lagrange multiplier portion of the system of equations that provides excellent scalability with problem size compared to conventional additive Schwarz methods. We demonstrate application of this approach using benchmarks for both quasi-static viscoelastic deformation and dynamic spontaneous rupture propagation that verify the numerical implementation in PyLith.

  20. Quasi real-time estimation of the moment magnitude of large earthquake from static strain changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaba, S.

    2016-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki (off the Pacific coast of Tohoku) earthquake, of moment magnitude 9.0, was accompanied by large static strain changes (10-7), as measured by borehole strainmeters operated by the Geological Survey of Japan in the Tokai, Kii Peninsula, and Shikoku regions. A fault model for the earthquake on the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, based on these borehole strainmeter data, yielded a moment magnitude of 8.7. On the other hand, based on the seismic wave, the prompt report of the magnitude which the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) announced just after earthquake occurrence was 7.9. Such geodetic moment magnitudes, derived from static strain changes, can be estimated almost as rapidly as determinations using seismic waves. I have to verify the validity of this method in some cases. In the case of this earthquake's largest aftershock, which occurred 29 minutes after the mainshock. The prompt report issued by JMA assigned this aftershock a magnitude of 7.3, whereas the moment magnitude derived from borehole strain data is 7.6, which is much closer to the actual moment magnitude of 7.7. In order to grasp the magnitude of a great earthquake earlier, several methods are now being suggested to reduce the earthquake disasters including tsunami. Our simple method of using static strain changes is one of the strong methods for rapid estimation of the magnitude of large earthquakes, and useful to improve the accuracy of Earthquake Early Warning.

  1. Failure in Three-Dimensional Woven Composites Subjected to Quasi-Static and Dynamic Indentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-12

    composites, High strain rate testing, Impact behavior, Interlaminar shear strength, Short beam shear strength, Textile composites Bhavani V. Sankar...propagation in plain woven laminates and 3D orthogonal woven composites during short beam shear tests were analyzed using FEA. Two kinds of 3D woven...delamination damage caused by such impacts the characterization of delamination damage in laminated composites becomes critical to creating safe designs. 3D

  2. A quasi-static method for determining the characteristics of a motion capture camera system in a "split-volume" configuration.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chris; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy, repeatability and resolution of a six-camera Motion Analysis system in a vertical split-volume configuration using a unique quasi-static methodology. The position of a reflective marker was recorded while it was moved quasi-statically over a range of 2.54 mm (0.100 inches) via a linearly-translating table. The table was placed at five different heights to cover both sub-volumes and the overlapping region. Data analysis showed that accuracy, repeatability and resolution values were consistent across all regions of the split-volume, including the overlapping section.

  3. A quasi-static method for determining the characteristics of a motion capture camera system in a "split-volume" configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy, repeatability and resolution of a six-camera Motion Analysis system in a vertical split-volume configuration using a unique quasi-static methodology. The position of a reflective marker was recorded while it was moved quasi-statically over a range of 2.54 mm (0.100 inches) via a linearly-translating table. The table was placed at five different heights to cover both sub-volumes and the overlapping region. Data analysis showed that accuracy, repeatability and resolution values were consistent across all regions of the split-volume, including the overlapping section.

  4. Contact forces between a particle and a wet wall at both quasi-static and dynamic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huang; Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing

    2017-06-01

    The contact regime of particle-wall is investigated by the atomic force microscope (AFM) and theoretical models. First, AFM is used to measure the cohesive force between a micron-sized grain and a glass plate at quasi-static state under various humidity. It is found out that the cohesive force starts to grow slowly and suddenly increase rapidly beyond a critical Relative Humidity (RH). Second, mathematical models of contacting forces are presented to depict the dynamic process that a particle impacts on a wet wall. Then the energy loss of a falling grain is calculated in comparison with the models and the experimental data from the previous references. The simulation results show that the force models presented here are adaptive for both low and high viscosity fluid films with different thickness.

  5. Quasi-phase-matched second harmonic generation in silicon nitride ring resonators controlled by static electric field.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rafael E P; de Matos, Christiano J S

    2013-12-30

    Actively-controlled second harmonic generation in a silicon nitride ring resonator is proposed and simulated. The ring was designed to resonate at both pump and second harmonic wavelengths and quasi-phase-matched frequency conversion is induced by a periodic static electric field generated by voltage applied to electrodes arranged along the ring. Nonlinear propagation simulations were undertaken and an efficiency of -21.67 dB was calculated for 60 mW of pump power at 1550 nm and for a 30V applied voltage, which compares favorably with demonstrated all-optical second harmonic generation in integrated microresonators. Transient effects were also evaluated. The proposed design can be exploited for the construction of electro-optical devices based on nonlinear effects in CMOS compatible circuits.

  6. Efficient calculation of the quasi-static electrical potential on a tetrahedral mesh and its implementation in STEPS

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, Iain; Cannon, Robert; De Schutter, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel method for calculating the quasi-static electrical potential on tetrahedral meshes, which we call E-Field. The E-Field method is implemented in STEPS, which performs stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion computations in tetrahedral-based cellular geometry reconstructions. This provides a level of integration between electrical excitability and spatial molecular dynamics in realistic cellular morphology not previously achievable. Deterministic solutions are also possible. By performing the Rallpack tests we demonstrate the accuracy of the E-Field method. Efficient node ordering is an important practical consideration, and we find that a breadth-first search provides the best solutions, although principal axis ordering suffices for some geometries. We discuss potential applications and possible future directions, and predict that the E-Field implementation in STEPS will play an important role in the future of multiscale neural simulations. PMID:24194715

  7. Precision structural engineering of self-rolled-up 3D nanomembranes guided by transient quasi-static FEM modeling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Koric, Seid; Yu, Xin; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2014-11-12

    Micro- and nanoscale tubular structures can be formed by strain-induced self-rolled-up nanomembranes. Precision engineering of the shape and dimension determines the performance of devices based on this platform for electronic, optical, and biological applications. A transient quasi-static finite element method (FEM) with moving boundary conditions is proposed as a general approach to design diverse types of three-dimensional (3D) rolled-up geometries. This method captures the dynamic release process of membranes through etching driven by mismatch strain and accurately predicts the final dimensions of rolled-up structures. Guided by the FEM modeling, experimental demonstration using silicon nitride membranes was achieved with unprecedented precision including controlling fractional turns of a rolled-up membrane, anisotropic rolling to form helical structures, and local stress control for 3D hierarchical architectures.

  8. Efficient calculation of the quasi-static electrical potential on a tetrahedral mesh and its implementation in STEPS.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Iain; Cannon, Robert; De Schutter, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel method for calculating the quasi-static electrical potential on tetrahedral meshes, which we call E-Field. The E-Field method is implemented in STEPS, which performs stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion computations in tetrahedral-based cellular geometry reconstructions. This provides a level of integration between electrical excitability and spatial molecular dynamics in realistic cellular morphology not previously achievable. Deterministic solutions are also possible. By performing the Rallpack tests we demonstrate the accuracy of the E-Field method. Efficient node ordering is an important practical consideration, and we find that a breadth-first search provides the best solutions, although principal axis ordering suffices for some geometries. We discuss potential applications and possible future directions, and predict that the E-Field implementation in STEPS will play an important role in the future of multiscale neural simulations.

  9. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IMPROVED QUASI-STATIC METHOD IN RATTLESNAKE/MOOSE FOR TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATION TRANSPORT MODELLING

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary M. Prince; Jean C. Ragusa; Yaqi Wang

    2016-02-01

    Because of the recent interest in reactor transient modeling and the restart of the Transient Reactor (TREAT) Facility, there has been a need for more efficient, robust methods in computation frameworks. This is the impetus of implementing the Improved Quasi-Static method (IQS) in the RATTLESNAKE/MOOSE framework. IQS has implemented with CFEM diffusion by factorizing flux into time-dependent amplitude and spacial- and weakly time-dependent shape. The shape evaluation is very similar to a flux diffusion solve and is computed at large (macro) time steps. While the amplitude evaluation is a PRKE solve where the parameters are dependent on the shape and is computed at small (micro) time steps. IQS has been tested with a custom one-dimensional example and the TWIGL ramp benchmark. These examples prove it to be a viable and effective method for highly transient cases. More complex cases are intended to be applied to further test the method and its implementation.

  10. Comparison of direct and quasi-static methods for neutron kinetic calculations with the EDF R and D COCAGNE code

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, E.; Guerin, P.; Dulla, S.; Nervo, M.; Ravetto, P.

    2012-07-01

    Quasi-Static (QS) methods are quite popular in the reactor physics community and they exhibit two main advantages. First, these methods overcome both the limits of the Point Kinetic (PK) approach and the issues of the computational effort related to the direct discretization of the time-dependent neutron transport equation. Second, QS methods can be implemented in such a way that they can be easily coupled to very different external spatial solvers. In this paper, the results of the coupling between the QS methods developed by Politecnico di Torino and the EDF R and D core code COCAGNE are presented. The goal of these activities is to evaluate the performances of QS methods (in term of computational cost and precision) with respect to the direct kinetic solver (e.g. {theta}-scheme) already available in COCAGNE. Additionally, they allow to perform an extensive cross-validation of different kinetic models (QS and direct methods). (authors)

  11. Interface trap density evaluation on bare silicon-on-insulator wafers using the quasi-static capacitance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Ghibaudo, G.; Mescot, X.; Faraone, L.; Cristoloveanu, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the quasi-static capacitance-voltage (QSCV) technique in pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (pseudo-MOSFET) configuration for evaluating the interface quality of bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers, without processing dedicated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) test devices. A physical model is developed that is capable of explaining the experimental results. In addition, frequency effects are used to validate the equations by a systematic comparison between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as by a direct comparison with the standard high-low frequency approach. An extraction procedure for interface trap density based solely on QSCV experimental results is proposed, and limits of the procedure are discussed. The proposed experimental and analytical procedure is demonstrated by characterizing SOI structures with different geometries and with different qualities of surface passivation of the top silicon film.

  12. Rate of Bubble Coalescence following Quasi-Static Approach: Screening and Neutralization of the Electric Double Layer

    PubMed Central

    Katsir, Yael; Marmur, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Air-bubble coalescence in aqueous electrolytic solutions, following quasi-static approach, was studied in order to understand its slow rate in purified water and high rate in electrolytic solutions. The former is found to be due to surface charges, originating from the speciation of dissolved CO2, which sustain the electric double layer repulsion. Rapid coalescence in electrolytic solutions is shown to occur via two different mechanisms: (1) neutralization of the carbonaceous, charged species by acids; or (2) screening of the repulsive charge effects by salts and bases. The results do not indicate any ion specificity. They can be explained within the DLVO theory for the van der Waals and electric double layer interactions between particles, in contrast to observations of coalescence following dynamic approach. The present conclusions should serve as a reference point to understanding the dynamic behavior. PMID:24589528

  13. The Quasi-Static Self Quenching of Trp-X and X-Trp Dipeptides in Water: Ultrafast Fluorescence Decay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianhua; Knutson, Jay R.

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay profiles of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan-amide (NATA) and tryptophan (Trp) dipeptides of the form Trp-X and X-Trp, where X is another aminoacyl residue, have been investigated using an ultraviolet upconversion spectrophoto fluorometer with time resolution better than 350 fs, together with a time correlated single photon counting apparatus on the 100ps to 20ns time scale. We analyzed the set of fluorescence decay profiles at multiple wavelengths using the global analysis technique. Nanosecond fluorescence transients for Trp dipeptides all show multiexponential decay, while NATA exhibits a monoexponential decay near 3 ns independent of pH. In the first 100 ps, a time constant for the water “bulk relaxation” around Trp, NATA and Trp dipeptides is seen near 1-2 ps, with an associated preexponential amplitude that is positive or negative depending on emission wavelength, as expected for a population-conserving spectral shift. The initial brightness (sub-ps) we measure for all these dipeptides is less than that of NATA, implying even faster (<200fs) intra-molecular (quasi) static quenching occurs within them. A new, third, ultrafast decay, bearing an exponential time constant of 20-30 ps with positive amplitude, has been found in many of these dipeptides. We believe it verifies our previous predictions of dipeptide QSSQ (“quasi static self quenching”) –the loss of quantum yield to sub-100ps decay process (Chen et al., Biochemistry, 1991, 30, 5184). Most important, this term is found in proteins as well (J.A.C.S., 2006, 128, 1214; Biophysical Journal 2008, 94, 546; 2009, 96, 46a), suggesting an ultrafast quenching mechanism must be common to both. PMID:19708715

  14. A quasi-static model of global atmospheric electricity. I - The lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Roble, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-steady model of global lower atmospheric electricity is presented. The model considers thunderstorms as dipole electric generators that can be randomly distributed in various regions and that are the only source of atmospheric electricity and includes the effects of orography and electrical coupling along geomagnetic field lines in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The model is used to calculate the global distribution of electric potential and current for model conductivities and assumed spatial distributions of thunderstorms. Results indicate that large positive electric potentials are generated over thunderstorms and penetrate to ionospheric heights and into the conjugate hemisphere along magnetic field lines. The perturbation of the calculated electric potential and current distributions during solar flares and subsequent Forbush decreases is discussed, and future measurements of atmospheric electrical parameters and modifications of the model which would improve the agreement between calculations and measurements are suggested.

  15. A quasi-static model of global atmospheric electricity. I - The lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Roble, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-steady model of global lower atmospheric electricity is presented. The model considers thunderstorms as dipole electric generators that can be randomly distributed in various regions and that are the only source of atmospheric electricity and includes the effects of orography and electrical coupling along geomagnetic field lines in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The model is used to calculate the global distribution of electric potential and current for model conductivities and assumed spatial distributions of thunderstorms. Results indicate that large positive electric potentials are generated over thunderstorms and penetrate to ionospheric heights and into the conjugate hemisphere along magnetic field lines. The perturbation of the calculated electric potential and current distributions during solar flares and subsequent Forbush decreases is discussed, and future measurements of atmospheric electrical parameters and modifications of the model which would improve the agreement between calculations and measurements are suggested.

  16. Measurements of displacement around holes in composite plates subjected to quasi-static compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Asundi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Attempts to develop a whole-field, high sensitivity optical technque for measurement of load induced changes of thickness of composite plates are described. Graphite-epoxy plates of quasi-isotropic layup were used as test specimens. Changes of thickness of three plates, each with a central hole of different size, were measured as a function of applied compressive loads. The first test specimen showed localized zones where no holographic fringes were present, surrounded by zones of low fringe contrast. This was thought to be a result of localized motion or creep. Subsequent tests with an increased time interval between specimen loading and holographic exposure demonstrated no localized zones of absent fringes. No plausible explanation for radical differences in the quality of fringe patterns was found, although the use of specimens having a high quality mirrorized surface provided superior change of thickness patterns. Recommendations for further investigations and changes in test procedure are presented.

  17. A Comparison of Low-Velocity Impact and Quasi-Static Indentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    system. 12 6. References 1. ASTM D7136/D7136M-05. Standard Test Method for Measuring the Damage Resistance of a Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite to...Strength Properties of Damaged Polymer Matrix Composite Plates. Annu. Book ASTM Stand. 2005. 3. Feraboli, P. Some Recommendations for the

  18. Endoscopic imaging to assess alveolar mechanics during quasi-static and dynamic ventilatory conditions in rats with noninjured and injured lungs.

    PubMed

    Schwenninger, David; Runck, Hanna; Schumann, Stefan; Haberstroh, Jörg; Priebe, Hans-Joachim; Guttmann, Josef

    2013-05-01

    Although global respiratory mechanics are usually used to determine the settings of mechanical ventilation, this approach does not adequately take into account alveolar mechanics. However, it should be expected that the ventilatory condition (quasi-static vs. dynamic) and lung condition (noninjured vs. injured) affect alveolar mechanics in a clinically relevant way. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate alveolar mechanics during quasi-static and dynamic ventilatory maneuvers in noninjured and injured lungs. We hypothesized that alveolar mechanics vary with ventilatory and lung conditions. Prospective animal study. Animal research laboratory. Male Wistar rats. Alveolar mechanics (derived from alveolar size and airway pressure) were determined in noninjured (n = 9) and in lungs lavaged with saline (n = 8) at quasi-static (low flow at a peak pressure of 40 cm H₂O) and dynamic ventilatory maneuvers (increase and decrease in positive end-expiratory pressure from 0 to 15 and back to 0 cm H₂O in steps of 3 cm H₂O). Alveoli were recorded endoscopically and alveolar mechanics were extracted using automated tracking of alveolar contours. The increase in alveolar size during quasi-static maneuvers was significantly greater than during dynamic maneuvers in noninjured (mean difference 18%, p < 0.001) but not in injured lungs (mean difference 3%, p = 0.293). During dynamic maneuvers, slope of the intratidal alveolar pressure/area curve (reflecting distensibility) decreased with increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (p = 0.001) independent of lung condition (noninjured and injured lungs). In contrast, independent of positive end-expiratory pressure but dependent on lung condition, the maximal tidal change in alveolar size was greater by an average of 40% in injured compared with noninjured lungs (p = 0.028). Alveolar mechanics during mechanical ventilation differed between quasi-static and dynamic conditions and varied with lung condition. Our data

  19. The effect of static pressure on the strength of inertial cavitation events.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Mobley, Joel; Church, Charles C; Gaitan, D Felipe

    2012-10-01

    Recent investigations of cavitation in fluids pressurized up to 30 MPa found that the intensity of light emissions increased by 1000-fold over that measured for single bubble sonoluminescence. A series of measurements is reported here to extend this original work by resolving the static pressure dependence of the shock wave and light emissions from the first and the most energetic collapses, along with the total shock wave energy and light emissions for the event. Each of these parameters was found to increase with the static pressure of the fluid. Furthermore, the energy of these shock wave and light emissions was found to increase in proportion to the stored acoustic energy in the system. These findings were corroborated using the Gilmore equation to numerically compute the work done by the liquid during the bubble collapse. The overall findings suggest that the increased collapse strength at high static pressure is due to the increased tension required to generate inertial cavitation, and not an increased pressure gradient between the interior of the vaporous bubble and the surrounding liquid.

  20. Tensile Fracture Strength of Brisbane Tuff by Static and Cyclic Loading Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erarslan, N.; Alehossein, H.; Williams, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the results of laboratory experiments during the investigation of tensile strength-strain characteristics of Brisbane tuff disc specimens under static and diametral cyclic loading. Three different cyclic loading methods were used; namely, sinusoidal cyclic loading, type I and II increasing cyclic loading with various amplitude values. The first method applied the stress amplitude-cycle number (s-n) curve approach to the measurement of the indirect tensile strength (ITS) and fracture toughness ( K IC) values of rocks for the first time in the literature. The type I and II methods investigated the effect of increasing cyclic loading on the ITS and K IC of rocks. For Brisbane tuff, the reduction in ITS was found to be 30 % under sinusoidal loading, whereas type I and II increasing cyclic loading caused a maximum reduction in ITS of 36 %. The maximum reduction of the static K IC of 46 % was obtained for the highest amplitude type I cyclic loading tested. For sinusoidal cyclic loading, a maximum reduction of the static K IC of 30 % was obtained. A continuous irreversible accumulation of damage was observed in dynamic cyclic tests conducted at different amplitudes and mean stress levels. Scanning electron microscope images showed that fatigue damage in Brisbane tuff is strongly influenced by the failure of the matrix because of both inter-granular fracturing and trans-granular fracturing. The main characteristic was grain breakage under cyclic loading, which probably starts at points of contact between grains and is accompanied by the production of very small fragments, probably due to frictional sliding within the weak matrix.

  1. Recovering Aerodynamic Side Loads on Rocket Nozzles using Quasi-Static Strain-Gage Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew; Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.

    2009-01-01

    During over-expanded operation of rocket nozzles, which is defined to be when the exit pressure is greater than internal pressure over some part of the nozzle, the nozzle will experience a transverse forcing function due to the pressure differential across the nozzle wall. Over-expansion occurs during the nozzle start-up and shutdown transient, even in high-altitude engines, because most test facilities cannot completely reproduce the near-vacuum pressures at those altitudes. During this transient, the pressure differential moves axially down the nozzle as it becomes pressurized, but this differential is never perfectly symmetric circumferentially. The character of the forcing function is highly complex and defined by a series of restricted and free shock separations. The subject of this paper is the determination of the magnitude of this loading during sub-scale testing via measurement of the structural dynamic response of the nozzle and its support structure. An initial attempt at back-calculating this load using the inverse of the transfer function was performed, but this attempt was shown to be highly susceptible to numerical error. The final method chosen was to use statically calibrated strain data and to filter out the system fundamental frequency such that the measured response yields close to the correct dynamic loading function. This method was shown to capture 93% of the pressure spectral energy using controlled load shaker testing. This method is one of the only practical ways for the inverse determination of the forcing function for non-stationary excitations, and, to the authors' knowledge, has not been described in the literature to date.

  2. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez; Power, Henry

    2010-06-07

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  3. Experimental characterization of damage at countersunk bolted joints tested under quasi-static bearing loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Alexandru Paul

    The use of composite materials in aerospace vehicles has allowed for creation of lighter structures that provide excellent stiffness. Although they allow for easy disassembly and inspection of critical assemblies, bolted joints are common damage initiation sites in composite structures. In order for aging aircraft to be considered for life extension programs, the damage at these locations must be characterized and well-understood. Failure studies require that data be provided through experimental tests. The drawback of the present test standard for bolted composite joints is that it was initially designed for testing polymers. This thesis discusses deficiencies in the measurement of bearing strength as a result of this shortcoming, although the battery of bearing tests is modeled after this established test standard. The goal of the present work is to characterize the bearing load induced damage in laminates with pin bearing and countersunk fasteners through a series of bearing tests on laminated composites using a new modified ASTM D5961 fixture designed for testing countersunk bolted joints. This thesis examines variations in measurement of bearing strength that comes with using different test fixtures. The reliability of each test fixture to represent real conditions is evaluated using test fixtures that represent real joint configurations. Results for damage conditions and joint responses are compared. This thesis presents a study of the damage initiation and accumulation in composite specimens loaded in bearing using three different test fixtures: Procedure A, Procedure C, and Procedure A Modified. Procedure A, which is used to load the test specimen in double-shear via a straight pin, is a well known test fixture that comes from ASTM D5961. Procedure C has a countersunk fastener that loads the test specimen in single-shear. These types of fasteners are preferred in the aerospace industry over traditional bolts in order to maintain a smooth aerodynamic profile

  4. Einsteinian Revolution's Misinterpretation: no True Black Holes, no Information Paradox: Just Quasi-Static Balls of Quark Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2014-03-01

    Even if one would assume the astrophysical massive compact objects (MCOs) to be Black Holes (BHs), no energy can be extracted from them because neutral vacuum BHs cannot acquire any (induced) electromagnetic property, neither can any current emerge from the central singularity. This is so despite wishful models claiming the contrary by attributing the Event Horizon (EH) or an imaginary "membrane" with wishful electromagnetic properties. Similarly various Quantum Gravity (QG) theories too attribute various imaginary and mysterious properties like "Brick Wall", "Fire Wall" with the EH even after claiming that the vacuum EH is a perfectly regular spacetime without any special property! The vacuum EH is also associated with imaginary material structures and entropy in a completely self-contradictory manner. To legitimize such contradictions & fudge, the "Holography" principle is invoked by which the information contained within the 3-D BH interior is hypothesized to be encoded on the 2-D EH. Further, some QG theories try to explain gravity & BH entropy (SBH) in terms of random motion of "atoms of vacuum" of dimension ~ ℓp (Planck Length). But since ℓp → 0 as ħ → 0, a classical vacuum would possess infinite entropy by such a hypothesis and so spacetime may not be granular ever. It is asserted that though BHs correspond to exact General Relativistic solutions, the relevant integration constants are zero, i.e., a Schwarzschild BH has M = 0 (Mitra, JMP 2009), and Kerr BHs too correspond to M = a = 0, implying SBH = 0 & BHs are asymptotic ground states of preceding collapse which radiates away entire mass-energy, angular momentum & entropy. Thus the finite mass BH Candidates must be Quasi-BHs. It has been shown that the most natural case for Quasi BHs are ultra-magnetized hot quasi-static balls of plasma, Magnetospheric Eternally Collapsing Objects (MECOs) radiating at their Eddington Luminosity. Spinning MECOs behave like ultramagatic GR pulsars and may naturally

  5. The response of pediatric ribs to quasi-static loading: mechanical properties and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Amanda M; Moorhouse, Kevin; Kang, Yun-Seok; Donnelly, Bruce R; Pfefferle, Kiel; Manning, Angela X; Litsky, Alan S; Herriott, Rod; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bolte, John H

    2013-12-01

    Traumatic injury is a major cause of death in the child population. Motor vehicle crashes account for a large portion of these deaths, and a considerable effort is put forth by the safety community to identify injury mechanisms and methods of injury prevention. However, construction of biofidelic anthropomorphic test devices and computational models for this purpose requires knowledge of bone properties that is difficult to obtain. The objective of this study is to characterize the relationship between mechanical properties and measures of skeletal development in the growing rib. Anterolateral segments of 44 ribs from 12 pediatric individuals (age range: 5 months to 9 years) were experimentally tested in three-point bending. Univariate mixed models were used to assess the predictive abilities of development-related variables (e.g., age, stature, histomorphometry, cross-sectional geometry) on mechanical variables (material and structural properties). Results show that stature, in addition to age, may be a reliable predictor of bone strength, and that histomorphometry has potential to explain bone properties and to further our understanding of fracture mechanisms. For example, percent secondary lamellar bone (%Sd.Ar) successfully predicts peak force (F P) and Young's modulus (E). Application of these findings is not restricted to injury biomechanics, but can also be referenced in forensic and anthropological contexts.

  6. Effect of preforming adherends on static and fatigue strength of bonded composite single-lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on bonded composite single-lap joints with the adherends performed to reduce the angle between the line of action of the applied in-plane force and the bondline. A classical closed-form solution was used to analyze the composite joints with various preform angles and overlap lengths. The adherends of the test specimens were preformed before bonding, during the layup and curing process. Static tests were conducted for preform angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 deg and overlap lengths of 0.75, 1.75, 2.75, and 3.75 in. A limited fatigue study was conducted for specimens with a 2.75-in. overlap and a preform angle of 5 deg. Results of the analysis showed that preforming the adherends of bonded composite single-lap joints significantly reduced the shear and peel stress concentrations in the adhesive. Experimental results showed that preforming the adherends significantly increased their static and fatigue strength and thus increased the load level for which bonded composite single-lap joints can be designed.

  7. Quasi-static electric field measurements made with the plasma diagnostics package in free flight during Spacelab-2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Spacelab-2 mission on the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) was released from the shuttle as a free flying satellite. The shuttle performed maneuvers around the PDP in order that the ionospheric plasma around the shuttle might be studied. One objective of the PDP was to measure quasi-static electric field sin the vicinity of the shuttle. During most of the free flight, the measured electric field was comparable to the induced electric field due to the orbital motion of the spacecraft. At certain times, when the shuttle thrusters were operating, decreases in the motional electric field by 10% to 20% were observed. During times when an electron beam was ejected from the shuttle, large signals were also recorded. These large signals were probably not due to ambient electric fields, but can be attributed to three causes: differences in fluxes of streaming electrons to the two probes due to shadowing by the PDP chassis, depressions in the plasma density caused by the PDP wake, and spatial gradients in the fluxes of energetic electrons reaching the probes. At 80 or more meters downstream from the beam, the energetic electrons had a preferential direction of motion opposite to the beam injection direction.

  8. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  9. Enhancement of quasi-static strain energy harvesters using non-uniform cross-section post-buckled beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-08-01

    Thanks to their efficiency enhancement systems based on post-buckled structural elements have been extensively used in many applications such as actuation, remote sensing and energy harvesting. The post-buckling snap-through behavior of bilaterally constrained beams has been exploited to create sensing or energy harvesting mechanisms for quasi-static applications. The conversion mechanism has been used to transform low-rate and low-frequency excitations into high-rate motions. Electric energy has been generated from such high-rate motions using piezoelectric transducers. However, lack of control over the post-buckling behavior severely limits the mechanism’s efficiency. This study aims to maximize the levels of harvestable power by controlling the location of snap-throughs along the beam at different buckling transitions. Since the snap-through location cannot be controlled by tuning the geometric properties of a uniform beam, non-uniform cross-sections are examined. An energy-based theoretical model is herein developed to predict the post-buckling response of non-prismatic beams. The total potential energy is minimized under constraints that represent the physical confinement of the beam between the lateral boundaries. The experimentally validated results show that changing the shape and geometric dimensions of non-uniform beams allows for the accurate controlling of the snap-through location at different buckling transitions. A 78.59% improvement in harvested energy levels has been achieved by optimization of beam shape.

  10. Effect of moderate magnetic annealing on the microstructure, quasi-static and viscoelastic mechanical behavior of a structural epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tehrani, Mehran; Al-Haik, Marwan; Garmestani, Hamid; Li, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    In this study the effect of moderate magnetic fields on the microstructure of a structural epoxy system was investigated. The changes in the microstructure have been quantitatively investigated using wide angle x-ray diffraction (WAXD) and pole figure analysis. The mechanical properties (modulus, hardness and strain rate sensitivity parameter) of the epoxy system annealed in the magnetic field were probed with the aid of instrumented nanoindentation and the results are compared to the reference epoxy sample. To further examine the creep response of the magnetically annealed and reference samples, short 45 min duration creep tests were carried out. An equivalent to the macro scale creep compliance was calculated using the aforementioned nano-creep data. Using the continuous complex compliance (CCC) analysis, the phase lag angle, tan (δ), between the displacement and applied force in an oscillatory nanoindentation test was measured for both neat and magnetically annealed systems through which the effect of low magnetic fields on the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy was invoked. The comparison of the creep strain rate sensitivity parameter , A/d(0), from short term(80 ), creep tests and the creep compliance J(t) from the long term(2700 s) creep tests with the tan(δ) suggests that former parameter is a more useful comparative creep parameter than the creep compliance. The results of this investigation reveal that under low magnetic fields both the quasi-static and viscoelastic mechanical properties of the epoxy have been improved.

  11. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  12. Microcontroller based closed-loop control of a 2D quasi-static/resonant microscanner with on-chip piezo-resistive sensor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter, Richard; Schwarzenberg, Markus; Dreyhaupt, André; Barth, Robert; Sandner, Thilo; Janschek, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we present a 2D raster scanning quasi-static/resonant micro mirror being controlled in both axes in closed-loop with on-chip piezo-resistive sensor feedback. While the resonant axis oscillates with a given frequency, the quasi-static axis allows static as well as dynamic deflection up to its eigenfrequency because of its staggered vertical comb (SVC) drive arrangement. Due to the high quality factor of the very low damped spring-masssystem, an adapted trajectory planning using jerk limitation is applied for the quasi-static axis [1]. Nevertheless, inaccuracies of the applied nonlinear micro mirror model and external disturbances lead to undesired residual oscillation in open-loop control mode. To achieve high precise and fast beam positioning, we implement a flatness-based control algorithm with feedback to on-chip piezo-resistive deflection sensors. In comparison to previous work [2, 3], we developed a micro controller setup for driving the microscanner, that is equipped with an analog Bessel filter increasing the sensor signal quality significantly. In this study we demonstrate a small size and low power micro mirror driver including high-voltage generation and a microcontroller for real-time control as well as a head circuit board for high resolution sensing. We discuss experimental results of open-loop and closed-loop control for 2D raster scanning operation. Finally, the outlook is given to the intrinsic capability to compensate temperature drifts influencing the piezo-resistive sensor signal.

  13. A comparison of the quasi-static mechanical and non-linear viscoelastic properties of the human semitendinosus and gracilis tendons.

    PubMed

    Abramowitch, Steven D; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Curran, Molly; Kilger, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Over 50-% of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are performed using semitendinosus and gracilis tendon autografts. Despite their increased use, there remains little quantitative data on their mechanical behavior. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the quasi-static mechanical and non-linear viscoelastic properties of human semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, as well as the variation of these properties along their length. Specimens were subjected to a series of uniaxial tensile tests: 1-h static stress-relaxation test, 30 cycle cyclic stress-relaxation test and load to failure test. To describe the non-linear viscoelastic behavior, the quasi-linear viscoelastic theory was utilized to model data from the static stress-relaxation experiment. The constants describing the viscoelastic behavior were similar between the proximal and distal halves of the gracilis tendon. The proximal half of the semitendinosus tendon, however, had a greater viscous response than its distal half, which was also significantly higher than the proximal gracilis tendon. In terms of the quasi-static mechanical properties, the properties were similar between the proximal and distal halves of the semitendinosus tendon. However, the distal gracilis tendon showed a significantly higher tangent modulus and ultimate stress compared to its proximal half, which was also significantly higher than the distal semitendinosus tendon. The results of this study demonstrate differences between the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons in terms of their quasi-static mechanical and non-linear viscoelastic properties. These results are important for establishing surgical preconditioning protocols and graft selection. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Static properties and multiaxial strength criterion for design of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.; Battiste, R.L.

    1998-11-01

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the US Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on one representative reference material -- an isocyanurate (polyurethane) reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass. The present paper describes tensile, compressive, flexure, and shear testing and results for the reference composite. Behavioral trends and proportional limit are established for both tension and compression. Damage development due to tensile loading, strain rate effects, and effects of temperature are discussed. Furthermore, effects on static properties of various fluids, including water at room and elevated temperatures, salt water, antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, used motor oil, battery acid, gasoline, and brake fluid, were investigated. Effects of prior loading were evaluated as well. Finally, the effect of multiaxial loading on strength was determined, and the maximum shear strength criterion was identified for design.

  15. On-line long-exposure phase diversity: a powerful tool for sensing quasi-static aberrations of extreme adaptive optics imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Mugnier, L M; Sauvage, J-F; Fusco, T; Cornia, A; Dandy, S

    2008-10-27

    The phase diversity technique is a useful tool to measure and pre-compensate for quasi-static aberrations, in particular non-common path aberrations, in an adaptive optics corrected imaging system. In this paper, we propose and validate by simulations an extension of the phase diversity technique that uses long exposure adaptive optics corrected images for sensing quasi-static aberrations during the scientific observation, in particular for high-contrast imaging. The principle of the method is that, for a sufficiently long exposure time, the residual turbulence is averaged into a convolutive component of the image and that phase diversity estimates the sole static aberrations of interest. The advantages of such a procedure, compared to the processing of shortexposure image pairs, are that the separation between static aberrations and turbulence-induced ones is performed by the long-exposure itself and not numerically, that only one image pair must be processed, that the estimation benefits from the high SNR of long-exposure images, and that only the static aberrations of interest are to be estimated. Long-exposure phase diversity can also be used as a phasing sensor for a segmented aperture telescope. Thus, it may be particularly useful for future planet finder projects such as EPICS on the European ELT.

  16. Quasi-Static Compression and Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Tri-Axial Bio-Composite Structural Panels Using a Spherical Head.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinghao; Hunt, John F; Gong, Shaoqin; Cai, Zhiyong

    2017-02-15

    This paper presents experimental results of both quasi-static compression and low-velocity impact behavior for tri-axial bio-composite structural panels using a spherical load head. Panels were made having different core and face configurations. The results showed that panels made having either carbon fiber fabric composite faces or a foam-filled core had significantly improved impact and compressive performance over panels without either. Different localized impact responses were observed based on the location of the compression or impact relative to the tri-axial structural core; the core with a smaller structural element had better impact performance. Furthermore, during the early contact phase for both quasi-static compression and low-velocity impact tests, the panels with the same configuration had similar load-displacement responses. The experimental results show basic compression data could be used for the future design and optimization of tri-axial bio-composite structural panels for potential impact applications.

  17. Multiplexed fibre Fizeau interferometer and fibre Bragg grating sensor system for simultaneous measurement of quasi-static strain and temperature using discrete wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Allan C. L.; Childs, Paul A.; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2006-02-01

    We present a multiplexed fibre Fizeau interferometer (FFI) and fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system for simultaneous measurement of quasi-static strain and temperature. A combined spatial-frequency and wavelength- division multiplexing scheme is employed to multiplex the FFI and FBG sensors. A demodulation technique based on the discrete wavelet transform with signal processing enhancements is used to determine the measurand- induced physical changes of the sensors. The noise associated with the sensor signal is reduced by the block-level-thresholding wavelet denoising method, which is applied via the demodulation technique. This sensor system yields a high accuracy and resolution, and low crosstalk. It is well suited for long-term quasi-static measurements, especially for the structural health monitoring of large-scale structures.

  18. Magnetic field strength and reproducibility of neodymium magnets useful for transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, Casto; Foffani, Guglielmo; Oliviero, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in humans reduces the excitability of the motor cortex for a few minutes after the end of stimulation. However, when tSMS is applied in humans, the cortex is at least 2 cm away, so most of the strength of the magnetic field will not reach the target. The main objective of the study was to measure the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by commercial neodymium magnets. We measured the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by four different types of neodymium cylindrical magnets using a magnetic field-to-voltage transducer. Magnetic field strength depended on magnet size. At distances <1.5 cm, the magnetic field strength was affected by the presence of central holes (potentially useful for recording electroencephalograms). At distances >1.5 cm, the measurements made on the cylinder axis and 1.5 cm off the axis were comparable. The reproducibility of the results (i.e., the consistency of the field strength across magnets of the same size) was very high. These measurements offer a quantitative empirical reference for developing devices useful for tSMS protocols in both humans and animals. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  19. HyPEP FY-07 Report: Initial Calculations of Component Sizes, Quasi-Static, and Dynamics Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2007-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) coupled to the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) process is one of two reference integrated systems being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory for the production of hydrogen. In this concept a VHTR outlet temperature of 900 °C provides thermal energy and high efficiency electricity for the electrolysis of steam in the HTSE process. In the second reference system the Sulfur Iodine (SI) process is coupled to the VHTR to produce hydrogen thermochemically. This report describes component sizing studies and control system strategies for achieving plant production and operability goals for these two reference systems. The optimal size and design condition for the intermediate heat exchanger, one of the most important components for integration of the VHTR and HTSE plants, was estimated using an analytic model. A partial load schedule and control system was designed for the integrated plant using a quasi-static simulation. Reactor stability for temperature perturbations in the hydrogen plant was investigated using both a simple analytic method and a dynamic simulation. Potential efficiency improvements over the VHTR/HTSE plant were investigated for an alternative design that directly couples a High Temperature Steam Rankin Cycle (HTRC) to the HTSE process. This work was done using the HYSYS code and results for the HTRC/HTSE system were compared to the VHTR/HTSE system. Integration of the VHTR with SI process plants was begun. Using the ASPEN plus code the efficiency was estimated. Finally, this report describes planning for the validation and verification of the HYPEP code.

  20. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  1. Controlled elastic postbuckling of bilaterally constrained non-prismatic columns: application to enhanced quasi-static energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Suihan; Burgueño, Rigoberto

    2016-12-01

    Axially compressed bilaterally constrained columns, which can attain multiple snap-through buckling events in their elastic postbuckling response, can be used as energy concentrators and mechanical triggers to transform external quasi-static displacement input to local high-rate motions and excite vibration-based piezoelectric transducers for energy harvesting devices. However, the buckling location with highest kinetic energy release along the element, and where piezoelectric oscillators should be optimally placed, cannot be controlled or isolated due to the changing buckling configurations. This paper proposes the concept of stiffness variations along the column to gain control of the buckling location for optimal placement of piezoelectric transducers. Prototyped non-prismatic columns with piece-wise varying thickness were fabricated through 3D printing for experimental characterization and numerical simulations were conducted using the finite element method. A simple theoretical model was also developed based on the stationary potential energy principle for predicting the critical line contact segment that triggers snap-through events and the buckling morphologies as compression proceeds. Results confirm that non-prismatic column designs allow control of the buckling location in the elastic postbuckling regime. Compared to prismatic columns, non-prismatic designs can attain a concentrated kinetic energy release spot and a higher number of snap-buckling mode transitions under the same global strain. The direct relation between the column’s dynamic response and the output voltage from piezoelectric oscillator transducers allows the tailorable postbuckling response of non-prismatic columns to be used as multi-stable energy concentrators with enhanced performance in micro-energy harvesters.

  2. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  3. Stresses and Displacements in Steel-Lined Pressure Tunnels and Shafts in Anisotropic Rock Under Quasi-Static Internal Water Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachoud, Alexandre J.; Schleiss, Anton J.

    2016-04-01

    Steel-lined pressure tunnels and shafts are constructed to convey water from reservoirs to hydroelectric power plants. They are multilayer structures made of a steel liner, a cracked backfill concrete layer, a cracked or loosened near-field rock zone and a sound far-field rock zone. Designers often assume isotropic behavior of the far-field rock, considering the most unfavorable rock mass elastic modulus measured in situ, and a quasi-static internal water pressure. Such a conventional model is thus axisymmetrical and has an analytical solution for stresses and displacements. However, rock masses often have an anisotropic behavior and such isotropic assumption is usually conservative in terms of quasi-static maximum stresses in the steel liner. In this work, the stresses and displacements in steel-lined pressure tunnels and shafts in anisotropic rock mass are studied by means of the finite element method. A quasi-static internal water pressure is considered. The materials are considered linear elastic, and tied contact is assumed between the layers. The constitutive models used for the rock mass and the cracked layers are presented and the practical ranges of variation of the parameters are discussed. An extensive systematic parametric study is performed and stresses and displacements in the steel liner and in the far-field rock mass are presented. Finally, correction factors are derived to be included in the axisymmetrical solution which allow a rapid estimate of the maximum stresses in the steel liners of pressure tunnels and shafts in anisotropic rock.

  4. Challenging the in-vivo assessment of biomechanical properties of the uterine cervix: A critical analysis of ultrasound based quasi-static procedures.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M M; Badir, S; Pensalfini, M; Bajka, M; Abitabile, P; Zimmermann, R; Mazza, E

    2015-06-25

    Measuring the stiffness of the uterine cervix might be useful in the prediction of preterm delivery, a still unsolved health issue of global dimensions. Recently, a number of clinical studies have addressed this topic, proposing quantitative methods for the assessment of the mechanical properties of the cervix. Quasi-static elastography, maximum compressibility using ultrasound and aspiration tests have been applied for this purpose. The results obtained with the different methods seem to provide contradictory information about the physiologic development of cervical stiffness during pregnancy. Simulations and experiments were performed in order to rationalize the findings obtained with ultrasound based, quasi-static procedures. The experimental and computational results clearly illustrate that standardization of quasi-static elastography leads to repeatable strain values, but for different loading forces. Since force cannot be controlled, this current approach does not allow the distinction between a globally soft and stiff cervix. It is further shown that introducing a reference elastomer into the elastography measurement might overcome the problem of force standardization, but a careful mechanical analysis is required to obtain reliable stiffness values for cervical tissue. In contrast, the maximum compressibility procedure leads to a repeatable, semi-quantitative assessment of cervical consistency, due to the nonlinear nature of the mechanical behavior of cervical tissue. The evolution of cervical stiffness in pregnancy obtained with this procedure is in line with data from aspiration tests.

  5. Normative data on the one-handed static pull strength of a Chinese population and a comparison with American data.

    PubMed

    Or, Calvin; Lin, Jia-Hua; Wang, Hailiang; McGorry, Raymond W

    2016-04-01

    We assess the one-handed static pull strength of a Chinese population and compare it to that of an American sample. Fifty men and 50 women in five age groups were asked to exert their maximum one-handed pull strength in three pulling directions (across, front and side) and from four pulling heights (61 cm, 76 cm, waist height and above-shoulder height). The results showed that women had less pull strength than men under all of the conditions tested. The front and side pulling resulted in the greatest pull strength, with a decrease detected when the pulling height was increased. The American sample exhibited greater strength than the Chinese. Body mass and men's handgrip force were also associated with the pull strength. These variables should be taken into account in the development of tasks related to one-handed pulling. Practitioner summary: In this paper, we report a laboratory-based experiment conducted to assess the one-handed static pull strength of a Chinese population and compare the results with those of an American population. The variables associated with pull strength included gender, pulling direction, pulling height, race, body mass and men's handgrip force.

  6. Calculation of reinforced-concrete frame strength under a simultaneous static cross section load and a column lateral impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Nikolay; Yugov, Nikolay; Kopanitsa, Dmitry; Kopanitsa, Georgy; Yugov, Alexey; Kaparulin, Sergey; Plyaskin, Andrey; Kalichkina, Anna; Ustinov, Artyom

    2016-01-01

    When designing buildings with reinforced concrete that are planned to resist dynamic loads it is necessary to calculate this structural behavior under operational static and emergency impact and blast loads. Calculations of the structures under shock-wave loads can be performed by solving dynamic equations that do not consider static loads. Due to this fact the calculation of reinforced concrete frame under a simultaneous static and dynamic load in full 3d settings becomes a very non trivial and resource consuming problem. This problem can be split into two tasks. The first one is a shock-wave problem that can be solved using software package RANET-3, which allows solving the problem using finite elements method adapted for dynamic task. This method calculates strain-stress state of the material and its dynamic destruction, which is considered as growth and consolidation of micro defects under loading. On the second step the results of the first step are taken as input parameters for quasi static calculation of simultaneous static and dynamic load using finite elements method in AMP Civil Engineering-11.

  7. Calculation of reinforced-concrete frame strength under a simultaneous static cross section load and a column lateral impact

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, Nikolay Kopanitsa, Dmitry Yugov, Alexey Kaparulin, Sergey Plyaskin, Andrey Kalichkina, Anna Ustinov, Artyom; Yugov, Nikolay; Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2016-01-15

    When designing buildings with reinforced concrete that are planned to resist dynamic loads it is necessary to calculate this structural behavior under operational static and emergency impact and blast loads. Calculations of the structures under shock-wave loads can be performed by solving dynamic equations that do not consider static loads. Due to this fact the calculation of reinforced concrete frame under a simultaneous static and dynamic load in full 3d settings becomes a very non trivial and resource consuming problem. This problem can be split into two tasks. The first one is a shock-wave problem that can be solved using software package RANET-3, which allows solving the problem using finite elements method adapted for dynamic task. This method calculates strain-stress state of the material and its dynamic destruction, which is considered as growth and consolidation of micro defects under loading. On the second step the results of the first step are taken as input parameters for quasi static calculation of simultaneous static and dynamic load using finite elements method in AMP Civil Engineering-11.

  8. Acute Effects of Static vs. Ballistic Stretching on Strength and Muscular Fatigue Between Ballet Dancers and Resistance-Trained Women.

    PubMed

    Lima, Camila D; Brown, Lee E; Wong, Megan A; Leyva, Whitney D; Pinto, Ronei S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Ruas, Cassio V

    2016-11-01

    Lima, CD, Brown, LE, Wong, MA, Leyva, WD, Pinto, RS, Cadore, EL, and Ruas, CV. Acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue between ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3220-3227, 2016-Stretching is used to increase joint range of motion, but the acute effects can decrease muscle strength. However, this may depend on the population or mode of stretching. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue between ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. Fifteen resistance-trained women (age 23.8 ± 1.80 years, mass 67.47 ± 7.77 kg, height 168.30 ± 5.53 cm) and 12 ballet dancers (age 22.8 ± 3.04 years, mass 58.67 ± 5.65 kg, height 168.00 ± 7.69 cm) performed 5 days of testing. The first day was control (no stretching), whereas the other 4 days were static or ballistic stretching in a counterbalanced order. Range of motion, strength, and fatigue tests were also performed. Both groups demonstrated a significant decrease in hamstrings strength after static (102.71 ± 2.67 N·m) and ballistic stretching (99.49 ± 2.61 N·m) compared with control (113.059 ± 3.25 N·m), with no changes in quadriceps strength. For fatigue, only ballet dancers demonstrated a decrease from control (71.79 ± 4.88%) to ballistic (65.65 ± 8.19%), but no difference with static (65.01 ± 12.29%). These findings suggest that stretching decreases hamstrings strength similarly in ballet dancers and resistance-trained women, with no differences between modes of stretching. However, ballistic stretching only decreased muscular fatigue in ballet dancers, but not in resistance-trained women. Therefore, no stretching should be performed before strength performance. However, ballistic stretching may decrease acute muscular fatigue in ballet dancers.

  9. Self-Consistent Kinetic Approach for Low Frequency and Quasi-static Electromagnetic Perturbations in Magnetic-Mirror Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellat, Rene; Le Contel, Olivier; Roux, Alain; Perraut, Sylvaine; Hurricane, Omar; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    We describe a new self-consistent kinetic approach of collisionless plasmas. The basic equations are obtained from a linearization of the cyclotron and bounce averaged Vlasov and Maxwell equations. In the low frequency limit the Gauss equation is shown to be equivalent to the Quasi-Neutrality Condition (QNC). First we describe the work of Hurricane et al., 1995b, who investigated the effect of stochasticity on the stability of ballooning modes. An expression for the energy principle is obtained in the stochastic case, with comparisons with the adiabatic case. Notably, we show how the non adiabaticity of ions allows to recover a MHD-like theory with a modification of the polytropic index, for waves with frequencies smaller than the bounce frequency of protons. The stochasticity of protons can be due, in the far plasma sheet (beyond 10-12 RE, RE being the Earth radius), to the development of thin Current Sheet (CS) with a curvature radius that becomes smaller than the ion Larmor radius. Conversely the near Earth plasma sheet (6-8 RE), where the curvature radius is larger, is expected to be in the adiabatic regime. We give a description of slowly evolving (quasi-static) magnetic configurations, during the formation of high altitudes CS's, for instance during substorm growth phase in the Earth magnetosphere, and tentatively during the formation of CS's in the solar corona. Thanks to the use of a simple equilibrium magnetic field, a 2D dipole, the linear electromagnetic perturbations are computed analytically as functions of a forcing electrical current. The QNC, which is valid for long perpendicular wavelength electromagnetic perturbations (kλD1 where λD is the Debye length), is developed via an expansion in the small parameter Te/Ti. To the lowest order in Te/Ti (Te/Ti->0) we find that the enforcement of the QNC implies the presence of an electrostatic potential which is constant along the field line, but varies across it. The corresponding potential electric field

  10. The Effects of Dynamic Range of Motion Exercises and Static Stretching on Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanetzke, Carol A.

    The effects of Dynamic Range of Motion (D'ROM) exercises and static stretch on hip flexibility and hip strength were examined. One hundred one male and female college students were divided into three groups: D'ROM, static stretch (ST), and control (C). All subjects were measured before and after treatment for hip flexibility and strength. Two…

  11. The Effects of Dynamic Range of Motion Exercises and Static Stretching on Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanetzke, Carol A.

    The effects of Dynamic Range of Motion (D'ROM) exercises and static stretch on hip flexibility and hip strength were examined. One hundred one male and female college students were divided into three groups: D'ROM, static stretch (ST), and control (C). All subjects were measured before and after treatment for hip flexibility and strength. Two…

  12. The second Sandia Fracture Challenge. Predictions of ductile failure under quasi-static and moderate-rate dynamic loading

    DOE PAGES

    Boyce, B. L.; Kramer, S. L. B.; Bosiljevac, T. R.; ...

    2016-03-14

    Ductile failure of structural metals is relevant to a wide range of engineering scenarios. Computational methods are employed to anticipate the critical conditions of failure, yet they sometimes provide inaccurate and misleading predictions. Challenge scenarios, such as the one presented in the current work, provide an opportunity to assess the blind, quantitative predictive ability of simulation methods against a previously unseen failure problem. Instead of evaluating the predictions of a single simulation approach, the Sandia Fracture Challenge relied on numerous volunteer teams with expertise in computational mechanics to apply a broad range of computational methods, numerical algorithms, and constitutive modelsmore » to the challenge. This exercise is intended to evaluate the state of health of technologies available for failure prediction. In the first Sandia Fracture Challenge, a wide range of issues were raised in ductile failure modeling, including a lack of consistency in failure models, the importance of shear calibration data, and difficulties in quantifying the uncertainty of prediction [see Boyce et al. (Int J Fract 186:5–68, 2014) for details of these observations]. This second Sandia Fracture Challenge investigated the ductile rupture of a Ti–6Al–4V sheet under both quasi-static and modest-rate dynamic loading (failure in ~ 0.1 s). Like the previous challenge, the sheet had an unusual arrangement of notches and holes that added geometric complexity and fostered a competition between tensile- and shear-dominated failure modes. The teams were asked to predict the fracture path and quantitative far-field failure metrics such as the peak force and displacement to cause crack initiation. Fourteen teams contributed blind predictions, and the experimental outcomes were quantified in three independent test labs. In addition, shortcomings were revealed in this second challenge such as inconsistency in the application of appropriate boundary

  13. The second Sandia Fracture Challenge. Predictions of ductile failure under quasi-static and moderate-rate dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B. L.; Kramer, S. L. B.; Bosiljevac, T. R.; Corona, E.; Moore, J. A.; Elkhodary, K.; Simha, C. H. M.; Williams, B. W.; Cerrone, A. R.; Nonn, A.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Bomarito, G. F.; Warner, J. E.; Carter, B. J.; Warner, D. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Zhang, T.; Fang, X.; Lua, J.; Chiaruttini, V.; Mazière, M.; Feld-Payet, S.; Yastrebov, V. A.; Besson, J.; Chaboche, J. -L.; Lian, J.; Di, Y.; Wu, B.; Novokshanov, D.; Vajragupta, N.; Kucharczyk, P.; Brinnel, V.; Döbereiner, B.; Münstermann, S.; Neilsen, M. K.; Dion, K.; Karlson, K. N.; Foulk, J. W.; Brown, A. A.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bignell, J. L.; Sanborn, S. E.; Jones, C. A.; Mattie, P. D.; Pack, K.; Wierzbicki, T.; Chi, S. -W.; Lin, S. -P.; Mahdavi, A.; Predan, J.; Zadravec, J.; Gross, A. J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Xue, L.

    2016-03-14

    Ductile failure of structural metals is relevant to a wide range of engineering scenarios. Computational methods are employed to anticipate the critical conditions of failure, yet they sometimes provide inaccurate and misleading predictions. Challenge scenarios, such as the one presented in the current work, provide an opportunity to assess the blind, quantitative predictive ability of simulation methods against a previously unseen failure problem. Instead of evaluating the predictions of a single simulation approach, the Sandia Fracture Challenge relied on numerous volunteer teams with expertise in computational mechanics to apply a broad range of computational methods, numerical algorithms, and constitutive models to the challenge. This exercise is intended to evaluate the state of health of technologies available for failure prediction. In the first Sandia Fracture Challenge, a wide range of issues were raised in ductile failure modeling, including a lack of consistency in failure models, the importance of shear calibration data, and difficulties in quantifying the uncertainty of prediction [see Boyce et al. (Int J Fract 186:5–68, 2014) for details of these observations]. This second Sandia Fracture Challenge investigated the ductile rupture of a Ti–6Al–4V sheet under both quasi-static and modest-rate dynamic loading (failure in ~ 0.1 s). Like the previous challenge, the sheet had an unusual arrangement of notches and holes that added geometric complexity and fostered a competition between tensile- and shear-dominated failure modes. The teams were asked to predict the fracture path and quantitative far-field failure metrics such as the peak force and displacement to cause crack initiation. Fourteen teams contributed blind predictions, and the experimental outcomes were quantified in three independent test labs. In addition, shortcomings were revealed in this second challenge such as inconsistency in the application of appropriate boundary conditions, need

  14. Small repeating earthquakes activity and interplate quasi-static slips in the Hyuga-nada, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Y.; Shimizu, H.; Goto, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Hyuga-nada region, a high-angle subduction zone belong the Kyushu-Ryukyu arc, is one of the most seismically active area in Japan and earthquakes with magnitude from 6.5 to 7.5 usually occur at dozens of years interval. In this region, the Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) subducts northwestward beneath the Eurasian Plate (EU) at a rate of about 5cm/year [Seno et al. (1993)]. We detected small repeating earthquakes in and around the Hyuga-nada using waveform similarity based on Igarashi et al. (2003). We used about 20,000 earthquakes which occurred in and around the Hyuga-nada and magnitude range is more than 2.0 detected by SEVO, Kyushu University from 1994 to 2008. We identified about 1,000 small repeating earthquakes, and they were compiled 390 groups. Most of small repeating earthquakes occur near the plate boundary between the PHS and the EU. They do not distribute in large moment-release areas of large earthquakes, but they distribute in those areas surrounding them; these characteristics are also found in NE Japan [e.g. Igarashi et al. (2003); Uchida et al. (2003)]. We selected 145 groups of small repeating earthquakes occurring in the plate boundary based on focal mechanism analysis. Almost all of them distribute the southern side from 32.5N, which suggests that an interplate coupling is probably changing near 32.5N. This result is consistent with present study of interplate coupling in and around Hyuga-nada using a geodetic data by GPS observation [e.g., Nishimura et al. (1999)]. We also estimated interplate quasi-static slip rate distribution in the Hyuga-nada using small repeating earthquakes. The result shows that the slip rate of shallow side of plate boundary is relatively larger than deep side of that in the area of 31.3~32N. In the deep side, the Hyuga-nada earthquakes (Mw6.7) occurred in Dec. 1996. It suggests that the interplate coupling of deep side is stronger than that of shallow side. Acknowledgments: In this study, we have used the data of

  15. Analysis of volcanic long-period events with quasi-static displacements from high-density seismological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Johannes; Bean, Christopher J.; Lokmer, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic long-period (LP) events are commonly thought to be related to fluid pressure fluctuations in cracks and conduits beneath volcanoes. Sudden pressure fluctuations can generate slow/crack waves that can propagate along the fluid-solid boundaries between the fluid-filled source and the surrounding medium and thus sustain the resonance of the source. Although there are different variations of this model proposed in the literature, all of them include the source resonance sustained by crack waves. An alternative model (Bean et al., 2014) involves slow-slip fracturing of the shallow volcanic edifice. One of the difficulties in confirming or disproving these models lies in the limited frequency band in which moment tensor inversions of seismic LP signals are typically carried out in order to obtain acceptable solutions. In order to remove low-frequency noise and the high-frequency part of signals, which is difficult to model with numerical simulations, signals are band pass filtered in their most energetic frequency band before the inversions. However, this means we are only recovering a narrow band of the source-time history and any information outside this range is lost. Furthermore, as possible lower frequency components are less sensitive to the complex (and usually poorly known) velocity structure in the shallow edifice, they are particularly interesting for inversions. In this study we are investigating possibilities to include a broader frequency spectrum of the observed displacement signals into moment tensor inversions. In particular, we have observed quasi-static displacement steps for numerous LP events on different volcanoes. These are visible mostly on stations near the summit area and have amplitudes of a few micrometres. We are exploring possibilities to use these signals and distinguish them from noise (e.g. induced by tilting of the instrument). For our analysis we use a combination of numerical simulations and laboratory data to constrain the

  16. Moment measurements in dynamic and quasi-static spine segment testing using eccentric compression are susceptible to artifacts based on loading configuration.

    PubMed

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Carter, Jarrod W; Oxland, Thomas R; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    The tolerance of the spine to bending moments, used for evaluation of injury prevention devices, is often determined through eccentric axial compression experiments using segments of the cadaver spine. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory demonstrated that eccentric axial compression resulted in "unexpected" (artifact) moments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static and dynamic effects of test configuration on bending moments during eccentric axial compression typical in cadaver spine segment testing. Specific objectives were to create dynamic equilibrium equations for the loads measured inferior to the specimen, experimentally verify these equations, and compare moment responses from various test configurations using synthetic (rubber) and human cadaver specimens. The equilibrium equations were verified by performing quasi-static (5 mm/s) and dynamic experiments (0.4 m/s) on a rubber specimen and comparing calculated shear forces and bending moments to those measured using a six-axis load cell. Moment responses were compared for hinge joint, linear slider and hinge joint, and roller joint configurations tested at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Calculated shear force and bending moment curves had similar shapes to those measured. Calculated values in the first local minima differed from those measured by 3% and 15%, respectively, in the dynamic test, and these occurred within 1.5 ms of those measured. In the rubber specimen experiments, for the hinge joint (translation constrained), quasi-static and dynamic posterior eccentric compression resulted in flexion (unexpected) moments. For the slider and hinge joints and the roller joints (translation unconstrained), extension ("expected") moments were measured quasi-statically and initial flexion (unexpected) moments were measured dynamically. In the cadaver experiments with roller joints, anterior and posterior eccentricities resulted in extension moments, which were unexpected and expected, for those

  17. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, Leonid V; Zakharova, Anna N; Kabachkova, Anastasia V; Kironenko, Tatyana A; Orlov, Sergei N

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  18. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Zakharova, Anna N.; Kabachkova, Anastasia V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons. PMID:28194116

  19. Fatigue-Crack Propagation and Residual Static Strength of PH 15-7 Mo (TH 1050) Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-12-01

    section prior to the application of load.) A method of quantitatively predicting fatigue-crack growth rates in aluminum alloys was developed in...section stress. A method of calculating stress-concentration factors based on Neuber’s analysis of stresses around sharp notches (ref. 2) was...developed in the crack-growth analysis. A simple engineering method for predicting the strength of cracked aluminum parts under static loading was

  20. A Preliminary Report on Static Strength Testing for Use in the Development of Occupational Physical Selection Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Ergonomics Guide for the Assessment of Human Static Strength. Am. Ind. Hyg. Assn. J. 36: 505-511, 1975. 5. E. ASMUSSEN. Measurement of Muscular...and Shoulder Muscles. Ergonomics . 23(0): 37-47, 1980. 9. E KAMON. Personal communication, 1981. 10. B.J. WINER. Statistical Prinoiples in...adjustable belts, 5.0 centimeters in width. A stool * and a removable elbow rest, which attached to the wood support, were used in some of the tests. 2. The

  1. Some observations on loss of static strength due to fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, Walter; Hardrath, Herbert F

    1955-01-01

    Static tensile tests were performed on simple notched specimens containing fatigue cracks. Four types of aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T3(formerly 24S-T3) and 7075-T6(formerly 75S-T6) in sheet form, and 2024-T4(formerly 24S-T4) and 7075-T6(formerly 75S-T6) in extruded form. The cracked specimens were tested statically under four conditions: unmodified and with reduced eccentricity of loading by three methods. Results of static tests on C-46 wings containing fatigue cracks are also reported.

  2. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation and Drop-Weight Impact Testing on Carbon/Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Douglas, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    This project was initiated to investigate the damage tolerance of polymer matrix composites (PMC). After a low velocity impact-such as the ones that can occur during manufacturing or service there is usually very little visual damage. There are two possible methods to simulate foreign object impact on PMC: static indentation and drop weight impact. A static method for modeling low velocity foreign object impact events for composites can prove to be very beneficial to researchers since much more data can be obtained from a static test than from an impact test. In order to examine if this is feasible, a series of static indentation and low velocity impact tests were performed and compared. Square specimens of different sizes and thicknesses were tested to cover a wide array of low velocity impact events. Laminates with a 45 degree stacking sequence were used since this is a common type of engineering laminate. Three distinct flexural rigidities under two different boundary conditions were tested in order to obtain damage due to large deflections. Comparisons between static indentation and low velocity impact tests were based on the maximum applied transverse load. The dependent parameters examined were dent depth, back surface crack length, delamination area, and load-deflection behavior. Results showed that no distinct differences could be seen between the static indentation tests and the low velocity impact tests, indicating that static indentation tests can be used to simulate low velocity impact events.

  3. Antihysteresis of perceived longitudinal body axis during continuous quasi-static whole-body rotation in the earth-vertical roll plane.

    PubMed

    Tatalias, M; Bockisch, C J; Bertolini, G; Straumann, D; Palla, A

    2011-03-01

    Estimation of subjective whole-body tilt in stationary roll positions after rapid rotations shows hysteresis. We asked whether this phenomenon is also present during continuous quasi-static whole-body rotation and whether gravitational cues are a major contributing factor. Using a motorized turntable, 8 healthy subjects were rotated continuously about the earth-horizontal naso-occipital axis (earth-vertical roll plane) and the earth-vertical naso-occipital axis (earth-horizontal roll plane). In both planes, three full constant velocity rotations (2°/s) were completed in clockwise and counterclockwise directions (acceleration = 0.05°/s(2), velocity plateau reached after 40 s). Subjects adjusted a visual line along the perceived longitudinal body axis (pLBA) every 2 s. pLBA deviation from the longitudinal body axis was plotted as a function of whole-body roll position, and a sine function was fitted. At identical whole-body earth-vertical roll plane positions, pLBA differed depending on whether the position was reached by a rotation from upright or by passing through upside down. After the first 360° rotation, pLBA at upright whole-body position deviated significantly in the direction of rotation relative to pLBA prior to rotation initiation. This deviation remained unchanged after subsequent full rotations. In contrast, earth-horizontal roll plane rotations resulted in similar pLBA before and after each rotation cycle. We conclude that the deviation of pLBA in the direction of rotation during quasi-static earth-vertical roll plane rotations reflects static antihysteresis and might be a consequence of the known static hysteresis of ocular counterroll: a visual line that is perceived that earth-vertical is expected to be antihysteretic, if ocular torsion is hysteretic.

  4. Effect of static and dynamic muscle stretching as part of warm up procedures on knee joint proprioception and strength.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Gregory S

    2017-10-01

    The importance of warm up procedures prior to athletic performance is well established. A common component of such procedures is muscle stretching. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of static stretching (SS) as part of warm up procedures on knee joint position sense (KJPS) and the effect of dynamic stretching (DS) on KJPS is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic and static stretching as part warm up procedures on KJPS and knee extension and flexion strength. This study had a randomised cross-over design and ten healthy adults (20±1years) attended 3 visits during which baseline KJPS, at target angles of 20° and 45°, and knee extension and flexion strength tests were followed by 15min of cycling and either a rest period (CON), SS, or DS and repeat KJPS and strength tests. All participants performed all conditions, one condition per visit. There were warm up×stretching type interactions for KJPS at 20° (p=0.024) and 45° (p=0.018), and knee flexion (p=0.002) and extension (p<0.001) strength. The SS and DS improved KJPS but CON condition did not and SS decreased strength. No change in strength was present for DS or CON. Both SS and DS improve KJPS as part of pre-exercise warm up procedures. However, the negative impact of SS on muscle strength limits the utility of SS before athletic performance. If stretching is to be performed as part of a warm up, DS should be favoured over SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Static compressive strength prediction of open-hole structure based on non-linear shear behavior and micro-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wangnan; Cai, Hongneng; Li, Chao

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the strength of the constituents of carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminate (CFRP), and a prediction of the static compressive strength of open-hole structure of polymer composites. The approach combined with non-linear analysis in macro-level and a linear elastic micromechanical failure analysis in microlevel (non-linear MMF) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy. A face-centered cubic micromechanics model is constructed to analyze the stresses in fiber and matrix in microlevel. Non-interactive failure criteria are proposed to characterize the strength of fiber and matrix. The non-linear shear behavior of the laminate is studied experimentally, and a novel approach of cubic spline interpolation is used to capture significant non-linear shear behavior of laminate. The user-defined material subroutine UMAT for the non-linear share behavior is developed and combined in the mechanics analysis in the macro-level using the Abaqus Python codes. The failure mechanism and static strength of open-hole compressive (OHC) structure of polymer composites is studied based on non-linear MMF. The UTS50/E51 CFRP is used to demonstrate the application of theory of non-linear MMF.

  6. Investigation of structure-property relationships of polyisobutylene-based biomaterials: Morphology, thermal, quasi-static tensile and long-term dynamic fatigue behavior.

    PubMed

    Götz, C; Lim, G T; Puskas, J E; Altstädt, V

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the morphology, thermal, quasi-static and long-term dynamic creep properties of one linear and three arborescent polyisobutylene-based block copolymers (L_SIBS31, D_IBS16, D_IBS27 and D_IBS33). Silicone rubber, a common biopolymer, was considered as a benchmark material for comparison. A unique hysteretic testing methodology of Stepwise Increasing Load Test (SILT) and Single Load Test (SLT) was used in this study to evaluate the long-term dynamic fatigue performance of these materials. Our experimental findings revealed that the molecular weight of polyisobutylene (PIB) and polystyrene (PS) arms [M(n)(PIB(arm)) and M(n)(PS(arm))], respectively had a profound influence on the nano-scaled phase separation, quasi-static tensile, thermal transition, and dynamic creep resistance behaviors of these PIB-based block copolymers. However, silicone rubber outperformed the PIB-based block copolymers in terms of dynamic creep properties due to its chemically crosslinked structure. This indicates a need for a material strategy to improve the dynamic fatigue and creep of this class of biopolymers to be considered as alternative to silicone rubber for biomedical devices.

  7. Quasi-Static Compression and Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Tri-Axial Bio-Composite Structural Panels Using a Spherical Head

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinghao; Hunt, John F; Gong, Shaoqin; Cai, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of both quasi-static compression and low-velocity impact behavior for tri-axial bio-composite structural panels using a spherical load head. Panels were made having different core and face configurations. The results showed that panels made having either carbon fiber fabric composite faces or a foam-filled core had significantly improved impact and compressive performance over panels without either. Different localized impact responses were observed based on the location of the compression or impact relative to the tri-axial structural core; the core with a smaller structural element had better impact performance. Furthermore, during the early contact phase for both quasi-static compression and low-velocity impact tests, the panels with the same configuration had similar load-displacement responses. The experimental results show basic compression data could be used for the future design and optimization of tri-axial bio-composite structural panels for potential impact applications. PMID:28772542

  8. Small repeating earthquake activity, interplate quasi-static slip, and interplate coupling in the Hyuga-nada, southwestern Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yusuke; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Goto, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Small repeating earthquake (RE) analysis is a useful method for estimating interplate quasi-static slip, which is a good indicator of interplate coupling. We detected 170 continual-type interplate RE groups and then estimated the spatial variation in quasi-static slip in the Hyuga-nada over the past 17 years. The RE activity in this region has different characteristics compared with that in the northeast Japan subduction zone, presumably reflecting differences in the subduction properties. Our results revealed that interplate coupling spatially changes along the trench-axis and dip-direction—a phenomenon that cannot be resolved by land-based Global Positioning System (GPS) analysis. By comparing seismicity, the low-slip-rate areas correspond with the location of hypocenters and asperities for large- and moderate-sized interplate earthquakes, suggesting strong interplate coupling at these sites. These results indicate that the slip rate distribution estimated from RE activity is reliable and useful for assessing the potential of future large earthquakes.

  9. Effect of fiber length on static and fatigue strengths of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics with polypropylene matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Fujii, T.; Tanaka, T.

    1996-10-01

    Changes in the damage mechanism as a function of fiber length were examined in a quasi-isotropically reinforced random chopped glass/polypropylene composite during uniaxial tensile testing (at various temperatures) and fatigue testing (at room temperature). Three types of specimens, which have the different fiber length in a pellet, were used. As a result, the effect of fiber length on mechanical properties was revealed. Moreover, the outline of the percolation theory was given, which estimates the strength and other important mechanical properties on the basis of the probabilistic microcrack initiation and bonding of microcracks.

  10. Quasi-static three-dimensional magnetic field evolution in solar active region NOAA 11166 associated with an X1.5 flare

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Wiegelmann, T. E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.de

    2014-09-01

    We study the quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields constructed from the non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation aiming to understand the relation between the magnetic field topology and ribbon emission during an X1.5 flare in active region (AR) NOAA 11166. The flare with a quasi-elliptical and two remote ribbons occurred on 2011 March 9 at 23:13 UT over a positive flux region surrounded by negative flux at the center of the bipolar AR. Our analysis of the coronal magnetic structure with potential and NLFFF solutions unveiled the existence of a single magnetic null point associated with a fan-spine topology and is co-spatial with the hard X-ray source. The footpoints of the fan separatrix surface agree with the inner edge of the quasi-elliptical ribbon and the outer spine is linked to one of the remote ribbons. During the evolution, the slow footpoint motions stressed the field lines along the polarity inversion line and caused electric current layers in the corona around the fan separatrix surface. These current layers trigger magnetic reconnection as a consequence of dissipating currents, which are visible as cusp-shaped structures at lower heights. The reconnection process reorganized the magnetic field topology whose signatures are observed at the separatrices/quasi-separatrix layer structure in both the photosphere and the corona during the pre-to-post flare evolution. In agreement with previous numerical studies, our results suggest that the line-tied footpoint motions perturb the fan-spine system and cause null point reconnection, which eventually causes the flare emission at the footpoints of the field lines.

  11. Influence of structure on static cracking resistance and fracture of welded joints of pipe steels of strength class K60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, N. A.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Makovetskii, A. N.; Shander, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    The static cracking resistance of a number of welded joints made from pipe steels of K60 strength class has been determined. It has been established that the deformation parameter CTOD varies significantly at identical parameters of weldability of steels. The character of fracture has been investigated and the zone of local brittleness of welded joints has been studied. It has been shown that the ability of a metal to resist cracking is determined by the austenite grain size and by the bainite morphology in the region of overheating in the heat-affected zone of a welded joint.

  12. Tibio-femoral joint contact in healthy and osteoarthritic knees during quasi-static squat: A bi-planar X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeighami, A; Dumas, R; Kanhonou, M; Hagemeister, N; Lavoie, F; de Guise, J A; Aissaoui, R

    2017-02-28

    The aim of this study was to quantify the tibio-femoral contact point (CP) locations in healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) subjects during a weight-bearing squat using stand-alone biplanar X-ray images. Ten healthy and 9 severe OA subjects performed quasi-static squats. Bi-planar X-ray images were recorded at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 70° of knee flexion. A reconstruction/registration process was used to create 3D models of tibia, fibula, and femur from bi-planar X-rays and to measure their positions at each posture. A weighted centroid of proximity algorithm was used to calculate the tibio-femoral CP locations. The accuracy of the reconstruction/registration process in measuring the quasi-static kinematics and the contact parameters was evaluated in a validation study. The quasi-static kinematics data revealed that in OA knees, adduction angles were greater (p<0.01), and the femur was located more medially relative to the tibia (p<0.01). Similarly, the average CP locations on the medial and lateral tibial plateaus of the OA patients were shifted (6.5±0.7mm; p<0.01) and (9.6±3.1mm; p<0.01) medially compared to the healthy group. From 0° to 70° flexion, CPs moved 8.1±5.3mm and 8.9±5.3mm posteriorly on the medial and lateral plateaus of healthy knees; while in OA joints CPs moved 10.1±8.4mm and 3.6±2.8mm posteriorly. The average minimum tibio-femoral bone-to-bone distances of the OA joints were lower in both compartments (p<0.01). The CPs in the OA joints were located more medially and displayed a higher ratio of medial to lateral posterior translations compared to healthy joints.

  13. On the modeling, design and validation of two dimensional quasi-static eddy current forces in a mechanical oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, John Anthony; Epp, David S.; Wittwer, Jonathan W.

    2005-10-01

    Damping vibrations is important in the design of some types of inertial sensing devices. One method for adding damping to a device is to use magnetic forces generated by a static magnetic field interacting with eddy currents. In this report, we develop a 2-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of quasistatic eddy currents in a thin sheet of conducting material. The model was used for design and sensitivity analyses of a novel mechanical oscillator that consists of a shuttle mass (thin sheet of conducting material) and a set of folded spring elements. The oscillator is damped through the interaction of a static magnetic field and eddy currents in the shuttle mass. Using a prototype device and Laser Dopler Velocimetry (LDV), measurements were compared to the model in a validation study using simulation based uncertainty analyses. Measurements were found to follow the trends predicted by the model.

  14. Temperature dependent quasi-static capacitance-voltage characterization of SiO2/β-Ga2O3 interface on different crystal orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ke; Singisetti, Uttam

    2017-09-01

    The interface trap density (Dit) of the SiO2/β-Ga2O3 interface in ( 2 ¯ 01), (010), and (001) orientations is obtained by the Hi-Lo method with the low frequency capacitance measured using the Quasi-Static Capacitance-Voltage (QSCV) technique. QSCV measurements are carried out at higher temperatures to increase the measured energy range of Dit in the bandgap. At room temperature, higher Dit is observed near the band edge for all three orientations. The measurement at higher temperatures led to an annealing effect that reduced the Dit value for all samples. Comparison with the conductance method and frequency dispersion of the capacitance suggests that the traps at the band edge are slow traps which respond to low frequency signals.

  15. On the study of local-stress rearrangements during quasi-static plastic shear of a model glass: do local-stress components contain enough information?

    PubMed

    Tsamados, M; Tanguy, A; Léonforte, F; Barrat, J-L

    2008-07-01

    We present a numerical study of the mechanical response of a 2D Lennard-Jones amorphous solid under steady quasi-static and athermal shear. We focus here on the evolution of local stress components. While the local stress is usually taken as an order parameter in the description of the rheological behaviour of complex fluids, and for plasticity in glasses, we show here that the knowledge of local stresses is not sufficient for a complete description of the plastic behaviour of our system. The distribution of local stresses can be approximately described as resulting from the sum of localized quadrupolar events with an exponential distribution of amplitudes. However, we show that the position of the center of the quadrupoles is not related to any special evolution of the local stress, but must be described by another variable.

  16. The young's modulus of 1018 steel and 67061-T6 aluminum measured from quasi-static to elastic precursor strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Philip J; Trujillo, Carl; Lovato, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The assumption that Young's modulus is strain-rate invariant is tested for 6061-T6 aluminium alloy and 1018 steel over 10 decades of strain-rate. For the same billets of material, 3 quasi-static strain-rates are investigated with foil strain gauges at room temperature. The ultrasonic sound speeds are measured and used to calculate the moduli at approximately 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. Finally, ID plate impact is used to generate an elastic pre-cursor in the alloys at a strain-rate of approximately 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} from which the longitudinal sound speed may be obtained. It is found that indeed the Young's modulus is strain-rate independent within the experimental accuracy.

  17. The Young's Modulus of 1018 Steel and 6061-T6 Aluminium Measured from Quasi-Static to Elastic Precursor Strain-Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Lovato, Manuel L.

    2009-12-01

    The assumption that Young's modulus is strain-rate invariant is tested for 6061-T6 aluminium alloy and 1018 steel over 10 decades of strain-rate. For the same billets of material, 3 quasi-static strain-rates are investigated with foil strain gauges at room temperature. The ultrasonic sound speeds are measured and used to calculate the moduli at approximately 104 s-1. Finally, 1D plate impact is used to generate an elastic pre-cursor in the alloys at a strain-rate of approximately 106 s1 from which the longitudinal sound speed may be obtained. It is found that indeed the Young's modulus is strain-rate independent within the experimental accuracy.

  18. Results of PBX 9501 and PBX 9502 Round-Robin Quasi-Static Tension Tests from JOWOG-9/39 Focused Exchange.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted with the participation of three laboratory facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), BWXT Pantex Plant (PX), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study involved the machining and quasi-static tension testing of two plastic-bonded high explosive (PBX) composites, PBX 9501 and PBX 9502. Nine tensile specimens for each type of PBX were to be machined at each of the three facilities; 3 of these specimens were to be sent to each of the participating materials testing facilities for tensile testing. The resultant data was analyzed to look for trends associated with specimen machining location and/or trends associated with materials testing location. The analysis provides interesting insights into the variability and statistical nature of mechanical properties testing on PBX composites. Caution is warranted when results are compared/exchanged between testing facilities.

  19. Unified nano-mechanics based probabilistic theory of quasibrittle and brittle structures: I. Strength, static crack growth, lifetime and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Jia-Liang; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2011-07-01

    Engineering structures must be designed for an extremely low failure probability such as 10 -6, which is beyond the means of direct verification by histogram testing. This is not a problem for brittle or ductile materials because the type of probability distribution of structural strength is fixed and known, making it possible to predict the tail probabilities from the mean and variance. It is a problem, though, for quasibrittle materials for which the type of strength distribution transitions from Gaussian to Weibullian as the structure size increases. These are heterogeneous materials with brittle constituents, characterized by material inhomogeneities that are not negligible compared to the structure size. Examples include concrete, fiber composites, coarse-grained or toughened ceramics, rocks, sea ice, rigid foams and bone, as well as many materials used in nano- and microscale devices. This study presents a unified theory of strength and lifetime for such materials, based on activation energy controlled random jumps of the nano-crack front, and on the nano-macro multiscale transition of tail probabilities. Part I of this study deals with the case of monotonic and sustained (or creep) loading, and Part II with fatigue (or cyclic) loading. On the scale of the representative volume element of material, the probability distribution of strength has a Gaussian core onto which a remote Weibull tail is grafted at failure probability of the order of 10 -3. With increasing structure size, the Weibull tail penetrates into the Gaussian core. The probability distribution of static (creep) lifetime is related to the strength distribution by the power law for the static crack growth rate, for which a physical justification is given. The present theory yields a simple relation between the exponent of this law and the Weibull moduli for strength and lifetime. The benefit is that the lifetime distribution can be predicted from short-time tests of the mean size effect on

  20. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength was measured in 20 healthy people at four knee joint angles (90°, 70°, 50°, 30°) before and after stretching. One leg received SS, the contralateral received CRS. Both stretching techniques resulted in significant strength loss, which was most apparent at short muscle lengths [SS: P = 0.025; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 11.7% at 90° P < 0.01; 5.6% at 70° nonsignificant (ns); 1.3% at 50° ns; -3.7% at 30° ns. CRS: P < 0.001; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 17.7% at 90°, 13.4% at 70°, 11.4% at 50°, all P < 0.01, 4.3% at 30° ns]. The overall stretch-induced strength loss was greater (P = 0.015) after CRS (11.7%) vs SS (3.7%). The muscle length effect on strength loss was not different between CRS and SS (stretching × angle × stretching technique P = 0.43). Contrary to the hypothesis, CRS did not result in a greater shift in the length-tension relationship, and in fact, resulted in greater overall strength loss compared with SS. These results support the use of SS for stretching the hamstrings.

  1. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct-imaging instruments with a Zernike phase-mask sensor. II. Concept validation with ZELDA on VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, M.; Vigan, A.; Dohlen, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Fusco, T.; Blanchard, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Madec, F.; Moreaux, G.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Zins, G.

    2016-08-01

    Warm or massive gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars are now routinely observed by dedicated high-contrast imaging instruments that are mounted on large, ground-based observatories. These facilities include extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) and state-of-the-art coronagraphy to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for exoplanet detection and their spectral characterization. However, low spatial frequency differential aberrations between the ExAO sensing path and the science path represent critical limitations for the detection of giant planets with a contrast lower than a few 10-6 at very small separations (<0.3'') from their host star. In our previous work, we proposed a wavefront sensor based on Zernike phase-contrast methods to circumvent this problem and measure these quasi-static aberrations at a nanometric level. We present the design, manufacturing, and testing of ZELDA, a prototype that was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its reintegration in Chile. Using the internal light source of the instrument, we first performed measurements in the presence of Zernike or Fourier modes introduced with the deformable mirror. Our experimental results are consistent with the results in simulations, confirming the ability of our sensor to measure small aberrations (<50 nm rms) with nanometric accuracy. Following these results, we corrected the long-lived non-common path aberrations in SPHERE based on ZELDA measurements and estimated a contrast gain of 10 in the coronagraphic image at 0.2'', reaching the raw contrast limit set by the coronagraph in the instrument. In addition to this encouraging result, the simplicity of the design and its phase reconstruction algorithm makes ZELDA an excellent candidate for the online measurements of quasi-static aberrations during the observations. The implementation of a ZELDA-based sensing path on the current and future facilities (ELTs, future space missions) could facilitate the observation of cold gaseous

  2. Elastic properties and fracture strength of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The layups of the studied laminates are (0, + or - 60) sub s, (0, + or - 45, 90) sub s, (0, + or - 30, + or - 60, 90) sub s (0, + or - 22 1/2, + or - 45, + or - 67 1/2, 90) sub s. The properties determined were tensile modulus, Poisson's ratio, bending stiffness, fracture strength and fracture strain. Measured properties and properties predicted using laminate theory were found to be in reasonable agreement. Reasons for data scatter were determined.

  3. Small static electric field strength promotes aggregation-prone structures in amyloid-β(29-42)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Shi, Xiao-Feng; Salsbury, Freddie R.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The formation of senile plaques in central neural system resulting from the aggregation of the amyloid β (Aβ) of 40 and 42 residues is one of the two hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Numerous experiments and computational studies have shown that the aggregation of Aβ peptides in vitro is very complex and depends on many factors such as pH, agitation, temperature, and peptide concentration. The impact of a static electric field (EF) on amyloid peptide aggregation has been much less studied, although EFs may have some applications to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms. Here, we study the influence of an EF strength of 20 mV/nm, present in the human brains, on the conformation of the Aβ29-42 dimer. Our 7 μs non-equilibrium atomistic simulations in aqueous solution show that this field-strength promotes substantially the formation of β-hairpins, believed to be a very important intermediate state during aggregation. This work also suggests that structural biology experiments conducted under appropriate EF strengths may help reduce the conformational heterogeneity of Aβ1-40/Aβ1-42 dimers and provide significant insights into their structures that may be disease-causing.

  4. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation and Drop-Weight Impact Testing on Carbon-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.

    2001-01-01

    The project had two objectives: 1) The primary objective was to characterize damage tolerance of composite materials. To accomplish this, polymer matrix composites were to be subjected to static indentation as well as low-velocity impacts and the results analyzed. 2) A second objective was to investigate the effects of laser shock peening on the damage tolerance of aerospace materials, such as aluminum alloys, in terms of crack nucleation and crack propagation. The impact testing was proposed to be performed using a Dynatup drop tower. The specimens were to be placed over a square opening in a steel platen and impacted with a hemispherical tup. The damage was to be characterized in the laminate specimens. The damage tolerance of aerospace alloys was to be studied by conducting fatigue tests on aluminum alloy specimens with prior shock peening treatment. The crack length was to be monitored by a microscope and the crack propagation rate, da/dN, determined.

  5. Dynamic Strength Analysis of Tantalum using a Multimode Rippled Target under Laser Driven Quasi-Isentropic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ping; Cavallo, Robert; Park, Hye-Sook; Plechaty, Chris; Prisbrey, Shon; Wilson, Mike; Maddox, Brian; Blobaum, Kerri; May, Robert

    2012-10-01

    We present results from a material strength analysis of tantalum using a multimode rippled target under quasi-isentropic plasma loading at pressure greater than 100GPa and strain rate above 106 s-1. The results are compared with test data measured at Omega Laser. A conventional approach [1,2] utilizes the RTI (Rayleigh-Taylor Instability) mechanism to infer material strength from the growth of a single sinusoidal mode pre-imposed on a target. This method was proven reliable [2,3], but there is room for improvement in efficiency. By deploying an initial perturbation with two or more sinusoidal modes superimposed onto a single target, we are able to collect more test data in a single experiment. Presented in this paper are the verification of a multimode approach against single mode; mode coupling development during the loading sequence; the behavior of induced modes; and the detection of those modes in both simulation and test measurements.[4pt] [1] B.A. Remington et at., Material Science and Technology, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2006[0pt] [2] H.S. Park et al., PRL. 104, 135504 (2010)[0pt] [3] N. R. Barton et al., J. of Applied Physics, 109, 073501, 2011

  6. UTILIZATION OF THE WAVEFRONT SENSOR AND SHORT-EXPOSURE IMAGES FOR SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF QUASI-STATIC ABERRATION AND EXOPLANET INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2013-04-10

    Heretofore, the literature on exoplanet detection with coronagraphic telescope systems has paid little attention to the information content of short exposures and methods of utilizing the measurements of adaptive optics wavefront sensors. This paper provides a framework for the incorporation of the wavefront sensor measurements in the context of observing modes in which the science camera takes millisecond exposures. In this formulation, the wavefront sensor measurements provide a means to jointly estimate the static speckle and the planetary signal. The ability to estimate planetary intensities in as little as a few seconds has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of exoplanet search surveys. For simplicity, the mathematical development assumes a simple optical system with an idealized Lyot coronagraph. Unlike currently used methods, in which increasing the observation time beyond a certain threshold is useless, this method produces estimates whose error covariances decrease more quickly than inversely proportional to the observation time. This is due to the fact that the estimates of the quasi-static aberrations are informed by a new random (but approximately known) wavefront every millisecond. The method can be extended to include angular (due to diurnal field rotation) and spectral diversity. Numerical experiments are performed with wavefront data from the AEOS Adaptive Optics System sensing at 850 nm. These experiments assume a science camera wavelength {lambda} of 1.1 {mu}, that the measured wavefronts are exact, and a Gaussian approximation of shot-noise. The effects of detector read-out noise and other issues are left to future investigations. A number of static aberrations are introduced, including one with a spatial frequency exactly corresponding the planet location, which was at a distance of Almost-Equal-To 3{lambda}/D from the star. Using only 4 s of simulated observation time, a planetary intensity, of Almost-Equal-To 1 photon ms{sup -1

  7. A stack-based flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell for large quasi-static loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Shi, Zhifei; Wang, Jianjun; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell (F-C PEHC) is proposed. This cell has a large load capacity and adjustable force transmission coefficient assembled from replaceable individual components. A statically indeterminate mechanical model for the cell is established and the theoretical force transmission coefficient is derived based on structural mechanics. An inverse correlation between the force transmission coefficient and the relative stiffness of Element 1’s limbs is found. An experimental study is also conducted to verify the theoretical results. Both weakened and enhanced modes are achieved for this experiment. The maximum power output approaches 4.5 mW at 120 kΩ resistive load under a 4 Hz harmonic excitation with 600 N amplitude for the weakened mode, whereas the maximum power output approaches 17.8 mW at 120 kΩ under corresponding load for the enhanced mode. The experimental measurements of output voltages are compared with the theoretical ones in both weakened and enhanced modes. The experimental measurements of open-circuit voltages are slightly smaller for harmonic excitations with amplitudes that vary from 400 N to 800 N and the errors are within 14%. During the experiment, the maximum load approaches 2.8 kN which is quite large but not the ultimate bearing capacity of the present device. The mechanical model and theoretical transmission coefficient can be used in other flex-compressive mode energy transducers.

  8. The quasi-static failure properties of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall estimated by a mixed experimental-numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Caroline; Swedenborg, Jesper; Roy, Joy; Gasser, T Christian

    2013-07-01

    Assessing the risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is critical in the management of aneurysm patients and an individual assessment is possible with the biomechanical rupture risk assessment. Such an assessment could potentially be improved by a constitutive AAA wall model that accounts for irreversible damage-related deformations. Because of that the present study estimated the elastic and inelastic properties of the AAA wall through a mixed experimental-numerical approach. Specifically, finite element (FE) models of bone-shaped tensile specimens were used to merge data from failure testing of the AAA wall with their measured collagen orientation distribution. A histo-mechanical constitutive model for collagen fibers was employed, where plastic fibril sliding determined not only remaining deformations but also weakening of the fiber. The developed FE models were able to replicate the experimentally recorded load-displacement property of all 16 AAA wall specimens that were investigated in the study. Tensile testing in longitudinal direction of the AAA defined a Cauchy strength of 569(SD 411) kPa that was reached at a stretch of 1.436(SD 0.118). The stiffness and strength of specimens decreased with the wall thickness and were elevated (p = 0.018; p = 0.030) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking affected the tissue parameters that were related to the irreversible deformation response, and no correlation with gender and age was found. The observed effects on the biomechanical properties of the AAA wall could have long-term consequences for the management of aneurysm patients, i.e., specifically they might influence future AAA rupture risk assessments. However, in order to design appropriate clinical validation studies our findings should firstly be verified in a larger patient cohort.

  9. Static and cyclic strength of austenitic corrosion-resistant cast Cr-Ni-Mn-Mo-N steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostina, M. V.; Muradyan, S. O.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Blinov, E. V.; Prosvirin, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    The resistance to cyclic loading of high-nitrogen corrosion-resistant cast austenitic 05Kh22AG15N8M2FL (˜0.5% N) steel is studied for the first time (high-cycle tests of plane specimens at 20°C in air upon repeated tension). The structure of the steel, its static strength, and the fracture in regions of high- and low-cycle fatigues are investigated. It is shown that the structural state of the steel (solid-solution treatment of the as-cast and deformed steel, hot plastic deformation, and aging) and the test conditions influence the fatigue life. The results are compared with the high-cycle fatigue life of austenitic steels with 0.1-1.1% N treated for solid solution, and the fatigue limit is compared to the ultimate strength, the grain size, and the total content of nitrogen and carbon in the steels. Fractographic studies are performed for the fracture surfaces of cast 05Kh22AG15N8M2FL steel after fatigue tests.

  10. Quasi-static time-series simulation using OpenDSS in IEEE distribution feeder model with high PV penetration and its impact on solar forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Touseef Ahmed Faisal

    Since 2000, renewable electricity installations in the United States (excluding hydropower) have more than tripled. Renewable electricity has grown at a compounded annual average of nearly 14% per year from 2000-2010. Wind, Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) and solar Photo Voltaic (PV) are the fastest growing renewable energy sectors. In 2010 in the U.S., solar PV grew over 71% and CSP grew by 18% from the previous year. Globally renewable electricity installations have more than quadrupled from 2000-2010. Solar PV generation grew by a factor of more than 28 between 2000 and 2010. The amount of CSP and solar PV installations are increasing on the distribution grid. These PV installations transmit electrical current from the load centers to the generating stations. But the transmission and distribution grid have been designed for uni-directional flow of electrical energy from generating stations to load centers. This causes imbalances in voltage and switchgear of the electrical circuitry. With the continuous rise in PV installations, analysis of voltage profile and penetration levels remain an active area of research. Standard distributed photovoltaic (PV) generators represented in simulation studies do not reflect the exact location and variability properties such as distance between interconnection points to substations, voltage regulators, solar irradiance and other environmental factors. Quasi-Static simulations assist in peak load planning hour and day ahead as it gives a time sequence analysis to help in generation allocation. Simulation models can be daily, hourly or yearly depending on duty cycle and dynamics of the system. High penetration of PV into the power grid changes the voltage profile and power flow dynamically in the distribution circuits due to the inherent variability of PV. There are a number of modeling and simulations tools available for the study of such high penetration PV scenarios. This thesis will specifically utilize OpenDSS, a open source

  11. The influence of fault geometry and frictional contact properties on slip surface behavior and off-fault damage: insights from quasi-static modeling of small strike-slip faults from the Sierra Nevada, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geological and geophysical investigations demonstrate that faults are geometrically complex structures, and that the nature and intensity of off-fault damage is spatially correlated with geometric irregularities of the slip surfaces. Geologic observations of exhumed meter-scale strike-slip faults in the Bear Creek drainage, central Sierra Nevada, CA, provide insight into the relationship between non-planar fault geometry and frictional slip at depth. We investigate natural fault geometries in an otherwise homogeneous and isotropic elastic material with a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity method (DDM). Although the DDM is a powerful tool, frictional contact problems are beyond the scope of the elementary implementation because it allows interpenetration of the crack surfaces. By incorporating a complementarity algorithm, we are able to enforce appropriate contact boundary conditions along the model faults and include variable friction and frictional strength. This tool allows us to model quasi-static slip on non-planar faults and the resulting deformation of the surrounding rock. Both field observations and numerical investigations indicate that sliding along geometrically discontinuous or irregular faults may lead to opening of the fault and the formation of new fractures, affecting permeability in the nearby rock mass and consequently impacting pore fluid pressure. Numerical simulations of natural fault geometries provide local stress fields that are correlated to the style and spatial distribution of off-fault damage. We also show how varying the friction and frictional strength along the model faults affects slip surface behavior and consequently influences the stress distributions in the adjacent material.

  12. The effect of early static loading on the in vitro shear/peel bond strength of a 'no-mix' orthodontic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ching, E; Cook, P A; Bubb, N L; Wood, D J

    2000-10-01

    This study addressed the question of whether shear and tensile loads applied 15 minutes after bonding metal brackets to enamel affected the shear/peel bond strength of the adhesive. Ninety standard 0.022-inch stainless steel edgewise premolar mesh-backed brackets were bonded using a no-mix chemical-cured adhesive to 90 teeth, which had been prepared in a standardized manner. After 15 minutes three groups of 30 teeth were subjected to the following regimes: no applied load, tensile static load of 0.77 N (78 g), and shear static load of 0.77 N. After 14 days storage in 100 per cent relative humidity at 37 degrees C, the shear/peel strength of the adhesive bond was measured using a purpose built jig mounted on a universal testing machine. Shear/peel bond strengths were analysed using Weibull statistics. The Weibull moduli of the three groups indicated that the adhesive performed consistently despite early static loading. Characteristic strengths were 9.22, 9.27, and 9.05 MPa for the control, tensile, and shear groups, respectively. The findings indicate that static loads (such as tying in of archwires) can be placed on brackets 15 minutes after cementation, without a clinically significant reduction in bond strength of the tested adhesive.

  13. On the propagation of a quasi-static disturbance in a heterogeneous, deformable, and porous medium with pressure-dependent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    2011-10-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid when the medium properties are smoothly-varying, I derive a semi-analytic expression for the propagation velocity of a quasi-static disturbance traveling within a nonlinear-elastic porous medium. The phase, a function related to the propagation time, depends upon the properties of the medium, including the pressure-sensitivities of the medium parameters, and on pressure and displacement amplitude changes. Thus, the propagation velocity of a disturbance depends upon its amplitude, as might be expected for a nonlinear process. As a check, the expression for the phase function is evaluated for a poroelastic medium, when the material properties do not depend upon the fluid pressure. In that case, the travel time estimates agree with conventional analytic estimates, and with values calculated using a numerical simulator. For a medium with pressure-dependent permeability I find general agreement between the semi-analytic estimates and estimates from a numerical simulation. In this case the pressure amplitude changes are obtained from the numerical simulator.

  14. Strain and load thresholds for cervical muscle recruitment in response to quasi-static tensile stretch of the caprine C5-C6 facet joint capsule.

    PubMed

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Lu, Ying; Cavanaugh, John M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of cervical muscles to physiologic tensile stretch of cervical facet joint capsule (FJC) at a quasi-static displacement rate of 0.5mm/s. In vivo caprine left C5-C6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile displacement paradigm. EMG activity was recorded during FJC stretch from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels and bilaterally from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups at the C5-C6 level. Onset of muscular activity was later analyzed using visual and computer-based methods. Capsule load and strain at the time of onset were recorded and compared between the muscle groups. Results indicated capsule load was a better indicator of the tensile stretch thresholds for muscular recruitment than capsule strain. MF responded at significantly smaller capsule loads than TR and LC, while TR and LC activation loads were not significantly different. SM did not respond to physiologic FJC stretch. Muscle group recruitment order reflected the muscles' fiber type compositions and functional roles in the spine. This study provides the first evidence that the cervical ligamento-muscular reflex pathways are activated via tensile FJC stretch and extend to superficial and deep musculature on the anterior and posterior aspects of the neck, ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of FJC stretch.

  15. Experimental Investigation of InSight HP3 Mole Interaction with Martian Regolith Simulant - Quasi-Static and Dynamic Penetration Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jason P.; Hudson, Troy L.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-05-01

    The InSight mission launches in 2018 to characterize several geophysical quantities on Mars, including the heat flow from the planetary interior. This quantity will be calculated by utilizing measurements of the thermal conductivity and the thermal gradient down to 5 meters below the Martian surface. One of the components of InSight is the Mole, which hammers into the Martian regolith to facilitate these thermal property measurements. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the effect of the Mole's penetrating action on regolith compaction and mechanical properties. Quasi-static and dynamic experiments were run with a 2D model of the 3D cylindrical mole. Force resistance data was captured with load cells. Deformation information was captured in images and analyzed using Digitial Image Correlation (DIC). Additionally, we used existing approximations of Martian regolith thermal conductivity to estimate the change in the surrounding granular material's thermal conductivity due to the Mole's penetration. We found that the Mole has the potential to cause a high degree of densification, especially if the initial granular material is relatively loose. The effect on the thermal conductivity from this densification was found to be relatively small in first-order calculations though more complete thermal models incorporating this densification should be a subject of further investigation. The results obtained provide an initial estimate of the Mole's impact on Martian regolith thermal properties.

  16. Effects of microstructural factors on quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors of Ti-6Al-4V alloys with widmanstätten structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Geun; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Chong Soo; Hur, Sunmoo

    2003-11-01

    The effects of microstructural factors on the quasi-static tensile and dynamic torsional deformation behaviors in Ti-6Al-4V alloys with Widmanstätten structures were investigated in this study. Dynamic torsional tests were conducted using a torsional Kolsky bar for five Widmanstätten structures, in which microstructural parameters such as colony size and α lamellar spacing were varied by heat treatments, and then the test data were analyzed in relation to microstructures, tensile properties, and fracture mode. Under dynamic torsional loading, maximum shear stress was largely dependent on colony size, whereas shear strain at the maximum shear stress point was on colony size as well as α lamellar spacing. Adiabatic shear bands were found in the deformed area of the fractured torsional specimens, and their width was smallest in the structure whose colony size and α lamellar spacing were both large. The possibility of the adiabatic shear band formation was quantitatively analyzed in relation to microstructural factors. It was the highest in the coarse Widmanstätten structure, which was confirmed by the theoretical critical shear strain (υ c ) condition for the adiabatic shear band formation.

  17. Pulse and quasi-static remagnetization peculiarities and relaxation properties of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovgii, V. T.; Linnik, A. I.; Kamenev, V. I.; Tarenkov, V. Yu.; Sidorov, S. L.; Todris, B. M.; Mikhailov, V. I.; Davideiko, N. V.; Linnik, T. A.; Popov, Ju. F.; Balbashov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    Hysteresis features of magnetization and resistance of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 single crystal in quasi-static (up to 9 T) and pulse (up to 14 T) magnetic fields are studied. The relaxation processes of magnetization and resistance after the action of a magnetic field of 9 T are also studied. It is shown that relaxation curves are approximated by two exponents with different time constants. These two constants relate to relaxation of the metastable ferromagnetic phase towards two different crystal structures (Imma and p21/m). Mechanism of phase transitions: antiferromagnetic insulator↔ferromagnetic metal (AFM/I↔FM/M) and existence of a high-conductive state of a sample after removal of magnetizing field in the temperature range below 150 K is proposed. The mechanism is connected with structural transition induced by magnetic field (due to magnetostriction) and slow relaxation of the FM-phase (larger volume) to the equilibrium AFM-phase (smaller volume) after field removal. It is shown that during pulse magnetization at the temperature 18 K time required for the AFM/I→FM/M phase transition is by six-seven orders of magnitude less than for realization of the FM/M→AFM/I phase transition.

  18. Specific features of pulse and quasi-static remagnetization and relaxation properties of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovgii, V. T.; Linnik, A. I.; Kamenev, V. I.; Tarenkov, V. Yu.; Sidorov, S. L.; Todris, B. M.; Mikhailov, V. I.; Davydeiko, N. V.; Linnik, T. A.; Popov, Yu. F.; Balbashov, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The hysteresis features in the behavior of the magnetization and resistance of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 single crystals in quasi-static (up to 9 T) and pulsed (up to 14 T) magnetic fields have been studied. Relaxation processes of magnetization and resistance after the action of a magnetic field of 9 T have also been investigated. It has been shown that relaxation curves are approximated by two exponents with different time constants, which are related to relaxation of the metastable ferromagnetic phase towards two different antiferromagnetic crystal structures ( I mma and p21/ m). Mechanism of the phase transitions antiferromagnetic insulator ↔ ferromagnetic metal (AFM/I ↔ FM/M) and existence of a high-conductive state of a sample after removal of magnetizing field in the temperature range below 150 K is proposed. The mechanism is determined by the structural transition, which is induced by a magnetic field (due to magnetostriction), and by a slow relaxation of the FM-phase (larger volume) to the stable AFM-phase (smaller volume) after field removal. It has been shown that, during pulse magnetization at the temperature 18 K, the time required for the AFM/I → FM/M phase transition is six-seven orders of magnitude shorter than that for the FM/M → AFM/I phase transition.

  19. A concept for energy harvesting from quasi-static structural deformations through axially loaded bilaterally constrained columns with multiple bifurcation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajnef, N.; Burgueño, R.; Borchani, W.; Sun, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A major obstacle limiting the development of deployable sensing and actuation solutions is the scarcity of power. Converted energy from ambient loading using piezoelectric scavengers is a possible solution. Most of the previously developed research focused on vibration-based piezoelectric harvesters which are typically characterized by a response with a narrow natural frequency range. Several techniques were used to improve their effectiveness. These methods focus only on the transducer’s properties and configurations, but do little to improve the stimuli from the source. In contrast, this work proposes to focus on the input deformations generated within the structure, and the induction of an amplified amplitude and up-converted frequency toward the harvesters’ natural spectrum. This paper introduces the concept of using mechanically-equivalent energy converters and frequency modulators that can transform low-amplitude and low-rate service deformations into an amplified vibration input to the piezoelectric transducer. The introduced concept allows energy conversion within the unexplored quasi-static frequency range (≪1 Hz). The post-buckling behavior of bilaterally constrained columns is used as the mechanism for frequency up-conversion. A bimorph cantilever polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric beam is used for energy conversion. Experimental prototypes were built and tested to validate the introduced concept and the levels of extractable power were evaluated for different cases under varying input frequencies. Finally, finite element simulations are reported to provide insight into the scalability and performance of the developed concept.

  20. Study of Channel Characteristics for Galvanic-Type Intra-Body Communication Based on a Transfer Function from a Quasi-Static Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi Mei; Mak, Peng Un; Pun, Sio Hang; Gao, Yue Ming; Lam, Chan-Tong; Vai, Mang I.; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intra-Body Communication (IBC), which modulates ionic currents over the human body as the communication medium, offers a low power and reliable signal transmission method for information exchange across the body. This paper first briefly reviews the quasi-static electromagnetic (EM) field modeling for a galvanic-type IBC human limb operating below 1 MHz and obtains the corresponding transfer function with correction factor using minimum mean square error (MMSE) technique. Then, the IBC channel characteristics are studied through the comparison between theoretical calculations via this transfer function and experimental measurements in both frequency domain and time domain. High pass characteristics are obtained in the channel gain analysis versus different transmission distances. In addition, harmonic distortions are analyzed in both baseband and passband transmissions for square input waves. The experimental results are consistent with the calculation results from the transfer function with correction factor. Furthermore, we also explore both theoretical and simulation results for the bit-error-rate (BER) performance of several common modulation schemes in the IBC system with a carrier frequency of 500 kHz. It is found that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:23443387

  1. Study of channel characteristics for galvanic-type intra-body communication based on a transfer function from a quasi-static field model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi Mei; Mak, Peng Un; Pun, Sio Hang; Gao, Yue Ming; Lam, Chan-Tong; Vai, Mang I; Du, Min

    2012-11-27

    Intra-Body Communication (IBC), which modulates ionic currents over the human body as the communication medium, offers a low power and reliable signal transmission method for information exchange across the body. This paper first briefly reviews the quasi-static electromagnetic (EM) field modeling for a galvanic-type IBC human limb operating below 1 MHz and obtains the corresponding transfer function with correction factor using minimum mean square error (MMSE) technique. Then, the IBC channel characteristics are studied through the comparison between theoretical calculations via this transfer function and experimental measurements in both frequency domain and time domain. High pass characteristics are obtained in the channel gain analysis versus different transmission distances. In addition, harmonic distortions are analyzed in both baseband and passband transmissions for square input waves. The experimental results are consistent with the calculation results from the transfer function with correction factor. Furthermore, we also explore both theoretical and simulation results for the bit-error-rate (BER) performance of several common modulation schemes in the IBC system with a carrier frequency of 500 kHz. It is found that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  2. Effects of cryopreservation, decellularization and novel extracellular matrix conditioning on the quasi-static and time-dependent properties of the pulmonary valve leaflet.

    PubMed

    Converse, Gabriel L; Armstrong, Matt; Quinn, Rachael W; Buse, Eric E; Cromwell, Michael L; Moriarty, Sara J; Lofland, Gary K; Hilbert, Stephen L; Hopkins, Richard A

    2012-07-01

    Decellularized allografts offer potential as heart valve substitutes and scaffolds for cell seeding. The effects of decellularization on the quasi-static and time-dependent mechanical behavior of the pulmonary valve leaflet under biaxial loading conditions have not previously been reported in the literature. In the current study, the stress-strain, relaxation and creep behaviors of the ovine pulmonary valve leaflet were investigated under planar-biaxial loading conditions to determine the effects of decellularization and a novel post-decellularization extracellular matrix (ECM) conditioning process. As expected, decellularization resulted in increased stretch along the loading axes. A reduction in relaxation was observed following decellularization. This was accompanied by a reduction in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Based on previous implant studies, these changes may be of little functional consequence in the short term; however, the long term effects of decreased relaxation and GAG content remain unknown. Some restoration of relaxation was observed following ECM conditioning, especially in the circumferential specimen direction, which may help mitigate any detrimental effects due to decellularization. Regardless of processing, creep under biaxial loading was negligible.

  3. Quasi-static characterization and modeling of the bending behavior of single crystal galfenol for magnetostrictive sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supratik

    2009-12-01

    Iron-gallium alloys (Galfenol) are structural magnetostrictive materials that exhibit high free-strain at low magnetic fields, high stress-sensitivity and useful thermo-mechanical properties. Galfenol, like smart materials in general, is attractive for use as a dynamic actuator and/or sensor material and can hence find use in active shape and vibration control, real-time structural health monitoring and energy harvesting applications. Galfenol possesses significantly higher yield strength and greater ductility than most smart materials, which are generally limited to use under compressive loads. The unique structural attributes of Galfenol introduce opportunities for use of a smart material in applications that involve tension, bending, shear or torsion. A principal motivation for the research presented in this dissertation is that bending and shear loads lead to development of non-uniform stress and magnetic fields in Galfenol which introduce significantly more complexity to the considerations to be modeled, compared to modeling of purely axial loads. This dissertation investigates the magnetostrictive response of Galfenol under different stress and magnetic field conditions which is essential for understanding and modeling Galfenol's behavior under bending, shear or torsion. Experimental data are used to calculate actuator and sensor figures of merit which can aid in design of adaptive structures. The research focuses on the bending behavior of Galfenol alloys as well as of laminated composites having Galfenol attached to other structural materials. A four-point bending test under magnetic field is designed, built and conducted on a Galfenol beam to understand its performance as a bending sensor. An extensive experimental study is conducted on Galfenol-Aluminum laminated composites to evaluate the effect of magnetic field, bending moment and Galfenol-Aluminum thickness ratio on actuation and sensing performance. A generalized recursive algorithm is presented for

  4. Differential Effect of Taekwondo Training on Knee Muscle Strength and Reactive and Static Balance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Chow, Lina P. Y.; Ma, Ada W. W.; Tsang, William W. N.

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effect of short-term intensive TKD training on the isokinetic knee muscle strength and reactive and static balance control of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Among the 44 children with DCD (mean age: 7.6 plus or minus 1.3 years) recruited, 21 were randomly assigned…

  5. Differential Effect of Taekwondo Training on Knee Muscle Strength and Reactive and Static Balance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Chow, Lina P. Y.; Ma, Ada W. W.; Tsang, William W. N.

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effect of short-term intensive TKD training on the isokinetic knee muscle strength and reactive and static balance control of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Among the 44 children with DCD (mean age: 7.6 plus or minus 1.3 years) recruited, 21 were randomly assigned…

  6. Interferometric visualization and demodulation method for measuring quasi-static strain in fiber Bragg grating sensors by a simple rotating etalon filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Alessandra S.; Coppola, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Pietro; Foti, Giuseppe; Iodice, Mario

    2004-09-01

    Optical fiber sensors are the ideal system to monitor "smart structures" and on-site/real time stress measurements: they can be in fact easily embedded or attached to the structures under test and are not affected by electro- magnetic noise. In particular a signal from a Fiber Bragg grating sensor (FBG) may be processed such that its information remains immune to optical power fluctuations. Different interrogation methods can be used for reading out Bragg wavelength shifts. In this paper we propose a very simple interferometric method for interrogating FBG sensors, based on bi-polished silicon sample acting like an etalon tuneable filter (ETF). The Bragg wavelength shift can be evaluated by analyzing the spectral response of signal reflected by the FBG sensor and filtered by the ETF that is continuously and rapidly tuned. Tuning was obtained by rotating the ETF. Variation in the strain at the FBG causes a phase shift in the analyzed signal. The overall spectral signal, collected with time, consists in an interferometric figure which finesse and fringe contrast depending on the geometrical sizes and facets reflectivity of the silicon sample. The fringe pattern, expressed by the Airy's formula, depends on the wavelength l of the incident radiation and on the angle of incidence. The phase of fringe pattern can be retrieved by a standard FFT method giving quantitative measurements of the quasi-static strain variation sensed by the FBG. In this way, the method allows a valuable visualization of the time-evolution of the incremental strain applied to the FBG. Principle of functioning of this method is described and first results obtained employing such configuration, are reported.

  7. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  8. Fracture in Westerly granite under AE feedback and constant strain rate loading: Nucleation, quasi-static propagation, and the transition to unstable fracture propagation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    New observations of fracture nucleation are presented from three triaxial compression experiments on intact samples of Westerly granite, using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. By conducting the tests under different loading conditions, the fracture process is demonstrated for quasi-static fracture (under AE Feedback load), a slowly developing unstable fracture (loaded at a 'slow' constant strain rate of 2.5 ?? 10-6/s) and an unstable fracture that develops near instantaneously (loaded at a 'fast' constant strain rate of 5 ?? 10-5/s). By recording a continuous ultrasonic waveform during the critical period of fracture, the entire AE catalogue can be captured and the exact time of fracture defined. Under constant strain loading, three stages are observed: (1) An initial nucleation or stable growth phase at a rate of ??? 1.3 mm/s, (2) a sudden increase to a constant or slowly accelerating propagation speed of ??? 18 mm/s, and (3) unstable, accelerating propagation. In the ??? 100 ms before rupture, the high level of AE activity (as seen on the continuous record) prevented the location of discrete AE events. A lower bound estimate of the average propagation velocity (using the time-to-rupture and the existing fracture length) suggests values of a few m/s. However from a low gain acoustic record, we infer that in the final few ms, the fracture propagation speed increased to 175 m/s. These results demonstrate similarities between fracture nucleation in intact rock and the nucleation of dynamic instabilities in stick slip experiments. It is suggested that the ability to constrain the size of an evolving fracture provides a crucial tool in further understanding the controls on fracture nucleation. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2006.

  9. The association of trunk muscle cross-sectional area and magnetic resonance image parameters with isokinetic and psychophysical lifting strength and static back muscle endurance in men.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, L E; Latikka, P; Videman, T; Manninen, H; Battié, M C

    1997-10-01

    The relationship between trunk muscle morphology as measured on transverse magnetic resonance images and isokinetic lifting, psychophysical lifting, and static back muscle endurance testing was examined in 110 men, ages 35-67 years (mean, 48 years), who had been chosen based on their exposure to a wide variety of occupational and leisure-time physical activities. The computed T2-relaxation times and the T2-weighted and proton density-weighted signal intensities of the erector spinae, quadratus lumborum, and psoas major muscles had almost no association with any of the strength tests. The cross-sectional areas of the muscles had good correlations with isokinetic lifting strength (r = 0.46-0.53). They did not correlate well with psychophysical lifting and static back muscle endurance. Other characteristics or neurological or psychological factors may have more influence on those tests.

  10. Acute Effects of Foam Rolling, Static Stretching, and Dynamic Stretching During Warm-Ups on Muscular Flexibility and Strength in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Su, Hsuan; Chang, Nai-Jen; Wu, Wen-Lan; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Chu, I-Hua

    2016-10-13

    Foam rolling has been proposed to improve muscle function, performance, and joint range of motion (ROM). However, whether a foam rolling protocol can be adopted as a warm-up to improve flexibility and muscle strength is unclear. To examine and compare the acute effects of foam rolling, static stretching, and dynamic stretching used as part of warm-up on flexibility and muscle strength of knee flexion and extension. Crossover study. University research laboratory. 15 male and 15 female college students (age 21.43 ± 1.48 y, weight 65.13 ± 12.29 kg, height 166.90 ± 6.99 cm). Isokinetic peak torque was measured during knee extension and flexion at an angular velocity of 60°/second. Flexibility of the quadriceps was assessed by the modified Thomas test, while flexibility of hamstrings was assessed using the sit-and-reach test. The 3 interventions were performed by all participants in random order on 3 days separated by 48-72 hours. The flexibility test scores improved significantly more after foam rolling as compared to static and dynamic stretching. With regard to muscle strength, only knee extension peak torque (pre vs. post intervention) improved significantly after the dynamic stretching and foam rolling, but not after static stretching. Knee flexion peak torque remained unchanged. Foam rolling is more effective than static and dynamic stretching in acutely increasing flexibility of the quadriceps and hamstrings without hampering muscle strength, and may be recommended as part of a warm-up in healthy young adults.

  11. Observation and Modeling of the Solar Transition Region. 1; A Quasi-Static Loops Model with Implications for Heating the Lower Transition Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Walker, A. B. C., II; Porter, Jason; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    We report on observations of the solar atmosphere in several extreme ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet bandpasses obtained by the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, a rocket borne spectroheliograph, on flights in 1987, 1991, and 1994, spanning the last solar maximum. Quiet sun emission observed in the 171 A - 175 A bandpass, which includes lines of 0Ov, O vi, Fe ix, and Fe x, has been analyzed to test models of the temperatures and geometries of the structures responsible for this emission. Analyses of intensity variations above the solar limb reveal scale heights consistent with a quiet sun plasma temperature of 500 000 K less than or equal to T(sub e) less than or equal to 800 000 K. Intensity modulations in the quiet sun are observed to occur on a scale comparable to the supergranular scale. The structures responsible for the quiet sun EUV emission are modeled as small quasi-static loops. We find that the emission predicted by loop models with maximum temperatures between 700 000 K and 900 000 K are consistent with our observations. We also present a preliminary comparison of the predictions of our models with observations of diagnostic spectral line ratios obtained from previous observers. We discuss the implications a distribution of loops of the type we model here would have for heating the lower transition region. Finally, in fight of the models we calculate here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge concerning the contributions thermal conduction from coronal (T(sub e) greater than or equal to 10(exp 6) K) and upper transition region (10(exp 5) K less than T(sub e) less than 10(esp 6) K) structures make to lower transition region emission. We argue that the evidence which has lead many authors to conclude that the interface of hotter and cooler plasmas makes a negligible contribution to lower transition region emission is much less compelling in light of recent observations and analyses. We further argue that it is the interface of

  12. Conformational heterogeneity and quasi-static self-quenching in DNA containing a fluorescent guanine analogue, 3MI or 6MI.

    PubMed

    Wojtuszewski Poulin, Kristi; Smirnov, Aleksandr V; Hawkins, Mary E; Balis, Frank M; Knutson, Jay R

    2009-09-22

    Two different microenvironments in the DNA sequence 5'-act aGa gat ccc tca gac cct ttt agt cag tGt gga-3' (in both single- and double-stranded forms) are explored using two similar fluorescent nucleoside analogues, 3MI and 6MI. Each probe was evaluated in two environments, one strand with the probe flanked by thymines (PTRT) and the other by adenines (PTRA) with positions indicated by G's in the sequence. Both time-resolved anisotropies and lifetimes of the probes depend upon local interactions, and these are altered by duplex formation. Integrals of lifetime curves compared with quantum yields reveal that each probe displays a "dark" component (below detection limits, with a lifetime of <70 ps). For 6MI in PTRA, this QSSQ "quasi-static self-quenching" or "dark" component represents approximately half the molecules, whether in single- or double-stranded form. In PTRT, 6MI displays an unusual increase in the quantum yield upon formation of the double strand (from 0.107 to 0.189) apparently the result of escape from QSSQ which simultaneously declines from 66 to 33%. This is also accompanied by doubling of steady-state anisotropy. Only 6MI in the PTRT duplex displays a rotational correlation time of >7 ns. In other words, the DS 6MI PTRA environment fails to constrain local motion and QSSQ remains the same as in the single strand; in contrast, the flanking T duplex environment restricts local motion and halves QSSQ. We collected both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching titrations of 3MI and 6MI in solution with the mononucleotides AMP, CMP, GMP, and TMP. The dynamic quenching rank of the free probes (quenching constant, kq: T > A > G > C) is totally different from that of incorporated probes. We hypothesize the production of weak 3MI.C or 6MI.C complexes that are somehow rendered less subject to dynamic quenching by collision with subsequent C molecules.

  13. Plastic Instabilities and Their Consequences in Steels and Other High Strength Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    rate yes Superalloys * Alloy 600 quasi-static no Rend 41 quasi-static no Steels * HY80 quasi-static no ultra-soft5 no low temperatures no AISI 4340...AD-A240 976 ([f) A Final Technical Report Contract No. N00014-88-K-0111 S PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH...PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Submitted to: Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street

  14. Correlation of ankle eversion to inversion strength ratio and static balance in dominant and non-dominant limbs of basketball players.

    PubMed

    Dabadghav, Rachana

    2016-04-01

    To compare ankle eversion to inversion strength ratio (E/I R) and static balance control between the dominant and non-dominant limbs of basketball players and to correlate ankle E/I R and static balance control in the dominant and non-dominant limbs of basketball players. Twenty-one healthy basketball players in the age-group of 18-25 years participated in this study. Isokinetic ankle eversion and inversion muscle strength was assessed at 30°/s and 120°/s in both dominant and non-dominant limbs using the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer. Similarly balance was assessed on a force platform with eyes open and eyes closed in both dominant and non-dominant limbs. Repeated measure ANOVA for strength measurement, found that there was significant main effect of speed, P=0.001 (P<0.05). However, there was no significant main effect in the sides P=0.099 (P<0.05).There was significant main effect of sides with respect to balance. Balance was affected more in non-dominant limb P=0.000 as compared to dominant limb. However, there was not much of a significant difference with eyes open and eyes closed position. The E/I ratio was >1.0 at the angular velocity of 120°/s increasing the chances of ankle injuries in basketball players. There was no correlation between ankle strength and balance in both dominant and non-dominant limbs.

  15. Evaluation of Static vs. Dynamic Visualizations for Engineering Technology Students and Implications on Spatial Visualization Ability: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Dickerson, Daniel; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of using static versus dynamic visualizations is a controversial one. Few studies have explored the effectiveness of static visualizations to those of dynamic visualizations, and the current state of the literature remains somewhat unclear. During the last decade there has been a lengthy debate about the opportunities for using…

  16. Evaluation of Static vs. Dynamic Visualizations for Engineering Technology Students and Implications on Spatial Visualization Ability: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Dickerson, Daniel; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of using static versus dynamic visualizations is a controversial one. Few studies have explored the effectiveness of static visualizations to those of dynamic visualizations, and the current state of the literature remains somewhat unclear. During the last decade there has been a lengthy debate about the opportunities for using…

  17. Differential effect of Taekwondo training on knee muscle strength and reactive and static balance control in children with developmental coordination disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Chung, Joanne W Y; Chow, Lina P Y; Ma, Ada W W; Tsang, William W N

    2013-05-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effect of short-term intensive TKD training on the isokinetic knee muscle strength and reactive and static balance control of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Among the 44 children with DCD (mean age: 7.6 ± 1.3 years) recruited, 21 were randomly assigned to undergo daily TKD training for 1h over three consecutive months, with the remaining 23 children being assigned to the DCD control group. Eighteen typically developing children (mean age: 7.2 ± 1.0 years) received no training as normal controls. Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength and reactive and static balance control were assessed using an isokinetic machine (with low, moderate and high movement velocities), a motor control test (MCT) and a unilateral stance test (UST), respectively. A repeated measures MANCOVA revealed a significant group through time interaction effect in isokinetic outcomes at 180°/s and in the UST outcome. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that DCD-TKD children's isokinetic knee muscle strength, specifically at 180°/s, was as high as that of the normal control children (p>0.0083) after TKD training. Moreover, UST body sway velocity was slower in the DCD-TKD group than in the DCD control group (p<0.001), and was comparable to that of the normal control group (p>0.05) after TKD training. However, no such improvement in balance was observed in the MCT (p>0.025). The results show that children with DCD who undergo a 3-month program of intensive TKD training experience improvements in isokinetic knee muscle strength at 180°/s and static single-leg standing balance control, but do not benefit from improved reactive balance control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quasi-static Slips Around the Source Areas of the 2003 Tokachi-oki (M8.0) and 2005 Miyagi-oki (M7.2) Earthquakes, Japan Estimated From Small Repeating Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, N.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hirahara, S.; Igarashi, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Kasahara, M.

    2005-12-01

    We have estimated spatio-temporal distribution of interplate quasi-static slips around the source areas of the 2003 Tokachi-oki (M8.0) and 2005 Miyagi-oki (M7.2) earthquakes by using small repeating earthquakes. The small repeating earthquakes are thought to be caused by repeated rupture of small asperities surrounded by stable sliding areas on the fault. Here we estimated cumulative slips for small repeating earthquakes assuming that they were equal to the quasi-static slip histories in the surrounding areas on the plate boundaries (Igarashi et al., 2003; Uchida et al., 2003). The 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake occurred on September 26, 2003 off the southeast of Hokkaido, Japan. The present analyses show that the slips in the areas around and to the east of the asperity of the earthquake were slow before the earthquake but that it was significantly accelerated after the earthquake. The slip rate acceleration to the east of the asperity probably triggered a M7.1 event which occurred on November 29, 2004 at the eastern edge of the accelerated area (about 100km east from the hypocenter of the Tokachi-oki earthquake). It seems that the quasi-static slip released the slip deficit in the locked area between the asperities of the 2003 Tokachi-oki and 1973 Nemuro-oki (M7.4) earthquakes. The 2005 Miyagi-oki earthquake occurred on August 16, 2005 in the anticipated source area for the recurrent _eMiyagi-oki earthquake_f. However, it was estimated that the earthquake did not destroyed the whole area of the asperity which caused the previous Miyagi-oki earthquake in 1978 (The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, 2005). Our result shows the quasi-static slips for the period of 20 years before the earthquake was almost constant to the west of the source area of the 2005 earthquake. The slips after the earthquake were not significant for the period of 15 days which suggests the plate boundary around the asperity for the earthquake is still locking.

  19. A Kinematic Simulation for Quasi-static Stress Change in Southwest Japan: Effect of the Interplate Earthquake Cycle on the MTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, A.; Ogawa, H.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ohno, Y.; Kato, S.; Si, H.; Fukahata, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Stress change caused by a great earthquake affects seismicity in the surrounding area, as shown by the fact that the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku Earthquake induced M6-7 earthquakes. In Southwest Japan, great interplate earthquakes along the Nankai trough (M~8) have occurred repeatedly with the interval of 100-150 years. In addition, there is a great active fault system, Median Tectonic Line (MTL), consisted of arc-parallel strike-slip fault segments, whose total fault length is about 360km. The occurrences of these earthquakes around the same time will wreak tremendous damage. This is a pressing problem, because the probabilities of earthquake occurrence within 30 years are estimated to be 70 % and 60 % for the next Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes, respectively. In the present study, we simulate the stress change in Southwest Japan in recent 440 years and evaluate the effect of interplate earthquake cycle on the MTL by change in the Coulomb Failure Function (CFF). We constructed a kinematic simulation model composed of the layered elastic-viscoelastic half-space with realistic 3-D geometry of the Eurasian-Philippine Sea plate interface (Hashimoto et al., 2004). The cause of stress change is essentially in kinematic plate interaction at plate boundaries, which is represented by the increase of discontinuity in tangential displacement across the plate interface (Matsu'ura & Sato, 1989). We can decompose the total slip motion on the plate interface into a steady slip over the whole plate interface and its perturbation, earthquake cycles. The long-term effect of steady subduction cannot be ignored, because it inevitably causes secular change in tectonic stress (Hashimoto et al., 2006). Assuming slip history at plate boundary based on the global plate motion NUVEL-1A (DeMets et al., 1994) and historical earthquake data, we calculated the stress accumulation due to steady subduction and the cyclic stress change due to earthquake cycle, respectively, by using quasi-static

  20. Strength Analysis of Sandwitch Panels with CFRP Quasi Isotropic Layup or Isotropic Material Facesheets in Dynamic Environment Using MSC Nastran and SineMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, A.; Carbonell Garcia, A.

    2012-07-01

    The frequency response solution (SOL 111) of MSC Nastran versions prior to 2012 only allows the output of element stress components and element forces and does not allow the calculation of composite failure indices or Von-Mises stress for metallic parts. The analysis of a sandwich panel comprises several strength verifications, such as the check of facesheet and core failure as well as the check of facesheet and core local stability (shear crimping, wrinkling). In static analysis (SOL 101), MSC Nastran provides failure index output which can be used to generate fringe plots of Margins of Safety (MoS) in any post- processing tool. The other verifications (core strength and local stability) must be performed using different tools. For the dynamic analysis of sandwich panels, an analysis technique based on element forces and on failure envelope at laminate level has been developed and implemented in a Fortran program (SineMOS) which allows evaluating facesheet and core failure as well as local stability, taking into account modulus and phase information of the element forces. SineMOS is able to produce files containing information used to generate plots of minimum Margin of Safety in Patran for each failure mode. This paper shows the various steps of the analysis process, starting from the building of the failure envelope for the CFRP facesheet laminate. Finally some validation example is shown, comparing SineMOS results with results based on the application of static displacements to the nodes of the model.

  1. Effect of the Power Balance® band on static balance, hamstring flexibility, and arm strength in adults.

    PubMed

    Verdan, Princess J R; Marzilli, Thomas S; Barna, Geanina I; Roquemore, Anntionette N; Fenter, Brad A; Blujus, Brittany; Gosselin, Kevin P

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Power Balance® bands on strength, flexibility, and balance. Strength and flexibility were measured using the MicroFit system. Strength was measured via a bicep curl and flexibility via the sit-and-reach method. Balance was measured by the BIODEX System SD. There were 4 different conditions for the balance test: eyes open on a firm surface (EOFS), eyes closed on a firm surface (ECFS), eyes open on a foam surface (EOFoS), and eyes closed on a foam surface (ECFoS). There were 24 subjects in the study (10 men and 14 women). A counterbalance, double-blind, placebo, controlled within-subject design was used. Each of the subjects participated in 3 treatment sessions, consisting of Power Balance®, placebo band, and no band. An alpha level of p ≤ 0.05 was set a priori. There were no significant differences in strength, flexibility, or balance with regard to the treatments used. There was a significant difference between the conditions in the balance test (p = 0.000): EOFS (0.51), ECFS (0.68), EOFoS (0.99), and ECFoS (2.18); however, these were independent of the treatment conditions. The results indicate that the Power Balance® bands did not have an effect on strength, flexibility, or balance.

  2. Numerical Modeling for Hole-Edge Cracking of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) Components in the Static Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Mohr, William; Yang, Yu-Ping; Zelenak, Paul; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Numerical modeling of local formability, such as hole-edge cracking and shear fracture in bending of AHSS, is one of the challenging issues for simulation engineers for prediction and evaluation of stamping and crash performance of materials. This is because continuum-mechanics-based finite element method (FEM) modeling requires additional input data, "failure criteria" to predict the local formability limit of materials, in addition to the material flow stress data input for simulation. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting hole-edge failures during static bend tests of AHSS structures. A local-strain-based failure criterion and a stress-triaxiality-based failure criterion were developed and implemented in LS-DYNA simulation code to predict hole-edge failures in component bend tests. The holes were prepared using two different methods: mechanical punching and water-jet cutting. In the component bend tests, the water-jet trimmed hole showed delayed fracture at the hole-edges, while the mechanical punched hole showed early fracture as the bending angle increased. In comparing the numerical modeling and test results, the load-displacement curve, the displacement at the onset of cracking, and the final crack shape/length were used. Both failure criteria also enable the numerical model to differentiate between the local formability limit of mechanical-punched and water-jet-trimmed holes. The failure criteria and static bend test developed here are useful to evaluate the local formability limit at a structural component level for automotive crash tests.

  3. Quasi-Static 3-Point Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Bend Test and Analysis for Shuttle Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Damage Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Sotiris, Kellas

    2006-01-01

    Static 3-point bend tests of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) were conducted to failure to provide data for additional validation of an LS-DYNA RCC model suitable for predicting the threshold of impact damage to shuttle orbiter wing leading edges. LS-DYNA predictions correlated well with the average RCC failure load, and were good in matching the load vs. deflection. However, correlating the detectable damage using NDE methods with the cumulative damage parameter in LS-DYNA material model 58 was not readily achievable. The difficulty of finding internal RCC damage with NDE and the high sensitivity of the mat58 damage parameter to the load near failure made the task very challenging. In addition, damage mechanisms for RCC due to dynamic impact of debris such as foam and ice and damage mechanisms due to a static loading were, as expected, not equivalent.

  4. Determination of the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin under varying pH and ionic strength by composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingfang; Acosta, Diana M; Whitney, Jon R; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering (CG-MALS) is an emerging technique for the determination of intermolecular interactions via the second virial coefficient B22. With CG-MALS, detailed studies of the second virial coefficient can be carried out more accurately and effectively than with traditional methods. In addition, automated mixing, delivery and measurement enable high speed, continuous, fluctuation-free sample delivery and accurate results. Using CG-MALS we measure the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solutions at various values of pH and ionic strength of a univalent salt (NaCl). The systematic variation of the second virial coefficient as a function of pH and NaCl strength reveals the net charge change and the isoelectric point of BSA under different solution conditions. The magnitude of the second virial coefficient decreases to 1.13 x 10(-5) ml*mol/g(2) near the isoelectric point of pH 4.6 and 25 mM NaCl. These results illuminate the role of fundamental long-range electrostatic and van der Waals forces in protein-protein interactions, specifically their dependence on pH and ionic strength.

  5. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  6. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  7. The effect of high strength static magnetic fields and ionizing radiation on gene expression and DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takafumi; Takahashi, Kohki; Suzuki, Yoko; Konishi, Yukinaga; Ota, Yuta; Mori, Chihiro; Ikenaga, Takahiko; Takanami, Takako; Saito, Rumiko; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging with high static magnetic fields (SMFs) has become widely used for medical imaging purposes because SMFs cause fewer genotoxic side effects than ionizing radiation (IR). However, the effect of exposure to high SMFs on global transcription is little understood. We demonstrate that genes involved in motor activity, actin binding, cell adhesion, and cuticles are transiently and specifically induced following exposure to 3 or 5 T SMF in the experimental model metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition, transient induction of hsp12 family genes was observed after SMF exposure. The small-heat shock protein gene hsp16 was also induced but to a much lesser extent, and the LacZ-stained population of hsp-16.1::lacZ transgenic worms did not significantly increase after exposure to SMFs with or without a second stressor, mild heat shock. Several genes encoding apoptotic cell-death activators and secreted surface proteins were upregulated after IR, but were not induced by SMFs. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analyses for 12 of these genes confirmed these expression differences between worms exposed to SMFs and IR. In contrast to IR, exposure to high SMFs did not induce DNA double-strand breaks or germline cell apoptosis during meiosis. These results suggest that the response of C. elegans to high SMFs is unique and capable of adjustment during long exposure, and that this treatment may be less hazardous than other therapeutic tools.

  8. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  9. Computer-assisted image analysis for measuring body segmental angles during a static strength element on parallel bars: validity and reliability.

    PubMed

    Siatras, Theophanis

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to introduce a technique using computer-assisted image analysis for measuring body segmental angles during a static strength element on parallel bars. Criterion validity and intra-rater reliability of measurements were evaluated using digital photography, skin markers and a gravity-reference goniometer. Twenty male former gymnasts participated in this study. They performed a strength hold element on parallel bars (V-sit) and they were photographed with legs extended and stabilized at the highest possible level. The leg to horizontal, trunk to vertical and arm to vertical angles were calculated and examined for reliability using image-pro software. The leg angle was also examined for its validity, by simultaneously using a Myrin goniometer. The two goniometric techniques indicated high leg angle measurements agreement (R = 0.997, p < 0.001). However, Bland-Altman analysis showed that there was a slight leg angle measurement overrating using image-pro software, especially at smaller angles. The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) values were high for leg angle (R = 0.971), trunk angle (R = 0.957) and arm angle (R = 0.945), showing an excellent test-retest agreement. It was ascertained that the measurement of segmental angles during V-sit on parallel bars using digital photography and computer-assisted image analysis can be highly reliable when taken by the same experienced examiner.

  10. Comparison of the effects of remote after-effects of static contractions for different upper-extremity positions and pinch-force strengths in patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion.

    PubMed

    Arai, Mitsuo; Shiratani, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the after-effects of static contractions of upper extremity muscles in different shoulder joint positions and at different pinch-force strengths on the maximal active range of motion (MAROM) and wrist agonist/antagonist IEMG activities for patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion (ROM) due to upper limb pain and dysfunction. The subjects were 10 outpatients (3 males, 7 females) with restricted wrist joints. These subjects performed four static contractions of upper extremity muscles in neutral and diagonal shoulder joint positions and with weak and strong pinch-force strengths in random order. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that the change in MAROM was significantly larger (P < 0.05) after diagonal-strong static contractions than after neutral-weak static contractions. There were no significant correlations between changes in MAROM and IEMG activities. These results indicate that shoulder joint position and pinch-force strength should be considered for effective induction of remote after-effects of static contractions for increasing MAROM for restricted wrist flexion ROM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Static and non-static black holes with the Liouville mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, T. M.; Nurmagambetov, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new class of static and non-static quasi-spherical black hole solutions in four-dimensional Minkowski and Anti-de Sitter spaces and briefly discuss its employing in the Gauge/Gravity duality.

  12. Role of the adsorption factor in reduction of the long-term static crack resistance of high-strength steel in gaseous media

    SciTech Connect

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Tsirul'nik, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish the role of the adsorption layer in subcritical crack growth in high-strength steel subject to long-term static loading in controlled-composition gaseous media. Investigations of long-term crack resistance were made in a sealed chamber on 45KhN2MFA steel with an edge crack loaded by four-point bending. The gaseous media were commercially pure hydrogen and helium. The most aggressive medium was deoxygenated and dried hydrogen and the least aggressive helium. The effect of helium moisture content on crack growth kinetics was evaluated. Subcritical crack growth mechanisms were determined, by fractography with a scanning electron microscope, to be typically intergranular. Hydrogen embrittlement occurred in three stages: establishment of adsorption equilibrium, adsorbed molecule dissociation into atomic hydrogen, and transport of hydrogen atoms into the prefailure zone. Local fracture occurred as a result of a reduction in critical stress in connection with hydrogen impregnation of the prefailure zone.

  13. Quasi-static Tensile and Compressive Behavior of Nanocrystalline Tantalum based on Miniature Specimen Testing—Part I: Materials Processing and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligda, J.; Scotto D'Antuono, D.; Taheri, M. L.; Schuster, B. E.; Wei, Q.

    2016-11-01

    Grain size reduction of metals into ultrafine-grained (UFG, grain size 100 nm < d < 1000 nm) and nanocrystalline (NC, d < 100 nm) regimes results in considerable increase in strength along with other changes in mechanical behavior such as vanishing strain hardening and limited ductility. Severe plastic deformation (SPD) has been among the favored technologies for the fabrication of UFG/NC metals. Primary past research efforts on SPD UFG/NC metals have been focused on easy-to-work metals, especially face-centered cubic metals such as copper, nickel, etc., and the limited efforts on body-centered cubic metals have mainly focused on high strain rate behavior where these metals are shown to deform via adiabatic shear bands. Except for the work on Fe, only a few papers can be found associated with UFG/NC refractory metals. In the first part of the present work (Part I), high-pressure torsion (HPT) is used to process UFG/NC tantalum, a typical refractory metal. The microstructure of the HPT disk as a function of radial location as well as orientation will be examined. In the subsequent part (Part II), the location-specific mechanical behavior will be presented and discussed. It is suggested that refractory metals such as Ta are ideal to employ SPD technology for microstructure refinement because of the extremely high melting point and relatively good workability.

  14. Investigation on the Cyclic Response of Superelastic Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Slit Damper Devices Simulated by Quasi-Static Finite Element (FE) Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jong Wan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) slit damper system as an alternative design approach for steel structures is intended to be evaluated with respect to inelastic behavior simulated by refined finite element (FE) analyses. Although the steel slit dampers conventionally used for aseismic design are able to dissipate a considerable amount of energy generated by the plastic yielding of the base materials, large permanent deformation may occur in the entire structure. After strong seismic events, extra damage repair costs are required to restore the original configuration and to replace defective devices with new ones. Innovative slit dampers fabricated by superelastic SMAs that automatically recover their initial conditions only by the removal of stresses without heat treatment are introduced with a view toward mitigating the problem of permanent deformation. The cyclically tested FE models are calibrated to experimental results for the purpose of predicting accurate behavior. This study also focuses on the material constitutive model that is able to reproduce the inherent behavior of superelastic SMA materials by taking phase transformation between austenite and martensite into consideration. The responses of SMA slit dampers are compared to those of steel slit dampers. Axial stress and strain components are also investigated on the FE models under cyclic loading in an effort to validate the adequacy of FE modeling and then to compare between two slit damper systems. It can be shown that SMA slit dampers exhibit many structural advantages in terms of ultimate strength, moderate energy dissipation and recentering capability. PMID:28788504

  15. Credibility of Low-Strength Static Magnet Therapy as an Attention Control Intervention for a Randomized Controlled Study of CranioSacral Therapy for Migraine Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Peter; Park, Jongbae; Faurot, Keturah R.; Coble, Rebecca; Suchindran, Chirayath; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Wilkinson, Laurel; Mann, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Developing valid control groups that generate similar perceptions and expectations to experimental complementary and alternative (CAM) treatments can be challenging. The perceived credibility of treatment and outcome expectancy often contributes to positive clinical responses to CAM therapies, thereby confounding efficacy data. As part of a clinical feasibility study, credibility and expectancy data were obtained from subjects suffering from migraine who received either CranioSacral therapy (CST) or an attention-control, sham, and low-strength magnet (LSSM) intervention. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the LSSM intervention generated similar levels of subject credibility and expectancy compared to CST. Design This was a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Subjects Sixty-five (65) adults with moderate to severe migraine were the subjects of this study. Interventions After an 8-week baseline, subjects were randomized to eight weekly treatments of either CST (n=36) or LSSM (n=29). The latter involved the use of a magnet-treatment protocol using inactive and low-strength static magnets designed to mimic the CST protocol in terms of setting, visit timing, body positioning, and therapist–subject interaction. Outcome measures A four-item, self-administered credibility/expectancy questionnaire, based on a validated instrument, was completed after the first visit. Results Using a 0–9 rating scale, the mean score for perceived logicality of treatment was significantly less for LSSM (5.03, standard deviation [SD] 2.34) compared to CST (6.64, SD 2.19). Subject confidence that migraine would improve was greater for CST (5.94, SD 2.01) than for LSSM (4.9, SD 2.21), a difference that was not statistically significant. Significantly more subjects receiving CST (6.08, SD 2.27) would confidently recommend treatment to a friend than those receiving LSSM (4.69, SD 2.49). Conclusions Although LSSM did not achieve a comparable level

  16. Performance of a static-anode/flat-panel x-ray fluoroscopy system in a diagnostic strength magnetic field: a truly hybrid x-ray/MR imaging system.

    PubMed

    Fahrig, R; Wen, Z; Ganguly, A; DeCrescenzo, G; Rowlands, J A; Stevens, G M; Saunders, R F; Pelc, N J

    2005-06-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasing in variety and frequency, facilitated by advances in imaging technology. Our hybrid imaging system (GE Apollo flat panel, custom Brand x-ray static anode x-ray tube, GE Lunar high-frequency power supply and 0.5 T Signa SP) provides both x-ray and MR imaging capability to guide complex procedures without requiring motion of the patient between two distant gantries. The performance of the x-ray tube in this closely integrated system was evaluated by modeling and measuring both the response of the filament to an externally applied field and the behavior of the electron beam for field strengths and geometries of interest. The performance of the detector was assessed by measuring the slanted-edge modulation transfer function (MTF) and when placed at zero field and at 0.5 T. Measured resonant frequencies of filaments can be approximated using a modified vibrating beam model, and were at frequencies well below the 25 kHz frequency of our generator for our filament geometry. The amplitude of vibration was not sufficient to cause shorting of the filament during operation within the magnetic field. A simple model of electrons in uniform electric and magnetic fields can be used to estimate the deflection of the electron beam on the anode for the fields of interest between 0.2 and 0.5 T. The MTF measured at the detector and the DQE showed no significant difference inside and outside of the magnetic field. With the proper modifications, an x-ray system can be fully integrated with a MR system, with minimal loss of image quality. Any x-ray tube can be assessed for compatibility when placed at a particular location within the field using the models. We have also concluded that a-Si electronics are robust against magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the x-ray system installation is required to provide estimates of system operation.

  17. Seed orientation and magnetic field strength have more influence on tomato seed performance than relative humidity and duration of exposure to non-uniform static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Poinapen, Danny; Brown, Daniel C W; Beeharry, Girish K

    2013-09-15

    Different factors (e.g., light, humidity, and temperature) including exposure to static magnetic fields (SMFs), referred here as critical factors, can significantly affect horticultural seed performance. However, the link between magnetic field parameters and other interdependent factors affecting seed viability is unclear. The importance of these critical factors affecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) var. MST/32 seed performance was assessed after performing several treatments based on a L9 (3(4)) (four factors at three levels) orthogonal array (OA) design. The variable factors in the design were magnetic flux density (R1=332.1±37.8mT; R2=108.7±26.9mT; and R3=50.6±10.5mT), exposure time (1, 2, and 24h), seed orientation (North polarity, South polarity, and control - no magnetic field), and relative humidity (RH) (7.0, 25.5, and 75.5%). After seed moisture content stabilisation at the different chosen RH, seeds were exposed in dark under laboratory conditions to several treatments based on the OA design before performance evaluation. Treatments not employing magnetic field exposure were used as controls. Results indicate that electrolyte leakage rate was reduced by a factor of 1.62 times during seed imbibition when non-uniform SMFs were employed. Higher germination (∼11.0%) was observed in magnetically-exposed seeds than in non-exposed ones, although seedlings emerging from SMF treatments did not show a consistent increase in biomass accumulation. The respective influence of the four critical factors tested on seed performance was ranked (in decreasing order) as seed orientation to external magnetic fields, magnetic field strength, RH, and exposure time. This study suggests a significant effect of non-uniform SMFs on seed performance with respect to RH, and more pronounced effects are observed during seed imbibition rather than during later developmental stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Static and dynamic fracture of transparent nanograined alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenky, A.; Bar-On, I.; Rittel, D.

    2010-04-01

    Transparent nanograined alumina has a great technological potential for highly demanding applications which take advantage of its superior mechanical properties like hardness, wear resistance, and strength, in addition to its optical performance in the infrared and visible domain. Accurate fracture properties (toughness) of this material are rather scarce in the quasi-static regime, and almost non-existent in the dynamic regime. Therefore, the present work investigates the static and dynamic fracture toughness of polycrystalline, nanograined alumina. The results show a marked increase in the dynamic initiation toughness when compared with the quasi-static regime, a phenomenon that was previously observed for other quasi-brittle materials. A combined fractographic and numerical study is carried out in order to identify the underlying mechanism(s) for the observed high dynamic initiation toughness. It is proposed that the latter results from the combined effect of a geometrical crack-front perturbation along with the contribution of the kinetic energy of the specimen. A discussion of the dynamic fracture toughness as a material property concludes this work.

  19. Quasi-Static Fiber Pressure Sensor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-24

    community. Remote optical measurement of pressure- induced plate deflection is often obtained via white light interferometry or dual wavelength...the pressure plate deflection within a Fabry-Perot cavity where phase is demodulated with a dual grating spectrometer providing real-time, high...resolution remote measurement of pressure using optical interrogation of a deflecting pressure plate . This technique yields absolute gap Inventors

  20. Large scale static and dynamic friction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtar, K.; Barton, N.

    1984-12-31

    A series of nineteen shear tests were performed on fractures 1 m/sup 2/ in area, generated in blocks of sandstone, granite, tuff, hydrostone and concrete. The tests were conducted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A vertical stress assisted fracturing technique was developed to create the fractures through the large test blocks. Prior to testing, the fractured surface of each block was characterized using the Barton JRC-JCS concept. the results of characterization were used to generate the peak strength envelope for each fractured surface. Attempts were made to model the stress path based on the classical transformation equations which assumes a theoretical plane, elastic isotropic properties, and therefore no slip. However, this approach gave rise to a stress path passing above the strength envelope which is clearly unacceptable. The results of the experimental investigations indicated that actual stress path is affected by the dilatancy due to fracture roughness, as well as by the side friction imposed by the boundary conditions. By introducing the corrections due to the dilation and boundary conditions into the stress transformation equation, the fully corrected stress paths for predicting the strength of fractured blocks were obtained.

  1. Brownian particle-kinetics in a superparamagnetic ferrofluid subjected to static magnetic-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisnanto, Suko Bagus; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    The stochastic Brownian particle-kinetics in a superparamagnetic ferrofluid at room temperature is of significance in nullifying total magnetization vectors of the suspended particles. Correspondingly, the apparent magnetization response observed under static magnetic field shows no hysteresis loop, but being linear at a given finite field-difference. Owing to this superparamagnetism, we propose a differential magnetometry to analyze the static field-induced particle-kinetics and further to identify the effective field-strength in reorienting particle-moments toward the applied field direction. A polydispersive ferrofluid containing iron-oxide nanoparticles, in practice, is subjected to a very-low oscillatory-field, immediately after applying the static-field. For a given frequency, we confirm a decreasing ac susceptibility as dc field-strength increases, which suggests a statistically less fluctuating magnetization-vectors. Via numerical integration of ac susceptibility recorded, we furthermore estimate the nonlinear quasi-static magnetization at various measurement frequencies. The resulting nonlinearity is attributable to the contributing relaxation dynamics of the particles. More importantly, the difference between dc and ac susceptibilities is found to be field-strength and frequency-dependent. Its value is further maximized at an effective field-strength, from which we identified the coexisting energy-barriers.

  2. Volcano collapse promoted by progressive strength reduction: New data from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Keith, Terry E.C.; Kayen, Robert; Iverson, Neal R.; Iverson, Richard M.; Brien, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Rock shear strength plays a fundamental role in volcano flank collapse, yet pertinent data from modern collapse surfaces are rare. Using samples collected from the inferred failure surface of the massive 1980 collapse of Mount St. Helens (MSH), we determined rock shear strength via laboratory tests designed to mimic conditions in the pre-collapse edifice. We observed that the 1980 failure shear surfaces formed primarily in pervasively shattered older dome rocks; failure was not localized in sloping volcanic strata or in weak, hydrothermally altered rocks. Our test results show that rock shear strength under large confining stresses is reduced ∼20% as a result of large quasi-static shear strain, as preceded the 1980 collapse of MSH. Using quasi-3D slope-stability modeling, we demonstrate that this mechanical weakening could have provoked edifice collapse, even in the absence of transiently elevated pore-fluid pressures or earthquake ground shaking. Progressive strength reduction could promote collapses at other volcanic edifices.

  3. Moderate strength (0.23–0.28 T) static magnetic fields (SMF) modulate signaling and differentiation in human embryonic cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Compelling evidence exists that magnetic fields modulate living systems. To date, however, rigorous studies have focused on identifying the molecular-level biosensor (e.g., radical ion pairs or membranes) or on the behavior of whole animals leaving a gap in understanding how molecular effects are translated into tissue-wide and organism-level responses. This study begins to bridge this gulf by investigating static magnetic fields (SMF) through global mRNA profiling in human embryonic cells coupled with software analysis to identify the affected signaling pathways. Results Software analysis of gene expression in cells exposed to 0.23–0.28 T SMF showed that nine signaling networks responded to SMF; of these, detailed biochemical validation was performed for the network linked to the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. We found the short-term (<24 h) activation of IL-6 involved the coordinate up-regulation of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) with complementary changes to NEU3 and ST3GAL5 that reduced ganglioside GM3 in a manner that augmented the activation of TLR4 and IL-6. Loss of GM3 also provided a plausible mechanism for the attenuation of cellular responses to SMF that occurred over longer exposure periods. Finally, SMF-mediated responses were manifest at the cellular level as morphological changes and biochemical markers indicative of pre-oligodendrocyte differentiation. Conclusion This study provides a framework describing how magnetic exposure is transduced from a plausible molecular biosensor (lipid membranes) to cell-level responses that include differentiation toward neural lineages. In addition, SMF provided a stimulus that uncovered new relationships – that exist even in the absence of magnetic fields – between gangliosides, the time-dependent regulation of IL-6 signaling by these glycosphingolipids, and the fate of embryonic cells. PMID:19653909

  4. Quasi-continuous magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Naumovich, G.J.; Hoang, T.A.; Dent, P.C.

    1996-05-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is completing a quasi-continuous magnet which will sustain a constant field of 60 T for 100 ms in a 32-mm 77 K bore. This magnet consists of 9 mechanically independent, nested, liquid nitrogen-cooled coils which are individually reinforced by high-strength stainless steel outer shells. The coils were wound from rectangular large cross-section, high-strength, high-conductivity copper conductor insulated wtih polyimide and fiberglass tapes. After winding, the coils were inserted into closely fitted, stainless steel reinforcing shells and impregnated with epoxy resin. Design, analysis, material, fabrication and operational issues for this class of magnets are reviewed. Fabrication and quality assurance testing of the 60 T coil set are covered in detail. Future growth of and possible links from this technology to other magnet systems are discussed. Needed improvements in design, analysis, materials, and fabrication are outlined.

  5. Electronic properties of quasi one-dimensional quantum wire models under equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, E.; Micu, C.; Racolta, D.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper one deals with the theoretical derivation of energy bands and of related wavefunctions characterizing quasi 1D semiconductor heterostructures, such as InAs quantum wire models. Such models get characterized this time by equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of dimensionless magnitude a under the influence of in-plane magnetic fields of magnitude B. We found that the orientations of the field can be selected by virtue of symmetry requirements. For this purpose one resorts to spin conservations, but alternative conditions providing sensible simplifications of the energy-band formula can be reasonably accounted for. Besides the wavenumber k relying on the 1D electron, one deals with the spin-like s=±1 factors in the front of the square root term of the energy. Having obtained the spinorial wavefunction, opens the way to the derivation of spin precession effects. For this purpose one resorts to the projections of the wavenumber operator on complementary spin states. Such projections are responsible for related displacements proceeding along the Ox-axis. This results in a 2D rotation matrix providing both the precession angle as well as the precession axis.

  6. Effect of Hollow Sphere Size and Distribution on the Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Properties of Al-A380-Al2O3 Syntactic Foams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    static and high strain rate compressive properties of Al-A380-Al2O3 syntactic foams J. A. Santa Maria 1 , B. F. Schultz 1 , J. B. Ferguson 1 , N...variety of matrices including aluminum [7-22], magnesium [23], zinc [24], iron [15,22,25-26] and titanium [15,27] alloys. Various hollow spheres have been...5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) J. Santa Maria; B;. Schultz ; J. Ferguson; N. Gupta; P. Rohatgi 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  7. Residual strength of composite laminates subjected to tensile-compressive fatigue loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, Assa; Nelson, H. G.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the measurements of the residual strengths of T300/934 graphite epoxy laminates, in tension and in compression, after the samples were exposed to tension-compression fatigue loading (R = -1). Four laminate ocnfigurations were tested: unidirectional, cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic. It was found that the fatigue behavior of laminates was dependent on the quasi-static strengths and the specific structure of the laminate. No direct correlation was found between remaining residual strengths and the percentage of average fatigue life. However, a correlation scheme was developed for the individual specimen under test, based on a cumulative damage model and a stiffness change of the material.

  8. Modeling of hydrogen-assisted cracking in iron crystal using a quasi-Newton method.

    PubMed

    Telitchev, Igor Ye; Vinogradov, Oleg

    2008-07-01

    A Quasi-Newton method was applied in the context of a molecular statics approach to simulate the phenomenon of hydrogen embrittlement of an iron lattice. The atomic system is treated as a truss-type structure. The interatomic forces between the hydrogen-iron and the iron-iron atoms are defined by Morse and modified Morse potential functions, respectively. Two-dimensional hexagonal and 3D bcc crystal structures were subjected to tensile numerical tests. It was shown that the Inverse Broyden's Algorithm-a quasi-Newton method-provides a computationally efficient technique for modeling of the hydrogen-assisted cracking in iron crystal. Simulation results demonstrate that atoms of hydrogen placed near the crack tip produce a strong deformation and crack propagation effect in iron lattice, leading to a decrease in the residual strength of numerically tested samples.

  9. 75 FR 1179 - Passenger Equipment Safety Standards; Front End Strength of Cab Cars and Multiple-Unit Locomotives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    .... Dynamic Impact Testing c. Analysis 2. Industry-Sponsored Quasi-Static Testing in 2001 a. Test Article Design b. Quasi-Static Testing c. Analysis 3. FRA-Sponsored Dynamic and Quasi-Static Testing in 2008 a... Corner Posts d. Analysis F. Approaches for Specifying Large Deformation Requirements G. Crash...

  10. Co-cured composite joint strength investigation based on behavior characterization of the [0/ (+/-)theta/90]s family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xinyuan

    Joints provide a path for transfer of load and are important components in an assembly of structures, particularly in translating joint strength improvements directly to significant cost savings. These cost savings are more evident in composite joints since manufacturing of more complex single piece components results in a reduction of both part count and labor. An improvement in joint strength for co-cured composite joints through minimized free-edge delamination was investigated for a quasi-isotropic [0/ +/- 45/90]s lay-up based on the quantitative assessments of the quasi-static and fatigue strength and qualitative understanding of the fatigue damage initiation and propagation for the [0/ +/- theta/90]s family of co-cured composite joints. A previously proposed co-cured joint concept, the Single Nested Overlap (SNO) joint, was compared against a Straight Laminate (SL) and a single lap joint. The SL represents a "perfect" joint and serves as an upper bound whereas the single lap joint represents the simplest generic joint and is the base design for the SNO joint concept. Three categorized failure types, which represent the predominant failure modes in the SL, single lap, and SNO joints, along with two different fatigue strength indicators were used for quasi-static and fatigue strength comparison. With fatigue run-out defined at 1x106 cycles, the fatigue damage initiation and propagation at high loadings was monitored with an Infrared Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (IR-TSA) technique, while a damage type comparison was used at low loadings. Quasi-static Acoustic Emission (AE) counts were observed to be Fatigue Limit (FL) indicators for [0/ +/- theta/90] s SL and SNO joints. The validity of these FL indicators was also assessed in the comparison of damage types.

  11. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  12. Mechanical behavior and microstructure of Ti{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Ta{sub 20}Nb{sub 20} high-entropy alloy loaded under quasi-static and dynamic compression conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dirras, G.; Couque, H.; Lilensten, L.; Heczel, A.; Tingaud, D.; Couzinié, J.-P.; Perrière, L.; Gubicza, J.; Guillot, I.

    2016-01-15

    The microstructure and the mechanical behavior of equimolar Ti{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Ta{sub 20}Nb{sub 20} high-entropy alloy in a wide range of initial strain rates between ~ 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} and ~ 3.4 × 10{sup 3} s{sup −1} were studied. A significant increment in the yield strength with increasing strain rate was observed. The yield strength at ~ 3.4 × 10{sup 3} s{sup −1} was about 40% higher than that measured at ~ 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. Analysis by electron backscatter diffraction shows that in the low strain rate regime (up to ~ 10 s{sup −1}) the deformation occurs mainly in evenly distributed bands, while in the dynamic regime the deformation is strongly localized in macroscopic shear bands accompanied by softening even after the onset of yielding. The Kernel Average Misorientation technique reveals a high level of lattice rotation within these bands that also carries intense shear. In addition, X-ray diffraction line profile analysis indicates that the sharp increase in the flow stress is mostly related to an increase of the dislocation density. - Highlights: • Strain rate effect on the plastic behavior of Ti{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Ta{sub 20}Nb{sub 20} HEA was studied. • Low strain rate regime was characterized by a continuous hardening. • At high strain rates softening occurred shortly after the onset of yielding. • Intense strain localization in shear bands occurred in the high strain rate regime. • High dislocation density explained the upturn of flow stress at high strain rates.

  13. On the tensile strength of insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-08-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young’s modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids.

  14. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for...

  15. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for...

  16. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for...

  17. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for...

  18. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for...

  19. Static versus dynamic fracturing in shallow carbonate fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondriest, Michele; Doan, Mai-Linh; Aben, Frans; Fusseis, Florian; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Voorn, Maarten; Secco, Michele; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-03-01

    Moderate to large earthquakes often nucleate within and propagate through carbonates in the shallow crust. The occurrence of thick belts of low-strain fault-related breccias is relatively common within carbonate damage zones and was generally interpreted in relation to the quasi-static growth of faults. Here we report the occurrence of hundreds of meters thick belts of intensely fragmented dolostones along a major transpressive fault zone in the Italian Southern Alps. These fault rocks have been shattered in-situ with negligible shear strain accumulation. The conditions of in-situ shattering were investigated by deforming the host dolostones in uniaxial compression both under quasi-static (strain rate ∼10-5 s-1) and dynamic (strain rate > 50 s-1) loading. Dolostones deformed up to failure under low-strain rate were affected by single to multiple discrete extensional fractures sub-parallel to the loading direction. Dolostones deformed under high-strain rate were shattered above a strain rate threshold of ∼ 120 s-1 and peak stresses on average larger than the uniaxial compressive strength of the rock, whereas they were split in few fragments or remained macroscopically intact at lower strain rates. Fracture networks were investigated in three dimensions showing that low- and high-strain rate damage patterns (fracture intensity, aperture, orientation) were significantly different, with the latter being similar to that of natural in-situ shattered dolostones (i.e., comparable fragment size distributions). In-situ shattered dolostones were thus interpreted as the result of high energy dynamic fragmentation (dissipated strain energies >1.8 MJ/m3) similarly to pulverized rocks in crystalline lithologies. Given their seismic origin, the presence of in-situ shattered dolostones can be used in earthquake hazard studies as evidence of the propagation of seismic ruptures at shallow depths.

  20. Static penetration resistance of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgunoglu, H. T.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Model test results were used to define the failure mechanism associated with the static penetration resistance of cohesionless and low-cohesion soils. Knowledge of this mechanism has permitted the development of a new analytical method for calculating the ultimate penetration resistance which explicitly accounts for penetrometer base apex angle and roughness, soil friction angle, and the ratio of penetration depth to base width. Curves relating the bearing capacity factors to the soil friction angle are presented for failure in general shear. Strength parameters and penetrometer interaction properties of a fine sand were determined and used as the basis for prediction of the penetration resistance encountered by wedge, cone, and flat-ended penetrometers of different surface roughness using the proposed analytical method. Because of the close agreement between predicted values and values measured in laboratory tests, it appears possible to deduce in-situ soil strength parameters and their variation with depth from the results of static penetration tests.

  1. Measuring Static and Dynamic Properties of Frozen Silty Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.

    1998-09-30

    A mechanical characterization of frozen silty soils has been conducted to support computer modeling of penetrators. The soils were obtained from the Eilson AFB (Alaska) vicinity. Quasi-static testing with a multiaxial system in a cold room and intermediate strain rate testing with a split Hopkinson pressure bar were conducted. Maximum stresses achieved were slightly above 1 GPa, apparently limiting the observed behavior primarily to elastic compression and pore crushing phenomena. Lower temperatures seem to increase the strength of the material markedly, although not by a simple factor. Lower temperatures and higher strain rates increase the apparent Young's and bulk moduli as well (an increase of {approximately} a factor of two is observed for strain rate increasing from 0.001 s{sup {minus}1} to 800 s{sup {minus}1}). The strength also depends strongly on strain rate. Increasing the strain rate from 0.001 {sup {minus}1} to 0.07 {sup {minus}1} increases the strength by a factor of five to ten (to values of order 1 GPa). However,only a small increase in strength is seen as strain rate is increased to {approximately} 10{sup 2}--10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}. The reliability of the strength measurements at strain rates< 1 s{sup {minus}1} is decreased due to details of the experimental geometry, although general trends are observable. A recipe is provided for a simulant soil based on bentonite, sand, clay-rich soil and water to fit the {approximately} 6% air-filled porosity, density and water content of the Alaska soils, based on benchtop mixing and jacketed compression testing of candidate mixes.

  2. Johnson - Cook Strength Models for Mild and DP 590 Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantam, K.; Brar, N. S.; Bajaj, D.; Hill, S.

    2006-07-28

    Automotive steels, Mild and Dual Phase590 (DP590) are characterized in tension at room temperature, using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques at various strain rates ranging from {approx}10-3/s to {approx}1800/s. Tension stress-strain data for both the steels are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook Strength model constants, J-C strength model constants for mild steel are A=217 MPa, B = 234 MPa, n = 0.643 and C = 0.076 and for DP590 steel are A = 430 MPa, B = 824 MPa, n = 0.510 and C = 0.017. Higher value of strain rate sensitivity constant C for mild steel (0.076) compared to DP 590 (0.017) is also reflected in the stress- strain data at various strain rates.

  3. The effect of energy feedbacks on continental strength.

    PubMed

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Weinberg, Roberto F; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2006-07-06

    The classical strength profile of continents is derived from a quasi-static view of their rheological response to stress--one that does not consider dynamic interactions between brittle and ductile layers. Such interactions result in complexities of failure in the brittle-ductile transition and the need to couple energy to understand strain localization. Here we investigate continental deformation by solving the fully coupled energy, momentum and continuum equations. We show that this approach produces unexpected feedback processes, leading to a significantly weaker dynamic strength evolution. In our model, stress localization focused on the brittle-ductile transition leads to the spontaneous development of mid-crustal detachment faults immediately above the strongest crustal layer. We also find that an additional decoupling layer forms between the lower crust and mantle. Our results explain the development of decoupling layers that are observed to accommodate hundreds of kilometres of horizontal motions during continental deformation.

  4. The effect of new dynamic splint in pinch strength in De Quervain syndrome: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Zahra; Javanshir, Mohammad Ali; Saeedi, Hassan; Farmani, Farzad; Aghajani Fesharaki, Siamak

    2016-02-17

    Objective For patients with De Quervain syndrome using thumb spica orthosis is restricting, so many patient are dissatisfied with using static model. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of modified dynamic and conventional static orthoses on pinch power and functional abilities of hand in De Quervain syndrome. Method In this quasi-experimental study, palmar and lateral pinch strength of the thumb, pain and functional abilities of hand, patient's satisfaction of orthoses, were evaluated after using modified dynamic and conventional static orthosis in two groups. Results Both orthoses improved palmar and lateral pinch strength of the thumb, pain level and functional abilities. In comparison of mentioned variables, there was no significant difference between two groups regarding to pain recovery and abilities improvement (p > 0.05). However, the satisfaction level of the patients who had used dynamic orthosis was higher (p < 0.05). Conclusion It seems, adding a joint to the static thumb spica leads to patient's relief and consequently to their satisfaction. Implications for Rehabilitation The dynamic thumb spica, is easier to use and patients satisfaction is higher than static thumb spica. Therefore, it can be used for conservative treatment of De Quervain syndrome.

  5. Monitoring Contamination of the subsurface with Quasi-Static Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spetzler, H.; Snieder, R.; Zhang, J.

    2005-12-01

    Data from a field experiment suggest that we can detect the infiltration of contaminated water (contaminated with 150 ppm of a biosurfactant, Rhamnolipid) into the vadose zone with tilt meters. Three sets of instruments were installed in the vicinity of a 50m x 50m field, which was instrumented and could be irrigated in a controlled manner. Each set consisted of one tiltmeter at the bottom of a 10m cased borehole and one seismometer buried to a depth of about 1m. The instruments were installed in late summer and early fall of 2002. The drift in tilt caused by their installation decayed to near background levels in about one year. The site was irrigated with plain water at 50,000 l/day for 40 days during the fall of 2003. The irrigation was repeated in the fall of 2004 for 50 days, again with 50,000 l/day. This time the irrigation water contained 150ppm of a biosurfactant. This surfactant was chosen to simulate a contaminant through its effect on the modification of surface tension and because it is environmentally benign. It was developed for bioremediation. We expected subtle changes in the relative responses of the instruments as the elastic properties of the vadose zone were altered by the contaminant. This expectation is based on a long series of laboratory measurements, e.g. W. Brunner and H.A. Spetzler 2002. We used natural sources for the excitation of the instruments, solid Earth tides for the tiltmeters and microseisms, i.e. ocean generated noise at about 6s periods, for the seismometers. In the case of the tilt meters we used theoretical site specific tilt and compared that with our measured tilt. We found no significant change in the correlation coefficient between theoretical and measured tilt for the water-only irrigation. The correlation coefficient was generally above 0.9. The correlation coefficient dropped precipitously about ten days after we had started irrigating with the surfactant. It recovered again about ten days after irrigation was stopped. A preliminary analysis of the seismic data shows similar trends, but with much more noise. Using a Born approximation we calculate that a slight perturbation of the complex moduli near the surface does indeed yield changes in tidally-induced tilt near the observed values. Brunner, W. M. and H. A. Spetzler, Contaminant-Induced Mechanical Damping in Partially Saturated Berea Sandstone, Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol.29, No.16, 10.1029/2002GL015455 ,2002

  6. A Planar Quasi-Static Constraint Mode Tire Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-10

    strikes a balance between simple tire models that lack the fidelity to make accurate chassis load predictions and computationally intensive models that...strikes a balance between heuristic tire models (such as a linear point-follower) that lack the fidelity to make accurate chassis load predictions

  7. Jamming transition as probed by quasi-static shear simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussinger, Claus

    2010-03-01

    This contribution deals with flow properties of amorphous colloidal or granular materials close to their jamming threshold. There is by now ample evidence that the (athermal) jamming transition (``point J'') can be thought of as a critical phenomenon with a divergent length-scale. While much effort has been put into characterizing the critical properties of the arrested solid state, only little is known about the actual physical mechanisms that lead to this arrest when coming from the flowing side. We try to fill this gap by studying the particle dynamics in the flowing state. We show how the motion of single particles is connected to the growth of dynamical heterogeneities. Approaching point J from below we find a diverging dynamical susceptibility. The associated particle mobilities show signs of strong spatial correlations, with patterns involving string- and loop-like excitations as well as compact regions of active particles. As a result we can develop an intuitive and appealing picture that describes flow in terms of a ``liquid of temporarily rigid clusters''. This picture of how flow is realized below point J contrasts well with the traditional view of plastic flow in ``soft-glassy'' materials, where flow is described by the failure of localized defects embedded in an elastic solid. We argue that this latter behavior is observed in the yield-stress flow regime above point J.

  8. Convergence of the Quasi-static Antenna Design Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    used to minimize the error in the radiation resistance. The dipole eigenmode LOSA and COSA values are a good approximation to the reactance; they are...fit for improved LOSA and COSA values. This iteration process was repeated until a self-consistent numerical solution was obtained. Figure 7...circuit model. Parameters Eigenmode 1 Eigenmode 1 & 2 QSADA CDC 95.87 90.364 pF COSA 90.15 pF 90.292385 pF N/A LOSA 0.67295 uH 0.67164778 uH

  9. Inherent Conservatism in Deterministic Quasi-Static Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1997-01-01

    The cause of the long-suspected excessive conservatism in the prevailing structural deterministic safety factor has been identified as an inherent violation of the error propagation laws when reducing statistical data to deterministic values and then combining them algebraically through successive structural computational processes. These errors are restricted to the applied stress computations, and because mean and variations of the tolerance limit format are added, the errors are positive, serially cumulative, and excessively conservative. Reliability methods circumvent these errors and provide more efficient and uniform safe structures. The document is a tutorial on the deficiencies and nature of the current safety factor and of its improvement and transition to absolute reliability.

  10. Modeling quasi-static poroelastic propagation using an asymptotic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    2007-11-01

    Since the formulation of poroelasticity (Biot(1941)) and its reformulation (Rice & Cleary(1976)), there have been many efforts to solve the coupled system of equations. Perhaps because of the complexity of the governing equations, most of the work has been directed towards finding numerical solutions. For example, Lewis and co-workers published early papers (Lewis & Schrefler(1978); Lewis et al.(1991)Lewis, Schrefler, & Simoni) concerned with finite-element methods for computing consolidation, subsidence, and examining the importance of coupling. Other early work dealt with flow in a deformable fractured medium (Narasimhan & Witherspoon 1976); Noorishad et al.(1984)Noorishad, Tsang, & Witherspoon. This effort eventually evolved into a general numerical approach for modeling fluid flow and deformation (Rutqvist et al.(2002)Rutqvist, Wu, Tsang, & Bodvarsson). As a result of this and other work, numerous coupled, computer-based algorithms have emerged, typically falling into one of three categories: one-way coupling, loose coupling, and full coupling (Minkoff et al.(2003)Minkoff, Stone, Bryant, Peszynska, & Wheeler). In one-way coupling the fluid flow is modeled using a conventional numerical simulator and the resulting change in fluid pressures simply drives the deformation. In loosely coupled modeling distinct geomechanical and fluid flow simulators are run for a sequence of time steps and at the conclusion of each step information is passed between the simulators. In full coupling, the fluid flow and geomechanics equations are solved simultaneously at each time step (Lewis & Sukirman(1993); Lewis & Ghafouri(1997); Gutierrez & Lewis(2002)). One disadvantage of a purely numerical approach to solving the governing equations of poroelasticity is that it is not clear how the various parameters interact and influence the solution. Analytic solutions have an advantage in that respect; the relationship between the medium and fluid properties is clear from the form of the solution. Unfortunately, analytic solutions are only available for highly idealized conditions, such as a uniform (Rudnicki(1986)) or one-dimensional (Simon et al.(1984)Simon, Zienkiewicz, & Paul; Gajo & Mongiovi(1995); Wang & Kumpel(2003)) medium. In this paper I derive an asymptotic, semi-analytic solution for coupled deformation and flow. The approach is similar to trajectory- or ray-based methods used to model elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation (Aki & Richards(1980); Kline & Kay(1979); Kravtsov & Orlov(1990); Keller & Lewis(1995)) and, more recently, diffusive propagation (Virieux et al.(1994)Virieux, Flores-Luna, & Gibert; Vasco et al.(2000)Vasco, Karasaki, & Keers; Shapiro et al.(2002)Shapiro, Rothert, Rath, & Rindschwentner; Vasco(2007)). The asymptotic solution is valid in the presence of smoothly-varying, heterogeneous flow properties. The situation I am modeling is that of a formation with heterogeneous flow properties and uniform mechanical properties. The boundaries of the layer may vary arbitrary and can define discontinuities in both flow and mechanical properties. Thus, using the techniques presented here, it is possible to model a stack of irregular layers with differing mechanical properties. Within each layer the hydraulic conductivity and porosity can vary smoothly but with an arbitrarily large magnitude. The advantages of this approach are that it produces explicit, semi-analytic expressions for the arrival time and amplitude of the Biot slow and fast waves, expressions which are valid in a medium with heterogeneous properties. As shown here, the semi-analytic expressions provide insight into the nature of pressure and deformation signals recorded at an observation point. Finally, the technique requires considerably fewer computer resources than does a fully numerical treatment.

  11. Monitoring the subsurface with quasi-static deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, Roel; Spetzler, Hartmut

    2013-09-06

    This project consisted of three sub-projects that are all aimed at monitoring the subsurface with geophysical methods. The objectives of these sub-projects are: to investigate the use of seismic waves for remote monitoring of temperature changes in the Yucca Mountain nuclear repository; to investigate the use of measured changes in the tidal tilt as a diagnostic for the infiltration of fluids in the subsurface; and to extract the electrostatic response from dynamic field fluctuations.

  12. A fundamental model of quasi-static wheelchair biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Leary, M; Gruijters, J; Mazur, M; Subic, A; Burton, M; Fuss, F K

    2012-11-01

    The performance of a wheelchair system is a function of user anatomy, including arm segment lengths and muscle parameters, and wheelchair geometry, in particular, seat position relative to the wheel hub. To quantify performance, researchers have proposed a number of predictive models. In particular, the model proposed by Richter is extremely useful for providing initial analysis as it is simple to apply and provides insight into the peak and transient joint torques required to achieve a given angular velocity. The work presented in this paper identifies and corrects a critical error; specifically that the Richter model incorrectly predicts that shoulder torque is due to an anteflexing muscle moment. This identified error was confirmed analytically, graphically and numerically. The authors have developed a corrected, fundamental model which identifies that the shoulder anteflexes only in the first half of the push phase and retroflexes in the second half. The fundamental model has been extended by the authors to obtain novel data on joint and net power as a function of push progress. These outcomes indicate that shoulder power is positive in the first half of the push phase (concentrically contracting anteflexors) and negative in the second half (eccentrically contracting retroflexors). As the eccentric contraction introduces adverse negative power, these considerations are essential when optimising wheelchair design in terms of the user's musculoskeletal system. The proposed fundamental model was applied to assess the effect of vertical seat position on joint torques and power. Increasing the seat height increases the peak positive (concentric) shoulder and elbow torques while reducing the associated (eccentric) peak negative torque. Furthermore, the transition from positive to negative shoulder torque (as well as from positive to negative power) occurs later in the push phase with increasing seat height. These outcomes will aid in the optimisation of manual wheelchair propulsion biomechanics by minimising adverse negative muscle power, and allow joint torques to be manipulated as required to minimise injury or aid in rehabilitation.

  13. Real-time quasi-static ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Treece, Graham; Lindop, Joel; Chen, Lujie; Housden, James; Prager, Richard; Gee, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a technique used for clinical imaging of tissue stiffness with a conventional ultrasound machine. It was first proposed two decades ago, but active research continues in this area to the present day. Numerous clinical applications have been investigated, mostly related to cancer imaging, and though these have yet to prove conclusive, the technique has seen increasing commercial and clinical interest. This paper presents a review of the most widely adopted, non-quantitative, techniques focusing on technical innovations rather than clinical applications. The review is not intended to be exhaustive, concentrating instead on placing the various techniques in context according to the authors' perspective of the field. PMID:22866230

  14. Electromagnetic angular momentum in quasi-static conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, J. L.; Campos, I.; E Roa-Neri, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    The correct definition of electromagnetic momentum in matter, either Abraham’s g A = (1/4πc) (E × H), or Minkowski’s g M = (1/4πc) (D × B) has been a theme of controversy for a century. Therefore, we can find those who favor one or the other of these proposals. We present here an alternative view, considering that both of the aforementioned equations are equivalent since they pertain to different balance equations derived from the macroscopic Maxwell equations. This is done through their application to a device proposed by Lai in 1980, and recovering his results. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students can find in this work an introduction to a controversial issue and an alternative point of view about it.

  15. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  16. Static and dynamic bending responses of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Voo, L M; Pintar, F A; Yoganandan, N; Liu, Y K

    1998-12-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic bending responses of the human mid-lower cervical spine were determined using cadaver intervertebral joints fixed at the base to a six-axis load cell. Flexion bending moment was applied to the superior end of the specimen using an electrohydraulic piston. Each specimen was tested under three cycles of quasi-static load-unload and one high-speed dynamic load. A total of five specimens were included in this study. The maximum intervertebral rotation ranged from 11.0 to 15.4 deg for quasi-static tests and from 22.9 to 34.4 deg for dynamic tests. The resulting peak moments at the center of the intervertebral joint ranged from 3.8 to 6.9 Nm for quasi-static tests and from 14.0 to 31.8 Nm for dynamic tests. The quasi-static stiffness ranged from 0.80 to 1.35 Nm/deg with a mean of 1.03 Nm/deg (+/- 0.11 Nm/deg). The dynamic stiffness ranged from 1.08 to 2.00 Nm/deg with a mean of 1.50 Nm/deg (+/- 0.17 Nm/deg). The differences between the two stiffnesses were statistically significant (p < 0.01). Exponential functions were derived to describe the quasi-static and dynamic moment-rotation responses. These results provide input data for lumped-parameter models and validation data for finite element models to better investigate the biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

  17. Spatiotemporal binary interaction and designer quasi-particle condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Radha; Pattu Sakthi, Vinayagam; Hyun Jong, Shin; Kuppuswamy, Porsezian

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a new integrable model to investigate the dynamics of two component quasi-particle condensates with spatiotemporal interaction strengths. We derive the associated Lax pair of the coupled Gross—Pitaevskii (GP) equation and construct matter wave solitons. We show that the spatiotemporal binary interaction strengths not only facilitate the stabilization of the condensates, but also enables one to fabricate condensates with desirable densities, geometries, and properties, leading to the so-called “designer quasi-particle condensates”.

  18. Inter-subband structure factor for a quasi-one-dimensional polaron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Paulo César Miranda; Osório, Francisco Aparecido Pinto; Borges, Antônio Newton

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the collective excitation spectra of quasi-one-dimensional plasmon in a rectangular GaAs quantum wire is investigated. Our calculations are performed within the Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjölander (STLS) self-consistent theory taking into account the plasmon-longitudinal optical (LO) phonon coupling effects. We have employed a three subband model with only the first subband occupied by electrons and we have considered intra-subband and inter-subband transitions. We show that the polaronic effects cause the appearance of dips and oscillations in the static structure factor dispersion relation, which are directly related with the oscillator strength transfer between the collective excitation energy branches. We have also observed oscillations in the pair-correlation function that are characteristic of inter-subband transitions and it denotes partial localization of the particle.

  19. Collisions between quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    The collision between pairs of quasi-parallel shocks is examined using hybrid numerical simulations. In the interaction, the two shocks are transmitted through each other leaving behind a hot plasma with a population of particles with energies in excess of 40 E0, where E0 is the kinetic energy of particles in the shock frame prior to the collision. The energization is more efficient for quasi-parallel shocks than parallel shocks. Collisions between shocks of equal strengths are more efficient than those that are unequal. The results are of importance for phenomena during the impulsive phase of solar flares, in the distant solar wind and at planetary bow shocks.

  20. Particle roughness in magnetorheology: effect on the strength of the field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereda, F.; Segovia-Gutiérrez, J. P.; de Vicente, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on the effect of particle roughness on the strength of the field-induced structures of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in the quasi-static regime. We prepared one set of MR fluids with carbonyl iron particles and another set with magnetite particles, and in both sets we had particles with different degrees of surface roughness. Small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) magnetosweeps and steady shear (SS) tests were carried out on the suspensions to measure their elastic modulus (G‧) and static yield stress (τstatic). Results for both the iron and the magnetite sets of suspensions were consistent: for the MR fluids prepared with rougher particles, G‧ increased at smaller fields and τstatic was ca. 20% larger than for the suspensions prepared with relatively smooth particles. In addition to the experimental study, we carried out finite element method calculations to assess the effect of particle roughness on the magnetic interaction between particles. These calculations showed that roughness can facilitate the magnetization of the particles, thus increasing the magnetic energy of the system for a given field, but that this effect depends on the concrete morphology of the surface. For our real systems, no major differences were observed between the magnetization cycles of the MR fluids prepared with particles with different degree of roughness, which implied that the effect of roughness on the measured G‧ and τstatic was due mainly to friction between the solid surfaces of adjacent particles.

  1. Initiation of Massive Landsliding through Progressive Strength Reduction in Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. E.; Keith, T. C.; Kayen, R. E.; Iverson, N. R.; Iverson, R. M.; Brien, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Landslides that sculpt deeply into volcano edifices can be extremely large. For example, the 1980 collapse of Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano generated a 2.8 km3 debris-avalanche deposit from a series of massive retrogressive failures. Rock shear strength plays a fundamental role in such landsliding, yet pertinent data from modern volcano collapse surfaces are rare. The collapse crater at MSH affords access to rocks directly from the failure surface of the1980 massive landslide. We used a combination of field observations, laboratory strength tests designed to mimic conditions in the pre-collapse edifice, and quasi-3D slope-stability analyses to investigate the effects of progressive strength reduction, caused by pre-collapse deformation, on the instability of the volcano's edifice. Within the MSH crater, we observed that the basal shear zone from the outermost initial landslide block (Block I) of the 1980 failure formed primarily in pervasively shattered older dacitic dome rocks; shearing was not localized in sloping volcanic strata or in weak, hydrothermally altered rocks. We collected relatively undisturbed tube samples and disturbed bulk samples of the shattered dacite from near the slip surface of Block I. Using a triaxial testing device, equipped with high-pressure components to mimic overburden stresses in the pre-collapse edifice, we determined the quasi-static drained shear strength of the undisturbed samples. These tests indicated a peak angle of internal friction, φ, of 35° and a residual φ (after undergoing axial strain up to 20%) of 29°. We also determined residual shear strength using a specially constructed large-volume ring-shear apparatus that imposed large quasi-static shear strains exceeding 100%. These tests yielded a similar residual strength, with φ of 27°. Prior to its catastrophic collapse in 1980, the MSH edifice was deformed northward tens of meters by an intruding cryptodome, which likely caused shearing along a summit fault and

  2. The Influence of Notches Under Static Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaes, K

    1938-01-01

    From the described experiments it is seen that notches are a potential source of strength decrease even under static stress, which the designer must take into consideration. Section I is a general treatment of notch influence under the various types of stresses. Section II treats the influence of notches in thin sheet as is used in airplane construction.

  3. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  4. Quasi-Lower Dimension and Quasi-Lipschitz Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haipeng; Du, Yali; Wei, Chun

    In this paper, we show that the lower dimension is not invariant under quasi-Lipschitz mapping, and then we find an invariant named the quasi-lower dimension. We also compute the quasi-lower dimension of a class of sets defined by digit restrictions, and then give an example to distinguish the quasi-lower dimension and other dimensions.

  5. A Report on the Validation of Beryllium Strength Models

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Derek Elswick

    2016-02-05

    This report discusses work on validating beryllium strength models with flyer plate and Taylor rod experimental data. Strength models are calibrated with Hopkinson bar and quasi-static data. The Hopkinson bar data for beryllium provides strain rates up to about 4000 per second. A limitation of the Hopkinson bar data for beryllium is that it only provides information on strain up to about 0.15. The lack of high strain data at high strain rates makes it difficult to distinguish between various strength model settings. The PTW model has been calibrated many different times over the last 12 years. The lack of high strain data for high strain rates has resulted in these calibrated PTW models for beryllium exhibiting significantly different behavior when extrapolated to high strain. For beryllium, the α parameter of PTW has recently been calibrated to high precision shear modulus data. In the past the α value for beryllium was set based on expert judgment. The new α value for beryllium was used in a calibration of the beryllium PTW model by Sky Sjue. The calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Also, the calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the density changes of the beryllium sample during the Hopkinson bar and quasi-static experiments. In this paper, the calibrated PTW model by Sjue is compared against experimental data and other strength models. The other strength models being considered are a PTW model calibrated by Shuh- Rong Chen and a Steinberg-Guinan type model by John Pedicini. The three strength models are used in a comparison against flyer plate and Taylor rod data. The results show that the Chen PTW model provides better agreement to this data. The Chen PTW model settings have been previously adjusted to provide a better fit to flyer plate data, whereas the Sjue PTW model has not been changed based on flyer plate data. However, the Sjue model provides a reasonable fit to

  6. No hair theorem in quasi-dilaton massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, De-Jun; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2016-04-11

    We investigate the static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions in the quasi-dilaton model and its generalizations, which are scalar extended dRGT massive gravity with a shift symmetry. We show that, unlike generic scalar extended massive gravity models, these theories do not admit static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions until the theory parameters in the dRGT potential are fine-tuned. When fine-tuned, the geometry of the static, spherically symmetric black hole is necessarily that of general relativity and the quasi-dilaton field is constant across the spacetime. The fine-tuning and the no hair theorem apply to black holes with flat, anti-de Sitter ormore » de Sitter asymptotics. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).« less

  7. Static and dynamic friction in sliding colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-03-01

    In a recent experimental breakthrough, the controlled sliding of 2D colloidal crystals over perfectly regular, laser generated periodic or quasi-periodic `corrugation` potentials has been realized in Bechinger's group. Based on realistic MD simulations which reproduce the main experimentally observed features, we explore the potential impact of colloid monolayer sliding in nanotribology. The free motion of edge-spawned kinks and antikinks in smooth incommensurate sliding is contrasted with the kink-antikink pair nucleation at the large static friction threshold in the commensurate case. The Aubry pinning/depinning transition is also demonstrated, e.g., as a function of the corrugation amplitude. Simulated sliding data allow the extraction of frictional work directly from particles coordinates and velocities as a function of classic friction parameters, primarily speed, and corrugation strength. Analogies with sliding charge-density waves, driven Josephson systems, sliding of rare gas islands, and other novel features suggest further experiments and insights, which promote colloid sliding to a novel friction study instrument. Research partly sponsored by Sinergia Project CRSII2 136287/1.

  8. Influence of loading-rate and steel fibers on the shear strength of ultra high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratislav, Lukic; Pascal, Forquin

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes quasi-static and dynamic experimental methods used to examine the confined shear strength of an Ultra High Performance Concrete, with and without the presence of steel fibers in the concrete composition. An experimental setup was created to investigate the concrete shear strength under quasi-static loading regime using a hydraulic press Schenk while dynamic shear strength was characterized by subjecting concrete samples to dynamic loading through a modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Both methods are based on a Punch Through Shear (PTS) test with a well-instrumented aluminum passive confinement ring that allows measuring the change of radial stress in the shear ligament throughout the test. Firstly, four equally distributed radial notches have been performed in order to deduce the radial stress by suppressing a self-confinement of the sample peripheral part. However, by analyzing the strain gauge data from the confinement ring, it has been noticed that these were apparently insufficient, especially for fiber-reinforced samples, resulting in subsequently practicing eight radial notches through the sample peripheral part. The results obtained from both procedures are reported and discussed.

  9. Micromechanics-based strength and lifetime prediction of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandorawalla, Tozer Jamshed

    With the increasing use of composite materials for diverse applications ranging from civil infrastructure to offshore oil exploration, the durability of these materials is an important issue. Practical and accurate models for lifetime will enable engineers to push the boundaries of design and make the most efficient use of composite materials, while at the same time maintaining the utmost standards of safety. The work described in this dissertation is an effort to predict the strength and rupture lifetime of a unidirectional carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite using micromechanical techniques. Sources of material variability are incorporated into these models to predict probabilistic distributions for strength and lifetime. This approach is best suited to calculate material reliability for a desired lifetime under a given set of external conditions. A systematic procedure, with experimental verification at each important step, is followed to develop the predictive models in this dissertation. The work begins with an experimental and theoretical understanding of micromechanical stress redistribution due to fiber fractures in unidirectional composite materials. In-situ measurements of fiber stress redistribution are made in macromodel composites where the fibers are large enough that strain gauges can be mounted directly onto the fibers. The measurements are used to justify and develop a new form of load sharing where the load of the broken fiber is redistributed only onto the nearest adjacent neighbors. The experimentally verified quasi-static load sharing is incorporated into a Monte Carlo simulation for tensile strength modeling. Very good agreement is shown between the predicted and experimental strength distribution of a unidirectional composite. For the stress-rupture models a time and temperature dependent load-sharing analysis is developed to compute stresses due to an arbitrary sequence of fiber fractures. The load sharing is incorporated into a simulation

  10. A comparison of quasi-symmetries in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alex; Ware, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the differences between the equilibrium, stability and transport properties of quasi-helically (QH) symmetric, quasi-axisymmetric (QA) and quasi-poloidally (QP) symmetric stellarator configurations with the same major radius, aspect ratio, average magnetic field strength, plasma β and pressure profiles. Previous work on quasi-symmetry in stellarators has typically focused on one type of quasi-symmetry. Optimized stellarators have been developed for QH, QA and QP configurations but at very different plasma parameters. In this work computational studies of optimized cases of all three cases have been undertaken. Results of the studies will be presented. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-FG02-03ER54699 at the University of Montana.

  11. Johnson-Cook Strength Model Constants for VascoMax 300 and 1080 Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cinnamon, J. D.; Palazotto, A. N.; Kennan, Z.; Brar, N. S.; Bajaj, D.

    2006-07-28

    High strength steels, VascoMax 300 and 1080, are characterized under tension at strain rates of {approx}1/s, {approx}500/s, {approx}1000/s, and {approx}1500/s and at high temperatures using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques. The data on 1080 steel exhibited a typical strain hardening response, whereas Vasco-Max 300 steel showed diminishing flow stress beyond yielding because of localized necking in gauge section of the tested specimens. The tension data are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook (J-C) strength model constants for the two steels. The flow stress values for VascoMax are adjusted to account for necking, and the corrected J-C model is developed.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength Al—Mg—Si—Cu profiles for safety parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Österreicher, J. A.; Schiffl, A.; Falkinger, G.; Bourret, G. R.

    2016-03-01

    Aluminium extrudate used for safety parts in cars need to exhibit high yield strength and ductility, a combination that is not easily achieved. In this work, the mechanical properties and microstructure of profiles with a yield strength greater than 280MPa achieved by two different artificial ageing treatments were studied. Profiles from one of the heat treatments performed well in quasi-static compression testing while those from the other heat treatment clearly failed. The batch of profiles that failed showed higher uniform elongation in tensile testing but a lower reduction in area. However, the difference in bending angles in the three-point-bending test were not as pronounced. Microscopic investigation of polished sections and fracture surfaces revealed that failure is dominated by the fracture of intermetallic phases resulting in voids. The growth and coalescence of these voids is facilitated by another population of smaller voids within the matrix, presumably nucleating at secondary phases.

  13. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    DOEpatents

    Costantino, Jr, Roger A.; Gliebe, Ronald J.

    1992-09-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  14. Multiaxial pedicle screw designs: static and dynamic mechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Ralph Edward; Loefler, Andreas Herman; Stanford, Philip Mark; Walsh, William R

    2004-02-15

    Randomized investigation of multiaxial pedicle screw mechanical properties. Measure static yield and ultimate strengths, yield stiffness, and fatigue resistance according to an established model. Compare these measured properties with expected loads in vivo. Multiaxial pedicle screws provide surgical versatility, but the complexity of their design may reduce their strength and fatigue resistance. There is no published data on the mechanical properties of such screws. Screws were assembled according to a vertebrectomy model for destructive mechanical testing. Groups of five assemblies were tested in static tension and compression and subject to three cyclical loads. Modes of failure, yield, and ultimate strength, yield stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined for six designs of screw. Static compression yield loads ranged from 217.1 to 388.0 N and yield stiffness from 23.7 to 38.0 N/mm. Cycles to failure ranged from 42 x 10(3) to 4,719 x 10(3) at 75% of static ultimate load. There were significant differences between designs in all modes of testing. Failure occurred at the multiaxial link in static and cyclical compression. Bending yield strengths just exceeded loads expected in vivo. Multiaxial designs had lower static bending yield strength than fixed screw designs. Five out of six multiaxial screw designs achieved one million cycles at 200 N in compression bending. "Ball-in-cup" multiaxial locking mechanisms were vulnerable to fatigue failure. Smooth surfaces and thicker material appeared to be protective against fatigue failure.

  15. Comparison of static wrist splint with static wrist and metacarpophalangeal splint in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Gul Tugba; Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Aytekin, Ebru; Ozgonenel, Levent; Tutun, Sule; Demir, Saliha Eroglu

    2015-01-01

    The position of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints may be an important factor affecting the efficacy of splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of a neutral volar static wrist splint with a neutral volar static wrist and MCP splint in patients with CTS. Fifty-four hands were included into the study. A neutral volar static wrist splint was given to the symptomatic hands of the patients in group 1 while a neutral volar static wrist and MCP splint was given to the symptomatic hands of the patients in group 2. Evaluation parameters were Visual Analog Scale for pain severity (VASp), grip strength, pinch strength, electrophysiologic tests and CTS Questionnaire (CTSQ) at baseline and four weeks later. At baseline there was no difference between groups. The intergroup comparison of the improvement showed significant differences in VASp at rest, grip strength, pinch strength and CTSQ functional capacity scores between groups in favor of wrist MCP splint. Although there were significant improvements with regard to sensory amplitude and motor latency in both groups after therapy, the differences between groups were not at the level of significance. The position of MCP joints seems to be an important factor for the treatment of CTS and should be considered while prescribing a splint to the patients with CTS.

  16. Riemann quasi-invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhozhaev, Stanislav I

    2011-06-30

    The notion of Riemann quasi-invariants is introduced and their applications to several conservation laws are considered. The case of nonisentropic flow of an ideal polytropic gas is analysed in detail. Sufficient conditions for gradient catastrophes are obtained. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  17. Quasi-Anonymous Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    QUASI- ANONYMOUS CHANNELS Ira S. Moskowitz Center for High Assurance Computer Systems - Code 5540 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC...Assurance Computer Systems - Code 5540 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA Abstract Although both anonymity and covert...channels are part of the larger topic of information hiding, there also exists an intrinsic linkage between anonymity and covert channels. This linkage

  18. THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PIFER, ALAN

    ORGANIZED TO MEET URGENT NATIONAL NEEDS, PROVIDE INDEPENDENT JUDGMENT, AND OFFER FRESH SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS, THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION IS DEFINED AS A NONPROFIT ASSOCIATION OR INSTITUTION LODGED IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR OF SOCIETY BUT FINANCED LARGELY OR ENTIRELY BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, RESPONSIBLE TO ITS OWN BOARD OF…

  19. Effect of Structure on Strength of Agglomerates using Distinct Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Tina; Ghadiri, Mojtaba

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of agglomerate strength is highly desirable for compression and tableting, dissolution and dispersion and mitigation of dust formation. The behaviour of agglomerates is affected by parameters such as density, agglomerate size, primary particle size, and interparticle bond strength. The method of agglomeration influences the evolution of structure, and this in turn affects its strength. Furthermore, the methods of strength characterisation, i.e. quasi-static or impact produce different results. To understand the role of structure and the influence of test method, agglomerate failure behaviour has been analysed by the use of the Distinct Element Method (DEM). We report on our work on the simulation of the breakage of the agglomerates for different porosities and impact conditions, where the role of impact speed and angle and type of contact bonding model have been evaluated. The adhesive contact model of JKR is used to form an agglomerate. The effect of the bonding level on the strength and size distribution of the clusters released as a result of failure has been investigated. This work also evaluates the effect of structure (porosity) on the strength of the agglomerates.

  20. Static Response of Neutron Matter.

    PubMed

    Buraczynski, Mateusz; Gezerlis, Alexandros

    2016-04-15

    We generalize the problem of strongly interacting neutron matter by adding a periodic external modulation. This allows us to study from first principles a neutron system that is extended and inhomogeneous, with connections to the physics of both neutron-star crusts and neutron-rich nuclei. We carry out fully nonperturbative microscopic quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the energy of neutron matter at different densities, as well as different strengths and periodicities of the external potential. In order to remove systematic errors, we examine finite-size effects and the impact of the wave function ansatz. We also make contact with energy-density functional theories of nuclei and disentangle isovector gradient contributions from bulk properties. Finally, we calculate the static density-density linear response function of neutron matter and compare it with the response of other physical systems.

  1. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  2. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  3. Scaling effects in the static and dynamic response of graphite-epoxy beam-columns. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.

    1990-01-01

    Scale model technology represents one method of investigating the behavior of advanced, weight-efficient composite structures under a variety of loading conditions. It is necessary, however, to understand the limitations involved in testing scale model structures before the technique can be fully utilized. These limitations, or scaling effects, are characterized. in the large deflection response and failure of composite beams. Scale model beams were loaded with an eccentric axial compressive load designed to produce large bending deflections and global failure. A dimensional analysis was performed on the composite beam-column loading configuration to determine a model law governing the system response. An experimental program was developed to validate the model law under both static and dynamic loading conditions. Laminate stacking sequences including unidirectional, angle ply, cross ply, and quasi-isotropic were tested to examine a diversity of composite response and failure modes. The model beams were loaded under scaled test conditions until catastrophic failure. A large deflection beam solution was developed to compare with the static experimental results and to analyze beam failure. Also, the finite element code DYCAST (DYnamic Crash Analysis of STructure) was used to model both the static and impulsive beam response. Static test results indicate that the unidirectional and cross ply beam responses scale as predicted by the model law, even under severe deformations. In general, failure modes were consistent between scale models within a laminate family; however, a significant scale effect was observed in strength. The scale effect in strength which was evident in the static tests was also observed in the dynamic tests. Scaling of load and strain time histories between the scale model beams and the prototypes was excellent for the unidirectional beams, but inconsistent results were obtained for the angle ply, cross ply, and quasi-isotropic beams. Results show

  4. Quasi-steady operation of reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A three fluid, Lagrangian mesh, transport and stability code (RFPBRN) has been developed and applied to the Reversed Field Pinch reactor concept. Using a circular cylinder, quasi-static approximation, RFPBRN follows the time evolution of the temperature, density, and magnetic field profiles for the RFP while simultaneously monitoring ideal MHD stability. Local stability is monitored for Suydam modes while global stability is monitored using a Rayleigh-Ritz expansion of the energy principle.

  5. Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

    2006-08-01

    The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

  6. Why Static Clings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  7. Static Analysis Numerical Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    and Honeywell Aerospace Advanced Technology to combine model-based development of complex avionics control software with static analysis of the...numerical algorithms, software verification, formal methods 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...18 3.3.4. Tool Software Integration Architecture

  8. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  9. Why Static Clings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  10. CAI Applications in Statics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Clayton C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a statics course developed at Texas A&M University in the engineering curriculum which utilizes computer-assisted instruction. Discusses the organization and management of the team that developed the course, the selection of the hardware and software used, and the implementation model and lesson prototype developed for the course.…

  11. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  12. Quasi-Fibonacci oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilik, A. M.; Kachurik, I. I.; Rebesh, A. P.

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties of the sequences of the energy eigenvalues for some generalizations of q-deformed oscillators including the p, q-oscillator, and the three-, four- and five-parameter deformed oscillators given in the literature. It is shown that most of the considered models belong to the class of so-called Fibonacci oscillators for which any three consecutive energy levels satisfy the relation En + 1 = λEn + ρEn - 1 with real constants λ, ρ. On the other hand, for a certain μ-oscillator known since 1993, we prove its non-Fibonacci nature. Possible generalizations of the three-term Fibonacci relation are discussed, among which for the μ-oscillator we choose, as the most adequate, the so-called quasi-Fibonacci (or local Fibonacci) property of the energy levels. The property is encoded in the three-term quasi-Fibonacci (QF) relation with the non-constant, n-dependent coefficients λ and ρ. Various aspects of the QF relation are elaborated for the μ-oscillator and some of its extensions.

  13. Aerodynamic and noise measurements on a quasi-two dimensional augmentor wing model with lobe-type nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made of the static, wind-on aerodynamic and static noise characteristics of an augmentor wing having lobe type nozzles. The study was made in the Ames 7-by 10-Foot No. 1 Wind Tunnel using a small-scale, quasi-two-dimensional model. Several configurations of lobe nozzles as well as a normal slot nozzle were tested. Results indicate that lobe nozzles offer improved static and wind-on aerodynamics and reduced static noise relative to slot nozzles. Best wind-on performance was obtained when the tertiary gap was closed even though the static thrust augmentation was maximum with the gap open. Static thrust augmentation, wind-on lift and drag, and static noise directivity are presented as well as typical static and wind-on exit velocity profiles, surface pressure distributions and noise spectrums. The data are presented with limited discussion.

  14. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  15. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  16. Influence of zirconia abutment preparation on the fracture strength of single implant lithium disilicate crowns after chewing simulation.

    PubMed

    Mitsias, Miltiadis; Koutayas, Spiridon-Oumvertos; Wolfart, Stefan; Kern, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    The use of all-ceramic crowns over zirconia abutments is a well-established esthetic treatment option in implant dentistry; however, the effect of the mechanical processing due to abutment preparation has not been investigated under functional loading. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of the zirconia abutment preparation depth and preparation mode on the fracture strength and fracture mode of lithium disilicate crowns after chewing simulation. Seventy single implant-supported lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) were adhesively cemented (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent) onto zirconia abutments (ZirDesign, Astra Tech) using implants with a diameter of 4.5 mm and a length of 15.0 mm (Osseospeed, Astra Tech). Study design concerned the replacement of a maxillary central incisor (11.0 mm in height and 8.0 mm in width). Subgroups (n = 7) were subjected to dynamic loading (C) up to 1.2 × 10(6) loading cycles at 135° with 98N in a thermomechanical chewing simulator (Kausimulator, Willytech); followed by quasi-static loading at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture in a universal testing machine (Z010/TN2S, Zwick). Additional subgroups were also subjected to quasi-static loading (S) at 135°. Lithium disilicate implant crowns were divided into five study groups (n = 14) according to the abutment preparation depth [A (control): 0.5 mm, B: 0.7 mm, C: 0.9 mm, and preparation mode [(No label): milling by the manufacturer, (P): copy-milling by the Celay System (Mikrona)]. All specimens survived dynamic loading and mean fracture strengths (N) after quasi-static loading were as follows: Group SA: 384 ± 84; Group CA: 403 ± 67; Group SB: 294 ± 95; Group CB: 374 ± 75; Group SC: 332 ± 52; Group CC: 373 ± 105; Group SPB: 332 ± 80; Group CPB: 499 ± 91; Group SPC: 380 ± 101; and Group CPC: 358 ± 54. Statistical analysis using multiple linear regression showed that both the preparation depth and mode

  17. Sociology as a Discipline: Quasi-Science and Quasi- Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zald, Mayer N.

    1991-01-01

    Traces the occupational and intellectual components of sociology's effort to win recognition as a science. Focuses on the model of science used and its limits. Argues that sociology, as quasi-science and quasi-humanities, should be maintaining the empirical outlook of a science while recognizing the impact of civilization on concepts and theories.…

  18. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  19. Quasi-phasematching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hum, David S.; Fejer, Martin M.

    2007-03-01

    The use of microstructured crystals in quasi-phasematched (QPM) nonlinear interactions has enabled operation of nonlinear devices in regimes inaccessible to conventional birefringently phasematched media. This review addresses basic aspects of the theory of QPM interactions, microstructured ferroelectrics and semiconductors for QPM, devices based on QPM media, and a series of techniques based on engineering of QPM gratings to tailor spatial and spectral response of QPM interactions. Because it is not possible in a brief review to do justice to the large body of results that have been obtained with QPM media over the past twenty years, the emphasis in this review will be on aspects of QPM interactions beyond their use simply as highly nonlinear alternatives to conventional birefringent media. To cite this article: D.S. Hum, M.M. Fejer, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  20. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  1. Static magnetotherapy for the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yao Y; Tsai, Fong Y

    2008-01-01

    Magnets have been used for centuries to treat a number of physical disorders. The vast majority of research, however, on static magnet therapy for insomnia has been confined to the auricular type of therapy, with publications limited to Chinese journals. Most of these studies have depended on the subjective self-assessment of participants rather than objective scientific measurements. In this study, the authors report the positive preliminary results of insomnia treatment using pillows with embedded magnets, magnetic insoles and TriPhase bracelets. The analysis is based on objective actigraphic and polysomnographic data. A theory of accelerated transition from wakefulness to sleep is proposed to explain the process of insomnia relief through low-strength static magnetic fields. Analysis by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is used to further investigate the theory.

  2. Firefly flashing under strong static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Barua, Anurup Gohain; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Miyashita, Yuito; Kurita, Satoru; Owada, Norio

    2012-02-01

    Firefly flashing has been the subject of numerous scientific investigations. Here we present in vivo flashes from male specimens of three species of fireflies-two Japanese species Luciola cruciata, Luciola lateralis and one Indian species Luciola praeusta-positioned under a superconducting magnet. When the OFF state of the firefly becomes long after flashing in an immobile state under the strong static magnetic field of strength 10 Tesla for a long time, which varies widely from species to species as well as from specimen to specimen, the effect of the field becomes noticeable. The flashes in general are more rapid, and occasionally overlap to produce broad compound flashes. We present the broadest flashes recorded to date, and propose that the strong static magnetic field affects the neural activities of fireflies, especially those in the spent up or 'exhausted' condition.

  3. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... equipment was not built to the requirements specified in paragraph (a)(1). (c) When overloaded in... respect to the petition; (ii) Information, including detailed drawings and material specifications... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design...

  4. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... equipment was not built to the requirements specified in paragraph (a)(1). (c) When overloaded in... respect to the petition; (ii) Information, including detailed drawings and material specifications... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design...

  5. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equipment was not built to the requirements specified in paragraph (a)(1). (c) When overloaded in... respect to the petition; (ii) Information, including detailed drawings and material specifications... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design...

  6. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equipment was not built to the requirements specified in paragraph (a)(1). (c) When overloaded in... respect to the petition; (ii) Information, including detailed drawings and material specifications... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design...

  7. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equipment was not built to the requirements specified in paragraph (a)(1). (c) When overloaded in... respect to the petition; (ii) Information, including detailed drawings and material specifications... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design...

  8. Residual strength of cracked 7075 T6 Al-alloy sheets under high loading rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasek, A.; Schijve, J.

    1995-04-01

    Dynamic tests were carried out on long sheet specimens with two collinear cracks. First the ligament between the two cracks fails, which implies that the cracks are linked up to a single crack. Linking up did increase the loading rate (dK/dt) of the outer crack tips up to 2 x 10(exp 4) MPa (sq root) m/s. COD measurements during the fast running crack were made. The residual strength was decreased by about 10 percent as compared to the quasi-static result. Fractographic evidence indicates that a high dK/dt has some effect on the shear lips. It promotes some plane-strain influence, associated with an increased yield stress, due to the high plastic strain rate in the crack tip zone. The results were evaluated in terms of fracture mechanics. The results are bearing on the damage tolerance of aircraft structures built up from 7075-T6 sheet material.

  9. Mechanical strength study of SiO2 isolation blocks merged in silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, O.; Postnikov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Quasi-static bending, compressive, tensile and fatigue tests of freestanding thermally oxidized crystal silicon microelements fabricated by the deep-reactive-ion etching process were performed to evaluate the strength and the reliability of structures. These structures serve as bearings and electrical isolation for microelectromechanical systems. The tests were conducted at device level using a specially designed electromagnetic actuator based on a testing machine (load range: 1 mN-1 N, accuracy: ± 0.08 mN) which enables mechanical testing of microelements. We have developed a method to calibrate an actuator using the silicon cantilevers on the microscale. A finite element model of the test structure is proposed. This model is used to calculate the displacements and stresses produced by an applied load force. Isolation structures are fractured from both the front and back sides of the wafer, and fracture strength results are compiled for each of these cases. It was found that the tensile strength of the structures is 200 MPa and the ultimate bending stress is 550 MPa. Data on strength and failure stress as found in the study may be very important for reliability evaluation of isolation merged in single crystal silicon wafer.

  10. Static Properties of Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory S.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * CHIRAL FIELD THEORY * The Skyrme Lagrangian * Topological Solitons * Symmetries and Currents * THE SKYRMION * The Hedgehog * The Shape Function * The Rotating Soliton * QUANTIZATION * Quantization and Wave Functions * Matrix Elements * STATIC PROPERTIES * Masses * Sizes and Magnetic Moments * Electric and Magnetic Transition Elements * Axial Coupling and the Goldberger-Treiman Relation * More Results and Predictions * DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS * APPENDIX A: NOTATION * APPENDIX B: PAULI MATRIX ALGEBRA * APPENDIX C: THE ADJOINT REPRESENTATION OF SU(2) * APPENDIX D: A FEW USEFUL FACTS * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  11. Dynamic and static moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. H.; Johnston, David H.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic bulk moduli (Ks and Kd) are measured as continuous functions of pressure from zero to 2-3 kilobars for two sandstones, a tuff, limestone, granite, and oil shale. Results for the sandstones and granite are in good agreement with previously reported data with Ks/Kd varying from about 0.5 at atmospheric pressure to close to unity at pressures 2 kilobars and above. For rocks behaving elastically under static loading, the Ks/Kd ratio is inversely related to the microcrack density. For the limestone, time dependent deformation associated with pore collapse results in Ks/Kd ratios approaching 0.1 at high pressure. Upon unloading, while initially high ( ˜ 1.0) at high pressures, Ks/Kd becomes lower than values obtained during loading at low pressures ( < 1 kilobar) due to opening of microcracks generated during pore collapse. For the oil shale, in which few microcracks exist, Ks/Kd remains relatively constant with pressure at a value of about 0.7.

  12. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  13. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  14. Static friction between silicon nanowires and elastomeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qingquan; Zhu, Yong

    2011-09-27

    This paper reports the first direct measurements of static friction force and interfacial shear strength between silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). A micromanipulator is used to manipulate and deform the NWs under a high-magnification optical microscope in real time. The static friction force is measured based on "the most-bent state" of the NWs. The static friction and interface shear strength are found to depend on the ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) treatment of PDMS. The shear strength starts at 0.30 MPa without UVO treatment, increases rapidly up to 10.57 MPa at 60 min of treatment and decreases for longer treatment. Water contact angle measurements suggest that the UVO-induced hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion of PDMS surface is responsible for the increase in the static friction, while the hydrophobic recovery effect contributes to the decrease. The static friction between NWs and PDMS is of critical relevance to many device applications of NWs including NW-based flexible/stretchable electronics, NW assembly and nanocomposites (e.g., supercapacitors). Our results will enable quantitative interface design and control for such applications.

  15. Convective quasi-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.-I.; Plant, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The concept of convective quasi-equilibrium (CQE) is a key ingredient in order to understand the role of deep moist convection in the atmosphere. It has been used as a guiding principle to develop almost all convective parameterizations and provides a basic theoretical framework for large-scale tropical dynamics. The CQE concept as originally proposed by Arakawa and Schubert (1974) is systematically reviewed from wider perspectives. Various interpretations and extensions of Arakawa and Schubert's CQE are considered both in terms of a thermodynamic analogy and as a dynamical balance. The thermodynamic interpretations can be more emphatically embraced as a homeostasis. The dynamic balance interpretations can be best understood by analogy with the slow manifold. Various criticisms of CQE can be avoided by taking the dynamic balance interpretation. Possible limits of CQE are also discussed, including the importance of triggering in many convective situations, as well as the possible self-organized criticality of tropical convection. However, the most intriguing aspect of the CQE concept is that in spite of many observational tests supporting and interpreting it in many different senses, it has never been established in a robust manner based on a systematic analysis of the cloud work function budget by observations as was originally defined.

  16. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  17. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  18. Elastic properties, strength and damage tolerance of pultruded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Mrinal Chandra

    Pultruded composites are candidate materials for civil engineering infrastructural applications due their higher corrosion resistance and lower life cycle cost. Efficient use of materials like structural members requires thorough understanding of the mechanism that affects their response. The present investigation addresses the modeling and characterization of E-glass fiber/polyester resin matrix pultruded composites in the form of sheets of various thicknesses. The elastic constants were measured using static, vibration and ultrasonic methods. Two types of piezoelectric crystals were used in ultrasonic measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using a single specimen, in the form of a circular disk, was shown in measuring all the elastic constants using ultrasonic technique. The effects of stress gradient on tensile strength were investigated. A large number of specimens, parallel and transverse to the pultrusion direction, were tested in tension, 3-point flexure, and 4-point flexure. A 2-parameter Weibull model was applied to predict the tensile strength from the flexure tests. The measured and Weibull-predicted ratios did not show consistent agreement. Microstructural observations suggested that the flaw distribution in the material was not uniform, which appears to be a basic requirement for the Weibull distribution. Compressive properties were measured using a short-block compression test specimen of 44.4-mm long and 25.4-mm wide. Specimens were tested at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° orientations. The compression test specimen was modeled using 4-noded isoparametric layered plate and shell elements. The predicted elastic properties for the roving layer and the continuous strand mat layer was used for the finite element study. The damage resistance and damage tolerance were investigated experimentally. Using a quasi-static indentation loading, damage was induced at various incrementally increased force levels to investigate the damage growth process. Damage

  19. Monopole Strength Function of Deformed Superfluid Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Kortelainen, E. M.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Losa, C.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strength for strongly deformed configurations in ^{240}Pu by considering huge quasi-particle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-bound and weakly bound nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  20. Luttinger parameter of quasi-one-dimensional para -H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, G.; Gordillo, M. C.; Boronat, J.

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the ground-state properties of para-hydrogen in one dimension and in quasi-one-dimensional configurations using the path-integral ground-state Monte Carlo method. This method produces zero-temperature exact results for a given interaction and geometry. The quasi-one-dimensional setup has been implemented in two forms: the inner channel inside a carbon nanotube coated with H2 and a harmonic confinement of variable strength. Our main result is the dependence of the Luttinger parameter on the density within the stable regime. Going from one dimension to quasi-one dimension, keeping the linear density constant, produces a systematic increase of the Luttinger parameter. This increase is, however, not enough to reach the superfluid regime and the system always remain in the quasicrystal regime, according to Luttinger liquid theory.

  1. Orientational ordering, buckling, and dynamic transitions for vortices interacting with a periodic quasi-one-dimensional substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Thien, Q.; McDermott, D.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the statics and dynamics of vortices in the presence of a periodic quasi-one-dimensional substrate, focusing on the limit where the vortex lattice constant is smaller than the substrate lattice period. As a function of the substrate strength and filling factor, within the pinned state, we observe a series of order-disorder transitions associated with buckling phenomena in which the number of vortex rows that fit between neighboring substrate maxima increases. These transitions coincide with steps in the depinning threshold, jumps in the density of topological defects, and changes in the structure factor. At the buckling transition, the vortices are disordered, while between the buckling transitions the vortices form a variety of crystalline and partially ordered states. In the weak substrate limit, the buckling transitions are absent and the vortices form an ordered hexagonal lattice that undergoes changes in its orientation with respect to the substrate as a function of vortex density. At intermediate substrate strength, certain ordered states appear that are correlated with peaks in the depinning force. Under an applied drive, the system exhibits a rich variety of distinct dynamical phases, including plastic flow, a density-modulated moving crystal, and moving floating solid phases. We also find a dynamic smectic-to-smectic transition in which the smectic ordering changes from being aligned with the substrate to being aligned with the external drive. The different dynamical phases can be characterized using velocity histograms and the structure factor. We discuss how these results are related to recent experiments on vortex ordering in thin films with periodic thickness modulations. Our results should also be relevant for other types of systems such as ions, colloids, or Wigner crystals interacting with periodic quasi-one-dimensional substrates.

  2. Strength Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... strengthens your heart and lungs. When you strength train with weights, you're using your muscles to ... see there are lots of different ways to train with weights. Try a few good basic routines ...

  3. No-dipole-hair theorem for higher-dimensional static black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Emparan, Roberto; Ohashi, Seiju; Shiromizu, Tetsuya

    2010-10-15

    We prove that static black holes in n-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetime cannot support nontrivial electric p-form field strengths when (n+1)/2{<=}p{<=}n-1. This implies, in particular, that static black holes cannot possess dipole hair under these fields.

  4. Perturbative no-hair property of form fields for higher dimensional static black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Seiju; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2011-04-15

    In this paper we examine the static perturbation of p-form field strengths around higher dimensional Schwarzschild spacetimes. As a result, we can see that the static perturbations do not exist when p{>=}3. This result supports the no-hair properties of p-form fields. However, this does not exclude the presence of the black objects having nonspherical topology.

  5. Investigation of static and cyclic bearing failure mechanisms for GR/EP laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. W.; Tuttle, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Static, cyclic load (fatigue), and residual strength testing of graphite-epoxy (GR/EP) and aluminum pin bearing joints was completed to study bearing failure mechanisms. Parameters investigated included static strength, failure mode, fatigue life, hole growth, joint stiffness, and residual strength. Comparative evaluation of these results show that the MIL-HDBK-5 convention for the definition of bearing strength can be used for GR/EP materials while maintaining the same, or improved, level of structural integrity shown for metal joints.

  6. Experimental study on the seismic behavior of high strength concrete filled double-tube columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jiaru; Li, Ningbo; Ji, Xiaodong; Zhao, Zuozhou

    2014-03-01

    To study the seismic behavior of high strength concrete filled double-tube (CFDT) columns, each consisting of an external square steel tube and an internal circular steel tube, quasi-static tests on eight CFDT column specimens were conducted. The test variables included the width-to-thickness ratio ( β 1) and the area ratio ( β 2) of the square steel tube, the wall thickness of the circular steel tube, and the axial force (or the axial force ratio) applied to the CFDT columns. The test results indicate that for CFDT columns with a square steel tube with β 1 of 50.1 and 24.5, local buckling of the specimen was found at a drift ratio of 1/150 and 1/50, respectively. The lateral force-displacement hysteretic loops of all specimens were plump and stable. Reducing the width-to-thickness ratio of the square steel tube, increasing its area ratio, or increasing the wall thickness of the internal circular steel tube, led to an increased flexural strength and deformation capacity of the specimens. Increasing the design value of the axial force ratio from 0.8 to 1.0 may increase the flexural strength of the specimens, while it may also decrease the ultimate deformation capacity of the specimen with β 1 of 50.1.

  7. Age and Individual Differences in Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined age group and individual differences in controlled force exertion by emulating sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 222 right-handed female adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects matched their submaximal grip strength by the dominant hand to changing demand values displayed as either a sinusoidal or a quasi-random…

  8. Thermal properties of molecular crystals through dispersion-corrected quasi-harmonic ab initio calculations: the case of urea.

    PubMed

    Erba, Alessandro; Maul, Jefferson; Civalleri, Bartolomeo

    2016-01-31

    An ab initio quantum-mechanical theoretical framework is presented to compute the thermal properties of molecular crystals. The present strategy combines dispersion-corrected density-functional-theory (DFT-D), harmonic phonon dispersion, quasi-harmonic approximation to the lattice dynamics for thermal expansion and thermodynamic functions, and quasi-static approximation for anisotropic thermo-elasticity. The proposed scheme is shown to reliably describe thermal properties of the urea molecular crystal by a thorough comparison with experimental data.

  9. The Bearing Capacity of Floating Ice Plates Subjected to Static or Quasi-Static Loads. A Critical Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    at"), where t is time and a and ß are constants to be determined from experi- mental data (ref. 6. eq 177). However, these approaches have no...Minerva Tecnica . :j. Assur. A. (1962) Surfacing submarines through ice. Proc. Army Science Conference, vol. I. 4. Assur, A. (1967) Flexural and

  10. Load monitoring of aerospace structures utilizing micro-electro-mechanical systems for static and quasi-static loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M.; Rocha, B.; Li, M.; Shi, G.; Beltempo, A.; Rutledge, R.; Yanishevsky, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Research Council Canada (NRC) has worked on the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) test platforms for assessing the performance of sensor systems for load monitoring applications. The first SHM platform consists of a 5.5 m cantilever aluminum beam that provides an optimal scenario for evaluating the ability of a load monitoring system to measure bending, torsion and shear loads. The second SHM platform contains an added level of structural complexity, by consisting of aluminum skins with bonded/riveted stringers, typical of an aircraft lower wing structure. These two load monitoring platforms are well characterized and documented, providing loading conditions similar to those encountered during service. In this study, a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) for acquiring data from triads of gyroscopes, accelerometers and magnetometers is described. The system was used to compute changes in angles at discrete stations along the platforms. The angles obtained from the MEMS were used to compute a second, third or fourth order degree polynomial surface from which displacements at every point could be computed. The use of a new Kalman filter was evaluated for angle estimation, from which displacements in the structure were computed. The outputs of the newly developed algorithms were then compared to the displacements obtained from the linear variable displacement transducers connected to the platforms. The displacement curves were subsequently post-processed either analytically, or with the help of a finite element model of the structure, to estimate strains and loads. The estimated strains were compared with baseline strain gauge instrumentation installed on the platforms. This new approach for load monitoring was able to provide accurate estimates of applied strains and shear loads.

  11. Johnson-Cook Strength Model for Automotive Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantam, K.

    2005-07-01

    Over the last few years most automotive companies are engaged in performing simulations of the capability of individual components or entire structure of a motor vehicle to adequately sustain the shock (impacts) and to protect the occupants from injuries during crashes. These simulations require constitutive material models (e.g., Johnson-Cook) of the sheet steel and other components based on the compression/tension data obtained in a series of tests performed at quasi-static (˜1/s) to high strain rates (˜2000/s). One such study is undertaken by the recently formed IISI (International Iron and Steel Institute) in organizing the round robin tests to compare the tensile data generated at our Laboratory at strain rates of ˜1/s, ˜300/s, ˜800/s, and ˜2000/s on two grades of automotive steel (Mild steel and Dual Phase-DP 590) using split Hopkinson bar with those generated at high strain rate testing facilities in Germany and Japan. Our tension data on mild steel (flow stress ˜ 500 MPa) suggest a relatively small strain rate sensitivity of the material. The second steel grade (DP-590) tested exhibits significant strain rate sensitivity in that the flow stress increases from about 700 MPa (at ˜1/s) to 900 MPa (at ˜2000/s). J-C strength model constants (A, B, n, and C) for the two steel grades will be presented.

  12. 14 CFR 25.305 - Strength and deformation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... strength is shown by dynamic tests simulating actual load conditions, the 3-second limit does not apply. Static tests conducted to ultimate load must include the ultimate deflections and ultimate deformation... appreciably higher than those corresponding to static loads, the effects of this rate of application must...

  13. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  14. Structural testing for static failure, flutter and other scary things

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Ground test and flight test methods are described that may be used to highlight potential structural problems that occur on aircraft. Primary interest is focused on light-weight general aviation airplanes. The structural problems described include static strength failure, aileron reversal, static divergence, and flutter. An example of each of the problems is discussed to illustrate how the data acquired during the tests may be used to predict the occurrence of the structural problem. While some rules of thumb for the prediction of structural problems are given the report is not intended to be used explicitly as a structural analysis handbook.

  15. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-01

    The "shear fracture" which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of "shear fracture" phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a "shear fracture" in the component.

  16. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  17. Static Dissipative Cable Ties, Such as for Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langley, Patrick T. (Inventor); Siddique, Fazle E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods of cyclically heating and cooling an article formed of a static dissipative ETFE resin, such as to reduce an electrical resistivity and/or to increase a tensile strength of the article, and methods of irradiating an article formed of a static dissipative ETFE resin, such as to increase a tensile strength of the article. Also disclosed herein are articles formed of a static dissipative ETFE resin, and processed in accordance with methods disclosed herein. Such an article may include, for example and without limitation, a cable strap to wrap, support, and/or secure one or more wires or cables, such as a cable tie.

  18. Review of Modelling Techniques for In Vivo Muscle Force Estimation in the Lower Extremities during Strength Training

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Florian; Oberhofer, Katja; Taylor, William R.; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of the musculoskeletal loading conditions during strength training is essential for performance monitoring, injury prevention, rehabilitation, and training design. However, measuring muscle forces during exercise performance as a primary determinant of training efficacy and safety has remained challenging. Methods. In this paper we review existing computational techniques to determine muscle forces in the lower limbs during strength exercises in vivo and discuss their potential for uptake into sports training and rehabilitation. Results. Muscle forces during exercise performance have almost exclusively been analysed using so-called forward dynamics simulations, inverse dynamics techniques, or alternative methods. Musculoskeletal models based on forward dynamics analyses have led to considerable new insights into muscular coordination, strength, and power during dynamic ballistic movement activities, resulting in, for example, improved techniques for optimal performance of the squat jump, while quasi-static inverse dynamics optimisation and EMG-driven modelling have helped to provide an understanding of low-speed exercises. Conclusion. The present review introduces the different computational techniques and outlines their advantages and disadvantages for the informed usage by nonexperts. With sufficient validation and widespread application, muscle force calculations during strength exercises in vivo are expected to provide biomechanically based evidence for clinicians and therapists to evaluate and improve training guidelines. PMID:26417378

  19. Optimizing the qusai-static folding and deploying of thin-walled tube flexure hinges with double slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Deng, Zongquan; Liu, Rongqiang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Hongwei

    2014-03-01

    The thin-walled tube flexure(TWTF) hinges have important potential application value in the deployment mechanisms of satellite and solar array, but the optimal design of the TWTF hinges haven't been completely solved, which restricts their applications. An optimal design method for the qusai-static folding and deploying of TWTF hinges with double slots is presented based on the response surface theory. Firstly, the full factorial method is employed to design of the experiments. Then, the finite element models of the TWTF hinges with double slots are constructed to simulate the qusai-static folding and deploying non-linear analysis. What's more, the mathematical model of the TWTF flexure hinge quasi-static folding and deploying properties are derived by the response surface method. Considering of small mass and high stability, the peak moment of quasi-static folding and deploying as well as the lightless are set as the objectives to get the optimal performances. The relative errors of the objectives between the optimal design results and the FE analysis results are less than 7%, which demonstrates the precision of the surrogate models. Lastly, the parameter study shows that both the slots length and the slots width both have significant effects to the peak moment of quasi-static folding and deploying of TWTF hinges with double slots. However, the maximum Mises stress of quasi-static folding is more sensitive to the slots length than the slots width. The proposed research can be applied to optimize other thin-walled flexure hinges under quasi-static folding and deploying, which is of great importance to design of flexure hinges with high stability and low stress.

  20. Einstein static universe from GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atazadeh, K.; Darabi, F.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the existence and stability of the Einstein static universe under the Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) effects. We show that this solution in the presence of perfect fluid with a minimal length is cyclically stable around a center equilibrium point. By taking linear homogeneous perturbations, we find that the scale factor of Einstein static universe for closed deformed isotropic and homogeneous FLRW universe depends on the GUP coupling parameter α. Thus, in the model by GUP effects, our universe can stay at the Einstein static state past-eternally, which means that the big bang singularity might be resolved successfully by an emergent scenario.