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Sample records for quasi rotational levels

  1. Application of quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to the calculation of rotational energy levels of methane vibrational polyads.

    PubMed

    Cassam-Chenaï, P; Rousseau, G; Ilmane, A; Bouret, Y; Rey, M

    2015-07-21

    In previous works, we have introduced an alternative perturbation scheme to find approximate solutions of the spectral problem for the rotation-vibration molecular Hamiltonian. An important feature of our approach is that the zero order Hamiltonian is the direct product of a purely vibrational Hamiltonian with the identity on the rotational degrees of freedom. The convergence of our method for the methane vibrational ground state was very satisfactory and our predictions were quantitative. In the present article, we provide further details on the implementation of the method in the degenerate and quasi-degenerate cases. The quasi-degenerate version of the method is tested on excited polyads of methane, and the results are assessed with respect to a variational treatment. The optimal choice of the size of quasi-degenerate spaces is determined by a trade-off between speed of convergence of the perturbation series and the computational effort to obtain the effective super-Hamiltonian. PMID:26203014

  2. Application of quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to the calculation of rotational energy levels of methane vibrational polyads

    SciTech Connect

    Cassam-Chenaï, P. Rousseau, G.; Ilmane, A.; Bouret, Y.; Rey, M.

    2015-07-21

    In previous works, we have introduced an alternative perturbation scheme to find approximate solutions of the spectral problem for the rotation-vibration molecular Hamiltonian. An important feature of our approach is that the zero order Hamiltonian is the direct product of a purely vibrational Hamiltonian with the identity on the rotational degrees of freedom. The convergence of our method for the methane vibrational ground state was very satisfactory and our predictions were quantitative. In the present article, we provide further details on the implementation of the method in the degenerate and quasi-degenerate cases. The quasi-degenerate version of the method is tested on excited polyads of methane, and the results are assessed with respect to a variational treatment. The optimal choice of the size of quasi-degenerate spaces is determined by a trade-off between speed of convergence of the perturbation series and the computational effort to obtain the effective super-Hamiltonian.

  3. KIC 10526294: a slowly rotating B star with rotationally split, quasi-equally spaced gravity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pápics, P. I.; Moravveji, E.; Aerts, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Triana, S. A.; Bloemen, S.; Southworth, J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Massive stars are important for the chemical enrichment of the universe. Since internal mixing processes influence their lives, it is very important to place constraints on the corresponding physical parameters, such as core overshooting and the internal rotation profile, so as to calibrate their stellar structure and evolution models. Although asteroseismology has been shown to be able to deliver the most precise constraints so far, the number of detailed seismic studies delivering quantitative results is limited. Aims: Our goal is to extend this limited sample with an in-depth case study and provide a well-constrained set of asteroseismic parameters, contributing to the ongoing mapping efforts of the instability strips of the β Cep and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars. Methods: We derived fundamental parameters from high-resolution spectra using spectral synthesis techniques. We used custom masks to obtain optimal light curves from the original pixel level data from the Kepler satellite. We used standard time-series analysis tools to construct a set of significant pulsation modes that provide the basis for the seismic analysis carried out afterwards. Results: We find that KIC 10526294 is a cool SPB star, one of the slowest rotators ever found. Despite this, the length of Kepler observations is sufficient to resolve narrow rotationally split multiplets for each of its nineteen quasi-equally spaced dipole modes. The number of detected consecutive (in radial order) dipole modes in this series is higher than ever before. The observed amount of splitting shows an increasing trend towards longer periods, which - largely independent of the seismically calibrated stellar models - points towards a non-rigid internal rotation profile. From the average splitting we deduce a rotation period of ~188 days. From seismic modelling, we find that the star is young with a central hydrogen mass fraction Xc> 0.64; it has a core overshooting αov ≤ 0.15. Based on

  4. Rotation elastogram: a novel method to visualize local rigid body rotation under quasi-static compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmiya, C.; Kothawala, Ali Arshad; Thittai, Arun K.

    2016-04-01

    During manual palpation of breast masses, the perception of its stiffness and slipperiness are the two commonly used information by the physician. In order to reliably and quantitatively obtain this information several non-invasive elastography techniques have been developed that seek to provide an image of the underlying mechanical properties, mostly stiffness-related. Very few approaches have visualized the "slip" at the lesion-background boundary that only occurs for a loosely-bonded benign lesion. It has been shown that axial-shear strain distribution provides information about underlying slip. One such feature, referred to as "fill-in" was interpreted as a surrogate of the rotation undergone by an asymmetrically-oriented-loosely bonded-benign-lesion under quasi-static compression. However, imaging and direct visualization of the rotation itself has not been addressed yet. In order to accomplish this, the quality of lateral displacement estimation needs to be improved. In this simulation study, we utilize spatial compounding approach and assess the feasibility to obtain good quality rotation elastogram. The angular axial and lateral displacement estimates were obtained at different insonification angles from a phantom containing an elliptical inclusion oriented at 45°, subjected to 1% compression from the top. A multilevel 2D-block matching algorithm was used for displacement tracking and 2D-least square compounding of angular axial and lateral displacement estimates was employed. By varying the maximum steering angle and incremental angle, the improvement in the lateral motion tracking accuracy and its effects on the quality of rotational elastogram were evaluated. Results demonstrate significantly-improved rotation elastogram using this technique.

  5. Quasi 9 and 30-40 days periodicities in the solar differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaraiah, J.

    2011-09-01

    Using the daily Mt. Wilson Doppler velocity data during 1986-1994 (solar cycle 22), we studied the short-term variations of the order of a few days to a month timescales in the solar differential rotation. We represent the differential rotation in the form: ω(λ)=A¯+B¯(5sin2λ-1)+C¯(21sin4λ-14sin2λ+1), using a set of Gegenbauer polynomials, where ω( λ) is the angular velocity at latitude λ. The coefficients A¯,B¯, and C¯ are free of crosstalk. We found that ≈9-day periodicity is statistically highly significant in the variations of C¯ at the maximum of solar cycle 22. A similar periodicity is found in the variations of B¯ during the descending phase of the cycle 22 with significant on ⩾99.9% confidence level. At this cycle maximum, a 30-40 day periodicity is found to be dominant among the variations in B¯, and this periodicity is found in A¯ during almost throughout the period 1986-1994. The ≈9-day periodicity in the variation of the differential rotation approximately matches with the known quasi 10-day periodicity in the total solar irradiance (TSI) variability. Hence, we speculate that there exists a relationship between the differential rotation and TSI variability. We suggest that the 9-10 day periodicities of the differential rotation and TSI have a relationship with the production and the emergence rates of the large-scale solar magnetic flux.

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    SciTech Connect

    Hougen, J.T.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  7. Self-consistent models of quasi-relaxed rotating stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: Two new families of self-consistent axisymmetric truncated equilibrium models for the description of quasi-relaxed rotating stellar systems are presented. The first extends the well-known spherical King models to the case of solid-body rotation. The second is characterized by differential rotation, designed to be rigid in the central regions and to vanish in the outer parts, where the imposed energy truncation becomes effective. Methods: The models are constructed by solving the relevant nonlinear Poisson equation for the self-consistent mean-field potential. For rigidly rotating configurations, the solutions are obtained by an asymptotic expansion based on the rotation strength parameter, following a procedure developed earlier by us for the case of tidally generated triaxial models. The differentially rotating models are constructed by means of a spectral iterative approach, with a numerical scheme based on a Legendre series expansion of the density and the potential. Results: The two classes of models exhibit complementary properties. The rigidly rotating configurations are flattened toward the equatorial plane, with deviations from spherical symmetry that increase with the distance from the center. For models of the second family, the deviations from spherical symmetry are strongest in the central region, whereas the outer parts tend to be quasi-spherical. The relevant parameter spaces are thoroughly explored and the corresponding intrinsic and projected structural properties are described. Special attention is given to the effect of different options for the truncation of the distribution function in phase space. Conclusions: Models in the moderate rotation regime are best suited to applications to globular clusters. For general interest in stellar dynamics, at high values of the rotation strength the differentially rotating models tend to exhibit a toroidal core embedded in an otherwise quasi-spherical configuration. Physically simple analytical models

  8. Testing gravity of a regular and slowly rotating phantom black hole by quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songbai; Wang, Mei; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-10-01

    We extend firstly the regular phantom black hole solution to a slowly rotating black hole case and find that the phantom field depresses the angular velocity of the event horizon and suppresses the super-radiation of the black hole. We also probe the dependence of quasi-periodic oscillations frequencies in a relativistic precession model on the phantom parameter. With the observation data of GRO J1655-40, we make a constraint on the parameters of the regular and slowly rotating phantom black hole. Our results show that although the best-fit value of the phantom parameter b is small, the allowed value of b in the 1σ region is b\\lt 0.619, which means that the phantom theoretical model cannot be excluded by the constraint from quasi-periodic oscillations with the observation data of GRO J1655-40.

  9. Orbital motion and quasi-quantized disk around rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Joan Jing; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang

    2014-04-01

    In accreting neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, NS accretes material from its low-mass companion via a Keplerian disk. In a viscous accretion disk, inflows orbit the NS and spiral in due to dissipative processes, such as the viscous process and collisions of elements. The dynamics of accretion flows in the inner region of an accretion disk is significantly affected by the rotation of NS. The rotation makes NS, thus the spacetime metric, deviate from the originally spherical symmetry, and leads to gravitational quadrupole, on one hand. On the other hand, a rotating NS drags the local inertial frame in its vicinity, which is known as the rotational frame-dragging effect. In this paper, we investigate the orbital motion of accretion flows of accreting NS/LMXBs and demonstrate that the rotational effects of NS result in a band of quasi-quantized structure in the inner region of the accretion disk, which is different, in nature, from the scenario in the strong gravity of black hole arising from the resonance for frequencies related to epicyclic and orbital motions. We also demonstrate that such a disk structure may account for frequencies seen in X-ray variability, such as quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), and can be a potential promising tool for the investigation of photon polarization.

  10. Spin-orbit coupling and chaotic rotation for coorbital bodies in quasi-circular orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Robutel, Philippe

    2013-12-10

    Coorbital bodies are observed around the Sun sharing their orbits with the planets, but also in some pairs of satellites around Saturn. The existence of coorbital planets around other stars has also been proposed. For close-in planets and satellites, the rotation slowly evolves due to dissipative tidal effects until some kind of equilibrium is reached. When the orbits are nearly circular, the rotation period is believed to always end synchronous with the orbital period. Here we demonstrate that for coorbital bodies in quasi-circular orbits, stable non-synchronous rotation is possible for a wide range of mass ratios and body shapes. We show the existence of an entirely new family of spin-orbit resonances at the frequencies n ± kν/2, where n is the orbital mean motion, ν the orbital libration frequency, and k an integer. In addition, when the natural rotational libration frequency due to the axial asymmetry, σ, has the same magnitude as ν, the rotation becomes chaotic. Saturn coorbital satellites are synchronous since ν << σ, but coorbital exoplanets may present non-synchronous or chaotic rotation. Our results prove that the spin dynamics of a body cannot be dissociated from its orbital environment. We further anticipate that a similar mechanism may affect the rotation of bodies in any mean-motion resonance.

  11. Quasi-static stop band with flexural metamaterial having zero rotational stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials realizing stop bands have attracted much attentions recently since they can break-through the well-known mass law. However, achieving the stop band at extremely low frequency has been still a big challenge in the fields of elastic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a new metamaterial based on the idea of the zero rotational stiffness, to achieve extremely low frequency stop band for flexural elastic waves. Unlike the previous ways to achieve the stop band, we found that the zero rotational stiffness can provide a broad stop band at extremely low frequency, which starts from even almost zero frequency. To achieve the zero rotational stiffness, we propose a new elastic metamaterial consisting of blocks and links with the hinge connection. Analytic developments as well as numerical simulations evidence that this new metamaterial can exhibit extremely low and broad stop band, even at the quasi-static ranges. In addition, the metamaterial is shown to exhibit the negative group velocity at extremely low frequency ranges, as well as the quasi-static stop band, if it is properly designed.

  12. Quasi-static stop band with flexural metamaterial having zero rotational stiffness.

    PubMed

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials realizing stop bands have attracted much attentions recently since they can break-through the well-known mass law. However, achieving the stop band at extremely low frequency has been still a big challenge in the fields of elastic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a new metamaterial based on the idea of the zero rotational stiffness, to achieve extremely low frequency stop band for flexural elastic waves. Unlike the previous ways to achieve the stop band, we found that the zero rotational stiffness can provide a broad stop band at extremely low frequency, which starts from even almost zero frequency. To achieve the zero rotational stiffness, we propose a new elastic metamaterial consisting of blocks and links with the hinge connection. Analytic developments as well as numerical simulations evidence that this new metamaterial can exhibit extremely low and broad stop band, even at the quasi-static ranges. In addition, the metamaterial is shown to exhibit the negative group velocity at extremely low frequency ranges, as well as the quasi-static stop band, if it is properly designed. PMID:27651146

  13. Quasi-static stop band with flexural metamaterial having zero rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials realizing stop bands have attracted much attentions recently since they can break-through the well-known mass law. However, achieving the stop band at extremely low frequency has been still a big challenge in the fields of elastic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a new metamaterial based on the idea of the zero rotational stiffness, to achieve extremely low frequency stop band for flexural elastic waves. Unlike the previous ways to achieve the stop band, we found that the zero rotational stiffness can provide a broad stop band at extremely low frequency, which starts from even almost zero frequency. To achieve the zero rotational stiffness, we propose a new elastic metamaterial consisting of blocks and links with the hinge connection. Analytic developments as well as numerical simulations evidence that this new metamaterial can exhibit extremely low and broad stop band, even at the quasi-static ranges. In addition, the metamaterial is shown to exhibit the negative group velocity at extremely low frequency ranges, as well as the quasi-static stop band, if it is properly designed. PMID:27651146

  14. Quasi-3D Navier-Stokes model for a rotating airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.Z.; Soerensen, J.N.

    1999-04-10

    The design of blade shapes for wind turbines is typically based on employing the blade-element momentum-theory (BEM) with lift and drag forces determined from 2D measurements. The results obtained are reasonable in the vicinity of the design point, but in stalled conditions the BEM is known to underpredict the forces acting on the blades. Here, a quasi-3D model of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in a rotating frame of reference has been developed. The equations governing the flow past a rotating blade are approximated using an order of magnitude analysis on the spanwise derivatives. The model takes into account rotational effects and spanwise outflow at computing expenses in the order of what is typical for similar 2D calculations. Results are presented for both laminar and turbulent flows past blades in pure rotation. In the turbulent case the influence of small-scale turbulence is modelled by the one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model. The computations demonstrate that the main influence of rotation is to increase the maximum lift.

  15. Quasi four-level Tm:LuAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor); Rodriguez, Waldo J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A quasi four-level solid-state laser is provided. A laser crystal is disposed in a laser cavity. The laser crystal has a LuAG-based host material doped to a final concentration between about 2% and about 7% thulium (Tm) ions. For the more heavily doped final concentrations, the LuAG-based host material is a LuAG seed crystal doped with a small concentration of Tm ions. Laser diode arrays are disposed transversely to the laser crystal for energizing the Tm ions.

  16. Strong gravity effects of rotating black holes: quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Daylan Esmer, Göksel; Talazan, Pamir

    2013-02-01

    We explore strong gravity effects of the geodesic motion in the spacetime of rotating black holes in general relativity and braneworld gravity. We focus on the description of the motion in terms of three fundamental frequencies: the orbital frequency, the radial and vertical epicyclic frequencies. For a Kerr black hole, we perform a detailed numerical analysis of these frequencies at the innermost stable circular orbits and beyond them as well as at the characteristic stable orbits, at which the radial epicyclic frequency attains its highest value. We find that the values of the epicyclic frequencies for a class of stable orbits exhibit good qualitative agreement with the observed frequencies of the twin peaks quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in some black hole binaries. We also find that at the characteristic stable circular orbits, where the radial (or the vertical) epicyclic frequency has maxima, the vertical and radial epicyclic frequencies exhibit an approximate 2:1 ratio even in the case of near-extreme rotation of the black hole. Next, we perform a similar analysis of the fundamental frequencies for a rotating braneworld black hole and argue that the existence of such a black hole with a negative tidal charge, whose angular momentum exceeds the Kerr bound in general relativity, does not confront with the observations of high-frequency QPOs.

  17. Non linear Quasi-Geostrophic thermal convection and dynamo in a rapidly rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, P.; Guervilly, C.

    2009-12-01

    Using a combination of a quasi-geostrophic (QG) model for the velocity field and a classical spectral 3D code for the temperature field, we compute thermal convective motions in a rapidly rotating full sphere. The QG flow is computed in the equatorial plane, whereas the temperature field is calculated within the full sphere. The coupling terms are evaluated by interpolating onto the 2D (equatorial) and 3D coarse grids. Our hybrid approach allows us to compute simulations at low Ekman numbers, low Prandtl numbers and explore the strongly non-linear regime currently inaccessible with purely 3D codes. We pay particular attention to the zonal winds generated by non-linear interactions between the convection columns. Understanding these zonal winds is especially relevant for the study of atmospheric layers of planets such as Jupiter and Saturn [1] and dynamo generation in convective dynamos. Moreover the 2D/3D approach has already been used successfully to obtain dynamos driven by a QG flow with a mechanical boundary forcing [2]. Following these ideas, we solve the magnetic induction equation in 3D to obtain dynamos for low Ekman, Prandtl and magnetic Prandtl numbers. [1] Heimpel, M.H., Aurnou, J.M., Wicht, J., 2005. Simulation of equatorial and high-latitude jets on Jupiter in a deep convection model. Nature 438, 193-196. [2] Schaeffer, N. and Cardin, P., 2006. Quasi-geostrophic kinematic dynamos at low magnetic Prandtl number. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 245, 595-604.

  18. Kinetic theory of quasi-stationary collisionless axisymmetric plasmas in the presence of strong rotation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2013-05-15

    The problem of formulating a kinetic treatment for quasi-stationary collisionless plasmas in axisymmetric systems subject to the possibly independent presence of local strong velocity-shear and supersonic rotation velocities is posed. The theory is developed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for multi-species non-relativistic plasmas. Applications to astrophysical accretion discs arising around compact objects and to plasmas in laboratory devices are considered. Explicit solutions for the equilibrium kinetic distribution function (KDF) are constructed based on the identification of the relevant particle adiabatic invariants. These are shown to be expressed in terms of generalized non-isotropic Gaussian distributions. A suitable perturbative theory is then developed which allows for the treatment of non-uniform strong velocity-shear/supersonic plasmas. This yields a series representation for the equilibrium KDF in which the leading-order term depends on both a finite set of fluid fields as well as on the gradients of an appropriate rotational frequency. Constitutive equations for the fluid number density, flow velocity, and pressure tensor are explicitly calculated. As a notable outcome, the discovery of a new mechanism for generating temperature and pressure anisotropies is pointed out, which represents a characteristic feature of plasmas considered here. This is shown to arise as a consequence of the canonical momentum conservation and to contribute to the occurrence of temperature anisotropy in combination with the adiabatic conservation of the particle magnetic moment. The physical relevance of the result and the implications of the kinetic solution for the self-generation of quasi-stationary electrostatic and magnetic fields through a kinetic dynamo are discussed.

  19. QUAGMIRE v1.3: a quasi-geostrophic model for investigating rotating fluids experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Haine, T. W. N.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2009-02-01

    QUAGMIRE is a quasi-geostrophic numerical model for performing fast, high-resolution simulations of multi-layer rotating annulus laboratory experiments on a desktop personal computer. The model uses a hybrid finite-difference/spectral approach to numerically integrate the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations of motion in cylindrical geometry in each layer. Version 1.3 implements the special case of two fluid layers of equal resting depths. The flow is forced either by a differentially rotating lid, or by relaxation to specified streamfunction or potential vorticity fields, or both. Dissipation is achieved through Ekman layer pumping and suction at the horizontal boundaries, including the internal interface. The effects of weak interfacial tension are included, as well as the linear topographic beta-effect and the quadratic centripetal beta-effect. Stochastic forcing may optionally be activated, to represent approximately the effects of random unresolved features. A leapfrog time stepping scheme is used, with a Robert filter. Flows simulated by the model agree well with those observed in the corresponding laboratory experiments.

  20. QUAGMIRE v1.3: a quasi-geostrophic model for investigating rotating fluids experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Haine, T. W. N.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2008-09-01

    QUAGMIRE is a quasi-geostrophic numerical model for performing fast, high-resolution simulations of multi-layer rotating annulus laboratory experiments on a desktop personal computer. The model uses a hybrid finite-difference/spectral approach to numerically integrate the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations of motion in cylindrical geometry in each layer. Version 1.3 implements the special case of two fluid layers of equal resting depths. The flow is forced either by a differentially rotating lid, or by relaxation to specified streamfunction or potential vorticity fields, or both. Dissipation is achieved through Ekman layer pumping and suction at the horizontal boundaries, including the internal interface. The effects of weak interfacial tension are included, as well as the linear topographic beta-effect and the quadratic centripetal beta-effect. Stochastic forcing may optionally be activated, to represent approximately the effects of random unresolved features. A leapfrog time stepping scheme is used, with a Robert filter. Flows simulated by the model agree well with those observed in the corresponding laboratory experiments.

  1. QUAGMIRE v1.3: a quasi-geostrophic model for investigating rotating fluids experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Haine, T. W. N.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2009-04-01

    The QUAGMIRE model has recently been made freely available for public use. QUAGMIRE is a quasi-geostrophic numerical model for performing fast, high-resolution simulations of multi-layer rotating annulus laboratory experiments on a desktop personal computer. This presentation describes the model's main features. QUAGMIRE uses a hybrid finite-difference/spectral approach to numerically integrate the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations of motion in cylindrical geometry in each layer. Version 1.3 implements the special case of two fluid layers of equal resting depths. The flow is forced either by a differentially rotating lid, or by relaxation to specified streamfunction or potential vorticity fields, or both. Dissipation is achieved through Ekman layer pumping and suction at the horizontal boundaries, including the internal interface. The effects of weak interfacial tension are included, as well as the linear topographic beta-effect and the quadratic centripetal beta-effect. Stochastic forcing may optionally be activated, to represent approximately the effects of random unresolved features. A leapfrog time stepping scheme is used, with a Robert filter. Flows simulated by the model agree well with those observed in the corresponding laboratory experiments.

  2. Study of the crossing of quasi-energy levels in a four-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Arushanyan, S; Melikyan, A; Saakyan, S

    2011-05-31

    It was shown previously that in taking into account only dipole transitions, the crossing of quasi-energy levels is possible in the system if any of the transitions forms a closed loop. It followed herefrom that for the analysis of the crossing conditions, it is necessary to consider a system which has at least four levels. In this paper we show that we can uniquely specify which quasi-energy levels cross at the given values of the parameters of the atomic system and radiation field, without solving an algebraic quartic equation. It was found that the most suitable system for the implementation of the crossing is the group of energy levels {sup 5}S{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 3/2} and {sup 5}D{sub 3/2} of a rubidium atom. The performed calculations of the laser field intensity and frequency values at which crossing takes place in this system show that they are easily attainable. It turned out that in this system there occur crossing of quasi-energy levels corresponding to the excited atomic levels. (intersection of quasi-energy levels)

  3. QSONIC- FULL POTENTIAL TRANSONIC, QUASI-THREE DIMENSIONAL FLOW THROUGH A ROTATING TURBOMACHINERY BLADE ROW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, QSONIC, has been developed for calculating the full potential, transonic quasi-three-dimensional flow through a rotating turbomachinery blade row. The need for lighter, more efficient turbomachinery components has led to the consideration of machines with fewer stages, each with blades capable of higher speeds and higher loading. As speeds increase, the numerical problems inherent in the transonic regime have to be resolved. These problems include the calculation of imbedded shock discontinuities and the dual nature of the governing equations, which are elliptic in the subcritical flow regions but become hyperbolic for supersonic zones. QSONIC provides the flow analyst with a fast and reliable means of obtaining the transonic potential flow distribution on a blade-to-blade stream surface of a stationary or rotating turbomachine blade row. QSONIC combines several promising transonic analysis techniques. The full potential equation in conservative form is discretized at each point on a body-fitted period mesh. A mass balance is calculated through the finite volume surrounding each point. Each local volume is corrected in the third dimension for any change in stream-tube thickness along the stream tube. The nonlinear equations for all volumes are of mixed type (elliptic or hyperbolic) depending on the local Mach number. The final result is a block-tridiagonal matrix formulation involving potential corrections at each grid point as the unknowns. The residual of each system of equations is solved along each grid line. At points where the Mach number exceeds unity, the density at the forward (sweeping) edge of the volume is replaced by an artificial density. This method calculates the flow field about a cascade of arbitrary two-dimensional airfoils. Three-dimensional flow is approximated in a turbomachinery blade row by correcting for stream-tube convergence and radius change in the through flow direction. Several significant assumptions were made in

  4. Characteristics of FRC plasmas sustained in quasi-steady state by Rotating Magnetic Field in the FIX apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsuhisa; Inomoto, Michiaki; Fukuda, Takeshi; Okada, Shigefumi; Higashikozono, Takamitsu; Goto, Seiichi

    2004-11-01

    The FRC (Field Reversed Configuration) plasma has been successfully produced and sustained in quasi-steady-state by the application of RMF (Rotating Magnetic Field) in FIX (FRC Injection eXperiment). The transverse RMF was applied to drive toroidal current and sustain FRC at frequencies between ion and electron cyclotron resonances. The experiment was carried out using the metal chamber. The inner radius of the chamber is 0.4m and 4 RMF antennas are located at r=0.3m. By the application of RMF, the axial field was reversed whilst the external field was increased by 50turned off. It has been hereby found that no rotating n=2 distortion was observed despite its small normalized radius of 0.5, which is contrary to the previous experiments in ROTAMAK, STX and TCS. In addition, it was confirmed that the decrement of the axial field is proportional to the RMF frequency (<160kHz) and magnetic strength.

  5. Multiple Quasi-Equilibria of the ITCZ and the Origin of Monsoon Onset. Part 2; Rotational ITCZ Attractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Chao's numerical and theoretical work on multiple quasi-equilibria of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and the origin of monsoon onset is extended to solve two additional puzzles. One is the highly nonlinear dependence on latitude of the "force" acting on the ITCZ due to earth's rotation, which makes the multiple quasi-equilibria of the ITCZ and monsoon onset possible. The other is the dramatic difference in such dependence when different cumulus parameterization schemes are used in a model. Such a difference can lead to a switch between a single ITCZ at the equator and a double ITCZ, when a different cumulus parameterization scheme is used. Sometimes one of the double ITCZ can diminish and only the other remain, but still this can mean different latitudinal locations for the single ITCZ. A single idea based on two off-equator attractors for the ITCZ, due to earth's rotation and symmetric with respect to the equator, and the dependence of the strength and size of these attractors on the cumulus parameterization scheme solves both puzzles. The origin of these rotational attractors, explained in Part I, is further discussed. The "force" acting on the ITCZ due to earth's rotation is the sum of the "forces" of the two attractors. Each attractor exerts on the ITCZ a "force" of simple shape in latitude; but the sum gives a shape highly varying in latitude. Also the strength and the domain of influence of each attractor vary, when change is made in the cumulus parameterization. This gives rise to the high sensitivity of the "force" shape to cumulus parameterization. Numerical results, of experiments using Goddard's GEOS general circulation model, supporting this idea are presented. It is also found that the model results are sensitive to changes outside of the cumulus parameterization. The significance of this study to El Nino forecast and to tropical forecast in general is discussed.

  6. Antihysteresis of perceived longitudinal body axis during continuous quasi-static whole-body rotation in the earth-vertical roll plane.

    PubMed

    Tatalias, M; Bockisch, C J; Bertolini, G; Straumann, D; Palla, A

    2011-03-01

    Estimation of subjective whole-body tilt in stationary roll positions after rapid rotations shows hysteresis. We asked whether this phenomenon is also present during continuous quasi-static whole-body rotation and whether gravitational cues are a major contributing factor. Using a motorized turntable, 8 healthy subjects were rotated continuously about the earth-horizontal naso-occipital axis (earth-vertical roll plane) and the earth-vertical naso-occipital axis (earth-horizontal roll plane). In both planes, three full constant velocity rotations (2°/s) were completed in clockwise and counterclockwise directions (acceleration = 0.05°/s(2), velocity plateau reached after 40 s). Subjects adjusted a visual line along the perceived longitudinal body axis (pLBA) every 2 s. pLBA deviation from the longitudinal body axis was plotted as a function of whole-body roll position, and a sine function was fitted. At identical whole-body earth-vertical roll plane positions, pLBA differed depending on whether the position was reached by a rotation from upright or by passing through upside down. After the first 360° rotation, pLBA at upright whole-body position deviated significantly in the direction of rotation relative to pLBA prior to rotation initiation. This deviation remained unchanged after subsequent full rotations. In contrast, earth-horizontal roll plane rotations resulted in similar pLBA before and after each rotation cycle. We conclude that the deviation of pLBA in the direction of rotation during quasi-static earth-vertical roll plane rotations reflects static antihysteresis and might be a consequence of the known static hysteresis of ocular counterroll: a visual line that is perceived that earth-vertical is expected to be antihysteretic, if ocular torsion is hysteretic.

  7. [Human tolerance to rotation at different levels of increased gravitation].

    PubMed

    Genin, A M; Kotovskaia, A R; Galle, R R; Gavrilova, L N; Sarkisov, I Iu

    1982-01-01

    The effects of acceleration of different value (up to 2 g) on the level of motion sickness, vestibular and postural reactions to rotation were studied. The experiments were carried out in a centrifuge equipped with a cabin that could be mounted at a different distance from the axis of rotation. Three experimental runs were conducted with a rate of rotation of 15.3 and accelerations values of 1.09, 1.6 and 2.0 g. Vestibular stimulation was produced by head movements of a predetermined number. It was found that with increase in the acceleration value the level of motion sickness decreased and the nystagmic reaction and balance dysfunction enhanced. PMID:6977679

  8. Effects of propeller rotation direction on airplane interior noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.; Daniels, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Interior noise measurements for upsweeping and downsweeping movement of the propeller blade tips past the fuselage were made on a twin-engine airplane and on two simplified fuselage models. Changes in interior noise levels of as much as 8 dB reversal of propeller rotation direction were measured for some configurations and test conditions.

  9. Conserved Quantities in General Relativity: From the Quasi-Local Level to Spatial Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ning; Wang, Mu-Tao; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-08-01

    We define quasi-local conserved quantities in general relativity by using the optimal isometric embedding in Wang and Yau (Commun Math Phys 288(3):919-942, 2009) to transplant Killing fields in the Minkowski spacetime back to the 2-surface of interest in a physical spacetime. To each optimal isometric embedding, a dual element of the Lie algebra of the Lorentz group is assigned. Quasi-local angular momentum and quasi-local center of mass correspond to pairing this element with rotation Killing fields and boost Killing fields, respectively. They obey classical transformation laws under the action of the Poincaré group. We further justify these definitions by considering their limits as the total angular momentum and the total center of mass of an isolated system. These expressions were derived from the Hamilton-Jacobi analysis of the gravitational action and thus satisfy conservation laws. As a result, we obtained an invariant total angular momentum theorem in the Kerr spacetime. For a vacuum asymptotically flat initial data set of order 1, it is shown that the limits are always finite without any extra assumptions. We also study these total conserved quantities on a family of asymptotically flat initial data sets evolving by the vacuum Einstein evolution equation. It is shown that the total angular momentum is conserved under the evolution. For the total center of mass, the classical dynamical formula relating the center of mass, energy, and linear momentum is recovered, in the nonlinear context of initial data sets evolving by the vacuum Einstein evolution equation. The definition of quasi-local angular momentum provides an answer to the second problem in classical general relativity on Penrose's list (Proc R Soc Lond Ser A 381(1780):53-63, 1982).

  10. Rotational Energies in Various Torsional Levels of CH_2DOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, L. H.; Hilali, A. El; Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Klee, S.

    2012-06-01

    Using an approach accounting for the hindered internal rotation of a monodeuterated methyl group, an analysis of the torsional spectrum of the monodeuterated species of methanol CH_2DOH has been carried out recently and led to the assignment of 76 torsional subbands in its microwave, FIR, and IR spectra. Although this approach also allowed us to account for subband centers, the rotational structure of the torsional subbands is not well understood yet. In this paper, we will deal with the rotational energies of CH_2DOH. Analyses of the rotational structure of the available subbands^b have been performed using the polynomial-type expansion introduced in the case of the normal species of methanol. For each subband, FIR or IR transitions and a-type microwave lines, within the lower torsional level, were fitted. The frequencies of the latters were taken from previous investigations or from new measurements carried out from 50 to 950 GHz with the submillimeterwave solid state spectrometer in Lille. Subbands involving lower levels with v_t=0 and K ≥ 3 could be satisfactorily analyzed. For levels characterized by lower K-values, the expansion fails. In the case of the K=1, v_t=1 level, the frequencies of a-type microwave transitions involving the lower member of the K-type doublet cannot be well reproduced. For K=0 levels with v_t=1 and 2, a large number of terms is needed in the expansion. We will try to understand why the rotational energies of these levels cannot be reproduced. The results of the analyses will be compared to those obtained with a global approach based on the rotation-torsion Hamiltonian of the molecule. [2] El Hilali, Coudert, Konov, and Klee, J. Chem. Phys. 135 (2011) 194309. [3] Ioli, Moruzzi, Riminucci, Strumia, Moraes, Winnewisser, and Winnewisser, J. Mol. Spec. 171 (1995) 130. [4] Quade and Suenram, J. Chem. Phys. 73 (1980) 1127; and Su and Quade, J. Mol. Spec. 134 (1989) 290. [5] Lauvergnat, Coudert, Klee, and Smirnov, J. Mol. Spec. 256 (2009

  11. Paleocene sea level movements with a 430,000 year quasi-periodic cyclicity

    SciTech Connect

    Briskin, M. ); Fluegeman, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Sea level movements with quasi-periodicity of 430,000 years are identified in the marine sedimentary units of the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain of Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia which represent a 5.8 million year record of strandline displacement during Paleocene time. Principal component analysis of the benthic foraminiferal fauna yielded six assemblages which when combined with two other qualitatively derived assemblages provided paleoecologic information which clearly reflects the influence of paleocirculation and paleoclimatic regime of the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The presence of the planktonic foraminiferal taxa Subbotina trinidadensis and Planorotalites pseudomenardii as well as paleolatitudes ranging from 15{degree} N (for the Campeche Shelf) to 25{degree} N (for the Coastal Plain) emphasizes a paleoclimatic regime which is dominantly tropical. A paleoceanographic model was derived which suggests that normal marine waters were brought into the Gulf of Mexico by two major currents. Strandline displacements are related to transgressive and regressive sea level movements in an ice free Paleocene world. The well delineated 430,000 year quasi-periodic cycle observed in the sea level curve is identified as being astronomical in character. These results support the view that changes in the Earth's orbit may trigger changes in the geometry of the Earth's surface in a way which causes sea level to oscillate with a quasi-periodicity of 430,000 years.

  12. Quasi-three-level Nd:GdVO4 laser under diode pumping directly into the emitting level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Zhang, K.; Gao, J.; Chen, F.; Li, X. D.; Yan, R. P.; Yu, J. H.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2008-11-01

    We present experimental investigation on quasi-three-level operation of Nd:GdVO4 laser under 879 nm laser diode pumping into the emitting level. By using a 5-mm-long, 0.2-at.% bulk crystal, the maximal 3.65 W continuous wave 912 nm laser is obtained under 16.5 W pump power. The slope efficiency is 35.9% and the optical conversion efficiency is 22.1% with respect to the absorbed pump power. The beam quality factor is about 1.83 for 3.0 W output power at 912 nm. The good results demonstrate that the 879 nm direct pumping can also be used in the quasi-three-level systems.

  13. Quasi-three-level neodymium vanadate laser operation under polarized diode pumping: theoretical and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Yan, R. P.; Dai, X. J.; Yu, X.; Zhang, L.; Wu, X. D.

    2012-08-01

    We propose a novel technique for pumping neodymium vanadate crystal in 4 F 3/2 → 4 I 9/2 transition with polarized diode light. With a theoretical model on quasi-three-level neodymium vanadate lasers including excited state absorption and energy transfer upconversion effects, the improvement on the laser performance of polarized pumping is evaluated. A maximum output power of 4.8 W in Nd:GdVO4 912 nm laser is achieved with the incident pump power of 21.8 W, the maximum output power increases about 85% and the slope efficiency is enhanced to 1.5 times towards the unpolarized pumping under the same condition. This technique is especially suitable for quasi-three-level systems end pumped by high-brightness fiber coupled diode sources associated with short neodymium vanadate crystals.

  14. Relativistic Landau levels in the rotating cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, M. S.; Muniz, C. R.; Christiansen, H. R.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-09-01

    In the spacetime induced by a rotating cosmic string we compute the energy levels of a massive spinless particle coupled covariantly to a homogeneous magnetic field parallel to the string. Afterwards, we consider the addition of a scalar potential with a Coulomb-type and a linear confining term and completely solve the Klein-Gordon equations for each configuration. Finally, assuming rigid-wall boundary conditions, we find the Landau levels when the linear defect is itself magnetized. Remarkably, our analysis reveals that the Landau quantization occurs even in the absence of gauge fields provided the string is endowed with spin.

  15. Quantum Calculation of Inelastic CO Collisions with H. II. Pure Rotational Quenching of High Rotational Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kyle M.; Song, L.; Yang, B. H.; Groenenboom, G. C.; van der Avoird, A.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide is a simple molecule present in many astrophysical environments, and collisional excitation rate coefficients due to the dominant collision partners are necessary to accurately predict spectral line intensities and extract astrophysical parameters. We report new quantum scattering calculations for rotational deexcitation transitions of CO induced by H using the three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) of Song et al. State-to-state cross sections for collision energies from 10-5 to 15,000 cm-1 and rate coefficients for temperatures ranging from 1 to 3000 K are obtained for CO (v = 0, j) deexcitation from j=1-45 to all lower j‧ levels, where j is the rotational quantum number. Close-coupling and coupled-states calculations were performed in full-dimension for j=1-5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 while scaling approaches were used to estimate rate coefficients for all other intermediate rotational states. The current rate coefficients are compared with previous scattering results using earlier PESs. Astrophysical applications of the current results are briefly discussed.

  16. Dynamic characterization of intracavity losses in broadband quasi-three-level lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Major, Arkady

    2014-11-01

    We present a simple, fast and accurate technique to characterize intracavity losses in broadband quasi-three-level lasers based on spectroscopic gain analysis. The technique is based on spectral gain measurement and potentially can be used at any laser output power levels, thus allowing a dynamic optimization of laser performance. Successful experimental demonstration was carried out with a diode-pumped Yb:KGW continuous wave oscillator. A comparison with traditional Findlay-Clay analysis and numerical modeling was also made. PMID:25401815

  17. Quasi-Fermi level splitting and sub-bandgap absorptivity from semiconductor photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katahara, John K.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.

    2014-11-01

    A unified model for the direct gap absorption coefficient (band-edge and sub-bandgap) is developed that encompasses the functional forms of the Urbach, Thomas-Fermi, screened Thomas-Fermi, and Franz-Keldysh models of sub-bandgap absorption as specific cases. We combine this model of absorption with an occupation-corrected non-equilibrium Planck law for the spontaneous emission of photons to yield a model of photoluminescence (PL) with broad applicability to band-band photoluminescence from intrinsic, heavily doped, and strongly compensated semiconductors. The utility of the model is that it is amenable to full-spectrum fitting of absolute intensity PL data and yields: (1) the quasi-Fermi level splitting, (2) the local lattice temperature, (3) the direct bandgap, (4) the functional form of the sub-bandgap absorption, and (5) the energy broadening parameter (Urbach energy, magnitude of potential fluctuations, etc.). The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by fitting the room temperature PL spectrum of GaAs. It is then applied to Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) to reveal the nature of their tail states. For GaAs, the model fit is excellent, and fitted parameters match literature values for the bandgap (1.42 eV), functional form of the sub-bandgap states (purely Urbach in nature), and energy broadening parameter (Urbach energy of 9.4 meV). For CIGSSe and CZTSSe, the model fits yield quasi-Fermi leveling splittings that match well with the open circuit voltages measured on devices made from the same materials and bandgaps that match well with those extracted from EQE measurements on the devices. The power of the exponential decay of the absorption coefficient into the bandgap is found to be in the range of 1.2 to 1.6, suggesting that tunneling in the presence of local electrostatic potential fluctuations is a dominant factor contributing to the sub-bandgap absorption by either purely electrostatic (screened Thomas-Fermi) or a photon

  18. Testosterone levels and mental rotation performance in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Hooven, Carole K; Boynes, Matthew; Gray, Peter B; Pope, Harrison G

    2007-03-01

    Males achieve markedly higher scores than females on mental rotation tests (MRTs). Therefore, it might be hypothesized that, within groups of males, testosterone levels modulate MRT performance. However, studies of this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Notably, a recent study of 28 American men, using the computerized Shepard and Metzler MRT (SM), found significant associations between salivary testosterone levels and the intercepts of the functions relating response time and error rate to the angular disparity between comparison objects. Conversely, a study of 35 British men, using the same methodology, found no such associations. We attempted a cross-cultural replication of these studies, in which we obtained salivary testosterone levels, together with performance measures on the SM, from 92 heterosexual right-handed men, aged 21-38, in Beijing, China. We hypothesized that Chinese men might perform more slowly and carefully than Western men on this test (which imposes no time limitations), but that associations of testosterone levels with performance, if real, should nevertheless be detectable across cultures. We found that the Chinese men indeed displayed significantly longer response times than the American men, although the Chinese men were equally accurate. Interestingly, testosterone was significantly associated with the slope of the response time function in Chinese men, whereas the earlier American study had found that testosterone was associated with the intercept, but not the slope, of this function. These observations suggest that differing cultural values regarding speed and accuracy may influence MRT performance--and that these values must be considered in future studies of testosterone and MRT measures.

  19. Testosterone levels and mental rotation performance in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Hooven, Carole K; Boynes, Matthew; Gray, Peter B; Pope, Harrison G

    2007-03-01

    Males achieve markedly higher scores than females on mental rotation tests (MRTs). Therefore, it might be hypothesized that, within groups of males, testosterone levels modulate MRT performance. However, studies of this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Notably, a recent study of 28 American men, using the computerized Shepard and Metzler MRT (SM), found significant associations between salivary testosterone levels and the intercepts of the functions relating response time and error rate to the angular disparity between comparison objects. Conversely, a study of 35 British men, using the same methodology, found no such associations. We attempted a cross-cultural replication of these studies, in which we obtained salivary testosterone levels, together with performance measures on the SM, from 92 heterosexual right-handed men, aged 21-38, in Beijing, China. We hypothesized that Chinese men might perform more slowly and carefully than Western men on this test (which imposes no time limitations), but that associations of testosterone levels with performance, if real, should nevertheless be detectable across cultures. We found that the Chinese men indeed displayed significantly longer response times than the American men, although the Chinese men were equally accurate. Interestingly, testosterone was significantly associated with the slope of the response time function in Chinese men, whereas the earlier American study had found that testosterone was associated with the intercept, but not the slope, of this function. These observations suggest that differing cultural values regarding speed and accuracy may influence MRT performance--and that these values must be considered in future studies of testosterone and MRT measures. PMID:17292367

  20. Diode-pumped quasi-three-level 456-nm Nd:GdVO{sub 4} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zavartsev, Yu D; Zagumennyi, A I; Kutovoi, S A; Mikhailov, V A; Podreshetnikov, V V; Sirotkin, A A; Shcherbakov, Ivan A; Zerrouk, F

    2003-07-31

    A diode-pumped quasi-three-level Nd:GdVO{sub 4} laser emitting at a wavelength of 912 nm corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} - {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} transition of the neodymium ion and at the second-harmonic linewidth of 456 nm after intracavity frequency doubling in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal is studied. The maximum output power at the fundamental frequency was 2.96 W and the conversion efficiency amounted to 48 %. The second-harmonic output power achieved 220 mW for the conversion efficiency of 15 %. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  1. Quasi-Fermi level splitting and sub-bandgap absorptivity from semiconductor photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Katahara, John K.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.

    2014-11-07

    A unified model for the direct gap absorption coefficient (band-edge and sub-bandgap) is developed that encompasses the functional forms of the Urbach, Thomas-Fermi, screened Thomas-Fermi, and Franz-Keldysh models of sub-bandgap absorption as specific cases. We combine this model of absorption with an occupation-corrected non-equilibrium Planck law for the spontaneous emission of photons to yield a model of photoluminescence (PL) with broad applicability to band-band photoluminescence from intrinsic, heavily doped, and strongly compensated semiconductors. The utility of the model is that it is amenable to full-spectrum fitting of absolute intensity PL data and yields: (1) the quasi-Fermi level splitting, (2) the local lattice temperature, (3) the direct bandgap, (4) the functional form of the sub-bandgap absorption, and (5) the energy broadening parameter (Urbach energy, magnitude of potential fluctuations, etc.). The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by fitting the room temperature PL spectrum of GaAs. It is then applied to Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGSSe) and Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} (CZTSSe) to reveal the nature of their tail states. For GaAs, the model fit is excellent, and fitted parameters match literature values for the bandgap (1.42 eV), functional form of the sub-bandgap states (purely Urbach in nature), and energy broadening parameter (Urbach energy of 9.4 meV). For CIGSSe and CZTSSe, the model fits yield quasi-Fermi leveling splittings that match well with the open circuit voltages measured on devices made from the same materials and bandgaps that match well with those extracted from EQE measurements on the devices. The power of the exponential decay of the absorption coefficient into the bandgap is found to be in the range of 1.2 to 1.6, suggesting that tunneling in the presence of local electrostatic potential fluctuations is a dominant factor contributing to the sub-bandgap absorption by either purely electrostatic (screened Thomas-Fermi) or

  2. Atomic Level Distributed Strain within Graphene Divacancies from Bond Rotations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qu; Robertson, Alex W; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-08-25

    Vacancy defects play an important role in influencing the properties of graphene, and understanding their detailed atomic structure is crucial for developing accurate models to predict their impact. Divacancies (DVs) are one of the most common defects in graphene and can take three different structural forms through various sequences of bond rotations to minimize the energy. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy with monochromation of the electron source, we resolve the position of C atoms in graphene and measure the C-C bond lengths within the three DVs, enabling a map of bond strain to be generated. We show that bond rotations reduce the maximum single bond strain reached within a DV and help distribute the strain over a larger number of bonds to minimize the peak magnitude.

  3. Towards Understanding Quantum Monodromy in Quasi-Symmetric Molecules: Fassst Rotational Spectra of CH_3NCO and CH_3NCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Fortman, Sarah; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Winnewisser, Manfred; De Lucia, Frank C.; Koput, Jacek

    2010-06-01

    The recent studies of the rotational spectrum of the NCNCS molecule demonstrated the success of quantum monodromy in describing the quasilinear behavior of this molecule, inclusive of the abrupt transition of spectroscopic behavior from the bent to the linear molecule regime. Similar, quasisymmetric behaviour, is known to be present in symmetric top molecules, and has been studied at lowest-J transitions for two such molecules, CH_3NCO and CH_3NCS. Further progress requires more experimental data and presently we report FASSST rotational spectra of CH_3NCO and CH_3NCS. The spectra provide practically continuous 117-376 GHz coverage and are very rich, since the ladder of excited vibrational states associated with the qusilinear bending coordinate is multiplied by the nearly free internal rotation of the methyl group. Initial stages of the analysis leading up to an analysis in an extension of the framework used for NCNCS are described. B.P.Winnewisser, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95. 243002 (2005). M.Winnewisser, et al., J. Mol. Struct. 798, 1 {2006}. B.P.Winnewisser, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. DOI:10.1039/B922023B (2010). J.Koput, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 115, 131 (1986) J.Koput, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 118, 189 (1986)

  4. Quasi-bound complexes in collisions of different linear molecules: Classical trajectory study of their manifestations in rotational relaxation and spectral line broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Stable bimolecular complexes (tightly bound dimers) in the gas phase are usually created during third body stabilization of their unstable precursors-quasi-bound complexes (QCs). The latter can arise under the condition that at least one of the colliding partners has an internal degree of freedom. In this article, the principal difference between "orbitings" and QCs is demonstrated in the classical nonreactive scattering picture. Additionally, fractions of QCs in binary collisions of different linear molecules are compared. Also in the article the influence of QCs on rotational R-T relaxation and on vibration-rotational spectral line broadening is discussed. Explicit formulae shedding light on the QCs contribution to the R-T relaxation cross section and the line width and shift are presented. The obtained results emphasize the need for including QCs in every theoretical modeling of spectroscopic manifestation of intermolecular interactions. Besides the topics above, the possible manifestation of non-impact effects in the central regions of spectral lines due to QCs is stated. And finally, special consideration is given to the problem of adequate simulation of QCs formation at different pressures.

  5. The Calculation of Rotational Energy Levels Using Tunneling Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2009-06-01

    The present talk will present a pedagogical introduction and review of 25 years of using tunneling Hamiltonians to parameterize and fit rotationally resolved spectra of small polyatomic molecules with one or more large-amplitude motions (LAMs). This tunneling formalism does not require a quantitative knowledge of the potential surface, but instead makes use only of its symmetry properties. Topics planned for discussion include: the user communities for such Hamiltonians; the range of applicability and achievable accuracy; a representative list of molecules treated to date and their various combinations of internal-rotation, inversion, hydrogen-bond-exchange, and H-atom-transfer LAMs; a way of organizing the LAMs of these molecules in the mind using the piston-and-crankshaft vocabulary of the reciprocating engine; how the theoretical tools of point-groups, permutation-inversion groups, extended groups, and time reversal are used in the tunneling-Hamiltonian formalism; and finally a brief report on the present status of two unfinished applications of the tunneling-Hamiltonian formalism, namely cis/trans bent acetylene (HCCH) and protonated acetylene (C_2H_3^+).

  6. Asymptotic expansion homogenization of discrete fine-scale models with rotational degrees of freedom for the simulation of quasi-brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezakhani, Roozbeh; Cusatis, Gianluca

    2016-03-01

    Discrete fine-scale models, in the form of either particle or lattice models, have been formulated successfully to simulate the behavior of quasi-brittle materials whose mechanical behavior is inherently connected to fracture processes occurring in the internal heterogeneous structure. These models tend to be intensive from the computational point of view as they adopt an "a priori" discretization anchored to the major material heterogeneities (e.g. grains in particulate materials and aggregate pieces in cementitious composites) and this hampers their use in the numerical simulations of large systems. In this work, this problem is addressed by formulating a general multiple scale computational framework based on classical asymptotic analysis and that (1) is applicable to any discrete model with rotational degrees of freedom; and (2) gives rise to an equivalent Cosserat continuum. The developed theory is applied to the upscaling of the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM), a recently formulated discrete model for concrete and other quasi-brittle materials, and the properties of the homogenized model are analyzed thoroughly in both the elastic and the inelastic regime. The analysis shows that the homogenized micropolar elastic properties are size-dependent, and they are functions of the RVE size and the size of the material heterogeneity. Furthermore, the analysis of the homogenized inelastic behavior highlights issues associated with the homogenization of fine-scale models featuring strain-softening and the related damage localization. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the RVE behavior subject to curvature components causing bending and torsional effects demonstrate, contrarily to typical Cosserat formulations, a significant coupling between the homogenized stress-strain and couple-curvature constitutive equations.

  7. A diode-pumped Nd3+-doped gadolinium gallium garnet quasi-three-level laser at 933 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. H.; Han, Y. H.; Zhao, Y. D.

    2013-11-01

    We report for the first time a Nd3+-doped gadolinium gallium garnet (Nd:GGG) laser operating on a quasi-three-level laser at 933 nm, based on the 4F3/2-4I9/2 transition. Continuous wave 691 mW output power at 933 nm is obtained under 10.2 W of incident pump power. Moreover, intracavity second-harmonic generation has also been achieved with a blue power of 89 mW by using a LiB3O5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal.

  8. Interaction between the ultrashort pulse and two-level medium beyond the rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Long-Zhao; Wen, Da-Qing; Jiang, Shao-Ji; Yu, Xiang-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Based on the semiclassical theory of light-matter interactions, the optical Bloch equations describing the interaction between light and two-level medium without the rotating wave approximation are established. By solving this equation set, the rule of the interaction between the ultrashort pulse and two-level medium is investigated. We analyze its physical properties and clarify the applicable condition of the rotating wave approximation in a quantitative way. These results reveal the physical mechanism of the interaction between the ultrashort pulse and two-level medium.

  9. Effects of the axis of rotation and primordially solicited limb of high level athletes in a mental rotation task.

    PubMed

    Habacha, Hamdi; Lejeune-Poutrain, Laure; Margas, Nicolas; Molinaro, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    A recent set of studies has investigated the selective effects of particular physical activities that require full-body rotations, such as gymnastics and wrestling (Moreau, Clerc, Mansy-Dannay, & Guerrien, 2012; Steggemann, Engbert, & Weigelt, 2011), and demonstrated that practicing these activities imparts a clear advantage in in-plane body rotation performance. Other athletes, such as handball and soccer players, whose activities do require body rotations may have more experience with in-depth rotations. The present study examined the effect of two components that are differently solicited in sport practices on the mental rotation ability: the rotation axis (in-plane, in-depth) and the predominantly used limb (arms, legs). Handball players, soccer players, and gymnasts were asked to rotate handball and soccer strike images mentally, which were presented in different in-plane and in-depth orientations. The results revealed that handball and soccer players performed the in-depth rotations faster than in-plane rotations; however, the two rotation axes did not differ in gymnasts. In addition, soccer players performed the mental rotations of handball strike images slower. Our findings suggest that the development of mental rotation tasks that involve the major components of a physical activity allows and is necessary for specifying the links between this activity and the mental rotation performance.

  10. Effects of the axis of rotation and primordially solicited limb of high level athletes in a mental rotation task.

    PubMed

    Habacha, Hamdi; Lejeune-Poutrain, Laure; Margas, Nicolas; Molinaro, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    A recent set of studies has investigated the selective effects of particular physical activities that require full-body rotations, such as gymnastics and wrestling (Moreau, Clerc, Mansy-Dannay, & Guerrien, 2012; Steggemann, Engbert, & Weigelt, 2011), and demonstrated that practicing these activities imparts a clear advantage in in-plane body rotation performance. Other athletes, such as handball and soccer players, whose activities do require body rotations may have more experience with in-depth rotations. The present study examined the effect of two components that are differently solicited in sport practices on the mental rotation ability: the rotation axis (in-plane, in-depth) and the predominantly used limb (arms, legs). Handball players, soccer players, and gymnasts were asked to rotate handball and soccer strike images mentally, which were presented in different in-plane and in-depth orientations. The results revealed that handball and soccer players performed the in-depth rotations faster than in-plane rotations; however, the two rotation axes did not differ in gymnasts. In addition, soccer players performed the mental rotations of handball strike images slower. Our findings suggest that the development of mental rotation tasks that involve the major components of a physical activity allows and is necessary for specifying the links between this activity and the mental rotation performance. PMID:25064695

  11. Iterative algorithm for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Haiyang; Wu, Fan; Hou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    New method for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution is proposed. It is based on basic iterative scheme and accelerates the Gauss-Seidel method by introducing an acceleration parameter. This modified Successive Over-relaxation (SOR) is effective for solving the rotationally asymmetric components with pixel-level spatial resolution, without the usage of a fitting procedure. Compared to the Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel method, the modified SOR method with an optimal relaxation factor converges much faster and saves more computational costs and memory space without reducing accuracy. It has been proved by real experimental results.

  12. Establishing the level of cylindrical rotation in boxy/peanut bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaeinezhad, A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Balcells, M.; Peletier, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    We present SAURON integral-field observations of a sample of 12 mid-to-high-inclination disc galaxies, to unveil hidden bars on the basis of their kinematics, i.e. the correlation between velocity and h3 profiles, and to establish their degree of cylindrical rotation. For the latter, we introduce a method to quantify cylindrical rotation that is robust against inner disc components. We confirm high levels of cylindrical rotation in boxy/peanut bulges, but also observe this feature in a few galaxies with rounder bulges. We suggest that these are also barred galaxies with end-on orientations. Re-analysing published data for our own Galaxy using this new method, we determine that the Milky Way bulge is cylindrically rotating at the same level as the strongest barred galaxy in our sample. Finally, we use self-consistent three-dimensional N-body simulations of bar-unstable discs to study the dependence of cylindrical rotation on the bar's orientation and host galaxy inclination.

  13. Tunable continuous-wave laser at quasi-three-level with a disordered Nd:LGS crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wei, Zhiyi; Zhang, Yongdong; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang; Gao, Mingwei; Gao, Chunqing; Wang, Zhenlin

    2011-05-15

    A diode-pumped tunable CW Nd(3+):LGS laser at quasi-three-level has been demonstrated. The output power up to 403 mW at the central wavelength of 904 nm was obtained, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.7%. Taking advantage of the broad emission spectrum of the disordered crystal Nd:LGS, we tuned the laser wavelength within the spectral range of 899.8 to 906.6 nm with an etalon inserted into the V-type cavity. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to obtain a tunable laser based on the (4)F(3/2)-(4)I(9/2) transition of Nd(3+)-doped crystals.

  14. Tibial rotational osteotomy for idiopathic torsion. A comparison of the proximal and distal osteotomy levels.

    PubMed

    Krengel, W F; Staheli, L T

    1992-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 52 rotational tibial osteotomies (RTOs) performed on 35 patients with severe idiopathic tibial torsion. Thirty-nine osteotomies were performed at the proximal or midtibial level. Thirteen were performed at the distal tibial level with a technique previously described by one of the authors. Serious complications occurred in five (13%) of the proximal and in none of the distal RTOs. For severe and persisting idiopathic tibial torsion, the authors recommend correction by RTO at the distal level. Proximal level osteotomy is indicated only when a varus or valgus deformity required concurrent correction.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Ciprofloxacin Levels in GCF and Plasma of Chronic Periodontitis Patients: Quasi Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Denthumdas, Sunil Kumar; Wadgave, Umesh; Pharne, Pooja Mohan; Patil, Sandeep Jambukumar; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Deshpande, Pavan; Koppikar, Rajesh Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For any antimicrobial approach to be successful in periodontal therapy, it is important that the antimicrobial agent targets the sub-gingival biofilm by attaining sufficient concentration at the sub-gingival site. Aim The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the concentrations of ciprofloxacin present in Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) and plasma after its systemic administration. Materials and Methods A total of 20 subjects, in the age group of 30-60 years satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were chosen from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Hyderabad and consent was obtained. Subjects were put on oral ciprofloxacin therapy (Baycip, Bayer Corporation) of 500mg twice daily doses for five days to establish steady state tissue levels of the agent. GCF and serum samples were collected at the 72nd hour after the first dose of ciprofloxacin and were compared using unpaired t test. Results The mean gingival index value of the subjects was 1.8 ± 0.59 and the mean probing depth of the subjects taken in the study was 5.724 ± 0.47mm. The results of this study showed that ciprofloxacin concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.001) in GCF than in plasma. Conclusion Results from the present study and those from the earlier studies clearly indicate the ciprofloxacin’s ability to reach and concentrate in infected periodontal sites via GCF. This property of ciprofloxacin may be useful for eradication of periodontal pathogens, thus improving the outcome of periodontal therapy. PMID:27504410

  16. Digital gray-level transformation for the reduction of redundant shadows in rotational panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Y; Wakoh, M; Yamamoto, K; Ueno, H; Kuroyanagi, K

    1990-08-01

    In rotational panoramic radiography, the tomographic motion in combination with a slit scanning method make an image layer wide. But some objects outside the image layer are hard to blur and they result to redundant shadows. The gray-level transformation, as one form of digital image processing for the reduction of these redundant shadows, was evaluated. Two methods, the gamma transformation and the histogram flattening method, were examined. A drum scanner was used as the image scanner. The panoramic image on the x-ray film was turned into an 8 bit digital image on the image memory, which had the size of a 512 x 480 matrix. In rotational panoramic radiography, there are low density and contrast regions where redundant shadows of the cervical vertebrae and the mandibular ramus are superimposed on the tomographic image. The histogram of the gray-level was suppressed for the lower gray-levels. The stretching of this gray-level distribution was effective in the reducing redundant shadows. When processed by gamma transformation, the smaller gamma coefficient below 1.0 clarified the tomographic image, and when processed by the histogram flattening method, the setting of the level (L) value around 64-128 effectively reduced the redundant shadows. However, the effectiveness of both gray-level transformations was greatest in restricted cases in which the area where redundant shadows were superimposed on the tomographic image was comparatively large.

  17. Level statistics of near-yrast states in rapidly rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Døssing, T.; Vigezzi, E.; Åberg, S.

    1997-02-01

    The nearest neighbour level spacing distribution and the Δ3 statistic of level fluctuations associated with very high spin states ( I ≳ 30) in rare-earth deformed nuclei are analysed by means of a cranked shell model. The many particle-many hole configurations created in the rotating Nilsson potential are mixed by the surface-delta two-body residual interaction. The levels in the near-yrast region show a Poisson-like level spacing distribution. As the intrinsic excitation energy U increases, the level statistics shows a gradual transition from order to chaos, reaching at U ≳ 2 MeV the Wigner distribution typical-of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. This transition is caused by the residual two-body interaction. On the other hand, the level spacings between the yrast and the first excited state show a peculiar behaviour, displaying a Wigner-like distribution instead of the Poisson-like distribution seen for the other near-yrast rotational states. The lowest spacings reflect the properties of the single-particle orbits in the mean-field, and are only weakly affected by the residual two-body interaction.

  18. The mixed level damping of the single-axial rotation of INS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhu, Hai; Li, Gang; Gao, Dayuan

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of the Single-axial Rotation of INS (SRINS), the idea of the level damping of the platform INS is introduced to the system, and the principle of the damping is offered. On the basic of analyzing on both of inner level damping and outer level damping, the mixed level damping is put forward. The results show that by introducing the damping network to the system, both of the Schuler oscillation and the Foucault oscillation are eliminated, and the precision of the SRINS is greatly enhanced; At the same time, by used of the mixed level damping, which can not only reduce the effect of the vehicle power-driven to the precision of the system, but also avoid the limit of the accurate reference velocity.

  19. Comprehension and Motivation Levels in Conjunction with the Use of eBooks with Audio: A Quasi-Experimental Study of Post-Secondary Remedial Reading Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Kimberly W.

    2014-01-01

    This quasi-experimental pretest, posttest nonequivalent control group study investigated the comprehension scores and motivation levels of post-secondary remedial reading students in a two-year technical college in Northwest Georgia using an eBook, an eBook with audio, and a print book. After reading a module on Purpose and Tone in the three book…

  20. Rotational stress-induced increase in epinephrine levels delays cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Otranto, Marcela; Vieira, Andreza M; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Fierro, Iolanda M; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2010-03-01

    Stress impairs wound healing of cutaneous lesions; however, the mechanism is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rotational stress on cutaneous wound healing in mice and propose a mechanism. Male mice were spun at 45 rpm for 15 min every hour beginning 3 days before wounding until euthanasia. Control animals were not subjected to stress. To confirm that catecholamines participate in stress-induced delay of wound healing, mice were treated daily with propranolol. An excisional lesion was created and measured. Seven and 14 days later, animals were killed and lesions collected. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostained for alpha-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 activity, nitrite levels, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were measured in the wounds. In addition, murine skin fibroblast cultures were treated with high levels of epinephrine and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Stressed mice exhibited reduced locomotor activity and increased normetanephrine plasma levels. Rotational stress was associated with decreased wound contraction, reduced re-epithelialization, reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation, but with strongly increased nitrite levels. Furthermore, inflammatory cell infiltration, TNF-alpha expression, myofibroblastic differentiation, and angiogenesis were all delayed in the stress group. Propranolol administration reversed the deleterious effects of stress on wound contraction and re-epithelialization. High epinephrine concentrations increased murine skin fibroblast proliferation and nitric oxide synthesis, and strongly inhibited skin fibroblast migration and both pro- and active MMP-2. In conclusion, rotational stress impairs cutaneous wound healing due to epinephrine increased levels.

  1. Zeeman-tuned rotational level-crossing spectroscopy in a diatomic free radical.

    PubMed

    Cahn, S B; Ammon, J; Kirilov, E; Gurevich, Y V; Murphree, D; Paolino, R; Rahmlow, D A; Kozlov, M G; DeMille, D

    2014-04-25

    Rotational levels of molecular free radicals can be tuned to degeneracy by using laboratory-scale magnetic fields. Because of their intrinsically narrow width, these level crossings of opposite-parity states have been proposed for use in the study of parity-violating interactions and other applications. We experimentally study a typical manifestation of this system using BaF138. Using a Stark-mixing method for detection, we demonstrate level-crossing signals with spectral width as small as 6 kHz. We use our data to verify the predicted line shapes, transition dipole moments, and Stark shifts and to precisely determine molecular magnetic g factors. Our results constitute an initial proof of concept for use of this system to study nuclear spin-dependent parity-violating effects.

  2. Zeeman-tuned rotational level-crossing spectroscopy in a diatomic free radical.

    PubMed

    Cahn, S B; Ammon, J; Kirilov, E; Gurevich, Y V; Murphree, D; Paolino, R; Rahmlow, D A; Kozlov, M G; DeMille, D

    2014-04-25

    Rotational levels of molecular free radicals can be tuned to degeneracy by using laboratory-scale magnetic fields. Because of their intrinsically narrow width, these level crossings of opposite-parity states have been proposed for use in the study of parity-violating interactions and other applications. We experimentally study a typical manifestation of this system using BaF138. Using a Stark-mixing method for detection, we demonstrate level-crossing signals with spectral width as small as 6 kHz. We use our data to verify the predicted line shapes, transition dipole moments, and Stark shifts and to precisely determine molecular magnetic g factors. Our results constitute an initial proof of concept for use of this system to study nuclear spin-dependent parity-violating effects. PMID:24815646

  3. Quantal radiation from macroscopic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutinsky, V.; Plujko, V.

    1988-09-01

    Macroscopic rotation of deformed excited nuclei may under certain conditions be accompanied by radiation of quasi-discrete gamma rays which resemble the cascade of transitions between nuclear rotational states.

  4. Lifetimes of Vibro-Rotational Levels in Excited Electronic States of Diatomic Hydrogen Isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Astashkevich, S. A. Lavrov, B. P.

    2015-06-15

    The current situation in studies of lifetimes of excited rovibronic levels for the H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, HD, HT, and DT molecules is analyzed. All measured lifetime values (792 entries for 618 different vibro-rotational levels of 33 electronic states) reported in 61 publications before April 2015 are compiled and listed in tabular format together with an annotated bibliography. Experimental data are only available for the H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2} molecules. The data collected in the present work show fragmentariness of experimental data. For the vast majority of the levels, the lifetime values were reported in one paper only and up to now are without independent experimental verification. A complete bibliography of publications concerning semiempirical determination and nonempirical calculations of the lifetimes is presented. Numerical results obtained in the framework of these two approaches are listed only in cases when experimental data are available. For more than half of the levels, the differences between measured and calculated values are three times higher than experimental errors. These discrepancies show necessity of more precise experimental and nonempirical studies. For some 79 rovibronic levels, our analysis makes it possible to propose certain set of recommended lifetime values.

  5. Lifetimes of Vibro-Rotational Levels in Excited Electronic States of Diatomic Hydrogen Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashkevich, S. A.; Lavrov, B. P.

    2015-06-01

    The current situation in studies of lifetimes of excited rovibronic levels for the H2, D2, T2, HD, HT, and DT molecules is analyzed. All measured lifetime values (792 entries for 618 different vibro-rotational levels of 33 electronic states) reported in 61 publications before April 2015 are compiled and listed in tabular format together with an annotated bibliography. Experimental data are only available for the H2, HD, and D2 molecules. The data collected in the present work show fragmentariness of experimental data. For the vast majority of the levels, the lifetime values were reported in one paper only and up to now are without independent experimental verification. A complete bibliography of publications concerning semiempirical determination and nonempirical calculations of the lifetimes is presented. Numerical results obtained in the framework of these two approaches are listed only in cases when experimental data are available. For more than half of the levels, the differences between measured and calculated values are three times higher than experimental errors. These discrepancies show necessity of more precise experimental and nonempirical studies. For some 79 rovibronic levels, our analysis makes it possible to propose certain set of recommended lifetime values.

  6. Individual Differences in ERPs during Mental Rotation of Characters: Lateralization, and Performance Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beste, Christian; Heil, Martin; Konrad, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive process of imaging an object turning around is called mental rotation. Many studies have been put forward analyzing mental rotation by means of event-related potentials (ERPs). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured during mental rotation of characters in a sample (N = 82) with a sufficient size to obtain even small effects. A…

  7. Detailed photoluminescence studies of thin film Cu{sub 2}S for determination of quasi-Fermi level splitting and defect levels

    SciTech Connect

    Sträter, H. Brüggemann, R.; Bauer, G. H.; Siol, S.; Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W.

    2013-12-21

    We have studied chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) layers prepared by physical vapor deposition with varying deposition parameters by calibrated spectral photoluminescence (PL) and by confocal PL with lateral resolution of Δ x≈0.9 μm. Calibrated PL experiments as a function of temperature T and excitation fluxes were performed to obtain the absolute PL-yield and to calculate the splitting of the quasi-Fermi levels (QFLs) μ=E{sub f,n}−E{sub f,p} at an excitation flux equivalent to the AM 1.5 spectrum and the absorption coefficient α(ℏω), both in the temperature range of 20 K≤T≤400 K. The PL-spectra reveal two peaks at E{sub #1}=1.17 eV and E{sub #2}=1.3 eV. The samples show a QFL-splitting of μ>700 meV associated with a pseudo band gap of E{sub g}=1.25 eV. The high-energy peak shows an unexpected temperature behavior, namely, an increase of PL-yield with rising temperature at variance with the behavior of QFL-splitting that decreases with rising T. Our observations indicate that, contrary to common believe, it is not the PL-yield, but rather the QFL-splitting that is the comprehensive indicator of the quality of the excited state in an illuminated semiconductor. A further examination of the lateral variation of opto-electronic properties by confocal PL and the surface contour shows no detectable correlation between Cu{sub 2}S grains/grain boundaries and the PL-yield or QFL-splitting.

  8. A model for quasi-parity-doublet spectra in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Nikolay

    2013-05-01

    A model of a quadrupole-octupole vibrating and rotating core plus a particle is proposed to describe and classify the quasi-parity-doublet spectra in odd-mass nuclei. The yrast levels are described as low-energy rotation-vibration modes built on the ground state. The non-yrast split parity-doublet sequences are considered as higher-energy rotation-vibration modes coupled to one-quasi-particle states. The even-even core is considered within the model of a coherent quadrupole-octupole motion, while the odd nucleon is described within the reflection-asymmetric deformed shell model with pairing interaction. The Coriolis decoupling and K-mixing interactions are calculated microscopically through a parity projection of the single-particle wave function. The unified model scheme was tested on the yrast and non-yrast quasi-parity-doublet spectra in the nuclei 223Ra and 221Fr.

  9. Effects of upper trunk rotation on shoulder joint torque among baseball pitchers of various levels.

    PubMed

    Aguinaldo, Arnel L; Buttermore, Janet; Chambers, Henry

    2007-02-01

    High rotational torques during baseball pitching are believed to be linked to most overuse injuries at the shoulder. This study investigated the effects of trunk rotation on shoulder rotational torques during pitching. A total of 38 pitchers from the professional, college, high school, and youth ranks were recruited for motion analysis. Professional pitchers demonstrated the least amount of rotational torque (p = .001) among skeletally mature players, while exhibiting the ability to rotate their trunks significantly later in the pitching cycle, as compared to other groups (p = .01). It was concluded that the timing of their rotation was optimized as to allow the throwing shoulder to move with decreased joint loading by conserving the momentum generated by the trunk. These results suggest that a specific pattern in throwing can be utilized to increase the efficiency of the pitch, which would allow a player to improve performance with decreased risk of overuse injury.

  10. Acceleration forces at eye level experienced with rotation on the horizontal bar.

    PubMed

    Beck, G R; Rabinovitch, P; Brown, A C

    1979-06-01

    Negative acceleration forces (-Gz) experienced at eye level have been associated with preretinal hemorrhage and headache. These signs and symptoms were found in individuals who experienced negative (toward the head) force while rotating on a horizontal bar or hanging from a trapeze. Lightweight accelerometers were used to measure -Gz experienced at eye level in children and adult gymnasts performing a single-knee backswing on a horizontal bar. Rate of onset of -Gz, peak -Gz, time experiencing -Gz, area of curve (G.second), and mean force (area/time) were calculated. There was no significant difference between the children and the adult gymnasts in any of the above parameters. The best gymnast had a maximum rate of onset of 38.15 G/s and the maximum negative force experienced was 5.52 G. The maximum rate of onset for a child was 41.56 G/s and the maximum negative force experienced was 5.73 G. Compared with -Gz tolerance curves generated on a centrifuge the best gymnast would have become symptomatic while performing this maneuver in 6 s. The best child would have become symptomatic in 25 s. These tolerance limits can be easily exceeded by gymnasts and by the monkey-bar enthusiast. PMID:468634

  11. Reconciling past changes in Earth's rotation with 20th century global sea-level rise: Resolving Munk's enigma.

    PubMed

    Mitrovica, Jerry X; Hay, Carling C; Morrow, Eric; Kopp, Robert E; Dumberry, Mathieu; Stanley, Sabine

    2015-12-01

    In 2002, Munk defined an important enigma of 20th century global mean sea-level (GMSL) rise that has yet to be resolved. First, he listed three canonical observations related to Earth's rotation [(i) the slowing of Earth's rotation rate over the last three millennia inferred from ancient eclipse observations, and changes in the (ii) amplitude and (iii) orientation of Earth's rotation vector over the last century estimated from geodetic and astronomic measurements] and argued that they could all be fit by a model of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) associated with the last ice age. Second, he demonstrated that prevailing estimates of the 20th century GMSL rise (~1.5 to 2.0 mm/year), after correction for the maximum signal from ocean thermal expansion, implied mass flux from ice sheets and glaciers at a level that would grossly misfit the residual GIA-corrected observations of Earth's rotation. We demonstrate that the combination of lower estimates of the 20th century GMSL rise (up to 1990) improved modeling of the GIA process and that the correction of the eclipse record for a signal due to angular momentum exchange between the fluid outer core and the mantle reconciles all three Earth rotation observations. This resolution adds confidence to recent estimates of individual contributions to 20th century sea-level change and to projections of GMSL rise to the end of the 21st century based on them. PMID:26824058

  12. Reconciling past changes in Earth's rotation with 20th century global sea-level rise: Resolving Munk's enigma.

    PubMed

    Mitrovica, Jerry X; Hay, Carling C; Morrow, Eric; Kopp, Robert E; Dumberry, Mathieu; Stanley, Sabine

    2015-12-01

    In 2002, Munk defined an important enigma of 20th century global mean sea-level (GMSL) rise that has yet to be resolved. First, he listed three canonical observations related to Earth's rotation [(i) the slowing of Earth's rotation rate over the last three millennia inferred from ancient eclipse observations, and changes in the (ii) amplitude and (iii) orientation of Earth's rotation vector over the last century estimated from geodetic and astronomic measurements] and argued that they could all be fit by a model of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) associated with the last ice age. Second, he demonstrated that prevailing estimates of the 20th century GMSL rise (~1.5 to 2.0 mm/year), after correction for the maximum signal from ocean thermal expansion, implied mass flux from ice sheets and glaciers at a level that would grossly misfit the residual GIA-corrected observations of Earth's rotation. We demonstrate that the combination of lower estimates of the 20th century GMSL rise (up to 1990) improved modeling of the GIA process and that the correction of the eclipse record for a signal due to angular momentum exchange between the fluid outer core and the mantle reconciles all three Earth rotation observations. This resolution adds confidence to recent estimates of individual contributions to 20th century sea-level change and to projections of GMSL rise to the end of the 21st century based on them.

  13. Rotation of Bloch sphere induced by Lamb shift in open two-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-You; Tang, Ning; Liu, Ying; Zeng, Hao-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    From a quite general form of the Lindblad-like master equation of open two-level systems (qubits), we study the effect of Lamb shift on the non-Markovian dynamics. We find that the Lamb shift can induce a non-uniform rotation of the Bloch sphere, but that it does not affect the non-Markovianity of the open system dynamics. We determine the optimal initial-state pairs that maximize the backflow of information for the considered master equation and find an interesting phenomenon-the sudden change of the non-Markovianity. We relate the dynamics to the evolution of the Bloch sphere to help us comprehend the obtained results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275064 and 11075050), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20124306110003), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT0964), and the Construct Program of the National Key Discipline, China.

  14. Effects of pairing correlations on the inverse level density parameter of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Quynh Huong, Le; Quang Hung, Nguyen; Thi Quynh Trang, Le

    2016-06-01

    Angular momentum dependence of the inverse level density parameter K in the excitation-energy region of ˜ 30 - 40 MeV is studied within the finite-temperature Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (FTBCS) theory and the FTBCS theory that includes the effect due to quasiparticle-number fluctuations (FTBCS1). The two theories take into account the noncollective rotation of the nucleus at nonzero values of z-projection M of the total angular momentum. The comparison between the results obtained within the FTBCS and FTBCS1 as well as the case without pairing correlations and the experimental data for two medium-mass even-even nuclei 108Cd and 122Te shows that by including the pairing corrections the FTBCS and FTBCS1 reproduces quite well all the experimental data, whereas the non-pairing case always overestimates the data. Due to the effect of quasiparticle-number fluctuations, the FTBCS1 gaps at different M values do not collapse at critical temperature TC as in the FTBCS ones but monotonously decrease with increasing T and being finite even at high T. As the result, the values of K obtained within the FTBCS1 are always closer to the experimental data than those obtained within the FTBCS.

  15. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE MEMORY OF ACADEMICIAN A M PROKHOROV: Diode-pumped quasi-three-level 456-nm Nd:GdVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavartsev, Yu D.; Zagumennyi, A. I.; Zerrouk, F.; Kutovoi, S. A.; Mikhailov, V. A.; Podreshetnikov, V. V.; Sirotkin, A. A.; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.

    2003-07-01

    A diode-pumped quasi-three-level Nd:GdVO4 laser emitting at a wavelength of 912 nm corresponding to the 4F3/2 — 4I9/2 transition of the neodymium ion and at the second-harmonic linewidth of 456 nm after intracavity frequency doubling in a KNbO3 crystal is studied. The maximum output power at the fundamental frequency was 2.96 W and the conversion efficiency amounted to 48 %. The second-harmonic output power achieved 220 mW for the conversion efficiency of 15 %.

  16. Late Holocene shoreline behavior in embayments of Lake Michigan: Influence of quasi-periodic lake-level variations and sediment supply

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J. . Indiana Geological Survey)

    1994-04-01

    Lake Michigan contains numerous former embayments into glacial deposits or bedrock. Many of the embayments contain dunes, spits, and captured lakes, but others contain arcuate strandplains of beach ridges. The strandplains are a geologic record of shoreline behavior and lake-level variation throughout the late Holocene. The larger strandplains show similar long-term patterns of beach-ridge development. The similar patterns are expected because variations in lake level are a primary control on shoreline behavior, and all embayments would have experienced relatively the same lake-level changes. Some variations in the long-term pattern of shoreline development do occur between strandplains. These dissimilarities are primarily a function of different rates of sediment supply to the shoreline of each embayment. Beach-ridge development within embayments can be represented on a rate of water level change versus rate of sediment supply diagram (Curray diagram) as three superimposed ovals on the positive rate of sediment supply side of the diagram. The three stacked ovals represent the three quasi-periodic lake-level variations defined by Thompson (1992) and show the position of the shoreline for a given time within the Curray diagram fields. For shorelines with a high rate of sediment supply, only the 30-year quasi-periodic variation would reach the aggradation line. For shorelines having significantly less sediment supply, rising lake level on the 150- and 600-year variations would force the 30-year oval across the aggradation line and well into the depositional and possibly the erosional transgression fields. Under these conditions erosion would occur that may remove, stack, or at least prevent one or more beach ridges from being developed.

  17. Investigation of soft tissue movement during level walking: translations and rotations of skin markers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zheng, Naiquan Nigel

    2008-11-14

    Skin marker-based stereophotogrammetry is the most widely used technique for human motion analysis but its accuracy is mainly limited by soft tissue artifact (STA) which reflects the non-rigidity of human body segments during activities. To compensate for the effects of STA and improve the accuracy of motion analysis, it is critical to understand the behavior and characteristics of soft tissue movement. By using a non-invasive approach, this study investigated the soft tissue movement on the thigh and shank of twenty healthy subjects during level walking which is one of the most important human daily activities and the basic content of clinical gait analysis. With the measurement of inter-marker translations and rotations on each segment, a 4D picture (3D space and time) of soft tissue deformation on the thigh and shank during walking was quantified in terms of the positional and orientational change between different skin locations. Soft tissue deformation showed nonuniform distribution at different locations as well as along different directions. The range of inter-marker movement was found to be up to 19.1mm/19.6 degrees on the thigh and 9.3mm/8.6 degrees on the shank. Results in this study provide useful information for understanding soft tissue movement behavior and exploring better marker configurations. Inter-marker movement exhibited similar patterns across subjects. This finding suggests the possibility that STA has inter-subject similarity, which is contrary to the prevailing opinion. This new insight may lead to more effective STA compensation strategies for skin marker-based motion analysis.

  18. Earth Rotation and Geoid Constraints Upon The Modern Rate of Global Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    The explanation for the tide gauge inferred rate of secular sea level rise that has been ongoing over the last century remains enigmatic. Various explanations have been pro- posed for the fact that there is a large shortfall between the sum of the estimates of the steric and small ice sheets and glaciers contributions, respectively 0.6 mm yr-1 and ~0.3 mm yr-1 and the tide gauge inferred rate of ~1.8 mm yr-1( see Douglas and Peltier, Physics Today, March 2002 for a recent discussion). Possible explanations in- clude climate induced melting of the great polar ice sheets on Greenland and Antarc- tica, substantial upwards bias in the tide gauge inferred rates ( Cabanes et al., Science, 2002), or substantial underestimation of the steric rate most recently analysed in de- tail be Levitus and others(Science 2001,2002). Strong arguments exist as to why the second explanation is not likely to be correct. If we accept that the steric and small ice sheets estimates are reliable then we are forced to accept a significant contribution due to the modern day melting of polar ice. Yet the extent to which this contribution could be significant is strongly constrained by Earth rotation observations. I will ad- dress the issue as to how firm these constraints actually are. Grace observations of the time dependent geoid height, a signal which is also contaminated by the GIA process, as are Topex/Poseidon observations, once filtered to remove this effect, are expected to be immensely valuable in resolving the remaining uncertainties.

  19. Interaction of a two-level atom with single-mode optical field beyond the rotating wave approximation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-11-17

    One of the simplest models involving the atom-field interaction is the coupling of a single two-level atom with single-mode optical field. Under the rotating wave approximation, this problem is reduced to a form that can be solved exactly. But the approximation is only valid when the two levels are resonant or nearly resonant with the applied electromagnetic radiation. Here we present an analytical solution without the rotating wave approximation and applicable to general atom-field interaction far away from the resonance. We find that there exists remarkable influence of the initial phase of optical field on the Rabi oscillations and Rabi splitting, and this issue cannot be explored in the context of the rotating wave approximation. Due to the retention of the counter-rotating terms, higher-order harmonic appears during the Rabi splitting. The analytical solution suggests a way to regulate and control the quantum dynamics of a two-level atom and allows for exploring more essential features of the atom-field interaction. PMID:25402108

  20. Interaction of a two-level atom with single-mode optical field beyond the rotating wave approximation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-11-17

    One of the simplest models involving the atom-field interaction is the coupling of a single two-level atom with single-mode optical field. Under the rotating wave approximation, this problem is reduced to a form that can be solved exactly. But the approximation is only valid when the two levels are resonant or nearly resonant with the applied electromagnetic radiation. Here we present an analytical solution without the rotating wave approximation and applicable to general atom-field interaction far away from the resonance. We find that there exists remarkable influence of the initial phase of optical field on the Rabi oscillations and Rabi splitting, and this issue cannot be explored in the context of the rotating wave approximation. Due to the retention of the counter-rotating terms, higher-order harmonic appears during the Rabi splitting. The analytical solution suggests a way to regulate and control the quantum dynamics of a two-level atom and allows for exploring more essential features of the atom-field interaction.

  1. Microwave studies of collision-induced transitions between rotational levels. VIII. Collisions between NH/sub 3/ and polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, A.R.; Oka, T.

    1983-03-15

    The technique of four-level microwave double resonance has been applied to the study of rotation-inversion transitions of NH/sub 3/ induced by collisions with various polar molecules. H/sub 2/O, D/sub 2/O, CH/sub 3/OH, CH/sub 3/X and CHX/sub 3/ (X = F, Cl, Br, I), NO, CO, and OCS were used as collision partners. The values of eta = ..delta..I/I observed for many four-level systems which are connected by dipole-type transitions (..delta..J = +- 1, ..delta..K = 0, parity +bold-arrow-left-right-) are given and qualitatively explained taking into account the long-range dipole--dipole interaction and the pattern of rotational energy levels of the collision partners.

  2. Influence of the generated power, measurement bandwidth, and noise level on intensity statistics of a quasi-CW Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, Oleg A.; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry V.

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper we numerically study instrumental impact on statistical properties of quasi-CW Raman fiber laser using a simple model of multimode laser radiation. Effects, that have the most influence, are limited electrical bandwidth of measurement equipment and noise. To check this influence, we developed a simple model of the multimode quasi- CW generation with exponential statistics (i.e. uncorrelated modes). We found that the area near zero intensity in probability density function (PDF) is strongly affected by both factors, for example both lead to formation of a negative wing of intensity distribution. But far wing slope of PDF is not affected by noise and, for moderate mismatch between optical and electrical bandwidth, is only slightly affected by bandwidth limitation. The generation spectrum often becomes broader at higher power in experiments, so the spectral/electrical bandwidth mismatch factor increases over the power that can lead to artificial dependence of the PDF slope over the power. It was also found that both effects influence the ACF background level: noise impact decreases it, while limited bandwidth leads to its increase.

  3. Exposure levels due to WLAN devices in indoor environments corrected by a time-amplitude factor of distribution of the quasi-stochastic signals.

    PubMed

    Miclaus, Simona; Bechet, Paul; Stratakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    With the development of radiofrequency technology, radiating quasi-stochastic signals like the wireless local area networks (WLAN), a proper procedure of exposure level assessment is needed. No standardised procedure exists at the moment. While channel power measurement proved to overestimate the field strength, weighting techniques were proposed. The paper compares the exposure levels determined by three different procedures, two of them correcting the field level by weighting. Twenty-three experimental cases of WLAN traffic load are analysed in an indoor environment in controlled conditions. The results show the differences obtained when the duty cycle (DC) method is applied comparatively with the application of weighting based on an amplitude-time correction. Significant exposure level reductions of 52.6-79.2 % from the field determined by frequency domain method and of 36.5-72.8 % from the field determined by the DC weighting method were obtained by time-amplitude method. Specificities of weighting factors probability density functions were investigated and regression analysis was applied for a detailed characterisation of this procedure. PMID:24591729

  4. Ab initio ground-state potential energy function and vibration-rotation energy levels of imidogen, NH.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2015-06-30

    The accurate ground-state potential energy function of imidogen, NH, has been determined from ab initio calculations using the multireference averaged coupled-pair functional (MR-ACPF) method in conjunction with the correlation-consistent core-valence basis sets up to octuple-zeta quality. The importance of several effects, including electron correlation beyond the MR-ACPF level of approximation, the scalar relativistic, adiabatic, and nonadiabatic corrections were discussed. Along with the large one-particle basis set, all of these effects were found to be crucial to attain "spectroscopic" accuracy of the theoretical predictions of vibration-rotation energy levels of NH.

  5. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2C 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    DOE PAGES

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm–1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, itmore » allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  6. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2 C̃ (1)B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A; Field, Robert W

    2016-04-14

    The C̃ (1)B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X̃ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C̃ state below 1600 cm(-1) of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C̃ electronic state.

  7. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2 C ˜ 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    The C ˜ 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X ˜ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C ˜ state below 1600 cm-1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C ˜ electronic state.

  8. Control of nitratation in an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification rotating biological contactor through disc immersion level variation.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Boon, Nico; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Berckmoes, Karla; Mosquera, Mariela; Seuntjens, Dries; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2014-03-01

    With oxygen supply playing a crucial role in an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND) rotating biological contactor (RBC), its controlling factors were investigated in this study. Disc rotation speeds (1.8 and 3.6rpm) showed no influence on the process performance of a lab-scale RBC, although abiotic experiments showed a significant effect on the oxygenation capacity. Estimations of the biological oxygen uptake rate revealed that 85-89% of the oxygen was absorbed by the microorganisms during the air exposure of the discs. Indeed, increasing the disc immersion (50 to 75-80%) could significantly suppress undesired nitratation, on the short and long term. The presented results demonstrated that nitratation could be controlled by the immersion level and revealed that oxygen control in an OLAND RBC should be predominantly based on the atmospheric exposure percentage of the discs.

  9. Beach-ridge development in Lake Michigan: Shoreline behavior in response to quasi-periodic lake-level events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Strandplains of arcuate beach ridges are common in coastal embayments in parts of the Great Lakes. Similarities in beach-ridge development and geomorphology are recognizable in many of the embayments in the Lake Michigan basin despite differences in size and shape, available sediment type and supply, predepositional slope and topography, and hydrographic regime between the embayments. These similarities are primarily a product of three scales of quasiperiodic lake-level variation ranging in time from 30 to 600 years and in water level change from 0.5 to 3.7 m. The interaction of these three lake-level variations can be represented on a Curray (1964) diagram (rate of water level change versus rate of sediment supply). The position of any shoreline on the diagram and the type of behavior the shoreline is experiencing is a product of the interaction of the three variations. Two large Strandplains of late Holocene beach ridges occur at opposite ends of Lake Michigan (Toleston Beach and Thompson embayment). The two areas exhibit similar patterns of beach-ridge development for the past 2600 calendar years. That is, both areas form beach ridges about every 30 years. Groups of 4 to 6 beach ridges reflect a longer-term lake-level variation of about 150 years. Only during the largest variation of about 600 years in duration do the two areas differ. The rise to the 1700 cal yr B.P. high caused the erosion of beach ridges back to 2800 cal yrs B.P. in northern Lake Michigan. In southern Lake Michigan, no erosion occurred during this lake level high. Differences in shoreline development between the two areas are related to the rate of sediment supply to the shorelines. As the sediment sink for the southern half of Lake Michigan, the southern strandplain received a greater sediment flux than the northern strandplain during the latter part of the late Holocene and produced a continuous record of beach-ridge development. ?? 1995 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Camden active spaces: Does the construction of active school playgrounds influence children's physical activity levels? A longitudinal quasi-experiment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lee; Kipps, Courtney; Aggio, Daniel; Fox, Paul; Robinson, Nigel; Trend, Verena; Munnery, Suzie; Kelly, Barry; Hamer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity is essential for every facet of children's health. However, physical activity levels in British children are low. The school environment is a promising setting to increase children's physical activity but limited empirical evidence exists on how a change in the outdoor physical school environment influences physical activity behaviour. The London Borough of Camden is redesigning seven existing school playgrounds to engage children to become more physically active. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the impact of the redesigned playgrounds on children's physical activity, well-being and physical function/fitness. Method and analysis This project will use a longitudinal quasi-experimental design. Seven experimental schools and one control school will take part. One baseline data collection session and two follow-ups will be carried out. Between baseline and follow-up, the experimental school playgrounds will be redesigned. At baseline, a series of fitness tests, anthropometric and questionnaire measurements, and 7-day objective physical activity monitoring (Actigraph accelerometer) will be carried out on children (aged 5–16 years). This will be repeated at follow-up. Changes in overall physical activity levels and levels during different times of the day (eg, school breaks) will be examined. Multilevel regression modelling will be used to analyse the data. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will be disseminated through peer-review publications and scientific presentations. Ethical approval was obtained through the University College London Research Ethics Committee (Reference number: 4400/002). PMID:25232566

  11. Pure rotational spectrometers for trace-level VOC detection and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Justin L.; Harris, Brent J.; Pulliam, Robin L.; Muckle, Matt T.; Reynolds, Roger; McDaniel, David; Pate, Brooks H.

    2014-05-01

    Pure rotational spectroscopy in the centimeter, millimeter, and THz regions of the electromagnetic spectrum is a powerful technique for the characterization of polar molecules in the gas phase. Although this technology has a long history in the research sector for structural characterization, recent advances in digital electronics have only recently made commercial instruments competitive with established chemical analysis techniques. BrightSpec is introducing a platform of pure rotational spectrometers in response to critical unmet needs in chemical analysis. These instruments aim to deliver the operational simplicity of Fourier transform infrared spectrometers in conjunction with the chemical analysis capabilities of mass spectrometers. In particular, the BrightSpec ONE instrument a broadband gas mixture analyzer with full capabilities for chemical analysis. This instrument implements Fourier transform millimeter-wave emission spectroscopy, wherein a brief excitation pulse is applied to the sample, followed by the measurement of the coherent free induction decay responses of all molecular transitions within the excitation bandwidth. After sample injection and characterization, the spectrometer returns a list of all known species detected in the sample, along with their concentrations in the mixture. No prior knowledge about the sample composition is required. The instrument can then perform double-resonance measurements (analogous to 2-D COSY NMR), direct mass determination through analysis of the time profile of the molecular signal, and automated isotopic identification as part of a suite of tools that can return the structural identity of the unknowns in the sample.

  12. Effects of combined wrist flexion/extension and forearm rotation and two levels of relative force on discomfort.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid Ali; O'Sullivan, Leonard; Gallwey, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated perceived discomfort in an isometric wrist flexion task. Independent variables were wrist flexion/extension (55%, 35% flexion, neutral, 35% and 55% extension ranges of motion (ROM)), forearm rotation (60%, 30% prone, neutral, 30% and 60% supine ROM) and two levels of flexion force (10% and 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). Discomfort was significantly affected by flexion force, forearm rotation and a two-way interaction of force with forearm rotation (each p < 0.05). High force for 60%ROM forearm pronation and supination resulted in increasingly higher discomfort for these combinations. Flexion forces were set relative to the MVC in each wrist posture and this appears to be important in explaining a lack of significant effect (p = 0.34) for flexion/extension on discomfort. Regression equations predicting discomfort were developed and used to generate iso-discomfort contours, which indicate regions where the risk of injury should be low and others where it is likely to be high. Regression equations predicting discomfort and iso-discomfort contours are presented, which indicate combinations of upper limb postures for which discomfort is predicted to be low, and others where it is likely to be high. These are helpful in the study of limits for risk factors associated with upper limb musculoskeletal injury in industry.

  13. Is there a relationship between the performance in a chronometric mental-rotations test and salivary testosterone and estradiol levels in children aged 9-14 years?

    PubMed

    Quaiser-Pohl, Claudia; Jansen, Petra; Lehmann, Jennifer; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2016-01-01

    The consistent gender differences favoring males in some spatial abilities like mental rotation have raised the question of whether testosterone or other gonadal hormones contribute to these differences--especially because such gender differences seem to appear mainly from the age of puberty on. Studies generally suggest that spatial ability is facilitated by moderately high testosterone levels (i.e., levels that are relatively high for females and relatively low for males). However, the role of sex steroids for mental-rotation performance of (pre-) pubertal children has not been the focus of research, yet. In our study, the relationships between different aspects of mental-rotation performance (accuracy, reaction time, rotation speed) and salivary testosterone and estradiol levels were investigated. Subjects were 109 children (51 boys and 58 girls) aged between 9 and 14 years (M = 11.41, SD = 1.74). They performed a chronometric mental-rotations test, in which the stimuli consisted of three-dimensional drawings of Shepard and Metzler cube figures. In addition, saliva samples were gathered for the analysis of free testosterone and estradiol levels. Results showed a significant gender difference in reaction time and rotational speed in favor of boys, and a significant age, but no gender difference in testosterone and estradiol levels. We found no significant relationships between hormonal levels and any measure of mental-rotation performance.

  14. Application of the generalized Euler series transformation for calculation of vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglova, T. V.

    2004-01-01

    The detailed spectroscope information about highly excited molecules and radicals such us as H+3, H2, HI, H2O, CH2 is needed for a number of applications in the field of laser physics, astrophysics and chemistry. Studies of highly excited molecular vibration-rotation states face several problems connected with slowly convergence or even divergences of perturbation expansions. The physical reason for a perturbation expansion divergence is the large amplitude motion and strong vibration-rotation coupling. In this case one needs to use the special method of series summation. There were a number of papers devoted to this problem: papers 1-10 in the reference list are only example of studies on this topic. The present report is aimed at the application of GET method (Generalized Euler Transformation) to the diatomic molecule. Energy levels of a diatomic molecule is usually represented as Dunham series on rotational J(J+1) and vibrational (V+1/2) quantum numbers (within the perturbation approach). However, perturbation theory is not applicable for highly excited vibration-rotation states because the perturbation expansion in this case becomes divergent. As a consequence one need to use special method for the series summation. The Generalized Euler Transformation (GET) is known to be efficient method for summing of slowly convergent series, it was already used for solving of several quantum problems Refs.13 and 14. In this report the results of Euler transformation of diatomic molecule Dunham series are presented. It is shown that Dunham power series can be represented of functional series that is equivalent to its partial summation. It is also shown that transformed series has the butter convergent properties, than the initial series.

  15. Accurate Determination of Rotational Energy Levels in the Ground State of ^{12}CH_4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, M.; Iwakuni, K.; Okubo, S.; Sasada, H.

    2013-06-01

    We have measured absolute frequencies of saturated absorption of 183 allowed and 21 forbidden transitions in the νb{3} band of ^{12}CH_4 using an optical comb-referenced difference-frequency-generation spectrometer from 86.8 to 93.1 THz (from 2890 to 3100 wn). The pump and signal sources are a 1.06-μ m Nd:YAG laser and a 1.5-μ m extended-cavity laser diode. An enhanced-cavity absorption cell increases the optical electric field and enhances the sensitivity. The typical uncertainty is 3 kHz for the allowed transitions and 12 kHz for the forbidden transitions. Twenty combination differences are precisely determined, and the scalar rotational and centrifugal distortion constants of the ground state are thereby yielded as r@ = l@ r@ = l B_{{s}} (157 122 614.2 ± 1.5) kHz, D_{{s}} (3 328.545 ± 0.031) kHz, H_{{s}} (190.90 ± 0.26) Hz, and L_{{s}} (-13.16 ± 0.76) mHz. Here, B_{{s}} is the rotational constant and D_{{s}}, H_{{s}} and L_{{s}} are the scalar quartic, sextic, octic distortion constants. The relative uncertainties are considerably smaller than those obtained from global analysis of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. S. Okubo, H. Nakayama, K. Iwakuni, H. Inaba and H. Sasada, Opt. Express 19, 23878 (2011). M. Abe, K. Iwakuni, S. Okubo, and H. Sasada, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B (to be published). S. Albert, S. Bauerecker, V. Boudon, L. R. Brown, J. -P. Champion, M. Loëte, A. Nikitin, and M. Quack, Chem. Phys. 356, 131 (2009).

  16. Unsteady granular flows in a rotating tumbler.

    PubMed

    Pohlman, Nicholas A; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    The characteristics of steady granular flow in quasi-two-dimensional rotating tumblers have been thoroughly investigated and are fairly well understood. However, unsteady time-varying flow has not been studied in detail. The linear response of granular flow in quasi-two-dimensional rotating tumblers is presented for periodic forcing protocols via sinusoidal variation in the rotational speed of the tumbler and for step changes in rotational speed. Variations in the tumbler radius, particle size, and forcing frequency are explored. Similarities to steady flow include the fastest flow occurring at the free surface of the flowing layer and an instantaneous approximately linear velocity profile through the depth. The flowing layer depth varies by 2-5 particle diameters between minimum and maximum rotation rates. However, unsteady forcing also causes the flow to exhibit dynamic properties. For periodic rotational speeds, the phase lag of the flowing layer depth increases linearly with increasing input forcing frequency up to nearly 2.0 rad over 0-20 cycles per tumbler revolution. The amplitude responses of the velocity and shear rate show a resonance behavior unique to the system level parameters. The phase lag of all flow properties appears to be related to the number of particle contacts from the edge of the rotating tumbler. Characterization via step changes in rotational speed shows dynamic properties of overshoot (up to 35%) and rise times on the order of 0.2-0.7 s. The results suggest that the unsteady granular flow analysis may be beneficial for characterizing the "flowability" and "rheology" of granular materials based on particle size, moisture content, or other properties. PMID:19905105

  17. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state.

  18. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state. PMID:27481562

  19. Calculated rotation-bending energy levels of CH 5+ and a comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-05-01

    We report J > 0 CH 5+ levels computed by fixing stretch coordinates. They are computed by using a simple product basis, exploiting symmetry, and carefully parallelizing the calculation. The J > 0 CH 5+ levels are compared with those obtained from other theoretical methods and with experimental ground state combination differences of Asvany et al. [Science, 347, 1346 (2015)]. If the assignment of Asvany et al. is correct, there are important differences between the levels we compute and those observed. We propose a different assignment of the experimental levels that reduces the maximum error from 34 to 2 cm-1. The new assignment can only be correct if states of both parities exist in the experiment. Although, ro-vibrational levels of CH 5+ cannot be associated with individual vibrational states, they do occur in blocks separated by gaps.

  20. Calculation of rotation-vibration energy levels of the ammonia molecule based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2016-09-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for gas-phase ammonia NH3 has been computed using the methodology pioneered for water (Polyansky et al., 2013). Multireference configuration interaction calculations are performed at about 50 000 points using the aug-cc-pCVQZ and aug-cc-pCV5Z basis sets and basis set extrapolation. Relativistic and adiabatic surfaces are also computed. The points are fitted to a suitable analytical form, producing the most accurate ab initio PES for this molecule available. The rotation-vibration energy levels are computed using nuclear motion program TROVE in both linearised and curvilinear coordinates. Better convergence is obtained using curvilinear coordinates. Our results are used to assign the visible spectrum of 14NH3 recorded by Coy and Lehmann (1986). Rotation-vibration energy levels for the isotopologues NH2D, NHD2, ND3 and 15NH3 are also given. An ab initio value for the dissociation energy D0 of 14NH3 is also presented.

  1. High temperature heat source generation with quasi-continuous wave semiconductor lasers at power levels of 6 W for medical use.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Imai, Yusuke; Tei, Kazuyoku; Ito, Shinobu; Kanazawa, Hideko; Yamaguchi, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a technology to create a high temperature heat source on the tip surface of the glass fiber proposed for medical surgery applications. Using 4 to 6 W power level semiconductor lasers at a wavelength of 980 nm, a laser coupled fiber tip was preprocessed to contain a certain amount of titanium oxide powder with a depth of 100 μm from the tip surface so that the irradiated low laser energy could be perfectly absorbed to be transferred to thermal energy. Thus, the laser treatment can be performed without suffering from any optical characteristic of the material. A semiconductor laser was operated quasi-continuous wave mode pulse time duration of 180 ms and >95% of the laser energy was converted to thermal energy in the fiber tip. Based on two-color thermometry, by using a gated optical multichannel analyzer with a 0.25 m spectrometer in visible wavelength region, the temperature of the fiber tip was analyzed. The temperature of the heat source was measured to be in excess 3100 K.

  2. Time resolved fluorescence from parity mixed rotational energy levels - Collisions vs electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandich, M. L.; Gaebe, C. E.; Gottscho, R. A.

    1985-10-01

    Moore et al. (1984) have described a method for the in situ and nonintrusive measurement of plasma electric fields by a method involving the excitation of a parity or Lambda doublet of the polar diatomic molecule BCl. Three approximations are made in deriving a theoretical relationship between field strength and the forbidden to allowed line intensity ratio. One approximation is related to the neglect of collisional transfer, while another is based on the neglect of coherent phenomena, such as quantum beats between the mixed parity levels. New experimental evidence is provided, and it is shown that the latter approximation is not always justified. The last assumption is the neglect of hyperfine structure effects on field-dependent line intensities and polarizations. Hyperfine effects are accounted for in a phenomenological fashion which is justified empirically. Attention is given to both time-resolved and time-integrated fluorescence measurements from parity-mixed energy levels in the polar diatomic molecule BCl.

  3. Evaluation of the lubrication mechanism at various rotation speeds and granule filling levels in a container mixer using a thermal effusivity sensor.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Jumpei; Aoki, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    To research the detailed mechanism of the lubrication process using the thermal effusivity sensor, the relationships of the lubrication progress with the pattern of powder flow, the rotation speed and the filling level were investigated. The thermal effusivity profile was studied as a function of the number of rotations at various rotation speeds. It was observed that at lower rotation speeds, the profiles of the lubrication progress were almost the same, regardless of the rotation speed. In this region, the highest speed was defined as the critical rotation speed (CRS), which was found to be one of the important factors. The CRS had close relations with avalanche flow in the blender. The first and the second phases were observed in the lubrication process. The first phase was influenced by the CRS and the filling level in the blender. The second phase was influenced by the rotation speed. The mechanism of two-phase process was proposed as a macro progression of the dispersion of the lubricant (first phase) and micro progression of the coating of the powder particles with lubricant (second phase). The accurate monitoring by the thermal effusivity sensor was able to help a better understanding in the lubrication process.

  4. Evaluation of the lubrication mechanism at various rotation speeds and granule filling levels in a container mixer using a thermal effusivity sensor.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Jumpei; Aoki, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    To research the detailed mechanism of the lubrication process using the thermal effusivity sensor, the relationships of the lubrication progress with the pattern of powder flow, the rotation speed and the filling level were investigated. The thermal effusivity profile was studied as a function of the number of rotations at various rotation speeds. It was observed that at lower rotation speeds, the profiles of the lubrication progress were almost the same, regardless of the rotation speed. In this region, the highest speed was defined as the critical rotation speed (CRS), which was found to be one of the important factors. The CRS had close relations with avalanche flow in the blender. The first and the second phases were observed in the lubrication process. The first phase was influenced by the CRS and the filling level in the blender. The second phase was influenced by the rotation speed. The mechanism of two-phase process was proposed as a macro progression of the dispersion of the lubricant (first phase) and micro progression of the coating of the powder particles with lubricant (second phase). The accurate monitoring by the thermal effusivity sensor was able to help a better understanding in the lubrication process. PMID:25000482

  5. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei; Rey, Michaël; Szalay, Péter G.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C2H4 obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82 542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C2H4 molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.-Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm-1 for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm-1 for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm-1. Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for 12C2H4, 13C2H4, and 12C2D4 isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm-1 are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of 13C2H4 and 12C2D4 and rovibrational levels of 12C2H4.

  6. Magneto-optical rotation and cross-phase modulation via coherently driven four-level atomsin a tripod configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, David; Malakyan, Yuri P.

    2004-08-01

    We study the interaction of a weak probe field, having two orthogonally polarized components, with an optically dense medium of four-level atoms in a tripod configuration. In the presence of a coherent driving laser, electromagnetically induced transparency is attained in the medium, dramatically enhancing its linear as well as nonlinear dispersion while simultaneously suppressing the probe field absorption. We present the semiclassical and fully quantum analysis of the system. We propose an experimentally feasible setup that can induce large Faraday rotation of the probe field polarization and therefore be used for ultrasensitive optical magnetometry. We then study the Kerr nonlinear coupling between the two components of the probe, demonstrating a novel regime of symmetric, extremely efficient cross-phase modulation, capable of fully entangling two single-photon pulses. This scheme may thus pave the way to photon-based quantum information applications, such as deterministic all-optical quantum computation, dense coding, and teleportation.

  7. The vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of N2-H2O and N2-D2O.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2015-07-14

    In this paper, we report vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of the van der Waals clusters N2-H2O and N2-D2O computed from an ab initio potential energy surface. The only dynamical approximation is that the monomers are rigid. We use a symmetry adapted Lanczos algorithm and an uncoupled product basis set. The pattern of the cluster's levels is complicated by splittings caused by H-H exchange tunneling (larger splitting) and N-N exchange tunneling (smaller splitting). An interesting result that emerges from our calculation is that whereas in N2-H2O, the symmetric H-H tunnelling state is below the anti-symmetric H-H tunnelling state for both K = 0 and K = 1, the order is reversed in N2-D2O for K = 1. The only experimental splitting measurements are the D-D exchange tunneling splittings reported by Zhu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 214309 (2013)] for N2-D2O in the v2 = 1 region of D2O. Due to the inverted order of the split levels, they measure the sum of the K = 0 and K = 1 tunneling splittings, which is in excellent agreement with our calculated result. Other splittings we predict, in particular those of N2-H2O, may guide future experiments. PMID:26178101

  8. The vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of N2-H2O and N2-D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of the van der Waals clusters N2-H2O and N2-D2O computed from an ab initio potential energy surface. The only dynamical approximation is that the monomers are rigid. We use a symmetry adapted Lanczos algorithm and an uncoupled product basis set. The pattern of the cluster's levels is complicated by splittings caused by H-H exchange tunneling (larger splitting) and N-N exchange tunneling (smaller splitting). An interesting result that emerges from our calculation is that whereas in N2-H2O, the symmetric H-H tunnelling state is below the anti-symmetric H-H tunnelling state for both K = 0 and K = 1, the order is reversed in N2-D2O for K = 1. The only experimental splitting measurements are the D-D exchange tunneling splittings reported by Zhu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 214309 (2013)] for N2-D2O in the v2 = 1 region of D2O. Due to the inverted order of the split levels, they measure the sum of the K = 0 and K = 1 tunneling splittings, which is in excellent agreement with our calculated result. Other splittings we predict, in particular those of N2-H2O, may guide future experiments.

  9. Faraday rotation due to quadratic gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yihan; Liu, Liping; Tian, Wen-Xiu

    2011-01-01

    The linearized field equations of quadratic gravitation in stationary space-time are written in quasi-Maxwell form. The rotation of the polarization plane for an electromagnetic wave propagating in the gravito-electromagnetic field caused by a rotating gravitational lens is discussed. The influences of the Yukawa potential in quadratic gravitation on the gravitational Faraday rotation are investigated.

  10. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, Thibault Rey, Michaël Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Nikitin, Andrei; Szalay, Péter G.

    2014-09-14

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C{sub 2}H{sub 4} obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82 542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.–Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm{sup −1} for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm{sup −1} for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm{sup −1}. Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and {sup 12}C{sub 2}D{sub 4} isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm{sup −1} are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and {sup 12}C{sub 2}D{sub 4} and rovibrational levels of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  11. The analemma criterion: accidental quasi-satellites are indeed true quasi-satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the Solar system, a quasi-satellite is an object that follows a heliocentric path with an orbital period that matches almost exactly with that of a host body (planetary or not). The trajectory is of such nature that, without being gravitationally attached, the value of the angular separation between host and quasi-satellite as seen from the Sun remains confined within relatively narrow limits for time-spans that exceed the length of the host's sidereal orbital period. Here, we show that under these conditions, a quasi-satellite traces an analemma in the sky as observed from the host in a manner similar to that found for geosynchronous orbits. The analemmatic curve (figure-eight-, teardrop-, ellipse-shaped) results from the interplay between the tilt of the rotational axis of the host and the properties of the orbit of the quasi-satellite. The analemma criterion can be applied to identify true quasi-satellite dynamical behaviour using observational or synthetic astrometry and it is tested for several well-documented quasi-satellites. For the particular case of 15810 (1994 JR1), a putative accidental quasi-satellite of dwarf planet Pluto, we show explicitly that this object describes a complex analemmatic curve for several Plutonian sidereal periods, confirming its transient quasi-satellite status.

  12. Analysis of the Rotation-Torsion Spectrum of CH_2DOH Within the e_0, e_1, and o_1 Torsional Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, L. H.; Pearson, John C.; Yu, Shanshan; Margules, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Klee, S.

    2013-06-01

    Since the first assignments of Quade and coworkers, a more satisfactory understanding of the spectrum of CH_2DOH has now been achieved. Thanks to a multidimensional potential energy surface and to a new theoretical approach accounting for the internal rotation of a partially deuterated methyl group, 76 torsional subbands could be identified in the microwave and FIR domains. 8356 rotation and rotation-torsion transitions were also assigned for the three lowest lying torsional levels, e_0, e_1, and o_1, in the microwave and terahertz domains and were analyzed with empirical models. In this paper, a new approach aimed at accounting for the rotation-torsion energy levels of CH_2DOH will be presented. It is based on the exact expression of the generalized 4× 4 inertia tensor of the molecule and accounts for the C_s symmetry of the partially deuterated methyl group, for the dependence of the rotational constants on the angle of internal rotation, and for the rotation-torsion Coriolis coupling. This approach will be used to analyze high-resolution data involving the three lowest lying torsional levels, up to k=11. In addition to the microwave data reported recently,^d new transitions recorded in the terahertz domain at JPL will be analyzed. The results of the analysis will be presented in the paper and the parameters determined in the analysis will be discussed. Quade and Suenram, J. Chem. Phys. {73} (1980) 1127; and Su and Quade, J. Mol. Spec. {134} (1989) 290. Lauvergnat, Coudert, Klee, and Smirnov, J. Mol. Spec. {256} (2009) 204. El Hilali, Coudert, Konov, and Klee, J. Chem. Phys. {135} (2011) 194309. Pearson, Yu, and Drouin, J. Mol. Spec. {280} (2012) 119. Quade and Lin, J. Chem. Phys. {38} (1963) 540.

  13. Reconciling past changes in Earth’s rotation with 20th century global sea-level rise: Resolving Munk’s enigma

    PubMed Central

    Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Hay, Carling C.; Morrow, Eric; Kopp, Robert E.; Dumberry, Mathieu; Stanley, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, Munk defined an important enigma of 20th century global mean sea-level (GMSL) rise that has yet to be resolved. First, he listed three canonical observations related to Earth’s rotation [(i) the slowing of Earth’s rotation rate over the last three millennia inferred from ancient eclipse observations, and changes in the (ii) amplitude and (iii) orientation of Earth’s rotation vector over the last century estimated from geodetic and astronomic measurements] and argued that they could all be fit by a model of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) associated with the last ice age. Second, he demonstrated that prevailing estimates of the 20th century GMSL rise (~1.5 to 2.0 mm/year), after correction for the maximum signal from ocean thermal expansion, implied mass flux from ice sheets and glaciers at a level that would grossly misfit the residual GIA-corrected observations of Earth’s rotation. We demonstrate that the combination of lower estimates of the 20th century GMSL rise (up to 1990) improved modeling of the GIA process and that the correction of the eclipse record for a signal due to angular momentum exchange between the fluid outer core and the mantle reconciles all three Earth rotation observations. This resolution adds confidence to recent estimates of individual contributions to 20th century sea-level change and to projections of GMSL rise to the end of the 21st century based on them. PMID:26824058

  14. Association between exposure to rotating night shift versus day shift using levels of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and cortisol and other sex hormones in women.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; García-Unzueta, María Teresa; Santos-Benito, María Francisca; Llorca, Javier

    2015-02-01

    The present study aims to compare 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) secretion patterns and levels of cortisol and sex hormones (estradiol, progesterone, DHEA, DHEAS, and testosterone) among rotating night-shift workers and day-shift workers. We performed a cross-sectional study in Cantabria (northern Spain) including 136 women (73 day-shift workers and 63 rotating night-shift workers). Blood and urine samples were obtained after two consecutive working days. Differences in means were estimated using ANCOVA, stratified by menopausal status, ovulation phase, and adjusted for season, age, body mass index, consumption of cigarettes in the last 24 h. aMT6s circadian rhythm was analyzed using the cosinor analysis. The present study showed that rotating night-shift workers had lower excretion of aMT6s than day-shift workers (mesor = 50.26 ng aMT6s/mg creatinine in women with rotating night shift versus 88.79 ng aMT6s/mg creatinine in women with day shift), lower fluctuation (amplitude = 45.24 ng aMT6s/mg creatinine in rotating night-shift workers versus 79.71 ng aMT6s/mg creatinine in day-shift workers), and a later acrophase (aMT6s peak time: 08:31 in rotating night-shift workers versus 07:13 h in day-shift workers). Additionally, women with rotating night shift had higher estradiol and progesterone levels, compared to day workers, especially in the follicular phase on the menstrual cycle. PMID:25216206

  15. New approach to evaluate the lubrication process in various granule filling levels and rotating mixer sizes using a thermal effusivity sensor.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Jumpei; Aoki, Shigeru; Uemoto, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    The principles of thermal effusivity are applied to an understanding of the detailed mechanisms of the lubrication process in a rotating mixer. The relationships and impact of the lubrication process by the pattern of powder flow, the filling level, and the rotating mixer size were investigated. Thermal effusivity profiles of the lubrication process, as obtained, indicate that lubrication is a two-phase process. The intersection point of the first and second phases (IPFS) is influenced by changing the filling level, thus changing the resulting number of avalanche flows created. The slope of the second phase (SSP) is influenced by the relationship between the number and the length of avalanche flows. Understanding this difference between the first and second phases is important to successfully evaluate the impact of proposed changes in the lubrication process. From this knowledge, a predictive model of the lubrication profile can be generated to allow an evaluation of proposed changes to the lubrication process. This model allows estimation of the lubrication profile at different filling levels and in different rotating mixer sizes. In this study, the actual lubrication profile almost coincides with the model predicted lubrication profile. Based on these findings, it is assumed that lubrication profiles at a commercial scale can be predicted from data generated at the laboratory scale. Further, it is assumed that changes in the filling level can also be estimated from the laboratory or current data.

  16. New approach to evaluate the lubrication process in various granule filling levels and rotating mixer sizes using a thermal effusivity sensor.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Jumpei; Aoki, Shigeru; Uemoto, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    The principles of thermal effusivity are applied to an understanding of the detailed mechanisms of the lubrication process in a rotating mixer. The relationships and impact of the lubrication process by the pattern of powder flow, the filling level, and the rotating mixer size were investigated. Thermal effusivity profiles of the lubrication process, as obtained, indicate that lubrication is a two-phase process. The intersection point of the first and second phases (IPFS) is influenced by changing the filling level, thus changing the resulting number of avalanche flows created. The slope of the second phase (SSP) is influenced by the relationship between the number and the length of avalanche flows. Understanding this difference between the first and second phases is important to successfully evaluate the impact of proposed changes in the lubrication process. From this knowledge, a predictive model of the lubrication profile can be generated to allow an evaluation of proposed changes to the lubrication process. This model allows estimation of the lubrication profile at different filling levels and in different rotating mixer sizes. In this study, the actual lubrication profile almost coincides with the model predicted lubrication profile. Based on these findings, it is assumed that lubrication profiles at a commercial scale can be predicted from data generated at the laboratory scale. Further, it is assumed that changes in the filling level can also be estimated from the laboratory or current data. PMID:25757487

  17. Excited vibrational level rotational constants for SiC2: A sensitive molecular diagnostic for astrophysical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Silacyclopropynylidene, SiC2, is a known and highly abundant circumstellar molecule. Its spectrum has been established as a major component of lines observed toward the carbon-rich star IRC +10216 (CW Leonis). It has been detected in its low-lying v3 = 1 and 2 vibrational states as well as in various isotopic compositions. Increasing sensitivity and spatial resolution will enable many more emission or absorption lines to be detected. In order to detect new molecular species, unassigned lines of known species must be identified. This work uses established ab initio quartic force fields to produce data necessary for this classification of lines related to SiC2. Agreement between the theoretical vibrational frequencies and known rotational and spectroscopic constants is quite good, as good as 5 cm-1 and 3 MHz, respectively in some cases. In addition, experimentally unknown vibrational frequencies and rotational constants are provided for the first overtones and combination bands in addition to 3ν3, the second overtone of the low-lying antisymmetric stretch/carbide rotation mode. Frequencies of v3 = 3 low-J rotational transitions of the main isotopic species are also estimated from published data for v3 ≤ 2. Further, we determine rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters for which in most cases vibrational effects due to the ν3 mode were reduced to first, and in several cases also to second order. These values may approximate equilibrium values better than the ground state values. The data produced herein will aid in the experimental and observational characterization of this known astromolecule in order to identify some of the unassigned lines for a known entity.

  18. You Should Be the Specialist! Weak Mental Rotation Performance in Aviation Security Screeners - Reduced Performance Level in Aviation Security with No Gender Effect.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Jenny K; Suchan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Aviation security screeners analyze a large number of X-ray images per day and seem to be experts in mentally rotating diverse kinds of visual objects. A robust gender-effect that men outperform women in the Vandenberg & Kuse mental rotation task has been well documented over the last years. In addition it has been shown that training can positively influence the overall task-performance. Considering this, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether security screeners show better performance in the Mental Rotation Test (MRT) independently of gender. Forty-seven security screeners of both sexes from two German airports were examined with a computer based MRT. Their performance was compared to a large sample of control subjects. The well-known gender-effect favoring men on mental rotation was significant within the control group. However, the security screeners did not show any sex differences suggesting an effect of training and professional performance. Surprisingly this specialized group showed a lower level of overall MRT performance than the control participants. Possible aviation related influences such as secondary effects of work-shift or expertise which can cumulatively cause this result are discussed. PMID:27014142

  19. You Should Be the Specialist! Weak Mental Rotation Performance in Aviation Security Screeners – Reduced Performance Level in Aviation Security with No Gender Effect

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Jenny K.; Suchan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Aviation security screeners analyze a large number of X-ray images per day and seem to be experts in mentally rotating diverse kinds of visual objects. A robust gender-effect that men outperform women in the Vandenberg & Kuse mental rotation task has been well documented over the last years. In addition it has been shown that training can positively influence the overall task-performance. Considering this, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether security screeners show better performance in the Mental Rotation Test (MRT) independently of gender. Forty-seven security screeners of both sexes from two German airports were examined with a computer based MRT. Their performance was compared to a large sample of control subjects. The well-known gender-effect favoring men on mental rotation was significant within the control group. However, the security screeners did not show any sex differences suggesting an effect of training and professional performance. Surprisingly this specialized group showed a lower level of overall MRT performance than the control participants. Possible aviation related influences such as secondary effects of work-shift or expertise which can cumulatively cause this result are discussed. PMID:27014142

  20. You Should Be the Specialist! Weak Mental Rotation Performance in Aviation Security Screeners - Reduced Performance Level in Aviation Security with No Gender Effect.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Jenny K; Suchan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Aviation security screeners analyze a large number of X-ray images per day and seem to be experts in mentally rotating diverse kinds of visual objects. A robust gender-effect that men outperform women in the Vandenberg & Kuse mental rotation task has been well documented over the last years. In addition it has been shown that training can positively influence the overall task-performance. Considering this, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether security screeners show better performance in the Mental Rotation Test (MRT) independently of gender. Forty-seven security screeners of both sexes from two German airports were examined with a computer based MRT. Their performance was compared to a large sample of control subjects. The well-known gender-effect favoring men on mental rotation was significant within the control group. However, the security screeners did not show any sex differences suggesting an effect of training and professional performance. Surprisingly this specialized group showed a lower level of overall MRT performance than the control participants. Possible aviation related influences such as secondary effects of work-shift or expertise which can cumulatively cause this result are discussed.

  1. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  2. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-12-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1-0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum.

  3. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1–0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum. PMID:25523102

  4. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational-vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition wavenumbers for H216O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Bernath, Peter F.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Császár, Attila G.; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Fábri, Csaba; Fazliev, Alexander Z.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Gordon, Iouli E.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Mizus, Irina I.

    2013-03-01

    This is the third of a series of articles reporting critically evaluated rotational-vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed labels and uncertainties, for all the main isotopologues of water. This paper presents experimental line positions, experimental-quality energy levels, and validated labels for rotational-vibrational transitions of the most abundant isotopologue of water, H216O. The latest version of the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) line-inversion procedure is used to determine the rovibrational energy levels of the electronic ground state of H216O from experimentally measured lines, together with their self-consistent uncertainties, for the spectral region up to the first dissociation limit. The spectroscopic network of H216O containstwo components, an ortho (o) and a para (p) one. For o-H216O and p-H216O, experimentally measured, assigned, and labeled transitions were analyzed from more than 100 sources. The measured lines come from one-photon spectra recorded at room temperature in absorption, from hot samples with temperatures up to 3000 K recorded in emission, and from multiresonance excitation spectra which sample levels up to dissociation. The total number of transitions considered is 184 667 of which 182 156 are validated: 68 027 between para states and 114 129 ortho ones. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H216O and p-H216O, respectively. The energy levels, including their labeling with approximate normal-mode and rigid-rotor quantum numbers, have been checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing exact kinetic energy operators as well as against previous compilations of energy levels. The extensive list of MARVEL lines and levels obtained are deposited in the supplementary data of this paper, as well as in a distributed information system

  5. Reversible control of F(1)-ATPase rotational motion using a photochromic ATP analog at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Ei-Ichiro; Kamei, Takashi; Konno, Hiroki; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2014-03-28

    Motor enzymes such as F1-ATPase and kinesin utilize energy from ATP for their motion. Molecular motions of these enzymes are critical to their catalytic mechanisms and were analyzed thoroughly using a single molecule observation technique. As a tool to analyze and control the ATP-driven motor enzyme motion, we recently synthesized a photoresponsive ATP analog with a p-tert-butylazobenzene tethered to the 2' position of the ribose ring. Using cis/trans isomerization of the azobenzene moiety, we achieved a successful reversible photochromic control over a kinesin-microtubule system in an in vitro motility assay. Here we succeeded to control the hydrolytic activity and rotation of the rotary motor enzyme, F1-ATPase, using this photosensitive ATP analog. Subsequent single molecule observations indicated a unique pause occurring at the ATP binding angle position in the presence of cis form of the analog.

  6. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  7. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  8. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  9. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  10. Riemann quasi-invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhozhaev, Stanislav I

    2011-06-30

    The notion of Riemann quasi-invariants is introduced and their applications to several conservation laws are considered. The case of nonisentropic flow of an ideal polytropic gas is analysed in detail. Sufficient conditions for gradient catastrophes are obtained. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  11. THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PIFER, ALAN

    ORGANIZED TO MEET URGENT NATIONAL NEEDS, PROVIDE INDEPENDENT JUDGMENT, AND OFFER FRESH SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS, THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION IS DEFINED AS A NONPROFIT ASSOCIATION OR INSTITUTION LODGED IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR OF SOCIETY BUT FINANCED LARGELY OR ENTIRELY BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, RESPONSIBLE TO ITS OWN BOARD OF…

  12. Serious rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W

    1983-07-01

    Usually, serious rotator cuff injuries can be operated upon and a high level of performance can be achieved afer surgery. This is not so for the substantial tears seen in baseball pitchers. However, a damaged rotator cuff can be rehabilitated and can recover from the threatened tear without surgery if detected early enough and given the proper treatment.

  13. Effect of diversified crop rotations on groundwater levels and crop water productivity in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolin; Chen, Yuanquan; Pacenka, Steven; Gao, Wangsheng; Ma, Li; Wang, Guangya; Yan, Peng; Sui, Peng; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2015-03-01

    Water shortage is the major bottleneck that limits sustainable yield of agriculture in the North China Plain. Due to the over-exploitation of groundwater for irrigating the winter wheat-summer maize double cropping systems, a groundwater crisis is becoming increasingly serious. To help identify more efficient and sustainable utilization of the limited water resources, the water consumption and water use efficiency of five irrigated cropping systems were calculated and the effect of cropping systems on groundwater table changes was estimated based on a long term field experiment from 2003 to 2013 in the North China Plain interpreted using a soil-water-balance model. The five cropping systems included sweet potato → cotton → sweet potato → winter wheat-summer maize (SpCSpWS, 4-year cycle), ryegrass-cotton → peanuts → winter wheat-summer maize (RCPWS, 3-year cycle), peanuts → winter wheat-summer maize (PWS, 2-year cycle), winter wheat-summer maize (WS, 1-year cycle), and continuous cotton (Cont C). The five cropping systems had a wide range of annual average actual evapotranspiration (ETa): Cont C (533 mm/year) < SpCSpWS (556 mm/year) < PWS (615 mm/year) < RCPWS (650 mm/year) < WS rotation (734 mm/year). The sequence of the simulated annual average groundwater decline due to the five cropping systems was WS (1.1 m/year) > RCPWS (0.7 m/year) > PWS (0.6 m/year) > SPCSPWS and Cont C (0.4 m/year). The annual average economic output water use efficiency (WUEe) increased in the order SpCSpWS (11.6 yuan ¥ m-3) > RCPWS (9.0 ¥ m-3) > PWS (7.3 ¥ m-3) > WS (6.8 ¥ m-3) > Cont C (5.6 ¥ m-3) from 2003 to 2013. Results strongly suggest that diversifying crop rotations could play a critically important role in mitigating the over-exploitation of the groundwater, while ensuring the food security or boosting the income of farmers in the North China Plain.

  14. Rotation and vibration-rotation spectrum of FeH

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.G.; Davis, S.P.

    1988-02-01

    The far-IR rotation and fundamental vibration-rotation spectra of the FeH molecule's 4Delta-4Delta system are calculated. The vibration-rotation band is in the middle of a band in the water spectrum, so that it will have to be searched for from outer space. In the case of the rotation spectrum, the feature to look for is the rotation line at 1411 GHz, which is produced by the transition between the two lowest rotational levels of the lowest (7/2) subband. This feature can be looked for from the ground. 14 references.

  15. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings. PMID:27638070

  16. Association between meniscal tears and the peak external knee adduction moment and foot rotation during level walking in postmenopausal women without knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Davies-Tuck, Miranda L; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai; Davis, Susan R; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Meniscal injury is a risk factor for the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis, yet little is known about risk factors for meniscal pathology. Joint loading mediated via gait parameters may be associated with meniscal tears, and determining whether such an association exists was the aim of this study. Methods Three-dimensional Vicon gait analyses were performed on the dominant knee of 20 non-osteoarthritic women, and the peak external knee adduction moment during early and late stance was determined. The degree of foot rotation was also examined when the knee adductor moment peaked during early and late stance. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine the presence and severity of meniscal lesions in the dominant knee. Results The presence (P = 0.04) and severity (P = 0.01) of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment during early stance while a trend for late stance was observed (P = 0.07). They were also associated with increasing degrees of internal foot rotation during late stance, independent of the magnitude of the peak external knee adduction moment occurring at that time (P = 0.03). During level walking among healthy women, the presence and severity of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment. Moreover, the magnitude of internal foot rotation was associated with the presence and severity of medial meniscal lesions, independent of the peak knee adductor moment during late stance. Conclusion These data may suggest that gait parameters may be associated with meniscal damage, although longitudinal studies will be required to clarify whether gait abnormalities predate meniscal lesions, or vice versa, and therefore whether modification of gait patterns may be helpful. PMID:18492234

  17. Testing the limits of quasi-geostrophic theory: application to observed laboratory flows outside the quasi-geostrophic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Read, Peter; Haine, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    We compare laboratory observations of equilibrated baroclinic waves in the rotating two-layer annulus, with numerical simulations from a quasi-geostrophic model. The laboratory experiments lie well outside the quasi-geostrophic regime: the Rossby number reaches unity; the depth-to-width aspect ratio is large; and the fluid contains ageostrophic inertia-gravity waves. Despite being formally inapplicable, the quasi-geostrophic model captures the laboratory flows reasonably well. The model displays several systematic biases, which are consequences of its treatment of boundary layers and neglect of interfacial surface tension, and which may be explained without invoking the dynamical effects of the moderate Rossby number, large aspect ratio or inertia-gravity waves. We conclude that quasi-geostrophic theory appears to continue to apply well outside its formal bounds. This is an unexpected and intriguing result that could not have been predicted from the existing literature. It is also potentially useful, for example by permitting the use of a low-order quasi-geostrophic model to easily map out the bifurcation structure - which would be very difficult with a primitive equations model - followed by the use of a primitive equations model for more quantitative agreement in specific cases. Reference Williams, PD, PL Read and TWN Haine (2010) Testing the limits of quasi-geostrophic theory: application to observed laboratory flows outside the quasi-geostrophic regime. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, in press.

  18. Study of the rotational-level and temperature dependence of the quenching rate of OH fluorescence due to collisions with water molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koker, Edmond B.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of the OH radical as an intermediate in many combustion reactions and in atmospheric photochemistry has led many researchers to use it as a diagnostic tool in these processes. The amount of data that has been acquired over the years for this radical is quite considerable. However, the quenching rate of OH with water molecules as a function of temperature and the rotational level of the excited state is not very well understood. The motivation of the studies undertaken is to bridge the gap between the low temperature measurements and the high temperature ones reported in the literature. The technique generally employed in these diagnostics is laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), through which rotational state selective excitation of the radical is possible. Furthermore, in a combustion medium, water is produced in abundance so that knowledge of the quenching rate of OH due to water molecules plays a crucial role in interpreting the data. In general, the precursor to an understanding of the collisional quenching rates of OH involves a characterization of the mode in which the radical is produced; the resulting rotational and translational distribution, followed by a measurement of the OH temperature; and ultimately obtaining the rate constants from the pressure dependence of the fluorescence signal. The experimental implementation of these measurements therefore involved, as a first step, the production of the OH radicals in a microwave discharge cell using water vapor as the source, wherein a hydrogen atom is abstracted from H2O. The second step involved the absorption of photons from the frequency-doubled output of a pulsed amplified, single-frequency cw ring dye laser. By tuning the laser to the peak of the transition and observing the fluorescence decay after the laser pulse, the lifetime of the OH in a particular rotational electronic state was determined (tau = 1.4 microseconds for Q(sub 1)(3)). Knowledge of this parameter led to a determination of

  19. Vibrational and rotational energy transfers involving the CH B 2Σ- v=1 vibrational level in collisions with Ar, CO, and N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-Yi; Tsai, Ming-Tsang; Lin, King-Chuen

    2006-04-01

    With photolysis-probe technique, we have studied vibrational and rotational energy transfers of CH involving the B Σ-2 (v =1, 0⩽N⩽6, F) state by collisions with Ar, CO, and N2O. For the vibrational energy transfer (VET) measurements, the time-resolved fluorescence of the B-X(0,0) band is monitored following the (1,0) band excitation. For the rotational energy transfer (RET) measurements, the laser-induced fluorescence of the initially populated state is dispersed using a step-scan Fourier transform spectrometer. The time-resolved spectra obtained in the nanosecond regime may yield the RET information under a single pressure of the collider. The rate constants of intramolecular energy transfers are evaluated with simulation of kinetic models. The VET lies in the range of 4×10-12to4×10-11cm3molecule-1s-1, with efficiency following the order of Ar rotational distribution. The RET rates are more rapid by one to two orders of magnitude, comparable to the gas kinetic, with the trend of Ar level reported previously. In general, the propensity rules obeyed in the v =0 collision with Ar are valid in v =1, but the latter case shows a weaker tendency. It might be caused by the anisotropy difference of interaction potential when vibrational excitation is considered. For the polyatomic collider, the strong long-range dipole-dipole interaction

  20. Simulation of Non-resonant Internal Kink Mode with Toroidal Rotation in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Guoyong

    2013-07-16

    Plasmas in spherical and conventional tokamaks, with weakly reversed shear q pro le and minimum q above but close to unity, are susceptible to an non-resonant (m, n ) = (1, 1) internal kink mode. This mode can saturate and persist and can induce a (2; 1) seed island for Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTMs)1 . The mode can also lead to large energetic particle transport and signi cant broadening of beam-driven current. Motivated by these important e ects, we have carried out extensive nonlinear simulations of the mode with nite toroidal rotation using parameters and pro les of an NTSX plasma with a weakly reversed shear pro le. The numerical results show that, at the experimental level, plasma rotation has little e ect on either equilibrium or linear stability. However, rotation can signi cantly inuence the nonlinear dynamics of the (1, 1) mode and the the induced (2, 1) magnetic island. The simulation results show that a rotating helical equilibrium is formed and maintained in the nonlinear phase at nite plasma rotation. In contrast, for non-rotating cases, the nonlinear evolution exhibits dynamic oscillations between a quasi-2D state and a helical state. Furthermore, the e ects of rotation are found to greatly suppress the (2, 1) magnetic island even at a low level.

  1. Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Orbitsfor the Standard Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, Alberto; Gentile, Guido

    We consider both periodic and quasi-periodic solutions for the standard map, and we study the corresponding conjugating functions, i.e. the functions conjugating the motions to trivial rotations. We compare the invariant curves with rotation numbers ω satisfying the Bryuno condition and the sequences of periodic orbits with rotation numbers given by their convergents ωN = pN/qN. We prove the following results for N--> ∞: (1) for rotation numbers ωNN we study the radius of convergence of the conjugating functions and we find lower bounds on them, which tend to a limit which is a lower bound on the corresponding quantity for ω (2) the periodic orbits consist of points which are more and more close to the invariant curve with rotation number ω (3) such orbits lie on analytical curves which tend uniformly to the invariant curve.

  2. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-01-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  3. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-03-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  4. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  5. Turbulence at quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitna, Alexander; Zastenker, Georgy; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana

    2016-07-01

    A solar wind is a highly turbulent medium carrying various modes of magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities. During its supersonic expansion, it meets obstacles like planetary magnetospheres and bow shocks are formed. Depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field with respect to the local shock normal, either quasi-parallel or quasi-perpendicular shocks can be formed. Particles reflected at the ramp of the quasi-parallel shock are streaming far upstream along the magnetic field lines, giving rise to all sorts of instabilities like SLAMS and ULF waves. In the case of the quasi-perpendicular bow shock, the reflected particles influence only a narrow upstream region of the order of the proton gyroradius but the downstream plasma becomes highly turbulent regardless of the shock type. We analyze the high cadence (31 ms) data from the BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft and compare the frequency spectra of observed turbulence in MHD and kinetic ranges in upstream and downstream regions of the supercritical quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular bow shocks. We found that the change in the fluctuation level (from upstream to downstream) as well as the spectral indices differ substantially in the MHD and kinetic ranges for both types of bow shock.

  6. Enhanced low-level LSC performance for carbon-14 dating using a bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}) quasi-active guard

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The Packard 2770TR/SL is a novel low-level liquid scintillation spectrometer which employs bismuth germanate (BGO - Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}) as a quasi-active guard to reduce background count rates and improve limits of detection. The results of this study indicate that this system shows tremendous potential for radiocarbon dating. Its great advantage is that it can give exceptional performance using standard low {sup 40}K borosilicate glass vials costing only a few cents each. For example, in an optimized counting window, 4.6-mL {sup 14}C benzene contained in a standard 7-mL glass vial produced a background count rate of 0.49 cpm and an efficiency of 70.3%, yielding a figure of merit (E{sup 2}V{sup 2}/B) value of 213,000 {+-}9,000 (where B = background count rate in counts per minute [cpm], E = percentage efficiency, and V = volume of benzene). This performance is comparable to published data for low-level instruments which employ active coincidence guard detectors and standard glass vials. When the same vials were recounted in vial holders, specially fabricated from BGO, the corresponding optimum values for background, efficiency and figure of merit, respectively, were 0.24 cpm, 61.0% and 328,000 {+-} 19,000. This performance is comparable to that of other low-level counting instruments when they are used in combination with specialized Teflon and silica vials. The BGO vial holders were also used in previous generations of Packard instruments which employ time resolved liquid scintillation counting (TR-LSC) for electronic background reduction and this resulted in significant improvements in performance.

  7. Calculation of Rotation-Vibration Energy Levels of the Water Molecule with Near-Experimental Accuracy Based on an ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2013-10-01

    A recently computed, high-accuracy ab initio Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential energy surface (PES) for the water molecule is combined with relativistic, adiabatic, quantum electrodynamics, and, crucially, nonadiabatic corrections. Calculations of ro-vibrational levels are presented for several water isotopologues and shown to have unprecedented accuracy. A purely ab initio calculation reproduces some 200 known band origins associated with seven isotopologues of water with a standard deviation (σ) of about 0.35 cm-1. Introducing three semiempirical scaling parameters, two affecting the BO PES and one controlling nonadiabatic effects, reduces σ below 0.1 cm-1. Introducing one further rotational nonadiabatic parameter gives σ better than 0.1 cm-1 for all observed ro-vibrational energy levels up to J = 25. We conjecture that the energy levels of closed-shell molecules with roughly the same number of electrons as water, such as NH3, CH4, and H3O+, could be calculated to this accuracy using an analogous procedure. This means that near-ab initio calculations are capable of predicting transition frequencies with an accuracy only about a factor of 5 worse than high resolution experiments.

  8. Quasi-Random Sequence Generators.

    1994-03-01

    Version 00 LPTAU generates quasi-random sequences. The sequences are uniformly distributed sets of L=2**30 points in the N-dimensional unit cube: I**N=[0,1]. The sequences are used as nodes for multidimensional integration, as searching points in global optimization, as trial points in multicriteria decision making, as quasi-random points for quasi Monte Carlo algorithms.

  9. Probabilistic stellar rotation periods with Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Ruth; Aigrain, Suzanne; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Stellar rotation has many applications in the field of exoplanets. High-precision photometry from space-based missions like Kepler and K2 allows us to measure stellar rotation periods directly from light curves. Stellar variability produced by rotation is usually not sinusoidal or perfectly periodic, therefore sine-fitting periodograms are not well suited to rotation period measurement. Autocorrelation functions are often used to extract periodic information from light curves, however uncertainties on rotation periods measured by autocorrelation are difficult to define. A ‘by eye’ check, or a set of heuristic criteria are used to validate measurements and rotation periods are only reported for stars that pass this vetting process. A probabilistic rotation period measurement method, with a suitable generative model bypasses the need for a validation stage and can produce realistic uncertainties. The physics driving the production of variability in stellar light curves is still poorly understood and difficult to model. We therefore use an effective model for stellar variability: a Gaussian process with a quasi-periodic covariance function. By injecting fake signals into Kepler light curves we show that the GP model is well suited to quasi-periodic, non-sinusoidal signals, is capable of modelling noise and physical signals simultaneously and provides probabilistic rotation period measurements with realistic uncertainties.

  10. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  11. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  12. Quasi-continuous magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Naumovich, G.J.; Hoang, T.A.; Dent, P.C.

    1996-05-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is completing a quasi-continuous magnet which will sustain a constant field of 60 T for 100 ms in a 32-mm 77 K bore. This magnet consists of 9 mechanically independent, nested, liquid nitrogen-cooled coils which are individually reinforced by high-strength stainless steel outer shells. The coils were wound from rectangular large cross-section, high-strength, high-conductivity copper conductor insulated wtih polyimide and fiberglass tapes. After winding, the coils were inserted into closely fitted, stainless steel reinforcing shells and impregnated with epoxy resin. Design, analysis, material, fabrication and operational issues for this class of magnets are reviewed. Fabrication and quality assurance testing of the 60 T coil set are covered in detail. Future growth of and possible links from this technology to other magnet systems are discussed. Needed improvements in design, analysis, materials, and fabrication are outlined.

  13. Quasi-phasematching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hum, David S.; Fejer, Martin M.

    2007-03-01

    The use of microstructured crystals in quasi-phasematched (QPM) nonlinear interactions has enabled operation of nonlinear devices in regimes inaccessible to conventional birefringently phasematched media. This review addresses basic aspects of the theory of QPM interactions, microstructured ferroelectrics and semiconductors for QPM, devices based on QPM media, and a series of techniques based on engineering of QPM gratings to tailor spatial and spectral response of QPM interactions. Because it is not possible in a brief review to do justice to the large body of results that have been obtained with QPM media over the past twenty years, the emphasis in this review will be on aspects of QPM interactions beyond their use simply as highly nonlinear alternatives to conventional birefringent media. To cite this article: D.S. Hum, M.M. Fejer, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  14. Vortices in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate under extreme elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Lotero, P.; Palacios, J.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate a nonaxisymmetric rotating Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the limit of rotation frequency for which the BEC transforms into a quasi-one-dimensional system. We compute the vortex lattice wave function by minimizing the Gross-Pitaevskii energy functional in the lowest Landau level approximation for different confinement potentials. The condensate typically presents a changing number of vortex rows as a function of the interaction strength or rotation-confinement ratio. More specifically, the vortex lattices can be classified into two classes according to their symmetry with respect to the longitudinal axis. These two classes correspond to different local minima of the energy functional and evolve independently as a function of the various parameters.

  15. Quasi-active suspension design using magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jack N.; Neild, Simon A.; Wagg, David J.

    2011-05-01

    Quasi-active damping is a method of coupled mechanical and control system design using multiple semi-active dampers. By designing the systems such that the desired control force may always be achieved using a combination of the dampers, quasi-active damping seeks to approach levels of vibration isolation achievable through active damping, whilst retaining the desirable attributes of semi-active systems. In this article a design is proposed for a quasi-active, base-isolating suspension system. Control laws are firstly defined in a generalised form, where semi-active dampers are considered as idealised variable viscous dampers. This system is used to demonstrate in detail the principles of quasi-active damping, in particular the necessary interaction between mechanical and control systems. It is shown how such a system can produce a tunable, quasi-active region in the frequency response of very low displacement transmissibility. Quasi-active control laws are then proposed which are specific for use with magnetorheological dampers. These are validated in simulation using a realistic model of the damper dynamics, again producing a quasi-active region in the frequency response. Finally, the robustness of the magnetorheological, quasi-active suspension system is demonstrated.

  16. Energy Spectra of Strongly Stratified and Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Nicolaenko, Basil; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Turbulence under strong stratification and rotation is usually characterized as quasi-two dimensional turbulence. We develop a "quasi-two dimensional" energy spectrum which changes smoothly between the Kolmogorov -5/3 law (no stratification), the -2 scalings of Zhou for the case of strong rotation, as well as the -2 scalings for the case of strong rotation and stratification. For strongly stratified turbulence, the model may give the -2 scaling predicted by Herring; and the -5/3 scaling indicated by some mesoscale observations.

  17. Trends in the components of extreme water levels signal a rotation of winds in strong storms in the eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindsoo, Katri; Soomere, Tarmo

    2016-04-01

    high water levels are different, vary markedly along the coast and provide a useful quantification of the vulnerability of single coastal segments with respect to coastal flooding. The formal linear trends in the extreme values of these water level components exhibit radically different spatial variations. The slopes of the trends in the weekly average are almost constant (~4 cm/decade for 8-day running average) along the entire eastern Baltic Sea coast. This first of all indicates that the duration of storm sequences has increased. The trends for maxima of local storm surge heights represent almost the entire spatial variability in the water level extremes. Their slopes are almost zero at the open Baltic Proper coasts of the Western Estonian archipelago. Therefore, an increase in wind speed in strong storms is unlikely in this area. In contrast, the slopes in question reach 5-7 cm/decade in the eastern Gulf of Finland and Gulf of Riga. This feature suggests that wind direction in strongest storms may have rotated in the northern Baltic Sea.

  18. Theoretical analysis of rotating cavitation in rocket pump inducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Kamijo, Kenjiro; Yoshida, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Yoshiki

    1992-07-01

    Rotating cavitation was analyzed using an actuator disk method. Quasi-steady pressure performance of the impeller, mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of the cavity were taken into account. Three types of destabilizing modes were observed: rotating cavitation propagating faster than the rotational speed of the impeller, rotating cavitation propagating in the direction opposite that of the impeller, and rotating stall propagating slower than the rotational speed of the impeller. It was shown that both types of rotating cavitations were caused by the positive mass flow gain factor, while the rotating stall was caused by the positive slope of the pressure performance. Stability and propagation velocity maps are presented for the two types of rotating cavitations in the mass flow gain factor-cavitation compliance plane. The correlation between theoretical results and experimental observations is discussed.

  19. Effects of manure and mineral fertilization strategies on soil antibiotic resistance gene levels and microbial community in a paddy-upland rotation system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Sun, Wanchun; Zhang, Zulin; Chapman, Stephen J; Freitag, Thomas E; Fu, Jianrong; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Junwei

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the responses of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and the soil microbial community in a paddy-upland rotation system to mineral fertilizer (NPK) and different application dosages of manure combined with NPK. The occurrence of five tetracycline ARGs (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetG and tetW), two sulfonamide ARGs (sul1 and sul2) and one genetic element (IntI1) was quantified. NPK application showed only slight or no impact on soil ARGs abundances compared with the control without fertilizer. Soil ARGs abundances could be increased by manure-NPK application but was related to manure dosage (2250-9000 kg ha(-1)). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the soil ARG profile of the treatment with 9000 kg ha(-1) manure separated clearly from the other treatments; the ARGs that contributed most to the discrimination of this treatment were tetA, tetG, tetW, sul1, sul2 and IntI1. Community level physiological profile (CLPP) analysis showed that increasing manure dosage from 4500 kg ha(-1) to 9000 kg ha(-1) induced a sharp increase in almost all of the detected ARGs but would not change the microbial community at large. However, 9000 kg ha(-1) manure application produced a decline in soil microbial activity. Determination of antibiotics and heavy metals in soils suggested that the observed bloom of soil ARGs might associate closely with the accumulation of copper and zinc in soil. PMID:26774780

  20. Effects of manure and mineral fertilization strategies on soil antibiotic resistance gene levels and microbial community in a paddy-upland rotation system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Sun, Wanchun; Zhang, Zulin; Chapman, Stephen J; Freitag, Thomas E; Fu, Jianrong; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Junwei

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the responses of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and the soil microbial community in a paddy-upland rotation system to mineral fertilizer (NPK) and different application dosages of manure combined with NPK. The occurrence of five tetracycline ARGs (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetG and tetW), two sulfonamide ARGs (sul1 and sul2) and one genetic element (IntI1) was quantified. NPK application showed only slight or no impact on soil ARGs abundances compared with the control without fertilizer. Soil ARGs abundances could be increased by manure-NPK application but was related to manure dosage (2250-9000 kg ha(-1)). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the soil ARG profile of the treatment with 9000 kg ha(-1) manure separated clearly from the other treatments; the ARGs that contributed most to the discrimination of this treatment were tetA, tetG, tetW, sul1, sul2 and IntI1. Community level physiological profile (CLPP) analysis showed that increasing manure dosage from 4500 kg ha(-1) to 9000 kg ha(-1) induced a sharp increase in almost all of the detected ARGs but would not change the microbial community at large. However, 9000 kg ha(-1) manure application produced a decline in soil microbial activity. Determination of antibiotics and heavy metals in soils suggested that the observed bloom of soil ARGs might associate closely with the accumulation of copper and zinc in soil.

  1. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  2. Flow Structure on a Flapping Wing: Quasi-Steady Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Cem; Rockwell, Donald

    2011-11-01

    The flapping motion of an insect wing typically involves quasi-steady motion between extremes of unsteady motion. This investigation characterizes the flow structure for the quasi-steady limit via a rotating wing in the form of a thin rectangular plate having a low aspect ratio (AR =1). Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is employed, in order to gain insight into the effects of centripetal and Coriolis forces. Vorticity, velocity and streamline patterns are used to describe the overall flow structure with an emphasis on the leading-edge vortex. A stable leading-edge vortex is maintained over effective angles of attack from 30° to 75° and it is observed that at each angle of attack the flow structure remains relatively same over the Reynolds number range from 3,600 to 14,500. The dimensionless circulation of the leading edge vortex is found to be proportional to the effective angle of attack. Quasi-three-dimensional construction of the flow structure is used to identify the different regimes along the span of the wing which is then complemented by patterns on cross flow planes to demonstrate the influence of root and tip swirls on the spanwise flow. The rotating wing results are also compared with the equivalent of translating wing to further illustrate the effects of the rotation.

  3. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Manousakis, Antonios; Kluźniak, Włodzimierz

    2016-05-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of oscillating tori orbiting a non-rotating black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Kluźniak-Lee). Motions of the torus were triggered by adding subsonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured L2 norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of L2 norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. The most prominent modes of oscillation excited in the torus by a quasi-random perturbation are the breathing mode and the radial and vertical epicyclic modes. The radial and the plus modes, as well as the vertical and the breathing modes will have frequencies in an approximate 3:2 ratio if the torus is several Schwarzschild radii away from the innermost stable circular orbit. Results of our simulations may be of interest in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries, as well as in supermassive black holes.

  4. High resolution analysis of the rotational levels of the (0 0 0), (0 1 0), (1 0 0), (0 0 1), (0 2 0), (1 1 0) and (0 1 1) vibrational states of 34S16O2

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Sams, Robert L.; Ngom, El Hadji A.

    2008-11-01

    A high resolution (0.0018 cm-1) Fourier transform instrument has been used to record the spectrum of an enriched 34S (95.3 %) sample of sulfur dioxide. A thorough analysis of the ν2, 2ν2 - ν2 , ν1, ν1 + ν2 - ν2, ν3, ν2 + ν3 - ν2, ν1 + ν2 and ν2 + ν3 bands has been carried out leading to a large set of assigned lines. From these lines ground state combination differences were obtained and fitted together with the existing microwave, millimeter, and terahertz rotational lines. An improved set of ground state rotational constants were obtained. Next, the upper state rotational levels were fitted. For the (010), (110), (011) states, a simple Watson type Hamilton sufficed. However, it was necessary to include explicitly interacting terms in the Hamiltonian matrix in order to fit the rotational levels of the (020), (100) and (101) states to within their experimental accuracy. More explicitly, it was necessary to use a ΔK=2 term to model the Fermi interaction between the (020) and (100) levels and a ΔK=3 term to model the Coriolis interaction between the (100) and (001) levels. Precise Hamiltonian constants were derived for the (000), (010), (100), (001), (020), (110) and (011) vibrational states.

  5. On the absence of rotational levels for J{sup π}K = 0{sup +}0{sub 2} and 2{sup +}2{sub 2} nonrotational states in {sup 164}Dy and {sup 166}Er

    SciTech Connect

    Govor, L. I. Demidov, A. M.; Kurkin, V. A.; Mikhailov, I. V.

    2015-03-15

    Various reasons for the absence of rotational levels for J{sup π}K = 0{sup +}0{sub 2} and 2{sup +}2{sub 2} nonrotational states in {sup 164}Dy and {sup 166}Er are considered. Preference is given to the effect of the excitation of an anharmonic two-phonon state in pair vibrations of the superconducting type.

  6. Recent studies of the high-spin quasi-continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herskind, B.; Døssing, T.; Leoni, S.; Matsuo, M.; Vigezzi, E.

    Two new methods, the Rotational Plane Mapping, and the Fluctuation Analysis Method are reviewed, and applied to the study of high spin quasi-continuum states in 167,168Yb and 163Tm nuclei. New results are given for the rotational damping width Г rot and the number of different 2-step-paths below and above U0, defined to be the energy of the borderline between undamped regular rotational motion for bands along the yrast line and the region of heated nuclei with damped rotational motion. The results indicate that at least 30 bands with regular rotational structure exist in the I = 40 region before damping becomes dominating. The fundamental concept of rotational damping may be questioned, and has never been verified experimentally. The analysis support the damping picture, giving evidence for a strong branching of the E2 decay, showing 10 times as many 2-step-paths through the continuum than expected if only regular rotational E2 decay, and E1 statistical branching were the decay modes.

  7. Visualizing rotations and composition of rotations with the Rodrigues vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdenebro, Angel G.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that the mathematical treatment of three-dimensional rotations can be simplified, and its geometrical understanding improved, using the Rodrigues vector representation. We present a novel geometrical interpretation of the Rodrigues vector. Based on this interpretation and simple geometrical considerations, we derive the Euler-Rodrigues formula, Cayley’s rotation formula and the composition law for finite rotations. The level of this discussion should be suitable for undergraduate physics or engineering courses where rotations are discussed.

  8. Quasi-optical constrained lens amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Jon S.

    1995-09-01

    A major goal in the field of quasi-optics is to increase the power available from solid state sources by combining the power of individual devices in free space, as demonstrated with grid oscillators and grid amplifiers. Grid amplifiers and most amplifier arrays require a plane wave feed, provided by a far field source or at the beam waist of a dielectric lens pair. These feed approaches add considerable loss and size, which is usually greater than the quasi-optical amplifier gain. In addition, grid amplifiers require external polarizers for stability, further increasing size and complexity. This thesis describes using constrained lens theory in the design of quasi optical amplifier arrays with a focal point feed, improving the power coupling between the feed and the amplifier for increased gain. Feed and aperture arrays of elements, input/output isolation and stability, amplifier circuitry, delay lines and bias distribution are all contained on a single planar substrate, making monolithic circuit integration possible. Measured results of X band transmission lenses and a low noise receive lens are presented, including absolute power gain up to 13 dB, noise figure as low as 1.7 dB, beam scanning to +/-30 deg, beam forming and beam switching of multiple sources, and multiple level quasi-optical power combining. The design and performance of millimeter wave power combining amplifier arrays is described, including a Ka Band hybrid array with 1 watt output power, and a V Band 36 element monolithic array with a 5 dB on/off ratio.

  9. Numerical investigation of the Earth's rotation during a complete precession cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A theory for the long-term rotational motion of the quasi-rigid Earth was constructed by numerical integration. The theory spans 72,000 years centered about 1968 A.D., and provides accurate rotational and positional data for the Earth in the recent past and the near future. The physical model is termed dynamically consistent because developments for the active forces and torques are truncated based solely on their magnitudes regardless of their origin. The model includes all appropriate forces and torques due to the geopotential and tidal effects as well as lunisolar and planetary contributions. The elastic and inelastic deformations due to tidal action were too small to affect the mass properties of the Earth at the truncation level of the model. However, long-term dissipative effects of the tidal forces and torques were not negligible. These considerations gave the model its quasi-rigid characterization. The numerical output provided both rotational and orbital-element data. The data were fitted throughout the 72,000-year range using Chebyshev polynomial series.

  10. Experimental Avalanches in a Rotating Drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubard, Aline; O'Hern, Corey; Shattuck, Mark

    We address the question of universality in granular avalanches and the system size effects on it. We set up an experiment made from a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum half-filled with a monolayer of stainless-steel spheres. We measure the size of the avalanches created by the increased gravitational stress on the pile as we quasi-statically rotate the drum. We find two kinds of avalanches determined by the drum size. The size and duration distributions of the avalanches that do not span the whole system follow a power law and the avalanche shapes are self-similar and nearly parabolic. The distributions of the avalanches that span the whole system are limited by the maximal amount of potential energy stored in the system at the moment of the avalanche. NSF CMMI-1462439, CMMI-1463455.

  11. SUBMILLIMETER QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN MAGNETICALLY CHOKED ACCRETION FLOW MODELS OF SgrA*

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2013-09-10

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) appear in general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetically choked accretion flows around rapidly rotating black holes (BHs). We perform polarized radiative transfer calculations with the ASTRORAY code to explore the manifestations of these QPOs for SgrA*. We construct a simulation-based model of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and find model parameters by fitting the mean polarized source spectrum. The simulated QPOs have a total submillimeter flux amplitude up to 5% and a linearly polarized flux amplitude up to 2%. The oscillations reach high levels of significance 10{sigma}-30{sigma} and high-quality factors Q Almost-Equal-To 5. The oscillation period T Almost-Equal-To 100 M Almost-Equal-To 35 minutes corresponds to the rotation period of the BH magnetosphere that produces a trailing spiral in resolved disk images. The total flux signal is significant over noise for all tested frequencies 87 GHz, 230 GHz, and 857 GHz and inclination angles 10 Degree-Sign , 37 Degree-Sign , and 80 Degree-Sign . The non-detection in the 230 GHz SubMillimeter Array light curve is consistent with a low signal level and a low sampling rate. The presence of submillimeter QPOs in SgrA* will be better tested with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  12. Quasi-biennial oscillation above 10 mb

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, M.P. Dunkerton, T.J. )

    1991-07-01

    It is shown that the quasi-biennial oscillation of the equatorial lower stratosphere was correlated with mean zonal wind in the upper stratosphere, 1979-90. Correlations were positive near 60{degree}N and 30{degree}S during northern hemisphere (NH) winter and negative in the equatorial upper stratosphere during all seasons. Spatial autocorrelation of mean zonal wind during NH winter was actually largest in the upper stratosphere, between 10{degree}S and 62{degree}N, due to strong coupling between tropical and extratropical flow at upper levels.

  13. Quasi-periodic continuation along a continuous symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomone, Matthew David

    Given a system of differential equations which admits a continuous group of symmetries and possesses a periodic solution, we show that under certain nondegeneracy assumptions there always exists a continuous family containing infinitely many periodic and quasi-periodic trajectories. This generalizes the continuation method of Poincaré to orbits which are not necessarily periodic. We apply these results in the setting of the Lagrangian N -body problem of homogeneous potential to characterize an infinite family of rotating nonplanar "hip-hop" orbits in the four-body problem of equal masses, and show how some other trajectories in the N -body theory may be extended to infinite families of periodic and quasi-periodic trajectories.

  14. Visualizing Compound Rotations with Virtual Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanders, Megan; Kavanagh, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Mental rotations are among the most difficult of all spatial tasks to perform, and even those with high levels of spatial ability can struggle to visualize the result of compound rotations. This pilot study investigates the use of the virtual reality-based Rotation Tool, created using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) together with…

  15. Vortex structures of rotating Bose-Einstein condensates in an anisotropic harmonic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Matveenko, S. I.

    2010-09-15

    We found an analytical solution for the vortex structure in a rapidly rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in the lowest Landau level approximation. This solution is exact in the limit of a large number of vortices and is obtained for the case of a condensate in a anisotropic harmonic potential. The solution describes as limiting cases both a triangle vortex lattice in the symmetric potential trap and a quasi-one-dimensional structure of vortex rows in an asymmetric case, when the rotation frequency is very close to the lower trapping potential frequency. The shape of the density profile is found to be close to the Thomas-Fermi inverted paraboloid form, except in the vicinity of edges of a condensate cloud.

  16. Marginal Stability Diagrams for Infinite-n Ballooning Modes in Quasi-symmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson; C.C. Hegna; R. Torasso; A. Ware

    2003-12-05

    By perturbing the pressure and rotational-transform profiles at a selected surface in a given equilibrium, and by inducing a coordinate variation such that the perturbed state is in equilibrium, a family of magnetohydrodynamic equilibria local to the surface and parameterized by the pressure gradient and shear is constructed for arbitrary stellarator geometry. The geometry of the surface is not changed. The perturbed equilibria are analyzed for infinite-n ballooning stability and marginal stability diagrams are constructed that are analogous to the (s; alpha) diagrams constructed for axi-symmetric configurations. The method describes how pressure and rotational-transform gradients influence the local shear, which in turn influences the ballooning stability. Stability diagrams for the quasi-axially-symmetric NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment), a quasi-poloidally-symmetric configuration and the quasi-helically-symmetric HSX (Helically Symmetric Experiment) are presented. Regions of second-stability are observed in both NCSX and the quasi-poloidal configuration, whereas no second stable region is observed for the quasi-helically symmetric device. To explain the different regions of stability, the curvature and local shear of the quasi-poloidal configuration are analyzed. The results are seemingly consistent with the simple explanation: ballooning instability results when the local shear is small in regions of bad curvature. Examples will be given that show that the structure, and stability, of the ballooning mode is determined by the structure of the potential function arising in the Schroedinger form of the ballooning equation.

  17. Quasi-Linear Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, William; Bird, Ross; Eldred, Dennis; Zook, Jon; Knowles, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    This work involved developing spacequalifiable switch mode DC/DC power supplies that improve performance with fewer components, and result in elimination of digital components and reduction in magnetics. This design is for missions where systems may be operating under extreme conditions, especially at elevated temperature levels from 200 to 300 degC. Prior art for radiation-tolerant DC/DC converters has been accomplished utilizing classical magnetic-based switch mode converter topologies; however, this requires specific shielding and component de-rating to meet the high-reliability specifications. It requires complex measurement and feedback components, and will not enable automatic re-optimization for larger changes in voltage supply or electrical loading condition. The innovation is a switch mode DC/DC power supply that eliminates the need for processors and most magnetics. It can provide a well-regulated voltage supply with a gain of 1:100 step-up to 8:1 step down, tolerating an up to 30% fluctuation of the voltage supply parameters. The circuit incorporates a ceramic core transformer in a manner that enables it to provide a well-regulated voltage output without use of any processor components or magnetic transformers. The circuit adjusts its internal parameters to re-optimize its performance for changes in supply voltage, environmental conditions, or electrical loading at the output

  18. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  19. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  20. The breakdown of the anelastic approximation in rotating compressible convection: implications for astrophysical systems

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Michael A.; Julien, Keith; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The linear theory for rotating compressible convection in a plane layer geometry is presented for the astrophysically relevant case of low Prandtl number gases. When the rotation rate of the system is large, the flow remains geostrophically balanced for all stratification levels investigated and the classical (i.e. incompressible) asymptotic scaling laws for the critical parameters are recovered. For sufficiently small Prandtl numbers, increasing stratification tends to further destabilize the fluid layer, decrease the critical wavenumber and increase the oscillation frequency of the convective instability. In combination, these effects increase the relative magnitude of the time derivative of the density perturbation contained in the conservation of mass equation to non-negligible levels; the resulting convective instabilities occur in the form of compressional quasi-geostrophic oscillations. We find that the anelastic equations, which neglect this term, cannot capture these instabilities and possess spuriously growing eigenmodes in the rapidly rotating, low Prandtl number regime. It is shown that the Mach number for rapidly rotating compressible convection is intrinsically small for all background states, regardless of the departure from adiabaticity. PMID:25792951

  1. Graphical Models for Quasi-Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter M.; Hall, Courtney E.; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and quasi-experimental designs play a central role in estimating cause-effect relationships in education, psychology, and many other fields of the social and behavioral sciences. This paper presents and discusses the causal graphs of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. For quasi-experimental designs the authors demonstrate…

  2. Large-scale quasi-geostrophic magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of a shallow fluid layer on a rapidly rotating planet or star. The presence of a background toroidal magnetic field is assumed, and the 'shallow water' beta-plane approximation is used. We derive a single equation for the slow large length scale dynamics. The range of validity of this equation fits the MHD of the lighter fluid at the top of Earth's outer core. The form of this equation is similar to the quasi-geostrophic (Q-G) equation (for usual ocean or atmosphere), but the parameters are essentially different. Our equation also implies the inverse cascade; but contrary to the usual Q-G situation, the energy cascades to smaller length scales, while the enstrophy cascades to the larger scales. We find the Kolmogorov-type spectrum for the inverse cascade. The spectrum indicates the energy accumulation in larger scales. In addition to the energy and enstrophy, the obtained equation possesses an extra (adiabatic-type) invariant. Its presence implies energy accumulation in the 30° sector around zonal direction. With some special energy input, the extra invariant can lead to the accumulation of energy in zonal magnetic field; this happens if the input of the extra invariant is small, while the energy input is considerable.

  3. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Brzezinski, Aleksander; Kosek, Wieslaw; Nastula, Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals with monitoring of geodynamic phenomena. It contains analysis of geodynamic networks of local, and regional scale using space (GNSS and SLR) techniques, Earth tides monitoring with gravimeters and water-tube hydrostatic clinometer, and the determination of secular variation of the Earth' magnetic field.

  4. Ideal statistically quasi Cauchy sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Ekrem; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    An ideal I is a family of subsets of N, the set of positive integers which is closed under taking finite unions and subsets of its elements. A sequence (xk) of real numbers is said to be S(I)-statistically convergent to a real number L, if for each ɛ > 0 and for each δ > 0 the set { n ∈N :1/n | { k ≤n :| xk-L | ≥ɛ } | ≥δ } belongs to I. We introduce S(I)-statistically ward compactness of a subset of R, the set of real numbers, and S(I)-statistically ward continuity of a real function in the senses that a subset E of R is S(I)-statistically ward compact if any sequence of points in E has an S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy subsequence, and a real function is S(I)-statistically ward continuous if it preserves S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy sequences where a sequence (xk) is called to be S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy when (Δxk) is S(I)-statistically convergent to 0. We obtain results related to S(I)-statistically ward continuity, S(I)-statistically ward compactness, Nθ-ward continuity, and slowly oscillating continuity.

  5. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  6. Equatorial symmetry of Boussinesq convective solutions in a rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner and outer spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2014-08-15

    We investigate properties of convective solutions of the Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing the respective rotation of the inner and outer spheres due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number are fixed to 0.4, 1, and 500{sup 2}, respectively. The Rayleigh number is varied from 2.6 × 10{sup 4} to 3.4 × 10{sup 4}. In this parameter range, the behaviours of obtained asymptotic convective solutions are almost similar to those in the system whose inner and outer spheres are restricted to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, although the difference is found in the transition process to chaotic solutions. The convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one to an equatorially symmetric chaotic one, and further to an equatorially asymmetric chaotic one, as the Rayleigh number is increased. This is in contrast to the transition in the system whose inner and outer spheres are assumed to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, where the convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one, to an equatorially asymmetric quasi-periodic one, and to equatorially asymmetric chaotic one. The inner sphere rotates in the retrograde direction on average in the parameter range; however, it sometimes undergoes the prograde rotation when the convective solution becomes chaotic.

  7. Localized waves supported by the rotating waveguide array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-09-01

    We show that truncated rotating square waveguide arrays support new types of localized modes that exist even in the linear case, in complete contrast to localized excitations in nonrotating arrays requiring nonlinearity for their existence and forming above the energy flow threshold. These new modes appear either around array center, since rotation leads to the emergence of the effective attractive potential with a minimum at the rotation axis, or in the array corners, in which case localization occurs due to competition between centrifugal force (in terms of quasi-particle analogy) and total internal reflection at the interface of the truncated array. The degree of localization of the central and corner modes mediated by rotation increases with rotation frequency. Stable rotating soliton families bifurcating from linear modes are analyzed in both focusing and defocusing media.

  8. On magnetostrophic inertia-less waves in quasi-geostrophic models of planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbé, F.; Jault, D.; Gillet, N.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate quasi-geostrophic waves in a rotating spherical shell permeated by an imposed magnetic field ?. A projection of the momentum equation onto a well chosen class of velocity fields results in a quasi-geostrophic reduced model where, in contrast with previous such models, the evolution of the velocity is not prescribed by an equation for the axial vorticity. We consider fields ? that may be longitudinally dependent. Increasing the angular rotation frequency, we find that the non-axisymmetric Alfvén waves that are present at low rotation morph into inertial waves, torsional Alfvén waves and low frequency magnetostrophic waves that satisfy Taylor's constraint (i.e. vanishing acceleration of the geostrophic cylinders by the magnetic forces).

  9. Hyperfine, rotational, and Zeeman structure of the lowest vibrational levels of the {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} (1) {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} state

    SciTech Connect

    Takekoshi, T.; Lang, F.; Strauss, C.; Denschlag, J. Hecker; Lysebo, Marius; Veseth, Leif

    2011-06-15

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical study of the electronically excited (1){sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} state of {sup 87}Rb{sub 2} molecules. The vibrational energies are measured for deeply bound states from the bottom up to v{sup '}=15 using laser spectroscopy of ultracold Rb{sub 2} Feshbach molecules. The spectrum of each vibrational state is dominated by a 47-GHz splitting into 0{sub g}{sup -} and 1{sub g} components caused mainly by a strong second-order spin-orbit interaction. Our spectroscopy fully resolves the rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman structure of the spectrum. We are able to describe this structure to the first order using a simplified effective Hamiltonian.

  10. The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of trigger points that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shenqiti, A.; Oldham, J.

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of LLLT in the treatment of trigger points (TrPs) that are associated with rotator cuff tendonitis. A double-blind randomized controlled trail was conducted. Sixty patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups: sham or laser therapy. The laser (Excel, Omega Universal Technologies Ltd, London, UK) parameters used were a wavelength of 820 nm, a power output of 100 mW, a frequency of 5000 Hz (modulated) and energy density of 32 J/cm2. The two groups received a course of 12 treatment sessions for four weeks (3 sessions per week). Pain, functional activities (as measured using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, SPADI), pressure pain threshold (PPT) and range of motion (ROM) were assessed pre and post treatment, with a three month follow-up assessment. Significant improvements in pain (p < 0.001) were observed for the laser group (6 cm median improvement on a 10 cm VAS) compared to the sham group (2 cm median improvement) immediately post treatment. The improvements in the laser group continued post treatment with a 7 cm median improvement observed at three month follow-up. Similar between group differences were observed for ROM (p < 0.01), functional activities (p <= 0.001) and PPT (p <= 0.05). The findings of the current study suggested that LLLT is effective in treating patients with TrPs associated with rotator cuff tendonitis, when using the parameters described. However, the mechanism of its action is not yet clear, and will require further investigation.

  11. Rotating polarizer and rotating retarder plate polarimeters: comparison of performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzari, Stefano; Rovati, Luigi; De Angelis, C.

    2001-05-01

    Rotating polarizer and rotating retarder plate polarimeters are widely used in high-resolution polarimetry, for example in remote sensing, fiber optic measurements and biomedics; as a consequence the analysis of the performances of these devices is very important from the instrumental point of view. To compare the two methods, we developed a synchronous polarimeter based on a mechanically rotating stage, where a rotating Glan-Thompson linear polarizer or a wave retarder can be easily mounted. A specific design allows to acquire synchronously the intensity signals digitally process the data to extract the polarization Stokes parameters. We investigate the two cases along with their impact on measurement techniques. Performance curves are shown for various polarization input parameters and light levels. Specifically, we address issues concerning the accuracy and the systematic and statistical measuring errors. Moreover, computer simulations and measurement results are presented and discussed.

  12. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-15

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity v{sub a}(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, v{sub k}, where v{sub a}(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, v{sub pl}=v{sub a}+v{sub k}, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy {delta}{phi}<{+-}{pi}/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  13. Bose-Einstein condensate in a rapidly rotating nonsymmetric trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fetter, Alexander L.

    2010-03-15

    A rapidly rotating Bose-Einstein condensate in a symmetric two-dimensional harmonic trap can be described with the lowest Landau-level set of single-particle states. The condensate wave function {psi}(x,y) is a Gaussian {proportional_to}exp(-r{sup 2}/2), multiplied by an analytic function f(z) of the complex variable z=x+iy. The criterion for a quantum phase transition to a non-superfluid correlated many-body state is usually expressed in terms of the ratio of the number of particles to the number of vortices. Here a similar description applies to a rapidly rotating nonsymmetric two-dimensional trap with arbitrary quadratic anisotropy ({omega}{sub x}{sup 2}<{omega}{sub y}{sup 2}). The corresponding condensate wave function {psi}(x,y) is a complex anisotropic Gaussian with a phase proportional to xy, multiplied by an analytic function f(z), where z=x+i{beta}{sub -}y is a stretched complex variable and 0{<=}{beta}{sub -{<=}}1 is a real parameter that depends on the trap anisotropy and the rotation frequency. Both in the mean-field Thomas-Fermi approximation and in the mean-field lowest Landau level approximation with many visible vortices, an anisotropic parabolic density profile minimizes the energy. An elongated condensate grows along the soft trap direction yet ultimately shrinks along the tight trap direction. The criterion for the quantum phase transition to a correlated state is generalized (1) in terms of N/L{sub z}, which suggests that a nonsymmetric trap should make it easier to observe this transition, or (2) in terms of a 'fragmented' correlated state, which suggests that a nonsymmetric trap should make it harder to observe this transition. An alternative scenario involves a crossover to a quasi one-dimensional condensate without visible vortices, as suggested by Aftalion et al., Phys. Rev. A 79, 011603(R) (2009).

  14. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  15. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  16. Quasi-Optical Transmission Line for 94-GHz Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.; Veruttipong, Watt

    2008-01-01

    A quasi-optical transmission line (QOTL) has been developed as a low-loss transmission line for a spaceborne cloudobserving radar instrument that operates at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz. This QOTL could also readily be redesigned for use in terrestrial millimeter-wave radar systems and millimeter-wave imaging systems. In the absence of this or another lowloss transmission line, it would be necessary to use a waveguide transmission line in the original radar application. Unfortunately, transmission losses increase and power-handling capacities of waveguides generally decrease with frequency, such that at 94 GHz, the limitation on transmitting power and the combined transmission and reception losses (greater than 5 dB) in a waveguide transmission line previously considered for the original application would be unacceptable. The QOTL functions as a very-lowloss, three-port circulator. The QOTL includes a shaped input mirror that can be rotated to accept 94-GHz transmitter power from either of two high-power amplifiers. Inside the QOTL, the transmitter power takes the form of a linearly polarized beam radiated from a feed horn. This beam propagates through a system of mirrors, each of which refocuses the beam to minimize diffraction losses. A magnetically biased ferrite disc is placed at one of the foci to utilize the Faraday effect to rotate the polarization of the beam by 45 degrees. The beam is then transmitted via an antenna system. The radar return (scatter from clouds, and/or reflections from other objects) is collected by the same antenna and propagates through the Faraday rotator in the reverse of the direction of propagation of the transmitted beam. In the Faraday rotator, the polarization of the received signal is rotated a further 45 degrees, so that upon emerging from the Faraday rotator, the received beam is polarized at 90 with respect to the transmitted beam. The transmitted and received signals are then separated by a wire-grid polarizer.

  17. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, D. M.; Goossens, J.; van den Berg, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. (1) Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit. We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow's rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals. (2) Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semi-circular canals (SCC)? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those Blood oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes. (3) We investigated if subject's sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is

  18. Proposal for fabrication-tolerant SOI polarization splitter-rotator based on cascaded MMI couplers and an assisted bi-level taper

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Minghao; Xuan, Yi; Huang, Haiyang; Li, You; Li, Ming; Chen, Xin; Jia, Qi; Sheng, Zhen; Wu, Aimin; Li, Wei; Wang, Xi; Zou, Shichang; Gan, Fuwan

    2014-01-01

    A novel silicon-on-insulator (SOI) polarization splitter-rotator (PSR) with a large fabrication tolerance is proposed based on cascaded multimode interference (MMI) couplers and an assisted mode-evolution taper. The tapers are designed to adiabatically convert the input TM0 mode into the TE1 mode, which will output as the TE0 mode after processed by the subsequent MMI mode converter, 90-degree phase shifter (PS) and MMI 3 dB coupler. The numerical simulation results show that the proposed device has a < 0.5 dB insertion loss with < −17 dB crosstalk in C optical communication band. Fabrication tolerance analysis is also performed with respect to the deviations of MMI coupler width, PS width, slab height and upper-cladding refractive index, showing that this device could work well even when affected by considerable fabrication errors. With such a robust performance with a large bandwidth, this device offers potential applications for CMOS-compatible polarization diversity, especially in the booming 100 Gb/s coherent optical communications based on silicon photonics technology. PMID:25402029

  19. Talbot effect of quasi-periodic grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Furui; Wang, Junhong; Teng, Shuyun

    2013-07-20

    Theoretic and experimental studies of the Talbot effect of quasi-periodic gratings are performed in this paper. The diffractions of periodic and quasi-periodic square aperture arrays in Fresnel fields are analyzed according to the scalar diffraction theory. The expressions of the diffraction intensities of two types of quasi-periodic gratings are deduced. Talbot images of the quasi-periodic gratings are predicted to appear at multiple certain distances. The quasi-periodic square aperture arrays are produced with the aid of a liquid crystal light modulator, and the self-images of the quasi-periodic gratings are measured successfully in the experiment. This study indicates that even a structure in short-range disorder may take on the self-imaging effect in a Fresnel field. PMID:23872752

  20. Rapidly rotating polytropes in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1994-01-01

    We construct an extensive set of equilibrium sequences of rotating polytropes in general relativity. We determine a number of important physical parameters of such stars, including maximum mass and maximum spin rate. The stability of the configurations against quasi-radial perturbations is diagnosed. Two classes of evolutionary sequences of fixed rest mass and entropy are explored: normal sequences which behave very much like Newtonian evolutionary sequences, and supramassive sequences which exist solely because of relativistic effects. Dissipation leading to loss of angular momentum causes a star to evolve in a quasi-stationary fashion along an evolutionary sequence. Supramassive sequences evolve towards eventual catastrophic collapse to a black hole. Prior to collapse, the star must spin up as it loses angular momentum, an effect which may provide an observational precursor to gravitational collapse to a black hole.

  1. Rotational excitation of physisorbed molecules by resonant electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    2002-04-01

    The resonant rotational excitation of physisorbed H 2 molecules by low energy electron impact is studied using the rotational sudden approximation. The rotational excitation efficiency is analysed as a function of the constraint imposed on the molecular rotation by the adsorption. This allows the description of the variation of the energy loss spectrum corresponding to rovibrational excitation as a function of the constraint on molecular rotation. This model study is then used to discuss the recent results by Svensson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 124] on the rovibrational excitation of H 2 molecules adsorbed at steps on Cu(5 1 0), in terms of quasi-2D rotor and of constrained 3D rotors.

  2. A simple quasi-diabatization scheme suitable for spectroscopic problems based on one-electron properties of interacting states.

    PubMed

    Cave, Robert J; Stanton, John F

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple quasi-diabatization scheme applicable to spectroscopic studies that can be applied using any wavefunction for which one-electron properties and transition properties can be calculated. The method is based on rotation of a pair (or set) of adiabatic states to minimize the difference between the given transition property at a reference geometry of high symmetry (where the quasi-diabatic states and adiabatic states coincide) and points of lower symmetry where quasi-diabatic quantities are desired. Compared to other quasi-diabatization techniques, the method requires no special coding, facilitates direct comparison between quasi-diabatic quantities calculated using different types of wavefunctions, and is free of any selection of configurations in the definition of the quasi-diabatic states. On the other hand, the method appears to be sensitive to multi-state issues, unlike recent methods we have developed that use a configurational definition of quasi-diabatic states. Results are presented and compared with two other recently developed quasi-diabatization techniques. PMID:26851911

  3. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  4. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  5. On the rotation of viscoelastic satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyelles, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Most of the natural satellites are thought to be synchronous. For some of them, the presence of a thin, outer crust coating a global ocean motivates the consideration of their elasticity for modeling their rotation. Some attempts have been made to include it as an additional effect in the rotational theories.Actually, the shapes of these bodies are partly fossil, partly due to internal processes, and partly due to the tidal and rotational distortions, driving them to the hydrostatic equilibrium.I here present a fully consistent model of viscoelastic rotation of these bodies, in which the tensor of inertia is time-dependent and ruled by these distorting effects. The influence of the different frequencies affecting the motion of the satellite and the tidal parameters is considered. For that, I use an iterative numerical algorithm, in which the tensor of inertia and the rotational variables are decomposed under a quasi-periodic form. The motion of the satellite is modeled with planetary ephemerides, and the frequency-dependency of the tides is based on the Maxwell model. This results in an improved theory of the librations and the obliquity, which I validate by analytical calculations. I show that not only the amplitudes of these quantities are affected, but also their phases. I finally apply this theory on Mimas and Epimetheus, for which librations have been measured. This implies an updated interpretation of their interiors.

  6. A generalized quasi-geostrophic model of thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.; Laycock, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that, under the influence of planetary rotation, the primary force balance for large scale convective planetary flows is between pressure gradients and the Coriolis force; these flows are termed geostrophic. Convective flows are never purely geostrophic because buoyancy (which powers convection) is necessarily present and so is viscous dissipation. Nevertheless, provided rotation is dominant, the first order geostrophic balance is preserved and these flows are often referred to as quasi-geostrophic (QG). When buoyancy is perpendicular to rotation, the non-axial QG flows are rigid, that is, they have small variations along the direction of rotation. QG numerical models of thermal convection, in which only the non-axial flows are evolved, have been developed to take advantage of this 2D structure of QG flows. These models can reproduce faithfully some of the features of fully three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The chief advantage of such QG models is that, because of their 2D nature, a much higher numerical resolution is achievable than for 3D models for the same computing cost and can thus be used to study aspects of convection under a regime not accessible in 3D models. In existing QG models, buoyancy is restricted to its non-axial component and the modelled region of convection is limited to that outside the tangent cylinder. Here, we present an extension on these models by incorporating the axial component of buoyancy and by modelling convection inside the tangent cylinder. When buoyancy is parallel to rotation, the non-axial QG flows are no longer rigid and include an axial gradient. To capture the first order dynamics inside the tangent cylinder, we must also track the evolution of non-rigid flows. We show that our model can reproduce the salient features of 3D numerical models near onset. Further, our model also captures features of well developed, fully turbulent convection, such as production of zonal jets.

  7. A quasi-glottogram signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanski, Greg; Shih, Chilin

    2003-10-01

    A novel, noninvasive experiment is proposed that reliably shows the strength of glottal oscillations. The quasi-glottogram (QGG) signal is generated from a microphone array that is trained to approximate the electroglottogram signal. The QGG may be useful to improve estimates of whether speech is voiced, to quantify partial voicing, and to reduce the phoneme effect when measuring the amplitude of speech signals. The technique is well adapted to the generation of text-to-speech systems, as it allows an estimate of the glottal flow during undisturbed, natural speech. For prosody studies, it can be used to provide an estimate of amplitude which is relatively unaffected by changes in phonemes, and is at least as reliable as standard estimators of amplitude.

  8. A quasi-glottogram signal.

    PubMed

    Kochanski, Greg; Shih, Chilin

    2003-10-01

    A novel, noninvasive experiment is proposed that reliably shows the strength of glottal oscillations. The quasi-glottogram (QGG) signal is generated from a microphone array that is trained to approximate the electroglottogram signal. The QGG may be useful to improve estimates of whether speech is voiced, to quantify partial voicing, and to reduce the phoneme effect when measuring the amplitude of speech signals. The technique is well adapted to the generation of text-to-speech systems, as it allows an estimate of the glottal flow during undisturbed, natural speech. For prosody studies, it can be used to provide an estimate of amplitude which is relatively unaffected by changes in phonemes, and is at least as reliable as standard estimators of amplitude. PMID:14587618

  9. Rotational-vibrational Description of Nucleon Scattering on Actinide Nuclei Using a Dispersive Coupled-channel Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, J. M.; Capote, R.; Soukhovitskiı˜, E. Sh.; Chiba, S.

    2014-04-01

    Tamura's coupling formalism has been extended to consider low-lying rotational bands built on vibrational (single-particle) band heads in well-deformed even-even (odd) actinides. These additional excitations are introduced as a perturbation to the underlying rigid rotor structure that is known to describe well the ground state rotational band of major actinides. Coupling matrix elements needed in extended Tamura's formalism are derived for both even-even and odd actinides. Employed dispersive optical model (DCCOMP) replaces the incident proton energy Ep (for proton induced reactions) by the equivalent Coulomb subtracted energy in all potential terms including both the imaginary and real potentials with the corresponding dispersive corrections. Therefore, the optical potential becomes fully symmetric for protons and neutrons. This potential is used to fit simultaneously all the available optical experimental databases (including neutron strength functions) for nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th (even even) nuclei. Quasi-elastic (p,n) scattering data to the isobaric analogue states of the target nuclei are also used to constrain the isovector part of the optical potential. Derived Lane-consistent DCCOMP is based on coupling of almost all levels below 1 MeV of excitation energy. The ground state, octupole, beta, gamma and non-axial rotational bands are considered for even nuclei, and rotational bands built on single-particle levels - for odd nuclei. Application of derived potential to odd targets based on a new coupling scheme is foreseen.

  10. Hydrogen rotation-vibration oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1974-01-29

    A laser system is described wherein molecular species of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes are induced to oscillate on rotational-vibrational levels by subjecting the hydrogen to a transverse beam of electrons of a narrowly defined energy between about 1 and 5 eV, thereby producing high intensity and high energy output. (Official Gazette)

  11. Minimax discrimination of quasi-Bell states

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kentaro

    2014-12-04

    An optimal quantum measurement is considered for the so-called quasi-Bell states under the quantum minimax criterion. It is shown that the minimax-optimal POVM for the quasi-Bell states is given by its square-root measurement and is applicable to the teleportation of a superposition of two coherent states.

  12. Quasi-Experimental Designs for Causal Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    When randomized experiments are infeasible, quasi-experimental designs can be exploited to evaluate causal treatment effects. The strongest quasi-experimental designs for causal inference are regression discontinuity designs, instrumental variable designs, matching and propensity score designs, and comparative interrupted time series designs. This…

  13. Level statistics for quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalovsky, V.; Horovitz, B.; Avishai, Y.

    2005-03-01

    Level statistics for two classes of disordered systems at criticality are analyzed in terms of different realizations of the Chalker-Coddington network model. These include: 1) Re-examination of the standard U(1) model describing dynamics of electrons on the lowest Landau level in the quantum Hall effect, where it is shown that after proper local unfolding the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution (NNSD) at the critical energy follows the Wigner surmise for Gaussian unitary ensembles (GUE). 2) Quasi-particles in disordered superconductors with broken time reversal and spin rotation invariance (in the language of random matrix theory this system is a representative of symmetry class D in the classification scheme of Altland and Zirnbauer). Here again the NNSD obeys the Wigner surmise for GUE, reflecting therefore only "basic" discrete symmetries of the system (time reversal violation) and ignoring particle-hole symmetries and other finer details (criticality). In the localized regime level repulsion is suppressed.

  14. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  15. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder ... Rotator cuff tendinitis refers to irritation of these tendons and inflammation of the bursa (a normally smooth ...

  16. Resonances in the rotational constants of 0_{g}^{-}(6s_{1/2}+6p_{1/2}) Cs2 levels analysed by an improved-Bv-formula associated to a 2-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelassi, Haikel; Pruvost, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Spin-orbit coupling in 0g-(6s1/2+6p1/2) long-range molecular levels of Cs2 assigned to resonances in the rotational constant (Bv) spectrum (Lignier L. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 13 (2011) 18910; Pichler M. et al., J. Chem. Phys., 121 (2004) 1796) has been analyzed with a model which associates an improved-B v -formula (established here) and a 2-channel model. The approach explains the Lorentzian shape of the observed resonances superimposing a non-horizontal background and the fit of the B v -spectrum allows us to deduce the spin-orbit coupling parameters. We compare this approach with an analysis of the binding energies using the vibrational quantum defect (VQD). The good agreement between the methods lets one conclude that the improved-B v -formula associated with a 2-channel model provides a pertinent approach for analyzing coupled molecular series.

  17. Trirotron: triode rotating beam radio frequency amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Lebacqz, Jean V.

    1980-01-01

    High efficiency amplification of radio frequencies to very high power levels including: establishing a cylindrical cloud of electrons; establishing an electrical field surrounding and coaxial with the electron cloud to bias the electrons to remain in the cloud; establishing a rotating electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the steady field, the circular path of the rotating field being one wavelength long, whereby the peak of one phase of the rotating field is used to accelerate electrons in a beam through the bias field in synchronism with the peak of the rotating field so that there is a beam of electrons continuously extracted from the cloud and rotating with the peak; establishing a steady electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the rotating field for high-energy radial acceleration of the rotating beam of electrons; and resonating the rotating beam of electrons within a space surrounding the second field, the space being selected to have a phase velocity equal to that of the rotating field to thereby produce a high-power output at the frequency of the rotating field.

  18. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  19. A fully implicit method for 3D quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, Christopher; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2009-09-01

    We describe the implementation of a prototype fully implicit method for solving three-dimensional quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion problems. This method allows us to solve the magnetic advection diffusion equations in an Eulerian frame with a fixed, user-prescribed velocity field. We have verified the correctness of method and implementation on two standard verification problems, the Solberg-White magnetic shear problem and the Perry-Jones-White rotating cylinder problem.

  20. Physics of untied rotating space elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Steven; Golubović, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    We explore fundamental aspects of the physics of a novel class of dynamical systems, Rotating Space Elevators (RSE) (L. Golubović, S. Knudsen, Europhys. Lett. 86, 34001 (2009) and S. Knudsen, L. Golubović, Eur. Phys. J. Plus 129, 242 (2014)). An RSE is a loopy string reaching deep into outer space. The floppy RSE loop executes a double rotating motion due to which the objects sliding along the RSE string (climbers) can be transported far away from the Earth's surface without using internal engines or propulsion. By extensive numerical simulations and analytic calculations, this study addresses an interesting and provocative question at the very heart of the RSE physics: What will happen if one unties the rotating space elevator from the Earth? We find that the untied RSE exhibits rich nonlinear dynamics. In particular, strikingly, we find that the untied RSE may still behave as if it were tied to the planet. Such a quasi-tied yet untied RSE remains close to the Earth and exhibits persistent shape and enduring double rotating motion. Moreover, the climbers sliding along such a quasi-tied RSE move in much the same way as they do along a tied RSE. Under some conditions however we find that the untied RSE may undergo an instability leading it to a dynamical state in which the RSE hops well above the Earth surface. By changing the untied RSE parameters, the maximum height reached during hopping may be made to diverge. Such an untied RSE unbinds from the Earth to infinity, i.e., to interplanetary space.

  1. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  2. Modular Coils and Plasma Configurations for Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-09-10

    Characteristics of modular coils for quasi-axisymmetric stellarators that are related to the plasma aspect ratio, number of field periods and rotational transform have been examined systematically. It is observed that, for a given plasma aspect ratio, the coil complexity tends to increase with the increased number of field periods. For a given number of field periods, the toroidal excursion of coil winding is reduced as the plasma aspect ratio is increased. It is also clear that the larger the coil-plasma separation is, the more complex the coils become. It is further demonstrated that it is possible to use other types of coils to complement modular coils to improve both the physics and the modular coil characteristics.

  3. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  4. Hydrogen abstraction from n-butanol by the methyl radical: high level ab initio study of abstraction pathways and the importance of low energy rotational conformers.

    PubMed

    Katsikadakos, D; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P; Hunt, P A

    2012-07-21

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions by the methyl radical from n-butanol have been investigated at the ROCBS-QB3 level of theory. Reaction energies and product geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol (ROH) have been computed, the reaction energies order α < γ < β < δ < OH. The preference for n-butane to favour H-abstraction at C(β) and C(γ) while, in contrast, n-butanol favours radical reactions at the C(α) carbon is rationalised. Transition state (TS) barriers and geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol are presented, and discussed with respect to the Hammond postulate. The reaction barriers order as α < OH < γ < β < δ. This relative ordering is not consistent with product radical stability, C-H bond dissociation energies or previous studies using O[combining dot above]H and HO[combining dot above](2) radicals. We provide a molecular orbital based rationalisation for this ordering and answer two related questions: Why is the γ-channel more stable than the β-channel? Why do the two C(γ)-H H-abstraction TS differ in energy? The method and basis set dependence of the TS barriers is investigated. The Boltzmann probability distribution for the n-butanol conformers suggests that low energy conformers are present in approximately equal proportions to the most stable conformer at combustion temperatures where ĊH(3) radicals are present. Thus, the relative significance of the various H-abstraction channels has been assessed for a selection of higher energy conformers (ROH'). Key results include finding that higher energy n-butanol conformers (E(ROH') > E(ROH)) can generate lower energy product radicals, E(ROH') < E(ROH). Moreover, higher energy conformers can also have a globally competitive TS energy for H-abstraction.

  5. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasi-Homologous Solar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (31)) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet, and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  6. On Obliquely Magnetized and Differentially Rotating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing; Goodman, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the interaction of differential rotation and a misaligned magnetic field. The incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved numerically for a free-decay problem. In the kinematic limit, differential rotation annihilates the non-axisymmetric field on a timescale proportional to the cube root of magnetic Reynolds number (Rm), as predicted by Rädler. Nonlinearly, the outcome depends upon the initial energy in the non-axisymmetric part of the field. Sufficiently weak fields approach axisymmetry as in the kinematic limit; some differential rotation survives across magnetic surfaces, at least on intermediate timescales. Stronger fields enforce uniform rotation and remain non-axisymmetric. The initial field strength that divides these two regimes does not follow the scaling R{{m}-1/3} predicted by quasi-kinematic arguments, perhaps because our Rm is never sufficiently large or because of reconnection. We discuss the possible relevance of these results to tidal synchronization and tidal heating of close binary stars, particularly double white dwarfs.

  7. Quasi-static self-powered sensing and data logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajnef, Nizar; Chakrabartty, Shantanu; Burgueño, Rigoberto; Borchani, Wassim

    2014-04-01

    Many signals of interest in the assessment of structural systems lie in the quasi-static range (frequency << 1Hz). This poses a significant challenge for the development of self-powered sensors that are required not only to monitor these events but also to harvest the energy for sensing, computation and storage from the signal being monitored. This paper combines the use of mechanically-equivalent frequency modulators and piezo-powered threshold detection modules capable of computation and data storage with a total current less than 10nA. The system is able to achieve events counting for input deformations at frequencies lower than 0.1Hz. The used mechanically-equivalent frequency modulators allow the transformation of the low-amplitude and low-rate quasi-static deformations into an amplified input to a piezoelectric transducer. The sudden transitions in unstable mode branch switching, during the elastic postbuckling response of slender columns and plates, are used to generate high-rate deformations. Experimental results show that an oscillating semi-crystalline plastic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), attached to the up-converting modules, is able to generate a harvestable energy at levels between 0.8μJ to 2μJ. In this work, we show that a linear injection response of our combined frequency up-converter / piezo-floating-gate sensing system can be used for self-powered measurement and recording of quasi-static deformations levels. The experimental results demonstrate that a sensor fabricated in a 0.5- μm CMOS technology can count and record the number of quasi-static input events, while operating at a power level significantly lower than 1μW.

  8. Comparison between the Analgesic Effect of two Techniques on the Level of Pain Perception During venipuncture in Children up to 7 Years of Age: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Vardhan; Kaur, Amanlo; Singla, Ruku; Chitkara, Neha; Bajaj, Krushnan V.; Rawat, H.C.L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Distraction techniques are often provided by nurses, parents or child life specialists and help in pain alleviation during procedures. The use of non pharmacological procedures to cope with pain behaviour is less costly and most of these procedures can be administered by a nurse. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess and compare the analgesic effect of holding the child by a family member versus holding the child by a family member along with an animation distraction intervention on the level of pain perception during venipuncture in children up to seven years of age. Materials and Methods: Purposive sampling technique was used to select 70 children admitted in paediatric ward of Guru Gobind Singh Medical Hospital, Faridkot, 35 children in each group viz. Group 1(child held by family member during venipuncture) and Group 2 (child held by family member along with an animation distraction during venipuncture) and video clippings were made for each subject in both groups. Standardized FLACC pain scale was used to assess the level of pain during venipuncture by seeing the video clips of procedure in both groups. Results: Findings revealed that the mean pain score of Group 1 was 3.86 and that of Group 2 was 2.43. Findings revealed that in Group 1 majority 31(88.57%) got severe pain and none remained relaxed during venipuncture whereas in Group 2 majority 10(28.58%) got moderate pain, 09(25.71%) remained relaxed and only 07(20%) got severe pain. The comparison of mean pain score of both groups was checked statistically by computing independent t-test and the value of t comes out to be 7.199 with p-value 0.000*** which was found to be highly significant. Conclusion: The study concluded that when during painful procedures like venipuncture if children are given any non-pharmacological intervention like animated distraction along with their family member it helps in managing the pain. In other words, it distracts/diverts the child’s attention from

  9. Quantum and quasi-classical calculations for the S⁺ + H₂(v,j) → SH⁺(v',j') + H reactive collisions.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio; Bulut, Niyazi

    2016-04-28

    State-to-state cross-sections for the S(+) + H2(v,j) → SH(+)(v',j') + H endothermic reaction are obtained using quantum wave packet (WP) and quasi-classical (QCT) methods for different initial ro-vibrational H2(v,j) over a wide range of translation energies. The final state distribution as a function of the initial quantum number is obtained and discussed. Additionally, the effect of the internal excitation of H2 on the reactivity is carefully studied. It appears that energy transfer among modes is very inefficient that vibrational energy is the most favorable for the reaction, and rotational excitation significantly enhances the reactivity when vibrational energy is sufficient to reach the product. Special attention is also paid to an unusual discrepancy between classical and quantum dynamics for low rotational levels while agreement improves with rotational excitation of H2. An interesting resonant behaviour found in WP calculations is also discussed and associated with the existence of roaming classical trajectories that enhance the reactivity of the title reaction. Finally, a comparison with the experimental results of Stowe et al. for S(+) + HD and S(+) + D2 reactions exhibits a reasonably good agreement with those results. PMID:27055725

  10. Quantum and quasi-classical calculations for the S+ + H2(v, j) →SH+(v′, j′)+H reactive collisions

    PubMed Central

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio; Bulut, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    State-to-state cross sections for the S+ + H2(v, j) → SH+ (v′, j′) + H endothermic reaction are obtained with quantum wave packet(WP) and quasi-classical (QCT) methods for different initial rovibrational H2(v, j) over a wide range of translation energies. Final state distribution as a function of the initial quantum number is obtained and discussed. Additionally, the effect of the internal excitation of H2 on the reactivity is carefully studied. It appears that energy transfer among modes is very inefficient, that vibrational energy is the most favorable for reaction and rotational excitation significantly enhance reactivity when vibrational energy is sufficient to reach the product. Special attention is also paid on an unusual discrepancy between classical and quantum dynamics for low rotational levels while agreement improves with rotational excitation of H2, An interesting resonant behaviour found in WP calculations is also discussed and is associated to the existence of roaming classical trajectories that enhance the reactivity of the title reaction. Finally, a comparison with the experimental results of Stowe et al.[1] for S+ + HD and S+ +D2 reactions, finding a reasonably good agreement with those results. PMID:27055725

  11. Scattering of particles by deformed non-rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Guancheng; Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-11-01

    We study the excitation of axial quasi-normal modes of deformed non-rotating black holes by test particles and we compare the associated gravitational wave signal with that expected in general relativity from a Schwarzschild black hole. Deviations from standard predictions are quantified by an effective deformation parameter, which takes into account deviations from both the Schwarzschild metric and the Einstein equations. We show that, at least in the case of non-rotating black holes, it is possible to test the metric around the compact object, in the sense that the measurement of the gravitational wave spectrum can constrain possible deviations from the Schwarzschild solution.

  12. Recent advances in quasi-poloidal stellarator physics issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, D. A.; Hirshman, S. P.; Lyon, J. F.; Berry, L. A.; Strickler, D. J.

    2005-08-01

    The quasi-poloidal stellarator (QPS) hybrid has been developed using a stellarator optimization approach that has proven to be compatible with both low aspect ratio and significantly reduced neoclassical transport relative to anomalous levels. A unique characteristic of this type of quasi-symmetry is a reduced viscous damping level for poloidal plasma flows. Since the plasma-generated E × B and diamagnetic flows are nearly poloidal, minimal parallel flows (and viscous stress) are required to achieve parallel pressure balance in comparison with configurations such as the tokamak, in which the plasma induced flows are nearly perpendicular to the direction of minimum viscosity and relatively larger parallel flows are required. In addition to this impact on neoclassical flows it is also anticipated that quasi-poloidal symmetry will minimize resistance to self-organized plasma-turbulence-driven shear flows and ease access to enhanced confinement states. In order to test these and other transport issues, the QPS device has been designed with a high degree of flexibility by allowing variable current capability not only in its vertical and toroidal coilsets but also in each separate modular coil group. Numerical optimizations have demonstrated that this flexibility can be used not only to modify transport properties, such as the poloidal viscosity, but also to directly suppress magnetic islands.

  13. A new look at equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoden, Shigeo; Holton, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Simplified quasi-biennial oscillation models are studied, taking bifurcation theory into account. It is found that the model has a trivial steady solution of no mean zonal flow when the two components of the wave forcing are symmetric. The steady solution becomes unstable with respect to an oscillatory eigenmode when the amplitude of the wave forcing exceeds a critical value. Periodic solutions branch off from the steady solution at this point because of Hopf bifurcation. If the two components are not symmetric, the model has a nontrivial steady solution with nonzero mean zonal flow. Hopf bifurcation takes place and periodic solutions which are not symmetric with respect to time appear. A two-level model is developed to analyze the quasi-biennial oscillation mechanism. It is shown that both vertical diffusion and the shielding effect are needed to obtain periodic solutions.

  14. Quasi-Particle Self-Consistent GW for Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, F; Harding, M E; Seiler, C; Weigend, F; Evers, F; van Setten, M J

    2016-06-14

    We present the formalism and implementation of quasi-particle self-consistent GW (qsGW) and eigenvalue only quasi-particle self-consistent GW (evGW) adapted to standard quantum chemistry packages. Our implementation is benchmarked against high-level quantum chemistry computations (coupled-cluster theory) and experimental results using a representative set of molecules. Furthermore, we compare the qsGW approach for five molecules relevant for organic photovoltaics to self-consistent GW results (scGW) and analyze the effects of the self-consistency on the ground state density by comparing calculated dipole moments to their experimental values. We show that qsGW makes a significant improvement over conventional G0W0 and that partially self-consistent flavors (in particular evGW) can be excellent alternatives. PMID:27168352

  15. Finite-Time Quasi-Synchronization of Two Nonidentical Chaotic Systems via Intermittent Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan; Xian, Jin-Guo

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the finite-time quasi-synchronization of two nonidentical Lur'e systems with parameter mismatches by using intermittent control. Based on Lyapunov stability theory and some differential inequality techniques, sufficient conditions for finite-time quasi-synchronization are derived and the explicit expression of error level is obtained. Meanwhile, a numerical simulation is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11171216

  16. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  17. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Døssing, T.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.; Yoshida, K.

    1997-04-01

    In order to provide a microscopic description of levels and E2 transitions in rapidly rotating nuclei with internal excitation energy up to a few MeV, use is made of a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface delta two-body force. The damping of collective rotational motion is investigated in the case of a typical rare-earth nucleus, namely 168Yb. It is found that rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and the number of levels which form rotational band structures is thus limited. We predict at a given rotational frequency the existence of about 30 rotational bands of various lengths, in overall agreement with the experimental findings. The onset of the rotational damping proceeds quite gradually as a function of the internal excitation energy. The transition region extends up to around 2 MeV above yrast and it is characterized by the presence of scars of discrete rotational bands which extend over few spin values and stand out among the damped transitions, and by a two-component profile in the Eγ- Eγ correlation. The important role played by the high-multipole components of the two-body residual interaction is emphasized.

  18. Asteroid rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Harris, A. W.; Murray, C. D.

    1984-01-01

    A trend of increasing mean rotational frequency with increasing diameter is noted in asteroids with diameters greater than 120 km, irrespective of M-, S-, and C-type asteroid subset and family or nonfamily membership. This trend cannot be accounted for by observational selection. For asteroids with diameters smaller than 120 km mean rotational frequency increases with decreasing diameter, but within this group there is a subset with exceptionally long rotational periods. This marked change in the distribution at 120-km diameter could separate primordial asteroids from their collision products. It is also noted that, for asteroids of a given diameter, M asteroids rotate faster than S asteroids, which in turn rotate faster than C asteroids. For all types, family members rotate faster than nonfamily members.

  19. The spatial rotator.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, A; Hahn, U; Larsen, J O; Gundersen, H J G; Jensen, E B Vedel; Nyengaard, J R

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases where over- and underprojection phenomena are not negligible, they should therefore be corrected for if the spatial rotator is to be applied. If such a correction is not possible, it is needed to avoid these phenomena by using microscopy with increased resolution in the focal plane. PMID:23488880

  20. Confirmation of bistable stellar differential rotation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Solar-like differential rotation is characterized by a rapidly rotating equator and slower poles. However, theoretical models and numerical simulations can also result in a slower equator and faster poles when the overall rotation is slow. Aims: We study the critical rotational influence under which differential rotation flips from solar-like (fast equator, slow poles) to an anti-solar one (slow equator, fast poles). We also estimate the non-diffusive (Λ effect) and diffusive (turbulent viscosity) contributions to the Reynolds stress. Methods: We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of mildly turbulent convection in spherical wedge geometry. Here we apply a fully compressible setup which would suffer from a prohibitive time step constraint if the real solar luminosity was used. To avoid this problem while still representing the same rotational influence on the flow as in the Sun, we increase the luminosity by a factor of roughly 106 and the rotation rate by a factor of 102. We regulate the convective velocities by varying the amount of heat transported by thermal conduction, turbulent diffusion, and resolved convection. Results: Increasing the efficiency of resolved convection leads to a reduction of the rotational influence on the flow and a sharp transition from solar-like to anti-solar differential rotation for Coriolis numbers around 1.3. We confirm the recent finding of a large-scale flow bistability: contrasted with running the models from an initial condition with unprescribed differential rotation, the initialization of the model with certain kind of rotation profile sustains the solution over a wider parameter range. The anti-solar profiles are found to be more stable against perturbations in the level of convective turbulent velocity than the solar-type solutions. Conclusions: Our results may have implications for real stars that start their lives as rapid rotators implying solar-like rotation in the early main

  1. Probing the three-dimensional structure of a rotating turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert-Felsot, Jori E.; Zhang, Hepeng

    2005-11-01

    We study laboratory produced fluid turbulence under the influence of rapid rotation. Three-dimensional turbulence was generated by strong pumping through sources and sinks at the bottom of a deep rotating tank (48.4 cm high, 39.4 cm diameter) filled with water. The resulting flow evolved toward quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) turbulence with increasing height in the tank. The quasi-2D flow near the top of the tank contained many long-lived coherent vortices and jetsootnotetextJ. E. Ruppert- Felsot, O. Praud, E. Sharon, and H. L. Swinney, Phys. Rev. E 72, 016311 (2005). Digital particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow field were made using tracer particles illuminated by laser light-sheets. Measurements using two synchronized cameras and vertically separated horizontal light-sheets revealed that the coherent vortices were columnar and vertically extended throughout the tank. We found the simultaneously measured vertically separated horizontal projections of the velocity field to be well correlated even at moderate rotation. Further, a gradual spatial decay was observed in the correlation for increasing vertical separation, rather than a sharp transition. The findings were consistent with the effect of rotation to cause a quasi-2D column-like flow structure aligned along the axis of rotation.

  2. Principle of bio-inspired insect wing rotational hinge design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan

    A principle for designing and fabricating bio-inspired miniature artificial insect flapping wing using flexure rotational hinge design is presented. A systematic approach of selecting rotational hinge stiffness value is proposed. Based on the understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics, a dynamic simulation is constructed using the established quasi-steady model and the wing design. Simulations were performed to gain insight on how different parameters affect the wing rotational response. Based on system resonance a model to predict the optimal rotational hinge stiffness based on given wing parameter and flapping wing kinematic is proposed. By varying different wing parameters, the proposed method is shown to be applicable to a wide range of wing designs with different sizes and shapes. With the selected hinge stiffness value, aspects of the rotational joint design is discussed and an integrated wing-hinge structure design using laminated carbon fiber and polymer film is presented. Manufacturing process of such composite structure is developed to achieve high accuracy and repeatability. The yielded hinge stiffness is verified by measurements. To validate the proposed model, flapping wing experiments were conducted. A flapping actuation set up is built using DC motor and a controller is implemented on a microcontroller to track desired wing stroke kinematic. Wing stroke and rotation kinematic were extracted using a high speed camera and the lift generation is evaluated. A total of 49 flapping experiments were presented, experimental data shows good correlation with the model's prediction. With the wing rotational hinge stiffness designed so that the rotational resonant frequency is twice as the stroke frequency, the resulting wing rotation generates near optimal lift. With further simulation, the proposed model shows low sensitivity to wing parameter variation. As a result, giving a design parameter of a flapping wing robot platform, the proposed principle can

  3. Fourier's law for quasi-one-dimensional chaotic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, Thomas H.; Weidenmüller, Hans A.

    2011-05-01

    We derive Fourier's law for a completely coherent quasi-one-dimensional chaotic quantum system coupled locally to two heat baths at different temperatures. We solve the master equation to first order in the temperature difference. We show that the heat conductance can be expressed as a thermodynamic equilibrium coefficient taken at some intermediate temperature. We use that expression to show that for temperatures large compared to the mean level spacing of the system, the heat conductance is inversely proportional to the level density and, thus, inversely proportional to the length of the system.

  4. A quasi-3D viscous-inviscid interaction code: Q3UIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, N. R.; Sørensen, J. N.; Shen, W. Z.

    2014-12-01

    A computational model for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbine airfoils under rotation and subjected to steady and unsteady motions developed in [1] is presented herein. The model is based on a viscous-inviscid interaction technique using strong coupling between the viscous and inviscid parts. The rotational effects generated by centrifugal and Coriolis forces are introduced in Q3UIC via the streamwise and spanwise integral boundary layer momentum equations. A special inviscid version of the code has been developed to cope with massive separation. To check the ability of the code wind turbine airfoils in steady and unsteady conditions for a large range of angles of attack are considered here. Further, the new quasi-3D code Q3UIC is used to perform a parametric study of a wind turbine airfoil under rotation confined to its boundary layer.

  5. The long-term rotation dynamics of neutron stars with differentially rotating unmagnetized core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, D. P.; Goglichidze, O. A.; Tsygan, A. I.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the pulsar long-term rotation dynamics taking into account the non-rigidity of neutron star rotation. We restrict our attention to the models with two essential assumptions: (1) crust-core interaction occurs via the viscosity (magnetic coupling is not important); (2) neutron star shape is symmetrical over the magnetic axis. The neutron star core is described by linearized quasi-stationary Newtonian hydrodynamical equations in one-fluid and two-fluid (neutron superfluidity) approximations. It is shown that in this case the pulsar inclination angle evolves to 0° or 90° very quickly. Since such fast evolution seems to contradict the observation data, either neutron stars are triaxial or the magnetic field plays the leading role in crust-core coupling.

  6. Quasi-Biennial Oscillation as the Result of Planetary Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retejum, Alexey

    QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATION AS THE RESULT OF PLANETARY MOTION A.Ju.Retejum Lomonosov Moscow State University, aretejum@yandex.ru A remarkable phenomenon of quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) attracts a growing attention for its unclear origin and possible global impact. A comprehensive theory of this phenomenon should answer the following questions: 1. Why does the phase change of the atmospheric circulation on average occur every 800 days? 2. When does the cycle length decreases or increases? 3. Wherefore the regular wind shift is observed in the equatorial stratosphere only? 4. What could cause a sudden reverse in zonal wind direction? 5. Why the generating impulse travels from the border between the atmosphere and outer space downwards without significant loss of power? 6. What is the reason of known differences in behavior patterns between west and east winds? 7. How do middle and upper latitudes respond to the remote signal? Unfortunately all the explanation of QBO that have been given so far, unable to meet the above criteria. The author proposes an alternative idea of the external forcing due to motion of Mars, Jupiter and Venus. This study is based on the QBO Index data at the 30-hPa Height for the 1979-2013 period (http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/data/indices/qbo.u30.index). Having in mind that the oscillation is symmetric about the Equator, where the Earth rotation speed is highest, one examined on the first stage relationships between the QBO manifestation and the length of day. A ten-year comparison of slow and fast spinning periods (1979-1983, 1991-1995 and 2000-2006, 2009-2011 respectively) reveals a significant difference in west and east winds strengths. The same picture can be observed if mean monthly data for March-April (the length of day maximum) and July (the length of day minimum) are collated. This is the answer to the question # 3. The exact answers to questions # 1 and # 2 give an analysis of the dependence of the wind reverse time on the moments

  7. Quasi-equivalent viruses: a paradigm for protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J E; Speir, J A

    1997-06-27

    The structure and assembly of icosahedral virus capsids composed of one or more gene products and displaying quasi-equivalent subunit associations are discussed at three levels. The principles of quasi-equivalence and the related geodesic dome formation are first discussed conceptually and the geometric basis for their construction from two-dimensional assembly units is reviewed. The consequences for such an assembly when three-dimensional protein subunits are the associating components are then discussed with the coordinates of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) used to generate hypothetical structures in approximate agreement with the conceptual models presented in the first section. Biophysical, molecular genetic, and atomic structural data for CCMV are then reviewed, related to each other, and incorporated into an assembly model for CCMV that is discussed with respect to the modular, chemical nature of the viral subunit structure. The concepts of quasi-equivalence are then examined in some larger virus structures containing multiple subunit types and auxiliary proteins and the need for additional control points in their assembly are considered. The conclusion suggests that some viral assembly principles are limited paradigms for protein associations occurring in the broader range of cell biology including signal transduction, interaction of transcription factors and protein trafficking. PMID:9223631

  8. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  9. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  10. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  11. The Weighted Oblimin Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates that the weighting procedure proposed by E. Cureton and S. Mulaik (1975) can be applied to the Direct Oblimin approach of D. Clarkson and R. Jennrich (1988) to provide good results. The rotation method obtained is called Weighted Oblimin. Compared this method to other rotation methods with favorable results. (SLD)

  12. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  13. Central Rotations of Milky Way Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Noyola, Eva; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Opitsch, Michael; Williams, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements. This Letter includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  14. CENTRAL ROTATIONS OF MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Williams, Michael J.; Noyola, Eva; Opitsch, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements.

  15. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  16. CBe5Hn((n-4)) (n = 2-5): Hydrogen-Stabilized CBe5 Pentagons Containing Planar or Quasi-Planar Pentacoordinate Carbons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Ren, Guang-Ming; Miao, Chang-Qing; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2015-12-31

    The diagonal relationship between beryllium and aluminum and the isoelectronic relationship between BeH unit and Al atom were utilized to design a new series ppC- or quasi-ppC-containing species C5v CBe5H5(+), Cs CBe5H4, C2v CBe5H3(-), and C2v CBe5H2(2-) by replacing the Al atoms in previously reported global minima planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) species D5h CAl5(+), C2v CAl4Be, C2v CAl3Be2(-), and C2v CAl2Be3(2-) with BeH units. The three-center two-electron (3c-2e) bonds formed between Be and bridging H atoms were crucial for the stabilization of these ppC species. The natural bond orbital (NBO) and adaptive natural density partitioning (AdNDP) analyses revealed that the central ppCs or quasi-ppCs possess the stable eight electron-shell structures. The AdNDP analyses also disclosed that these species are all 6σ+2π double-aromatic in nature. The aromaticity was proved by the calculated negative nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) values. DFT and high-level CCSD(T) calculations revealed that these ppC- or quasi-ppC species are the global minimum or competitive low-lying local minimum (Cs CBe5H4) on their potential energy surfaces. The Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic (BOMD) simulations revealed that the H atoms in C2v CBe5H3(-) and C2v CBe5H2(2-) can easily rotate around the CBe5 cores and the structure of quasi-planar C5v CBe5H5(+) will become the planar structure at room temperature; however, these interesting dynamic behaviors did not indicate the kinetic instability as the basic ppC structures were maintained during the simulations. Therefore, it would be potentially possible to realize these interesting ppC- or quasi-ppc-species in future experiments. PMID:26694982

  17. The Orbit and Future Motion of Earth Quasi-Satellite 2016 HO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodas, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The newly discovered small asteroid 2016 HO3 is not only co-orbital with the Earth, it is currently trapped as a quasi-satellite, and it will remain a constant companion of our planet for centuries to come. Although it orbits the Sun, not the Earth, in a frame rotating with the Earth the asteroid appears to make yearly loops around our planet, and also bobs up and down through the ecliptic due to its 8-degree orbital inclination. What makes this asteroid a quasi-satellite is the fact that the Earth's gravity influences its motion so that it never wanders farther away than about 100 lunar distances. In the rotating frame, the asteroid's yearly cycles librate back and forth along the Earth's orbit, with a period of about 45 years. One other asteroid, 2003 YN107, followed a similar librational pattern from 1997 to 2006, but has since departed our vicinity. 2016 HO3, on the other hand, will continue to librate about our planet for centuries to come, making it the best and most stable example of a quasi-satellite to date.

  18. KIC 10526294: a slowly rotating B star with rotationally split, quasi-equally spaced gravity modes (Corrigendum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pápics, P. I.; Moravveji, E.; Aerts, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Triana, S. A.; Bloemen, S.; Southworth, J.

    2014-10-01

    Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated by the Isaac Newton Group on the island of La Palma at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  20. Stability of Rigidly Rotating Supermassive Stars against Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Uchida, Haruki; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    We revisit secular stability against quasi-radial collapse for rigidly rotating supermassive stars (SMSs) in general relativity. We suppose that the SMSs are in a nuclear-burning phase and can be modeled by polytropic equations of state with the polytropic index np slightly smaller than 3. The stability is determined in terms of the turning point method. We find a fitting formula of the stability condition for the plausible range of np (2.95≲ {n}{{p}}≲ 3) for SMSs. This condition reconfirms that while non-rotating SMSs with a mass of ˜ {10}5{M}⊙ -{10}6{M}⊙ may undergo a general relativistically induced quasi-radial collapse, rigidly rotating SMSs with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy (β) of ˜ {10}-2 are likely to be stable against collapse unless they are able to accrete ˜5 times more mass during the (relatively brief) hydrogen-burning phase of their evolution. We discuss the implications of our results.

  1. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  2. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  3. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  4. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated.

  5. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  6. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  7. Some remarks on quasi-Hermitian operators

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Jean-Pierre; Trapani, Camillo

    2014-01-15

    A quasi-Hermitian operator is an operator that is similar to its adjoint in some sense, via a metric operator, i.e., a strictly positive self-adjoint operator. Whereas those metric operators are in general assumed to be bounded, we analyze the structure generated by unbounded metric operators in a Hilbert space. Following our previous work, we introduce several generalizations of the notion of similarity between operators. Then we explore systematically the various types of quasi-Hermitian operators, bounded or not. Finally, we discuss their application in the so-called pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics.

  8. NN*(1440) quasi-bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lu; Zou Bingsong; Shen Pengnian; Zhang Yingjie

    2011-10-21

    Inspired by a recent observation of a narrow resonance-like structure around 2360 MeV in the pn {yields} d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} cross section, we investigate the possibility of forming NN*(1440) quasi-bound state by meson exchange potential. With parameters of the t-channel {pi}, {sigma}, {rho} and {omega} exchanges determined by relevant NN scattering and N*(1440) decay processes, it is found that a NN*(1440) quasi-bound state with the same quantum numbers as the deuteron can be formed with binding energy about 20 MeV.

  9. Quasi-Porous Plug With Vortex Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure-letdown valve combines quasi-porous-plug and vortex-chamber in one controllable unit. Valve useful in fossil-energy plants for reducing pressures in such erosive two-phase process streams as steam/water, coal slurries, or combustion gases with entrained particles. Quasi-Porous Plug consists of plenums separated by perforated plates. Number or size of perforations increases with each succeeding stage to compensate for expansion. In Vortex Chamber, control flow varies to control swirl and therefore difference between inlet and outlet pressures.

  10. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in quasi one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathi, Urbashi Deo, P. Singha

    2015-06-24

    Electronic charge and spin separation leading to charge density wave and spin density wave is well established in one dimension in the presence and absence of Coulomb interaction. We start from quasi one dimension and show the possibility of such a transition in quasi one dimension as well as in two dimensions by going to a regime where it can be shown for electrons that just interact via Fermi statistics. Such density waves arise due to internal symmetry breaking in a many fermion quantum system. We can extend this result to very wide rings with infinitely many electrons including Coulomb interaction.

  11. Electroglottographic Quasi-open quotient and amplitude in crescendo phonation.

    PubMed

    Hacki, T

    1996-12-01

    Crescendo phonation (swelltone) was used to evaluate the laryngeal tensioning behavior of seven normal speakers and of 12 dysphonic patients. EGG quasi-open quotient (qOq), stroboscopic open quotient, and vocal sound pressure level (SPL) were measured, and EGG amplitude and the mucosal wave were assessed qualitatively. For normal speakers, the qOq decreased greatly as vocal intensity increased. The same tendency was observed, but to a lesser extent, among hyperfunctional dysphonics. In contrast, qOq increased with vocal intensity among the hypofunctional dysphonics. The crescendo task combined with EGG assessment appears to offer a valid approach to the classification of laryngeal dysfunctions.

  12. What does physical rotation reveal about mental rotation?

    PubMed

    Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2014-02-01

    In a classic psychological science experiment, Shepard and Metzler (1971) discovered that the time participants took to judge whether two rotated abstract block figures were identical increased monotonically with the figures' relative angular disparity. They posited that participants rotate mental images to achieve a match and that mental rotation recruits motor processes. This interpretation has become central in the literature, but until now, surprisingly few researchers have compared mental and physical rotation. We had participants rotate virtual Shepard and Metzler figures mentally and physically; response time, accuracy, and real-time rotation data were collected. Results suggest that mental and physical rotation processes overlap and also reveal novel conclusions about physical rotation that have implications for mental rotation. Notably, participants did not rotate figures to achieve a match, but rather until they reached an off-axis canonical difference, and rotational strategies markedly differed for judgments of whether the figures were the same or different.

  13. Rotation during lifting tasks: effects of rotation frequency and task order on localized muscle fatigue and performance.

    PubMed

    Horton, Leanna M; Nussbaum, Maury A; Agnew, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Though widely considered to reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, there is limited evidence suggesting that rotating between tasks is effective in doing so. The purpose of the current study was to quantify the effects of rotation and parameters of rotation (frequency and task order) on muscle fatigue and performance. This was done using a simulated lifting task, with rotation between two levels of loading of the same muscle groups. Twelve participants completed six experimental sessions during which repetitive box lifting was performed for one hour either with or without rotation. When rotation was present, it occurred every 15 minutes or every 30 minutes and was between two load levels (box weights). Rotation reduced fatigue and cardiovascular demand compared to the heavier load without rotation, with a mean reduction of ∼33% in perceived discomfort and a ∼17% reduction in percentage of heart rate reserve. Further, rotation increased fatigue and cardiovascular demand compared to the lighter load without rotation, with a mean increase of ∼34% perceived discomfort and a ∼19% increase in percentage of heart rate reserve. Neither rotation frequency nor task order had definitive effects, though maximum discomfort ratings were nearly 20% higher when starting with the lighter load task. These parameters of rotation should be further evaluated under more realistic task conditions. PMID:25551257

  14. Rotation during lifting tasks: effects of rotation frequency and task order on localized muscle fatigue and performance.

    PubMed

    Horton, Leanna M; Nussbaum, Maury A; Agnew, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Though widely considered to reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, there is limited evidence suggesting that rotating between tasks is effective in doing so. The purpose of the current study was to quantify the effects of rotation and parameters of rotation (frequency and task order) on muscle fatigue and performance. This was done using a simulated lifting task, with rotation between two levels of loading of the same muscle groups. Twelve participants completed six experimental sessions during which repetitive box lifting was performed for one hour either with or without rotation. When rotation was present, it occurred every 15 minutes or every 30 minutes and was between two load levels (box weights). Rotation reduced fatigue and cardiovascular demand compared to the heavier load without rotation, with a mean reduction of ∼33% in perceived discomfort and a ∼17% reduction in percentage of heart rate reserve. Further, rotation increased fatigue and cardiovascular demand compared to the lighter load without rotation, with a mean increase of ∼34% perceived discomfort and a ∼19% increase in percentage of heart rate reserve. Neither rotation frequency nor task order had definitive effects, though maximum discomfort ratings were nearly 20% higher when starting with the lighter load task. These parameters of rotation should be further evaluated under more realistic task conditions.

  15. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  16. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  17. Energy loss of a heavy particle near 3D charged rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider a charged rotating black hole in three dimensions with a scalar charge and discuss the energy loss of a heavy particle moving near the black-hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find the dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge increases the energy loss.

  18. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  19. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  20. Rotating superfluid turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Makoto; Araki, Tsunehiko; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2003-05-23

    Almost all studies of vortex states in helium II have been concerned with either ordered vortex arrays or disordered vortex tangles. This work numerically studies what happens in the presence of both rotation (which induces order) and thermal counterflow (which induces disorder). We find a new statistically steady state in which the vortex tangle is polarized along the rotational axis. Our results are used to interpret an instability that was discovered experimentally by Swanson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 190 (1983)

  1. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  2. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  3. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  4. Quasi 3D ECE imaging system for study of MHD instabilities in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S. Choi, M. J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Leem, J.; Nam, Y.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Park, H.; Woo, D. S.; Kim, K. W.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Ito, N.; Mase, A.; Lee, S. G.

    2014-11-15

    A second electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system has been installed on the KSTAR tokamak, toroidally separated by 1/16th of the torus from the first ECEI system. For the first time, the dynamical evolutions of MHD instabilities from the plasma core to the edge have been visualized in quasi-3D for a wide range of the KSTAR operation (B{sub 0} = 1.7∼3.5 T). This flexible diagnostic capability has been realized by substantial improvements in large-aperture quasi-optical microwave components including the development of broad-band polarization rotators for imaging of the fundamental ordinary ECE as well as the usual 2nd harmonic extraordinary ECE.

  5. Schramm-Loewner (SLE) analysis of quasi two-dimensional turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalabard, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Quasi two-dimensional turbulence can be observed in several cases: for example, in the laboratory using liquid soap films, or as the result of a strong imposed rotation as obtained in three-dimensional large direct numerical simulations. We study and contrast SLE properties of such flows, in the former case in the inverse cascade of energy to large scale, and in the latter in the direct cascade of energy to small scales in the presence of a fully-helical forcing. We thus examine the geometric properties of these quasi 2D regimes in the context of stochastic geometry, as was done for the 2D inverse cascade by Bernard et al. (2006). We show that in both cases the data is compatible with self-similarity and with SLE behaviors, whose different diffusivities can be heuristically determined.

  6. On quasi-periodic variations of low-energy cosmic rays observed near earth.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Karel; Langer, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) may partially, especially at high altitudes, contribute to the dosimetric characteristics. Along with irregular CR variations as Forbush decreases and solar particle events are, the quasi-periodic variations may be of some relevance too. A very short review (with references to original papers) of the present knowledge of various types of such variations is presented, namely (i) diurnal wave, (ii) ~27 d variability due to the solar rotation, (iii) Rieger-type periodicity, and (iv) quasi-biennial oscillations as well as waves on longer time scales related to solar activity and to polarity of magnetic field of the Sun. Variability is illustrated in measurements of secondary CR on the ground including the high-altitude observations at Lomnický štít.

  7. On quasi-periodic variations of low-energy cosmic rays observed near earth.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Karel; Langer, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) may partially, especially at high altitudes, contribute to the dosimetric characteristics. Along with irregular CR variations as Forbush decreases and solar particle events are, the quasi-periodic variations may be of some relevance too. A very short review (with references to original papers) of the present knowledge of various types of such variations is presented, namely (i) diurnal wave, (ii) ~27 d variability due to the solar rotation, (iii) Rieger-type periodicity, and (iv) quasi-biennial oscillations as well as waves on longer time scales related to solar activity and to polarity of magnetic field of the Sun. Variability is illustrated in measurements of secondary CR on the ground including the high-altitude observations at Lomnický štít. PMID:25979741

  8. Quasi-periodic solutions of a quasi-periodically forced nonlinear beam equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, one quasi-periodically forced nonlinear beam equation utt+uxxxx+μu+ɛg(ωt,x)u3=0,μ>0,x∈[0,π] with hinged boundary conditions is considered. Here ɛ is a small positive parameter, g( ωt, x) is real analytic in all variables and quasi-periodic in t with a frequency vector ω = ( ω1, ω2, … , ωm). It is proved that the above equation admits small-amplitude quasi-periodic solutions.

  9. Quasi-stars and the Schönberg-Chandrasekhar limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Warrick H.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism by which the supermassive black holes that power bright quasars at high redshift form remains unknown. One possibility is that, if fragmentation is prevented, the monolithic collapse of a massive protogalactic disc proceeds via a cascade of triaxial instabilities and leads to the formation of a quasi-star: a growing black hole, initially of typical stellar-mass, embedded in a hydrostatic giant-like envelope. Quasi-stars are the main object of study in this dissertation. Their envelopes satisfy the equations of stellar structure so the Cambridge STARS code is modified to model them. Analysis of the models leads to an extension of the classical Schönberg-Chandrasekhar limit and an exploration of the implications of this extension for the evolution of main-sequence stars into giants. In Chapter 1, I introduce the problem posed by the supermassive black holes that power high-redshift quasars. I discuss potential solutions and describe the conditions under which a quasi-star might form. In Chapter 2, I outline the Cambridge STARS code and the modifications that are made to model quasi-star envelopes. In Chapter 3, I present models of quasi-stars where the base of the envelope is located at the Bondi radius of the black hole. The black holes in these models are subject to a robust upper fractional mass limit of about one tenth. In addition, the final black hole mass is sensitive to the choice of the inner boundary radius of the envelope. In Chapter 4, I construct alternative models of quasi-stars by drawing from work on convection- and advection-dominated accretion flows around black holes. To improve the accuracy of my models, I incorporate corrections owing to special and general relativity into a variant of the STARS code that includes rotation. The evolution of these quasi-stars is qualitatively different from those described in Chapter 3. Most notably, the core black holes are no longer subject to a fractional mass limit and ultimately accrete all of

  10. Perturbative Calculation of Quasi-Potential in Non-equilibrium Diffusions: A Mean-Field Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Gawȩdzki, Krzysztof; Nardini, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    In stochastic systems with weak noise, the logarithm of the stationary distribution becomes proportional to a large deviation rate function called the quasi-potential. The quasi-potential, and its characterization through a variational problem, lies at the core of the Freidlin-Wentzell large deviations theory (Freidlin and Wentzell, Random perturbations of dynamical systems, 2012). In many interacting particle systems, the particle density is described by fluctuating hydrodynamics governed by Macroscopic Fluctuation Theory (Bertini et al., arXiv:1404.6466 , 2014), which formally fits within Freidlin-Wentzell's framework with a weak noise proportional to 1/√{N}, where N is the number of particles. The quasi-potential then appears as a natural generalization of the equilibrium free energy to non-equilibrium particle systems. A key physical and practical issue is to actually compute quasi-potentials from their variational characterization for non-equilibrium systems for which detailed balance does not hold. We discuss how to perform such a computation perturbatively in an external parameter λ , starting from a known quasi-potential for λ =0. In a general setup, explicit iterative formulae for all terms of the power-series expansion of the quasi-potential are given for the first time. The key point is a proof of solvability conditions that assure the existence of the perturbation expansion to all orders. We apply the perturbative approach to diffusive particles interacting through a mean-field potential. For such systems, the variational characterization of the quasi-potential was proven by Dawson and Gartner (Stochastics 20:247-308, 1987; Stochastic differential systems, vol 96, pp 1-10, 1987). Our perturbative analysis provides new explicit results about the quasi-potential and about fluctuations of one-particle observables in a simple example

  11. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Pure Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Mercaptan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Zingsheim, Oliver; Thorwirth, Sven; Müller, Holger S. P.; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Vinyl mercaptan (ethenethiol, CH_2=CHSH) exists in the gas phase in two distinct rotameric forms, syn (planar) and anti (quasi-planar in the ground vibrational state). The microwave spectra of these two isomers were investigated previously, however not exceeding frequencies of about 65 GHz. In the present investigation, the pure rotational spectra of both species have been investigated at millimeter wavelengths. Vinyl mercaptan was produced in a radiofrequency discharge through a constant flow of ethanedithiol at low pressure. Both syn and anti rotamers were observed and new extensive sets of molecular parameters were obtained. Owing to its close structural relationship to vinyl alcohol and the astronomical abundance of complex sulfur-bearing molecules, vinyl mercaptan is a plausible candidate for future radio astronomical searches. M. Tanimoto et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 78, 95--105 & 106--119 (1979)

  13. Representable states on quasilocal quasi *-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Bagarello, F.; Trapani, C.; Triolo, S.

    2011-01-15

    Continuing a previous analysis originally motivated by physics, we consider representable states on quasilocal quasi *-algebras, starting with examining the possibility for a compatible family of local states to give rise to a global state. Some properties of local modifications of representable states and some aspects of their asymptotic behavior are also considered.

  14. Comet candidates among quasi-Hilda objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; García-Migani, E.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the results of a search for quasi-Hilda comets. We wanted to find objects that have recently arrived from the Centaur zone that could became active near the perihelion of their orbits. Methods: Two hundred and seventy-seven objects from the ASTORB database were selected following a dynamical criteria to constrain the unstable quasi-Hilda region. These objects were integrated backward 50 000 yr in order to identify those that have recently arrived from the outer regions of the solar system. Results: The backward integration showed that 11 objects could be Centaurs or transneptunian objects that ended their dynamical evolution as quasi-Hilda comets. The dynamical evolution of these objects from a statistical point of view was studied by computing the time-averaged distribution of a number of clones as a function of the aphelion and perihelion distances. All the candidates show a dynamical behavior that is expected for comets injected in the inner solar system from the Centaur or transneptunian regions and reaching the quasi-Hilda region.

  15. A variation on lacunary quasi Cauchy sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakalli, Huseyin; Et, Mikail; Sengul, Hacer

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, we introduce a concept of ideal lacunary statistical quasi-Cauchy sequence of order α of real numbers in the sense that a sequence (xk) of points in R is called I-lacunary statistically quasi-Cauchy of order α, if { r ∈N :1/hrα | { k ∈Ir:| Δ xk | ≥ɛ } | ≥δ } ∈I for each ɛ > 0 and for each δ > 0, where an ideal I is a family of subsets of positive integers N which is closed under taking finite unions and subsets of its elements. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate ideal lacunary statistical ward continuity of order α, where a function f is called I- lacunary statistically ward continuous of order α if it preserves I-lacunary statistically quasi-Cauchy sequences of order α, i.e. (f (xn)) is a Sθα(I ) -quasi-Cauchy sequence whenever (xn) is.

  16. Implementing a Critically Quasi-Ethnographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtagh, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an account of the methodological approach of a study designed to address some fundamental questions relating to formative assessment. The paper reports on the use of a critically quasi-ethnographic approach and describes the practicalities of adopting such an approach. The validity of the study is also considered, reflecting on…

  17. Quasi-monolithic tunable optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbore, Mark (Inventor); Tapos, Francisc (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical resonator has a piezoelectric element attached to a quasi-monolithic structure. The quasi-monolithic structure defines an optical path. Mirrors attached to the structure deflect light along the optical path. The piezoelectric element controllably strains the quasi-monolithic structure to change a length of the optical path by about 1 micron. A first feedback loop coupled to the piezoelectric element provides fine control over the cavity length. The resonator may include a thermally actuated spacer attached to the cavity and a mirror attached to the spacer. The thermally actuated spacer adjusts the cavity length by up to about 20 microns. A second feedback loop coupled to the sensor and heater provides a coarse control over the cavity length. An alternative embodiment provides a quasi-monolithic optical parametric oscillator (OPO). This embodiment includes a non-linear optical element within the resonator cavity along the optical path. Such an OPO configuration is broadly tunable and capable of mode-hop free operation for periods of 24 hours or more.

  18. Quasi-Optical SIS Mixer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported our ongoing development of sensitive quasi-optical SIS mixers for the submillimeter band. The technology developed under this grant is now being applied to NASA missions, including the NASA/USRA SOFIA airborne observatory and and the ESA/NASA FIRST/Herschel space astronomy mission.

  19. Quasi-likelihood for Spatial Point Processes

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yongtao; Jalilian, Abdollah; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fitting regression models for intensity functions of spatial point processes is of great interest in ecological and epidemiological studies of association between spatially referenced events and geographical or environmental covariates. When Cox or cluster process models are used to accommodate clustering not accounted for by the available covariates, likelihood based inference becomes computationally cumbersome due to the complicated nature of the likelihood function and the associated score function. It is therefore of interest to consider alternative more easily computable estimating functions. We derive the optimal estimating function in a class of first-order estimating functions. The optimal estimating function depends on the solution of a certain Fredholm integral equation which in practise is solved numerically. The derivation of the optimal estimating function has close similarities to the derivation of quasi-likelihood for standard data sets. The approximate solution is further equivalent to a quasi-likelihood score for binary spatial data. We therefore use the term quasi-likelihood for our optimal estimating function approach. We demonstrate in a simulation study and a data example that our quasi-likelihood method for spatial point processes is both statistically and computationally efficient. PMID:26041970

  20. Variations on strongly lacunary quasi Cauchy sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Huseyin; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new function space, namely the space of Nθ (p)-ward continuous functions, which turns out to be a closed subspace of the space of continuous functions for each positive integer p. Nθα(p ) -ward continuity is also introduced and investigated for any fixed 0 < α ≤ 1, and for any fixed positive integer p. A real valued function f defined on a subset A of R, the set of real numbers is Nθα(p ) -ward continuous if it preserves Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy sequences, i.e. (f (xn)) is an Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy sequence whenever (xn) is Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy sequence of points in A, where a sequence (xk) of points in R is called Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy if lim r →∞ 1/hrα ∑k ∈Ir |Δ xk | p =0 , where Δxk = xk+1-xk for each positive integer k, p is a fixed positive integer, α is fixed in ]0, 1], Ir = (kr-1, kr], and θ = (kr) is a lacunary sequence, i.e. an increasing sequence of positive integers such that k0 ≠ 0, and hr: kr-kr-1 →∞.

  1. Quasi-equilibria in reduced Liouville spaces.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Emsley, Lyndon

    2012-06-14

    The quasi-equilibrium behaviour of isolated nuclear spin systems in full and reduced Liouville spaces is discussed. We focus in particular on the reduced Liouville spaces used in the low-order correlations in Liouville space (LCL) simulation method, a restricted-spin-space approach to efficiently modelling the dynamics of large networks of strongly coupled spins. General numerical methods for the calculation of quasi-equilibrium expectation values of observables in Liouville space are presented. In particular, we treat the cases of a time-independent Hamiltonian, a time-periodic Hamiltonian (with and without stroboscopic sampling) and powder averaging. These quasi-equilibrium calculation methods are applied to the example case of spin diffusion in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. We show that there are marked differences between the quasi-equilibrium behaviour of spin systems in the full and reduced spaces. These differences are particularly interesting in the time-periodic-Hamiltonian case, where simulations carried out in the reduced space demonstrate ergodic behaviour even for small spins systems (as few as five homonuclei). The implications of this ergodic property on the success of the LCL method in modelling the dynamics of spin diffusion in magic-angle spinning experiments of powders is discussed.

  2. Ego-rotation and object-rotation in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu; Yang, Laiqi; Ma, Wentao; Wu, Xingqu; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Dunhong; Liu, Guangxiong; Deng, Zihe; Hua, Zhen; Jia, Ting

    2013-08-30

    Mental rotation (MR) performance provides a direct insight into a prototypical higher-level visuo-spatial cognitive operation. Previous studies suggest that progressive slowing with an increasing angle of orientation indicates a specific wing of object-based mental transformations in the psychomotor retardation that occurs in major depressive disorder (MDD). It is still not known, however, whether the ability of object-rotation is associated with the ability of ego-rotation in MDD. The present study was designed to investigate the level of impairment of mental transformation abilities in MDD. For this purpose we tested 33 MDD (aged 18-52 years, 16 women) and 30 healthy control subjects (15 women, age and education matched) by evaluating the performance of MDD subjects with regard to ego-rotation and object-rotation tasks. First, MDD subjects were significantly slower and made more errors than controls in mentally rotating hands and letters. Second, MDD and control subjects displayed the same pattern of response times to stimuli at various orientations in the letter task but not the hand task. Third, in particular, MDD subjects were significantly slower and made more errors during the mental transformation of hands than letters relative to control subjects and were significantly slower and made more errors in physiologically impossible angles than physiologically possible angles in the mental rotation hand task. In conclusion, MDD subjects present with more serious mental rotation deficits specific to the hand than the letter task. Importantly, deficits were more present during the mental transformation in outward rotation angles, thus suggesting that the mental imagery for hands and letters relies on different processing mechanisms which suggest a module that is more complex for the processing of human hands than for letters during mental rotation tasks. Our study emphasises the necessity of distinguishing different levels of impairment of action in MDD subjects.

  3. Analyses of quasi-isotropic composite plates under quasi-static point loads simulating low-velocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    In thin composite laminates, the first level of visible damage occurs in the back face and is called back face spalling. A plate-membrane coupling model, and a finite element model to analyze the large deformation behavior of eight-ply quasi-isotropic circular composite plates under impact type point loads are developed. The back face spalling phenomenon in thin composite plates is explained by using the plate-membrane coupling model and the finite element model in conjunction with the fracture mechanics principles. The experimental results verifying these models are presented. Several conclusions concerning the deformation behavior are reached and discussed in detail.

  4. Rotational period of GQ Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeg, C.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Guenther, E.; Gaedke, A.; Bedalov, A.; Neuhäuser, R.; Walter, F. M.

    2007-06-01

    Aims: We wanted to determine the rotation parameters of GQ Lup A, thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the GQ Lup system. Methods: We have undertaken a photometric monitoring campaign on GQ Lup A consisting of two epochs spaced one year apart. We also searched the photometric archives to enlarge the data set. Results: We were able to determine the photometric period (8.45±0.2 days) in both epochs in several photometric bands. This periodicity could also be found in some of the archival data. The combined false-alarm probability is 0.015. The variation is most likely caused by hot spots on the surface of GQ Lup A. This, combined with high-resolution spectra (v sin i) allows calculation of GQ Lup A's inclination (i=27±5°). Radial velocity data also contains this period but is inconclusive. Nevertheless, the RV data supports the interpretation that hot spots cause the photometric variation. We use the known K-band variability, amplitude, and phase of GQ Lup A together with a new image of GQ Lup A+b, taken quasi-simultaneously with our monitoring of the star, to confirm the magnitude and, hence, luminosity of the companion. Based on observations obtained on Cerro Paranal, Chile, in ESO program 075.C-0710(C) and on La Silla, Chile, in ESO programs 074.C-0034(A),075.C-0710(E), 075.C-0710(F), 075.C-0202(A), 076.C-0010(A) as well as with ANDICAM of the SMARTS consortium. Photometry data of epochs I and II are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/468/1039

  5. Quasi-optical MEMS switching array technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weikang

    During this Ph.D. dissertation research, both experimental and theoretical investigations have been conducted to develop new micro-elecro-mechancical systems (MEMS) based technologies and new device concepts for the microwave and millimeter wave frequency range. A proof-of-principle E-band (60GHz˜90GHz) MEMS switching array has been successful designed and constructed, where 400 MEMS switches form a two dimensional array on a 2inch x 2inch quartz substrate. The E-band MEMS grid array switch has demonstrated >6 dB maximum isolation at 76 GHz and >10 dB on/off contrast ratio at 70˜85 GHz. Extensive work has been carried out with the aim of developing a compact impedance matching method for quasi-optic grid arrays. A new device concept is presented, where bulk micro-machining techniques are utilized to create a new class of artificial materials with continuously variable dielectric constant for use in millimeter wave quasi-optical systems. Based on this bulk micro-machined material, two novel quasi-optical impedance transformers have been modeled, designed, and characterized, which provide ideal impedance matching for quasi-optical systems. Photonic bandgap (PBG) RF circuit models also have been studied for microwave and millimeter wave applications. During the course of this development activity, materials characteristics have been analyzed for their suitability in quasi-optical grid array circuit and RF MEMS device applications. Air bridge MEMS switches have been designed, fabricated and characterized for microwave and millimeter wave applications.

  6. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  7. Bifurcation, Locking and Quasi-Period Synchronization in a Round-Coupling Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senlin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    We present a round-coupling laser system with two inverse injection semiconductor lasers and discuss nonlinear dynamics in the two lasers. We make an analysis in locking, synchronization and reverse synchronization of the two lasers. We find that the injection-coupling level determines dynamics and stability of the two lasers. Locking critical condition is successfully predicted. Quasi-period and dynamics in the two lasers are investigated by controlling the current, detuning and injection levels. Many bifurcate diagrams are illustrated via varying the controlling parameters. A route to chaos after bifurcation and quasi-period is described for the two lasers.

  8. Transient effects in rotating magnetic field current drive*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2000-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive is investigated using a two-fluid model. The time and radius dependence separates so that the time-dependent behavior can be found by quadrature. This leads to the prediction of transient behavior leading rapidly to a quasi-steady state that evolves on a diffusion timescale. During the transient phase the ions and electrons spin up together. The timescale of the transient phase is set by the ion inertia in balance with ion-electron friction. Unless there is an additional ion momentum source to balance the resistive friction with the electrons, the quasi-steady state has no current drive effect. Collisions with neutrals is a momentum source in some experiments, notably rotamaks and the STX experiment at the University of Washington. Other sources of ion momentum will be needed for effective RMF current drive in hotter, fusion-relevant plasmas. The properties of the quasi-steady state are found, including the self-consistent ion rotation rate and radial electric field, and RMF corrections on the pressure balance. *This research is supported by USDOE grant DE-FG0398ER54480.

  9. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  10. Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy with quasi-monochromatic computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Gregor; Mensing, Tristan; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Pietsch, Hubertus; Huetter, Joachim; Cibik, Levent; Gerlach, Martin; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Wedell, Reiner; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wust, Peter; Luedemann, Lutz

    2009-06-15

    Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy is a bimodal therapy, consisting of the administration of highly radiation-absorbing substances into the tumor area and localized regional irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays. Irradiation can be performed by a modified computed tomography (CT) unit equipped with an additional x-ray optical module which converts the polychromatic, fan-shaped CT beam into a monochromatized and focused beam for energy-tuned photoelectric-enhanced radiotherapy. A dedicated x-ray optical module designed for spatial collimation, focusing, and monochromatization was mounted at the exit of the x-ray tube of a clinical CT unit. Spectrally resolved measurements of the resulting beam were performed using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation. The spatial photon fluence was determined by film dosimetry. Depth-dose measurements were performed and compared to the polychromatic CT and a therapeutic 6 MV beam. The spatial dose distribution in phantoms using a rotating radiation source (quasi-monochromatic CT and 6 MV, respectively) was investigated by gel dosimetry. The photoelectric dose enhancement for an iodine fraction of 1% in tissue was calculated and verified experimentally. The x-ray optical module selectively filters the energy of the tungsten K{alpha} emission line with an FWHM of 5 keV. The relative photon fluence distribution demonstrates the focusing characteristic of the x-ray optical module. A beam width of about 3 mm was determined at the isocenter of the CT gantry. The depth-dose measurements resulted in a half-depth value of approximately 36 mm for the CT beams (quasi-monochromatic, polychromatic) compared to 154 mm for the 6 MV beam. The rotation of the radiation source leads to a steep dose gradient at the center of rotation; the gel dosimetry yields an entrance-to-peak dose ratio of 1:10.8 for the quasi-monochromatic CT and 1:37.3 for a 6 MV beam of the same size. The photoelectric dose enhancement

  11. Influence of gravity waves on the internal rotation and Li abundance of solar-type stars.

    PubMed

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Talon, Suzanne

    2005-09-30

    The Sun's rotation profile and lithium content have been difficult to understand in the context of conventional models of stellar evolution. Classical hydrodynamic models predict that the solar interior must rotate highly differentially, in disagreement with observations. It has recently been shown that internal waves produced by convection in solar-type stars produce an asymmetric, shear layer oscillation, similar to Earth's quasi-biennial oscillation, that leads to efficient angular momentum redistribution from the core to the envelope. We present results of a model that successfully reproduces both the rotation profile and the surface abundance of lithium in solar-type stars of various ages.

  12. General Relativistic Elastic Body, Fluid,quasi-rigid Body, Quasi-liquid and Others in Multiple Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chongming

    2009-05-01

    The approximation method in multiple coordinate systems at first post Newtonian (1 PN) level has been established by Darmour, Soffel and Xu (Phys. Rev. D(PRD) 43, 3273 (1991);D 45, 1017(1992);D 47, 3124 (1993);D 49, 618 (1994)). Normally, to discuss an astronomical object (e.g. a star in binary systems or the earth in solar system) we need multiple coordinate systems, especially for precise astrometry 1 PN (some time even 2 PN) approximate method is required. As we know up to now the ideas on elastic body, fluid, rigid body and liquid in the framework of Newtonian physics are still very useful for understanding and calculating some practical problems. Although the general relativistic theories of elastic body, general relativistic hydrodynamics and post-Newtonian quasi-rigid body have been discussed by many authors (including our papers (PRD63, 043002(2001); D63, 064001(2001); D68, 064009(2003); D69, 024003(2004); D71,024030 (2005))), but there is no completing discussion on all of these ideas in a unified point view. The applications of these ideas in the general relativity are important in the research fields of astrometry and geophysics, especially in case precise measurements reach so higher level (millimicro arc sec). The extended relativistic versions of these ideas should be revised the Newtonian results. In this paper, we shall give a complete discussion on all of these ideas in 1 PN approximation. We shall clarify the ideas on perfect elastic material, quasi-rigid body, quasi-liquid and so on with some precise mathematical forms. For fluid we show the hydrodynamic equations of a non-perfect fluid in multiple coordinates systems (both local and global).

  13. Collision-induced rotational excitation in N2 (+)((2)Σg (+),v=0)-Ar: Comparison of computations and experiment.

    PubMed

    Unke, Oliver T; Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-06-14

    The collisional dynamics of N2 (+)((2)Σg (+)) cations with Ar atoms is studied using quasi-classical simulations. N2 (+)-Ar is a proxy to study cooling of molecular ions and interesting in its own right for molecule-to-atom charge transfer reactions. An accurate potential energy surface (PES) is constructed from a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) interpolation based on high-level ab initio data. The global PES including the asymptotics is fully treated within the realm of RKHS. From several ten thousand trajectories, the final state distribution of the rotational quantum number of N2 (+) after collision with Ar is determined. Contrary to the interpretation of previous experiments which indicate that up to 98% of collisions are elastic and conserve the quantum state, the present simulations find a considerably larger number of inelastic collisions which supports more recent findings. PMID:27306007

  14. Biased impurity tunneling current emission spectrum in the presence of quasi-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, N. S.; Arseyev, P. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We performed theoretical investigations of the tunneling current noise spectra through single-level impurity in the presence of quasi-particle (electron-phonon) interaction by means of the non-equilibrium Green function formalism. We demonstrated a fundamental link between quantum noise in tunneling contact and light emission processes. We calculated tunneling current noise spectra through a single level impurity atom both in the presence and in the absence of quasi-particle interaction for a finite bias voltage and identified it as a source of experimentally observed light emission from bias STM contacts. The results turn out to be sensitive to the tunneling contact parameters. Our findings provide important insight into the nature of non-equilibrium electronic transport in tunneling junctions with quasi-particle interaction.

  15. Quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma containing spherical particles and their binary agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, M.; Semenov, I.; Nosenko, V.; Thomas, H. M.

    2016-05-01

    A unique type of quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma system was observed which consisted of monodisperse microspheres and their binary agglomerations (dimers). The particles and their dimers levitated in a plasma sheath at slightly different heights and formed two distinct sublayers. The system did not crystallize and may be characterized as a disordered solid. The dimers were identified based on their characteristic appearance in defocused images, i.e., rotating interference fringe patterns. The in-plane and interplane particle separations exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the discharge pressure.

  16. Quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma containing spherical particles and their binary agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, M; Semenov, I; Nosenko, V; Thomas, H M

    2016-05-01

    A unique type of quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma system was observed which consisted of monodisperse microspheres and their binary agglomerations (dimers). The particles and their dimers levitated in a plasma sheath at slightly different heights and formed two distinct sublayers. The system did not crystallize and may be characterized as a disordered solid. The dimers were identified based on their characteristic appearance in defocused images, i.e., rotating interference fringe patterns. The in-plane and interplane particle separations exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the discharge pressure. PMID:27300990

  17. Resistivity scaling of rotating magnetic field current drive in FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Guo, H. Y.; Milroy, R. D.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.

    2003-10-01

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) have been used to both form and sustain low density, prolate FRCs in the translation confinement and sustainment (TCS) facility. The two most important factors governing performance are the plasma resistivity, which sets the maximum density for which toroidal current can be maintained, and the energy loss rate, which sets the plasma temperature. The plasma resistivity has been determined by carefully measuring the amount of RMF power absorbed by the FRC. When the ratio of RMF magnitude, Bohgr, to external poloidal confinement field, Be, is high, this resistivity is very adversely affected by the RMF drive process. However, when Bohgr/Be falls below about 0.3, the resistivity returns to values typical of non-driven FRCs. The observed scaling leads to a density dependence of ne ~ Bohgr/rsohgr1/2 where rs is the FRC separatrix radius and ohgr is the RMF frequency. Since the FRC contains little or no toroidal field, Be is proportional to (neTt)1/2 where Tt = Te + Ti is the sum of the electron and ion temperatures. In the present experiments, except for the initial start-up phase where Tt can exceed 100 eV, the plasma temperature is limited to about 40 eV by high oxygen impurity levels. Thus, low Bohgr/Be, low resistivity operation was only realized by operating at low values of Bohgr. The RMF drive sustains particles as well as flux, and resistive input powers can be in the MW range at higher values of Bohgr, so that high temperature, steady-state operation should be possible once impurity levels are reduced. Changes are being made to the present 'O-ring' sealed, quartz chambered TCS to provide bakable metal walls and wall conditioning as in other quasi-steady fusion facilities.

  18. Magnetosheath filamentary structures formed by ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  19. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  20. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  1. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  2. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  3. Chiral rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy, a technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components BX X, BY Y, and BZ Z of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centers. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarizability components αX X, αY Y, and αZ Z as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.

  4. Rotational Alignment Altered by Source Position Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Chris S.; Heflin, M. B.; Lanyi, G. E.; Sovers, O. J.; Steppe, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    In the construction of modern Celestial Reference Frames (CRFs) the overall rotational alignment is only weakly constrained by the data. Therefore, common practice has been to apply a 3-dimensional No-Net-Rotation (NNR) constraint in order to align an under-construction frame to the ICRF. We present evidence that correlations amongst source position parameters must be accounted for in order to properly align a CRF at the 5-10 (mu)as level of uncertainty found in current work. Failure to do so creates errors at the 10-40 (mu)as level.

  5. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}ȯ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  6. Microstructural Characterisation of Jute/Epoxy Quasi-Unidirectional Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amandeep Singh; Hall, Wayne; Summerscales, John

    2014-12-01

    The elastic properties of a composite can be predicted by micromechanical models based on the properties of the individual constituent materials of the composite and their geometrical characteristics. This paper presents a novel methodology using image analysis to determine (a) the fibre volume fraction and (b) the fibre orientation distribution factor of quasi-unidirectional jute fibre reinforced epoxy resin composites. For fibre volume fraction, digital micrographs were smoothed to reduce noise in the image, an intensity histogram informed selection of the threshold intensity for conversion to a binary image, the image was morphologically closed and opened to remove internal voids and small features respectively and the fibre volume fraction was calculated as the ratio of the detected fibre area to the total image area. For fibre orientation, the image was sharpened with Contrast-Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalisation, a threshold was set for conversion to binary and then a masking image was rotated at a number of seed points over the image to find the angles with the minimum sum of intensity at each point. The data generated was then used to validate new rules-of-mixture equations for natural fibre composites.

  7. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  8. Rotating quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the definition of rotating thermal states for scalar and fermion fields in unbounded Minkowski space-time. For scalar fields such states are ill-defined everywhere, but for fermion fields an appropriate definition of the vacuum gives thermal states regular inside the speed-of-light surface. For a massless fermion field, we derive analytic expressions for the thermal expectation values of the fermion current and stress-energy tensor. These expressions may provide qualitative insights into the behaviour of thermal rotating states on more complex space-time geometries.

  9. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  10. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  11. A Compact Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Ku; the ARIES-CS Team

    2003-10-20

    We report the progress made in assessing the potential of compact, quasi-axisymmetric stellarators as power-producing reactors. Using an aspect ratio A=4.5 configuration derived from NCSX and optimized with respect to the quasi-axisymmetry and MHD stability in the linear regime as an example, we show that a reactor of 1 GW(e) maybe realizable with a major radius *8 m. This is significantly smaller than the designs of stellarator reactors attempted before. We further show the design of modular coils and discuss the optimization of coil aspect ratios in order to accommodate the blanket for tritium breeding and radiation shielding for coil protection. In addition, we discuss the effects of coil aspect ratio on the peak magnetic field in the coils.

  12. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  13. QUASI-RESONANT THEORY OF TIDAL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onghia, Elena; Vogelsberger, Mark; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-12-10

    When a spinning system experiences a transient gravitational encounter with an external perturber, a quasi-resonance occurs if the spin frequency of the victim roughly matches the peak angular speed of the perturber. Such encounters are responsible for the formation of long tails and bridges during galaxy collisions. For high-speed encounters, the resulting velocity perturbations can be described by the impulse approximation. The traditional impulse approximation, however, does not distinguish between prograde and retrograde encounters, and therefore completely misses the resonant response. Here, we modify the impulse approximation to include the effects of quasi-resonant phenomena on stars orbiting within a disk. Explicit expressions are derived for the velocity and energy changes to the stars induced by tidal forces from an external gravitational perturber passing either on a straight line or a parabolic orbit. Comparisons with numerical-restricted three-body calculations illustrate the applicability of our analysis.

  14. Investigations of Magnetically Enhanced RIE Reactors with Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2008-10-01

    In Magnetically Enhanced Reactive Ion Etching (MERIE) reactors, a magnetic field parallel to the substrate enables higher plasma densities and control of ion energy distributions. Since it is difficult to make the B-field uniform across the wafer, the B-field is often azimuthally rotated at a few Hz to average out non-uniformities. The rotation is slow enough that the plasma is in quasi-equilibrium with the instantaneous B-field. For the pressures (10's mTorr or less) and B-fields (10's - 100's G) of interest, electrons are magnetized whereas ions are usually not. The orientation and intersection of the B-field with the wafer are important, as intersecting field lines provide a low resistance path for electron current to the substrate. We report on a modeling study of plasma properties in MERIE reactors having rotating B-fields by investigating a series of quasi-steady states of B-field profiles. To resolve side-to-side variations, computations are performed in Cartesian coordinates. The model, nonPDPSIM, was improved with full tensor conductivities in the fluid portions of the code and v x B forces in the kinetic portions. Results are discussed while varying the orientation and strength of the B-field for electropositive (argon) and electronegative (Ar/CxFy, Ar/Cl2) gas mixtures.

  15. Characteristics of Quasi-Molecular State Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Devdariani, A.; Dalimier, E.; Kereselidze, T.; Noselidze, I.; Rebentrost, F.; Sauvan, P.

    2008-10-22

    The quasi-molecular dipole transition moments have been considered analytically within the framework of the two-state approximation with particular emphasis on their roots (zeros) on spectral manifestations of the roots in the adiabatic diabatic limits. The interrelation between the spectral features the non-adiabatic transitions found in [1] has been demonstrated for excited state charge exchange Al{sup +12}(n = 4)+C{sup +6}{yields}Al{sup +13}+C{sup +5}(n = 2)

  16. Reformulation of quasi-linear theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. N.

    1972-01-01

    Standard plasma quasi-linear theory is reformulated on the basis of a classical quantum derivation proceeding from the Vlasov equation and dealing only with frequency, wavenumber, and velocity. The wave amplitudes are assumed to be weakly time-dependent, and no distinction is made between growing and decaying waves. The proposed method leads to no negative diffusivity of 'fake' diffusion. By appropraite treatment of nonresonant interaction, expressions are obtained for wave energy and momentum.

  17. A quasi-linear analysis of the impurity effect on turbulent momentum transport and residual stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, S. H.; Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-08-01

    We study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  18. Quasi-classical trajectory simulations of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in HONO2 and DONO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Lohr, Lawrence L; Barker, John R

    2005-05-01

    By use of an analytic potential energy surface developed in this work for nitric acid, the quasi-classical trajectory method was used to simulate intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR). A method was developed for monitoring the average vibrational energy in the OH (or OD) mode that uses the mean-square displacement of the bond length calculated during the trajectories. This method is effective for both rotating and nonrotating molecules. The calculated IVR time constant for HONO(2) decreases exponentially with increasing excitation energy, is almost independent of rotational temperature, and is in excellent agreement with the experimental determination (Bingemann, D.; Gorman, M. P.; King, A. M.; Crim, F. F. J. Chem.Phys. 1997, 107, 661). In DONO(2), the IVR time constants show more complicated behavior with increasing excitation energy, apparently due to 2:1 Fermi-resonance coupling with lower frequency modes. This effect should be measurable in experiments.

  19. A quasi-linear analysis of the impurity effect on turbulent momentum transport and residual stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, S. H. Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-08-15

    We study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  20. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Electromagnetic waves arise in many areas of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. Aims: We numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Methods: Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited for such artificial singularities that are related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object rotates like a star, for example, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study, such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. Results: To study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity and quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we computed the spin-down luminosity expected for these stars and compared it to the classical or non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical results. Conclusions: Quantum electrodynamics leads to an irrelevant change in the spin-down luminosity even for a magnetic field of about the critical value of 4.4 × 109 T. Therefore the braking index remains close to its value for a point dipole in vacuum, namely n = 3. The same conclusion holds for a general-relativistic quantum electrodynamically corrected force-free magnetosphere.

  1. Rotation of Saturn and Jupiter and their Magnetized Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Yu, Z. J.; Wei, H.; Jia, Y.; Leisner, J. S.; Burton, M. E.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Pioneer 10, 11, Voyager 1 and 2, Ulysses, and Galileo measurements of the Jovian magnetic field have found that the magnetic dipole axis is tilted from the rotation axis by close to 10°. The longitude of the dipole has remained almost fixed using the IAU 1965 period, confirming the assumption, tacit in the use of the radio waves, that their periodicity is controlled by the rotation of the magnetic field originating deep inside the planet. Using the full suite of magnetic measurements from the 6 spacecraft, we can refine the rotation period to 9h 55m, 29.704 ± 0.003s, which period is within the uncertainty of the IAU definition. This system III period does not order all magnetospheric phenomena, and a system IV period has been introduced to order other periodic phenomenon. System IV measures the rotation of the magnetospheric plasma which slips with respect to the ionosphere and the planetary interior. No significant dipole tilt is present at Saturn, so we do not presently have an IAU-defined Saturnian system III period, but we do have a period analogous to the jovian system IV period called the SKR period, a variable period not locked to the planet. This period is clearly controlled by the interaction of Enceladus with the ionosphere and the magnetospheric plasma. This interaction upsets the centrifugal-centripetal force balance in the corotating plasma by removing angular momentum. A quasi-three-to-one resonance with Enceladus may allow periodic density enhancements to build up, affecting the dynamics of the entire magnetosphere. Returning to Jupiter, we can learn lessons from the Saturn-Enceladus system pertinent to the Io-Jupiter system, where there is a four-to-one quasi-resonance. The behavior of these two rotating giant magnetospheres is thus qualitatively similar despite the large difference in the tilt of the dipole axes.

  2. THE ROTATION PROFILE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN {+-}60 Degree-Sign LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-08-10

    Through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotation Nos. 1625 to 2129 (from 1975 February to 2012 October), the sidereal rotation rates of solar magnetic fields between {+-}60 Degree-Sign latitudes are investigated. It seems that the temporal variation of rotation rates should be related to the solar cycle phase. The rotation profile of magnetic fields is obtained: the sidereal rotation rates decrease from the equator to mid-latitude and reach their minimum values of about 13.16 deg day{sup -1} (13.17 deg day{sup -1}) at 53 Degree-Sign (54 Degree-Sign ) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, then increase toward higher latitudes. This rotation profile is different from the differential rotation law obtained by Snodgrass from a cross-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms, in which the rotation rates show a steep decrease from the equator to the poles. However, it is much closer to the quasi-rigid rotation law derived by Stenflo from an auto-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms. Some possible interpretations are discussed for the resulting rotation profile.

  3. Rotational properties of the Maria asteroid family

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.-J.; Byun, Y.-I.; Choi, Y.-J.; Moon, H.-K.; Hinse, T. C.; Park, J.-H.; Brosch, N.; Kaplan, M.; Kaynar, S.; Uysal, Ö.; Eker, Z.; Güzel, E.; Behrend, R.; Yoon, J.-N.; Mottola, S.; Hellmich, S.

    2014-03-01

    The Maria family is regarded as an old-type (∼3 ± 1 Gyr) asteroid family that has experienced substantial collisional and dynamical evolution in the main belt. It is located near the 3:1 Jupiter mean-motion resonance area that supplies near-Earth asteroids to the inner solar system. We carried out observations of Maria family asteroids during 134 nights from 2008 July to 2013 May and derived synodic rotational periods for 51 objects, including newly obtained periods of 34 asteroids. We found that there is a significant excess of fast and slow rotators in the observed rotation rate distribution. The one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms that the spin rate distribution is not consistent with a Maxwellian at a 92% confidence level. From correlations among rotational periods, amplitudes of light curves, and sizes, we conclude that the rotational properties of Maria family asteroids have been changed considerably by non-gravitational forces such as the YORP effect. Using a light-curve inversion method, we successfully determined the pole orientations for 13 Maria members and found an excess of prograde versus retrograde spins with a ratio (N{sub p} /N{sub r} ) of 3. This implies that the retrograde rotators could have been ejected by the 3:1 resonance into the inner solar system since the formation of the Maria family. We estimate that approximately 37-75 Maria family asteroids larger than 1 km have entered near-Earth space every 100 Myr.

  4. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  5. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  6. Rotational speed control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on rotational speed control are presented. The Centrifuge Facility Systems Study - 2.5 m centrifuge is shown. A life sciences centrifuge is scheduled to fly aboard Space Station Freedom. Live animal and plant specimens will be carried on the rotor and compared with microgravity specimens in racks.

  7. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  8. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... torn rotator cuff is usually successful in relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure may not always return strength to ... may not fully heal. Stiffness, weakness, and chronic pain may still be ... are not followed. Older patients (over age 65). Smoking.

  9. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  10. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  11. Rotating Responsibility Reaps Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barbara; Schullery, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process used for group assignments in a business communication course which holds all group members accountable by using a structure of rotating responsibility. Discusses selecting assignments and implementing the process, noting how this structure requires equivalent advance preparation from all members and provides opportunities for…

  12. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  13. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  14. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  15. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  16. Three dimensional dynamics of rotating structures under mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bediz, Bekir; Romero, L. A.; Ozdoganlar, O. Burak

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the spectral-Tchebychev (ST) technique for solution of three dimensional (3D) dynamics of rotating structures. In particular, structures that exhibit coupled dynamic response require a 3D modeling approach to capture their dynamic behavior. Rotational motions further complicate this behavior, inducing coriolis, centrifugal softening, and (nonlinear) stress-stiffening effects. Therefore, a 3D solution approach is needed to accurately capture the rotational dynamics. The presented 3D-ST technique provides a fast-converging and precise solution approach for rotational dynamics of structures with complex geometries and mixed boundary conditions. Specifically, unlike finite elements techniques, the presented technique uses a series expansion approach considering distributed-parameter system equations: The integral boundary value problem for rotating structures is discretized using the spectral-Tchebychev approach. To simplify the domain of the structures, cross-sectional and rotational transformations are applied to problems with curved cross-section and pretwisted geometry. The nonlinear terms included in the integral boundary value problem are linearized around an equilibrium solution using the quasi-static method. As a result, mass, damping, and stiffness matrices, as well as a forcing vector, are obtained for a given rotating structure. Several case studies are then performed to demonstrate the application and effectiveness of the 3D-ST solution. For each problem, the natural frequencies and modes shapes from the 3D-ST solution are compared to those from the literature (when available) and to those from a commercial finite elements software. The case studies include rotating/spinning parallelepipeds under free and mixed boundary conditions, and a cantilevered pretwisted beam (i.e., rotating blade) with an airfoil geometry rotating on a hub. It is seen that the natural frequencies and mode shapes from the 3D-ST technique differ from those from the

  17. Radial velocity planet detection biases at the stellar rotational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical RV noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical time-scale and amplitude of stellar RV noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic time-scales of quasi-periodic RV jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable-zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable-zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  18. Internal length scales in rotating and stratified Boussinesq flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurien, Susan; Zhai, X. M.; Yeung, P. K.

    2015-11-01

    We study the characteristic length scales of the propagating (wave) and non-propagating (vortical) modes, in a suite of simulations of forced, rotating, stably stratified Boussinesq flows. We employ a pseudo-spectral code, periodic boundary conditions and grid resolutions ranging from 5123 to 20483 on Blue Gene/Q (Argonne) under DOE's INCITE program. The relative strength of rotation to stratification frequencies is given by the Burger number Bu . Integral length scales in the vertical and horizontal directions are chosen as the characteristic scales and their ratio defines an internal aspect ratio. Nominally quasi-geostrophic (QG) scaling of Bu?1 is recovered for the vortical scale aspect ratio in the stratification-dominated regime Bu >> 4 . Much weaker scaling in Bu emerges for the vortical mode in the rotation-dominated regime Bu << 1 / 4 . The aspect ratio of the wave modes in both regimes are only weakly dependent on Bu . Turbulence affects the wave modes in the strongly rotating case by increasing the aspect ratio systematically but has no impact on the weak Bu dependence. It appears that for unit aspect ratio domains, QG scaling of the vortical mode holds only for stratification-dominated flows irrespective of the strength of rotation.

  19. Simulated bioprosthetic heart valve deformation under quasi-static loading.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Abad, Ajay; Sacks, Michael S

    2005-11-01

    For more than 40 years, the replacement of diseased natural heart valves with prosthetic devices has dramatically extended the quality and length of the lives of millions of patients worldwide. However, bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) continue to fail due to structural failure resulting from poor tissue durability and faulty design. Clearly, an in-depth understanding of the biomechanical behavior of BHV at both the tissue and functional prosthesis levels is essential to improving BHV design and to reduce rates of failure. In this study, we simulated quasi-static BHV leaflet deformation under 40, 80, and 120 mm Hg quasi-static transvalvular pressures. A Fung-elastic material model was used that incorporated material parameters and axes derived from actual leaflet biaxial tests and measured leaflet collagen fiber structure. Rigorous experimental validation of predicted leaflet strain field was used to validate the model results. An overall maximum discrepancy of 2.36% strain between the finite element (FE) results and experiment measurements was obtained, indicating good agreement between computed and measured major principal strains. Parametric studies utilizing the material parameter set from one leaflet for all three leaflets resulted in substantial variations in leaflet stress and strain distributions. This result suggests that utilization of actual leaflet material properties is essential for accurate BHV FE simulations. The present study also underscores the need for rigorous experimentation and accurate constitutive models in simulating BHV function and design.

  20. Quasi-planktonic behavior of foraging top marine predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Penna, Alice; de Monte, Silvia; Kestenare, Elodie; Guinet, Christophe; D'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring marine top predators is fundamental for assessing the health and functioning of open ocean ecosystems. Although recently tracking observations have substantially increased, factors determining the horizontal exploration of the ocean by marine predators are still largely unknown, especially at the scale of behavioral switches (1-100 km, days-weeks). It is commonly assumed that the influence of water movement can be neglected for animals capable of swimming faster than the current. Here, we challenge this assumption by combining the use of biologging (GPS and accelerometry), satellite altimetry and in-situ oceanographic data (ADCP and drifting buoys) to investigate the effect of the mesoscale ocean dynamics on a marine predator, the southern elephant seal. A Lagrangian approach reveals that trajectories of elephant seals are characterized by quasi-planktonic bouts where the animals are horizontally drifting. These bouts correspond to periods of increased foraging effort, indicating that in the quasi-planktonic conditions energy is allocated to diving and chasing, rather than in horizontal search of favourable grounds. These results suggest that mesoscale features like eddies and fronts may act as a focal points for trophic interactions not only by bottom-up modulation of nutrient injection, but also by directly entraining horizontal displacements of the upper trophic levels.

  1. Quasi-planktonic behavior of foraging top marine predators.

    PubMed

    Della Penna, Alice; De Monte, Silvia; Kestenare, Elodie; Guinet, Christophe; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    Monitoring marine top predators is fundamental for assessing the health and functioning of open ocean ecosystems. Although recently tracking observations have substantially increased, factors determining the horizontal exploration of the ocean by marine predators are still largely unknown, especially at the scale of behavioral switches (1-100 km, days-weeks). It is commonly assumed that the influence of water movement can be neglected for animals capable of swimming faster than the current. Here, we challenge this assumption by combining the use of biologging (GPS and accelerometry), satellite altimetry and in-situ oceanographic data (ADCP and drifting buoys) to investigate the effect of the mesoscale ocean dynamics on a marine predator, the southern elephant seal. A Lagrangian approach reveals that trajectories of elephant seals are characterized by quasi-planktonic bouts where the animals are horizontally drifting. These bouts correspond to periods of increased foraging effort, indicating that in the quasi-planktonic conditions energy is allocated to diving and chasing, rather than in horizontal search of favourable grounds. These results suggest that mesoscale features like eddies and fronts may act as a focal points for trophic interactions not only by bottom-up modulation of nutrient injection, but also by directly entraining horizontal displacements of the upper trophic levels.

  2. Quasi-planktonic behavior of foraging top marine predators

    PubMed Central

    Della Penna, Alice; De Monte, Silvia; Kestenare, Elodie; Guinet, Christophe; d’Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring marine top predators is fundamental for assessing the health and functioning of open ocean ecosystems. Although recently tracking observations have substantially increased, factors determining the horizontal exploration of the ocean by marine predators are still largely unknown, especially at the scale of behavioral switches (1–100 km, days-weeks). It is commonly assumed that the influence of water movement can be neglected for animals capable of swimming faster than the current. Here, we challenge this assumption by combining the use of biologging (GPS and accelerometry), satellite altimetry and in-situ oceanographic data (ADCP and drifting buoys) to investigate the effect of the mesoscale ocean dynamics on a marine predator, the southern elephant seal. A Lagrangian approach reveals that trajectories of elephant seals are characterized by quasi-planktonic bouts where the animals are horizontally drifting. These bouts correspond to periods of increased foraging effort, indicating that in the quasi-planktonic conditions energy is allocated to diving and chasing, rather than in horizontal search of favourable grounds. These results suggest that mesoscale features like eddies and fronts may act as a focal points for trophic interactions not only by bottom-up modulation of nutrient injection, but also by directly entraining horizontal displacements of the upper trophic levels. PMID:26666350

  3. Quasi-planktonic behavior of foraging top marine predators.

    PubMed

    Della Penna, Alice; De Monte, Silvia; Kestenare, Elodie; Guinet, Christophe; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring marine top predators is fundamental for assessing the health and functioning of open ocean ecosystems. Although recently tracking observations have substantially increased, factors determining the horizontal exploration of the ocean by marine predators are still largely unknown, especially at the scale of behavioral switches (1-100 km, days-weeks). It is commonly assumed that the influence of water movement can be neglected for animals capable of swimming faster than the current. Here, we challenge this assumption by combining the use of biologging (GPS and accelerometry), satellite altimetry and in-situ oceanographic data (ADCP and drifting buoys) to investigate the effect of the mesoscale ocean dynamics on a marine predator, the southern elephant seal. A Lagrangian approach reveals that trajectories of elephant seals are characterized by quasi-planktonic bouts where the animals are horizontally drifting. These bouts correspond to periods of increased foraging effort, indicating that in the quasi-planktonic conditions energy is allocated to diving and chasing, rather than in horizontal search of favourable grounds. These results suggest that mesoscale features like eddies and fronts may act as a focal points for trophic interactions not only by bottom-up modulation of nutrient injection, but also by directly entraining horizontal displacements of the upper trophic levels. PMID:26666350

  4. Design studies of quasi-optical gyro amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Quasi-Optical Gyro Amplifier is a novel device for generating high-frequency, high-power coherent microwave radiation. The authors report a study on a quasi-optical gyro amplifier designed with a periodic mirror structure. A specific design is presented for an amplifier at 95 GHz with an output power level of 100 kW and an efficiency of 30%. The system consists of two sets of parallel mirrors facing each other. A free space Gaussian beam can propagate through the structure in a zigzagged path. An on axis gyrotron beam interacts with the radiation each time it crosses the Gaussian waist. With a beam of 70 kV, 5A and velocity ratio of 1.5, this nonlinear simulation shows that this device can be 16% efficient. With a tapered magnetic field, the efficiency can be increased to 40%. However, studies also show that electron velocity spread significantly reduces the gain. More seriously, bunched electrons considerably change the direction of radiation propagation. These issues need to be addressed in further studies.

  5. Extraction of quasi-straightforward-propagating photons from diffused light transmitting through a scattering medium by polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinaka, Hiromichi; Hashimoto, Koji; Wada, Kenji; Cho, Yoshio; Osawa, Masahiko

    1995-07-01

    The utilization of light polarization is proposed to extract quasi-straightforward-propagating photons from diffused light transmitting through a scattering medium under continuously operating conditions. Removal of a floor level normally appearing on the dynamic range over which the extraction capability is maintained is demonstrated. By use of pulse-based observations this cw scheme of extraction of quasi-straightforward-propagating photons is directly shown to be equivalent to the use of a temporal gate in the pulse-based operation.

  6. Rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    The rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24 is investigated through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields during Carrington rotation numbers 2076-2146 (2008 October to 2014 January). The sidereal rotation rates of positive and negative magnetic fields at some latitudes are shown, and it can be found that the positive (negative) fields generally rotate faster than the negative (positive) fields in the southern (northern) hemisphere at low latitudes. The mean rotation profiles of total, positive, and negative magnetic fields between ±60° latitudes in the time interval are also obtained. It should be noted that both of the mean rotation profiles of the positive and negative magnetic fields, as well as the mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field, exhibit a quasi-rigid rotation at latitudes above about 55°. The mean rotation rates of the positive (negative) polarity reach their maximum values at about 9°(6)° latitude in the southern (northern) hemisphere. The mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field displays an obvious north-south asymmetry, where the rotation seems to be more differential in the northern hemisphere. The latitude variation in the rotation rate differences between positive and negative magnetic fields is further studied, and it is found that magnetic fields with the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity, except for the zones around 52° latitude of the southern hemisphere and around 35° latitude of the northern hemisphere. The implication of these results is discussed. It is clear that the obtained results can provide some observational constraints on the theoretical research of the mechanisms of differential rotation and solar cycle.

  7. Scaling Effects in Carbon/Epoxy Laminates Under Transverse Quasi-Static Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Douglas, Michael J.; Estes, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Scaling effects were considered for 8, 16, 32, and 64 ply IM-7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy composites plates transversely loaded to the first significant load drop by means of both a quasi-static and an equivalent impact force. The resulting damage was examined by x-ray and photomicroscopy analysis. Load-deflection curves were generated for the quasi-static tests and the resulting indentation depth was measured. Results showed that the load-deflection data scaled well for most of the various thicknesses of plates. However, damage did not scale as well. No correlation could be found between dent depth and any of the other parameters measured in this study. The impact test results showed that significantly less damage was formed compared to the quasi- static results for a given maximum transverse load. The criticality of ply-level scaling (grouping plies) was also examined.

  8. Quasi-particle spectrum in trilayer graphene: Role of onsite coulomb interaction and interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Stacking dependent quasi-particle spectrum and density of states (DOS) in trilayer (ABC-, ABA- and AAA-stacked) graphene are analyzed using mean-field Green's function equations of motion method. Interlayer coupling (t1) is found to be responsible for the splitting of quasi-particle peaks in each stacking order. Coulomb interaction suppresses the trilayer splitting and generates a finite gap at Fermi level in ABC- while a tiny gap in ABA-stacked trilayer graphene. Influence of t⊥ is prominent for AAA-stacking as compared to ABC- and ABA-stacking orders. The theoretically obtained quasi-particle energies and DOS has been viewed in terms of recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopic (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) data available on these systems.

  9. Quasi-geostrophic turbulence and generalized scale invariance, a theoretical reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.; Tuck, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Lindborg et al. (2010) claim that the apparent spectrum power law E(k) ≈ k-3 on scales ≥600 km obtained with the help of commercial jetliner trajectory deviations (GASP and Mozaic databases) could not be brought into question (Lovejoy et al., 2009a), because this spectrum corresponds to "a well known theory of quasi-geostrophic turbulence developed by Charney (1971)". Lindborg et al. (2010) also claim that "limitations [of this theory] have been relaxed in many of the modern models of atmospheric turbulence". We show that both claims are irrelevant and that generalized scale invariance (GSI) is indispensable to go beyond the quasi-geostrophic limitations, to go in fact from scale analysis to scaling analysis in order to derive better analytical models. In this direction, we derive vorticity equations in a space of (fractal) dimension D=2+Hz (0 ≤ Hz ≤ 1), which corresponds to a first step in the derivation of a dynamical alternative to the quasi-geostrophic approximation and turbulence. The corresponding precise definition of fractional dimensional turbulence already demonstrates that the classical 2-D and 3-D turbulence are not the main options to understand atmospheric dynamics. Although (2 + Hz)-D turbulence (with 0 < Hz < 1) has more common features with 3-D turbulence than with 2-D turbulence, it has nevertheless very distinctive features: its scaling anisotropy is in agreement with the layered pancake structure, which is typical of rotating and stratified turbulence but not of the classical 3-D turbulence.

  10. Electronic properties of nanoentities revealed by electrically driven rotation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, D. L.; Zhu, Frank Q.; Xu, Xiaobin; Cammarata, Robert C.; Chien, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct electric measurement via small contacting pads on individual quasi-one-dimensional nanoentities, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes, are usually required to access its electronic properties. We show in this work that 1D nanoentities in suspension can be driven to rotation by AC electric fields. The chirality of the resultantrotation unambiguously reveals whether the nanoentities are metal, semiconductor, or insulator due to the dependence of the Clausius–Mossotti factor on the material conductivity and frequency. This contactless method provides rapid and parallel identification of the electrical characteristics of 1D nanoentities. PMID:22645373

  11. Rotation curves of ultralight BEC dark matter halos with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, F. S.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.

    2015-03-01

    We study the rotation curves of ultralight BEC dark matter halos. These halos are long lived solutions of initially rotating BEC fluctuations. In order to study the implications of the rotation characterizing these long-lived configurations we consider the particular case of a boson mass and no self-interaction. We find that these halos successfully fit samples of rotation curves of LSB galaxies.

  12. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  13. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.; Boro, Carl O.; Farris, Alvis

    2002-01-01

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  14. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  15. Soil compaction across the old rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating soil compaction levels across the Old Rotation, the world’s oldest continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) experiment, has not been conducted since the experiment transitioned to conservation tillage and high residue cover crops with and without irrigation. Our objective was to charact...

  16. On the rotating Letelier spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-11-01

    We construct the solution corresponding to a rotating black hole surrounded by a cloud of strings (Rotating Letelier spacetime) from its nonrotating counterpart (Letelier spacetime) by applying a method of coordinate complexification developed by Newman and Janis.

  17. How good a clock is rotation? The stellar rotation-mass-age relationship for old field stars

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H. E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2014-01-10

    The rotation-mass-age relationship offers a promising avenue for measuring the ages of field stars, assuming the attendant uncertainties to this technique can be well characterized. We model stellar angular momentum evolution starting with a rotation distribution from open cluster M37. Our predicted rotation-mass-age relationship shows significant zero-point offsets compared to an alternative angular momentum loss law and published gyrochronology relations. Systematic errors at the 30% level are permitted by current data, highlighting the need for empirical guidance. We identify two fundamental sources of uncertainty that limit the precision of rotation-based ages and quantify their impact. Stars are born with a range of rotation rates, which leads to an age range at fixed rotation period. We find that the inherent ambiguity from the initial conditions is important for all young stars, and remains large for old stars below 0.6 M {sub ☉}. Latitudinal surface differential rotation also introduces a minimum uncertainty into rotation period measurements and, by extension, rotation-based ages. Both models and the data from binary star systems 61 Cyg and α Cen demonstrate that latitudinal differential rotation is the limiting factor for rotation-based age precision among old field stars, inducing uncertainties at the ∼2 Gyr level. We also examine the relationship between variability amplitude, rotation period, and age. Existing ground-based surveys can detect field populations with ages as old as 1-2 Gyr, while space missions can detect stars as old as the Galactic disk. In comparison with other techniques for measuring the ages of lower main sequence stars, including geometric parallax and asteroseismology, rotation-based ages have the potential to be the most precise chronometer for 0.6-1.0 M {sub ☉} stars.

  18. Energy and rotation-dependent stereodynamics of reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Qing, Li; Yun-Fan, Yang; Yang, Yu; Yong-Jia, Zhang; Feng-Cai, Ma

    2016-02-01

    Quasi-classical trajectory calculations are performed to study the stereodynamics of the reaction based on the first excited state NH2(12A‧) potential energy surface reported by Li et al. [Li Y Q and Varandas A J C 2010 J. Phys. Chem. A 114 9644] for the first time. We observe the changes of differential cross-sections at different collision energies and different initial reagent rotational excitations. The influence of collision energy on the k-k‧ distribution can be attributed to a purely impulsive effect. Initial reagent rotational excitation transforms the reaction mechanism from insertion to abstraction. The effect of initial reagent rotational excitations on k-k‧ distribution can be explained by the rotational excitation enlarging the rotational rate of reagent NH in the entrance channel to reduce the probability of collision between incidence H atom and H atom of target molecular. We also investigate the changes of vector correlations and find that the rotational angular momentum vector j‧ of the product H2 is not only aligned, but also oriented along the y axis. The alignment parameter, the disposal of total angular momentum and the reaction mechanism are all analyzed carefully to explain the polarization behavior of the product rotational angular moment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474141and 11274149), the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. LJQ2015040), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China (Grant No. 2014-1685), and the Special Fund Based Research New Technology of Methanol Conversion and Coal Instead of Oil and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M550158).

  19. Mixing of a passive scalar by the instability of a differentially rotating axial pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, A.; Gellert, M.; Rüdiger, G.

    2016-04-01

    The mean-field diffusion of passive scalars such as lithium, beryllium or temperature dispersals due to the magnetic Tayler instability of a rotating axial pinch is considered. Our study is carried out within a Taylor-Couette setup for two rotation laws: solid-body quasi-Kepler rotation. The minimum magnetic Prandtl number used is 0.05, and the molecular Schmidt number Sc of the fluid varies between 0.1 and 2. An effective diffusivity coefficient for the mixing is numerically measured by the decay of a prescribed concentration peak located between both cylinder walls. We find that only models with Sc exceeding 0.1 basically provide finite instability-induced diffusivity values. We also find that for quasi-Kepler rotation at a magnetic Mach number Mm ≃ 2, the flow transits from the slow-rotation regime to the fast-rotation regime that is dominated by the Taylor-Proudman theorem. For fixed Reynolds number, the relation between the normalized turbulent diffusivity and the Schmidt number of the fluid is always linear so that also a linear relation between the instability-induced diffusivity and the molecular viscosity results, just in the sense proposed by Schatzman (1977, A&A, 573, 80). The numerical value of the coefficient in this relation reaches a maximum at Mm ≃ 2 and decreases for larger Mm, implying that only toroidal magnetic fields on the order of 1 kG can exist in the solar tachocline.

  20. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M Eugenia; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, Josè L

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O-H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N-H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  1. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  2. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  3. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  4. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  5. Rotational Spectrum of Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed using a recently constructed LA-MB-FTMW spectrometer, specifically designed to optimize the detection of heavier molecules at a lower frequency range. Independent analyses of the rotational spectra of individual conformers have conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The experimental values of the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been found capital in the discrimination of the conformers. Both observed conformers are stabilized by a O-H\\cdotsN hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N-H\\cdotsπ interaction forming a chain that reinforces the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  6. Solar Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, J.; SOE Internal Rotation Team

    With the flood of high quality helioseismic data from the instruments on the SOHO spacecraft (MDI/VIRGO/GOLF) and ground based instruments (eg. GONG and LOWL) we have been able to get increasingly detailed information on the rotation and other large scale flows in the solar interior. In this talk I will discuss some of the highlights of what we have learned so far and what we may expect to learn in the near future. Among the recent advances have been tighter constraints on the tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone, detection of details in the surface rotation rate similar to the torsional oscillations found in the surface Doppler shift and helioseismic evidence for meridional flows. The MDI project is supported by NASA contract NAG5-3077 at Stanford University.

  7. Intestinal Rotation Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Juan Carlos; Lo, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal rotation abnormality (IRA) predisposes to lethal midgut volvulus. An understanding of intestinal development illustrates the process of normal intestinal rotation and fixation. An appreciation of the clinical presentation and consequences of missed IRA will enhance clinical suspicion and timely evaluation. Selecting the appropriate imaging modality to diagnose IRA requires an understanding of the benefits and limitations of each. The Ladd's procedure continues to be the appropriate surgical treatment for IRA with or without volvulus. Laparoscopy has emerged as an option for the diagnosis and treatment of IRA. Populations in which IRA is always associated, but a Ladd's procedure rarely required, include patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and abdominal wall defects. Prevalence of IRA is higher in children with congenital heart disease and heterotaxy syndrome; asymptomatic patients require multidisciplinary consideration of the risks and benefits of screening for IRA, whether a Ladd's procedure is required, and the timing thereof. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e247-e250.]. PMID:27403672

  8. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  9. Rotating housing turbine

    DOEpatents

    Allouche, Erez; Jaganathan, Arun P.

    2016-10-11

    The invention is a new turbine structure having a housing that rotates. The housing has a sidewall, and turbine blades are attached to a sidewall portion. The turbine may be completely open in the center, allowing space for solids and debris to be directed out of the turbine without jamming the spinning blades/sidewall. The turbine may be placed in a generator for generation of electrical current.

  10. Quasi-optical diplexer for millimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Wordeman, M R

    1978-12-01

    A quasi-optical diplexer for injection of signal and local oscillator frequencies into a mixer at millimeter wave-lengths is described. The diplexer accepts both image and signal bands, presents low loss at both the signal and local oscillator frequencies and rejects local oscillator noise at the signal frequency. The configuration of the device makes it particularly useful for Cassegrain receivers using a cooled mixer and a lens corrected feed system. The diplexer has been tested at 150 GHz on the 11-m radio telescope operated by The National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona.

  11. Quasi-isochronous Muon Collection Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, C.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Intense muon beams have many potential applications, including neutrino factories and muon colliders. However, muons are produced as tertiary beams, resulting in diffuse phase space distributions. To make useful beams, the muons must be rapidly cooled before they decay. An idea conceived recently for the collection and cooling of muon beams, namely, the use of a Quasi-Isochronous Helical Channel (QIHC) to facilitate capture of muons into RF buckets, has been developed further. The resulting distribution could be cooled quickly and coalesced into a single bunch to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider. After a brief elaboration of the QIHC concept, recent developments are described.

  12. Bacterial Motion in Quasi Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. L.; Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    We study the effect of bacterial motion on micron-scale beads in a freely suspended soap film. Given the size of bacteria and beads, the geometry of the experiment is quasi-two-dimensional. Large positional fluctuations are observed for beads as large as 10 um in diameter, and the mean-square displacements, measured using video imaging, indicate superdiffusion on short times and normal diffusion on long times. Though the phenomenon is similar to Brownian motion of small particles, its physical origin is different and can be attributed to collective dynamics of bacteria.

  13. Chaotic Rotation of Nereid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The shape and spin of Neptune's outermost satellite Nereid are still unknown. Ground-based photometry indicates large brightness variations, but different observers report very different lightcurve amplitudes and periods. On the contrary, Voyager 2 images spanning 12 days show no evidence of variations greater than 0.1 mag. The latter suggest either that Nereid is nearly spherical, or that it is rotating slowly. We propose that tides have already despun Nereid's rotation to a period of a few weeks, during the time before the capture of Triton when Nereid was closer to Neptune. Since Nereid reached its present orbit, tides have further despun Nereid to a period on the order of a month. For Nereid's orbital eccentricity of 0.75, tidal evolution ceases when the spin period is still approximately 1/8 of the orbital period. Furthermore, the synchronous resonance becomes quite weak for such high eccentricities, along with other low-order spin orbit commensurabilities. In contrast, high-order resonances become very strong particularly the 6:1, 6.5:1, 7:1, 7.5:1, and 8:1 spin states. If Nereid departs by more than approximately 1% from a sphere, however, these resonances overlap, generating chaos. Our simulations show that Nereid is likely to be in chaotic rotation for any spin period longer than about 2 weeks.

  14. Rotational spacings in superdeformed bands of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.; Farhan, A.

    1995-08-01

    An unexpected result of the experimental investigation of superdeformed rotational bands is the observation of near-identical dynamic moments of inertia in different nuclei. This phenomenon was also noted in normally deformed rotational bands. A priori, the BCS method is suspect at I = 0 for the treatment of superdeformed nuclear shapes because the single-particle level density near the nuclear surface is small. If it were large, there would be no superdeformed minimum. At high spin, pairing correlations are further weakened, and the BCS method becomes even worse.

  15. Structural tailoring of counter rotation propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth W.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The STAT program was designed for the optimization of single rotation, tractor propfan designs. New propfan designs, however, generally consist of two counter rotating propfan rotors. STAT is constructed to contain two levels of analysis. An interior loop, consisting of accurate, efficient approximate analyses, is used to perform the primary propfan optimization. Once an optimum design has been obtained, a series of refined analyses are conducted. These analyses, while too computer time expensive for the optimization loop, are of sufficient accuracy to validate the optimized design. Should the design prove to be unacceptable, provisions are made for recalibration of the approximate analyses, for subsequent reoptimization.

  16. Asymmetric Hip Rotation in Professional Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Patrick C.; Patel, Jayesh K.; Ramkumar, Prem N.; Noble, Philip C.; Lintner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a renewed interest in examining the association between hip range of motion and injury in athletes, and the data on baseball players are conflicting. Understanding whether asymmetrical hip rotation is a normal adaptation or a risk factor for injury will help therapists, trainers, and physicians develop rehabilitation programs to improve kinetic energy transfer and prevent injury. As our knowledge of hip pathology among baseball pitchers improves, establishing baselines for hip motion is critical in the further assessment of injury. Hypothesis: Because of the repetitive nature of throwing sports and the adaptive changes documented in the shoulder, elite baseball pitchers would have characteristic patterns of hip internal and external rotations on their dominant throwing side (stance) and their nondominant side (stride) in extension. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Computer software was used to measure passive internal and external rotations on digital photographs of 111 professional baseball pitchers. Results: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the mean difference in external rotation was 4.7°, 32% of the subjects had a >10° increase in external rotation on the stride hip relative to the stance hip. This population was statistically different from the remaining group for older age (P = .0053), lower body mass index (P = .0379), and more years in professional baseball (P = .0328). In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Pitchers showed more internal rotation on their stance hip and more external rotation on their stride hip. Although the mean

  17. Effects of rotating flows on combustion and jet noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental investigations of combustion in rotating (swirling) flow have shown that the mixing and combustion processes were accelerated, flame length and noise levels significantly decreased, and flame stability increased relative to that obtained without rotation. Unsteady burning accompanied by a pulsating flame, violent fluctuating jet, and intense noise present in straight flow burning were not present in rotating flow burning. Correlations between theory and experiment show good agreement. Such effects due to rotating flows could lead to suppressing jet noise, improving combustion, reducing pollution, and decreasing aircraft engine size. Quantitative analysis of the aero-acoustic relationship and noise source characteristics are needed.-

  18. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  19. Soybean response to poultry litter in a rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean yield response to annual poultry litter rates (0, 1.0 and 3.4 tons/acre) on a Leeper silty clay loam soil in corn (M), cotton (C) and soybean (B) rotation system were evaluated. The rotation systems from 2010-2014 were: CMBBMR; CMCBM and CCMMB. This study site had high levels of soil test Ph...

  20. Influence of pelvis rotation styles on baseball pitching mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wight, Jeff; Richards, James; Hall, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Efficient, sequential timing is essential for upper level pitching. Interestingly, pitchers vary considerably in timing related elements of pitching style including pelvis rotation, arm cocking, stride leg behaviour, and pitch delivery time. The purpose of this study was to determine whether relationships exist among these elements by examining the overall style of pitchers exhibiting different pelvis rotation patterns. Pitching styles were defined by pelvis orientation at the instant of stride foot contact. Pitchers demonstrating a pelvis orientation greater than 30 degrees were designated as 'early rotators', while pitchers demonstrating a pelvis orientation less than 30 degrees were designated as 'late rotators'. Kinematic and temporal differences were associated with the two styles. During the arm cocking phase, early rotators showed significantly greater shoulder external rotation at the instant of stride foot contact, earlier occurrence of maximum pelvis rotation angular velocity, and shorter time taken to complete the phase. However, by the instant of maximum shoulder external rotation, early and late rotators appeared remarkably similar as no significant difference occurred in pelvis and arm orientations. Therefore, it appears that early and late rotators used different methods to achieve similar results, including throwing velocity. Significant differences in throwing arm kinetics were also found for 10 of the 11 measures in the study. As the pelvis assumed a more open position at stride foot contact, maximum kinetic values were found to both decrease in magnitude and occur at an earlier time within the pitch.

  1. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  2. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  3. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  4. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  5. Mesoporous nitrogen-doped TiO2 sphere applied for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A mesoscopic nitrogen-doped TiO2 sphere has been developed for a quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell [DSSC]. Compared with the undoped TiO2 sphere, the quasi-solid-state DSSC based on the nitrogen-doped TiO2 sphere shows more excellent photovoltaic performance. The photoelectrochemistry of electrodes based on nitrogen-doped and undoped TiO2 spheres was characterized with Mott-Schottky analysis, intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, which indicated that both the quasi-Fermi level and the charge transport of the photoelectrode were improved after being doped with nitrogen. As a result, a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 6.01% was obtained for the quasi-solid-state DSSC. PMID:22115421

  6. Rotation of cometary meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čapek, D.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: The rotation of meteoroids caused by gas drag during the ejection from a cometary nucleus has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to estimate the rotational characteristics of meteoroids after their release from a comet during normal activity. Methods: The basic dependence of spin rate on ejection velocity and meteoroid size is determined analytically. A sophisticated numerical model is then applied to meteoroids ejected from the 2P/Encke comet. The meteoroid shapes are approximated by polyhedrons, which have been determined by a 3D laser scanning method of 36 terrestrial rock samples. These samples come from three distinct sets with different origins and characteristics, such as surface roughness or angularity. Two types of gas-meteoroid interactions and three gas ejection models are assumed. The rotational characteristics of ejected meteoroid population are obtained by numerical integration of equations of motion with random initial conditions and random shape selection. Results: It is proved that the results do not depend on a specific set of shape models and that they are applicable to the (unknown) shapes of real meteoroids. A simple relationship between the median of meteoroid spin frequencies bar{f} (Hz), ejection velocities vej (m s-1), and sizes D (m) is determined. For diffuse reflection of gas molecules from meteoroid's surface it reads as bar{f≃ 2× 10-3 v_ej D-0.88}, and for specular reflection of gas molecules from meteoroid's surface it is bar{f≃ 5× 10-3 v_ej D-0.88}. The distribution of spin frequencies is roughly normal on log scale, and it is relatively wide: a 2σ-interval can be described as (0.1, 10)× bar{f}. Most of the meteoroids are non-principal axis rotators. The median angle between angular momentum vector and spin vector is 12°. About 60% of meteoroids rotate in long-axis mode. The distribution of angular momentum vectors is not random. They are concentrated in the perpendicular direction with respect to the gas

  7. Quasi-biennial oscillation of the tropical stratospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Giorgetta, M. A.; Graf, H. F.

    2015-05-01

    This study describes how aerosol in an aerosol-coupled climate model of the middle atmosphere is influenced by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) during times when the stratosphere is largely unperturbed by volcanic material. In accordance with satellite observations, the vertical extent of the stratospheric aerosol layer in the tropics is modulated by the QBO by up to 6 km, or ~ 35% of its mean vertical extent between 100-7 hPa (about 16-33 km). Its largest vertical extent lags behind the occurrence of strongest QBO westerlies. The largest reduction lags behind maximum QBO easterlies. Strongest QBO signals in the aerosol surface area (30 %) and number densities (up to 100% e.g. in the Aitken mode) are found in regions where aerosol evaporates, that is above the 10 hPa pressure level (~ 31 km). Positive modulations are found in the QBO easterly shear, negative modulations in the westerly shear. Below 10 hPa, in regions where the aerosol mixing ratio is largest (50-20 hPa, or ~ 20-26 km), in most of the analysed parameters only moderate statistically significant QBO signatures (< 10%) have been found. QBO signatures in the model prognostic aerosol mixing ratio are significant at the 95% confidence level throughout the tropical stratosphere where modelled mixing ratios exceed 0.1 ppbm. In some regions of the tropical lower stratosphere the QBO signatures in other analysed parameters are partly not statistically significant. Peak-to-peak amplitudes of the QBO signature in the prognostic mixing ratios are up to twice as large as seasonal variations in the region where aerosols evaporate and between 70-30 hPa. Between the tropical tropopause and 70 hPa the QBO signature is relatively weak and seasonal variations dominate the variability of the simulated Junge layer. QBO effects on the upper lid of the tropical aerosol layer turn the quasi-static balance between processes maintaining the layer's vertical extent into a cyclic balance when considering this dominant mode

  8. Comparison of quasi-static and dynamic squats: a three-dimensional kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic study of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Hagemeister, Nicola; Aissaoui, Rachid; de Guise, Jacques A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have described 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and electromyography (EMG) of the lower limbs during quasi-static or dynamic squatting activities. One study compared these two squatting conditions but only at low speed on healthy subjects, and provided no information on kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. The purpose of the present study was to contrast simultaneous recordings of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs during quasi-stat ic and fast-dynamic squats in healthy and pathological subjects. Ten subjects were recruited: five healthy and five osteoarthritis subjects. A motion-capture system, force plate, and surface electrodes respectively recorded 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. Each subject performed a quasi-static squat and several fast-dynamic squats from 0° to 70° of knee flexion. The two squatting conditions were compared for positions where quasi-static and fast-dynamic knee flexion-extension angles were similar. Mean differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were 1.5° for rotations, 1.9 mm for translations, 2.1% of subjects' body weight for ground reaction forces, 6.6 Nm for torques, 11.2 mm for center of pressure, and 6.3% of maximum fast-dynamic electromyographic activities for EMG. Some significant differences (p<0.05) were found in internal rotation, anterior translation, vertical force and EMG. All differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were small. 69.5% of compared data were equivalent. In conclusion, this study showed that quasi-static and fast-dynamic squatting activities are comparable in terms of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG, although some reservations still remain.

  9. Quasi-adiabatic compression heating of selected foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landfeld, Ales; Strohalm, Jan; Halama, Radek; Houska, Milan

    2011-03-01

    The quasi-adiabatic temperature increase due to compression heating, during high-pressure (HP) processing (HPP), was studied using specially designed equipment. The temperature increase was evaluated as the difference in temperature, during compression, between atmospheric pressure and nominal pressure. The temperature was measured using a thermocouple in the center of a polyoxymethylene cup, which contained the sample. Fresh meat balls, pork meat pate, and tomato purée temperature increases were measured at three initial temperature levels between 40 and 80 °C. Nominal pressure was either 400 or 500 MPa. Results showed that the fat content had a positive effect on temperature increases. Empirical equations were developed to calculate the temperature increase during HPP at different initial temperatures for pressures of 400 and 500 MPa. This thermal effect data can be used for numerical modeling of temperature histories of foods during HP-assisted pasteurization or sterilization processes.

  10. Wave and particle evolution downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Omidi, N.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Distributions of ions heated in quasi-perpendicular bow shocks have large perpendicular temperature anisotropies that provide free energy for the growth of Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) and mirror waves. These modes are often obsreved in the Earth's magnetosheath. Using two-dimensional hybrid simulations, we show that these waves are produced near the shock front and convected downstream rather than being produced locally downstream. The wave activity reduces the proton anisotropy to magnetosheath levels within a few tens of gyroradii of the shock but takes significantly longer to reduce the anisotropy of He(++) ions. The waves are primarily driven by proton anisotropy and the dynamics of the helium ions is controlled by the proton waves. Downstream of high Mach number shocks, mirror waves compete effectively with AIC waves. Downstream of low Mach number shocks, AIC waves dominate.

  11. Artificial quasi-periodic plasma inhomogeneities in the lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikovich, V. V.; Benediktov, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Terina, G. I.

    Experimental results are presented on artificial quasi-periodic plasma inhomogeneities in a standing wave field of high-power shortwave radio transmission, at ionospheric altitudes of 75 to 115 km. A transmitter of an equivalent power of 20 MW periodically emitted for 10 to 20 sec an extraordinary component at frequencies of 5.5-5.75 MHz. Backward-scattered signals, at amplitudes of 40-70 dB below the specular channel level, were observed, and relaxation time fluctuation was noted to be within the range of from tenths of seconds to several seconds. The scattering height of the regular component of the sounding waves decreased as the sounding wave frequency approached the extraordinary component frequency of the disturbing radio emission, in accordance with the spatial synchronism condition (Belikovich et al., 1978). The feasibility of using the method for measurements at lower altitudes was shown.

  12. Rotation of methyl radicals in molecular solids.

    PubMed

    Kiljunen, Toni; Popov, Evgeny; Kunttu, Henrik; Eloranta, Jussi

    2010-04-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were carried out to study the rotation of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in solid carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen matrices. The radicals were produced by dissociating methane by plasma bursts generated by a focused 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation during the gas condensation on the substrate. The ESR spectra exhibit anisotropic features that persist over the temperature range examined, and in most cases this indicates a restriction of rotation about the C(2) symmetry axis. A nonrotating CH(3) was also observed in a CO(2) matrix. The intensity ratio between the symmetric (A) and antisymmetric (E) nuclear spin states was recorded as a function of temperature for each molecular matrix. The rotational energy levels are modified from their gas phase structure with increasing crystal field strength. An anomalous situation was observed where the A/E ratio extended below the high temperature limit of 1/2. PMID:20141192

  13. Rotational Cooling of Trapped Polyatomic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G U; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH_{3}F) by optically pumping the population of 16 M sublevels in the rotational states J=3, 4, 5 and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J=4, K=3, M=4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (≈30  mK) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 10^{6} molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states, and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever-larger molecules.

  14. On intracluster Faraday rotation. II - Statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, J. M.; Dennison, B.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of a reliable sample of radio source Faraday rotation measurements seen through rich clusters of galaxies, with sources seen through the outer parts of clusters and therefore having little intracluster Faraday rotation, indicates that the distribution of rotation in the former population is broadened, but only at the 80% level of statistical confidence. Employing a physical model for the intracluster medium in which the square root of magnetic field strength/turbulent cell per gas core radius number ratio equals approximately 0.07 microgauss, a Monte Carlo simulation is able to reproduce the observed broadening. An upper-limit analysis figure of less than 0.20 microgauss for the field strength/turbulent cell ratio, combined with lower limits on field strength imposed by limitations on the Compton-scattered flux, shows that intracluster magnetic fields must be tangled on scales greater than about 20 kpc.

  15. Rotation of Jupiter and Saturn and their Magnetic Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Yu, Z. J.; Wei, H. Y.; Jia, Y. D.; Leisner, J. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-09-01

    The IAU-defined rotation rate of Jupiter is 9h 55m 29.71s, based on radio measurements of electromagnetic emissions with periodic behavior. Pioneer 10, 11, Voyager 1 and 2, Ulysses, and Galileo measurements of the Jovian magnetic field have found that the magnetic dipole axis is tilted from the rotation axis by close to 10°. The longitude of the dipole has remained almost fixed using the IAU period, confirming the assumption, tacit in the use of the radio waves, that their periodicity is controlled by the rotation of the magnetic field originating deep inside the planet. Using the full suite of magnetic measurements from the 6 spacecraft, we can refine the rotation period to 9h 55m, 29.704 ± 0.003s, which period is within the uncertainty of the IAU definition. This system III period does not order all magnetospheric phenomena, and a system IV period has been introduced to order other periodic phenomenon. No significant dipole tilt is present at Saturn, so we do not presently have a Saturnian system III period, but we do have a period analogous to the Jovian system IV period called the SKR period, a changeable period not locked to the planet. This period is clearly controlled by the interaction of Enceladus with the ionosphere and the magnetospheric plasma. This interaction upsets the centrifugal-centripetal force balance in the corotating plasma by removing angular momentum. A quasi-three-to-one resonance with Enceladus may allow periodic density enhancements to build up, affecting the dynamics of the entire magnetosphere. Returning to Jupiter, we can learn lessons from the Saturn-Enceladus system pertinent to the Io-Jupiter system, where there is a four-to-one quasi-resonance. The System IV period appears to be the jovian equivalent of the saturnian SKR period.

  16. Quasi-induced exposure: methodology and insight.

    PubMed

    Stamatiadis, N; Deacon, J A

    1997-01-01

    Even though the numerator in accident rates can be accurately determined nowadays, the denominator of these rates is an item of discussion and debate within the highway safety community. A critical examination of an induced exposure technique, based on the non-responsible driver/vehicle of a two-vehicle accident (quasi-induced exposure), is presented here. Differences in exposure for a series of accident location and time combinations are investigated, the assumption of similarities between drivers of single-vehicle accidents and the responsible driver of multiple-vehicle accidents is refuted, and the use of the non-responsible driver as a measure of exposure is tested using vehicle classification data. The results of the analyses reveal the following: (1) accident exposure is different for different location and time combinations: (2) induced exposure estimates provide an accurate reflection of exposure to multiple-vehicle accidents; (3) induced exposure estimates are acceptable surrogates for vehicle miles of travel when estimates are made for conditions during which the mix of road users is fairly constant; and (4) the propensity for involvement in single-vehicle accidents is generally different than that in multiple-vehicle accidents for a given class of road users. We concluded that the quasi-induced exposure is a powerful technique for measuring relative exposure of drivers or vehicles when real exposure data are missing. PMID:9110039

  17. Quasi-spherical direct drive fusion.

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, J. Pace; Abbott, Lucas M.; Langston, William L.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Nash, Thomas J.; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Silva, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present designs of quasi-spherical direction drive z-pinch loads for machines such as ZR at 28 MA load current with a 150 ns implosion time (QSDDI). A double shell system for ZR has produced a 2D simulated yield of 12 MJ, but the drive for this system on ZR has essentially no margin. A double shell system for a 56 MA driver at 150 ns implosion has produced a simulated yield of 130 MJ with considerable margin in attaining the necessary temperature and density-radius product for ignition. They also represent designs for a magnetically insulated current amplifier, (MICA), that modify the attainable ZR load current to 36 MA with a 28 ns rise time. The faster pulse provided by a MICA makes it possible to drive quasi-spherical single shell implosions (QSDD2). They present results from 1D LASNEX and 2D MACH2 simulations of promising low-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules and 1D LASNEX results of high-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules.

  18. Numerical safety study of currents induced in the patient during rotations in the static field produced by a hybrid MRI-LINAC system.

    PubMed

    Trakic, Adnan; Limei Liu; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Zilberti, Luca; Feng Liu; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-03-01

    MRI-LINAC is a new image-guided radiotherapy treatment system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a linear particle accelerator (LINAC) into a single unit. Moving (i.e., rotating or translating) the patient inside the strong magnetic field of the split MRI-LINAC magnet can potentially induce high levels of electric fields and corresponding current densities in the conducting tissues. The prediction and assessment of patient safety in terms of electromagnetic field exposure have received very little attention for a split cylindrical MRI magnet configuration, especially in the vicinity of the gap region. In this novel numerical study, based on the quasi-static finite-difference method, rotation-induced electric fields and current densities are calculated considering a split 1-T magnet and a tissue-accurate 2-mm-resolution human body model. The patient was modeled in both axial and radial orientations relative to the magnet gap in a number of treatment/imaging scenarios. It was found that rotating the patient in the radial orientation produced an order of magnitude larger field exposure in the central nervous system than when the patient was rotated in the axial orientation. Also, rotating the patient with periods lower than about Trot = 43.3 s may result in field exposures above the limits set out in the international safety guidelines. The novel results of this investigation can provide useful insights into the safe use of the MRI-LINAC technology and optimal orientations of the patient during the treatment. PMID:24216628

  19. Waves and vortices in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouquet, Annick; Herbert, Corentin; Marino, Raffaele; Rosenberg, Duane

    2015-04-01

    The interactions between vortices and waves is a long-standing problem in fluid turbulence. It can lead to a self-sustaining process that is dominant, for example in pipe flows, and to the prediction of large-scale coherent structures such as baroclinic jets in planetary atmospheres, and it can also be used as a control tool for the onset of turbulence. Similarly, the dynamics of the atmosphere and the ocean is dominated by complex interactions between nonlinear eddies and waves due to a combination of rotation and stratification (characterized respectively by frequencies f and N), as well as shear layers. The waves are faster at large scales, and this leads to a quasi-geostrophic quasi-linear regime in which there is a balance between pressure gradient and the Coriolis and gravity forces. The range of scales in these geophysical flows before dissipation prevails is such that other regimes can arise in which turbulence comes into play, with the eddy turn-over time becoming comparable to the wave period, and for which isotropy recovers for sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. One may decompose the flow-- observational, experimental or numerical, in terms of the normal modes that it supports, i.e. the inertia-gravity waves and the (slow, zero frequency) vortical modes carrying the potential vorticity, thanks to the existence of a small parameter, as for example the fluctuation around a mean flow or the ratio of the wave period to the eddy turn-over time. In this context an ensemble of data sets of rotating stratified turbulence will be analyzed, stemming from accurate direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations at high resolution, up to 40963 grid points, using high-performance computing. These flows all support a constant-flux bi-directional cascade of energy towards both the large scales and the small scales. The parameter space includes the Reynolds number, the Prandtl number(s), and the Rossby and Froude numbers, and a universal response to a variety

  20. Design of Quasi-Terminator Orbits near Primitive Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantoine, Gregory; Broschart, Stephen B.; Grebow, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-terminator orbits are a class of quasi-periodic orbits around a primitive body that exist in the vicinity of the well-known terminator orbits. The inherent stability of quasi-terminator trajectories and their wide variety of viewing geometries make them a very compelling option for primitive body mapping missions. In this paper, we discuss orbit design methodologies for selection of an appropriate quasi-terminator orbit that would meet the needs of a specific mission. Convergence of these orbits in an eccentric, higher-fidelity model is also discussed with an example case at Bennu, the target of the upcoming NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission.

  1. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  2. A quasi-linear control theory analysis of timesharing skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    The compliance of the human ankle joint is measured by applying 0 to 50 Hz band-limited gaussian random torques to the foot of a seated human subject. These torques rotate the foot in a plantar-dorsal direction about a horizontal axis at a medial moleolus of the ankle. The applied torques and the resulting angular rotation of the foot are measured, digitized and recorded for off-line processing. Using such a best-fit, second-order model, the effective moment of inertia of the ankle joint, the angular viscosity and the stiffness are calculated. The ankle joint stiffness is shown to be a linear function of the level of tonic muscle contraction, increasing at a rate of 20 to 40 Nm/rad/Kg.m. of active torque. In terms of the muscle physiology, the more muscle fibers that are active, the greater the muscle stiffness. Joint viscosity also increases with activation. Joint stiffness is also a linear function of the joint angle, increasing at a rate of about 0.7 to 1.1 Nm/rad/deg from plantar flexion to dorsiflexion rotation.

  3. Magnetopause rotational forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Ledley, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometer experiment on board Ogo 5 are analyzed by the minimum-variance technique for two magnetopause crossings, believed to provide the best evidence presently available of magnetopause rotational discontinuities. Approximate agreement with predictions from MHD and first-order orbit theory is found, but available low-energy electron data suggest the presence of significant non-MHD effects. The paper also illustrates an improved method for data interval selection, a new magnetopause hodogram representation, and the utility of data simulation.

  4. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  5. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  6. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  7. Supernova seismology: gravitational wave signatures of rapidly rotating core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Klion, Hannah; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-06-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce, and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with non-linear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early post-bounce GW signal is produced by the fundamental quadrupolar oscillation mode of the PNS, at a frequency 0.70 ≲ f ≲ 0.80 kHz, whose energy is largely trapped within the PNS and leaks out on a ˜10-ms time-scale. Quasi-radial oscillations are not trapped within the PNS and quickly propagate outwards until they steepen into shocks. Both the PNS structure and Coriolis/centrifugal forces have a strong impact on the GW spectrum, and a detection of the GW signal can therefore be used to constrain progenitor properties.

  8. Numerical Study of Rotating Turbulence with External Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation at 256(exp 3) resolution have been carried out to study the response of isotropic turbulence to the concurrent effects of solid-body rotation and numerical forcing at the large scales. Because energy transfer to the smaller scales is weakened by rotation, energy input from forcing gradually builds up at the large scales, causing the overall kinetic energy to increase. At intermediate wavenumbers the energy spectrum undergoes a transition from a limited k(exp -5/3) inertial range to k(exp -2) scaling recently predicted in the literature. Although the Reynolds stress tensor remains approximately isotropic and three-components, evidence for anisotropy and quasi- two-dimensionality in length scales and spectra in different velocity components and directions is strong. The small scales are found to deviate from local isotropy, primarily as a result of anisotropic transfer to the high wavenumbers. To understand the spectral dynamics of this flow we study the detailed behavior of nonlinear triadic interactions in wavenumber space. Spectral transfer in the velocity component parallel to the axis of rotation is qualitatively similar to that in non-rotating turbulence; however the perpendicular component is characterized by a greatly suppressed energy cascade at high wavenumber and a local reverse transfer at the largest scales. The broader implications of this work are briefly addressed.

  9. Dynamics of Prestressed Rotating Anisotropic Plates Subject to Transverse Loads and Heat Sources, Part i: Modelling and Solution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SON, HEUIGI; KIKUCHI, NOBORU; GALIP ULSOY, A.; YIGIT, AHMET S.

    2000-09-01

    This paper considers the application of the finite element method for the analysis of translating or rotating plates, based on Mindlin plate theory and the von Kármán strain expression, in the context of linear thermoelasticity. The existence of convective terms generates gyroscopic terms, unstabilizing effects in the stiffness matrix, and radial in-plane tension. Homogenization theory, applicable to not only determining the global material properties for composite materials like laminate or fiber-reinforced matrix, but also computing microscopic stress levels, was applied to obtain orthotropic material properties. The quasi-static stretching assumption was used to simplify the governing equations. A second order implicit time-integration scheme, applicable for both the linear and non-linear governing equations, was presented, which allows a time increment sufficiently large (without numerical stability problems) based on the accuracy needed. This paper (Part I) presents the problem formulation and solution methods, while a companion paper (Part II) presents and discusses results for specially orthotropic rotating disks.

  10. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  11. Rotatable superconducting cyclotron adapted for medical use

    DOEpatents

    Blosser, Henry G.; Johnson, David A.; Riedel, Jack; Burleigh, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron (10) rotatable on a support structure (11) in an arc of about 180.degree. around a pivot axis (A--A) and particularly adapted for medical use is described. The rotatable support structure (13, 15) is balanced by being counterweighted (14) so as to allow rotation of the cyclotron and a beam (12), such as a subparticle (neutron) or atomic particle beam, from the cyclotron in the arc around a patient. Flexible hose (25) is moveably attached to the support structure for providing a liquified gas which is supercooled to near 0.degree. K. to an inlet means (122) to a chamber (105) around superconducting coils (101, 102). The liquid (34) level in the cyclotron is maintained approximately half full so that rotation of the support structure and cyclotron through the 180.degree. can be accomplished without spilling the liquid from the cyclotron. With the coils vertically oriented, each turn of the winding is approximately half immersed in liquid (34) and half exposed to cold gas and adequate cooling to maintain superconducting temperatures in the section of coil above the liquid level is provided by the combination of cold gas/vapor and by the conductive flow of heat along each turn of the winding from the half above the liquid to the half below.

  12. Development of the High Field Magneto-Optical Measurement System with a Rotational Cavity for the Study of Organic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, M.; Ohta, H.; Koyama, K.; Oshima, Y.; Motokawa, M.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a new magneto-optical measurement system with a rotational cavity. It consists of a millimeter vector network analyzer and a 15T solenoid type superconducting magnet and it can go down to 1.5 K. The rotational cavity can be used in the transmission configuration and the rotation can be performed up to almost 360 degrees in 1 degree precision. We will show the magneto-optical measurement results of β"-(BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ) using our new system. We observe the quasi-two-dimensional periodic orbit resonance (POR) in β"-(BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ). The Fermi surfaces of this system will be discussed.

  13. Development of the High Field Magneto-Optical Measurement System with a Rotational Cavity for the Study of Organic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, M.; Ohta, H.; Koyama, K.; Oshima, Y.; Motokawa, M.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.

    We have developed a new magneto-optical measurement system with a rotational cavity. It consists of a millimeter vector network analyzer and a 15T solenoid type superconducting magnet and it can go down to 1.5 K. The rotational cavity can be used in the transmission configuration and the rotation can be performed up to almost 360 degrees in 1 degree precision. We will show the magneto-optical measurement results of β"-(BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ) using our new system. We observe the quasi-two-dimensional periodic orbit resonance (POR) in β"-(BEDT-TTF) (TCNQ). The Fermi surfaces of this system will be discussed.

  14. Revealing cosmic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amit P. S.; Shimon, Meir; Keating, Brian G.

    2012-10-01

    Cosmological Birefringence, a rotation of the polarization plane of radiation coming to us from distant astrophysical sources, may reveal parity violation in either the electromagnetic or gravitational sectors of the fundamental interactions in nature. Until only recently this phenomenon could be probed with only radio observations or observations at UV wavelengths. Recently, there is a substantial effort to constrain such nonstandard models using observations of the rotation of the polarization plane of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. This can be done via measurements of the B-modes of the CMB or by measuring its TB and EB correlations which vanish in the standard model. In this paper we show that EB correlations-based estimator is the best for upcoming polarization experiments. The EB-based estimator surpasses other estimators because it has the smallest noise and of all the estimators is least affected by systematics. Current polarimeters are optimized for the detection of B-mode polarization from either primordial gravitational waves or by large-scale structures via gravitational lensing. In the paper we also study the optimization of CMB experiments for the detection of cosmological birefringence, in the presence of instrumental systematics, which by themselves are capable of producing EB correlations, potentially mimicking cosmological birefringence.

  15. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  16. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  17. Embedding of Analytic Quasi-Periodic Cocycles into Analytic Quasi-Periodic Linear Systems and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jiangong; Zhou, Qi

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we prove that any analytic quasi-periodic cocycle close to constant is the Poincaré map of an analytic quasi-periodic linear system close to constant, which bridges both methods and results in quasi-periodic linear systems and cocycles. We also show that the almost reducibility of an analytic quasi-periodic linear system is equivalent to the almost reducibility of its corresponding Poincaré cocycle. By the local embedding theorem and the equivalence, we transfer the recent local almost reducibility results of quasi-periodic linear systems (Hou and You, in Invent Math 190:209-260, 2012) to quasi-periodic cocycles, and the global reducibility results of quasi-periodic cocycles (Avila, in Almost reducibility and absolute continuity, 2010; Avila et al., in Geom Funct Anal 21:1001-1019, 2011) to quasi-periodic linear systems. Finally, we give a positive answer to a question of Avila et al. (Geom Funct Anal 21:1001-1019, 2011) and use it to study point spectrum of long-range quasi-periodic operator with Liouvillean frequency. The embedding also holds for some nonlinear systems.

  18. Rotational level-dependent collisional broadening and line shift of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi (1,0) band of OH in hydrogen-air combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the collisional broadening and line shift of the (1,0) band of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi system of OH are reported in atmospheric pressure hydrogen-air combustion gases. The measurements were made using a single-mode, narrow linewidth, frequency-doubled ring dye laser operating near 283 nm. The OH was generated in the combustion gases of a flat flame H2-air burner. Collisional broadening parameters for equilibrium mixtures of H2, O2, H2O, and N2 were obtained spanning a range of fuel/air equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 1.6 and temperatures from 1500 to 2050 K. Measurements were obtained spanning rotational quantum numbers from 4.5 to 16.5. The collision induced frequency shift was determined to be 0.1 that of the collisional broadening.

  19. Rotator Cerclage Technique for Partial Rotator Cuff Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Firat, Ahmet; Gursoy, Safa; Akkaya, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of partial rotator cuff tears is gradually increasing because of the advancements in imaging methods and arthroscopy techniques. One of the repair techniques is repair of the partial rotator cuff tear by conversion to a full-thickness tear. Another technique, the transtendon technique, has some practical challenges and risks. We attempted to develop a practical and easy technique with low morbidity to repair partial tears called the rotator cerclage technique. PMID:26900559

  20. Compensations for increased rotational inertia during human cutting turns.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mu; Brown, Brian; Jindrich, Devin L

    2014-02-01

    Locomotion in a complex environment is often not steady state, but unsteady locomotion (stability and maneuverability) is not well understood. We investigated the strategies used by humans to perform sidestep cutting turns when running. Previous studies have argued that because humans have small yaw rotational moments of inertia relative to body mass, deceleratory forces in the initial velocity direction that occur during the turning step, or 'braking' forces, could function to prevent body over-rotation during turns. We tested this hypothesis by increasing body rotational inertia and testing whether braking forces during stance decreased. We recorded ground reaction force and body kinematics from seven participants performing 45 deg sidestep cutting turns and straight running at five levels of body rotational inertia, with increases up to fourfold. Contrary to our prediction, braking forces remained consistent at different rotational inertias, facilitated by anticipatory changes to body rotational speed. Increasing inertia revealed that the opposing effects of several turning parameters, including rotation due to symmetrical anterior-posterior forces, result in a system that can compensate for fourfold changes in rotational inertia with less than 50% changes to rotational velocity. These results suggest that in submaximal effort turning, legged systems may be robust to changes in morphological parameters, and that compensations can involve relatively minor adjustments between steps to change initial stance conditions.

  1. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  2. Modeling quasi-lattice with octagonal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Girzhon, V. V.; Smolyakov, O. V.; Zakharenko, M. I.

    2014-11-15

    We prove the possibility to use the method of modeling of a quasi-lattice with octagonal symmetry similar to that proposed earlier for the decagonal quasicrystal. The method is based on the multiplication of the groups of basis sites according to specified rules. This model is shown to be equivalent to the method of the periodic lattice projection, but is simpler because it considers merely two-dimensional site groups. The application of the proposed modeling procedure to the reciprocal lattice of octagonal quasicrystals shows a fairly good matching with the electron diffraction pattern. Similarly to the decagonal quasicrystals, the possibility of three-index labeling of the diffraction reflections is exhibited in this case. Moreover, the ascertained ratio of indices provides information on the intensity of diffraction reflections.

  3. Plasmarons in Quasi-freestanding Epitaxial Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Aaron

    2011-03-01

    Graphene is a remarkable new electronic material with many unique properties. To realize its promise, it is essential to understand how its charge carriers interact. By measuring the spectral function of charge carriers in quasi-free-standing graphene, we show that at finite doping, the well-known linear Dirac spectrum does not provide a full description of the charge-carrying excitations. We find that there also exist composite ``plasmaron'' particles, consisting of holes coupled to density oscillatons of the graphene electron gas. The Dirac crossing point is resolved into three crossings: the first between pure charge bands, the second between pure plasmaron bands, and the third a ring-shaped crossing between charge and plasmaron bands.

  4. Quasi-periodic climate change on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Zent, Aaron P.

    The paper examines evidence that the Martian climate undergoes quasi-periodic variations, including the polar layered terrain, differences between the residual polar caps, and the current net southward flow of H2O. The driving functions for these variations are oscillations in the elements of the Martian orbit coupled with precession of the Martian spin axis. These 'astronomic variations' control the distribution of the insolation, which in turn influences the partition of volatiles between atmospheric and surface reservoirs. The major effects anticipated at low obliquity are growth of the polar caps, substantial decrease in surface pressure, cessation of duststorms, release of CO2 from the regolith, and poleward migration of H2O ground ice. At high obliquity, the mass of the perennial polar caps decreases and permanent CO2 frost disappears, CO2 desorbs from the regolith at high latitudes, the surface pressure may increase to several times its current value, and the atmospheric dust load increases.

  5. Mirror Instability: Quasi-linear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P.; Kuznetsov, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    Nonlinear properties of the mirror instability are investigated by direct integration of the quasi-linear diffusion equation [Shapiro and Shevchenko, 1964] near threshold. The simulation results are compared to the results of standard hybrid simulations [Califano et al., 2008] and discussed in the context of the nonlinear dynamical model by Kuznetsov et al. [2007]. References: Califano, F., P. Hellinger, E. Kuznetsov, T. Passot, P. L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2008), Nonlinear mirror mode dynamics: Simulations and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A08219, doi:10.1029/2007JA012898. Kuznetsov, E., T. Passot and P. L. Sulem (2007), Dynamical model for nonlinear mirror modes near threshold, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 235003 . Shapiro, V. D., and V. I. Shevchenko (1964), Quasilinear theory of instability of a plasma with an anisotropic ion velocity distribution, Sov. JETP, 18, 1109.

  6. Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering in Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.

    The eye is not just a "window to the soul"; it can also be a "window to the human body." The eye is built like a camera. Light which travels from the cornea to the retina traverses through tissues that are representative of nearly every tissue type and fluid type in the human body. Therefore, it is possible to diagnose ocular and systemic diseases through the eye. Quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) also known as dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a laboratory technique routinely used in the characterization of macromolecular dispersions. QELS instrumentation has now become more compact, sensitive, flexible, and easy to use. These developments have made QELS/DLS an important tool in ophthalmic research where disease can be detected early and noninvasively before the clinical symptoms appear.

  7. Convective Properties of Rotating Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Couch, Sean M.; Arnett, W. David; Timmes, F. X.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the effects of rotation on convective carbon, oxygen, and silicon shell burning during the late stages of evolution in a 20 M ⊙ star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics we construct one-dimensional (1D) stellar models both with no rotation and with an initial rigid rotation of 50% of critical. At different points during the evolution, we map the 1D models into 2D and follow the multidimensional evolution using the FLASH compressible hydrodynamics code for many convective turnover times until a quasi-steady state is reached. We characterize the strength and scale of convective motions via decomposition of the momentum density into vector spherical harmonics. We find that rotation influences the total power in solenoidal modes, with a slightly larger impact for carbon and oxygen shell burning than for silicon shell burning. Including rotation in 1D stellar evolution models alters the structure of the star in a manner that has a significant impact on the character of multidimensional convection. Adding modest amounts of rotation to a stellar model that ignores rotation during the evolutionary stage, however, has little impact on the character of the resulting convection. Since the spatial scale and strength of convection present at the point of core collapse directly influence the supernova mechanism, our results suggest that rotation could play an important role in setting the stage for massive stellar explosions.

  8. Dynamical Stability and Long-term Evolution of Rotating Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varri, Anna L.; Vesperini, E.; McMillan, S. L. W.; Bertin, G.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first results of an extensive survey of N-body simulations designed to investigate the dynamical stability and the long-term evolution of two new families of self-consistent stellar dynamical models, characterized by the presence of internal rotation. The first family extends the well-known King models to the case of axisymmetric systems flattened by solid-body rotation while the second family is characterized by differential rotation. The equilibrium configurations thus obtained can be described in terms of two dimensionless parameters, which measure the concentration and the amount of rotation, respectively. Slowly rotating configurations are found to be dynamically stable and we followed their long-term evolution, in order to evaluate the interplay between collisional relaxation and angular momentum transport. We also studied the stability of rapidly rotating models, which are characterized by the presence of a toroidal core embedded in an otherwise quasi-spherical configuration. In both cases, a description in terms of the radial and global properties, such as the ratio between the ordered kinetic energy and the gravitational energy of the system, is provided. Because the role of angular momentum in the process of cluster formation is only partly understood, we also undertook a preliminary investigation of the violent relaxation of simple systems initially characterized by approximate solid-body rotation. The properties of the final equilibrium configurations thus obtained are compared with those of the above-described family of differentially rotating models.

  9. Bifurcations of rotating waves in rotating spherical shell convection.

    PubMed

    Feudel, F; Tuckerman, L S; Gellert, M; Seehafer, N

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics and bifurcations of convective waves in rotating and buoyancy-driven spherical Rayleigh-Bénard convection are investigated numerically. The solution branches that arise as rotating waves (RWs) are traced by means of path-following methods, by varying the Rayleigh number as a control parameter for different rotation rates. The dependence of the azimuthal drift frequency of the RWs on the Ekman and Rayleigh numbers is determined and discussed. The influence of the rotation rate on the generation and stability of secondary branches is demonstrated. Multistability is typical in the parameter range considered.

  10. Purcell's ``rotator'': mechanical rotation at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, R.; Baudry, J.; Stone, H. A.

    2005-09-01

    An object consisting of three spheres, linked like the spokes on a wheel, can undergo a net rotational movement when the relative positions of the spheres proceed through a four-step cycle. This rotational motion is the analogue of the two-hinged swimmer originally proposed by Purcell (1977), which has served as a prototype for mechanical implementations of swimming. We also note that the rotational motion analysed here may be useful in the design of micromachines and has similarities to molecular-scale rotational motors that have been identified recently.

  11. A Method for Achieving Constant Rotation Rates in a Micro-Orthogonal Linkage System

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1999-05-12

    Silicon micromachine designs include engines that consist of orthog- onally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small as 50 {micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000 rpm. Generally, these en- gines will run with non-uniform rotation rates if the drive signals are not properly designed and maintained over a range of system parameters. We present a method for producing constant rotation rates in a micro-engine driven by an orthogonal linkage system. We show that provided the val- ues of certain masses, springs, damping factors, and lever arms are in the right proportions, the system behaves as though it were symmetrical. We will refer to systems built in this way as being quasi-symmetrical. We show that if a system is built quasi-symmetrically , then it is possible to achieve constant rotation rates even if one does not know the form of the friction function, or the value of the friction. We analyze this case in some detail.

  12. Mode- and plasma rotation in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brzozowski, J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    Mode rotation studies in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch, EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1 (2001)] are presented. The phase relations and nonlinear coupling of the resonant modes are characterized and compared with that expected from modeling based on the hypothesis that mode dynamics can be described by a quasi stationary force balance including electromagnetic and viscous forces. Both m=0 and m=1 resonant modes are studied. The m=1 modes have rotation velocities corresponding to the plasma flow velocity (20-60 km/s) in the core region. The rotation velocity decreases towards the end of the discharge, although the plasma flow velocity does not decrease. A rotating phase locked m=1 structure is observed with a velocity of about 60 km/s. The m=0 modes accelerate throughout the discharges and reach velocities as high as 150-250 km/s. The observed m=0 phase locking is consistent with theory for certain conditions, but there are several conditions when the dynamics are not described. This is not unexpected because the assumption of quasi stationarity for the mode spectra is not fulfilled for many conditions. Localized m=0 perturbations are formed in correlation with highly transient discrete dynamo events. These perturbations form at the location of the m=1 phase locked structure, but rotate with a different velocity as they spread out in the toroidal direction.

  13. Rotational quenching of CS in ultracold 3He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum mechanical scattering calculations of rotational quenching of CS (v = 0) collision with 3He are performed at ultracold temperatures and results are compared with isotopic 4He collision. Rotational quenching cross sections and rate coefficients have been calculated in the ultracold region for rotational levels up to j = 10 using the He-CS potential energy surface computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. The quenching cross sections are found to be two orders of magnitude larger for the 3He than the 4He isotope under ultracold conditions. Wigner threshold law is found to be valid below 10-3 K temperature.

  14. Experiment evaluation of speckle suppression efficiency of 2D quasi-spiral M-sequence-based diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Pashkevich, G A; Prygun, O V; Yurlov, V; Borodin, Y; Kryuchyn, A; Korchovyi, A A; Shylo, S

    2015-10-01

    The quasi-spiral 2D diffractive optical element (DOE) based on M-sequence of length N=15 is designed and manufactured. The speckle suppression efficiency by the DOE rotation is measured. The speckle suppression coefficients of 10.5, 6, and 4 are obtained for green, violet, and red laser beams, respectively. The results of numerical simulation and experimental data show that the quasi-spiral binary DOE structure can be as effective in speckle reduction as a periodic 2D DOE structure. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the speckle suppression efficiency of the 2D DOE structure decreases approximately twice at the boundaries of the visible range. It is shown that a replacement of this structure with the bilateral 1D DOE allows obtaining the maximum speckle suppression efficiency in the entire visible range of light. PMID:26479664

  15. Are supernova remnants quasi-parallel or quasi-perpendicular accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Leckband, J. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of shock waves in the solar system which show a pronounced difference in the plasma wave and particle environment depending on whether the shock is propagating along or perpendicular to the interplanetary magnetic field are discussed. Theories for particle acceleration developed for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks, when extended to the interstellar medium suggest that the relativistic electrons in radio supernova remnants are accelerated by either the Q parallel or Q perpendicular mechanisms. A model for the galactic magnetic field and published maps of supernova remnants were used to search for a dependence of structure on the angle Phi. Results show no tendency for the remnants as a whole to favor the relationship expected for either mechanism, although individual sources resemble model remnants of one or the other acceleration process.

  16. QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATIONS IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE CAUSED BY MAGNETIC ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Carbonell, Marc; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.e E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.e

    2010-11-20

    Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) are frequently observed in solar activity indices. However, no clear physical mechanism for the observed variations has been suggested so far. Here, we study the stability of magnetic Rossby waves in the solar tachocline using the shallow water magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our analysis shows that the combination of typical differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field with a strength of {>=}10{sup 5} G triggers the instability of the m = 1 magnetic Rossby wave harmonic with a period of {approx}2 years. This harmonic is antisymmetric with respect to the equator and its period (and growth rate) depends on the differential rotation parameters and magnetic field strength. The oscillations may cause a periodic magnetic flux emergence at the solar surface and consequently may lead to the observed QBO in solar activity features. The period of QBOs may change throughout a cycle, and from cycle to cycle, due to variations of the mean magnetic field and differential rotation in the tachocline.

  17. Tridimensional Plasma Spirals and High Frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations Around Black Holes*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebusco, P.; Coppi, B.; Bursa, M.

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical interpretation based on a novel kind of disc plasma modes [1] is proposed for High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (HFQPOs) in low mass X- ray binaries [2]. Tridimensional, tightly wound spirals are considered that co-rotate with the plasma disc in the vicinity of a black hole. These modes can be excited, from an axisymmetric disc embedded in a ``seed'' vertical magnetic field, by the combined effects of the differential rotation and the vertical gradients of the plasma density and temperature. Considering the electron temperature gradient is a clear oversimplification of the gradients that electron distributions can have in the highly non-thermal regimes from which HFQPOs emerge [3]. The tridimensional spiral modes considered are localized radially over relatively narrow widths [1] and have frequencies that are multiples of the local plasma rotation frequency. The higher toroidal number mφ modes are considered to decay into mφ=2 and mφ=3 modes, explaining the observed twin peak HFQPOs with the 3:2 ratio. Large variations in the collisional mean free path, corresponding to local compression and rarefaction, are associated with the considered spirals. These variations can lead to different emission characteristics. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, A&A 321, 504 (2009). [2] P. Rebusco, New Astronomy Review 855, 51 (2008). [3] B. Coppi, Phys. Plasmas 032901, 18 (2011).

  18. Hidden algebra method (quasi-exact-solvability in quantum mechanics)

    SciTech Connect

    Turbiner, Alexander

    1996-02-20

    A general introduction to quasi-exactly-solvable problems of quantum mechanics is presented. Main attention is given to multidimensional quasi-exactly-solvable and exactly-solvable Schroedinger operators. Exact-solvability of the Calogero and Sutherland N-body problems ass ociated with an existence of the hidden algebra slN is discussed extensively.

  19. E x B shearing rate in quasi-symmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1997-06-20

    The suppression of turbulence by the E x B shear is studied in systems with quasi-symmetry using the nonlinear analysis of eddy decorrelation previously utilized in finite aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. The analytically derived E x B shearing rate which contains the relevant geometric dependence can be used for quantitative assessment of the fluctuation suppression in stellarators with quasi-symmetry.

  20. Segmented Polynomial Models in Quasi-Experimental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasik, John L.

    1981-01-01

    The use of segmented polynomial models is explained. Examples of design matrices of dummy variables are given for the least squares analyses of time series and discontinuity quasi-experimental research designs. Linear combinations of dummy variable vectors appear to provide tests of effects in the two quasi-experimental designs. (Author/BW)

  1. Dynamic versus quasi-static loading of X65 offshore steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, M.; Børvik, T.; Langseth, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.

    2016-05-01

    Anchors or trawl gear occasionally impact offshore pipelines, resulting in large local and global deformations. Impact velocities are typically less than 5 m/s, but local strain rates may be very high. In this study strain rate effects in an X65 offshore material was characterised by split Hopkinson bar tests, while the cross-section homogeneity and possible anisotropic behaviour were determined by quasi-static material tests. Further, dynamic impact tests at prescribed velocities were carried out on simply supported full scale X65 steel pipes. Next, deformation-controlled quasi-static tests with the same boundary conditions were conducted. The level of deformation in the quasi-static tests was set to be equal to that attained in the dynamic tests. Finally, an assessment of the differences between the dynamically and quasi-statically loaded pipes was made in terms of force-displacement response, energy absorbed, and fracture. An optical light microscope and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate fracture surfaces arising from the various tests.

  2. Rotation of venus: continuing contradictions.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A

    1967-10-01

    Optical observations of Venus have yielded various values of the rotation period extending from less than one to several hundred days. Radar observations give a retrograde rotation of the solid globe in 244 +/- 2 days. Recent ultraviolet photographs, however, show relatively rapid displacements of clouds in the high atmosphere of Venus which suggest a retrogrode rotation in only 5 days. The two rates seem to be physically incompatible.

  3. Rotating black droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Santos, Jorge E.

    2013-07-01

    We construct the gravitational dual, in the Unruh state, of the "jammed" phase of a CFT at strong coupling and infinite N on a fixed five-dimensional rotating Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. When the angular momenta are all zero, the solution corresponds to the five-dimensional generalization of the solution first studied in [1]. In the extremal limit, when the angular momenta of the Myers-Perry black hole are maximum, the Unruh, Boulware and Hartle-Hawking states degenerate. We give a detailed analysis of the corresponding holographic stress energy tensor for all values of the angular momenta, finding it to be regular at the horizon in all cases. We compare our results with existent literature on thermal states of free field theories on black hole backgrounds.

  4. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  5. PLT rotating pumped limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Budny, R.V.; Corso, V.; Boychuck, J.; Grisham, L.; Heifetz, D.; Hosea, J.; Luyber, S.; Loprest, P.; Manos, D.

    1984-07-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face and the ability to rotate during tokamak discharges has been installed in a PLT pump duct. These features have been selected to handle the unique particle removal and heat load requirements of ICRF heating and lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. The limiter has been conditioned and commissioned in an ion-beam test stand by irradiation with 1 MW power, 200 ms duration beams of 40 keV hydrogen ions. Operation in PLT during ohmic discharges has proven the ability of the limiter to reduce localized heating caused by energetic electron bombardment and to remove about 2% of the ions lost to the PLT walls and limiters.

  6. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  7. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l < 60. The observationally constrained kinetic energy is approximately a thousandth of the theoretical prediction, suggesting the prevalence of an intrinsically different paradigm of turbulence. A fundamental question arises: what mechanism of turbulence transports the heat ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  8. Biologics in rotator cuff surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael O; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies of the rotator cuff are by far the most common cause of shoulder dysfunction and pain. Even though reconstruction of the rotator cuff results in improved clinical outcome scores, including decreased pain, several studies report high failure rates. Orthopaedic research has therefore focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. This biological augmentation has included the application of different platelet concentrates containing growth factors, mesenchymal stem cells, scaffolds and a combination of the above. The present review provides an overview over the biological augmentation options based upon current evidence. PMID:27582941

  9. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Electronic Control Of Slow Rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    Digital/analog circuit controls both angular position and speed of rotation of motor shaft with high precision. Locks angular position of motor to phase of rotation-command clock signal at binary submultiple of master clock signal. Circuit or modified version used to control precisely position and velocity of robotic manipulator, to control translation mechanism of crystal-growing furnace, to position hands of mechanical clock, or to control angular position and rate of rotation in any of large variety of rotating mechanisms.

  11. Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2011-11-15

    A largely unsolved theoretical issue in controlled fusion research is the consistent kinetic treatment of slowly-time varying plasma states occurring in collisionless and magnetized axisymmetric plasmas. The phenomenology may include finite pressure anisotropies as well as strong toroidal and poloidal differential rotation, characteristic of Tokamak plasmas. Despite the fact that physical phenomena occurring in fusion plasmas depend fundamentally on the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics, their consistent kinetic treatment remains still essentially unchallenged to date. The goal of this paper is to address the problem within the framework of Vlasov-Maxwell description. The gyrokinetic treatment of charged particles dynamics is adopted for the construction of asymptotic solutions for the quasi-stationary species kinetic distribution functions. These are expressed in terms of the particle exact and adiabatic invariants. The theory relies on a perturbative approach, which permits to construct asymptotic analytical solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell system. In this way, both diamagnetic and energy corrections are included consistently into the theory. In particular, by imposing suitable kinetic constraints, the existence of generalized bi-Maxwellian asymptotic kinetic equilibria is pointed out. The theory applies for toroidal rotation velocity of the order of the ion thermal speed. These solutions satisfy identically also the constraints imposed by the Maxwell equations, i.e., quasi-neutrality and Ampere's law. As a result, it is shown that, in the presence of nonuniform fluid and EM fields, these kinetic equilibria can sustain simultaneously toroidal differential rotation, quasi-stationary finite poloidal flows and temperature anisotropy.

  12. Image Rotation Does Not Rotate Smooth Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Stone, Leland S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Subjects viewing a drifting noise pattern make reflexive smooth eye movements in the direction of motion, which follow rapid changes in movement direction. These responses are unaffected by rotations of the pattern, suggesting that there is no coupling between visually sensed rotation and the direction of ocular following.

  13. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  14. Unidirectional rotating coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm based on rotational phase estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Han, Jinan; Yan, Huizhi

    2015-06-01

    The improved coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm gives high precision and resolution phase rotation, but it has some shortages such as high iterations and big system delay. This paper puts forward unidirectional rotating CORDIC algorithm to solve these problems. First, using under-damping theory, a part of unidirectional phase rotations is carried out. Then, the threshold value of angle is determined based on phase rotation estimation method. Finally, rotation phase estimation completes the rest angle iterations. Furthermore, the paper simulates and implements the numerical control oscillator by Quartus II software and Modelsim software. According to the experimental results, the algorithm reduces iterations and judgment of sign bit, so that it decreases system delay and resource utilization and improves the throughput. We always analyze the error brought by this algorithm. It turned out that the algorithm has a good application prospect in global navigation satellite system and channelized receiver. PMID:26133856

  15. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    DOEpatents

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  16. Thermodynamics of Quasi-One Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yung-Kang

    1995-11-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional materials are of interest because of the large variety of phase transitions they exhibit, such as charge-density-wave (CDW), spin-density -wave (SDW), spin-Peierls (SP) and superconducting transitions. Thermodynamic measurements are important to our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the phase transitions and the effect of fluctuations. Two quasi-one-dimensional inorganic oxides are comprehensively investigated in this thesis. First, CuGeO _3 undergoes a spin-Peierls transition at 14 K, and second, K_{0.3}MoO _3 shows a charge-density-wave ground state below the transition temperature of 180 K. We measured the heat capacity of CuGeO _3, using a high resolution ac calorimeter, both in the absence and presence of magnetic field. For the zero-field data, a sharp discontinuity at its spin -Peierls phase transition (~14 K) is observed. The magnitude of the jump is consistent with mean-field theory, indicating a nearest neighbor exchange interaction ~75 K, and that low-dimensional fluctuations have a small effect in depressing T_{c}. A temperature -dependent activation energy is observed at very low temperature. Between 5 and 10 K, we observed an activation energy Delta ~ 24K ~ 1.76 T_{c}, suggesting that the gap opens up more quickly below T_{c} than predicted by mean-field theory. The ratio of the specific heat anomaly and temperature derivative of the magnetic susceptibility at T _{c} equals the observed value of rm d^2T_{c}/dH ^2 at T_{c}, as expected in mean-field theory, but this ratio deviates from mean-field behavior below the transition. The depression of T_{c } in the presence of a magnetic field agrees well with mean-field theory, and there are no signs of suppression and broadening of the specific heat peaks due to external magnetic fields. The activation energy appears to be temperature dependent in all fields, but there is no clear evidence of reducing the activation energy in higher fields, suggesting that there is no

  17. Rotationally resolved photoionization with coherent VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedmann, R.T.; Tonkyn, R.G.; White, M.G.

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed field ionization (PFI) has been used in conjunction with coherent VUV radiation to investigate the rotational state distributions of molecular cations following single photon ionization. The rotational state distributions for several linear cations (O{sub 2}, NO, OH(OD), HCl and N{sub 2}0) can be interpreted predominately on the basis of the near-threshold, one-electron photoionization dynamics; however, field-induced autoionization is often the dominate ionization pathway for rotational branches involving negative changes in core angular momentum. For photoionization of the H{sub 2}X (X = 0, S) non-linear triatomic molecules, transitions between asymmetric top levels involving the rotational angular momentum projections, K{sub a} and K{sub c} permit resolution of the photoelectron continua according to symmetry. The observed spectra clearly demonstrate the importance of the non-spherical nature of the molecular ion potential which leads to photoelectron final states which are unexpected from atomic-like analogies.

  18. Rotationally resolved photoionization with coherent VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedmann, R.T.; Tonkyn, R.G.; White, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed field ionization (PFI) has been used in conjunction with coherent VUV radiation to investigate the rotational state distributions of molecular cations following single photon ionization. The rotational state distributions for several linear cations (O{sub 2}, NO, OH(OD), HCl and N{sub 2}0) can be interpreted predominately on the basis of the near-threshold, one-electron photoionization dynamics; however, field-induced autoionization is often the dominate ionization pathway for rotational branches involving negative changes in core angular momentum. For photoionization of the H{sub 2}X (X = 0, S) non-linear triatomic molecules, transitions between asymmetric top levels involving the rotational angular momentum projections, K{sub a} and K{sub c} permit resolution of the photoelectron continua according to symmetry. The observed spectra clearly demonstrate the importance of the non-spherical nature of the molecular ion potential which leads to photoelectron final states which are unexpected from atomic-like analogies.

  19. Rotational Spectroscopy of Methyl Vinyl Ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, R. A.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Methyl vinyl ketone, MVK, along with previously studied by our team methacrolein, is a major oxidation product of isoprene, which is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. In this talk we present the analysis of the rotational spectrum of MVK recorded at room temperature in the 50 -- 650 GHz region using the Lille spectrometer. The spectroscopic characterization of MVK ground state will be useful in the detailed analysis of high resolution infrared spectra. Our study is supported by high level quantum chemical calculations to model the structure of the two stable s-trans and s-cis conformers and to obtain the harmonic force field parameters, internal rotation barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. In the Doppler-limited spectra the splittings due to the internal rotation of methyl group are resolved, therefore for analysis of this molecule we used the Rho-Axis-Method Hamiltonian and RAM36 code to fit the rotational transitions. At the present time the ground state of two conformers is analyzed. Also we intend to study some low lying excited states. The analysis is in progress and the latest results will be presented. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged.

  20. On the Relativistic Precession and Oscillation Frequencies of Test Particles around Rapidly Rotating Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Valenzuela-Toledo, César A.

    2012-09-01

    Whether or not analytic exact vacuum (electrovacuum) solutions of the Einstein (Einstein-Maxwell) field equations can accurately describe the exterior space-time of compact stars still remains an interesting open question in relativistic astrophysics. As an attempt to establish their level of accuracy, the radii of the innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) of test particles given by analytic exterior space-time geometries have been compared with those given by numerical solutions for neutron stars (NSs) obeying a realistic equation of state (EOS). It has been so shown that the six-parametric solution of Pachón et al. (PRS) more accurately describes the NS ISCO radii than other analytic models do. We propose here an additional test of accuracy for analytic exterior geometries based on the comparison of orbital frequencies of neutral test particles. We compute the Keplerian, frame-dragging, and precession and oscillation frequencies of the radial and vertical motions of neutral test particles for the Kerr and PRS geometries and then compare them with the numerical values obtained by Morsink & Stella for realistic NSs. We identify the role of high-order multipole moments such as the mass quadrupole and current octupole in the determination of the orbital frequencies, especially in the rapid rotation regime. The results of this work are relevant to cast a separatrix between black hole and NS signatures and to probe the nuclear-matter EOS and NS parameters from the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in low-mass X-ray binaries.

  1. ON THE RELATIVISTIC PRECESSION AND OSCILLATION FREQUENCIES OF TEST PARTICLES AROUND RAPIDLY ROTATING COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pachon, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2012-09-01

    Whether or not analytic exact vacuum (electrovacuum) solutions of the Einstein (Einstein-Maxwell) field equations can accurately describe the exterior space-time of compact stars still remains an interesting open question in relativistic astrophysics. As an attempt to establish their level of accuracy, the radii of the innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) of test particles given by analytic exterior space-time geometries have been compared with those given by numerical solutions for neutron stars (NSs) obeying a realistic equation of state (EOS). It has been so shown that the six-parametric solution of Pachon et al. (PRS) more accurately describes the NS ISCO radii than other analytic models do. We propose here an additional test of accuracy for analytic exterior geometries based on the comparison of orbital frequencies of neutral test particles. We compute the Keplerian, frame-dragging, and precession and oscillation frequencies of the radial and vertical motions of neutral test particles for the Kerr and PRS geometries and then compare them with the numerical values obtained by Morsink and Stella for realistic NSs. We identify the role of high-order multipole moments such as the mass quadrupole and current octupole in the determination of the orbital frequencies, especially in the rapid rotation regime. The results of this work are relevant to cast a separatrix between black hole and NS signatures and to probe the nuclear-matter EOS and NS parameters from the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in low-mass X-ray binaries.

  2. Reynolds number scaling of the influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, E. M.; Ji, H.

    2015-10-06

    Here, we present fluid velocity measurements in a modified Taylor-Couette device operated in the quasi-Keplerian regime, where it is observed that nearly ideal flows exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. In contrast, nonideal flows show progressive departure from ideal Couette as the Reynolds number is increased. We present a model that describes the observed departures from ideal Couette rotation as a function of the fluxes of angular momentum across the boundaries, capturing the dependence on Reynolds number and boundary conditions.

  3. Quartic Rotation Criteria and Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Douglas B.; Jennrich, Robert I.

    1988-01-01

    Most of the current analytic rotation criteria for simple structure in factor analysis are summarized and identified as members of a general symmetric family of quartic criteria. A unified development of algorithms for orthogonal and direct oblique rotation using arbitrary criteria from this family is presented. (Author/TJH)

  4. Spatially homogeneous rotating world models.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozsvath, I.

    1971-01-01

    The mathematical problem encountered when looking for the simplest expanding and rotating model of the universe without the compactness condition for the space sections is formulated. The Lagrangian function is derived for four different rotating universes simultaneously. These models correspond in a certain sense to Godel's (1950) ?symmetric case.'

  5. An Improved Model of Cryogenic Propellant Stratification in a Rotating, Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliveira, Justin; Kirk, Daniel R.; Schallhorn, Paul A.; Piquero, Jorge L.; Campbell, Mike; Chase, Sukhdeep

    2007-01-01

    This paper builds on a series of analytical literature models used to predict thermal stratification within rocket propellant tanks. The primary contribution to the literature is to add the effect of tank rotation and to demonstrate the influence of rotation on stratification times and temperatures. This work also looks levels of thermal stratification for generic propellant tanks (cylindrical shapes) over a parametric range of upper-stage coast times, heating levels, rotation rates, and gravity levels.

  6. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  7. Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nigbor, R.L.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

  8. Quasi periodic oscillations in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alston, W.; Fabian, A.; Markevičiutė, J.; Parker, M.; Middleton, M.; Kara, E.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are coherent peaks of variability power observed in the X-ray power spectra (PSDs) of stellar mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). A scale invariance of the accretion process implies they should be present in the active galactic nuclei. The first robust detection was a ∼ 1 h periodicity in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396 from a ∼ 90 ks XMM-Newton observation; however, subsequent observations failed to detect the QPO in the 0.3-10.0 keV band. In this talk we present the recent detection of the ∼ 1 h periodicity in the 1.0-4.0 keV band of 4 further low-flux/spectrally-harder observations of RE J1034+396 (see Alston et al. 2014). We also present recent work on the discovery of a QPO in the Seyfert galaxy, MS 2254.9-3712, which again is only detected in energy bands associated with the primary power-law continuum emission (Alston et al. 2015). We conclude these features are most likely analogous to the high-frequency QPOs observed in XRBs. In both sources, we also see evidence for X-ray reverberation at the QPO frequency, where soft X-ray bands and Iron Kα emission lag the primary X-ray continuum. These time delays may provide another diagnostic for understanding the underlying QPO mechanism observed in accreting black holes.

  9. Quasi-Dirac neutrinos at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anamiati, G.; Hirsch, M.; Nardi, E.

    2016-10-01

    Lepton number violation is searched for at the LHC using same-sign leptons plus jets. The standard lore is that the ratio of same-sign lepton to opposite-sign lepton events, R ll , is equal to R ll = 1 ( R ll = 0) for Majorana (Dirac) neutrinos. We clarify under which conditions the ratio R ll can assume values different from 0 and 1, and we argue that the precise value 0 < R ll < 1 is controlled by the mass splitting versus the width of the quasi-Dirac resonances. A measurement of R ll = 0 , 1 would then contain valuable information about the origin of neutrino masses. We consider as an example the inverse seesaw mechanism in a left-right symmetric scenario, which is phenomenologically particularly interesting since all the heavy states in the high energy completion of the model could be within experimental reach. A prediction of this scenario is a correlation between the values of R ll and the ratio between the rates for heavy neutrino decays into standard model gauge bosons, and into three body final states ljj mediated by off-shell W R exchange.

  10. Quasi-satellite dynamics in formation flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkola, Seppo; Prioroc, Claudiu-Lucian

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-satellite phenomenon makes two celestial bodies to fly near each other (Mikkola et al.) and that effect can be used also to make artificial satellites move in tandem. We consider formation flight of two or three satellites in low eccentricity near Earth orbits. With the help of weak ion thrusters, it is possible to accomplish tandem flight. With ion thrusters, it is also possible to mimic many kinds of mutual force laws between the satellites. We found that both a constant repulsive force or an attractive force that decreases with the distance are able to preserve the formation in which the eccentricities cause the actual relative motion and the weak thrusters keep the mean longitude difference small. Initial values are important for the formation flight but very exact adjustment of orbital elements is not important. Simplicity is one of our goals in this study and this result is achieved at least in the way that, when constant force thrusters are used, the satellites only need to detect the directions of the other ones to fly in tandem. A repulsive acceleration of the order of 10-6 times the Earth attraction, is enough to effectively eliminate the disruptive effects of all the perturbations at least for a time-scale of years.

  11. Multispacecraft observations of quasi-periodic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Frantisek; Picket, Jolene S.; Santolik, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are VLF electromagnetic waves in the frequency range of about 0.5-5 kHz which exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation period is usually on the order of a few tens of seconds. The generation mechanism of these emissions is still not understood, but at least in some cases it appears to be related to ULF magnetic field pulsations which result in periodic modifications of the resonant conditions in the source region. We use multipoint measurements of QP emissions by the 4 Cluster spacecraft. The observations are obtained close to the equatorial region at radial distances of about 4 Earth radii, i.e. close to a possible generation region. A combined analysis of the high resolution data obtained by the WBD instruments and the ULF magnetic field data obtained by the FGM instruments allows for a detailed case-study analysis of these unique emissions. The presented analysis benefits from the recent close-separation configuration of three of the Cluster spacecraft (≡20-100 km) and a related timing analysis, which would be impossible otherwise.

  12. Delayed feedback control and phase reduction of unstable quasi-periodic orbits.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Natsuhiro; Komuro, Motomasa

    2014-09-01

    The delayed feedback control (DFC) is applied to stabilize unstable quasi-periodic orbits (QPOs) in discrete-time systems. The feedback input is given by the difference between the current state and a time-delayed state in the DFC. However, there is an inevitable time-delay mismatch in QPOs. To evaluate the influence of the time-delay mismatch on the DFC, we propose a phase reduction method for QPOs and construct a phase response curve (PRC) from unstable QPOs directly. Using the PRC, we estimate the rotation number of QPO stabilized by the DFC. We show that the orbit of the DFC is consistent with the unstable QPO perturbed by a small state difference resulting from the time-delay mismatch, implying that the DFC can certainly stabilize the unstable QPO.

  13. Viscosity profile and Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency of few transient black hole candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    Matters enter into the potential well formed by the compact objects due to the transport of angular momentum by viscosity. We compute the amount of viscosity during the outburst time of the transient sources. In the progressive days as the viscosity increases inner edge of the Keplerian disc moves closer to the black holes. Thus the size of the Compton cloud reduces and the frequency of the Quasi Periodic Oscillations increases. We also compute the Compton cooling day by day, which is responsible for the movement of the shock both in rising and declining phases of the outburst. Our viscosity value rises/decays monotonically during the rising/declining phases of the outburst, well within the range proposed by magneto-rotational instability. For that we solve the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and derive the condition of shock formation in presence of Compton cooling.

  14. Experimentally determining the exchange parameters of quasi-two dimensional Heisenbert magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Sengupta, P; Mcdonald, R D; Cox, S; Harrison, N; Goddard, P A; Lancaster, T; Blundell, S J; Pratt, F L; Manson, J L; Southerland, H I; Schlueter, J A

    2008-01-01

    Though long-range magnetic order cannot occur at temperatures T > 0 in a perfect two-dimensional (2D) Heisenberg magnet, real quasi-2D materials will invariably possess nonzero inter-plane coupling J{sub {perpendicular}} driving the system to order at elevated temperatures. This process can be studied using quantum Monte Carlo calculations. However, it is difficult to test the results of these calculations experimentally since for highly anisotropic materials in which the in-plane coupling is comparable with attainable magnetic fields J{sub {perpendicular}} is necessarily very small and inaccessible directly. In addition, because of the large anisotropy, the Neel temperatures are low and difficult to determine from thermodynamic measurements. Here, we present an elegant method of assessing the calculations via two independent experimental probes: pulsed-field magnetization in fields of up to 85 T, and muon-spin rotation.

  15. Experiments and modelling of active quasi-single helicity regime generation in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    The interaction of a static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) with a tearing mode (TM) is becoming a relevant topic in fusion plasma physics. RMPs can be generated by active coils and then used to affect the properties of TMs and of the corresponding magnetic islands. This paper shows how the feedback system of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) can produce a RMP that affects a rotating TM and stimulate the transition to the so-called quasi-single helicity (QSH) regime, a RFP plasma state characterized by a magnetic island surrounded by low magnetic chaos. The application of the RMP can increase the QSH probability up to 10% and enlarge the size of the corresponding island. Part of the experimental results are supported by a theoretical study that models the effect of the active coils on the magnetic island.

  16. The solar magnetic activity band interaction and instabilities that shape quasi-periodic variability.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; Leamon, Robert J; Krista, Larisza D; Title, Alan M; Hudson, Hugh S; Riley, Pete; Harder, Jerald W; Kopp, Greg; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas N; Kasper, Justin C; Stevens, Michael L; Ulrich, Roger K

    2015-04-07

    Solar magnetism displays a host of variational timescales of which the enigmatic 11-year sunspot cycle is most prominent. Recent work has demonstrated that the sunspot cycle can be explained in terms of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction between the overlapping activity bands of the 22-year magnetic polarity cycle. Those activity bands appear to be driven by the rotation of the Sun's deep interior. Here we deduce that activity band interaction can qualitatively explain the 'Gnevyshev Gap'—a well-established feature of flare and sunspot occurrence. Strong quasi-annual variability in the number of flares, coronal mass ejections, the radiative and particulate environment of the heliosphere is also observed. We infer that this secondary variability is driven by surges of magnetism from the activity bands. Understanding the formation, interaction and instability of these activity bands will considerably improve forecast capability in space weather and solar activity over a range of timescales.

  17. The solar magnetic activity band interaction and instabilities that shape quasi-periodic variability

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Krista, Larisza D.; Title, Alan M.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Riley, Pete; Harder, Jerald W.; Kopp, Greg; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas N.; Kasper, Justin C.; Stevens, Michael L.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2015-01-01

    Solar magnetism displays a host of variational timescales of which the enigmatic 11-year sunspot cycle is most prominent. Recent work has demonstrated that the sunspot cycle can be explained in terms of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction between the overlapping activity bands of the 22-year magnetic polarity cycle. Those activity bands appear to be driven by the rotation of the Sun's deep interior. Here we deduce that activity band interaction can qualitatively explain the ‘Gnevyshev Gap'—a well-established feature of flare and sunspot occurrence. Strong quasi-annual variability in the number of flares, coronal mass ejections, the radiative and particulate environment of the heliosphere is also observed. We infer that this secondary variability is driven by surges of magnetism from the activity bands. Understanding the formation, interaction and instability of these activity bands will considerably improve forecast capability in space weather and solar activity over a range of timescales. PMID:25849045

  18. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  19. Acoustic controlled rotation and orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic energy is applied to a pair of locations spaced about a chamber, to control rotation of an object levitated in the chamber. Two acoustic transducers applying energy of a single acoustic mode, one at each location, can (one or both) serve to levitate the object in three dimensions as well as control its rotation. Slow rotation is achieved by initially establishing a large phase difference and/or pressure ratio of the acoustic waves, which is sufficient to turn the object by more than 45 deg, which is immediately followed by reducing the phase difference and/or pressure ratio to maintain slow rotation. A small phase difference and/or pressure ratio enables control of the angular orientation of the object without rotating it. The sphericity of an object can be measured by its response to the acoustic energy.

  20. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015