Science.gov

Sample records for quasi-homogeneous initial states

  1. Propagation of the light generated by quasi-homogeneous sources through quasi-homogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chen, Yan-Ru; Zhao, Qi; Zhou, Mu-Chun; Xu, Shi-Xue

    2010-01-01

    The spectral density of the quasi-homogeneous (QH) light has been known when it scatters on QH media or propagates in free space. The case that QH sources are surrounded by QH media is proposed in this paper. Under the paraxial approximation, the spectral density of the QH light propagating through QH media is derived. A modified scaling law for the propagation of the QH light through QH media is also obtained. This law also holds true in the far field beyond the paraxial approximation.

  2. The Copenhagen problem with a quasi-homogeneous potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakis, Demetrios; Kalvouridis, Tilemahos

    2017-05-01

    The Copenhagen problem is a well-known case of the famous restricted three-body problem. In this work instead of considering Newtonian potentials and forces we assume that the two primaries create a quasi-homogeneous potential, which means that we insert to the inverse square law of gravitation an inverse cube corrective term in order to approximate various phenomena as the radiation pressure of the primaries or the non-sphericity of them. Based on this new consideration we investigate the equilibrium locations of the small body and their parametric dependence, as well as the zero-velocity curves and surfaces for the planar motion, and the evolution of the regions where this motion is permitted when the Jacobian constant varies.

  3. EDQNM closure: A homogeneous simulation to support it. A quasi-homogeneous simulation to disprove it

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoglio, J. P.; Squires, K.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    It is known that two-point closures are useful tools for understanding and predicting turbulence. Among the various closures, the Eddy Damped Quasi-Normal Markovian (EDQNM) approach is one of the simplest and, at the same time, most useful. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) can provide information that can be used to test the validity of two-point theories. It is the purpose of the present work to use DNS to validate, or improve upon, EDQNM. A case was selected for which EDQNM is known to give satisfactory results: homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Quantities were then evaluated which may be used to test the assumptions of two-point closure approximations: spectral Lagrangian time scales. The goal was to make a careful and refined study to validate the EDQNM theory. A reference case was built for which EDQNM is likely to give poor results. An attempt to generate a quasi-homogeneous turbulent field containing organized structures, was built by artifically injecting them in the initial conditions. The results of direct simulations using such initial conditions are expected to provide a challenge for EDQNM since this kind of field is simple enough to allow comparisons with two-point theories, but at the same time contains coherent structures which cannot be expected to be accurately accounted for by closures based on expansions about Gaussianity.

  4. Accelerating multi-scale sheet forming simulations by exploiting local macroscopic quasi-homogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawad, J.; Khairullah, Md; Roose, D.; Van Bael, A.

    2016-08-01

    Multi-scale simulations are computationally expensive if a two-way coupling is employed. In the context of sheet metal forming simulations, a fine-scale representative volume element (RVE) crystal plasticity (CP) model would supply the Finite Element analysis with plastic properties, taking into account the evolution of crystallographic texture and other microstructural features. The main bottleneck is that the fine-scale model must be evaluated at virtually every integration point in the macroscopic FE mesh. We propose to address this issue by exploiting a verifiable assumption that fine-scale state variables of similar RVEs, as well as the derived properties, subjected to similar macroscopic boundary conditions evolve along nearly identical trajectories. Furthermore, the macroscopic field variables primarily responsible for the evolution of fine-scale state variables often feature local quasi-homogeneities. Adjacent integration points in the FE mesh can be then clustered together in the regions where the field responsible for the evolution shows low variance. This way the fine-scale evolution is tracked only at a limited number of material points and the derived plastic properties are propagated to the surrounding integration points subjected to similar deformation. Optimal configurations of the clusters vary in time as the local deformation conditions may change during the forming process, so the clusters must be periodically adapted. We consider two operations on the clusters of integration points: splitting (refinement) and merging (unrefinement). The concept is tested in the Hierarchical Multi-Scale (HMS) framework [1] that computes macroscopic deformations by means of the FEM, whereas the micro-structural evolution at the individual FE integration points is predicted by a CP model. The HMS locally and adaptively approximates homogenized stress responses of the CP model by means of analytical plastic potential or yield criterion function. Our earlier work

  5. Evaluation of the core physics and safety characteristics of a quasi-homogeneous LMFBR concept

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, H.; Yarlagadda, B.S.

    1984-01-01

    A core design concept utilizing two types of driver assemblies that differ in fuel pin diameter has been investigated as an alternative to the heterogeneous LMFBR core for achieving low HCDA energetics. Core designs based on the (quasi-homogeneous) concept were developed and their performance compared to that of standard homogeneous and hetergeneous cores. It is shown that quasi-homogenous cores can be designed which possess many of the performance advantages of homogeneous cores (such as reduced power mismatches and local power swings), while retaining the potential safty advantages of heterogeneous cores (such as an incoherent response during loss-of-flow accidents and a reduced coolant void reactivity worth).

  6. Analytical and formal classifications of quasi-homogeneous foliations in (C,0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzmer, Yohann

    We classify the germs of quasi-homogeneous foliations in C with fixed separatrix. In short, we prove that the analytical (resp. formal) class of such a foliation only depends on the analytical (resp. formal) class of its representation of projective holonomy.

  7. Scattering of an electromagnetic light wave from a quasi-homogeneous medium with semisoft boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianyang; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-08-01

    Based on the first-order Born approximation, the scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave from a relatively more realistic random medium, a quasi-homogeneous medium with semisoft boundary, has been investigated. The analytic expressions for the spectral density, the spectral degree of coherence and the spectral degree of polarization have been derived, and the effects of the characteristics of the medium and the polarization of the incident light wave on the far-zone scattered field are determined. The numerical simulations indicate that, with the increasing of the edge softness M of the medium, the spectral density presents a pattern with interference fringes, and the number, position and width of interference fringes can be modified by the parameter. It is also found that there is an obvious value saltation in the coherence profile. Besides, unlike the intensity and the coherence are significantly affected by the properties of the medium, the polarization of the scattered field is irrelevant to them due to the quasi-homogeneity and isotropy of the medium, and it is only connected with the polarization of the incident light.

  8. The ocean quasi-homogeneous layer model and global cycle of carbon dioxide in system of atmosphere-ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Alexander; Glushkov, Alexander; Loboda, Nataliya; Khokhlov, Valery; Serbov, Nikoly; Svinarenko, Andrey

    The purpose of this paper is carrying out the detailed model of the CO2 global turnover in system of "atmosphere-ocean" with using the ocean quasi-homogeneous layer model. Practically all carried out models are functioning in the average annual regime and accounting for the carbon distribution in bio-sphere in most general form (Glushkov et al, 2003). We construct a modified model for cycle of the carbon dioxide, which allows to reproduce a season dynamics of carbon turnover in ocean with account of zone ocean structure (up quasi-homogeneous layer, thermocline and deepest layer). It is taken into account dependence of the CO2 transfer through the bounder between atmosphere and ocean upon temperature of water and air, wind velocity, buffer mechanism of the CO2 dissolution. The same program is realized for atmosphere part of whole system. It is obtained a tempo-ral and space distribution for concentration of non-organic carbon in ocean, partial press of dissolute CO2 and value of exchange on the border between atmosphere and ocean. It is estimated a role of the wind intermixing of the up ocean layer. The increasing of this effect leads to increasing the plankton mass and further particles, which are transferred by wind, contribute to more quick immersion of microscopic shells and organic material. It is fulfilled investigation of sen-sibility of the master differential equations system solutions from the model parameters. The master differential equa-tions system, describing a dynamics of the CO2 cycle, is numerically integrated by the four order Runge-Cutt method under given initial values of valuables till output of solution on periodic regime. At first it is indicated on possible real-zation of the chaos scenario in system. On our data, the difference of the average annual values for the non-organic car-bon concentration in the up quasi-homogeneous layer between equator and extreme southern zone is 0.15 mol/m3, be-tween the equator and extreme northern zone is 0

  9. Correlation between intensity fluctuations of electromagnetic waves scattered from a spatially quasi-homogeneous, anisotropic medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Feinan; Chang, Liping

    2016-10-17

    Within the validity of the first-order Born approximation, expressions are derived for the correlation between intensity fluctuations (CIF) of an electromagnetic plane wave scattered from a spatially quasi-homogeneous (QH), anisotropic medium. Upon establishing the correlation matrix of the scattering potential of the medium, we show that the CIF is the summation of Fourier transforms of the strengths and normalized correlation coefficients (NCCs) of the scattering potential matrix. Numerical results reveal that the CIF is susceptible to the effective width and correlation length of the medium, and degree of polarization of the incident electromagnetic wave. Our study not only extends the current knowledge of the CIF of a scattered field but also provides an important reference to the study of high-order intensity correlations of light scattered from a spatially anisotropic medium.

  10. Acidic ionic liquid as "quasi-homogeneous" catalyst for controllable synthesis of cellulose acetate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong; Han, Yangyang; Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Yuan, Guiping

    2014-11-26

    In this paper, we demonstrated that acidic ionic liquids (ILs) can be used as "quasi-homogeneous" catalysts for the efficient acetylation of cellulose. Unlike existing techniques that use large amount of ILs as solvent to dissolve and acetylate cellulose, a small amount of acidic ILs was used as catalyst in this study to overcome the low efficiency associated with relatively high viscosity and costs of ILs during homogeneous acetylation. Fully substituted cellulose acetate with a conversion of 88.8% was obtained by using only 9 mol% IL 1-vinyl-3-(3-sulfopropyl) imidazolium hydrogen sulfate as catalyst, which is much higher than that of common commercialized solid acid catalysts. The degree of substitution and solubility of the obtained cellulose acetate can be facilely controlled by varying the concentration of ILs and reaction time. The dual function of swelling and catalyzing of acidic ILs for the acetylation of cellulose is responsible for the excellent catalytic performance.

  11. Reciprocal relations for light from Young’s pinholes scattering upon a quasi-homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiming; Li, Jia

    2017-05-01

    Within the validity of the first-order Born approximation, a group of reciprocal relations are derived for light from Young’s pinholes scattering upon a spatially quasi-homogeneous (QH) medium. It is shown that the spectral degree of coherence (SDOC) of the scattered field is proportional to the Fourier transform of the strength of the scattering potential, and the spectral density of the scattered field is proportional to the Fourier transform of the normalized correlation coefficient of the scattering potential. By considering a particular case where the correlation function of the QH medium obeys the Gaussian distribution, we obtain the far-zone spectral density and SDOC of the scattered field which satisfy the derived reciprocal relations. Compared with previous reciprocal relations for scattering, our relations additionally introduce Young’s pinhole parameter that characterizes the geometry of Young’s pinholes.

  12. Quasi-homogeneous oxidation of glycerol by unsupported gold nanoparticles in the liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Skrzyńska, Elżbieta; Ftouni, Jamal; Girardon, Jean-Sébastien; Capron, Mickaël; Jalowiecki-Duhamel, Louise; Paul, Jean-François; Dumeignil, Franck

    2012-10-01

    A quasi-homogeneous solution of gold nanoparticles prepared by the Turkevich method was used as an unconventional catalyst in the oxidation of glycerol (GLY) in the liquid phase. The highest obtained conversion was 100 % after 3 h of reaction at 100 °C under an oxygen atmosphere (5 bar). The main products were glyceric, glycolic, formic, tartronic, and oxalic acid with selectivities of 28, 36, 25, 9, and 2 %, respectively. Traces of hydroxypyruvic and acetic acid were also detected (combined selectivities below 1 %). To elucidate the reaction mechanism and specify the role of gold nanoparticles in the oxidation process, a series of experiments under various reaction conditions were carried out. The effect of reaction temperature, oxygen pressure, gold concentration, and GLY/base molar ratio was investigated. All catalytic results were systematically compared to the corresponding noncatalytic base-induced transformations (blank tests). Such an approach allowed us to separate and clarify the respective driving parameters for the transformation of GLY (presence of a base and activity of the gold catalyst). The reaction mechanism comprised a series of oxidation and C-C cleavage reactions, whereas additional oxidation-reduction reactions (of the Cannizzaro type) could also occur in the presence of the base. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Correlation between intensity fluctuations induced by scattering of a partially coherent, electromagnetic wave from a quasi-homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chang, Liping; Chen, Feinan

    2016-12-01

    Based on the first-order Born approximation, the correlation between intensity fluctuations is derived for a partially coherent, electromagnetic plane wave scattering from a spatially quasi-homogeneous medium. Young's pinholes are utilized to control the degree of coherence of the incident field. For the electromagnetic scattering case, it is shown that the CIF of the scattered field strongly depends on the degree of polarization of the incident wave, Young's pinhole parameter, effective radius and correlation length of the medium. The influences of these parameters on the CIF distributions are revealed by numerical calculations.

  14. Conditions for invariant spectrum of light generated by scattering of partially coherent wave from quasi-homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2016-02-01

    Within the first-order Born approximation, the spectrum of light generated by the scattering of a partially coherent wave from a quasi-homogeneous (QH) medium is derived. In particular, the partially coherent incident wave is produced by Young's pinholes. It is shown that the spectrum of the scattered field is identical to the spectrum of incident plane waves if the Fourier transform of the normalized correlation coefficient (NCC) of the scattering potential satisfies a certain scaling law. The scaling law is valid when the medium size is sufficiently small compared with the space between Young' pinholes. Furthermore, comparisons are made between our conditions with the previous results.

  15. Quasi-homogeneous partial coherent source modeling of multimode optical fiber output using the elementary source method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Alaa; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa A.

    2017-10-01

    Multimode fibers (MMF) have many applications in illumination, spectroscopy, sensing and even in optical communication systems. In this work, we present a model for the MMF output field assuming the fiber end as a quasi-homogenous source. The fiber end is modeled by a group of partially coherent elementary sources, spatially shifted and uncorrelated with each other. The elementary source distribution is derived from the far field intensity measurement, while the weighting function of the sources is derived from the fiber end intensity measurement. The model is compared with practical measurements for fibers with different core/cladding diameters at different propagation distances and for different input excitations: laser, white light and LED. The obtained results show normalized root mean square error less than 8% in the intensity profile in most cases, even when the fiber end surface is not perfectly cleaved. Also, the comparison with the Gaussian–Schell model results shows a better agreement with the measurement. In addition, the complex degree of coherence, derived from the model results, is compared with the theoretical predictions of the modified Van Zernike equation showing very good agreement, which strongly supports the assumption that the large core MMF could be considered as a quasi-homogenous source.

  16. State Workforce Policy Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public/Private Ventures, Philadelphia, PA.

    Surging demand for workers, growing income inequality, and passage of welfare reforms have made work force development one of the United States' key national concerns. Public/Private Ventures has been working with various states to design work force development strategies that seek to address the concerns of many work force development specialists…

  17. Effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in stereotactic radiation therapy applied to quasi-homogenous brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon Sik; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Byung-Do; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Monte Carlo (MC) method in stereotactic radiotherapy for brain tumor. The difference in doses predicted by the conventional Ray-tracing (Ray) and the advanced MC algorithms was comprehensively investigated through the simulations for phantom and patient data, actual measurement of dose distribution, and the retrospective analysis of 77 brain tumors patients. These investigations consistently showed that the MC algorithm overestimated the dose than the Ray algorithm and the MC overestimation was generally increased as decreasing the beams size and increasing the number of beams delivered. These results demonstrated that the advanced MC algorithm would be inaccurate than the conventional Raytracing algorithm when applied to a (quasi-) homogeneous brain tumors. Thus, caution may be needed to apply the MC method to brain radiosurgery or radiotherapy. PMID:26871473

  18. Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Prince, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, an accountability system implemented in 2005-06 that measures students' gains in college readiness, college credits earned, and degree or certificate completion. The goal of the initiative is to increase educational attainment by focusing on the critical momentum points…

  19. State initiatives in state-Federal relations

    SciTech Connect

    Standish, T.K.

    1980-05-01

    Based upon historical analysis, this paper examines the proper role of regulation at the state, regional, and federal levels of government. Four areas of inquiry are highlighted by the so-called crises in public utility industries. The first question is whether there should be a shift from passive to active regulation. Second, is increased regulatory power needed at regional and Federal levels of government in order to achieve an appropriate balance between state, regional, and Federal government, or does overcentralization breed economic inefficiency and autocratic decisions. Third, should regulators have a higher degree of power and control over private-utility companies to accomplish objectives mandated by state legislatures and Congress, or is the real problem that private incentives have not been given enough leeway to solve the problems that confront us. And, fourth, if we are to address today's opportunities, should planning efficiency and public interest norms displace the time-honored competitive-market standards of economic efficiency and social justice as the basis for regulatory decisions. At the root of these issues, there is a clash between those arguing for the use of a planning paradigm to solve economic problems and those advocating reliance upon market forces. Economic imperatives lead us to expect a continuation of a trend which resolves the market/nonmarket balance in favor of more government participation. Hence, the scope of state initiatives and the range of opportunities for policy action, will in fact, be defined by economic forces larger than the current debate on the issues. 8 references.

  20. Correlation between intensity fluctuations of light generated by scattering of Young’s diffractive electromagnetic waves by a quasi-homogeneous, anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chen, Feinan

    2016-11-01

    Based on the first-order Born approximation, formulas are derived for the correlation between intensity fluctuations (CIF) of light generated by a Young’s diffractive electromagnetic wave scattered by a spatially quasi-homogeneous (QH), anisotropic medium. It is shown that the CIF of the scattered field can be written as the summation of the Fourier transforms of the strengths and normalized correlation coefficients (NCCs) of the scattering potentials. The differences between our results and those obtained in the previous literature are discussed. Our results might be important in investigating the high-order intensity correlation of an electromagnetic wave scattered from a 3D anisotropic object.

  1. On validating Quasi-Steady Quasi-Homogeneous nature of the relationgship between large-scale and small-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Chernyshenko, Sergei

    2016-11-01

    A formal definition to the two hypotheses of the quasi-steady and quasi-homogeneous (QSQH) theory was proposed. The theory is supposed to explain the phenomenon of the large-scale structures influencing the small-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer. Multi-objective optimisations were performed to find the optimal cut-off parameters for the new large-scale filters. The new filters were proved to obtain much more clear large-scale structures than the filter suggested by the previous studies. Calculations and comparisons for a set of statistical flow properties extracted from the databases of the direct numerical simulations of a plane channel flow were conducted. The accuracy of the predictions based on the QSQH theory was observed improving when the Reynolds number increases. Extrapolations of urms and two-points correlation from medium to high Reynolds number based on the QSQH approach were preformed and about 10 % accuracy was reported. The more interesting thing is that the QSQH theory implies a dependence of the mean profile log-law constants on the Reynolds number. The main overall result of the present work is the validations of the two hypotheses of the quasi-steady quasi-homogeneous theory in near-wall turbulent flows.

  2. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector → 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  3. State Initiatives for School and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC. Resource Center on Educational Equity.

    The Survey on State Initiatives to Improve School and Workplace Learning asked state education agencies (SEAs) a series of questions about activities in their states. The questions were grouped around several important aspects of the connection between school and employment. Forty-seven states and U.S. territories returned completed surveys. Most…

  4. Evolution of the regions of the 3D particle motion in the regular polygon problem of (N+1) bodies with a quasi-homogeneous potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakis, Demetrios; Kalvouridis, Tilemahos

    2017-09-01

    The regular polygon problem of (N+1) bodies deals with the dynamics of a small body, natural or artificial, in the force field of N big bodies, the ν=N-1 of which have equal masses and form an imaginary regular ν -gon, while the Nth body with a different mass is located at the center of mass of the system. In this work, instead of considering Newtonian potentials and forces, we assume that the big bodies create quasi-homogeneous potentials, in the sense that we insert to the inverse square Newtonian law of gravitation an inverse cube corrective term, aiming to approximate various phenomena due to their shape or to the radiation emitting from the primaries. Based on this new consideration, we apply a general methodology in order to investigate by means of the zero-velocity surfaces, the regions where 3D motions of the small body are allowed, their evolutions and parametric variations, their topological bifurcations, as well as the existing trapping domains of the particle. Here we note that this process is definitely a fundamental step of great importance in the study of many dynamical systems characterized by a Jacobian-type integral of motion in the long way of searching for solutions of any kind.

  5. State solar initiatives. Volume 1: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, R.; Neuendorffer, J.; Green, B.; Gordon, N.; Myring, G.; Perwin, E.; Poster, B.; Small, D.; Myring, L.

    1981-09-01

    The impacts of solar energy programs undertaken in California, Florida, New Mexico, Minnesota, and New York are reviewed. Initiatives were explored: information outreach activities; consumer protection programs including standards, testing, certification, warranties, licensing, and consumer complaint offices; and tax credits and rebates. The experience in these five states is analyzed and conclusions and recommendations that will assist state governments in improving or launching their own programs are presented.

  6. Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Begoli, Edmon; Boehmann, Brant; DeNap, Frank A

    2012-04-01

    In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI

  7. Kennesaw State University Classroom Technology Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHaney, Jane; Wallace, Deborah; Taylor, Beverley

    The purpose of the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Coca Cola/Board of Regents Classroom Technology Initiative was to develop preservice and inservice teachers' expertise in educational technology such as computers, presentation software, and multimedia and to teach educators to apply those skills to content instruction. Project goals were to…

  8. Tunnelling from non-localised initial states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowcock, Peter; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    An approach for calculating tunneling amplitudes from a nonlocalized initial state is presented. Generalizing the matching conditions and equations of motion to allow for complex momentum permits a description of tunneling in the presence of so-called classical motion. Possible applications of the method are presented.

  9. Kennesaw State University Classroom Technology Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHaney, Jane; Wallace, Deborah; Taylor, Beverley

    The purpose of the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Coca Cola/Board of Regents Classroom Technology Initiative was to develop preservice and inservice teachers' expertise in educational technology such as computers, presentation software, and multimedia and to teach educators to apply those skills to content instruction. Project goals were to…

  10. The initial state of generalized radiation universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kolionis, Georgios; Tsokaros, Antonios

    2013-04-01

    We use asymptotic methods to study the early time stability of isotropic and homogeneous solutions filled with radiation which are close initially to the exact, flat, radiation solution in quadratic lagrangian theories of gravity. For such models, we analyze all possible modes of approach to the initial singularity and prove the essential uniqueness and stability of the resulting asymptotic scheme in all cases except perhaps that of the conformally invariant Bach-Weyl gravity. We also provide a formal series representation valid near the initial singularity of the general solution of these models and show that this is dominated at early times by a form in which both curvature and radiation play a subdominant role. We also discuss the implications of these results for the generic initial state of the theory.

  11. The initial thermal state of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that the initial thermal state of the Moon was molten. The existence of young thrust fault scarps in the highlands and kbar stress drop, shallow moonquakes both suggest that the thermoelastic stresses in the outer crust are currently in the kbar range. This is expected if the Moon was initially molten, but not if the Moon had a magma ocean only a few hundred km deep. The thesis is also supported by reference to model studies of the concentrations of refractory incompatible elements.

  12. Fighting 'personhood' initiatives in the United States.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lee Rubin; Crockin, Susan L

    2012-06-01

    'Personhood' initiatives filed in many states within the United States threaten to impose potentially significant restrictions on infertility treatment, embryo disposition, pre-natal care, abortion, contraception, and stem-cell research, all through attempts to redefine a 'person' or 'human being' as existing from the moment of fertilization or conception, and endowed with the full legal and Constitutional rights of personhood. Virginia's recent, unsuccessful attempt to pass such legislation provides both a dramatic example of these efforts and valuable lessons in the fight against them by infertility advocates and others. Arguments over loss of infertility treatment seemed more persuasive to legislatures than did restrictions on abortion or stem cell research. Indeed, persuading legislators or voters that they could be 'pro-life' and still anti-personhood initiatives was a key strategy, and consumer efforts and media attention were instrumental. The most central lessons, however, may be the degree of intensity and coordinated strategy to shift public perception that lie behind these numerous state efforts, regardless of whether the actual initiatives are won or lost.

  13. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

  14. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Accuracy in Converting the Average Breast Dose Into the Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) Using the F-Factor in Cone Beam Breast CT- a Monte Carlo Study Using Homogeneous and Quasi-Homogeneous Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C; Zhong, Y; Wang, T; Shaw, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy in estimating the mean glandular dose (MGD) for homogeneous breast phantoms by converting from the average breast dose using the F-factor in cone beam breast CT. Methods: EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo codes were used to estimate the MGDs. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm high hemi-ellipsoids were used to simulate pendant-geometry breasts. Two different types of hemi-ellipsoidal models were employed: voxels in quasi-homogeneous phantoms were designed as either adipose or glandular tissue while voxels in homogeneous phantoms were designed as the mixture of adipose and glandular tissues. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volume glandular fractions (VGFs), defined as the ratio of glandular tissue voxels to entire breast voxels in the quasi-homogeneous phantoms, were studied. These VGFs were converted into glandular fractions by weight and used to construct the corresponding homogeneous phantoms. 80 kVp x-rays with a mean energy of 47 keV was used in the simulation. A total of 109 photons were used to image the phantoms and the energies deposited in the phantom voxels were tallied. Breast doses in homogeneous phantoms were averaged over all voxels and then used to calculate the MGDs using the F-factors evaluated at the mean energy of the x-rays. The MGDs for quasi-homogeneous phantoms were computed directly by averaging the doses over all glandular tissue voxels. The MGDs estimated for the two types of phantoms were normalized to the free-in-air dose at the iso-center and compared. Results: The normalized MGDs were 0.756 and 0.732 mGy/mGy for the 25% and 50% VGF homogeneous breasts and 0.761 and 0.733 mGy/mGy for the corresponding quasi-homogeneous breasts, respectively. The MGDs estimated for the two types of phantoms were similar within 1% in this study. Conclusion: MGDs for homogeneous breast models may be adequately estimated by converting from the average breast dose using the F-factor.

  15. Hemispherical anomaly from asymmetric initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoorioon, Amjad; Koivisto, Tomi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate if the hemispherical asymmetry in the CMB is produced from "asymmetric" excited initial conditions. We show that in the limit where the deviations from the Bunch-Davies vacuum are large and the scale of new physics is maximally separated from the inflationary Hubble parameter, the primordial power spectrum is modulated only by position-dependent dipole and quadrupole terms. Requiring the dipole contribution in the power spectrum to account for the observed power asymmetry, A =0.07 ±0.022 , we show that the amount of quadrupole terms is roughly equal to A2. The mean local bispectrum, which gets enhanced for the excited initial state, is within the 1 σ bound of Planck 2015 results for a large field model, fNL≃4.17 , but is reachable by future CMB experiments. The amplitude of the local non-Gaussianity modulates around this mean value, depending on the angle that the correlated patches on the 2d CMB surface make with the preferred direction. The amount of variation is minimized for the configuration in which the short and long wavelength modes are around the preferred pole and |k→3|≈|k→l ≈10|≪|k→1|≈|k→2|≈|k→l ≈2500| with fNLmin≈3.64 . The maximum occurs when these modes are at the antipode of the preferred pole, fNLmax≈4.81 . The difference of non-Gaussianity between these two configurations is as large as ≃1.17 , which can be used to distinguish this scenario from other scenarios that try to explain the observed hemispherical asymmetry.

  16. Classification of initial state granularity via 2D Fourier expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman-Smith, C. E.; Petersen, H.; Wolpert, R. L.

    2013-09-01

    A new method for quantifying fluctuations in the initial state of heavy ion collisions is presented. The initial state energy distribution is decomposed with a set of orthogonal basis functions which include both angular and radial variation. The resulting two-dimensional Fourier coefficients provide additional information about the nature of the initial state fluctuations compared to a purely angular decomposition. We apply this method to ensembles of initial states generated by both Glauber and color glass condensate Monte-Carlo codes. In addition initial state configurations with varying amounts of fluctuations generated by a dynamic transport approach are analyzed to test the sensitivity of the procedure. The results allow for a full characterization of the initial state structures that is useful to discriminate the different initial state models currently in use. Communicated by Steffen Bass

  17. Making Child Care Better: State Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groginsky, Scott; Robison, Susan; Smith, Shelley

    In light of increasing evidence that good early childhood programs lead to school success, reduced delinquency and crime, and better job opportunities and productivity, state legislators are developing policies to improve these services. This report is designed to provide state lawmakers and their staff with research and state examples of policy…

  18. State Education Initiatives of the Democratic Governors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Democratic Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

    The educational programs that have been proposed and implemented by Democratic governors in 29 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands are briefly outlined in this report. A list of educational contacts for 23 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands is included. (LMI)

  19. State College Readiness Initiatives and Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, David

    2009-01-01

    Greater attention to the college and career readiness problem by state leaders and policymakers could drastically boost the numbers and percentages of students who graduate from high school ready for college and career study. This chapter traces the author's work in developing California State University's Early Assessment Program, an initiative…

  20. Recurrence of initial state of nonlinear ion waves

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Satofuka, N.

    1981-06-01

    By solving the Korteweg--deVries equation in a wide range of the ratio between the nonlinearity and the dispersion, the recurrence of the initial state of the ion wave is examined. The recurrence is assured of taking place only when the dispersion of the initial ion wave predominates over the nonlinearity. If the initial wave has strong nonlinearity compared with the dispersion, the recurrence is indistinct, and the initial monochromatic wave evolves to a turbulent state.

  1. Variability in state Medicaid medication management initiatives.

    PubMed

    Neyarapally, George A; Smith, Marie A

    Many U.S. states have expanded Medicaid programs, with over 70 million beneficiaries now enrolled. States' interest in improving care quality and lowering costs has spurred experimentation with several medication management (MM) programs. The implementation of MM programs for beneficiaries has been sporadic, and program elements and implementation methods have been heterogeneous. A survey was conducted to: (1) determine covered MM services in state Medicaid programs, (2) report innovative MM program findings, and (3) identify challenges in creating sustainable MM programs. The survey was sent to state Medicaid pharmacy directors in February 2015. The survey data focused on the type and extent of pharmacist-provided MM services, MM provider qualifications, patient eligibility criteria and enrollment strategies, MM delivery settings and referral patterns, MM program evaluations, program costs and sustainability models, key implementation challenges, and future program enhancements. Many Medicaid programs generally followed Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management requirements. Highly variable findings were due to different Medicaid eligibility criteria, pharmacist integration with health teams, access to electronic medical records (EMRs), and MM delivery methods/settings to optimize drug therapy regimens. Several implementation challenges were identified. Pharmacist integration on care teams and access to EMRs improves MM implementation. MM program evaluation funding and data support must be secured prior to program implementation. The findings and discussion here can assist states with limited or preliminary Medicaid MM experience to progress toward sustainable programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Asymptotic entanglement in quantum walks from delocalized initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orthey, Alexandre C.; Amorim, Edgard P. M.

    2017-09-01

    We study the entanglement between the internal (spin) and external (position) degrees of freedom of the one-dimensional discrete time quantum walk starting from local and delocalized initial states whose time evolution is driven by Hadamard and Fourier coins. We obtain the dependence of the asymptotic entanglement with the initial dispersion of the state and establish a way to connect the asymptotic entanglement between local and delocalized states. We find out that the delocalization of the state increases the number of initial spin states which achieves maximal entanglement from two states (local) to a continuous set of spin states (delocalized) given by a simple relation between the angles of the initial spin state. We also carry out numerical simulations of the average entanglement along the time to confront with our analytical results.

  3. State Initiatives on Industry-Based Skill Standards and Credentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganzglass, Evelyn; Simon, Martin

    A study examined state initiatives for industry-based skill standards and credentials. Officials in 19 states were interviewed, case studies of programs in 3 states (Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Texas) were conducted, and focus group discussions were held with 25 individuals. State skill standards were generally found to be tied to broader efforts…

  4. Profiles in Connecting Learning and Work. State Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana M.

    This report contains profiles of initiatives in the 50 states and Puerto Rico to connect learning and work. Learning and work initiatives combine education reform, workforce preparation and economic development to prepare individuals for a lifetime of learning, citizenship, and career success. The profiles are drawn from state applications for…

  5. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Several State Initiatives. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the characteristics of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD); identify several federal-level FASD initiatives that emphasize education; and describe four state-level FASD initiatives that involve state education agencies (SEAs). An appendix at the end of the document provides a list of educational…

  6. The Common Core State Standards Initiative: an Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate decision making in the Common Core State Standards Initiative as the change process moved from research, development and diffusion activities to adoption of the Common Core State Standards by the states. A decision-oriented evaluation model was used to describe the four stages of planning, structuring,…

  7. 2014 Survey of States: Initiatives, Trends, and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyyan, Vitaliy; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the fourteenth survey of states by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) at the University of Minnesota. Results are presented for the 50 regular states and eight of the 11 unique states. The purpose of this report is to provide a snapshot of the new initiatives, trends, accomplishments, and emerging issues…

  8. Factors affecting yield and survival of cells when suspensions are subjected to centrifugation. Influence of centrifugal acceleration, time of centrifugation, and length of the suspension column in quasi-homogeneous centrifugal fields.

    PubMed

    Katkov, I I; Mazur, P

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the centrifugation of cell suspensions are to obtain the maximum yield of cells with minimum adverse effects of centrifugation. In the case of mechanically sensitive cells such as mouse sperm, the two goals are somewhat contradictory in that g-forces sufficient to achieve high yields are damaging, and g-forces that yield high viability produce low yields. This paper mathematically analyzes the factors contributing to each goal. The total yield of pelleted cells is determined by the sedimentation rate governed by Stokes' Law, and depends on the relative centrifugal force, centrifugation time, size and shape of the cells, density of the cells and medium, viscosity of the medium, and the length of the column of suspension. Because in the situation analyzed the column is short relative to the rotor radius, the analysis considers the centrifugal field to be quasi-homogeneous. The assumption is that cells are not damaged during sedimentation, but that they become injured at an exponential rate once they are pelleted, a rate that will depend on the specific cell type. The behavior is modeled by the solution of coupled differential equations. The predictions of the analysis are in good agreement with experimental data on the centrifugation of mouse sperm.

  9. State Initiatives To Increase Compensation for Child Care Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twombly, Eric C.; Montilla, Maria D.; De Vita, Carol J.

    Noting that wages for child care workers are among the lowest in the U.S. labor force and that generally caregivers are offered few employee benefits, this paper summarizes proposals and programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia to raise child care worker compensation. The paper classifies state-level initiatives into two categories:…

  10. Efficient state initialization by a quantum spectral filtering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; MacLean, Steve; Laflamme, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    An algorithm that initializes a quantum register to a state with a specified energy range is given, corresponding to a quantum implementation of the celebrated Feit-Fleck method. This is performed by introducing a nondeterministic quantum implementation of a standard spectral filtering procedure combined with an apodization technique, allowing for accurate state initialization. It is shown that the implementation requires only two ancilla qubits. A lower bound for the total probability of success of this algorithm is derived, showing that this scheme can be realized using a finite, relatively low number of trials. Assuming the time evolution can be performed efficiently and using a trial state polynomially close to the desired states, it is demonstrated that the number of operations required scales polynomially with the number of qubits. Tradeoffs between accuracy and performance are demonstrated in a simple example: the harmonic oscillator. This algorithm would be useful for the initialization phase of the simulation of quantum systems on digital quantum computers.

  11. 3D glasma initial state for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören

    2016-10-13

    We extend the impact-parameter-dependent Glasma model to three dimensions using explicit small-x evolution of the two incoming nuclear gluon distributions. We compute rapidity distributions of produced gluons and the early-time energy momentum tensor as a function of space-time rapidity and transverse coordinates. Finally, we study rapidity correlations and fluctuations of the initial geometry and multiplicity distributions and make comparisons to existing models for the three-dimensional initial state.

  12. 3D glasma initial state for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören

    2016-10-01

    We extend the impact-parameter-dependent Glasma model to three dimensions using explicit small-x evolution of the two incoming nuclear gluon distributions. We compute rapidity distributions of produced gluons and the early-time energy momentum tensor as a function of space-time rapidity and transverse coordinates. We study rapidity correlations and fluctuations of the initial geometry and multiplicity distributions and make comparisons to existing models for the three-dimensional initial state.

  13. Highlights from PHENIX-I: initial state and early times

    SciTech Connect

    Leitch, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    We will review the latest physics developments from PHENIX concentrating on cold nuclear matter effects, the initial state for heavy-ion collisions, and probes of the earliest stages of the hot-dense medium created in those collisions. Recent physics results from p + p and d + Au collisions; and from direct photons, quarkonia and low-mass vector mesons in A+A collisions will be highlighted. Insights from these measurements into the characteristics of the initial state and about the earliest times in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed.

  14. Initial State Factorization and the Kinoshita-Lee-Nauenberg Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Abdullah; Horowitz, W. A.

    2017-09-01

    We carry out for the first time a fully correct, self-consistent application of the Kinoshita-Lee-Nauenberg theorem in a next-to-leading order scattering calculation. We improve on previous works by including all initial and final state soft radiative processes, including absorption and an infinite sum of partially disconnected amplitudes. We show in general that the sum over the initial state radiation factorizes. We apply our approach to the Rutherford scattering cross section at next-to-leading order correction.

  15. Enhanced Inflationary Trispectrum from a Non-Vacuum Initial State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agullo, I.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Parker, L.

    2015-01-01

    We work out the primordial inflationary trispectrum for curvature perturbations in models with standard kinetic terms, when the initial quantum state is not necessarily the Bunch-Davies vacuum state. The presence of initial perturbations enhances the trispectrum amplitude for squeezed configurations, in parallel to the bispectrum enhancement. For those squeezed configurations the trispectrum acquires the so-called local form, with a scale dependent amplitude that can get values larger than the prediction of the so-called Maldacena consistency relation. The enhancement factor could be as large as 106, and could reach the sensitivity of forthcoming observations, even for single-field inflationary models.

  16. On the influence of initial state on gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Angelino, P.

    2008-04-01

    The influence of the initial state on the turbulence and transport is addressed in collisionless, global, and full-f gyrokinetic simulations solving both the equilibrium and the fluctuations. For two strongly differing initial states, it is found that the steady turbulent regime exhibits nearly identical statistical properties. This result is in marked contrast with the claim of different final states. In fact, a long transient with very different properties finally evolves towards the same turbulent regime for long simulation times. When the initial state is a local Maxwellian, i.e., constant on flux surfaces, a large-scale sheared electric potential develops on short time scales to compensate for the vertical curvature and grad-B drifts. We predict analytically (i) the temporal dynamics at short times of this electric potential, (ii) its poloidal structure, and (iii) its saturation time. All agree well with numerical simulations using the GYSELA code. The impact on the transport is twofold, as compared to the canonical initial state, where f only depends on the motion invariants: (i) the turbulence is delayed due to a weaker effective growth rate, (ii) the same transport level is obtained at long times and the turbulence exhibits nearly identical statistical characteristics. In agreement, the electric potential of these two cases has the same magnitude despite very different transients.

  17. Dependence of dissipation on the initial distribution over states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Wolpert, David H.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze how the amount of work dissipated by a fixed nonequilibrium process depends on the initial distribution over states. Specifically, we compare the amount of dissipation when the process is used with some specified initial distribution to the minimal amount of dissipation possible for any initial distribution. We show that the difference between those two amounts of dissipation is given by a simple information-theoretic function that depends only on the initial and final state distributions. Crucially, this difference is independent of the details of the process relating those distributions. We then consider how dissipation depends on the initial distribution for a ‘computer’, i.e. a nonequilibrium process whose dynamics over coarse-grained macrostates implement some desired input-output map. We show that our results still apply when stated in terms of distributions over the computer’s coarse-grained macrostates. This can be viewed as a novel thermodynamic cost of computation, reflecting changes in the distribution over inputs rather than the logical dynamics of the computation.

  18. State Scholars Initiative in Review: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In response to the demands of the changing economy and the business community's need for better-educated, more highly skilled workers, the U.S. Department of Education, through the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), developed the State Scholars Initiative (SSI), which encourages students to take a rigorous course of study in high…

  19. Anti-Gay Initiatives Cause Anxiety on State Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Jeff

    1994-01-01

    In at least 10 states, conservative groups are pushing for ballot initiatives to limit gay-rights laws or remove public funding from gay organizations. Legal experts feel colleges and universities would be affected, particularly in constraints placed on curriculum content, college policies and services, and use of institutional facilities for…

  20. Nonlinear elements in the EMTP: Steady-state initialization

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B.K.; Marti, J.R.; Dommel, H.W.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology is presented for the formulation and solution of networks containing a class of nonlinear elements within the framework of electromagnetic transient programs. The method facilitates steady-state initialization formulated in the time-domain as a two-point boundary value problem. The techniques developed are applied to a simple network exhibiting harmonics due to transformer saturation.

  1. State-of-the-Art in Open Courseware Initiatives Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vladoiu, Monica

    2011-01-01

    We survey here the state-of-the-art in open courseware initiatives worldwide. First, the MIT OpenCourseWare project is overviewed, as it has been the real starting point of the OCW movement. Usually, open courseware refers to a free and open digital publication of high quality university level educational materials that are organized as courses,…

  2. Washington State Student Achievement Initiative Policy Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Wachen, John; Moore, Colleen; Shulock, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges launched a performance funding policy called the Student Achievement Initiative (SAI) both to improve public accountability by more accurately describing what students achieve from enrolling in community colleges and to provide incentives to colleges through financial rewards…

  3. Do initial conditions matter? A comparison of model climatologies generated from different initial states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Cohen, C.; Wu, P.

    1981-01-01

    A coarse mesh (8 by 10) 7 layer global climate model was used to compute 15 months of meteorological history in two perpetual January experiments on a water planet (without continents) with a zonally symmetric climatological January sea surface temperature field. In the first of the two water planet experiments the initial atmospheric state was a set of zonal mean values of specific humidity, temperature, and wind at each latitude. In the second experiment the model was initialized with globally uniform mean values of specific humidity and temperature on each sigma level surface, constant surface pressure (1010 mb), and zero wind everywhere. A comparison was made of the mean January climatic states generated by the two water planet experiments. The first two months of each 15 January run were discarded, and 13 month averages were computed from months 3 through 15.

  4. Multiple steady states for characteristic initial value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.; Abarbanel, S.; Gottlieb, D.

    1984-01-01

    The time dependent, isentropic, quasi-one-dimensional equations of gas dynamics and other model equations are considered under the constraint of characteristic boundary conditions. Analysis of the time evolution shows how different initial data may lead to different steady states and how seemingly anamolous behavior of the solution may be resolved. Numerical experimentation using time consistent explicit algorithms verifies the conclusions of the analysis. The use of implicit schemes with very large time steps leads to erroneous results.

  5. Initial-State Quantum Fluctuations in the Little Bang

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, François; Schenke, Björn

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we review recent developments in the ab initio theoretical description of the initial state in heavy-ion collisions. We emphasize the importance of fluctuations, both for the phenomenological description of experimental data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and for the theoretical understanding of the nonequilibrium early-time dynamics and thermalization of the medium.

  6. Lunar Accretion and the Moon’s Initial Thermal State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Julien; Canup, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    Previous models of lunar formation from an impact-generated disk predict the Moon accretes in less than a year (Ida et al. 1997, Kokubo et al. 2000). Such a rapid accretion implies a fully molten initial Moon (e.g., Pritchard & Stevenson 2000). However, the lack of global faults on the Moon has been interpreted as constraining the depth of initial melting to the Moon’s outer few hundred kilometers (Solomon & Chaiken 1976). Depth estimates for the lunar magma ocean (250 to 1000 km; e.g., Shearer et al. 2006) are also typically less than the Moon’s full radius (1738 km). Taken at face value, such observations appear most consistent with a partially molten initial Moon. We have developed a new lunar accretion model that includes a more accurate description of the inner protolunar disk, taking into account thermal processes that limit the disk’s evolution rate (Salmon and Canup 2012). Our model predicts a 3-phase accretion of the Moon, in which material initially orbiting in the outer disk accumulates rapidly, followed by a much slower evolution of the vapor/fluid inner disk and a final phase of accretion of inner disk material onto the Moon. The Moon’s total accretion then occurs over about 100 years, which could be compatible with partial cooling of protolunar material. We have coupled our accretion model to a simple model for the Moon’s initial thermal state. We use a 3D spherical grid to model the forming Moon. We estimate heating due to each accretionary event using the impactor properties predicted by our accretion model, assuming that a fixed fraction ("h") of each impactor’s kinetic energy is retained locally within the Moon’s interior, and include cooling from the Moon’s surface. We use this model to estimate the Moon’s initial thermal state as a function of h and specific accretionary histories.

  7. The solid state lighting initiative: An industry/DOE collaborativeeffort

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Steve

    2000-10-01

    A new era of technology is emerging in lighting. It is being propelled by the dramatic improvements in performance of solid state light sources. These sources offer an entirely new array of design aspects not achievable with current light sources. At the same time, their performance characteristics continue to improve and are expected to eclipse those of the most common light sources within the near future. High efficiency is one of these performance attributes motivating the Department of Energy (DOE) to work with the manufacturers of this new technology to create a program plan sufficiently comprehensive to support an industry-driven Solid State Lighting Initiative before Congress. The purpose of the initiative is to educate Congress about the potential of this technology to reduce the electric lighting load within the United States and, consequently, to realize the associated environmental benefits. The initiative will solicit congressional support to accelerate the development of solid state technology through investment in the research and development necessary to overcome the technical barriers that currently limit the products to niche markets. While there are multiple technologies being developed as solid state light sources, the two technologies which hold the most promise for application to general illumination are Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs). The form of these sources can be quite different from current sources, allowing exciting new design uses for the products. Being diffuse sources, OLEDs are much lower in intensity per unit area than LEDs. The manufacturing process for OLEDs lends itself to shapes that can be formed to different geometries, making possible luminous panels or flexible luminous materials. Conversely, LEDs are very intense point sources which can be integrated into a small space to create an intense source or used separately for less focused applications. Both OLED and LED sources are expected

  8. Quantum quenches in the thermodynamic limit. II. Initial ground states.

    PubMed

    Rigol, Marcos

    2014-09-01

    A numerical linked-cluster algorithm was recently introduced to study quantum quenches in the thermodynamic limit starting from thermal initial states [M. Rigol, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 170601 (2014)]. Here, we tailor that algorithm to quenches starting from ground states. In particular, we study quenches from the ground state of the antiferromagnetic Ising model to the XXZ chain. Our results for spin correlations are shown to be in excellent agreement with recent analytical calculations based on the quench action method. We also show that they are different from the correlations in thermal equilibrium, which confirms the expectation that thermalization does not occur in general in integrable models even if they cannot be mapped to noninteracting ones.

  9. Correlated eikonal initial state in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ciappina, M.F.; Otranto, S.; Garibotti, C.R.

    2002-11-01

    An approximation is developed to deal with the ionization of atoms by bare charged ions. In this method the transition amplitude describing the three-body final state is evaluated using a continuum correlated wave and that for the initial state by an analytical continuation of the {phi}{sub 2} model to complex momenta. This procedure introduces in the atomic bound state a kinematical correlation with the projectile motion. Doubly differential cross sections (DDCS's) are computed for collisions of H{sup +} and F{sup 9+} ions with He atoms. Results for the DDCS's in the forward direction are compared with experimental data and other theoretical models. We find an enhancement of the distribution for low energy electrons and that the asymmetry of the electron capture to the continuum (ECC) peak is correctly described.

  10. Hindcasting to measure ice sheet model sensitivity to initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, A.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, G.; Khroulev, C.

    2013-07-01

    Validation is a critical component of model development, yet notoriously challenging in ice sheet modeling. Here we evaluate how an ice sheet system model responds to a given forcing. We show that hindcasting, i.e. forcing a model with known or closely estimated inputs for past events to see how well the output matches observations, is a viable method of assessing model performance. By simulating the recent past of Greenland, and comparing to observations of ice thickness, ice discharge, surface speeds, mass loss and surface elevation changes for validation, we find that the short term model response is strongly influenced by the initial state. We show that the thermal and dynamical states (i.e. the distribution of internal energy and momentum) can be misrepresented despite a good agreement with some observations, stressing the importance of using multiple observations. In particular we identify rates of change of spatially dense observations as preferred validation metrics. Hindcasting enables a qualitative assessment of model performance relative to observed rates of change. It thereby reduces the number of admissible initial states more rigorously than validation efforts that do not take advantage of observed rates of change.

  11. Collectivity in Small Collision Systems: An Initial-State Perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Schlichting, Sören; Tribedy, Prithwish

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of multiparticle correlations in the collisions of small systems such as p+p, p/d/ 3 He+A show striking similarity to the observations in heavy-ion collisions. A number of observables measured in the high-multiplicity events of these systems resemble features that are attributed to collectivity driven by hydrodynamics. However, alternative explanations based on initial-state dynamics are able to describe many characteristic features of these measurements. In this brief review, we highlight some of the recent developments and outstanding issues in this direction.

  12. Turning State Data and Research into Information: An Example from Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, David; Seppanen, Loretta; Stephens, Deborah; Stewart, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    This chapter discusses Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, a new performance funding system for community and technical colleges. Its purposes are to improve public accountability by more accurately describing what students achieve from enrolling in state colleges each year and provide incentives through financial rewards to…

  13. Collectivity in small systems: Initial correlations or final state flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn

    2017-01-01

    I review recent progress in understanding correlation measurements in small collision systems, such as proton+lead and proton+proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and proton+gold, deuteron+gold, and 3He+gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). I discuss two distinct theoretical approaches to describing the experimental data on multi-particle correlations. The first attributes the origin of the measured correlations to strong final state interactions, often described by hydrodynamics, the second employs the color glass condensate effective theory and is able to reproduce many features of the data from initial state effects only. I discuss how to distinguish which of the two sources of correlations dominates the experimental observables, and give an outlook on how to make progress on the theory side.

  14. Work fluctuations for Bose particles in grand canonical initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon; Talkner, Peter

    2012-05-01

    We consider bosons in a harmonic trap and investigate the fluctuations of the work performed by an adiabatic change of the trap curvature. Depending on the reservoir conditions such as temperature and chemical potential that provide the initial equilibrium state, the exponentiated work average (EWA) defined in the context of the Crooks relation and the Jarzynski equality may diverge if the trap becomes wider. We investigate how the probability distribution function (PDF) of the work signals this divergence. It is shown that at low temperatures the PDF is highly asymmetric with a steep fall-off at one side and an exponential tail at the other side. For high temperatures it is closer to a symmetric distribution approaching a Gaussian form. These properties of the work PDF are discussed in relation to the convergence of the EWA and to the existence of the hypothetical equilibrium state to which those thermodynamic potential changes refer that enter both the Crooks relation and the Jarzynski equality.

  15. Work fluctuations for Bose particles in grand canonical initial states.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon; Talkner, Peter

    2012-05-01

    We consider bosons in a harmonic trap and investigate the fluctuations of the work performed by an adiabatic change of the trap curvature. Depending on the reservoir conditions such as temperature and chemical potential that provide the initial equilibrium state, the exponentiated work average (EWA) defined in the context of the Crooks relation and the Jarzynski equality may diverge if the trap becomes wider. We investigate how the probability distribution function (PDF) of the work signals this divergence. It is shown that at low temperatures the PDF is highly asymmetric with a steep fall-off at one side and an exponential tail at the other side. For high temperatures it is closer to a symmetric distribution approaching a Gaussian form. These properties of the work PDF are discussed in relation to the convergence of the EWA and to the existence of the hypothetical equilibrium state to which those thermodynamic potential changes refer that enter both the Crooks relation and the Jarzynski equality.

  16. A State-Wide Obstetric Hemorrhage Quality Improvement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Debra; Lyndon, Audrey; Lagrew, David; Main, Elliott K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The mission of the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative is to eliminate preventable maternal death and injury and promote equitable maternity care in California. This article describes CMQCC’s statewide multi-stakeholder quality improvement initiative to improve readiness, recognition, response, and reporting of maternal hemorrhage at birth and details the essential role of nurses in its success. Project Design and Approach In partnership with the State Department of Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health, CMQCC identified maternal hemorrhage as a significant quality improvement opportunity. CMQCC organized a multi-disciplinary, multi-stakeholder task force to develop a strategy for addressing obstetric (OB) hemorrhage. Project Description The OB Hemorrhage Task Force, co-chaired by nurse and physician team leaders, identified four priorities for action and developed a comprehensive hemorrhage guideline. CMQCC is using a multi-level strategy to disseminate the guideline, including an open access toolkit, a minimal support mentoring model, a county partnership model, and a 30-hospital learning collaborative. Clinical Implications In participating hospitals, nurses have been the primary drivers in developing both general and massive hemorrhage policies and procedures, ensuring the availability of critical supplies, organizing team debriefing after a stage 2 or greater hemorrhage, hosting skills stations for measuring blood loss, and running OB hemorrhage drills. Each of these activities requires effort and leadership skill, even in hospitals where clinicians are convinced that these changes are needed. In some hospitals, the burden to convince physicians of the value of these new practices has rested primarily upon nurses. Thus, the state-wide initiative where nurse and physician leaders work together models the value of teamwork and provides a real-time demonstration of the potential for effective interdisciplinary collaboration to make a

  17. The Initial State of a Primordial Anisotropic Stage of Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the possibility that the inflationary period in the early universe was preceded by a primordial stage of strong anisotropy. In particular we focus on the simplest model of this kind, where the spacetime is described by a non-singular Kasner solution that quickly evolves into an isotropic de Sitter space, the so-called Kasner-de Sitter solution. The initial Big Bang singularity is replaced, in this case, by a horizon. We show that the extension of this metric to the region behind the horizon contains a timelike singularity which will be visible by cosmological observers. This makes it impossible to have a reliable prediction of the quantum state of the cosmological perturbations in the region of interest. In this paper we consider the possibility that this Kasner-de Sitter universe is obtained as a result of a quantum tunneling process effectively substituting the region behind the horizon by an anisotropic parent vacuum state, namely a 1+1 dimensional spacetime compactified over an internal flat torus, T2, which we take it to be of the form de Sitter2 × T2 or Minkowski2 × T2. As a first approximation to understand the effects of this anisotropic initial state, we compute the power spectrum of a massless scalar field in these backgrounds. In both cases, the spectrum converges at small scales to the isotropic scale invariant form and only present important deviations from it at the largest possible scales. We find that the decompactification scenario from M2 × T2 leads to a suppressed and slightly anisotropic power spectrum at large scales which could be related to some of the anomalies present in the current CMB data. On the other hand, the spectrum of the universe with a dS2 × T2 parent vacuum presents an enhancement in power at large scales not consistent with observations.

  18. International breastfeeding initiatives and their relevance to the current state of breastfeeding in the United States.

    PubMed

    Walker, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is becoming an endangered practice. Breastfeeding has fallen from the foundation of public health to something that is nice but not necessary in the minds of many consumers and health care professionals. Numerous international initiatives have been created to improve the initiation, duration, and exclusivity of breastfeeding throughout the world. These include the International Code of Marketing Breast-milk Substitutes, the Innocenti Declaration, and the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. In the United States, the National Alliance for Breastfeeding Advocacy (NABA), the US Breastfeeding Committee (USBC), and Baby-Friendly USA have played important roles in improving breastfeeding. We begin with a brief history of these initiatives and organizations and move on to discuss some of the progress and programs that can help return breastfeeding to its rightful place as the initial and most basic act of health protection.

  19. The Initial State of a Primordial Anisotropic Stage of Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the possibility that the inflationary period in the early universe was preceded by a primordial stage of strong anisotropy. In particular we focus on the simplest model of this kind, where the spacetime is described by a non-singular Kasner solution that quickly evolves into an isotropic de Sitter space, the so-called Kasner-de Sitter solution. The initial Big Bang singularity is replaced, in this case, by a horizon. We show that the extension of this metric to the region behind the horizon contains a timelike singularity which will be visible by cosmological observers. This makes it impossible to have a reliable prediction of the quantum state of the cosmological perturbations in the region of interest. In this paper we consider the possibility that this Kasner-de Sitter universe is obtained as a result of a quantum tunneling process effectively substituting the region behind the horizon by an anisotropic parent vacuum state, namely a 1+1 dimensional spacetime compactified over an internal flat torus, T{sub 2}, which we take it to be of the form de Sitter{sub 2} × T{sub 2} or Minkowski{sub 2} × T{sub 2}. As a first approximation to understand the effects of this anisotropic initial state, we compute the power spectrum of a massless scalar field in these backgrounds. In both cases, the spectrum converges at small scales to the isotropic scale invariant form and only present important deviations from it at the largest possible scales. We find that the decompactification scenario from M{sub 2} × T{sub 2} leads to a suppressed and slightly anisotropic power spectrum at large scales which could be related to some of the anomalies present in the current CMB data. On the other hand, the spectrum of the universe with a dS{sub 2} × T{sub 2} parent vacuum presents an enhancement in power at large scales not consistent with observations.

  20. The Initial State of a Primordial Anisotropic Stage of Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2015-06-12

    We investigate the possibility that the inflationary period in the early universe was preceded by a primordial stage of strong anisotropy. In particular we focus on the simplest model of this kind, where the spacetime is described by a non-singular Kasner solution that quickly evolves into an isotropic de Sitter space, the so-called Kasner-de Sitter solution. The initial Big Bang singularity is replaced, in this case, by a horizon. We show that the extension of this metric to the region behind the horizon contains a timelike singularity which will be visible by cosmological observers. This makes it impossible to have a reliable prediction of the quantum state of the cosmological perturbations in the region of interest. In this paper we consider the possibility that this Kasner-de Sitter universe is obtained as a result of a quantum tunneling process effectively substituting the region behind the horizon by an anisotropic parent vacuum state, namely a 1+1 dimensional spacetime compactified over an internal flat torus, T{sub 2}, which we take it to be of the form de Sitter{sub 2}×T{sub 2} or Minkowski{sub 2}×T{sub 2}. As a first approximation to understand the effects of this anisotropic initial state, we compute the power spectrum of a massless scalar field in these backgrounds. In both cases, the spectrum converges at small scales to the isotropic scale invariant form and only present important deviations from it at the largest possible scales. We find that the decompactification scenario from M{sub 2}×T{sub 2} leads to a suppressed and slightly anisotropic power spectrum at large scales which could be related to some of the anomalies present in the current CMB data. On the other hand, the spectrum of the universe with a dS{sub 2}×T{sub 2} parent vacuum presents an enhancement in power at large scales not consistent with observations.

  1. The Entrepreneurial State and Research Universities in the United States: Policy and New State-Based Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2007-01-01

    The convergence of United States federal science and economic policy that began in earnest under the Reagan administration formed the First Stage in an emerging post-Cold War drive toward technological innovation. A frenzy of new state-based initiatives now forms the Second Stage, further promoting universities as decisive tools for economic…

  2. The Entrepreneurial State and Research Universities in the United States: Policy and New State-Based Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2007-01-01

    The convergence of United States federal science and economic policy that began in earnest under the Reagan administration formed the First Stage in an emerging post-Cold War drive toward technological innovation. A frenzy of new state-based initiatives now forms the Second Stage, further promoting universities as decisive tools for economic…

  3. SRF (State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund): initial guidance for state revolving funds

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The document represents the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) approach to implementation of Title VI of the Clean Water Act (CWA), until interim final regulations on selected provisions in the guidance are issued. The release of the document marks a significant step in the transition of the responsibility for financing, constructing, and managing municipal wastewater-treatment facilities from the Federal government to States and localities. It will assist EPA Regions in their review of proposed State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund (SRF) programs and provide States with initial guidance on applying for Capitalization Grants.

  4. Rural health network development: public policy issues and state initiatives.

    PubMed

    Casey, M M; Wellever, A; Moscovice, I

    1997-02-01

    Rural health networks are a potential way for rural health care systems to improve access to care, reduce costs, and enhance quality of care. Networks provide a means for rural providers to contract with managed care organizations, develop their own managed care entities, share resources, and structure practice opportunities to support recruitment and retention of rural physicians and other health care professionals. The results of early network development initiatives indicate a need for state officials and others interested in encouraging network development to agree on common rural health network definitions, to identify clearly the goals of network development programs, and to document and analyze program outcomes. Future network development efforts need to be much more comprehensive if they are to have a significant impact on rural health care. This article analyzes public policy issues related to integrated rural health network development, discusses current efforts to encourage network development in rural areas, and suggests actions that states may take if they desire to support rural health network development. These actions include adopting a formal rural health network definition, providing networks with alternatives to certain regulatory requirements, and providing incentives such as matching grants, loans, or technical assistance. Without public sector support for networks, managed care options may continue to be unavailable in many less densely populated rural areas of the country, and locally controlled rural health networks are unlikely to develop as an alternative to the dominant pattern of managed care expansion by large urban entities. Implementation of Medicare reform legislation could provide significant incentives for the development of rural health networks, depending on the reimbursement provisions, financial solvency standards, and antitrust exemptions for provider-sponsored networks in the final legislation and federal regulations.

  5. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  6. Overdose Intake of Curcumin Initiates the Unbalanced State of Bodies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peiyu; Man, Shuli; Li, Jing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Liming; Yu, Peng; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-04-06

    Curcumin is the major active component of turmeric and widely used as a spice and coloring agent in food. However, its safety evaluation has been little investigated. To evaluate the 90-day subchronic toxicity of curcumin in rats, its general observation, clinical biochemistry, pathology, and metabolomics were evaluated. The results showed that curcumin induced liver injury through the generation of the overexpression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and the decreases of the levels of antioxidant enzyme SOD and detoxified enzyme GST. Meanwhile, for the self-protection of rats, curcumin treatment activated the transcription of Nrf-2 and elevated the expression of HO-1 to reduce tissue damage. Furthermore, curcumin significantly increased key mRNA levels of HK2, PKM2, LDHA, CES, Cpt1, Cpt2, FASN, and ATP5b and decreased levels of GLUT2 and ACC1 to enhance glycolysis and inhibit lipid metabolism and TCA cycle. Therefore, overdose or long-term intake of curcumin could initiate the unbalanced state of bodies through oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic disorders, which induces liver injury. Intermittent administration of curcumin is necessary in our daily lives.

  7. Using systems thinking in state health policymaking: an educational initiative.

    PubMed

    Minyard, Karen J; Ferencik, Rachel; Ann Phillips, Mary; Soderquist, Chris

    2014-06-01

    In response to limited examples of opportunities for state policymakers to learn about and productively discuss the difficult, adaptive challenges of our health system, the Georgia Health Policy Center developed an educational initiative that applies systems thinking to health policymaking. We created the Legislative Health Policy Certificate Program - an in-depth, multi-session series for lawmakers and their staff - concentrating on building systems thinking competencies and health content knowledge by applying a range of systems thinking tools: behavior over time graphs, stock and flow maps, and a system dynamics-based learning lab (a simulatable model of childhood obesity). Legislators were taught to approach policy issues from the big picture, consider changing dynamics, and explore higher-leverage interventions to address Georgia's most intractable health challenges. Our aim was to determine how we could improve the policymaking process by providing a systems thinking-focused educational program for legislators. Over 3 years, the training program resulted in policymakers' who are able to think more broadly about difficult health issues. The program has yielded valuable insights into the design and delivery of policymaker education that could be applied to various disciplines outside the legislative process.

  8. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2015-04-01

    Whether pQCD can describe exclusive reactions at medium energies remains an area of active study. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. A pQCD description of RCS requires the participation of three quarks and two hard gluons. However its predictions for the RCS cross sections disagree with data while calculations based on the handbag mechanism, involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs), match the data well. The measured longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL is inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations of the handbag mechanism. Furthermore, Miller's approach, which includes quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD where KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL (E12-14-006) has been approved to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C and will be able to discriminate between the various models. E12-14-006 will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  9. Consumer Satisfaction in Long-Term Care: State Initiatives in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Timothy J.; Lucas, Judith A.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Robinson, Joanne P.; Crystal, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a survey of state initiatives that measure resident satisfaction in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and we describe several model programs for legislators and public administrators contemplating the initiation of their own state programs. Design and Methods: Data on state initiatives and programs…

  10. BRIE: The Penn State Biogeochemical Research Initiative for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Brantley, S. L.; Brenchley, J.

    2003-12-01

    Few scientists are prepared to address the interdisciplinary challenges of biogeochemical research due to disciplinary differences in vocabulary, technique, and scientific paradigm. Thus scientists and engineers trained in traditional disciplines bring a restricted view to the study of environmental systems, which can limit their ability to exploit new techniques and opportunities for scientific advancement. Although the literature is effusive with enthusiasm for interdisciplinary approaches to biogeochemistry, there remains the basic difficulty of cross-training geological and biological scientists. The NSF-IGERT funded Biogeochemical Research Initiative for Education (BRIE) program at Penn State is specifically designed to break down both disciplinary and institutional barriers and it has fostered cross-disciplinary collaboration and training since 1999. Students and faculty are drawn from environmental engineering, geochemistry, soil science, chemistry and microbiology, and the program is regarded on the Penn State campus as a successful example of how interdisciplinary science can best be promoted. There are currently 23 Ph.D. students funded by the program, with an additional 7 affiliated students. At present, a total of 6 students have completed doctoral degrees, and they have done so within normal timeframes. The program is "discipline-plus," whereby students enroll in traditional disciplinary degree programs, and undertake broad training via 12 credits of graduate coursework in other departments. Students are co-advised by faculty from different disciplines, and engage in interdisciplinary research facilitated by research "credit cards." Funding is available for international research experiences, travel to meetings, and other opportunities for professional development. Students help institutionalize interdisciplinary training by designing and conducting a teaching module that shares their expertise with a class in another department or discipline

  11. The State of the States: State Initiatives in Foreign Languages and International Studies, 1979-1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Jamie B.

    As a followup to the 1979 report by the President's Commission on Foreign Language and International Studies, "Strength Through Wisdom," a study was conducted to learn what progress has been made toward improving international knowledge among Americans. State foreign language supervisors and others responsible for international education…

  12. 75 FR 47256 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Louisiana's hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  13. 77 FR 71395 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... State-initiated changes to Texas' hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and...

  14. 75 FR 36609 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Arkansas' hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  15. 76 FR 12307 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... State-initiated changes to Texas' hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and...

  16. 77 FR 41348 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Louisiana's hazardous waste program ] under the...

  17. 78 FR 58988 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Louisiana's hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  18. Health Care of Incarcerated Youth: State Programs & Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Linda S.; Sheahan, Paula M.

    This report presents the analysis and results of a survey of states' progress in meeting the goals and objectives of their state action plans on the health care of incarcerated youth. The survey questioned 48 juvenile justice professionals, health care professionals, and university faculty from across the nation concerning state progress toward…

  19. State Initiatives and Activities in Foreign Languages and International Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Jamie B.

    A listing of state efforts in foreign language education and international studies compiled from results of a telephone and mail survey of state foreign language supervisors is presented. For those states for which information was not available from supervisors, consultants, or education officials, other sources were consulted, including…

  20. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2014-06-01

    We review the phenomenology and theory of bulk observables in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, focusing on recent developments involving event-by-event fluctuations in the initial stages of a heavy-ion collision, and how they manifest in observed correlations. We first define the relevant observables and show how each measurement is related to underlying theoretical quantities. Then we review the prevailing picture of the various stages of a collision, including the state-of-the-art modeling of the initial stages of a collision and subsequent hydrodynamic evolution, as well as hadronic scattering and freeze-out in the later stages. We then discuss the recent results that have shaped our current understanding and identify the challenges that remain. Finally, we point out open issues and the potential for progress in the field.

  1. Expanding dependent coverage for young adults: lessons from state initiatives.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Joel C; Belloff, Dina; Monheit, Alan C; Delia, Derek; Koller, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires that adults up to age twenty-six be permitted to enroll as dependents on their parents' health plans. This article examines the experiences of states that enacted dependent expansion laws. Drawing on public information from thirty-one enacting states and case studies of four diverse reform states, it derives lessons that are pertinent to the implementation of this ACA provision. Dependent coverage laws vary across the states, but most impose residency, marital status, and other restrictions. The federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act further limits the reach of state laws. Eligibility for expanded coverage under the ACA is much broader. Rules in some states requiring or allowing separate premiums for adult dependents may also discourage enrollment compared with rules in other states (and the ACA), where these costs must be factored into family premiums. Business opposition in some states led to more restrictive regulations, especially for how premiums are charged, which in turn raised greater implementation challenges. Case study states did not report substantial young adult dependent coverage take-up, but early enrollment experience under ACA appears to be more positive. Long-term questions remain about the implications of this policy for risk pooling and the distribution of premium costs.

  2. Map and Track: State Initiatives To Encourage Responsible Fatherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitzer, Jane; Bernard, Stanley

    This report details current state efforts to promote responsible fatherhood, identifies and profiles specific strategies to encourage fathers to be responsible, and summarizes state father-related data. Chapter 1, "Setting the Context," provides a rationale for the policy interest in fathers and presents the methodology for the study.…

  3. State Technical Assistance Initiatives for IDEA Part B Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanft, Barbara

    This report discusses a study that examined state technical assistance (TA) infrastructures that support research-based practices for improved outcomes for students with disabilities served under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The 10 participating states included: Alabama, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, Montana, Oklahoma,…

  4. Map and Track: State Initiatives To Encourage Responsible Fatherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitzer, Jane; Bernard, Stanley

    This report details current state efforts to promote responsible fatherhood, identifies and profiles specific strategies to encourage fathers to be responsible, and summarizes state father-related data. Chapter 1, "Setting the Context," provides a rationale for the policy interest in fathers and presents the methodology for the study.…

  5. Frequently Asked Questions: Common Core State Standards Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The document provides answers to some of the frequently asked questions about the Common Core State Standards, from how they were developed to what they mean for states and local communities. The questions are organized into the following categories: (1) Overview; (2) Process; (3) Implementation and Future Work; and (4) Content and Quality of the…

  6. State Mindfulness Scale (SMS): development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Tanay, Galia; Bernstein, Amit

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the present research was to develop and test a novel conceptual model and corresponding measure of state mindfulness-the State Mindfulness Scale (SMS). We developed the SMS to reflect traditional Buddhist and contemporary psychological science models of mindfulness not similarly reflected in extant published measures of the construct. Study 1 exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a higher order 2-factor solution encompassing 1 second-order state mindfulness factor, and 2 first-order factors, one reflecting state mindfulness of bodily sensations and the other state mindfulness of mental events. Study 2 provided cross-sectional evidence of the convergent, discriminant, and incremental convergent validity of SMS scores with respect to other measures of state and trait mindfulness. Study 3, a randomized control experimental mindfulness intervention study, yielded a number of key findings with respect to SMS stability as a function of time and context, construct validity, incremental sensitivity to change in state mindfulness over time, and incremental predictive criterion-related validity. Findings are discussed with respect to the potential contribution of the SMS to the study of mindfulness as a statelike mental behavior, biopsychobehavioral research on the mechanisms of mindfulness, and clinical evaluation of mindfulness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. 76 FR 20087 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; State Small Business Credit Initiative Allocation Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Proposed Collection; Comment Request; State Small Business Credit Initiative Allocation Agreement AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title: State Small Business Credit Initiative Allocation Agreement. OMB Number: 1505-0227.... Participating States will use the Federal funds for programs that leverage private lending to help finance small...

  8. State Level Initiatives Related to Training and Supervision of Paraeducators. Quick Turn Around (QTA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri; Gerlach, Kent

    This report provides an overview of selected state initiatives related to the training and supervision of paraeducators serving students with disabilities. The five states highlighted in the document were selected because of the significant work each has done in the area of paraeducators. In all five states, paraeducator initiatives began prior to…

  9. 78 FR 58890 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... identified a variety of State-initiated changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  10. 75 FR 47223 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... identified a variety of State-initiated changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  11. Understanding the nuclear initial state with an electron ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    In these proceedings I describe how a future electron-ion collider will allow us to directly measure the initial spatial distribution of gluons in heavy ions, as well as its variance ("lumpiness") in exclusive diffraction. I show the feasibility of such a measurement by means of simulated data from the novel event generator Sartre.

  12. Small Island States Green Energy Initiative. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Khattak, Nasir

    1999-10-15

    This report covers the activities carried out during a one year period from 7/15/99 to 7/15/00 as part of the Small Islands Green Energy Initiative. The three activities were: 1) Energy Ministerial conference in the Caribbean; 2) Training session on renewable energy for utility engineers; and 3) Case studies compilation on renewable energy in the Caribbean.

  13. The States Speak. A Report on Intergenerational Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Age, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI.

    Results of a national survey of state involvement in intergenerational programs are reported. Following a preface, material is presented in three main sections. Section I, "The Landscape of Intergenerational Programs," presents an overview of the main categories of programs throughout the country. Survey responses indicate that all 50…

  14. Map and Track: State Initiatives for Young Children and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitzer, Jane; Page, Stephen

    In the past decade, there has been a sharp increase in awareness of how interventions that address multiple risk factors and target both children and their families can help ensure that children grow up healthy and able to learn. In 1995, the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) undertook a project to "map" state initiatives…

  15. Local Initiative for Displaced Workers Generates State Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crist, Donald G.; And Others

    In the midst of the economic recession of the early 1980's, two major facilities in Galesburg, Illinois, were closed down: a large private company and a state mental health facility which employed 15% of the local residents. The economic and social impact of these closures created a crisis for the town, its inhabitants, and service workers. In…

  16. 77 FR 15845 - State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) National Standards For Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) National Standards For Compliance AGENCY: Department of... of ``SSBCI National Standards: Compliance and Oversight for Participating States''. DATES: Effective..., DC 20220. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The ``SSBCI National Standards: Compliance and Oversight...

  17. Stochastic switching of TiO2-based memristive devices with identical initial memory states

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we show that identical TiO2-based memristive devices that possess the same initial resistive states are only phenomenologically similar as their internal structures may vary significantly, which could render quite dissimilar switching dynamics. We experimentally demonstrated that the resistive switching of practical devices with similar initial states could occur at different programming stimuli cycles. We argue that similar memory states can be transcribed via numerous distinct active core states through the dissimilar reduced TiO2-x filamentary distributions. Our hypothesis was finally verified via simulated results of the memory state evolution, by taking into account dissimilar initial filamentary distribution. PMID:24994953

  18. Multi-State Initiatives---Agriculture Security Preparedness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Service, Agriculture Information Bulletin No. 742, July 1998. 6 farming, including seed , feed, fertilizer, machinery, food processing...pathological organism. • This lack of diversity is compounded by the fact that 80 percent of the nation’s seed derives from one locale, the Idaho valley...due to the exceptionally dry climate in the region. • A notable percentage of imported hybrid seed used for crop production in the United States

  19. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .../H7 LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA § 56.10 Initial State response and containment plan. (a) In order... and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Layers under § 146.24(a) of this chapter or a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Turkeys...

  20. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .../H7 LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA § 56.10 Initial State response and containment plan. (a) In order... and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Layers under § 146.24(a) of this chapter or a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Turkeys...

  1. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .../H7 LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA § 56.10 Initial State response and containment plan. (a) In order... and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Layers under § 146.24(a) of this chapter or a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Turkeys...

  2. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .../H7 LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA § 56.10 Initial State response and containment plan. (a) In order... and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Layers under § 146.24(a) of this chapter or a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Turkeys...

  3. Toward a Semi-Self-Paced EEG Brain Computer Interface: Decoding Initiation State from Non-Initiation State in Dedicated Time Slots

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lingling; Leung, Howard; Peterson, David A.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) offer a broad class of neurologically impaired individuals an alternative means to interact with the environment. Many BCIs are “synchronous” systems, in which the system sets the timing of the interaction and tries to infer what control command the subject is issuing at each prompting. In contrast, in “asynchronous” BCIs subjects pace the interaction and the system must determine when the subject’s control command occurs. In this paper we propose a new idea for BCI which draws upon the strengths of both approaches. The subjects are externally paced and the BCI is able to determine when control commands are issued by decoding the subject’s intention for initiating control in dedicated time slots. A single task with randomly interleaved trials was designed to test whether it can be used as stimulus for inducing initiation and non-initiation states when the sensory and motor requirements for the two types of trials are very nearly identical. Further, the essential problem on the discrimination between initiation state and non-initiation state was studied. We tested the ability of EEG spectral power to distinguish between these two states. Among the four standard EEG frequency bands, beta band power recorded over parietal-occipital cortices provided the best performance, achieving an average accuracy of 86% for the correct classification of initiation and non-initiation states. Moreover, delta band power recorded over parietal and motor areas yielded a good performance and thus could also be used as an alternative feature to discriminate these two mental states. The results demonstrate the viability of our proposed idea for a BCI design based on conventional EEG features. Our proposal offers the potential to mitigate the signal detection challenges of fully asynchronous BCIs, while providing greater flexibility to the subject than traditional synchronous BCIs. PMID:24586440

  4. What Can the Common Core State Standards Initiative Learn from the National Assessment Governing Board?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) is a bit like the underdog candidate who wins the election when few think it possible. "Now what?" is the question facing the surprised victor. With an initial agreement for the Common Core State Standards to be developed, and visible progress toward their development and promulgation, what will…

  5. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting

    ScienceCinema

    Thomas, Sunil; Edmond, John; Krames, Michael; Raman, Sudhakar

    2016-07-12

    The importance of U.S. manufacturing for clean energy technologies, such as solid-state lighting (SSL), is paramount to increasing competitiveness in a global marketplace. SSLs are poised to drive the lighting market, worldwide. In order to continue that competitiveness and support further innovation, the time to invest in U.S. manufacturing of clean energy technologies is now. Across the country, companies developing innovative clean energy technologies find competitive advantages to manufacturing in the U.S. The Department of Energy's Building Technology Office SSL Manufacturing Roadmap is just one example of how we support manufacturing through convening industry perspectives on opportunities to significantly reduce risk, improve quality, increase yields, and lower costs.

  6. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting Video

    ScienceCinema

    Thomas, Sunil; Edmond, John; Krames, Michael; Raman, Sudhakar

    2016-07-12

    The importance of U.S. manufacturing for clean energy technologies, such as solid-state lighting (SSL), is paramount to increasing competitiveness in a global marketplace. SSLs are poised to drive the lighting market, worldwide. In order to continue that competitiveness and support further innovation, the time to invest in U.S. manufacturing of clean energy technologies is now. Across the country, companies developing innovative clean energy technologies find competitive advantages to manufacturing in the U.S. The Department of Energy's Building Technology Office SSL Manufacturing Roadmap is just one example of how we support manufacturing through convening industry perspectives on opportunities to significantly reduce risk, improve quality, increase yields, and lower costs.

  7. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sunil; Edmond, John; Krames, Michael; Raman, Sudhakar

    2014-09-23

    The importance of U.S. manufacturing for clean energy technologies, such as solid-state lighting (SSL), is paramount to increasing competitiveness in a global marketplace. SSLs are poised to drive the lighting market, worldwide. In order to continue that competitiveness and support further innovation, the time to invest in U.S. manufacturing of clean energy technologies is now. Across the country, companies developing innovative clean energy technologies find competitive advantages to manufacturing in the U.S. The Department of Energy's Building Technology Office SSL Manufacturing Roadmap is just one example of how we support manufacturing through convening industry perspectives on opportunities to significantly reduce risk, improve quality, increase yields, and lower costs.

  8. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Solid-State Lighting Video

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sunil; Edmond, John; Krames, Michael; Raman, Sudhakar

    2014-09-23

    The importance of U.S. manufacturing for clean energy technologies, such as solid-state lighting (SSL), is paramount to increasing competitiveness in a global marketplace. SSLs are poised to drive the lighting market, worldwide. In order to continue that competitiveness and support further innovation, the time to invest in U.S. manufacturing of clean energy technologies is now. Across the country, companies developing innovative clean energy technologies find competitive advantages to manufacturing in the U.S. The Department of Energy's Building Technology Office SSL Manufacturing Roadmap is just one example of how we support manufacturing through convening industry perspectives on opportunities to significantly reduce risk, improve quality, increase yields, and lower costs.

  9. Initial state azimuthal anisotropies in small collision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2016-12-01

    Strong multiparticle azimuthal correlations have recently been observed in high energy proton-nucleus collisions. While final state collective effects can be responsible for many of the observed effects, the domain structure in the classical color field of a high energy nucleus, naturally also leads to such multiparticle correlations. We describe recent calculations of the momentum space 2-particle cumulant azimuthal anisotropy coefficients νn { 2 }, n = 2 , 3 , 4 from fundamental representation Wilson line distributions describing the high energy nucleus. We find significant differences between Wilson lines from the MV model and from JIMWLK evolution. We also discuss the relation of this calculation to earlier work on the ridge correlation obtained in the "glasma graph" approximation, and to the "color electric field domain model."

  10. 20 CFR 658.413 - Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... State Agency Js Complaint System § 658.413 Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office... State agency office, the appropriate JS official shall offer to explain the operation of the JS complaint system. The appropriate JS official shall offer to take the complaint in writing if it is...

  11. 20 CFR 658.413 - Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Complaint System State Agency Js Complaint System § 658.413 Initial handling of complaints by the State or... a State agency office, the appropriate JS official shall offer to explain the operation of the JS complaint system. The appropriate JS official shall offer to take the complaint in writing if it is...

  12. 20 CFR 658.413 - Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Complaint System State Agency Js Complaint System § 658.413 Initial handling of complaints by the State or... a State agency office, the appropriate JS official shall offer to explain the operation of the JS complaint system. The appropriate JS official shall offer to take the complaint in writing if it is...

  13. Juvenile Justice Reform Initiatives in the States: 1994-1996. Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Criminal Justice Association, Washington, DC.

    This overview of recent state juvenile justice reform measures and identifies issues and trends associated with state juvenile reform initiatives. The report explains some of the more punitive measures, such as new criminal court transfer authority and expanded juvenile court sentencing options. Many states have balanced these steps with enhanced…

  14. 9 CFR 56.10 - Initial State response and containment plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .../H7 LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA § 56.10 Initial State response and containment plan. (a) In order...) Public awareness and education programs regarding avian influenza. (b) If a State is designated a U.S. Avian Influenza Monitored State, Layers under § 146.24(a) of this chapter or a U.S. Avian Influenza...

  15. Kindergarten Readiness Impacts of the Arkansas Better Chance State Prekindergarten Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustedt, Jason T.; Jung, Kwanghee; Barnett, W. Steven; Williams, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Enrollment in state-funded pre-K programs prior to kindergarten entry has become increasingly common. As each state develops its own model for pre-K, rigorous studies of the impacts of state-specific programs are needed. This study investigates impacts of the Arkansas Better Chance (ABC) initiative at kindergarten entry using a…

  16. Kindergarten Readiness Impacts of the Arkansas Better Chance State Prekindergarten Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustedt, Jason T.; Jung, Kwanghee; Barnett, W. Steven; Williams, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Enrollment in state-funded pre-K programs prior to kindergarten entry has become increasingly common. As each state develops its own model for pre-K, rigorous studies of the impacts of state-specific programs are needed. This study investigates impacts of the Arkansas Better Chance (ABC) initiative at kindergarten entry using a…

  17. The 1990 Montana initiative to increase cigarette taxes: lessons for other states and localities.

    PubMed

    Moon, R W; Males, M A; Nelson, D E

    1993-01-01

    In November 1990, voters in Montana defeated an initiative that would have increased the state's excise tax on a pack of cigarettes by 25 cents. The increased revenues were intended for tobacco education and research. Opponents of the measure, primarily tobacco companies, outspent proponents by more than 35 to 1. Their primary themes were opposition to new taxes and to a larger state bureaucracy. Based on the results of initiative campaigns in Montana and California, taxation initiatives are more likely to succeed if guidance is sought from leaders of similar campaigns in other states, tobacco control coalitions are built and funding secured early, and polling conducted before initiative measures are finalized. Other requirements for success include careful wording of the initiative, strong leadership, consideration of a paid petition drive, effective use of the news media, anticipating opposition arguments, and emphasizing the benefits of the tax increase in the campaign.

  18. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS INITIATIVE AND BIOMARKERS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), there are several on-going programs and projects that collect health and environmental information. The USEPA's Environmental Indicators Initiative is one such program which includes the development of environmenta...

  19. Evaluating the performance of vehicular platoon control under different network topologies of initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfu; Li, Kezhi; Zheng, Taixiong; Hu, Xiangdong; Feng, Huizong; Li, Yinguo

    2016-05-01

    This study proposes a feedback-based platoon control protocol for connected autonomous vehicles (CAVs) under different network topologies of initial states. In particularly, algebraic graph theory is used to describe the network topology. Then, the leader-follower approach is used to model the interactions between CAVs. In addition, feedback-based protocol is designed to control the platoon considering the longitudinal and lateral gaps simultaneously as well as different network topologies. The stability and consensus of the vehicular platoon is analyzed using the Lyapunov technique. Effects of different network topologies of initial states on convergence time and robustness of platoon control are investigated. Results from numerical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed protocol with respect to the position and velocity consensus in terms of the convergence time and robustness. Also, the findings of this study illustrate the convergence time of the control protocol is associated with the initial states, while the robustness is not affected by the initial states significantly.

  20. Genital Herpes - Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 48. Genital Herpes — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital herpes estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  1. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS INITIATIVE AND BIOMARKERS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), there are several on-going programs and projects that collect health and environmental information. The USEPA's Environmental Indicators Initiative is one such program which includes the development of environmenta...

  2. Genital Warts -- Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966 - 2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 46. Genital Warts — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital warts estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  3. Structural Minimality, CP and the Initial State in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Rakesh M.; Hancin-Bhatt, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Considers the current debate on the initial state of second language (L2) acquisition and presents critical empirical evidence from Hindi learners of English-as-a-Second-Language that supports the claim that the complementizer phase (CP) is initially absent from the grammar of L2 speakers.(Author/VWL)

  4. Structural Minimality, CP and the Initial State in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Rakesh M.; Hancin-Bhatt, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Considers the current debate on the initial state of second language (L2) acquisition and presents critical empirical evidence from Hindi learners of English-as-a-Second-Language that supports the claim that the complementizer phase (CP) is initially absent from the grammar of L2 speakers.(Author/VWL)

  5. Reduced quantum dynamics with initial system-environment correlations characterized by pure Markov states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkmen, A.; Verçin, A.; Yılmaz, S.

    2016-09-01

    Any tripartite state which saturates the strong subadditivity relation for the quantum entropy is defined as the Markov state. A tripartite pure state describing an open system, its environment, and their purifying system is a pure Markov state if and only if the bipartite marginal state of the purifying system and environment is a product state. It has been shown that as long as the purification of the input system-environment state is a pure Markov state, the reduced dynamics of the open system can be described, on the support of the initial system state, by a quantum channel for every joint unitary evolution of the system-environment composite even in the presence of initial correlations. Entanglement, discord, and classical correlations of the initial system-environment states implied by the pure Markov states are analyzed and it has been shown that all these correlations are entirely specified by the entropy of environment. Some implications concerning perfect quantum error correction procedure and quantum Markovian dynamics are presented.

  6. The Common Core State Standards Initiative: An Event History Analysis of State Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVenia, Mark; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Lang, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Today, with states' near-universal adoption of the Common Core State Standards, the political system has achieved that which was not possible less than 2 decades ago. Just why this is so remains unanswered. Some observers have attributed states' embrace of the standards to the substantial financial incentives that the federal government embedded…

  7. The Common Core State Standards Initiative: An Event History Analysis of State Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVenia, Mark; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Lang, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Today, with states' near-universal adoption of the Common Core State Standards, the political system has achieved that which was not possible less than 2 decades ago. Just why this is so remains unanswered. Some observers have attributed states' embrace of the standards to the substantial financial incentives that the federal government embedded…

  8. ICTs for Learning: An Overview of Systemic Initiatives in the Australian States and Territories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Glenn; Trinidad, Sue

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of Systemic Initiatives in the Australian States and Territories. This updated overview acknowledges the help and information provided by key contacts whom the authors contacted from each of the Australian State and Territory government education systems. In addition, the role of the Ministerial Council for…

  9. Universal Design for Learning: Four State Initiatives. Quick Turn Around (QTA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve; Tschantz, Jennifer

    This paper summarizes information from interviews with four states regarding their Universal Design for Learning (UDL) initiatives, i.e., state or regional level efforts to promote the principles and practices of UDL via professional development or the production and/or dissemination of universally designed instructional materials. Discussion of…

  10. Government Initiatives to Encourage Employer-Supported Child Care: The State and Local Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dana E.

    A study was conducted to identify a range of strategies that New York State government could adopt to stimulate business and industry to provide supportive family benefits, services, and work policies. The investigation included a national survey of state and local government initiatives and a special analysis of policies appropriate for New York…

  11. State College and Career Readiness Initiative: Statewide Transitional Courses for College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Kenna; Murray, Renee; Smith, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Through the "Strengthening Statewide College/Career Readiness Initiative" (SSCRI), Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) has collaborated with states on state policy goals and actions needed to improve high school students' academic readiness for postsecondary study and reduce the need for remedial work. SREB created and implemented…

  12. One State's Initiative to Increase Access to Higher Education for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mock, Martha; Love, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on a state-based initiative to engage youth with intellectual disabilities (ID), their families, universities, schools, agencies, and funders in improving access to inclusive postsecondary education (PSE). As opportunities in higher education for students with ID continue to increase across United States, there are differing…

  13. State Initiatives to Promote Technological Innovation and Economic Growth. Postsecondary Education Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Janice

    Activities undertaken by 43 states including Maryland to promote technological innovation and economic growth and the impact of these activities are identified. Implications for Maryland are also noted in a brief section of recommendations. State initiatives include: sponsoring research and development at colleges and companies, improving the…

  14. 20 CFR 658.413 - Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE JOB SERVICE SYSTEM Job Service Complaint System State Agency Js Complaint System § 658.413 Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office... complaint system. The appropriate JS official shall offer to take the complaint in writing if it is...

  15. Ahead of the Curve: State Success in the Developmental Education Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altstadt, David

    2012-01-01

    Building on their work through Achieving the Dream, six states and 15 community colleges joined the Developmental Education Initiative (DEI) in 2009 to take on one of higher education's most daunting challenges: improving the success of students who enter community college academically underprepared. The states and Jobs for the Future, which…

  16. Role of the Initial State in the Nonequilibrium Quantum Dynamics of Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Lea F.; Torres-Herrera, Eduardo J.

    2014-03-01

    We show that the dynamics of isolated many-body quantum systems after a quench depends on the interplay between the initial state and the Hamiltonian dictating the evolution. The systems considered are in the nonperturbative regime. The relaxation process is controlled by the width of the energy distribution of the initial state and may be very similar for both chaotic and integrable Hamiltonians. Our analytical expression for the fidelity decay displays excellent agreement with our numerical results. This decay is Gaussian and may persist until saturation. We also provide analytical expressions that describe very well the initial evolution of the Shannon entropy and of few-body observables. The analyses are developed for deterministic one-dimensional systems and initial states of interest to current experiments with cold atoms in optical lattices. This work was supported by the NSF grant No. DMR-1147430. E.J.T.H. acknowledges partial support by CONACyT, México.

  17. Initial state randomness improves sequence learning in a model hippocampal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, A. P.; Wu X.; Sullivan, D. W.; Levy, W. B.

    2002-03-01

    Randomness can be a useful component of computation. Using a computationally minimal, but still biologically based model of the hippocampus, we evaluate the effects of initial state randomization on learning a cognitive problem that requires this brain structure. Greater randomness of initial states leads to more robust performance in simulations of the cognitive task called transverse patterning, a context-dependent discrimination task that we code as a sequence prediction problem. At the conclusion of training, greater initial randomness during training trials also correlates with increased, repetitive firing of select individual neurons, previously named local context neurons. In essence, such repetitively firing neurons recognize subsequences, and previously their presence has been correlated with solving the transverse patterning problem. A more detailed analysis of the simulations across training trials reveals more about initial state randomization. The beneficial effects of initial state randomization derive from enhanced variation, across training trials, of the sequential states of a network. This greater variation is not uniformly present during training; it is largely restricted to the beginning of training and when novel sequences are introduced. Little such variation occurs after extensive or even moderate amounts of training. We explain why variation is high early in training, but not later. This automatic modulation of the initial-state-driven random variation through state space is reminiscent of simulated annealing where modulated randomization encourages a selectively broad search through state space. In contrast to an annealing schedule, the selective occurrence of such a random search here is an emergent property, and the critical randomization occurs during training rather than testing.

  18. State Education and Coordination Grants: The Early Experience. The State Youth Initiatives Project, Working Paper #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, May Long

    This paper focuses on issues related to the management, goals, activities, and problems of the State Education Coordination and Grants set-aside of the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA). (This provision places 8 percent of each State's total allocation for training for Disadvantaged Youth and Adults (Title II-A) under the authority of the…

  19. The State Youth Initiatives Project. State Education and Coordination Grants: The Early Experience. Working Paper #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, May Long

    A study gathered information from the early 8 percent set-aside experience of 12 states during the first official period of Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) activity. The states were Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, and South Carolina. Findings were that…

  20. A FFT Method for the Quasiclassical Selection of Initial Ro-Vibrational States of Triatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaker, Charles W.; Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an exact fast Fourier transform (FFT) method to prepare specified vibrational-rotational states of triatomic molecules. The method determines the Fourier coefficients needed to describe the coordinates and momenta of a vibrating-rotating triatomic molecule. Once the Fourier coefficients of a particular state are determined, it is possible to easily generate as many random sets of initial cartesian coordinates and momenta as desired. All the members of each set will correspond to the particular vibrational-rotational state selected. For example, in the case of the ground vibrational state of a non-rotating water molecule, the calculated actions of 100 sets of initial conditions produced actions within 0.001 h(bar) of the specified quantization values and energies within 5 cm(sup -1) of the semiclassical eigenvalue. The numerical procedure is straightforward for states in which all the fundamental frequencies are independent. However for states for which the fundamental frequencies become commensurate (resonance states), there are additional complications. In these cases it is necessary to determine a new set of "fundamental" frequencies and to modify the quantization conditions. Once these adjustments are made, good results are obtained for resonance states. The major problems are in labelling the large number of Fourier coefficients and the presence of regions of chaotic motion. Results are presented for the vibrational states of H2O and HCN and the ro-vibrational states of H2O.

  1. A FFT Method for the Quasiclassical Selection of Initial Ro-Vibrational States of Triatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaker, Charles W.; Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an exact fast Fourier transform (FFT) method to prepare specified vibrational-rotational states of triatomic molecules. The method determines the Fourier coefficients needed to describe the coordinates and momenta of a vibrating-rotating triatomic molecule. Once the Fourier coefficients of a particular state are determined, it is possible to easily generate as many random sets of initial cartesian coordinates and momenta as desired. All the members of each set will correspond to the particular vibrational-rotational state selected. For example, in the case of the ground vibrational state of a non-rotating water molecule, the calculated actions of 100 sets of initial conditions produced actions within 0.001 h(bar) of the specified quantization values and energies within 5 cm(sup -1) of the semiclassical eigenvalue. The numerical procedure is straightforward for states in which all the fundamental frequencies are independent. However for states for which the fundamental frequencies become commensurate (resonance states), there are additional complications. In these cases it is necessary to determine a new set of "fundamental" frequencies and to modify the quantization conditions. Once these adjustments are made, good results are obtained for resonance states. The major problems are in labelling the large number of Fourier coefficients and the presence of regions of chaotic motion. Results are presented for the vibrational states of H2O and HCN and the ro-vibrational states of H2O.

  2. The shift of harmonics with different initial vibrational states in the H{}_{2}^{+} molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Pan, Xue-Fei; Xu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2017-05-01

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation of H{}2+ and its isotopes is investigated by numerical simulations of the non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schrödinger equations. The general characteristic of the typical high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectra for the H{}2+ molecule indicates that only the odd harmonics can be generated. Here we show that how the initial vibrational states and nuclear dynamics break down this standard characteristic, i.e. a redshift or blueshift of the harmonics appears. We investigate the effect of the initial vibrational states on the redshift or blueshift of the HHG spectrum under trapezoidal laser pulses. The ionization probability and time-frequency analysis are used to illustrate the physical mechanism of the shift of the harmonics. We also show the HHG spectra from the different isotopes of H2+ molecule with different initial vibrational states.

  3. Environment and initial state engineered dynamics of quantum and classical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi Li, Chun-Xian; Guo, Yu; Lu, Geng-Biao; Ding, Kai-He

    2016-11-15

    Based on an open exactly solvable system coupled to an environment with nontrivial spectral density, we connect the features of quantum and classical correlations with some features of the environment, initial states of the system, and the presence of initial system–environment correlations. Some interesting features not revealed before are observed by changing the structure of environment, the initial states of system, and the presence of initial system–environment correlations. The main results are as follows. (1) Quantum correlations exhibit temporary freezing and permanent freezing even at high temperature of the environment, for which the necessary and sufficient conditions are given by three propositions. (2) Quantum correlations display a transition from temporary freezing to permanent freezing by changing the structure of environment. (3) Quantum correlations can be enhanced all the time, for which the condition is put forward. (4) The one-to-one dependency relationship between all kinds of dynamic behaviors of quantum correlations and the initial states of the system as well as environment structure is established. (5) In the presence of initial system–environment correlations, quantum correlations under local environment exhibit temporary multi-freezing phenomenon. While under global environment they oscillate, revive, and damp, an explanation for which is given. - Highlights: • Various interesting behaviors of quantum and classical correlations are observed in an open exactly solvable model. • The important effects of the bath structure on quantum and classical correlations are revealed. • The one-to-one correspondence between the type of dynamical behavior of quantum discord and the initial state is given. • Quantum correlations are given in the presence of initial qubits–bath correlations.

  4. Chimera states and the interplay between initial conditions and non-local coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalle, Peter; Sawicki, Jakub; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2017-03-01

    Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns that consist of coexisting domains of coherent and incoherent dynamics. We study chimera states in a network of non-locally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We investigate the impact of initial conditions in combination with non-local coupling. Based on an analytical argument, we show how the coupling phase and the coupling strength are linked to the occurrence of chimera states, flipped profiles of the mean phase velocity, and the transition from a phase- to an amplitude-mediated chimera state.

  5. Chimera states and the interplay between initial conditions and non-local coupling.

    PubMed

    Kalle, Peter; Sawicki, Jakub; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2017-03-01

    Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns that consist of coexisting domains of coherent and incoherent dynamics. We study chimera states in a network of non-locally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We investigate the impact of initial conditions in combination with non-local coupling. Based on an analytical argument, we show how the coupling phase and the coupling strength are linked to the occurrence of chimera states, flipped profiles of the mean phase velocity, and the transition from a phase- to an amplitude-mediated chimera state.

  6. No-go theorem for ground state cooling given initial system-thermal bath factorization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Segal, Dvira; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Ground-state cooling and pure state preparation of a small object that is embedded in a thermal environment is an important challenge and a highly desirable quantum technology. This paper proves, with two different methods, that a fundamental constraint on the cooling dynamic implies that it is impossible to cool, via a unitary system-bath quantum evolution, a system that is embedded in a thermal environment down to its ground state, if the initial state is a factorized product of system and bath states. The latter is a crucial but artificial assumption included in numerous tools that treat system-bath dynamics, such as master equation approaches and Kraus operator based methods. Adopting these approaches to address ground state and even approximate ground state cooling dynamics should therefore be done with caution, considering the fundamental theorem exposed in this work.

  7. Initial-state dependence of the quench dynamics in integrable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rigol, Marcos; Fitzpatrick, Mattias

    2011-09-15

    We identify and study classes of initial states in integrable quantum systems that, after the relaxation dynamics following a sudden quench, lead to near-thermal expectation values of few-body observables. In the systems considered here, those states are found to be insulating ground states of lattice hard-core boson Hamiltonians. We show that, as a suitable parameter in the initial Hamiltonian is changed, those states become closer to Fock states (products of single site states) as the outcome of the relaxation dynamics becomes closer to the thermal prediction. At the same time, the energy density approaches a Gaussian. Furthermore, the entropy associated with the generalized canonical and generalized grand-canonical ensembles, introduced to describe observables in integrable systems after relaxation, approaches that of the conventional canonical and grand-canonical ensembles. We argue that those classes of initial states are special because a control parameter allows one to tune the distribution of conserved quantities to approach the one in thermal equilibrium. This helps in understanding the approach of all the quantities studied to their thermal expectation values. However, a finite-size scaling analysis shows that this behavior should not be confused with thermalization as understood for nonintegrable systems.

  8. Dynamic evolution of initial instability during non-steady-state growth.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhibo; Zheng, Wenjian; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic evolution of initial instability is investigated by an analytic model obtained by modifying the theory of Warren and Langer [Phys. Rev. E 47, 2702 (1993)] and the quantitative phase-field model in directional solidification under transient conditions for realistic parameters of a dilute alloy. The evolutions of tip velocity and concentration in the liquid side of the interface predicted by the analytic model agree very well with that from the phase-field simulation in the linear growth stage of the non-steady-state growth, indicating that the model could be used as a convenient method to study the initial instability during non-steady-state growth. The influences of non-steady-state conditions which include the increasing rate of pulling speed and temperature gradient at the onset of initial instability are investigated, and we find that, the initial instability seems to depend strongly on the non-steady-state conditions and the non-steady-state history, and thus, it should be primarily considered in the study of the transient growth.

  9. A Developmental Perspective of State Policy Initiatives in Instructional Management in the State of Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Jane Bruner

    This paper traces the evolution of curriculum reform in Mississippi from a state level, norm-referenced accountability system to a performance-based, centralized accreditation system that integrates instructional management requirements into improvement standards. Accountability legislation has primarily been concerned with quality of student…

  10. High harmonic generation by anions and atoms: effect of initial/final-state wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, V. N.

    2005-12-01

    When high harmonic generation (HHG) is considered theoretically within the ideas of the rescattering mechanism, the specifics of initial/final state of an active electron usually attract little attention. We explore such specifics related to initial/final bound p-state of the active electron (existing studies concentrated on s-states). The halogen anions and noble gas atoms (except He) provide important examples of such targets. The present theory with realistic wavefunctions gives HHG rates by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude lower than previous calculations with asymptotic (single-exponential) wavefunctions. This indicates that the HHG process is much more sensitive to the description of the bound-state wavefunctions in the inner domain than the above-threshold ionization where the asymptotic (large-r) approach is sufficient and self-consistent. The rates of HHG processes with and without change of electron magnetic quantum number mell are compared for B(2p) and H(2p) targets.

  11. Extracting Information about the Initial State from the Black Hole Radiation.

    PubMed

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Padmanabhan, T

    2016-02-05

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state contained in a specific class of distortions of the black hole radiation and identify the classes of in states that can be partially or fully reconstructed from the information contained within. Even for the general in state, we can uncover some specific information. These results suggest that a classical collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantum treatment of the entire collapse process might allow us to retrieve much more information from the spectrum of the final radiation.

  12. Geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations in Cartesian coordinates: excited states.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2007-01-14

    The authors show that a recently proposed approach [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 084103 (2005)] for the inclusion of geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations can be used to obtain excited states of weakly bound complexes. Sample calculations are performed for free and constrained rare gas clusters. The results show that the proposed approach allows the evaluation of excited states with reasonable accuracy when compared to exact basis set calculations.

  13. Testosterone Lab Testing and Initiation in the United Kingdom and the United States, 2000 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongmei; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Context: New formulations, increased marketing, and wider recognition of declining testosterone levels in older age may have contributed to wider testosterone testing and supplementation in many countries. Objective: Our objective was to describe testosterone testing and testosterone treatment in men in the United Kingdom and United States. Design: This was a retrospective incident user cohort. Setting: We evaluated commercial and Medicare insurance claims from the United States and general practitioner healthcare records from the United Kingdom for the years 2000 through 2011. Participants: We identified 410 019 US men and 6858 UK men who initiated a testosterone formulation as well as 1 114 329 US men and 66 140 UK men with a new testosterone laboratory measurement. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures included initiation of any injected testosterone, implanted testosterone pellets, or prescribed transdermal or oral testosterone formulation. Results: Testosterone testing and supplementation have increased pronouncedly in the United States. Increased testing in the United Kingdom has identified more men with low levels, yet US testing has increased among men with normal levels. Men in the United States tend to initiate at normal levels more often than in the United Kingdom, and many men initiate testosterone without recent testing. Gels have become the most common initial treatment in both countries. Conclusions: Testosterone testing and use has increased over the past decade, particularly in the United States, with dramatic shifts from injections to gels. Substantial use is seen in men without recent testing and in US men with normal levels. Given widening use despite safety and efficacy questions, prescribers must consider the medical necessity of testosterone before initiation. PMID:24423353

  14. State innovation models: early experiences and challenges of an initiative to advance broad health system reform.

    PubMed

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Lamphere, JoAnn

    2013-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and states are partnering to transform health care systems by creating and testing new models of care delivery and payment. Interviews with officials from states participating in the State Innovation Models (SIM) Initiative reveal that the readiness of providers and payers to adopt innovations var­ies, requiring different starting points, goals, and strategies. So far, effective strategies appear to include: building on past reform efforts; redesigning health information technol­ogy to provide reliable, targeted data on care costs and quality; and using standard perfor­mance measures and financial incentives to spur alignment of providers' and payers' goals. State governments also have policy levers to encourage efficient deployment of a diverse health care workforce. As federal officials review states' innovation plans, set timetables, and provide technical assistance, they can also take steps to accommodate the budgetary, political, and time constraints that states are facing.

  15. Nutrition initiatives in the context of population aging: where does the United States stand?

    PubMed

    Chalé, Angela; Unanski, Amanda G; Liang, Raymond Y

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the earliest segment of the baby boom generation turned 65 years of age. This event marks the beginning of a new phase of growth of the older adult population in the United States and is in line with what is referred to worldwide as "population aging." By 2030, older adults will comprise 20% of the U.S. population. With the impending increase in the older adult population, the United States is unprepared to handle the accompanying social and economic impact of growing rates of age-related diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. These diseases have nutritional determinants and, as such, they signify the need for effective preventive nutrition initiatives to address population aging in the United States. Comparatively, the European Union (EU) is projected to reach an older adult population of 24% by 2030. In this special article we evaluate nutrition initiatives for older adults in the United States and also examine nutrition initiatives in the European Union in search of an ideal model. However, we found that available data for EU initiatives targeted at population aging were limited. We conclude by offering the proposal of a physician-based model that establishes the primary care physician as the initiator of nutrition screening, education, referrals, and follow-up for the older adult population in the United States as a long-term goal. Apropos of the immediate future, we consider barriers that underscore the establishment of a physician-based model and suggest objectives that are attainable. Although the data are limited for the European Union, this model may serve to guide management of chronic diseases with a nutritional component in economies similar to the United States worldwide.

  16. Initial system-bath state via the maximum-entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jibo; Len, Yink Loong; Ng, Hui Khoon

    2016-11-01

    The initial state of a system-bath composite is needed as the input for prediction from any quantum evolution equation to describe subsequent system-only reduced dynamics or the noise on the system from joint evolution of the system and the bath. The conventional wisdom is to write down an uncorrelated state as if the system and the bath were prepared in the absence of each other; yet, such a factorized state cannot be the exact description in the presence of system-bath interactions. Here, we show how to go beyond the simplistic factorized-state prescription using ideas from quantum tomography: We employ the maximum-entropy principle to deduce an initial system-bath state consistent with the available information. For the generic case of weak interactions, we obtain an explicit formula for the correction to the factorized state. Such a state turns out to have little correlation between the system and the bath, which we can quantify using our formula. This has implications, in particular, on the subject of subsequent non-completely positive dynamics of the system. Deviation from predictions based on such an almost uncorrelated state is indicative of accidental control of hidden degrees of freedom in the bath.

  17. The influence of the initial state of hydration on endocrine responses to exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Brandenberger, G; Candas, V; Follenius, M; Kahn, J M

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the effect of the initial state of hydration on hormone responses to prolonged exercise in the heat. Five subjects at two initial hydration levels (hypohydrated and hyperhydrated) were exposed to a 36 degrees C environment for 3 h of intermittent exercise. During exercise, the subjects were either fluid-deprived, or rehydrated with water or an isotonic electrolyte sucrose solution (ISO). Both the stress hormones, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol, and the main fluid regulatory hormones, aldosterone, renin activity (PRA) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), were measured in blood samples taken every hour. Prior hyperhydration significantly reduced initial AVP, aldosterone and PRA levels. However, except for AVP, which responded to exercise significantly less in previously hyperhydrated subjects (p less than 0.05), the initial hydration state did not influence the subsequent vascular and hormonal responses when the subjects were fluid-deprived while exercising. Concurrent rehydration, either with water or with ISO, reduced or even abolished the hormonal responses. There were no significant differences according to the initial hydration state, except for PRA responses, which were significantly lower (p less than 0.01) in previously hyperhydrated subjects who also received water during exercise. These results indicate that prior hydration levels influence only slightly the hormonal responses to prolonged exercise in the heat. Progressive rehydration during exercise, especially when extra electrolytes are given, is more efficient in maintaining plasma volume and osmolarity and in reducing the hormonal responses.

  18. Ahead of the Curve: State Success in the Developmental Education Initiative. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altstadt, David

    2012-01-01

    Less than 25 percent of college students who take any developmental education courses earn a credential within eight years. Over the past three years, the six states in the Developmental Education Initiative have developed and enacted unprecedented changes in policy and practice in an effort to reverse these dismal outcomes. "Ahead of the…

  19. Quantum computers and unstructured search: finding and counting items with an arbitrarily entangled initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlini, A.; Hosoya, A.

    2001-02-01

    Grover's quantum algorithm for an unstructured search problem and the COUNT algorithm by Brassard et al. are generalized to the case when the initial state is arbitrarily and maximally entangled. This ansatz might be relevant with quantum subroutines, when the computational qubits and the environment are coupled, and in general when the control over the quantum system is partial.

  20. The Illinois Alcoholism Prevention Initiative: A State-Wide Health Promotion and Primary Prevention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Jerald D.

    Two resource centers were funded by the Illinois Alcoholism Prevention Initiative to facilitate primary prevention and health promotion efforts at the local level. Located in DeKalb and Springfield, the centers assisted the Illinois State Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Division of Alcoholism in building a body of…

  1. World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration sponsored Advanced Resources International, Inc., to assess 48 gas shale basins in 32 countries, containing almost 70 shale gas formations. This effort has culminated in the report: World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States.

  2. Goals for Fourth World Peoples and Sovereignty Initiatives in the United States and New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffie, Mary Kay

    1998-01-01

    Compares national policies of the United States and New Zealand toward their indigenous populations, and sovereignty initiatives of Native Americans and Maoris. Discusses colonialist patterns, treaty relationships, historical policy trajectories, and sovereignty disputes. Examines Indian gaming and Maori land claims settlements as a means to gain…

  3. What Variables Condition Syntactic Transfer? A Look at the L3 Initial State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates transfer at the third-language (L3) initial state, testing between the following possibilities: (1) the first language (L1) transfer hypothesis (an L1 effect for all adult acquisition), (2) the second language (L2) transfer hypothesis, where the L2 blocks L1 transfer (often referred to in the recent literature as the "L2…

  4. Overview of the Common Core State Standards Initiatives for ELLs. TESOL Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL International Association, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this issue brief is to provide a comprehensive overview of the policies behind the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and to outline some of the initiatives now in place to address the needs of English language learners (ELLs) in relation to the CCSS. This issue brief contains the appendices: (1) Assessment Consortia Time Lines; and…

  5. Goals for Fourth World Peoples and Sovereignty Initiatives in the United States and New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffie, Mary Kay

    1998-01-01

    Compares national policies of the United States and New Zealand toward their indigenous populations, and sovereignty initiatives of Native Americans and Maoris. Discusses colonialist patterns, treaty relationships, historical policy trajectories, and sovereignty disputes. Examines Indian gaming and Maori land claims settlements as a means to gain…

  6. What Variables Condition Syntactic Transfer? A Look at the L3 Initial State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates transfer at the third-language (L3) initial state, testing between the following possibilities: (1) the first language (L1) transfer hypothesis (an L1 effect for all adult acquisition), (2) the second language (L2) transfer hypothesis, where the L2 blocks L1 transfer (often referred to in the recent literature as the "L2…

  7. Networked Governance in Three Policy Areas with Implications for the Common Core State Standards Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manna, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Policy makers and researchers now recognize that designing effective institutions to govern policy networks is a major challenge of the 21st Century. Presently, the Common Core State Standards Initiative resembles an emerging network of organizations united around the goal of developing clear and challenging academic expectations for students in…

  8. Language Acquisition as Computational Resetting: Verb Movement in L3 Initial State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermas, Abdelkader

    2010-01-01

    This study considers the acquisition of the verb movement parameter in L3 English by adult Arabic-French bilinguals. The focus is on the nature of the L3 initial state and the contribution of the syntactic (C[subscript HL]) and post-syntactic (phonetic form) modules to the process of parameter resetting. The results of acceptability judgement…

  9. Students' Initial Knowledge State and Test Design: Towards a Valid and Reliable Test Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CoPo, Antonio Roland I.

    2015-01-01

    Designing a good test instrument involves specifications, test construction, validation, try-out, analysis and revision. The initial knowledge state of forty (40) tertiary students enrolled in Business Statistics course was determined and the same test instrument undergoes validation. The designed test instrument did not only reveal the baseline…

  10. UCAN: A Four-State Rural Systemic Initiative. Year Three Performance Effectiveness Review (PER).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LLamas, Vicente J.

    The Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico-Rural Systemic Initiative (UCAN-RSI) supports systemic reform of mathematics, technology, and science education for rural students in its states, focusing on schools with high enrollments of American Indian and Hispanic students. This performance effectiveness review covers UCAN's progress during its third…

  11. UCAN: A Four-State Rural Systemic Initiative. Year Four Annual Report; Year Five Strategic Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LLamas, Vicente J.

    The Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico-Rural Systemic Initiative (UCAN-RSI) supports systemic improvement in science, technology, and mathematics education for all rural students in the four states, focusing on schools that enroll large numbers of American Indian and Hispanic students. This document contains a report on UCAN's 4th year (September…

  12. Overview of the Common Core State Standards Initiatives for ELLs. TESOL Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL International Association, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this issue brief is to provide a comprehensive overview of the policies behind the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and to outline some of the initiatives now in place to address the needs of English language learners (ELLs) in relation to the CCSS. This issue brief contains the appendices: (1) Assessment Consortia Time Lines; and…

  13. A Discussion of Change Theory, System Theory, and State Designed Standards and Accountability Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeal, Larry; Christy, W. Keith

    This brief paper is a presentation that preceeded another case of considering the ongoing dialogue on the advantages and disadvantages of centralized and decentralized school-improvement processes. It attempts to raise a number of questions about the relationship between state-designed standards and accountability initiatives and change and…

  14. UCAN: A Four-State Rural Systemic Initiative. Year Two Performance Effectiveness Review (PER).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LLamas, Vicente J.

    The Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico-Rural Systemic Initiative (UCAN-RSI) supports systemic reform of mathematics, technology, and science education for rural students in its states, focusing on schools with high enrollments of American Indian and Hispanic students. This performance effectiveness review covers UCAN's progress during its second…

  15. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-04-15

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k{sub 1} congruent with k{sub 0{+-}}O((1/R)) (where k{sub 0}={omega}{sub 0}/c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  16. Initial-state fluctuations in collisions between light and heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Kevin; Singer, Jordan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    In high-energy collisions involving small nuclei (p +p or x +Au collisions where x =p , d , or 3He) the fluctuating size, shape, and internal gluonic structure of the nucleon is shown to have a strong effect on the initial size and shape of the fireball of new matter created in the collision. A systematic study of the eccentricity coefficients describing this initial fireball state for several semirealistic models of nucleon substructure and for several practically relevant collision systems involving small nuclei is presented. The key importance of multiplicity fluctuations in such systems is pointed out. Our results show large differences from expectations based on conventional Glauber model simulations of the initial state created in such collisions.

  17. On the unique mapping relationship between initial and final quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A.S.; Miret-Artés, S.

    2013-12-15

    In its standard formulation, quantum mechanics presents a very serious inconvenience: given a quantum system, there is no possibility at all to unambiguously (causally) connect a particular feature of its final state with some specific section of its initial state. This constitutes a practical limitation, for example, in numerical analyses of quantum systems, which often make necessary the use of some extra assistance from classical methodologies. Here it is shown how the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics removes the ambiguity of quantum mechanics, providing a consistent and clear answer to such a question without abandoning the quantum framework. More specifically, this formulation allows to define probability tubes, along which the enclosed probability keeps constant in time all the way through as the system evolves in configuration space. These tubes have the interesting property that once their boundary is defined at a given time, they are uniquely defined at any time. As a consequence, it is possible to determine final restricted (or partial) probabilities directly from localized sets of (Bohmian) initial conditions on the system initial state. Here, these facts are illustrated by means of two simple yet physically insightful numerical examples: tunneling transmission and grating diffraction. -- Highlights: •The concept of quantum probability tube is introduced. •Quantum tubes result from the evolution of a separatrix set of initial Bohmian conditions. •Probabilities inside these sets remain constant along the corresponding quantum tubes. •Particular features of final states are then uniquely linked to specific regions of initial states. •Tunneling and grating diffraction are analyzed.

  18. State of stress and age offsets at oceanic fracture zones and implications for subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Long, M. D.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    The recycling of oceanic lithosphere back into the Earth’s interior through subduction is a central component of plate tectonics. The process by which new subduction zones initiate, however, remains poorly understood. A variety of mechanisms has been proposed by which a new subduction zone might initiate, including passive margin collapse (aided by sediment loading and/or rheological weakening due to the presence of volatiles) and forced convergence across a zone of preexisting lithospheric weakness. In this paper we focus on the latter model, which identifies three conditions necessary for subduction initiation: a zone of weakness such as a fracture zone, an age (and therefore density) offset along the fracture zone, and significant normal compressive stress which leads to shortening. We identify regions on the present-day Earth that meet these conditions and that may correspond to regions of relatively likely subduction initiation in the near future. Using a digital seafloor age model, we have created a database of oceanic fractures and quantified the associated age offsets. We have evaluated the state of stress on these lithospheric weak zones using two different global stress models. We find that the conditions needed to initiate subduction via the forced convergence model are relatively rare on the present-day Earth, and that there is no indication of incipient subduction at regions identified as relatively likely for subduction initiation. Using the same technique, we have evaluated the state of stress and seafloor age offset at regions of inferred present-day incipient subduction, and find that most of these regions are not associated with both high far-field compressive stresses and large age (and thus density) offsets. Subduction has likely initiated via forced convergence across preexisting zones of lithospheric weakness in the past, but our results indicate that the conditions needed for this type of subduction initiation are rare on the present

  19. Trends in adolescent smoking initiation in the United States: is tobacco marketing an influence?

    PubMed

    Gilpin, E A; Pierce, J P

    1997-01-01

    To compare recent trends in smoking initiation by adolescents with trends in inflation-adjusted cigarette pricing and tobacco marketing expenditures. We examined smoking initiation trends in demographic subgroups of adolescents aged 14-17 years during the decade 1979-1989. Data on cigarette pricing and tobacco marketing expenditures were adjusted for inflation and plotted over this same period. Large population surveys, United States. 140,975 ever-smokers aged 17-38 when surveyed in 1992 or 1993, who reported on age of smoking initiation during the decade 1979-1989. Initiation rate was calculated as the number in an age group who reported starting to smoke regularly in a year, divided by the number of never-smokers at the start of the year. Trends were evaluated by linear and quadratic models. From 1979 to 1984, adolescent initiation rates decreased, but increased thereafter, particularly among males, whites, and those who, as adults, reported never having graduated from high school. Cigarette price increased throughout the decade as did tobacco marketing expenditures, especially for coupons, value-added items, and promotional allowances. Availability of cheaper cigarettes is not likely to be a cause of increased smoking initiation by adolescents. Although other influences cannot be ruled out, we suspect that the expanded tobacco marketing budget, with its increased emphasis on tactics that may be particularly pertinent to young people, affected adolescent initiation rates.

  20. Stratospheric wind errors, initial states and forecast skill in the GLAS general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenenbaum, J.

    1983-01-01

    Relations between stratospheric wind errors, initial states and 500 mb skill are investigated using the GLAS general circulation model initialized with FGGE data. Erroneous stratospheric winds are seen in all current general circulation models, appearing also as weak shear above the subtropical jet and as cold polar stratospheres. In this study it is shown that the more anticyclonic large-scale flows are correlated with large forecast stratospheric winds. In addition, it is found that for North America the resulting errors are correlated with initial state jet stream accelerations while for East Asia the forecast winds are correlated with initial state jet strength. Using 500 mb skill scores over Europe at day 5 to measure forecast performance, it is found that both poor forecast skill and excessive stratospheric winds are correlated with more anticyclonic large-scale flows over North America. It is hypothesized that the resulting erroneous kinetic energy contributes to the poor forecast skill, and that the problem is caused by a failure in the modeling of the stratospheric energy cycle in current general circulation models independent of vertical resolution.

  1. Stratospheric wind errors, initial states and forecast skill in the GLAS general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenenbaum, J.

    1983-01-01

    Relations between stratospheric wind errors, initial states and 500 mb skill are investigated using the GLAS general circulation model initialized with FGGE data. Erroneous stratospheric winds are seen in all current general circulation models, appearing also as weak shear above the subtropical jet and as cold polar stratospheres. In this study it is shown that the more anticyclonic large-scale flows are correlated with large forecast stratospheric winds. In addition, it is found that for North America the resulting errors are correlated with initial state jet stream accelerations while for East Asia the forecast winds are correlated with initial state jet strength. Using 500 mb skill scores over Europe at day 5 to measure forecast performance, it is found that both poor forecast skill and excessive stratospheric winds are correlated with more anticyclonic large-scale flows over North America. It is hypothesized that the resulting erroneous kinetic energy contributes to the poor forecast skill, and that the problem is caused by a failure in the modeling of the stratospheric energy cycle in current general circulation models independent of vertical resolution.

  2. Transient population dynamics: Relations to life history and initial population state

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koons, D.N.; Grand, J.B.; Zinner, B.; Rockwell, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Most environments are variable and disturbances (e.g., hurricanes, fires) can lead to substantial changes in a population's state (i.e., age, stage, or size distribution). In these situations, the long-term (i.e., asymptotic) measure of population growth rate (??1) may inaccurately represent population growth in the short-term. Thus, we calculated the short-term (i.e., transient) population growth rate and its sensitivity to changes in the life-cycle parameters for three bird and three mammal species with widely varying life histories. Further, we performed these calculations for initial population states that spanned the entire range of possibilities. Variation in a population's initial net reproductive value largely explained the variation in transient growth rates and their sensitivities to changes in life-cycle parameters (all AICc ??? 6.67 units better than the null model, all R2 ??? 0.55). Additionally, the transient fertility and adult survival sensitivities tended to increase with the initial net reproductive value of the population, whereas the sub-adult survival sensitivity decreased. Transient population dynamics of long-lived, slow reproducing species were more variable and more different than asymptotic dynamics than they were for short-lived, fast reproducing species. Because ??1 can be a biased estimate of the actual growth rate in the short-term (e.g., 19% difference), conservation and wildlife biologists should consider transient dynamics when developing management plans that could affect a population's state, or whenever population state could be unstable.

  3. An implicit steady-state initialization package for the RELAP5 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, M.P.; Peterson, C.E.; Odar, F.

    1995-08-01

    A direct steady-state initialization (DSSI) method has been developed and implemented in the RELAP5 hydrodynamic analysis program. It provides a means for users to specify a small set of initial conditions which are then propagated through the remainder of the system. The DSSI scheme utilizes the steady-state form of the RELAP5 balance equations for nonequilibrium two-phase flow. It also employs the RELAP5 component models and constitutive model packages for wall-to-phase and interphase momentum and heat exchange. A fully implicit solution of the linearized hydrodynamic equations is implemented. An implicit coupling scheme is used to augment the standard steady-state heat conduction solution for steam generator use. It solves the primary-side tube region energy equations, heat conduction equations, wall heat flux boundary conditions, and overall energy balance equation as a coupled system of equations and improves convergence. The DSSI method for initializing RELAP5 problems to steady-state conditions has been compared with the transient solution scheme using a suite of test problems including; adiabatic single-phase liquid and vapor flow through channels with and without healing and area changes; a heated two-phase test bundle representative of BWR core conditions; and a single-loop PWR model.

  4. Reasons why women do not initiate breastfeeding: A southeastern state study.

    PubMed

    Ogbuanu, Chinelo A; Probst, Janice; Laditka, Sarah B; Liu, Jihong; Baek, JongDeuk; Glover, Saundra

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increase in breastfeeding initiation and duration in the United States, only five states have met the three Healthy People 2010 breastfeeding objectives. Our objectives are to study women's self-reported reasons for not initiating breastfeeding and to determine whether these reasons vary by race/ethnicity, and other maternal and hospital support characteristics. Data are from the 2000-2003 Arkansas Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, restricting the sample to women who did not initiate breastfeeding (unweighted n=2,917). Reasons for not initiating breastfeeding are characterized as individual reasons, household responsibilities, and circumstances. Analyses include the chi(2) test and multiple logistic regression. About 38% of Arkansas mothers of live singletons did not initiate breastfeeding. There was a greater representation of non-Hispanic Blacks among those who did not initiate breastfeeding (32%) than among those who initiated breastfeeding (9.9%). Among those who never breastfed, individual reasons were most frequently cited for noninitiation (63.0%). After adjusting for covariates, Hispanics had three times the odds of citing circumstances than Whites (odds ratio [OR], 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31-7.18). Women who indicated that the hospital staff did not teach them how to breastfeed had more than two times greater odds of citing individual reasons (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.30-3.91) or reasons related to household responsibilities (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.19-4.36) as compared with women who indicated they were taught. Findings suggest the need for targeting breastfeeding interventions to different subgroups of women. In addition, there are implications for policy particularly regarding breastfeeding support in hospitals.

  5. Geographic Factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Initiation Among Adolescent Girls in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Warner, Echo L; Kepka, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Background This study is among the first to explore geographic factors that may be associated with HPV vaccine uptake in the United States. Methods Data from the 2011 and 2012 National Immunization Survey-Teen for 20,565 female adolescents aged 13-17 years were analyzed to examine associations of HPV vaccine initiation (receipt of at least one dose) with ZIP code-level geographic factors. Logistic regression including individual and geographic factors was used to estimate the odds of HPV vaccine initiation. Results Approximately 53% of girls initiated the HPV vaccine in both years. Girls in high poverty communities had higher HPV vaccine initiation compared to those in low poverty communities (61.1% vs .52.4%; Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 1.18,95%CI 1.04-1.33). Initiation was higher among girls in communities where the majority of the population was Hispanic (69.0% vs. 49.9%;AOR 1.64, 95%CI 1.43-1.87) or non-Hispanic mixed race (60.4% vs. 49.9%; AOR 1.30, 95%CI 1.17-1.44) compared to majority non-Hispanic white communities. Interactions between individual-level race/ethnicity and community racial–ethnic composition indicated significantly higher odds of initiation among Hispanic girls living in Hispanic communities compared to Hispanic girls living in predominately NHW (AOR 2.23;95%CI 1.87-2.65) or NHB (AOR 1.90; 95%CI 1.20-3.04)communities, respectively Conclusion Initiation rates of HPV vaccination among teen girls were highest in the poorest communities and among Hispanics living in communities where the racial–ethnic composition was predominantly Hispanic or mixed race. Impact Given low HPV vaccination rates in the United States, these results provide important evidence to inform public health interventions to increase HPV vaccination. PMID:26768989

  6. Serotonin and the neuropeptide PDF initiate and extend opposing behavioral states in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Steven W; Pokala, Navin; Macosko, Evan Z; Albrecht, Dirk R; Larsch, Johannes; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2013-08-29

    Foraging animals have distinct exploration and exploitation behaviors that are organized into discrete behavioral states. Here, we characterize a neuromodulatory circuit that generates long-lasting roaming and dwelling states in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that two opposing neuromodulators, serotonin and the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF), each initiate and extend one behavioral state. Serotonin promotes dwelling states through the MOD-1 serotonin-gated chloride channel. The spontaneous activity of serotonergic neurons correlates with dwelling behavior, and optogenetic modulation of the critical MOD-1-expressing targets induces prolonged dwelling states. PDF promotes roaming states through a Gαs-coupled PDF receptor; optogenetic activation of cAMP production in PDF receptor-expressing cells induces prolonged roaming states. The neurons that produce and respond to each neuromodulator form a distributed circuit orthogonal to the classical wiring diagram, with several essential neurons that express each molecule. The slow temporal dynamics of this neuromodulatory circuit supplement fast motor circuits to organize long-lasting behavioral states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using vibrational branching ratios to probe initial and final state effects in molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchese, Robert R.; Bozek, John D.; Das, Aloke; Poliakoff, E. D.

    2009-11-01

    Recent computed and experimental results for ICN, BF3 and C6F6 will be presented. In ICN we consider the ionization leading to the X2 Π1/2,3/2 states of ICN+. We show how the geometry dependence of the initial state orbital can be studied using vibrational branching ratios. In C6F6, we consider the excitation of the effects of two prominent shape resonances on the symmetric stretching modes in the photoionization leading to the C 3B2u state of the ion. In BF3, the excitation of both the symmetric stretching and the degenerate asymmetric stretching modes are considered in the photoionization leading to the E2A1' state of the ion.

  8. Short distance and initial state effects in inflation: Stress tensor and decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Paul R.; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Mottola, Emil

    2005-08-15

    We present a consistent low energy effective field theory framework for parametrizing the effects of novel short distance physics in inflation, and their possible observational signatures in the cosmic microwave background. We consider the class of general homogeneous, isotropic initial states for quantum scalar fields in Robertson-Walker (RW) spacetimes, subject to the requirement that their ultraviolet behavior be consistent with renormalizability of the covariantly conserved stress tensor which couples to gravity. In the functional Schroedinger picture such states are coherent, squeezed, mixed states characterized by a Gaussian density matrix. This Gaussian has parameters which approach those of the adiabatic vacuum at large wave number, and evolve in time according to an effective classical Hamiltonian. The one complex parameter family of {alpha} squeezed states in de Sitter spacetime does not fall into this UV allowed class, except for the special value of the parameter corresponding to the Bunch-Davies state. We determine the finite contributions to the inflationary power spectrum and stress tensor expectation value of general UV allowed adiabatic states, and obtain quantitative limits on the observability and backreaction effects of some recently proposed models of short distance modifications of the initial state of inflation. For all UV allowed states, the second order adiabatic basis provides a good description of particles created in the expanding RW universe. Because of the absence of particle creation for the massless, minimally coupled scalar field in de Sitter space, there is no phase decoherence in the simplest free field inflationary models. We apply adiabatic regularization to the renormalization of the decoherence functional in cosmology to corroborate this result.

  9. Neuronal substrates for initiation, maintenance, and structural organization of sleep/wake states

    PubMed Central

    Eban-Rothschild, Ada; de Lecea, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Animals continuously alternate between sleep and wake states throughout their life. The daily organization of sleep and wakefulness is orchestrated by circadian, homeostatic, and motivational processes. Over the last decades, much progress has been made toward determining the neuronal populations involved in sleep/wake regulation. Here, we will discuss how the application of advanced in vivo tools for cell type–specific manipulations now permits the functional interrogation of different features of sleep/wake state regulation: initiation, maintenance, and structural organization. We will specifically focus on recent studies examining the roles of wake-promoting neuronal populations. PMID:28357049

  10. Hamiltonian Tomography in an Access-Limited Setting without State Initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Franco, C.; Paternostro, M.; Kim, M. S.

    2009-05-01

    We propose a scheme for the determination of the coupling parameters in a chain of interacting spins. This requires only time-resolved measurements over a single particle, simple data postprocessing and no state initialization or prior knowledge of the state of the chain. The protocol fits well into the context of quantum-dynamics characterization and is efficient even when the spin chain is affected by general dissipative and dephasing channels. We illustrate the performance of the scheme by analyzing explicit examples and discuss possible extensions.

  11. Initial-state-selected M N N Auger spectroscopy of atomic rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinen, J.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Cubaynes, D.; Bizau, J.-M.; Huttula, M.; Jänkälä, K.

    2017-04-01

    The M4 ,5N2 ,3N2 ,3 and M4 ,5N1N2 ,3 Auger decay of atomic Rb have been studied by using photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence measurements that enable initial ionic state selected Auger spectroscopy. The Auger spectra in the present study are separated by the total angular momentum j of the 3 d hole and the orbital of the valence electron n ℓ after photoionization. It is shown that the technique allows isolating overlapping features and the study of otherwise unobservable spectral details, from which the presence of shake-down transitions during normal Auger decay is demonstrated experimentally. The technique allows also probing the effects of initial state parity and electron correlation in Auger electron spectroscopy. The observed spectral features are interpreted with theoretical predictions obtained from configuration interaction Dirac-Fock approach.

  12. Vibrating sample magnetometer 2D and 3D magnetization effects associated with different initial magnetization states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukins, Ronald E.

    2017-05-01

    Differences in VSM magnetization vector rotation associated with various initial magnetization states were demonstrated. Procedures and criteria were developed to select sample orientation and initial magnetization states to allow for the combination of two different 2D measurements runs (with the same field profiles) to generate a dataset that can be representative of actual 3D magnetization rotation. Nickel, cast iron, and low moment magnetic tape media were used to demonstrate these effects using hysteresis and remanent magnetization test sequences. These results can be used to generate 2D and 3D magnetic properties to better characterize magnetic phenomena which are inherently three dimensional. Example applications are magnetic tape-head orientation sensitivity, reinterpretation of 3D coercivity and other standard magnetic properties, and multi-dimensional shielding effectiveness.

  13. A (not so?) novel explanation for the very special initial state of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okon, Elias; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    We put forward a proposal that combines objective collapse models, developed in connection with quantum-foundational questions, with the so-called Weyl curvature hypothesis, introduced by Roger Penrose as an attempt to account for the very special initial state of the Universe. In particular, we explain how a curvature dependence of the collapse rate in such models, an idea already shown to help in the context of black holes and information loss, could also offer a dynamical justification for Penrose's conjecture.

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccine initiation among 9–13-year-olds in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Kelly L.; Hendrix, Kristin S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The quadrivalent and 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are licensed for administration among 9–26-year-old males and females, with routine vaccination recommended for 11–12-year-olds. Despite the availability of the vaccine at younger ages, few studies have explored vaccine uptake prior to age 13, and national HPV vaccination surveillance data is limited to 13–17-year-olds. Our objective was to examine rates and predictors of HPV vaccine initiation among 9–13-year-olds in the United States. A national sample of mothers of 9–13-year-olds in the United States (N = 2446) completed a 2014 Web-based survey assessing socio-demographic characteristics, child's HPV vaccination history, provider communication regarding the vaccine, and other attitudes and behaviors pertaining to vaccination and healthcare utilization. The main outcome measure was child's initiation of the HPV vaccine (i.e., receipt of one or more doses). Approximately 35% of the full sample and 27.5% of the 9–10-year-olds had initiated HPV vaccination. Females were more likely than males to have initiated HPV vaccination by the age of 13 but not by younger ages. Strength of health provider recommendation regarding HPV vaccination was a particularly salient predictor of vaccine initiation. Approximately a third of children may be initiating the HPV vaccine series before or during the targeted age range for routine administration of the vaccine. Because coverage remains below national targets, further research aimed at increasing vaccination during early adolescence is needed. Improving providers' communication with parents about the HPV vaccine may be one potential mechanism for increasing vaccine coverage. PMID:26594616

  15. Initial State Dependence of Collisional Energy Transfer in Excited Dilithium-Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunxiao

    We have investigated collision induced rotational and vibrational energy transfer in the Li_2 ^*- Ne system. Our experiments were performed under single-collision conditions at an effective temperature of 691K^circ using dispersed, spontaneous, fluorescence techniques. We studied the Li _2 molecules at ten different initial rovibrational levels which covered three different electronic states, A^1Sigma_sp{u }{+}, E^1Sigma _sp{g}{+}, and F ^1Sigma_sp{g}{+} and measured over eight hundred inelastic rate constants. Specifically, for Li_2 A^1Sigma_sp{u}{+ } with an initial rotational level of j _{rm i} = 30, we looked at the initial vibrational level v_{rm i} ranging from 2 to 32 and -2 <= Deltav <= +2. For the Li_2 E ^1Sigma_sp{g}{+} we made measurements for j_{ rm i} = 29, and v_{ rm i} = 4. Finally, for the Li _2 F^1Sigma_sp {g}{+} state, we studied the initial level of j_{rm i} = 31, and v_{rm i} = 10. The dependence of collisional energy transfer on initial vibrational levels is studied systematically in our Li^2 A^1Sigma _sp{u}{+} experiments. We find that increasing v_{rm i } results in a linear increase in the vibrational rate constants, which is accompanied by a decrease in the rotationally inelastic rate constant. The total inelastic rate constant increases with v_{rm i} only at the highest values of v _{rm i}. The net vibrational energy transfer, DeltaE, calculated using rotationally summed rate constants is consistent with a simple model. However, explicit inclusion of rotation gives quite different values of DeltaE. We also compare our experimental results with three-dimensional trajectory calculations using both an ab initio potential surface and a simple repulsive potential surface. The measured rate constant distributions as functions of the final rotational level j_{rm f} from electronic states A^1 Sigma_sp{u}{+}, E^1Sigma_sp{g}{+ }, and F^1Sigma_sp {u}{+} are compared. We find that the distribution of vibrationally-elastic rate constants have a wider

  16. Exploring associations between state education initiatives and teachers' sleep: A social-ecological approach.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Kaori; Farley, Amy N; Kellemen, Marie; Swoboda, Christopher M

    2017-09-12

    Social policies that are not specifically aimed at impacting health can still have health consequences. State education reforms, such as standardized testing and stringent accountability for schools and teachers, may affect teacher health by changing their working conditions. This study explores associations between state education initiatives and teachers' sleep, an important predictor of productivity and chronic health conditions. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013 and 2014 data sets provided sleep and demographic data for 7836 teachers in 29 states in the United States. We linked the teacher data to state education reform data from the U.S. Department of Education. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of reporting inadequate sleep (i.e., <6.5 h and <5.5 h) associated with state education policies after adjusting for demographic characteristics. Teachers had significantly higher odds of reporting inadequate sleep if their state financed professional development, sanctioned or rewarded schools based on student performance, and regulated classroom materials for state-wide common core standards (ORs ranging from 1.25 to 1.84). More strictly defined inadequate sleep (<5.5 h) had generally higher ORs than less strict definition (<6.5 h). The Race-to-the-Top award, a US federal grant designed to encourage states to implement reforms through regulations and legislations, was also associated with inadequate sleep (OR = 1.41, p < 0.01, for <6.5 h; OR = 1.55, p < 0.01, for <5.5 h). Although this exploratory study did not have district- and school-level implementation data, the results suggest that some state education policies may have impacts on teacher sleep. Consequences of education reform for teacher health deserve more attention. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Open streets initiatives in the United States: closed to traffic, open to physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kuhlberg, Jill A; Hipp, J Aaron; Eyler, Amy; Chang, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    The ciclovía, or open streets concept, is a community-level physical activity (PA) promotion strategy where streets are closed to motorized traffic and open for individuals to engage in PA. This paper presents an overview of such initiatives in the United States (US) to understand their potential in PA promotion, comparing event and city characteristics. We searched ciclovía and open streets initiatives held in 2011 in the US using internet searches, publication databases, social media, and personal contacts. We extracted data on the each initiative's frequency, route length, attendance, evaluation procedures, and sociodemographic characteristics of host cities. Our search yielded 47 US cities with open streets in 2011. Cities were diverse in sociodemographic characteristics. Route lengths ranged from a few blocks to 51 miles and event frequency ranged from annual to monthly. Reporting number of participants for events was sporadic. Few events conducted formal evaluations. The number of US cities hosting open streets is increasing. The sociodemographics of the host cities suggest a potential to increase physical activity in populations at risk for developing chronic diseases through these initiatives. However, further evaluation is required. Identifying successful promotion and evaluation tactics would boost the health promotion potential of these initiatives.

  18. 77 FR 20817 - Diamond State Generation Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Diamond State Generation Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Diamond State Generation Partners, LLC's application...

  19. Variational data assimilation for the optimized ozone initial state and the short-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyeok; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Hwa Woon

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we apply the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to optimize initial ozone state and to improve the predictability of air quality. The numerical modeling systems used for simulations of atmospheric condition and chemical formation are the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The study area covers the capital region of South Korea, where the surface measurement sites are relatively evenly distributed. The 4D-Var code previously developed for the CMAQ model is modified to consider background error in matrix form, and various numerical tests are conducted. The results are evaluated with an idealized covariance function for the appropriateness of the modified codes. The background error is then constructed using the NMC method with long-term modeling results, and the characteristics of the spatial correlation scale related to local circulation are analyzed. The background error is applied in the 4D-Var research, and a surface observational assimilation is conducted to optimize the initial concentration of ozone. The statistical results for the 12 h assimilation periods and the 120 observatory sites show a 49.4 % decrease in the root mean squared error (RMSE), and a 59.9 % increase in the index of agreement (IOA). The temporal variation of spatial distribution of the analysis increments indicates that the optimized initial state of ozone concentration is transported to inland areas by the clockwise-rotating local circulation during the assimilation windows. To investigate the predictability of ozone concentration after the assimilation window, a short-time forecasting is carried out. The ratios of the RMSE (root mean squared error) with assimilation versus that without assimilation are 8 and 13 % for the +24 and +12 h, respectively. Such a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy is obtained solely by using the optimized initial state. The potential improvement in

  20. Variational data assimilation for the optimized ozone initial state and the short-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyeok; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Hwa Woon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we apply the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to optimize initial ozone state and to improve the predictability of air quality. The numerical modeling systems used for simulations of atmospheric condition and chemical formation are the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model . The study area covers the capital region of South Korea, where the surface measurement sites are relatively evenly distributed. The 4D-Var code previously developed for the CMAQ model is modified to consider background error in matrix form, and various numerical tests are conducted. The results are evaluated with an idealized covariance function for the appropriateness of the modified codes. The background error is then constructed using the NMC method with long-term modeling results, and the characteristics of the spatial correlation scale related to local circulation is analyzed. The background error is applied in the 4D-Var research, and a surface observational assimilation is conducted to optimize the initial concentration of ozone. The statistical results for the 12-hour assimilation periods and the 120 observatory sites show a 49.4% decrease in the root mean squred error (RMSE), and a 59.9% increase in the index of agreement (IOA). The temporal variation of spatial distribution of the analysis increments indicates that the optimized initial state of ozone concentration is transported to inland areas by the clockwise-rotating local circulation during the assimilation windows. To investigate the predictability of ozone concentration after the assimilation window, a short-time forecasting is carried out. The ratios of the RMSE with assimilation versus that without assimilation are 8% and 13% for the +24 and +12 hours, respectively. Such a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy is obtained solely by using the optimized initial state. The potential improvement in ozone prediction for

  1. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, Christine C.

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  2. Initial-state dependence of the route to chaos of an external-cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locquet, A.; Kim, Byungchil; Choi, Daeyoung; Li, Nianqiang; Citrin, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    External-cavity semiconductor lasers (ECLs), consisting of a laser diode in front of a mirror to reflect light back into the laser diode, are among the most important dynamical systems because of their ultrafast dynamics, their tunability, and the numerous existing applications. The dynamics of an ECL is greatly influenced by the existence and stability of numerous modes of the external cavity. In such high-dimensional nonlinear systems, numerous attractors, located around various modes of the external cavity, can coexist in phase space for a given set of parameters, a phenomenon called generalized multistability. In this work, we propose a procedure that allows one to select experimentally different modes of the external cavity as different initial states. We use this procedure to reveal experimentally generalized multistability in an ECL through the demonstration that different routes to chaos exist in an ECL, depending on the initial state selected. In particular, we show that the famous quasiperiodic route to chaos is only observed for specific choices of initial conditions.

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p{sub o} final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA.

  4. Moving science into state child and adolescent mental health systems: Illinois' evidence-informed practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Starin, Amy C; Atkins, Marc S; Wehrmann, Kathryn C; Mehta, Tara; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S; Marinez-Lora, A; Mehlinger, Renee

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the Illinois State Mental Health Authority embarked on an initiative to close the gap between research and practice in the children's mental health system. A stakeholder advisory council developed a plan to advance evidence informed practice through policy and program initiatives. A multilevel approach was developed to achieve this objective, which included policy change, stakeholder education, and clinician training. This article focuses on the evidence-informed training process designed following review of implementation research. The training involved in-person didactic sessions and twice-monthly telephone supervision across 6 cohorts of community based clinicians, each receiving 12 months of training. Training content initially included cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral parent training and was adapted over the years to a practice model based on common element concepts. Evaluation based on provider and parent report indicated children treated by training clinicians generally showed superior outcomes versus both a treatment-as-usual comparison group for Cohorts 1 to 4 and the statewide child population as a whole after 90 days of care for Cohorts 5 to 6. The results indicated primarily moderate to strong effects for the evidence-based training groups. Moving a large public statewide child mental health system toward more effective services is a complex and lengthy process. These results indicate training of community mental health providers in Illinois in evidence-informed practice was moderately successful in positively impacting child-level functional outcomes. These findings also influenced state policy in committing resources to continuing the initiative, even in difficult economic times.

  5. Fast and high-fidelity optical initialization of spin state of an electron in a semiconductor quantum dot using light-hole-trion states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parvendra; Nakajima, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically show that under the Faraday geometry fast and high-fidelity optical initialization of electron spin (ES) state in a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) can be realized by utilizing the light-hole (LH)-trion states. Initialization is completed within the time scale of ten nanoseconds with high fidelity, and the initialization laser pulse can be linearly, right-circularly, or left-circularly polarized. Moreover, we demonstrate that the time required for initialization can be further shortened down to a few hundreds of picoseconds if we introduce a pillar-microcavity to promote the relaxation of a LH-trion state towards the desired ES state through the Purcell effect. We also clarify the role of heavy-hole and light-hole mixing induced transitions on the fidelity of ES state initialization.

  6. Distance between quantum states in the presence of initial qubit-environment correlations: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Dajka, Jerzy; Luczka, Jerzy; Haenggi, Peter

    2011-09-15

    The time evolution of the trace distance between two states of an open quantum system may increase due to initial system-environment correlations, thus exhibiting a breakdown of distance contractivity of the reduced dynamics. We analyze how the time evolution of the distance depends on the chosen distance measure. Here we elucidate the behavior of the trace distance, the Hilbert-Schmidt distance, the Bures distance, the Hellinger distance, and the quantum Jensen-Shannon divergence for two system-environment setups, namely a qubit bilinearly coupled to an infinite and a finite-size environment with the latter composed of harmonic oscillators.

  7. First measurement of proton's charge form factor at very low Q2 with initial state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Weber, A. B.; Achenbach, P.; Beranek, T.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Cardinali, M.; Correa, L.; Debenjak, L.; Denig, A.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Ferretti Bondy, M. I.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J. M.; Friščić, I.; Griffioen, K.; Hoek, M.; Kegel, S.; Kohl, Y.; Merkel, H.; Middleton, D. G.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rohrbeck, M.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Štajner, S.; Thiel, M.; Tyukin, A.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Weinriefer, M.

    2017-08-01

    We report on a new experimental method based on initial-state radiation (ISR) in e-p scattering, which exploits the radiative tail of the elastic peak to study the properties of electromagnetic processes and to extract the proton charge form factor (GEp) at extremely small Q2. The ISR technique was implemented in an experiment at the three-spectrometer facility of the Mainz Microtron (MAMI). This led to a precise validation of radiative corrections far away from elastic line and provided first measurements of GEp for 0.001 ≤Q2 ≤ 0.004(GeV / c) 2.

  8. Nonequilibrium critical dynamics of the two-dimensional Ising model quenched from a correlated initial state.

    PubMed

    Környei, László; Pleimling, Michel; Iglói, Ferenc

    2008-01-01

    The universality class, even the order of the transition, of the two-dimensional Ising model depends on the range and the symmetry of the interactions (Onsager model, Baxter-Wu model, Turban model, etc.), but the critical temperature is generally the same due to self-duality. Here we consider a sudden change in the form of the interaction and study the nonequilibrium critical dynamical properties of the nearest-neighbor model. The relaxation of the magnetization and the decay of the autocorrelation function are found to display a power law behavior with characteristic exponents that depend on the universality class of the initial state.

  9. NNSA's next generation safeguards initiative to define an effective state system of accounting and control

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Rebecca S; Sunshine, Alexander; Matthews, Caroline; Frazer, Sarah; Matthews, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), the international outreach component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), is a collaborative program that endeavors to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development. One of the critical ways the program achieves this objective is through working with partners to increase the effectiveness of the State System of Accountancy for and Control of Nuclear Materials (SSAC) - the essential elements of national, regulatory and facility safeguards competencies that work as a system to provide the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the world the full assurance of the state's adherence to its safeguards agreements. INSEP provides assistance in developing a state's SSAC in a number of areas, from developing national legislation governing the possession and use of nuclear material to working with nuclear facility operators to developing good practices in waste management. INSEP has collaborated with foreign partners in peaceful nuclear applications for over two decades, but recently, it has focused its efforts on strengthening SSACs due to the growth of nuclear power worldwide, particularly in countries with limited nuclear infrastructures. This new area of focus has prompted INSEP to develop a model of SSAC competencies that will serve not only as a structure for its engagement with partner states, but also as a means to facilitate coordination with other states that provide training and assistance, and as a mechanism for evaluating the effectiveness of its work in reaching its intended objectives. While this model uses as its starting point the requirements on a State that are presented in the Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement and the Additional Protocol, it is not, in itself, a requirements document or guidance for implementing requirements. It is rather an analysis of what capabilities will be needed in a State to be able to meet requirements and to

  10. Controlling Two-Electron Threshold Dynamics in Double Photoionization of Lithium by Initial-State Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Schuricke, M.; Steinmann, J.; Albrecht, J.; Ullrich, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.; Dorn, A.

    2009-09-01

    Double photoionization (DPI) and ionization-excitation (IE) of Li(2s) and Li(2p), state-prepared and aligned in a magneto-optical trap, were explored in a reaction microscope at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). From 6 to 12 eV above threshold (ℏω=85, 91 eV), total as well as differential DPI cross sections were observed to critically depend on the initial state and, in particular, on the alignment of the 2p orbital with respect to the VUV-light polarization, whereas no effect is seen for IE. The alignment sensitivity is traced back to dynamical electron correlation at threshold.

  11. Controlling Two-Electron Threshold Dynamics in Double Photoionization of Lithium by Initial-State Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.; Schuricke, M.; Steinmann, J.; Albrecht, J.; Dorn, A.; Ullrich, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2009-09-04

    Double photoionization (DPI) and ionization-excitation (IE) of Li(2s) and Li(2p), state-prepared and aligned in a magneto-optical trap, were explored in a reaction microscope at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). From 6 to 12 eV above threshold ((Planck constant/2pi)omega=85, 91 eV), total as well as differential DPI cross sections were observed to critically depend on the initial state and, in particular, on the alignment of the 2p orbital with respect to the VUV-light polarization, whereas no effect is seen for IE. The alignment sensitivity is traced back to dynamical electron correlation at threshold.

  12. Study of the Exclusive Initial-State-RadiationProduction of the DDbar System

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-10-09

    A search for charmonium and other new states is performed in a study of exclusive initial-state-radiation production of D{bar D} events from electron-positron annihilations at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D{bar D} mass spectrum shows clear evidence of the {psi}(3770) plus other structures near 3.9, 4.1, and 4.4 GeV/c2. No evidence for Y (4260) {yields} D{bar D} is observed, leading to an upper limit of {Beta}(Y (4260) {yields} D{bar D})/{Beta}(Y (4260) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 1.0 at 90% confidence level.

  13. Use of uninformative priors to initialize state estimation for dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthy, Johnny L.; Holzinger, Marcus J.

    2017-10-01

    The admissible region must be expressed probabilistically in order to be used in Bayesian estimation schemes. When treated as a probability density function (PDF), a uniform admissible region can be shown to have non-uniform probability density after a transformation. An alternative approach can be used to express the admissible region probabilistically according to the Principle of Transformation Groups. This paper uses a fundamental multivariate probability transformation theorem to show that regardless of which state space an admissible region is expressed in, the probability density must remain the same under the Principle of Transformation Groups. The admissible region can be shown to be analogous to an uninformative prior with a probability density that remains constant under reparameterization. This paper introduces requirements on how these uninformative priors may be transformed and used for state estimation and the difference in results when initializing an estimation scheme via a traditional transformation versus the alternative approach.

  14. The Initial State of Optically Polarized 8Li+ from the β-NMR in Bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, W. A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Buck, T.; Chow, K. H.; Hariwal, A. N.; Kiefl, R. F.; McGee, F. H.; Morris, G. D.; Wang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike the positive muon, β-NMR probe nuclei must be actively polarized. At the TRIUMF ISAC facility this is accomplished by in-flight collinear optical pumping with resonant circularly polarized laser light. This reliably produces a high degree of polarization, but the detailed state populations in the beam emerging from the optical polarizer are not well known. These populations are significant as they represent the initial state of the ensemble of probe spins implanted in a β-NMR experiment. Here we use the well-resolved quadrupolar split spectrum of 8Li+ in a high purity single crystal of bismuth to extract the sublevel populations under typical polarizer operating conditions, accounting for the spin relaxation in this semimetal.

  15. Initial excited-state dynamics of an N-alkylated indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) rhodopsin analog.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Igor; Fusi, Stefania; Olivucci, Massimo; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Sasidharanpillai, Swaroop; Loppnow, Glen R

    2014-10-23

    N-Alkylated indanylidene-pyrroline-based molecular switches mimic different aspects of the light-induced retinal chromophore isomerization in rhodopsin: the vertebrate dim-light visual pigment. In particular, they display a similar ultrashort excited-state lifetime, subpicosecond photoproduct appearance time, and photoproduct vibrational coherence. To better understand the early light-induced dynamics of such systems, we measured and modeled the resonance Raman spectra of the Z-isomer of the N-methyl-4-(5'-methoxy-2',2'-dimethyl-indan-1'-ylidene)-5-methyl-2,3-dihydro-2H-pyrrolium (NAIP) switch in methanol solution. It is shown that the data, complemented with a <70 fs excited-state trajectory computation, demonstrate initial excited-state structural dynamics dominated by double-bond expansion and single-bond contraction stretches. This mode subsequently couples with the five-membered ring inversion and double-bond torsion. These results are discussed in the context of the mechanism of the excited-state photoisomerization of NAIP switches in solution and the 11-cis retinal in rhodopsin.

  16. From Initial Nucleation to Cassie-Baxter State of Condensed Droplets on Nanotextured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; Niu, Fenglei; He, Feng; Hao, Pengfei

    2017-02-16

    Understanding how droplet condensation happens plays an essential role for our fundamental insights of wetting behaviors in nature and numerous applications. Since there is a lack of study of the initial formation and growing processes of condensed droplets down to nano-/submicroscale, relevant underlying mechanisms remain to be explored. We report an in situ observation of vapor condensation on nano-/microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces using optical microscopy. An interesting picture of the vapor condensation, from the initial appearance of individual small droplets (≤1 μm) to a Cassie-Baxter wetting state (>30 μm), are exhibited. It is found that individual droplets preferentially nucleate at the top and the edge of single micropillars with very high apparent contact angles on the nanotextures. Scenarios of two distinguished growing modes are reported statistically and the underlying mechanisms are discussed in the view of thermodynamics. We particularly reveal that the formation of the Cassie-Baxter wetting state is a result of a continuous coalescence of individual small droplets, in which the nanotexture-enhanced superhydrophobicity plays a crucial role. We envision that these fundamental findings can deepen our understanding of the nucleation and development of condensed droplets in nanoscale, so as to optimize design strategies of superhydrophobic materials for a broad range of water-harvesting and heat-transfer systems.

  17. From Initial Nucleation to Cassie-Baxter State of Condensed Droplets on Nanotextured Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; Niu, Fenglei; He, Feng; Hao, Pengfei

    2017-02-01

    Understanding how droplet condensation happens plays an essential role for our fundamental insights of wetting behaviors in nature and numerous applications. Since there is a lack of study of the initial formation and growing processes of condensed droplets down to nano-/submicroscale, relevant underlying mechanisms remain to be explored. We report an in situ observation of vapor condensation on nano-/microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces using optical microscopy. An interesting picture of the vapor condensation, from the initial appearance of individual small droplets (≤1 μm) to a Cassie-Baxter wetting state (>30 μm), are exhibited. It is found that individual droplets preferentially nucleate at the top and the edge of single micropillars with very high apparent contact angles on the nanotextures. Scenarios of two distinguished growing modes are reported statistically and the underlying mechanisms are discussed in the view of thermodynamics. We particularly reveal that the formation of the Cassie-Baxter wetting state is a result of a continuous coalescence of individual small droplets, in which the nanotexture-enhanced superhydrophobicity plays a crucial role. We envision that these fundamental findings can deepen our understanding of the nucleation and development of condensed droplets in nanoscale, so as to optimize design strategies of superhydrophobic materials for a broad range of water-harvesting and heat-transfer systems.

  18. From Initial Nucleation to Cassie-Baxter State of Condensed Droplets on Nanotextured Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; Niu, Fenglei; He, Feng; Hao, Pengfei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how droplet condensation happens plays an essential role for our fundamental insights of wetting behaviors in nature and numerous applications. Since there is a lack of study of the initial formation and growing processes of condensed droplets down to nano-/submicroscale, relevant underlying mechanisms remain to be explored. We report an in situ observation of vapor condensation on nano-/microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces using optical microscopy. An interesting picture of the vapor condensation, from the initial appearance of individual small droplets (≤1 μm) to a Cassie-Baxter wetting state (>30 μm), are exhibited. It is found that individual droplets preferentially nucleate at the top and the edge of single micropillars with very high apparent contact angles on the nanotextures. Scenarios of two distinguished growing modes are reported statistically and the underlying mechanisms are discussed in the view of thermodynamics. We particularly reveal that the formation of the Cassie-Baxter wetting state is a result of a continuous coalescence of individual small droplets, in which the nanotexture-enhanced superhydrophobicity plays a crucial role. We envision that these fundamental findings can deepen our understanding of the nucleation and development of condensed droplets in nanoscale, so as to optimize design strategies of superhydrophobic materials for a broad range of water-harvesting and heat-transfer systems. PMID:28202939

  19. Sector activities and lessons learned around initial implementation of the United States national physical activity plan.

    PubMed

    Evenson, Kelly R; Satinsky, Sara B

    2014-08-01

    National plans are increasingly common but infrequently evaluated. The 2010 United States National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) provided strategies to increase population levels of physical activity. This paper describes (i) the initial accomplishments of the NPAP sector teams, and (ii) results from a process evaluation to determine how the sectors operated, their cross-sector collaboration, challenges encountered, and positive experiences. During 2011, a quarterly reporting system was developed to capture sector-level activities. A year-end interview derived more detailed information. Interviews with 12 sector leads were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for common themes. The 6 sectors worked on goals from the implementation plan that focused broadly on education, promotion, intervention, policy, collaboration, and evaluation. Through year-end interviews, themes were generated around operations, goal setting, and cross-sector collaboration. Challenges to the NPAP work included lack of funding and time, the need for marketing and promotion, and organizational support. Positive experiences included collaboration, efficiency of work, enhanced community dynamic, and accomplishments toward NPAP goals. These initial results on the NPAP sector teams can be used as a baseline assessment for future monitoring. The lessons learned may be useful to other practitioners developing evaluations around state- or national-level plans.

  20. Exploiting jet binning to identify the initial state of high-mass resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Liebler, Stefan; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin; Zeune, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    If a new high-mass resonance is discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, model-independent techniques to identify the production mechanism will be crucial to understand its nature and effective couplings to Standard Model particles. We present a powerful and model-independent method to infer the initial state in the production of any high-mass color-singlet system by using a tight veto on accompanying hadronic jets to divide the data into two mutually exclusive event samples (jet bins). For a resonance of several hundred GeV, the jet binning cut needed to discriminate quark and gluon initial states is in the experimentally accessible range of several tens of GeV. It also yields comparable cross sections for both bins, making this method viable already with the small event samples available shortly after a discovery. Theoretically, the method is made feasible by utilizing an effective field theory setup to compute the jet cut dependence precisely and model independently and to systematically control all sources of theoretical uncertainties in the jet binning, as well as their correlations. We use a 750 GeV scalar resonance as an example to demonstrate the viability of our method.

  1. Sector Activities and Lessons Learned Around Initial Implementation of the United States National Physical Activity Plan

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Satinsky, Sara B.

    2016-01-01

    Background National plans are increasingly common but infrequently evaluated. The 2010 United States National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) provided strategies to increase population levels of physical activity. This paper describes (i) the initial accomplishments of the NPAP sector teams, and (ii) results from a process evaluation to determine how the sectors operated, their cross-sector collaboration, challenges encountered, and positive experiences. Methods During 2011, a quarterly reporting system was developed to capture sector-level activities. A year-end interview derived more detailed information. Interviews with 12 sector leads were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for common themes. Results The 6 sectors worked on goals from the implementation plan that focused broadly on education, promotion, intervention, policy, collaboration, and evaluation. Through year-end interviews, themes were generated around operations, goal setting, and cross-sector collaboration. Challenges to the NPAP work included lack of funding and time, the need for marketing and promotion, and organizational support. Positive experiences included collaboration, efficiency of work, enhanced community dynamic, and accomplishments toward NPAP goals. Conclusions These initial results on the NPAP sector teams can be used as a baseline assessment for future monitoring. The lessons learned may be useful to other practitioners developing evaluations around state- or national-level plans. PMID:24176800

  2. Prenatal care initiation among pregnant teens in the United States: an analysis over 25 years.

    PubMed

    Hueston, William J; Geesey, Mark E; Diaz, Vanessa

    2008-03-01

    To examine changes in the initiation of prenatal care by teenage girls in the United States between 1978 and 2003. Using birth certificate data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics from 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998, and 2003 we described initiation of prenatal care in preteens (aged 10-14 years), young adolescents (aged 15-16), and older adolescents (aged 17-19) by the trimester in which care began. Although all three age groups showed trends toward earlier prenatal care, shifts to earlier prenatal care were mainly the result of more girls starting care in the first trimester and fewer in the second trimester. Younger teens were more likely to delay prenatal care or to receive no prenatal care for every year studied. Less education and prior births were also associated with increased likelihood of receiving delayed care. Shifts in timing of prenatal care initiation occurred in the U.S from 1978 to 2003. Much of the change corresponded to expanded eligibility in Medicaid coverage, suggesting that lack of health care coverage was a significant impediment to early prenatal care.

  3. Hydrologic system state at debris flow initiation in the Pitztal catchment, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostbauer, Karin; Hrachowitz, Markus; Prenner, David; Kaitna, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows represent a severe hazard in mountain regions. Though significant effort has been made to forecast such events, the trigger conditions as well as the hydrologic disposition of a watershed at the time of debris flow occurrence are not well understood. To improve our knowledge on the connection between debris flow initiation and the hydrologic system, this study applies a semi-distributed conceptual rainfall-runoff model, linking different system state variables such as soil moisture, snowmelt, or runoff with documented debris flow events in the Pitztal watershed, western Austria. The hydrologic modelling was performed on a daily basis between 1953 and 2012. High-intensity rainfall could be identified as the dominant trigger (31 out of 43 debris flows), while triggering exclusively by low-intensity, long-lasting rainfall was only observed in one single case. The remaining events were related to snowmelt; whether all of these events where triggered by rain-on-snow, or whether some of these events were actually triggered by snowmelt only, remains unclear since the occurrence of un- resp. underrecorded rainfall was detected frequently. The usage of a conceptual hydrological model for investigating debris flow initiation constitutes a novel approach in debris flow research and was assessed as very valuable. For future studies, it is recommended to evaluate also sub-daily information. As antecedent snowmelt was found to be much more important to debris flow initiation than antecedent rainfall, it might prove beneficial to include snowmelt in the commonly used rainfall intensity-duration thresholds.

  4. On the robustness of near term climate predictability regarding initial state uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germe, Agathe; Sévellec, Florian; Mignot, Juliette; Swingedouw, Didier; Nguyen, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    A set of four ensemble simulations has been designed to assess the relative importance of atmospheric, oceanic, and deep ocean initial state uncertainties, as represented by spatial white noise perturbations, on seasonal to decadal prediction skills in a perfect model framework. It is found that a perturbation mimicking random oceanic uncertainties have the same impact as an atmospheric-only perturbation on the future evolution of the ensemble after the first 3 months, even if they are initially only located in the deep ocean. This is due to the fast (1 month) perturbation of the atmospheric component regardless of the initial ensemble generation strategy. The divergence of the ensemble upper-ocean characteristics is then mainly induced by ocean-atmosphere interactions. While the seasonally varying mixed layer depth allows the penetration of the different signals in the thermocline in the mid-high latitudes, the rapid adjustment of the thermocline to wind anomalies followed by Kelvin and Rossby waves adjustment dominates the growth of the ensemble spread in the tropics. These mechanisms result in similar ensemble distribution characteristics for the four ensembles design strategy at the interannual timescale.

  5. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  6. Phosphorylation states of translational initiation factors affect mRNA cap binding in wheat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2004-07-20

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translational initiation factors (eIFs) has been shown to be an important means of regulating protein synthesis. Plant initiation factors undergo phosphorylation/dephosphorylation under a variety of stress and growth conditions. We have shown that recombinant wheat cap-binding protein, eIF(iso)4E, produced from E. coli can be phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of eIF(iso)4E has effects on m(7)G cap-binding affinity similar to those of phosphorylation of mammalian eIF4E even though eIF(iso)4E lacks an amino acid that can be phosphorylated at the residue corresponding to Ser-209, the phosphorylation site in mammalian eIF4E. The cap-binding affinity was reduced 1.2-2.6-fold when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated. The in vitro phosphorylation site for wheat eIF(iso)4E was identified as Ser-207. Addition of eIF(iso)4G and eIF4B that had also been phosphorylated in vitro further reduced cap-binding affinity. Temperature-dependent studies showed that DeltaH(degrees) was favorable for cap binding regardless of the phosphorylation state of the initiation factors. The entropy, however, was unfavorable (negative) except when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated and interacting with eIF(iso)4G. Phosphorylation may modulate not only cap-binding activity, but other functions of eukaryotic initiation factors as well.

  7. Relativistic and noise effects on multiplayer Prisoners' dilemma with entangling initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, H.; Rashidi, S. S.

    2017-06-01

    Three-players Prisoners' dilemma (Alice, Bob and Colin) is studied in the presence of a single collective environment effect as a noise. The environmental effect is coupled with final states by a particular form of Kraus operators K_0 and K_1 through amplitude damping channel. We introduce the decoherence parameter 0≤ p≤ 1 to the corresponding noise matrices, in order to controling the rate of environment influence on payoff of each players. Also, we consider the Unruh effect on the payoff of player, who is located at a noninertial frame. We suppose that two players (Bob and Colin) are in Rindler region I from Minkowski space-time, and move with same uniform acceleration (r_b=r_c ) and frequency mode. The game is begun with the classical strategies cooperation (C) and defection (D) accessible to each player. Furthermore, the players are allowed to access the quantum strategic space (Q and M). The quantum entanglement is coupled with initial classical states by the parameter γ \\in [0,π /2] . Using entangled initial states by exerting an unitary operator \\hat{J} as entangling gate, the quantum game (competition between Prisoners, as a three-qubit system) is started by choosing the strategies from classical or quantum strategic space. Arbitrarily chosen strategy by each player can lead to achieving profiles, which can be considered as Nash equilibrium or Pareto optimal. It is shown that in the presence of noise effect, choosing quantum strategy Q results in a winning payoff against the classical strategy D and, for example, the strategy profile (Q, D, C) is Pareto optimal. We find that the unfair miracle move of Eisert from quantum strategic space is an effective strategy for accelerated players in decoherence mode (p=1 ) of the game.

  8. Measuring Psychobiosocial States in Sport: Initial Validation of a Trait Measure.

    PubMed

    Robazza, Claudio; Bertollo, Maurizio; Ruiz, Montse C; Bortoli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We examined the item characteristics, the factor structure, and the concurrent validity of a trait measure of psychobiosocial states. In Study 1, Italian athletes (N = 342, 228 men, 114 women, Mage = 23.93, SD = 6.64) rated the intensity, the frequency, and the perceived impact dimensions of a psychobiosocial states scale, trait version (PBS-ST), which is composed of 20 items (10 functional and 10 dysfunctional) referring to how they usually felt before an important competition. In Study 2, the scale was cross validated in an independent sample (N = 251, 181 men, 70 women, Mage = 24.35, SD = 7.25). The concurrent validity of the PBS-ST scale scores were also examined in comparison with two sport-specific emotion-related measures and a general measure of affect. Exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis of the data of Study 1 showed that a 2-factor, 15-item solution of the PBS-ST scale (8 functional items and 7 dysfunctional items) reached satisfactory fit indices for the three dimensions (i.e., intensity, frequency, and perceived impact). Results of Study 2 provided evidence of substantial measurement and structural invariance of all dimensions across samples. The low association of the PBS-ST scale with other measures suggests that the scale taps unique constructs. Findings of the two studies offer initial validity evidence for a sport-specific tool to measure psychobiosocial states.

  9. Measuring Psychobiosocial States in Sport: Initial Validation of a Trait Measure

    PubMed Central

    Bertollo, Maurizio; Ruiz, Montse C.; Bortoli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We examined the item characteristics, the factor structure, and the concurrent validity of a trait measure of psychobiosocial states. In Study 1, Italian athletes (N = 342, 228 men, 114 women, Mage = 23.93, SD = 6.64) rated the intensity, the frequency, and the perceived impact dimensions of a psychobiosocial states scale, trait version (PBS-ST), which is composed of 20 items (10 functional and 10 dysfunctional) referring to how they usually felt before an important competition. In Study 2, the scale was cross validated in an independent sample (N = 251, 181 men, 70 women, Mage = 24.35, SD = 7.25). The concurrent validity of the PBS-ST scale scores were also examined in comparison with two sport-specific emotion-related measures and a general measure of affect. Exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis of the data of Study 1 showed that a 2-factor, 15-item solution of the PBS-ST scale (8 functional items and 7 dysfunctional items) reached satisfactory fit indices for the three dimensions (i.e., intensity, frequency, and perceived impact). Results of Study 2 provided evidence of substantial measurement and structural invariance of all dimensions across samples. The low association of the PBS-ST scale with other measures suggests that the scale taps unique constructs. Findings of the two studies offer initial validity evidence for a sport-specific tool to measure psychobiosocial states. PMID:27907111

  10. Initiation and continuation of long-acting reversible contraception in the United States military healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Chiles, Daniel P; Roberts, Timothy A; Klein, David A

    2016-09-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception is more effective for pregnancy prevention than shorter-acting contraceptive methods and has the potential to reduce healthcare disparities and costs. However, long-acting reversible contraception is underused in the United States. One population of interest is beneficiaries of the United States military healthcare system who have access to universal healthcare, including no-cost, no-copay contraception with unlimited method switching, and comprise a large, actual use cohort. Efforts to increase long-acting reversible contraception initiation and continuation in this population may improve health outcomes and mitigate the profound consequences of unintended or mistimed pregnancy on readiness and cost to the military. We aimed to determine long-acting reversible contraception initiation and continuation rates among the diverse population with universal healthcare who are enrolled in the US military healthcare system. This study is a retrospective cohort of >1.7 million women, aged 14-40 years, who were enrolled in the US military healthcare system, TRICARE Prime, between October 2009 and September 2014. Individuals were assessed for long-acting reversible contraception initiation and continuation with the use of medical billing records. Method continuation and factors that were associated with early method discontinuation were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier estimator and Cox proportional hazard models. During the study dates, 188,533 women initiated long-acting reversible contraception. Of these, 74.6% women selected intrauterine contraceptives. Method initiation rates remained relatively stable (41.7-50.1/1000 women/year) for intrauterine methods, although the rate for subdermal implants increased from 6.1-23.0/1000 women/year. In analysis of women who selected intrauterine contraceptives, 61.2% continued their method at 36 months, and 48.8% continued at 60 months. Among women who selected the implant, 32.0% continued their

  11. Effects of the interplay between initial state and Hamiltonian on the thermalization of isolated quantum many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Torres-Herrera, E J; Santos, Lea F

    2013-10-01

    We explore the role of the initial state on the onset of thermalization in isolated quantum many-body systems after a quench. The initial state is an eigenstate of an initial Hamiltonian H(I) and it evolves according to a different final Hamiltonian H(F). If the initial state has a chaotic structure with respect to H(F), i.e., if it fills the energy shell ergodically, thermalization is certain to occur. This happens when H(I) is a full random matrix, because its states projected onto H(F), are fully delocalized. The results for the observables then agree with those obtained with thermal states at infinite temperature. However, finite real systems with few-body interactions, as the ones considered here, are deprived of fully extended eigenstates, even when described by a nonintegrable Hamiltonian. We examine how the initial state delocalizes as it gets closer to the middle of the spectrum of H(F), causing the observables to approach thermal averages, be the models integrable or chaotic. Our numerical studies are based on initial states with energies that cover the entire lower half of the spectrum of one-dimensional Heisenberg spin-1/2 systems.

  12. Initial validation of a numeric zero to ten scale to measure children's state anxiety.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Margie; Lammers, Cathy; Senders, Craig; Savedra, Marilyn; Braun, Jerome V

    2007-11-01

    Although children experience physical and behavioral consequences from anxiety in many health care settings, anxiety assessment and subsequent management is not often performed because of the lack of clinically useful subjective scales. Current state anxiety scales are either observational or multidimensional self-report measures requiring significant clinician and patient time. Because anxiety is subjective, in this pilot study, we evaluated the validity of a self-report numeric 0-10 anxiety scale that is easy to administer to children in the clinical setting. A descriptive correlation research design was used to determine the concurrent validity for a numeric 0-10 anxiety scale with the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). During clinic preoperative visits, 60 children, 7-13 yr, provided anxiety scores for the 0-10 scale and the STAIC pre- and posteducation. Simple linear regression and Pearson correlation were performed to determine the strength of the relationship. STAIC was associated with the anxiety scale both preeducation (beta = 1.20, SE[beta] = 0.34, F[1,58] = 12.74, P = 0.0007) and posteducation (beta = 1.97, SE[beta]) = 0.31, F[1,58] = 40.11, P < 0.0001). Correlations were moderate for pre-education (r = 0.424) and posteducation (r = 0.639). This initial study supports the validity of the numeric 0-10 anxiety self-report scale to assess state anxiety in children as young as 7 yr.

  13. Initial and Final State Interaction Effects in Small-x Quark Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2010-08-30

    We study the initial and final state interaction effects in the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in the small-x saturation region. In particular, we discuss the quark distributions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan lepton pair production and dijet-correlation processes in pA collisions. We calculate the quark distributions in the scalar-QED model and then extend to the color glass condensate formalism in QCD. The quark distributions are found universal between the DIS and Drell-Yan processes. On the other hand, the quark distribution from the qq'-->qq' channel contribution to the dijet-correlation process is not universal. However, we find that it can be related to the quark distribution in DIS process by a convolution with the normalized unintegrated gluon distribution in the CGC formalism in the large Nc limit.

  14. Localized Bioconvection Patterns and Their Initial State Dependency in Euglena gracilis Suspensions in an Annular Container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Erika; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori; Izumi, Shunsuke; Iima, Makoto

    2014-04-01

    Localized patterns of bioconvection in Euglena gracilis suspensions were experimentally analyzed in an annular container. Near the critical mean density of convection, we succeeded in isolating two basic types of localized convection patterns. One was an almost stationary pattern consisting of two convection cells centered by an isolated high-density region of the microorganism where a downflow was generated, which we call a "bioconvection unit". The other was a traveling wave pattern consisting of an array of moving high-density waves bounded in a certain area. The effect of the mean density of E. gracilis on the emergence of the localized convection pattern was also examined. Near the critical mean density, we found that the emergence probability of the localized convection pattern depends on the initial state, i.e., whether E. gracilis has a uniform or localized distribution, which suggests that the system is bistable. Such bistability is often accompanied by localized structures in spatially extended dissipative systems.

  15. Illinois State University FOCUS Initiative: Civic Engagement and Outreach Projects in the ISU Physics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansher, J. A.; Holland, D. L.; Johns, G. F.; Willmitch, T. R.

    2007-05-01

    The Illinois State University Physics Department has long realized the importance of providing educational outreach opportunities to the wider community. Creating and maintaining community networks with engaging outreach projects helps us broaden the appreciation of physics, as well as encourage young students to consider careers in the sciences. A key aspect of these ISU Physics programs is that we involve our undergraduates in them, thereby fostering civic engagement in the next generation of scientists. This presentation highlights how our department promotes basic science literacy, and awareness of space physics and astronomy through several existing outreach projects. We also describe how we operate under the broader scope of the ISU FOCUS Initiative, and the NASA Solar System Ambassadors program.

  16. Robust consensus tracking control for multiagent systems with initial state shifts, disturbances, and switching topologies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Deyuan; Jia, Yingmin; Du, Junping

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the consensus tracking control issues of multiagent systems and aims to solve them as accurately as possible over a finite time interval through an iterative learning approach. Based on the iterative rule, distributed algorithms are proposed for every agent using its nearest neighbor knowledge, for which the robustness problem is addressed against initial state shifts, disturbances, and switching topologies. These uncertainties are dynamically changing not only along the time axis but also the iteration axis. It is shown that the matrix norm conditions can be developed to achieve the convergence of the considered consensus tracking objectives, for which necessary and sufficient conditions are presented in terms of linear matrix inequalities to guarantee their feasibility in the sense of the spectral norm. Furthermore, simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the obtained consensus tracking results.

  17. Initial state-specific photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole via 1 π σ ∗/ S 0 conical intersection initiated with optimally controlled UV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandipati, K. R.; Kanakati, Arun Kumar; Singh, H.; Lan, Z.; Mahapatra, S.

    2017-09-01

    Optimal initiation of quantum dynamics of N-H photodissociation of pyrrole on the S0-1πσ∗(1A2) coupled electronic states by UV-laser pulses in an effort to guide the subsequent dynamics to dissociation limits is studied theoretically. Specifically, the task of designing optimal laser pulses that act on initial vibrational states of the system for an effective UV-photodissociation is considered by employing optimal control theory. The associated control mechanism(s) for the initial state dependent photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole in the presence of control pulses is examined and discussed in detail. The initial conditions determine implicitly the variation in the dissociation probabilities for the two channels, upon interaction with the field. The optimal pulse corresponds to the objective fixed as maximization of overall reactive flux subject to constraints of reasonable fluence and quantum dynamics. The simple optimal pulses obtained by the use of genetic algorithm based optimization are worth an experimental implementation given the experimental relevance of πσ∗-photochemistry in recent times.

  18. Black carbon aerosol optical properties are influenced by initial mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Wenger, J.; Abbatt, J.; Lee, A.

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete combustion emits teragram quantities of black carbon (BC) aerosol to the troposphere each year, resulting in a significant warming effect on climate that may be second only to carbon dioxide. The magnitude of BC impacts on a global scale remains poorly constrained and is intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modeling informed by novel quantitative measurements from an Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), we show that initial mixing state (or the distribution of co-emitted components amongst fresh BC-containing particles) significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble observations indicate that BC near emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon (mfBC) in HOA- and BC-rich particle types was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of ensemble SP-AMS measurements indicates that BC-rich particles contribute the majority of BC mass (> 90%) in freshly emitted particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection to the atmosphere.

  19. Role of initial state and final quench temperature on aging properties in phase-ordering kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corberi, Federico; Villavicencio-Sanchez, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We study numerically the two-dimensional Ising model with nonconserved dynamics quenched from an initial equilibrium state at the temperature Ti≥Tc to a final temperature Tf below the critical one. By considering processes initiating both from a disordered state at infinite temperature Ti=∞ and from the critical configurations at Ti=Tc and spanning the range of final temperatures Tf∈[0 ,Tc[ we elucidate the role played by Ti and Tf on the aging properties and, in particular, on the behavior of the autocorrelation C and of the integrated response function χ . Our results show that for any choice of Tf, while the autocorrelation function exponent λC takes a markedly different value for Ti=∞ [λC(Ti=∞ ) ≃5 /4 ] or Ti=Tc [λC(Ti=Tc) ≃1 /8 ] the response function exponents are unchanged. Supported by the outcome of the analytical solution of the solvable spherical model we interpret this fact as due to the different contributions provided to autocorrelation and response by the large-scale properties of the system. As changing Tf is considered, although this is expected to play no role in the large-scale and long-time properties of the system, we show important effects on the quantitative behavior of χ . In particular, data for quenches to Tf=0 are consistent with a value of the response function exponent λχ=1/2 λC(Ti=∞ ) =5 /8 different from the one [λχ∈(0.5 -0.56 ) ] found in a wealth of previous numerical determinations in quenches to finite final temperatures. This is interpreted as due to important preasymptotic corrections associated to Tf>0 .

  20. Overview of the Common Core State Standard initiative and educational reform movement from the vantage of speech-language pathologists.

    PubMed

    Staskowski, Maureen

    2012-05-01

    Educational reform is sweeping the country. The adoption and the implementation of the Common Core State Standards in almost every state are meant to transform education. It is intended to update the way schools educate, the way students learn, and to ultimately prepare the nation's next generation for the global workplace. This article will describe the Common Core State Standard initiative and the underlying concerns about the quality of education in the United States as well as the opportunities this reform initiative affords speech-language pathologists. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Binary neutron star merger simulations with different initial orbital frequency and equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maione, F.; De Pietri, R.; Feo, A.; Löffler, F.

    2016-09-01

    We present results from three-dimensional general relativistic simulations of binary neutron star coalescences and mergers using public codes. We considered equal mass models where the baryon mass of the two neutron stars is 1.4{M}⊙ , described by four different equations of state (EOS) for the cold nuclear matter (APR4, SLy, H4, and MS1; all parametrized as piecewise polytropes). We started the simulations from four different initial interbinary distances (40,44.3,50, and 60 km), including up to the last 16 orbits before merger. That allows us to show the effects on the gravitational wave (GW) phase evolution, radiated energy and angular momentum due to: the use of different EOS, the orbital eccentricity present in the initial data and the initial separation (in the simulation) between the two stars. Our results show that eccentricity has a major role in the discrepancy between numerical and analytical waveforms until the very last few orbits, where ‘tidal’ effects and missing high-order post-Newtonian coefficients also play a significant role. We test different methods for extrapolating the GW signal extracted at finite radii to null infinity. We show that an effective procedure for integrating the Newman-Penrose {\\psi }4 signal to obtain the GW strain h is to apply a simple high-pass digital filter to h after a time domain integration, where only the two physical motivated integration constants are introduced. That should be preferred to the more common procedures of introducing additional integration constants, integrating in the frequency domain or filtering {\\psi }4 before integration.

  2. Conformational Differences between Open and Closed States of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Llácer, Jose L.; Hussain, Tanweer; Marler, Laura; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Thakur, Anil; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Translation initiation in eukaryotes begins with the formation of a pre-initiation complex (PIC) containing the 40S ribosomal subunit, eIF1, eIF1A, eIF3, ternary complex (eIF2-GTP-Met-tRNAi), and eIF5. The PIC, in an open conformation, attaches to the 5′ end of the mRNA and scans to locate the start codon, whereupon it closes to arrest scanning. We present single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of 48S PICs from yeast in these open and closed states, at 6.0 Å and 4.9 Å, respectively. These reconstructions show eIF2β as well as a configuration of eIF3 that appears to encircle the 40S, occupying part of the subunit interface. Comparison of the complexes reveals a large conformational change in the 40S head from an open mRNA latch conformation to a closed one that constricts the mRNA entry channel and narrows the P site to enclose tRNAi, thus elucidating key events in start codon recognition. PMID:26212456

  3. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (∂ 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ∂ 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  4. FINAL REPORT: SUNSHINE STATE SOLAR GRID INITIATIVE (SUNGRIN) PHASE 1 (Critical Milestone Review Version)

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, Rick; Steurer, Mischa; Li, Hui; Edrington, Chris; Dale, Steinar; Faruque, MD Omar; Schoder, Karl; McLaren, Peter G.; Liu, Liming; Ravindra, Harsha; Henry, Shawn; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Xiaohu; Springstroh, Aaron; Click, David; Reedy, Robert; Moaveni, Houtan; Davis, Kristopher; Cromer, Charlie; Pappalardo, Anthoney; Krueger, Rodica; Domijan, Alexander; Islam, Arif; Islam, Mujahidil; Damole, Ademole

    2012-03-30

    This report provides details on the activities and accomplishments of Phase 1 of the Sunshine State Solar Grid Initiative (SUNGRIN) Project for the period beginning 4/28/2010 and ending 12/31/2011. SUNGRIN is a five-phase high-penetration solar PV project within the Systems Integration (SI) area of the Solar Energy Technologies (SETP) Program, under the SunShot Initiative. SUNGRIN is focused on understanding and enabling high-penetration grid-connected solar PV through simulation assisted studies of actual Florida utility high-penetration distribution circuits as well as substations and, to a limited extent, the bulk power system. Each phase builds and expands upon the efforts of the previous phase, leading to a comprehensive examination and understanding of high-penetration solar PV issues, from the solar resource to the conversion and integration technologies to the electric power system, with Florida and it’s utility partners providing the broad range of conditions and system integration scenarios necessary to develop useful insight and solutions. This phase, Phase 1, was funded with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. This version of the final report is organized to align with statement of project objectives (SOPO) critical milestones.

  5. Implications of the Lessons Learned from a State Systems Change Initiative on Transition for Youth with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David R.; Guy, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Identifies lessons learned from the State Systems Change Initiative on Transition for Youth with Disabilities, such as: (1) the need for such initiatives to recognize political, economic, and social factors; (2) the need for systems change to be a dynamic and continuous improvement process; and (3) the value of using federal legislative mandates…

  6. High Penetration Solar PV Deployment Sunshine State Solar Grid Initiative (SUNGRIN)

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, Rick; Steurer, Mischa; Faruque, MD Omar; Langston, James; Schoder, Karl; Ravindra, Harsha; Hariri, Ali; Moaveni, Houtan; Click, Dave; Reedy, Bob

    2015-05-31

    The report provides results from the Sunshine State Solar Grid Initiative (SUNGRIN) high penetration solar PV deployment project led by Florida State University’s (FSU) Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS). FSU CAPS and industry and university partners have completed a five-year effort aimed at enabling effective integration of high penetration levels of grid-connected solar PV generation. SUNGRIN has made significant contributions in the development of simulation-assisted techniques, tools, insight and understanding associated with solar PV effects on electric power system (EPS) operation and the evaluation of mitigation options for maintaining reliable operation. An important element of the project was the partnership and participation of six major Florida utilities and the Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FRCC). Utilities provided details and data associated with actual distribution circuits having high-penetration PV to use as case studies. The project also conducted foundational work supporting future investigations of effects at the transmission / bulk power system level. In the final phase of the project, four open-use models with built-in case studies were developed and released, along with synthetic solar PV data sets, and tools and techniques for model reduction and in-depth parametric studies of solar PV impact on distribution circuits. Along with models and data, at least 70 supporting MATLAB functions have been developed and made available, with complete documentation.

  7. Study of the Exclusive Initial State RadiationProduction of the D \\bar D System

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-07

    A study of exclusive production of the D{bar D} system through initial-state radiation is performed in a search for charmonium states, where D = D{sup 0} or D{sup +}. The D{sup 0} mesons are reconstructed in the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay modes. The D{sup +} is reconstructed through the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decay mode. The analysis makes use of an integrated luminosity of 288.5 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment. The D{bar D} mass spectrum shows a clear {psi}(3770) signal. Further structures appear in the 3.9 and 4.1 GeV/c{sup 2} regions. No evidence is found for Y(4260) decays to D{bar D}, implying an upper limit {Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} D{bar D})/{Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 7.6 (95% confidence level).

  8. A state-wide partnership to promote safe and supportive schools: the PBIS Maryland Initiative.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Pas, Elise T; Bloom, Jerry; Barrett, Susan; Hershfeldt, Patricia; Alexander, Andrea; McKenna, Milton; Chafin, Ann E; Leaf, Philip J

    2012-07-01

    Schools continue to be an important context for preventive interventions targeting a range of behavioral and mental health problems. Yet competing demands on teachers and shifting priorities in response to federal legislation have posed some unique challenges to prevention researchers working in school settings. This paper summarizes an approach to prevention partnerships developed over a decade and centered on the three-tiered Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) model. A state-wide initiative was formed and led through a partnership between the Maryland State Department of Education, Sheppard Pratt Health System, and Johns Hopkins University, which focused on implementing evidence-based practices and conducting prevention research in Maryland public schools. Drawing on a community-based participatory research framework for developing research partnerships, we highlight the importance of forming and sustaining authentic relationships to support school-based prevention research and implementation of evidence-based programs. We also discuss how these relationships have been used to disseminate PBIS and rigorously test its effectiveness. We describe some lessons learned from the partnership and identify potential areas for future research on the prevention partnership model. We conclude with a discussion of the implications for both researchers and community partners engaged in translational research in school settings.

  9. Initial pseudo-steady state & asymptotic KPZ universality in semiconductor on polymer deposition.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Renan A L; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Ferraz, Isnard; Oliveira, Tiago J

    2017-06-19

    The Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class is a paradigmatic example of universality in nonequilibrium phenomena, but clear experimental evidences of asymptotic 2D-KPZ statistics are still very rare, and far less understanding stems from its short-time behavior. We tackle such issues by analyzing surface fluctuations of CdTe films deposited on polymeric substrates, based on a huge spatio-temporal surface sampling acquired through atomic force microscopy. A pseudo-steady state (where average surface roughness and spatial correlations stay constant in time) is observed at initial times, persisting up to deposition of ~10(4) monolayers. This state results from a fine balance between roughening and smoothening, as supported by a phenomenological growth model. KPZ statistics arises at long times, thoroughly verified by universal exponents, spatial covariance and several distributions. Recent theoretical generalizations of the Family-Vicsek scaling and the emergence of log-normal distributions during interface growth are experimentally confirmed. These results confirm that high vacuum vapor deposition of CdTe constitutes a genuine 2D-KPZ system, and expand our knowledge about possible substrate-induced short-time behaviors.

  10. GeoBolivia the initiator Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Plurinational State of Bolivia's Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina Rodriguez, Raul Fernando; Lesage, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    Started in 2011, the GeoBolivia project (www.geo.gob.bo)aims at building the Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Plurinational State of Bolivia (IDE-EPB by its Spanish initials), as an effort of the Vice Presidency of the State to give an open access to the public geographic information of Bolivia. The first phase of the project has already been completed. It consisted in implementing an infrastructure and a geoportal for accessing the geographic information through WMS, WFS, WCS and CSW services. The project is currently in its second phase dedicated to decentralizing the structure of IDE-EPB and promoting its use throughout the Bolivian State. The whole platform uses free software and open standards. As a complement, an on-line training module was developed to undertake the transfer of the knowledge the project generated. The main software components used in the SDI are: gvSIG, QGis, uDig as GIS desktop clients; PostGreSQL and PostGIS as geographic database management system; geOrchestra as a framework containing the GeoServer map server, the GeoNetwork catalog server and the OpenLayers and Mapfish GIS webclient; MapServer as a map server for generating OpenStreetMap tiles; Debian as operating system; Apache and Tomcat as web servers. Keywords: SDI, Bolivia, GIS, free software, catalog, gvSIG, QGIS, uDig, geOrchestra, OpenLayers, Mapfish, GeoNetwork, MapServer, GeoServer, OGC, WFS, WMS, WCS, CSW, WMC.

  11. 76 FR 64341 - Silver State Solar Power North LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Silver State Solar Power North LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Silver State Solar Power North, LLC's application for market... 20426. The filings in the above-referenced proceeding are accessible in the Commission's eLibrary system...

  12. 77 FR 20381 - Silver State Solar Power North, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Silver State Solar Power North, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Silver State Solar Power North, LLC's application for...

  13. Education, Key to Economic Growth. Recent Major Education Initiatives in Support of Economic Development in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This report describes new major education initiatives to enhance economic development in New York State. The 1970-1987 period has seen dramatic change in the labor profile impelled by technological and market forces transforming the economy. Apart from some fairly stable sectors, the state economy is characterized by a shift from manaufacturing to…

  14. Education, Key to Economic Growth. Recent Major Education Initiatives in Support of Economic Development in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This report describes new major education initiatives to enhance economic development in New York State. The 1970-1987 period has seen dramatic change in the labor profile impelled by technological and market forces transforming the economy. Apart from some fairly stable sectors, the state economy is characterized by a shift from manaufacturing to…

  15. Association between U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) features and HIV antiretroviral therapy initiation, 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Hanna, David B; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A; Hessol, Nancy A; Horberg, Michael A; Jacobson, Lisa P; Kirk, Gregory D; Kitahata, Mari M; Korthuis, P Todd; Moore, Richard D; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J; Sterling, Timothy R; Willig, James H; Collier, Ann; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E; Althoff, Keri N; Martin, Jeffrey N; Rodriguez, Benigno; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Gange, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) are federally funded to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) as the payer of last resort to eligible persons with HIV infection. States differ regarding their financial contributions to and ways of implementing these programs, and it remains unclear how this interstate variability affects HIV treatment outcomes. We analyzed data from HIV-infected individuals who were clinically-eligible for ART between 2001 and 2009 (i.e., a first reported CD4+ <350 cells/uL or AIDS-defining illness) from 14 U.S. cohorts of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD). Using propensity score matching and Cox regression, we assessed ART initiation (within 6 months following eligibility) and virologic suppression (within 1 year) based on differences in two state ADAP features: the amount of state funding in annual ADAP budgets and the implementation of waiting lists. We performed an a priori subgroup analysis in persons with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Among 8,874 persons, 56% initiated ART within six months following eligibility. Persons living in states with no additional state contribution to the ADAP budget initiated ART on a less timely basis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.73, 95% CI 0.60-0.88). Living in a state with an ADAP waiting list was not associated with less timely initiation (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.87-1.45). Neither additional state contributions nor waiting lists were significantly associated with virologic suppression. Persons with an IDU history initiated ART on a less timely basis (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47-0.95). We found that living in states that did not contribute additionally to the ADAP budget was associated with delayed ART initiation when treatment was clinically indicated. Given the changing healthcare environment, continued assessment of the role of ADAPs and their features that facilitate prompt treatment is needed.

  16. Anisotropic non-gaussianity from rotational symmetry breaking excited initial states

    SciTech Connect

    Ashoorioon, Amjad; Koivisto, Tomi

    2016-12-01

    If the initial quantum state of the primordial perturbations broke rotational invariance, that would be seen as a statistical anisotropy in the angular correlations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) temperature fluctuations. This can be described by a general parameterisation of the initial conditions that takes into account the possible direction-dependence of both the amplitude and the phase of particle creation during inflation. The leading effect in the CMBR two-point function is typically a quadrupole modulation, whose coefficient is analytically constrained here to be |B|≲0.06. The CMBR three-point function then acquires enhanced non-gaussianity, especially for the local configurations. In the large occupation number limit, a distinctive prediction is a modulation of the non-gaussianity around a mean value depending on the angle that short and long wavelength modes make with the preferred direction. The maximal variations with respect to the mean value occur for the configurations which are coplanar with the preferred direction and the amplitude of the non-gaussianity increases (decreases) for the short wavelength modes aligned with (perpendicular to) the preferred direction. For a high scale model of inflation with maximally pumped up isotropic occupation and ϵ≃0.01 the difference between these two configurations is about 0.27, which could be detectable in the future. For purely anisotropic particle creation, the non-Gaussianity can be larger and its anisotropic feature very sharp. The non-gaussianity can then reach f{sub NL}∼30 in the preferred direction while disappearing from the correlations in the orthogonal plane.

  17. Anisotropic non-gaussianity from rotational symmetry breaking excited initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoorioon, Amjad; Casadio, Roberto; Koivisto, Tomi

    2016-12-01

    If the initial quantum state of the primordial perturbations broke rotational invariance, that would be seen as a statistical anisotropy in the angular correlations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) temperature fluctuations. This can be described by a general parameterisation of the initial conditions that takes into account the possible direction-dependence of both the amplitude and the phase of particle creation during inflation. The leading effect in the CMBR two-point function is typically a quadrupole modulation, whose coefficient is analytically constrained here to be |B| lesssim 0.06. The CMBR three-point function then acquires enhanced non-gaussianity, especially for the local configurations. In the large occupation number limit, a distinctive prediction is a modulation of the non-gaussianity around a mean value depending on the angle that short and long wavelength modes make with the preferred direction. The maximal variations with respect to the mean value occur for the configurations which are coplanar with the preferred direction and the amplitude of the non-gaussianity increases (decreases) for the short wavelength modes aligned with (perpendicular to) the preferred direction. For a high scale model of inflation with maximally pumped up isotropic occupation and epsilonsimeq 0.01 the difference between these two configurations is about 0.27, which could be detectable in the future. For purely anisotropic particle creation, the non-Gaussianity can be larger and its anisotropic feature very sharp. The non-gaussianity can then reach 0fNL ~ 3 in the preferred direction while disappearing from the correlations in the orthogonal plane.

  18. A transition state view on reactive scattering: Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H+CH4-->H2+CH3 reaction studied in full dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffel, Gerd; Manthe, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H+CH4→H2+CH3 reaction are computed for vanishing total angular momentum by full-dimensional calculations employing the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree approach. An ensemble of wave packets completely describing reactivity for total energies up to 0.58 eV is constructed in the transition state region by diagonalization of the thermal flux operator. These wave packets are then propagated into the reactant asymptotic region to obtain the initial state-selected reaction probabilities. Reaction probabilities for reactants in all rotational states of the vibrational 1A1, 1F2, and 1E levels of methane are presented. Vibrational excitation is found to decrease reactivity when reaction probabilities at equivalent total energies are compared but to increase reaction probabilities when the comparison is done at the basis of equivalent collision energies. Only a fraction of the initial vibrational energy can be utilized to promote the reaction. The effect of rotational excitation on the reactivity differs depending on the initial vibrational state of methane. For the 1A1 and 1F2 vibrational states of methane, rotational excitation decreases the reaction probability even when comparing reaction probabilities at equivalent collision energies. In contrast, rotational energy is even more efficient than translational energy in increasing the reaction probability when the reaction starts from the 1E vibrational state of methane. All findings can be explained employing a transition state based interpretation of the reaction process.

  19. Moving the Barricades to Physical Activity: A Qualitative Analysis of Open Streets Initiatives Across the United States.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Amy A; Hipp, J Aaron; Lokuta, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Ciclovía, or Open Streets initiatives, are events where streets are opened for physical activity and closed to motorized traffic. Although the initiatives are gaining popularity in the United States, little is known about planning and implementing them. The goals of this paper are to explore the development and implementation of Open Streets initiatives and make recommendations for increasing the capacity of organizers to enhance initiative success. Phenomenology with qualitative analysis of structured interviews was used. Study setting was urban and suburban communities in the United States. Study participants were organizers of Open Streets initiatives in U.S. cities. Using a list of 47 events held in 2011, 27 lead organizers were interviewed by telephone about planning, implementation, and lessons learned. The interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. A phenomenologic approach was used, an initial coding tool was developed after reviewing a sample of transcripts, and constant comparative coding methodology was applied. Themes and subthemes were generated from codes. The most common reasons for initiation were to highlight or improve health and transportation. Most initiatives aimed to reach the general population, but some targeted families, children, or specific neighborhoods. Getting people to understand the concept of Open Streets was an important challenge. Other challenges included lack of funding and personnel, and complex logistics. These initiatives democratize public space for citizens while promoting physical activity, social connectedness, and other broad agendas. There are opportunities for the research community to contribute to the expanse and sustainability of Open Streets, particularly in evaluation and dissemination.

  20. Fate of the initial state perturbations in heavy ion collisions. II. Glauber fluctuations and sounds

    SciTech Connect

    Staig, Pilar; Shuryak, Edward

    2011-09-15

    Heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are well described by the (nearly ideal) hydrodynamics for average events. In the present paper we study initial state fluctuations appearing on an event-by-event basis and the propagation of perturbations induced by them. We found that (i) fluctuations of several of the lowest harmonics have comparable magnitudes and (ii) that at least all odd harmonics are correlated in phase, (iii) thus indicating the local nature of fluctuations. We argue that such local perturbations should be the source of the ''tiny bang,'' a pulse of sound propagating from it. We identify its two fundamental scales as (i) the ''sound horizon'' (analogous to the absolute ruler in cosmic microwave background and galaxy distributions) and (ii) the ''viscous horizon'' separating damped and undamped harmonics. We then qualitatively describe how one can determine them from the data and thus determine two fundamental parameters of the matter: the (average) speed of sound and viscosity. The rest of the paper explains how one can study mutual coherence of various harmonics. For that, one should go beyond the two-particle correlations to three (or more) particles. Mutual coherence is important for the picture of propagating sound waves.

  1. Planning for the worst in Washington State: initial response planning for improvised nuclear device explosions.

    PubMed

    Poeton, Richard W; Glines, Wayne M; McBaugh, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Since 11 September 2001, improvised nuclear devices have become recognized as an important radiological threat requiring emergency response planning. Although Protective Action Guidance is well established for fixed nuclear facilities, correspondingly well-developed guidance does not exist for nuclear explosions. The Washington State Department of Health has developed preplanned Protective Action Recommendations for improvised nuclear device explosions. These recommendations recognize the need for advice to the public soon after such an event, before significant data are available. They can be used before significant outside support is available locally, and reference observable effects so people can use them if communications were disabled. The recommendations focus on early actions (24-48 h) and place priority on actions to avoid deterministic health effects due to residual fallout. Specific emphasis is placed on determining recommendations for evacuation, as well as the extent of the area for sheltering. The key recommendations developed for an initial public response are: (1) if there is ready access to robust shelter such as an underground basement or interior spaces in a multi-story structure, immediate sheltering in these areas is the best action, regardless of location; (2) if robust shelter is not available, and if fallout is observed in the area, then evacuation is the best general recommendation for locations within 16 km (10 miles) of the explosion; and (3) beyond 16 km (10 miles), the generally recommended protective action is to shelter in the best-protected location which is readily available.

  2. Initial singlet and triplet spin state contributions to -> ppπ0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thörngren Engblom, P.; Meyer, H. O.; Balewski, J. T.; Daehnick, W. W.; Doskow, J.; Haeberli, W.; Lorentz, B.; Pancella, P. V.; Pollock, R. E.; von Przewoski, B.; Rathmann, F.; Rinckel, T.; Saha, Swapan K.; Schwartz, B.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wise, T.

    2000-01-01

    The PINTEX2http://www.iucf.indiana.edu/~pintex/2 facility at the IUCF Cooler ring, dedicated to the study of spin dependence in nucleon-nucleon interactions, has been used to measure polarization observables of the reaction -> ppπ0 at beam energies between 325 and 400 MeV. The stored, polarized proton beam had spin projections both in the longitudinal and the transverse directions with respect to the beam momentum. We report here on the measurements of the relative transverse and longitudinal spin-dependent cross sections3Defined as ΔσT(L) = [σ(⇕) + σ(⇕)] - [σ(⇈ + σ(⇊)] where the arrows denote parallel and antiparallel beam/target spin combinations, either transversely (T) or longitudinally (L) polarized.3, ΔσT/σtot and ΔσL/σtot, and how from these observables the initial spin singlet and triplet cross sections are obtained. Considering angular momentum states less than or equal to one, the contribution of the Ps partial waves to the cross section can be extracted.

  3. Initial state effects on the cosmic microwave background and trans-Planckian physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Kevin; Lowe, David A.

    2003-03-01

    There exists a one complex parameter family of de Sitter invariant vacua, known as α vacua. In the context of slow roll inflation, we show that all but the Bunch-Davies vacuum generates unacceptable production of high energy particles at the end of inflation. As a simple model for the effects of trans-Planckian physics, we go on to consider non de Sitter invariant vacua obtained by patching modes in the Bunch-Davies vacuum above some momentum scale Mc, with modes in an α vacuum below Mc. Choosing Mc near the Planck scale MPl, we find acceptable levels of hard particle production, and corrections to the cosmic microwave perturbations at the level of HMPl/M2c, where H is the Hubble parameter during inflation. More general initial states of this type with H≪Mc≪MPl can give corrections to the spectrum of cosmic microwave background perturbations at order 1. The parameter characterizing the α vacuum during inflation is a new cosmological observable.

  4. Influence of the initial state of carbon nanotubes on their colloidal stability under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwyzer, Irène; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Magrez, Arnaud; Nowack, Bernd

    2011-06-01

    The colloidal stability of dry and suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of amphiphilic compounds (i.e. natural organic matter or surfactants) at environmentally realistic concentrations was investigated over several days. The suspensions were analyzed for CNT concentration (UV-vis spectroscopy), particle size (nanoparticle tracking analysis), and CNT length and dispersion quality (TEM). When added in dry form, around 1% of the added CNTs remained suspended. Pre-dispersion in organic solvent or anionic detergent stabilized up to 65% of the added CNTs after 20 days of mild shaking and 5 days of settling. The initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. suspended) and the medium composition hence are critical determinants for the partitioning of CNTs between sediment and the water column. TEM analysis revealed that single suspended CNTs were present in all suspensions and that shaking and settling resulted in a fractionation of the CNTs with shorter CNTs remaining predominantly in suspension. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of the transition state in polyatomic reactions: initial state-selected reaction probabilities of the H + CH₄ → H₂ + CH₃ reaction.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Ralph; Manthe, Uwe

    2014-11-07

    Full-dimensional calculations of initial state-selected reaction probabilities on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) have been communicated recently [R. Welsch and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 051102 (2014)]. These calculations use the quantum transition state concept, the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach, and graphics processing units to speed up the potential evaluation. Here further results of these calculations and an extended analysis are presented. State-selected reaction probabilities are given for many initial ro-vibrational states. The role of the vibrational states of the activated complex is analyzed in detail. It is found that rotationally cold methane mainly reacts via the ground state of the activated complex while rotationally excited methane mostly reacts via H-H-CH3-bending excited states of the activated complex. Analyzing the different contributions to the reactivity of the vibrationally states of methane, a complex pattern is found. Comparison with initial state-selected reaction probabilities computed on the semi-empirical Jordan-Gilbert PES reveals the dependence of the results on the specific PES.

  6. The role of the transition state in polyatomic reactions: Initial state-selected reaction probabilities of the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Ralph; Manthe, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Full-dimensional calculations of initial state-selected reaction probabilities on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) have been communicated recently [R. Welsch and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 051102 (2014)]. These calculations use the quantum transition state concept, the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach, and graphics processing units to speed up the potential evaluation. Here further results of these calculations and an extended analysis are presented. State-selected reaction probabilities are given for many initial ro-vibrational states. The role of the vibrational states of the activated complex is analyzed in detail. It is found that rotationally cold methane mainly reacts via the ground state of the activated complex while rotationally excited methane mostly reacts via H-H-CH3-bending excited states of the activated complex. Analyzing the different contributions to the reactivity of the vibrationally states of methane, a complex pattern is found. Comparison with initial state-selected reaction probabilities computed on the semi-empirical Jordan-Gilbert PES reveals the dependence of the results on the specific PES.

  7. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1989 - December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    This annual report for calendar year 1989 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract.

  8. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1990 - December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    OAK A271 This annual report for calendar year 1990 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract.

  9. Technical progress report. Private sector initiatives between the United States and Japan. January 1991 - December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    This annual report for calendar year 1991 describes the efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract.

  10. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  11. Canada-United States-Mexico Trilateral Cooperation on Childhood Obesity Initiative.

    PubMed

    Rabadán-Diehl, Cristina; Safdie, Margarita; Rodin, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Childhood obesity is an important public health problem that affects countries in the Americas. In 2014, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Member States agreed on a Plan of Action for the Prevention of Obesity in Children and Adolescents in an effort to address the impact of this disorder in the Americas region. The interventions laid out in this regional plan are multi-faceted and require multi-sectoral partnerships. Building on a strong history of successful trilateral collaboration, Canada, Mexico, and the United States formed a partnership to address the growing epidemic of childhood obesity in the North American region. This collaborative effort, known as the Trilateral Cooperation on Childhood Obesity Initiative, is the first initiative in the region to address chronic noncommunicable diseases by bringing together technical and policy experts, with strong leadership and support from the secretaries and ministers of health. The Initiative's goals include increasing levels of physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior through 1) increased social mobilization and citizen engagement, 2) community- based outreach, and 3) changes to the built (man-made) environment. This article describes the background and development process of the Initiative; specific goals, activities, and actions achieved to date; and opportunities and next steps. This information may be useful for those forming other partnerships designed to address childhood obesity or other complex public health challenges in the region. RESUMEN La obesidad infantil es un problema de salud pública importante que afecta a los países de las Américas. En el 2014, los Estados Miembros de la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS) acordaron un Plan de acción para la prevención de la obesidad en la niñez y la adolescencia con el fin de hacer frente a las repercusiones de este trastorno en la Región de las Américas. Las intervenciones que componen este plan regional son multifacéticas y

  12. Measures of Last Resort: Assessing Strategies for State-Initiated Turnarounds. Linking State and Local School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochim, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) puts responsibility for improving student outcomes back where some say it has always belonged--under states' purview. No longer will prescriptive federal requirements dictate how states should identify, support, and turn around the lowest-performing schools and districts. Instead, states are empowered to craft…

  13. How to trust a perfect stranger: predicting initial trust behavior from resting-state brain-electrical connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Notebaert, Karolien; Anderl, Christine; Teckentrup, Vanessa; Kaßecker, Anja; Windmann, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal exchanges can be understood as the updating of an initial belief about a partner. This initial level of trust is essential when it comes to establishing cooperation with an unknown partner, as cooperation cannot arise without a minimum of trust not justified by previous successful exchanges with this partner. Here we demonstrate the existence of a representation of the initial trust level before an exchange with a partner has occurred. Specifically, we can predict the Investor’s initial investment—i.e. his initial level of trust toward the unknown trustee in Round 1 of a standard 10-round Trust Game—from resting-state functional connectivity data acquired several minutes before the start of the Trust Game. Resting-state functional connectivity is, however, not significantly associated with the level of trust in later rounds, potentially mirroring the updating of the initial belief about the partner. Our results shed light on how the initial level of trust is represented. In particular, we show that a person’s initial level of trust is, at least in part, determined by brain electrical activity acquired well before the beginning of an exchange. PMID:25274577

  14. How to trust a perfect stranger: predicting initial trust behavior from resting-state brain-electrical connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Notebaert, Karolien; Anderl, Christine; Teckentrup, Vanessa; Kaßecker, Anja; Windmann, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Reciprocal exchanges can be understood as the updating of an initial belief about a partner. This initial level of trust is essential when it comes to establishing cooperation with an unknown partner, as cooperation cannot arise without a minimum of trust not justified by previous successful exchanges with this partner. Here we demonstrate the existence of a representation of the initial trust level before an exchange with a partner has occurred. Specifically, we can predict the Investor's initial investment--i.e. his initial level of trust toward the unknown trustee in Round 1 of a standard 10-round Trust Game-from resting-state functional connectivity data acquired several minutes before the start of the Trust Game. Resting-state functional connectivity is, however, not significantly associated with the level of trust in later rounds, potentially mirroring the updating of the initial belief about the partner. Our results shed light on how the initial level of trust is represented. In particular, we show that a person's initial level of trust is, at least in part, determined by brain electrical activity acquired well before the beginning of an exchange.

  15. Association Between Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Testosterone Testing and Initiation in the United States, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Layton, J. Bradley; Kim, Yoonsang; Alexander, G. Caleb; Emery, Sherry L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Testosterone initiation increased substantially in the United States from 2000 to 2013, especially among men without clear indications. Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) also increased during this time. OBJECTIVE To investigate associations between televised DTCA and testosterone testing and initiation in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND POPULATION Ecologic study conducted in designated market areas (DMAs) in the United States. Monthly testosterone advertising ratings were linked to DMA-level testosterone use data from 2009–2013 derived from commercial insurance claims. Associations between DTCA and testosterone testing, initiation, and initiation without recent baseline tests were estimated using Poisson generalized estimating equations. EXPOSURES Monthly Nielsen ratings for testosterone DTCA in the 75 largest DMAs. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES (1) Rates of new serum testosterone testing; (2) rates of testosterone initiation (in-office injection, surgical implant, or pharmacy dispensing) for all testosterone products combined and for specific brands; and (3) rates of testosterone initiation without recent serum testosterone testing. RESULTS Of 17 228 599 commercially insured men in the 75 DMAs, 1 007 990 (mean age, 49.6 [SD, 11.5] years) had new serum testosterone tests and 283 317 (mean age, 51.8 [SD, 11.3] years) initiated testosterone treatment. Advertising intensity varied by geographic region and time, with the highest intensity seen in the southeastern United States and with months ranging from no ad exposures to a mean of 13.6 exposures per household. Nonbranded advertisements were common prior to 2012, with branded advertisements becoming more common during and after 2012. Each household advertisement exposure was associated with a monthly increase in rates of new testosterone testing (rate ratio [RR], 1.006; 95% CI, 1.004–1.008), initiation (RR, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.004–1.010), and initiation without a recent test (RR, 1.008; 95% CI

  16. Association Between Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Testosterone Testing and Initiation in the United States, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Layton, J Bradley; Kim, Yoonsang; Alexander, G Caleb; Emery, Sherry L

    2017-03-21

    Testosterone initiation increased substantially in the United States from 2000 to 2013, especially among men without clear indications. Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) also increased during this time. To investigate associations between televised DTCA and testosterone testing and initiation in the United States. Ecologic study conducted in designated market areas (DMAs) in the United States. Monthly testosterone advertising ratings were linked to DMA-level testosterone use data from 2009-2013 derived from commercial insurance claims. Associations between DTCA and testosterone testing, initiation, and initiation without recent baseline tests were estimated using Poisson generalized estimating equations. Monthly Nielsen ratings for testosterone DTCA in the 75 largest DMAs. (1) Rates of new serum testosterone testing; (2) rates of testosterone initiation (in-office injection, surgical implant, or pharmacy dispensing) for all testosterone products combined and for specific brands; and (3) rates of testosterone initiation without recent serum testosterone testing. Of 17 228 599 commercially insured men in the 75 DMAs, 1 007 990 (mean age, 49.6 [SD, 11.5] years) had new serum testosterone tests and 283 317 (mean age, 51.8 [SD, 11.3] years) initiated testosterone treatment. Advertising intensity varied by geographic region and time, with the highest intensity seen in the southeastern United States and with months ranging from no ad exposures to a mean of 13.6 exposures per household. Nonbranded advertisements were common prior to 2012, with branded advertisements becoming more common during and after 2012. Each household advertisement exposure was associated with a monthly increase in rates of new testosterone testing (rate ratio [RR], 1.006; 95% CI, 1.004-1.008), initiation (RR, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.004-1.010), and initiation without a recent test (RR, 1.008; 95% CI, 1.002-1.013). Mean absolute rate increases were 0.14 tests (95% CI, 0.09-0.19), 0.05 new

  17. Finite-time fuzzy stabilisation and control for nonlinear descriptor systems with non-zero initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhan; Zhang, Qingling; Ai, Jun; Sun, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For nonlinear descriptor systems, this paper presents an approach to obtain a fuzzy controller with guaranteed finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness with non-zero initial state, which outperforms some recent work and additionally provides a precision estimation of model approximation. We prove necessary and sufficient conditions of finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness with non-zero initial state for nonlinear descriptor systems. Using Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy dynamic models and proposed sufficient conditions, we define fuzzy sets and use linear matrix inequalities to satisfy differential linear matrix inequalities. A simulation confirms efficiency and precision of the given method.

  18. Correlates and contexts of US injection drug initiation among undocumented Mexican migrant men who were deported from the United States.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela M; Lozada, Remedios; Pollini, Robin A; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2012-08-01

    Preventing the onset of injection drug use is important in controlling the spread of HIV and other blood borne infections. Undocumented migrants in the United States face social, economic, and legal stressors that may contribute to substance abuse. Little is known about undocumented migrants' drug abuse trajectories including injection initiation. To examine the correlates and contexts of US injection initiation among undocumented migrants, we administered quantitative surveys (N = 309) and qualitative interviews (N = 23) on migration and drug abuse experiences to deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico. US injection initiation was independently associated with ever using drugs in Mexico pre-migration, younger age at first US migration, and US incarceration. Participants' qualitative interviews contextualized quantitative findings and demonstrated the significance of social contexts surrounding US injection initiation experiences. HIV prevention programs may prevent/delay US injection initiation by addressing socio-economic and migration-related stressors experienced by undocumented migrants.

  19. The Last State to Grant Nurse Practitioners DEA Licensure: An Education Improvement Initiative on the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.

    PubMed

    Kellams, Joni R; Maye, John P

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) now have prescriptive authority for controlled substances in all 50 states in the United States. Florida, the last state to grant NPs DEA licensure, has been wrought with prescription diversion practices for a number of years as pill mills, doctor shopping, and overprescribing proliferated. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) help curb drug diversion activity and play a key role in reducing the abuse of controlled substances. The primary objective of this education improvement initiative was to increase knowledge of actively licensed NPs in the state of Florida regarding the state's PDMP. The main themes included the drug abuse problem, description and progression of the PDMP, and how to use the Florida PDMP. Upon approval from the institutional review board, this education improvement initiative gauged NP knowledge of the PDMP and main themes before and after an educational PowerPoint intervention. A pretest/posttest questionnaire was administered for assessment of all knowledge questions. One hundred forty-five NPs with active advanced registered NP licenses in Florida completed both the pretest and posttest questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and paired t tests were used for statistical significance testing. Knowledge of the PDMP and the main themes of the education improvement initiative significantly increased (p < .001) from pretest to posttest results. This education improvement initiative had positive effects for NPs on the knowledge of the Florida PDMP and the main themes. This indicated that Florida NPs are able to acquire greater comprehension of the PDMP by an education intervention.

  20. Performance Incentives to Improve Community College Completion: Learning from Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative. A State Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulock, Nancy; Jenkins, Davis

    2011-01-01

    Amid growing signs of America's weakening position in the global economy, federal and state policymakers and major foundations have set ambitious goals for increasing postsecondary attainment in the United States. Given changing U.S. demographics, it has become clear that these national goals are attainable only with vastly improved outcomes among…

  1. 78 FR 58546 - State System Development Initiative (SSDI) Grant Program; Single-Case Deviation From Competition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... building of state data capacity and infrastructure that support comprehensive, community- based systems of..., established data networks, and sheer size of their birth cohort, the State of California is uniquely qualified... INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Snyder, MPH, Division of State and Community Health, Maternal and Child Health...

  2. Association between U.S. State AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) Features and HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation, 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, David B.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Horberg, Michael A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Collier, Ann; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Althoff, Keri N.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Gange, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) are federally funded to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) as the payer of last resort to eligible persons with HIV infection. States differ regarding their financial contributions to and ways of implementing these programs, and it remains unclear how this interstate variability affects HIV treatment outcomes. Methods We analyzed data from HIV-infected individuals who were clinically-eligible for ART between 2001 and 2009 (i.e., a first reported CD4+ <350 cells/uL or AIDS-defining illness) from 14 U.S. cohorts of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD). Using propensity score matching and Cox regression, we assessed ART initiation (within 6 months following eligibility) and virologic suppression (within 1 year) based on differences in two state ADAP features: the amount of state funding in annual ADAP budgets and the implementation of waiting lists. We performed an a priori subgroup analysis in persons with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Results Among 8,874 persons, 56% initiated ART within six months following eligibility. Persons living in states with no additional state contribution to the ADAP budget initiated ART on a less timely basis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.73, 95% CI 0.60–0.88). Living in a state with an ADAP waiting list was not associated with less timely initiation (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.87–1.45). Neither additional state contributions nor waiting lists were significantly associated with virologic suppression. Persons with an IDU history initiated ART on a less timely basis (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47–0.95). Conclusions We found that living in states that did not contribute additionally to the ADAP budget was associated with delayed ART initiation when treatment was clinically indicated. Given the changing healthcare environment, continued assessment of the role of ADAPs and their features that facilitate prompt treatment is needed. PMID:24260137

  3. The Impact of the Common Core State Standards Initiative on Math ACT Scores of West Tennessee High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kirkland D.

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) initiative is the latest effort by educational leaders to improve educational outcomes of American students. The standards are intended to bring uniformity in educational content of what is being taught in schools across the nation in order to promote rigor and academic portability. Proponents claimed the new…

  4. The Politics of Privatization Practice: An Analysis of State-Initiated Privatization via School Restructuring Statutes in Two Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2007-01-01

    Efforts to infuse market forces into public education are based on the supposition that these forces can improve student outcomes. This assumption does not consider the politics of implementation. This article examines state-initiated school privatization and reveals factors that influence translation of theory to practice. The cases depict what…

  5. ERISA as an obstacle to fair share legislation and other state initiatives to expand coverage to the uninsured and underinsured.

    PubMed

    Polvino, Kathlynn Butler; Antia, Mazda K; Burnette, Jeremy P

    2007-01-01

    As states experiment with legislation designed to address problems of healthcare affordability and accessibility by requiring employers to offer or spend more on employee health benefit plans, courts increasingly will be called upon to determine whether such mandates run afoul of ERISA. This article examines the potential impact of existing case law on current legislative initiatives.

  6. Universities and the Entrepreneurial State: Politics and Policy and a New Wave of State-Based Economic Initiatives. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.14.06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of US federal science and economic policy that began in earnest in the Reagan administration formed the first stage in an emerging post-Cold War drive toward technological innovation. A frenzy of new state-based initiatives now forms the Second Stage, further promoting universities as decisive tools for economic competitiveness.…

  7. Metrics, Dollars, and Systems Change: Learning from Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative to Design Effective Postsecondary Performance Funding Policies. A State Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Shulock, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The Student Achievement Initiative (SAI), adopted by the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges in 2007, is one of a growing number of performance funding programs that have been dubbed "performance funding 2.0." Unlike previous performance funding models, the SAI rewards colleges for students' intermediate…

  8. Diabatic Initialization of Mesoscale Models in the Southeastern United States: Can 0 to 12h Warm Season QPF be Improved?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Bradshaw, Tom; Burks, Jason; Darden, Chris; Dembek, Scott

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that numerical warm season quantitative precipitation forecasts lack significant skill for numerous reasons. Some are related to the model--it may lack physical processes required to realistically simulate convection or the numerical algorithms and dynamics employed may not be adequate. Others are related to initialization-mesoscale features play an important role in convective initialization and atmospheric observation systems are incapable of properly depicting the three-dimensional stability structure at the mesoscale. The purpose of this study is to determine if a mesoscale model initialized with a diabatic initialization scheme can improve short-term (0 to 12h) warm season quantitative precipitation forecasts in the Southeastern United States. The Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory is used to diabatically initialize the Pennsylvania State University/National center for Atmospheric Research (PSUNCAR) Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5). The SPORT Center runs LAPS operationally on an hourly cycle to produce analyses on a 15 km covering the eastern 2/3 of the United States. The 20 km National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Rapid Update Cycle analyses are used for the background fields. Standard observational data are acquired from MADIS with GOES/CRAFT Nexrad data acquired from in-house feeds. The MM5 is configured on a 140 x 140 12 km grid centered on Huntsville Alabama. Preliminary results indicate that MM5 runs initialized with LAPS produce improved 6 and 12h QPF threat scores compared with those initialized with the NCEP RUC.

  9. The differential impact of WIC peer counseling programs on breastfeeding initiation across the state of Maryland.

    PubMed

    Gross, Susan M; Resnik, Amy K; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Nanda, Joy P; Augustyn, Marycatherine; Paige, David M

    2009-11-01

    This cross-sectional study examines Maryland's women, infants, and children (WIC) breastfeeding initiation rates by program participation. The authors report on data regarding demographic and health characteristics and infant feeding practices for infants (n = 18,789) newly WIC-certified from January 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007. The authors compared self-reported, breastfeeding initiation rates for 3 groups: peer counselor (PC-treatment group) and two comparison groups, lactation consultant (LC), and standard care group (SCG). Reported breastfeeding initiation at certification was 55.4%. Multiple logistic regression analysis, controlling for relevant maternal and infant characteristics, showed that the odds of breastfeeding initiation were significantly greater among PC-exposed infants (OR [95% CI] 1.27 [1.18, 1.37]) compared to the reference group of SCG infants, but not significantly different between LC infants (1.04 [0.96, 1.14]) and the SCG. LC and SCG infants had similar odds of breastfeeding initiation. In the Maryland WIC program, breastfeeding initiation rates were positively associated with peer counseling.

  10. Structural Characteristic of the Initial Unfolded State on Refolding Determines Catalytic Efficiency of the Folded Protein in Presence of Osmolytes

    PubMed Central

    Warepam, Marina; Sharma, Gurumayum Suraj; Dar, Tanveer Ali; Khan, Md. Khurshid Alam; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2014-01-01

    Osmolytes are low molecular weight organic molecules accumulated by organisms to assist proper protein folding, and to provide protection to the structural integrity of proteins under denaturing stress conditions. It is known that osmolyte-induced protein folding is brought by unfavorable interaction of osmolytes with the denatured/unfolded states. The interaction of osmolyte with the native state does not significantly contribute to the osmolyte-induced protein folding. We have therefore investigated if different denatured states of a protein (generated by different denaturing agents) interact differently with the osmolytes to induce protein folding. We observed that osmolyte-assisted refolding of protein obtained from heat-induced denatured state produces native molecules with higher enzyme activity than those initiated from GdmCl- or urea-induced denatured state indicating that the structural property of the initial denatured state during refolding by osmolytes determines the catalytic efficiency of the folded protein molecule. These conclusions have been reached from the systematic measurements of enzymatic kinetic parameters (Km and kcat), thermodynamic stability (Tm and ΔHm) and secondary and tertiary structures of the folded native proteins obtained from refolding of various denatured states (due to heat-, urea- and GdmCl-induced denaturation) of RNase-A in the presence of various osmolytes. PMID:25313668

  11. State of stress and age offsets at oceanic fracture zones and implications for the initiation of subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mignon D.; Long, Maureen D.; Silver, Paul G.

    2011-11-01

    The recycling of oceanic lithosphere back into the Earth's interior through subduction is a central component of plate tectonics. The process by which new subduction zones initiate, however, remains poorly understood. Several different mechanisms for subduction initiation have been proposed, including passive margin collapse (aided by sediment loading and/or rheological weakening due to the presence of volatiles) and forced convergence across a zone of preexisting lithospheric weakness. In this paper we focus on the latter type of model, which identifies three conditions necessary for subduction initiation: a zone of weakness such as a fracture zone, an age (and therefore density) offset along the fracture zone, and significant normal compressive stress which leads to shortening. We identify regions on the present-day Earth which meet these conditions and which may correspond to regions of relatively likely subduction initiation in the near future. Using a digital seafloor age model, we have created a database of oceanic fractures and quantified the associated age offsets. We have evaluated the state of stress on these lithospheric weak zones using two different global stress models. We find that the conditions needed to initiate subduction via the forced convergence model are relatively rare on the present-day Earth, and that there is little indication of incipient subduction at regions identified as relatively likely for subduction initiation. Using the same technique, we have evaluated the state of stress and seafloor age offset at regions of inferred present-day incipient subduction, and find that most of these regions are not associated with both high far-field compressive stresses and large age (and thus density) offsets. Subduction has likely initiated via forced convergence across preexisting zones of lithospheric weakness in the past, but our results indicate that the conditions needed for this type of subduction initiation are rare on the present

  12. An instrumental variable approach finds no associated harm or benefit from early dialysis initiation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Scialla, Julia J.; Liu, Jiannong; Crews, Deidra C.; Guo, Haifeng; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Ephraim, Patti L.; Tangri, Navdeep; Sozio, Stephen M.; Shafi, Tariq; Miskulin, Dana C.; Michels, Wieneke M.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Wu, Albert W.; Powe, Neil R.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2014-01-01

    The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at dialysis initiation has been rising. Observational studies suggest harm, but may be confounded by unmeasured factors. As instrumental variable methods may be less biased we performed a retrospective cohort study of 310,932 patients starting dialysis between 2006 to 2008 and registered in the United States Renal Data System in order to describe geographic variation in eGFR at dialysis initiation and determine its association with mortality. Patients were grouped into 804 health service areas by zip code. Individual eGFR at dialysis initiation averaged 10.8 ml/min/1.73m2 but varied geographically. Only 11% of the variation in mean health service areas-level eGFR at dialysis initiation was accounted for by patient characteristics. We calculated demographic-adjusted mean eGFR at dialysis initiation in the health service areas using the 2006 and 2007 incident cohort as our instrument and estimated the association between individual eGFR at dialysis initiation and mortality in the 2008 incident cohort using the 2 stage residual inclusion method. Among 89,547 patients starting dialysis in 2008 with eGFR 5 to 20 ml/min/1.73m2, eGFR at initiation was not associated with mortality over a median of 15.5 months [hazard ratio 1.025 per 1 ml/min/1.73m2 for eGFR 5 to 14 ml/min/1.73m2; and 0.973 per 1 ml/min/1.73m2 for eGFR 14 to 20 ml/min/1.73m2]. Thus, there was no associated harm or benefit from early dialysis initiation in the United States. PMID:24786707

  13. An instrumental variable approach finds no associated harm or benefit with early dialysis initiation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Scialla, Julia J; Liu, Jiannong; Crews, Deidra C; Guo, Haifeng; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Ephraim, Patti L; Tangri, Navdeep; Sozio, Stephen M; Shafi, Tariq; Miskulin, Dana C; Michels, Wieneke M; Jaar, Bernard G; Wu, Albert W; Powe, Neil R; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-10-01

    The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at dialysis initiation has been rising. Observational studies suggest harm, but may be confounded by unmeasured factors. As instrumental variable methods may be less biased, we performed a retrospective cohort study of 310,932 patients who started dialysis between 2006 and 2008 and were registered in the United States Renal Data System in order to describe geographic variation in eGFR at dialysis initiation and determine its association with mortality. Patients were grouped into 804 health service areas (HSAs) by zip code. Individual eGFR at dialysis initiation averaged 10.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) but varied geographically. Only 11% of the variation in mean HSA-level eGFR at dialysis initiation was accounted for by patient characteristics. We calculated demographic-adjusted mean eGFR at dialysis initiation in the HSAs using the 2006 and 2007 incident cohort as our instrument and estimated the association between individual eGFR at dialysis initiation and mortality in the 2008 incident cohort using the two-stage residual inclusion method. Among 89,547 patients starting dialysis in 2008 with eGFR 5-20 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), eGFR at initiation was not associated with mortality over a median of 15.5 months (hazard ratio, 1.025 per 1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for eGFR 5-14 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); and 0.973 per 1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for eGFR 14-20 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). Thus, there was no associated harm or benefit with early dialysis initiation in the United States.

  14. Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, James N.; Grossmann, John R.; Shochet, Susan; Bresler, Joel; Duggan, Noreene

    1980-03-01

    The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

  15. Features of State Response to Intervention Initiatives in Northeast and Islands Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2009-No. 083

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocala, Candice; Mello, Daniel; Reedy, Kristin; Lacireno-Paquet, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach to instruction, assessment, and intervention that enables early identification of students who are experiencing academic or behavioral difficulties. The jurisdictions served by the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands expressed interest in a study of whether and how state education…

  16. 77 FR 71344 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ...), except for 40 CFR 270.42(a)(1)(i). language regarding injection wells, radioactive materials and... injection well,'' in the first sentence and the phrase ``For underground injection wells * * * the same... provide the legal basis for the State's implementation of the hazardous waste management program, as well...

  17. Strategic Global Advantage: The Career Academy/Technical College State Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Richard D.; Burns, Janet Z.

    2012-01-01

    Georgia's legislators have approved a plan whereby public school districts in the state could convert to charter schools to tailor programs for local educational communities. The state has authorized funds for five secondary-level charter career academies that are to be positioned regionally and partnered with a postsecondary community or…

  18. Civil Society, State, and Institutions for Young Children in Modern Japan: The Initial Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uno, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Research on the history of children and childhood in modern Japan (1868-1945) reveals that issues related to civil society, state, and the establishment of institutions for young children can be explored beyond the transatlantic world. In this essay, after briefly surveying historiography, a few basic terms, and earlier patterns of state and…

  19. Strategic Global Advantage: The Career Academy/Technical College State Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Richard D.; Burns, Janet Z.

    2012-01-01

    Georgia's legislators have approved a plan whereby public school districts in the state could convert to charter schools to tailor programs for local educational communities. The state has authorized funds for five secondary-level charter career academies that are to be positioned regionally and partnered with a postsecondary community or…

  20. Collaborative Technology Initiatives for Serving Persons with Disabilities in New York State. Occasional Paper #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Peter F.

    This paper describes the programs undertaken by the New York State Center for Learning Technologies in cooperation both with other state agencies and with private agencies to ensure that learning technologies are integrated into educational training programs for the disabled, the handicapped, and other special needs populations. Programs described…

  1. Map and Track: State Initiatives for Young Children and Families. 1998 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitzer, Jane; Page, Stephen

    This report profiles state efforts to develop comprehensive programs and policies for young children and families, presents indicators of child and family well-being, and describes state investments in young children and families. Chapter 1, "Overview of Findings and Implications," identifies the research questions, describes data collection…

  2. Taxing Pennsylvania: A Family-Focused Overview of Pennsylvania Taxes. State Fiscal Analysis Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, Harrisburg.

    Noting that a state's tax policies have direct impact on a family's ability to feed, clothe, house, educate, and care for its children, this report presents an overview of taxes in the state of Pennsylvania. The report is presented in five sections. Section 1 presents the argument that it is necessary to understand the rule driving the revenue…

  3. State-Based Case Studies of Assessment Initiatives in Undergraduate Education: Chronology of Critical Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Carol M.; Ewell, Peter T.

    The Education Commission of the States (ECS) together with the American Association for Higher Education recently conducted five case studies of state-based approaches to assessment in undergraduate education in Colorado, Missouri, New Jersey, South Dakota, and Virginia. The case studies, in turn, are part of the Missouri Governor John Ashcroft's…

  4. Juvenile Justice and Students with Disabilities: State Infrastructure and Initiatives. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2006-01-01

    According to data collected in 2003 by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), just over 96,000 youth were incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities throughout the United States (not including those being held in detention). An additional 10,000 youth were in state prisons or adult jails during the same time,…

  5. Map and Track: State Initiatives for Young Children and Families. 1998 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitzer, Jane; Page, Stephen

    This report profiles state efforts to develop comprehensive programs and policies for young children and families, presents indicators of child and family well-being, and describes state investments in young children and families. Chapter 1, "Overview of Findings and Implications," identifies the research questions, describes data collection…

  6. Are state immunization programs effective? Implications for the children's immunization initiative.

    PubMed

    Kauf, T L

    1998-01-01

    Several states operate universal vaccine purchase (UVP) programs aimed at ensuring adequate immunization of children. Some of these programs have been in operation for many decades. Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in implementing a federal UVP program. It is not clear, however, that such programs can significantly increase immunization levels; many nonfinancial barriers to full immunization exist and would have to be addressed. This paper uses cross-sectional data at the state level to estimate the effect of state UVP programs on the immunization levels of preschool children. The results indicate that states with UVP programs do not have significantly higher immunization rates than do other states. Therefore, it is not likely that a federal UVP program would significantly affect immunization rates.

  7. Gender difference in early initiation of methamphetamine use among current methamphetamine users in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Saw, Yu Mon; Saw, Thu Nandar; Yasuoka, Junko; Chan, Nyein; Kham, Nang Pann Ei; Khine, Wint; Cho, Su Myat; Jimba, Masamine

    2017-05-08

    Globally, methamphetamine (MA) use is a significant public health concern due to unprecedented health effects of its use. However, gender similarities and differences in early age of MA initiation and its risk factors among current MA users have been understudied in a developing country setting. A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted using a computer assisted self-interviewing program from January to March 2013 in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar. A total of 1362 (775 male and 587 female) self-reported current MA users aged between 18 and 35 years were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Two gender-stratified multiple logistic regression models (models I and II) were done for analysis. For similarities, 73.0% of males and 60.5% of females initiated MA before their 18th birthday. The early age of MA initiation was positively associated with the reasons and places of the first time MA use among both genders. For differences, males [hazard ratio 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.54] had a significantly higher risk than females to initiate MA at earlier age. Among male users, participants who had bisexual/homosexual preferences were more likely to initiate MA use earlier. In contrast, female users who exchanged sex for money and/or drugs were more likely to initiate MA in earlier age. More than 60.0% of male and female participants initiated MA use early; however, males initiated use earlier than females. Although similarities were found among both genders, differences found in key risk factors for early age MA initiation suggest that gender-specific, MA prevention programs are urgently needed in Myanmar.

  8. Solar America Initiative State Working Group: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Julie

    2012-03-30

    Through the support from the Department of Energy, NARUC has educated thousands of stakeholders, including Public Utility Commissioners, commission staff, and State energy officials on solar energy technology, implementation, and policy. During the lifetime of this grant, NARUC staff engaged stakeholders in policy discussions, technical research, site visits, and educational meetings/webinars/materials that provided valuable education and coordination on solar energy technology and policy among the States. Primary research geared toward State decision-makers enabled stakeholders to be informed on current issues and created new solar energy leaders throughout the United States. Publications including a Frequently Asked Questions guide on feed-in tariffs and a legal analysis of state implementation of feed-in tariffs gave NARUC members the capacity to understand complex issues related to the economic impacts of policies supportive of solar energy, and potential paths for implementation of technology. Technical partnerships with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) instructed NARUC members on feed-in tariff policy for four States and solar PV resource assessment in seven States, as well as economic impacts of solar energy implementation in those States. Because many of the States in these technical partnerships had negligible amounts of solar energy installed, this research gave them new capacity to understand how policies and implementation could impact their constituency. This original research produced new data now available, not only to decision-makers, but also to the public at-large including educational institutions, NGOs, consumer groups, and other citizens who have an interest in solar energy adoption in the US. Under this grant, stakeholders engaged in several dialogs. These educational opportunities brought NARUC members and other stakeholders together several times each year, shared best practices with State decision-makers, fostered

  9. Calculation of correlated initial state in the hierarchical equations of motion method using an imaginary time path integral approach.

    PubMed

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-11-21

    Based on recent findings in the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) for correlated initial state [Y. Tanimura, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044114 (2014)], we propose a new stochastic method to obtain the initial conditions for the real time HEOM propagation, which can be used further to calculate the equilibrium correlation functions and symmetrized correlation functions. The new method is derived through stochastic unraveling of the imaginary time influence functional, where a set of stochastic imaginary time HEOM are obtained. The validity of the new method is demonstrated using numerical examples including the spin-Boson model, and the Holstein model with undamped harmonic oscillator modes.

  10. Calculation of correlated initial state in the hierarchical equations of motion method using an imaginary time path integral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-11-21

    Based on recent findings in the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) for correlated initial state [Y. Tanimura, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044114 (2014)], we propose a new stochastic method to obtain the initial conditions for the real time HEOM propagation, which can be used further to calculate the equilibrium correlation functions and symmetrized correlation functions. The new method is derived through stochastic unraveling of the imaginary time influence functional, where a set of stochastic imaginary time HEOM are obtained. The validity of the new method is demonstrated using numerical examples including the spin-Boson model, and the Holstein model with undamped harmonic oscillator modes.

  11. Role of the Atmospheric Mean State on the Initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation in a Tropical Channel Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Pallav; Zhang, Chidong; Moncrieff, Mitch; Dudhia, Jimy; Caron, Julie M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bruyere, Cindy

    2010-06-08

    Tropical channel models, defined as models that are global in the zonal direction but bounded in the meridional direction, are particularly useful for simulating the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and understanding its physical and dynamical basis. Influences from the extratropics through the lateral boundaries have been found to be essential to the reproduction of the initiation of certain MJO events. This led to a hypothesis that multi-year simulations using a tropical channel model would reproduce reasonable MJO statistics under the influence of prescribed lateral boundary conditions derived from global reanalyses. Interestingly, the MJO statistics in such a multi-year simulation by a high-resolution tropical channel model are not better than those from global climate models. The error in the atmospheric mean state is found to be a possible reason for the poor MJO statistics in the simulation. Nevertheless, even with a large error in the mean state, the multi-year simulation captures two MJO events previously found to be initiated by extratropical influences. However, the model does not reproduce a third event, whose initiation is not directly influenced by the extratropics. This implies that in the absence of dynamical interactions between the MJO and the lateral boundary conditions, the error in the mean state could be sufficient to prevent the MJO initiation. To explore this third MJO event further, a series of sensitivity tests are conducted. These tests show that the simulation of this event is neither critically influenced by the cumulus parameterization employed, nor the initial conditions when the model is integrated 2 weeks prior to the MJO initiation. The model captures this event when the MJO signal is already present in the initial conditions. The use of highresolution sea surface temperature does not improve the simulation of the third MJO event. A higher-resolution nested domain covering the Indo-Pacific warm pool region and including a cloud

  12. Promoting quality improvement and achieving measurable change: the lead states initiative.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Sarah M; McKeever, Jennifer; Edwards, Kathleen F Kay; Thielen, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Along with the development of a national voluntary accreditation program for public health departments that holds quality improvement as its core goal, the application of quality improvement in public health has been gaining momentum. The 16 states participating in the Multi-State Learning Collaborative: Lead States in Public Health Quality Improvement (MLC) represent best practices in these activities. The MLC brings together partnerships in 16 US states to prepare for accreditation and implement quality-improvement practices. The grantee states are managing quality-improvement teams of local and state health department representatives and other partners. These teams, called mini-collaboratives, are working collectively to implement quality-improvement techniques to make measurable change on identified public health issues, or target areas. The work of the MLC seems to show that state and local-health departments and their key partners have the leadership, will and interest to apply quality improvement tools, and methods to solving public health problems and to raising the standard of public health practice. This article describes the history, current status, and lessons learned from the work of the MLC.

  13. A Descriptive Analysis of State-Supported Formative Assessment Initiatives in New York and Vermont. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 112

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louie, Josephine; Sanchez, Maria Teresa; North, Charlotte; Cazabon, Mary; Melo, Daniel; Kagle, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study examines two state-supported formative assessment initiatives that promote a consensus definition of formative assessment endorsed by the Council of Chief State School Officers. It describes the primary components of the two initiatives and the strategies that state, district, and school leaders report using to support implementation of…

  14. A Descriptive Analysis of State-Supported Formative Assessment Initiatives in New York and Vermont. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 112

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louie, Josephine; Sanchez, Maria Teresa; North, Charlotte; Cazabon, Mary; Melo, Daniel; Kagle, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study examines two state-supported formative assessment initiatives that promote a consensus definition of formative assessment endorsed by the Council of Chief State School Officers. It describes the primary components of the two initiatives and the strategies that state, district, and school leaders report using to support implementation of…

  15. Maine Rallies behind Rules for Athletics: State Initiative Billed as National Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2005-01-01

    Youth athletes increasingly complain about unruly fans, overbearing coaches, and pressures from elite travel teams. In Maine, at least, their concerns have been heard. Superintendents, sports officials, and parents in Maine are rallying behind a major initiative billed as a national model for creating more positive athletic experiences for young…

  16. Direct Democracy Takes on Bilingual Education: Framing the Debate in Four State Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrin, Jack; Kiley, Jocelyn; Pearson, Kathryn

    The entrenched nature of affirmative action, immigration, and bilingual education programs shows that ethnic minorities as well as powerful economic interests can benefit from client politics (H. D. Graham, 2002). In recent years, ballot initiatives have pierced the cocoon of legislative support for these policies and overturned them in California…

  17. Maine Rallies behind Rules for Athletics: State Initiative Billed as National Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2005-01-01

    Youth athletes increasingly complain about unruly fans, overbearing coaches, and pressures from elite travel teams. In Maine, at least, their concerns have been heard. Superintendents, sports officials, and parents in Maine are rallying behind a major initiative billed as a national model for creating more positive athletic experiences for young…

  18. Regional Variation in Breast Cancer Rates in the United States (Past Initiative)

    Cancer.gov

    Five institutions are being funded to conduct research using epidemiologic and statistical methods for determining whether various factors may account for the geographic differences in breast cancer rates in the United States.

  19. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program for 1988. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    York, City College of - 1 Dayton, University of - 5 North Carolina State Univ. - 1 Delta State University - 1 North Carolina, Univ. of -2 East Texas...Science Dr. Stephan Kolitz (1986) University of Massachusetts Specialty: Operations Reserach FLIGHT DYNAMICS LABORATORY (Wright-Patterson Air Force Base...Specialty: Aerospace Engineering Dr. Awatef Hamed Dr. Kenneth M. Sobel University of Cincinnati The City College of New York Specialty: Engineering

  20. Status of science education in state departments of education: An initial report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Kenneth W.; Yager, Robert E.

    The past five years have been characterized as times of assessment in science education. One aspect of the profession where little information has been reported is the service and leadership provided by the various Departments of Education that exist as a part of the 50 state governments. Information was collected from the 50 states concerning the professional preparation of state science consultants, the nature of the positions, number of workers employed in such units, changes in support staff, facilities, and budget for each five year interval between 1960-1980. Science consultants are 46 years of age, have completed more than 10 years of classroom teaching, have been supervisors at the last level, have been in state positions for one-eight years, and have a Master's degree (half have the Ph.D.). Science consultants in the state department of education work in local schools, write proposals, assist with other administrative duties, work as members of evaluation teams. They spend two-thirds of their time in science education per se. The duties have become more general with less time spent exclusively on science education duties. The positions have become more involved with regulations, evaluations; the consultants enjoying less flexibility in their jobs. There has been a decline in terms of numbers of consultants, budget for science education; and general support for science education projects in state departments of education during the 20-year period surveyed.

  1. A climatology and preliminary investigation of predictability of pristine nocturnal convective initiation in the central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, Sean; Gallus, William

    2017-04-01

    The prediction of convective initiation remains a challenge to forecasters in the central United States, especially for elevated events at night. This study examines a subset of 287 nocturnal elevated convective initiation events that occurred without direct influence from surface boundaries or pre-existing convection over a four-month period during the summer of 2015 (May, June, July, and August). Events were first classified into one of four types based on apparent formation mechanisms and location relative to any low-level jet. A climatology of each of the four types was performed focusing on general spatial tendencies over the central United States and initiation timing trends. Additionally, analysis of initiation elevation was performed. Simulations from five convection-allowing models available during the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field campaign, along with four versions of a 4km horizontal grid spacing Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using different planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterizations, were used to examine predictability of these types of convective initiation. The climatology revealed a dual-peak pattern for initiation timing with one peak near 0400 UTC and another 0700 UTC, and it was found that the dual peak structure was present for all four types of events, suggesting that the evolution of the low-level jet was not directly responsible for the twin peaks. Subtle differences in location and elevation of the initiation for the different types were identified. The convection-allowing models run during the PECAN project were found to be more deficient with location than timing. Threat scores typically averaged around 0.3 for the models, with false alarm ratios and hit rates both averaging around 0.5 to 0.6 for the various models. Initiation occurring within the low-level jet but far from a surface front was the one type that was occasionally missed by all five models examined. Once case for each of the four types

  2. Real-time broadening of nonequilibrium density profiles and the role of the specific initial-state realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinigeweg, R.; Jin, F.; Schmidtke, D.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Gemmer, J.

    2017-01-01

    The real-time broadening of density profiles starting from nonequilibrium states is at the center of transport in condensed-matter systems and dynamics in ultracold atomic gases. Initial profiles close to equilibrium are expected to evolve according to the linear response, e.g., as given by the current correlator evaluated exactly at equilibrium. Significantly off equilibrium, the linear response is expected to break down and even a description in terms of canonical ensembles is questionable. We unveil that single pure states with density profiles of maximum amplitude yield a broadening in perfect agreement with the linear response, if the structure of these states involves randomness in terms of decoherent off-diagonal density-matrix elements. While these states allow for spin diffusion in the XXZ spin-1 /2 chain at large exchange anisotropies, coherences yield entirely different behavior.

  3. H+CH4 → H2 + CH3 initial state-selected reaction probabilities on different potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Roman; Manthe, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H +CH4 →H2 +CH3 reaction on a recently developed potential energy surface which employs neutral network fitting based on permutational invariant polynomials are reported. The quantum dynamics calculations use the quantum transition state concept and the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach and study the reaction process in full-dimensionality for vanishing total angular momentum. A detailed comparison with previous results obtained on other high-level potential energy surfaces is given. The connection between the level of quantum state resolution and the sensitivity of the results on differences in the potential energy surfaces is highlighted. Employing a decomposition of the total reactivity into contributions of the different vibrational states of the activated complex, it is found that differences between the potential energy surfaces are mainly related to the umbrella motion of the methyl group.

  4. Is the hypothesis about a low entropy initial state of the Universe necessary for explaining the arrow of time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Tumulka, Roderich; Zanghı, Nino

    2016-07-01

    According to statistical mechanics, microstates of an isolated physical system (say, a gas in a box) at time t0 in a given macrostate of less-than-maximal entropy typically evolve in such a way that the entropy at time t increases with |t -t0| in both time directions. In order to account for the observed entropy increase in only one time direction, the thermodynamic arrow of time, one usually appeals to the hypothesis that the initial state of the Universe was one of very low entropy. In certain recent models of cosmology, however, no hypothesis about the initial state of the Universe is invoked. We discuss how the emergence of a thermodynamic arrow of time in such models can nevertheless be compatible with the above-mentioned consequence of statistical mechanics, appearances to the contrary notwithstanding.

  5. Jarzynski equality, Crooks fluctuation theorem, and the fluctuation theorems of heat for arbitrary initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zongping; Quan, H. T.

    2015-07-01

    By taking full advantage of the dynamic property imposed by the detailed balance condition, we derive a new refined unified fluctuation theorem (FT) for general stochastic thermodynamic systems. This FT involves the joint probability distribution functions of the final phase-space point and a thermodynamic variable. Jarzynski equality, Crooks fluctuation theorem, and the FTs of heat as well as the trajectory entropy production can be regarded as special cases of this refined unified FT, and all of them are generalized to arbitrary initial distributions. We also find that the refined unified FT can easily reproduce the FTs for processes with the feedback control, due to its unconventional structure that separates the thermodynamic variable from the choices of initial distributions. Our result is heuristic for further understanding of the relations and distinctions between all kinds of FTs and might be valuable for studying thermodynamic processes with information exchange.

  6. The initial state of the human gut microbiome determines its reshaping by antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Frédéric; Ouameur, Amin A; Déraspe, Maxime; Iqbal, Naeem; Gingras, Hélène; Dridi, Bédis; Leprohon, Philippe; Plante, Pier-Luc; Giroux, Richard; Bérubé, Ève; Frenette, Johanne; Boudreau, Dominique K; Simard, Jean-Luc; Chabot, Isabelle; Domingo, Marc-Christian; Trottier, Sylvie; Boissinot, Maurice; Huletsky, Ann; Roy, Paul H; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G; Corbeil, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Microbiome studies have demonstrated the high inter-individual diversity of the gut microbiota. However, how the initial composition of the microbiome affects the impact of antibiotics on microbial communities is relatively unexplored. To specifically address this question, we administered a second-generation cephalosporin, cefprozil, to healthy volunteers. Stool samples gathered before antibiotic exposure, at the end of the treatment and 3 months later were analysed using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. On average, 15 billion nucleotides were sequenced for each sample. We show that standard antibiotic treatment can alter the gut microbiome in a specific, reproducible and predictable manner. The most consistent effect of the antibiotic was the increase of Lachnoclostridium bolteae in 16 out of the 18 cefprozil-exposed participants. Strikingly, we identified a subgroup of participants who were enriched in the opportunistic pathogen Enterobacter cloacae after exposure to the antibiotic, an effect linked to lower initial microbiome diversity and to a Bacteroides enterotype. Although the resistance gene content of participants' microbiomes was altered by the antibiotic, the impact of cefprozil remained specific to individual participants. Resistance genes that were not detectable prior to treatment were observed after a 7-day course of antibiotic administration. Specifically, point mutations in beta-lactamase blaCfxA-6 were enriched after antibiotic treatment in several participants. This suggests that monitoring the initial composition of the microbiome before treatment could assist in the prevention of some of the adverse effects associated with antibiotics or other treatments.

  7. The initial state of the human gut microbiome determines its reshaping by antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Frédéric; Ouameur, Amin A; Déraspe, Maxime; Iqbal, Naeem; Gingras, Hélène; Dridi, Bédis; Leprohon, Philippe; Plante, Pier-Luc; Giroux, Richard; Bérubé, Ève; Frenette, Johanne; Boudreau, Dominique K; Simard, Jean-Luc; Chabot, Isabelle; Domingo, Marc-Christian; Trottier, Sylvie; Boissinot, Maurice; Huletsky, Ann; Roy, Paul H; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G; Corbeil, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome studies have demonstrated the high inter-individual diversity of the gut microbiota. However, how the initial composition of the microbiome affects the impact of antibiotics on microbial communities is relatively unexplored. To specifically address this question, we administered a second-generation cephalosporin, cefprozil, to healthy volunteers. Stool samples gathered before antibiotic exposure, at the end of the treatment and 3 months later were analysed using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. On average, 15 billion nucleotides were sequenced for each sample. We show that standard antibiotic treatment can alter the gut microbiome in a specific, reproducible and predictable manner. The most consistent effect of the antibiotic was the increase of Lachnoclostridium bolteae in 16 out of the 18 cefprozil-exposed participants. Strikingly, we identified a subgroup of participants who were enriched in the opportunistic pathogen Enterobacter cloacae after exposure to the antibiotic, an effect linked to lower initial microbiome diversity and to a Bacteroides enterotype. Although the resistance gene content of participants' microbiomes was altered by the antibiotic, the impact of cefprozil remained specific to individual participants. Resistance genes that were not detectable prior to treatment were observed after a 7-day course of antibiotic administration. Specifically, point mutations in beta-lactamase blaCfxA-6 were enriched after antibiotic treatment in several participants. This suggests that monitoring the initial composition of the microbiome before treatment could assist in the prevention of some of the adverse effects associated with antibiotics or other treatments. PMID:26359913

  8. Evaluating the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative on breast-feeding rates: a multi-state analysis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Stern, Ariel Dora; Baum, Christopher F; Gillman, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) on breast-feeding initiation and duration overall and according to maternal education. Quasi-experimental study using data from five states (Alaska, Maine, Nebraska, Ohio, Washington) that participated in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 1999 to 2009. Using differences-in-differences models that included year and hospital fixed effects, we compared rates of breast-feeding initiation and duration (any and exclusive breast-feeding for ≥4 weeks) before and after BFHI accreditation between mothers who gave birth in hospitals that were accredited or became accredited and mothers from matched non-BFHI facilities. We stratified analyses into lower and higher education groups. Thirteen BFHI hospitals and nineteen matched non-BFHI facilities across five states in the USA. Mothers (n 11 723) who gave birth in BFHI hospitals and mothers (n 13 604) from nineteen matched non-BFHI facilities. Although we did not find overall differences in breast-feeding initiation between birth facilities that received BFHI accreditation compared with non-Baby-Friendly facilities (adjusted coefficient = 0·024; 95 % CI -0·00, 0·51), breast-feeding initiation increased by 3·8 percentage points among mothers with lower education who delivered in Baby-Friendly facilities (P = 0·05), but not among mothers with higher education (adjusted coefficient = 0·002; 95 % CI -0·04, 0·05). BFHI accreditation also increased exclusive breast-feeding for ≥4 weeks by 4·5 percentage points (P = 0·02) among mothers with lower education who delivered in BFHI facilities. By increasing breast-feeding initiation and duration among mothers with lower education, the BFHI may reduce socio-economic disparities in breast-feeding.

  9. Evaluating the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative on breast-feeding rates: a multi-state analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Stern, Ariel Dora; Baum, Christopher F; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) on breast-feeding initiation and duration overall and according to maternal education. Design Quasi-experimental study using data from five states (Alaska, Maine, Nebraska, Ohio, Washington) that participated in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 1999 to 2009. Using differences-in-differences models that included year and hospital fixed effects, we compared rates of breast-feeding initiation and duration (any and exclusive breast-feeding for ≥4 weeks) before and after BFHI accreditation between mothers who gave birth in hospitals that were accredited or became accredited and mothers from matched non-BFHI facilities. We stratified analyses into lower and higher education groups. Setting Thirteen BFHI hospitals and nineteen matched non-BFHI facilities across five states in the USA. Subjects Mothers (n 11723) who gave birth in BFHI hospitals and mothers (n 13604) from nineteen matched non-BFHI facilities. Results Although we did not find overall differences in breast-feeding initiation between birth facilities that received BFHI accreditation compared with non-Baby-Friendly facilities (adjusted coefficient = 0.024; 95 % CI −0.00, 0.51), breast-feeding initiation increased by 3.8 percentage points among mothers with lower education who delivered in Baby-Friendly facilities (P = 0.05), but not among mothers with higher education (adjusted coefficient = 0.002; 95 % CI −0.04, 0.05). BFHI accreditation also increased exclusive breast-feeding for ≥4 weeks by 4.5 percentage points (P=0.02) among mothers with lower education who delivered in BFHI facilities. Conclusions By increasing breast-feeding initiation and duration among mothers with lower education, the BFHI may reduce socio-economic disparities in breast-feeding. PMID:24625787

  10. Fifty hertz magnetic fields individually affect chromatin conformation in human lymphocytes: dependence on amplitude, temperature, and initial chromatin state.

    PubMed

    Sarimov, Ruslan; Alipov, Eugene D; Belyaev, Igor Y

    2011-10-01

    Effects of magnetic field (MF) at 50 Hz on chromatin conformation were studied by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) in human lymphocytes from two healthy donors. MF within the peak amplitude range of 5-20 µT affected chromatin conformation. These MF effects differed significantly between studied donors, and depended on magnetic flux density and initial condensation of chromatin. While the initial state of chromatin was rather stable in one donor during one calendar year of measurements, the initial condensation varied significantly in cells from another donor. Both this variation and the MF effect depended on temperature during exposure. Despite these variations, the general rule was that MF condensed the relaxed chromatin and relaxed the condensed chromatin. Thus, in this study we show that individual effects of 50 Hz MF exposure at peak amplitudes within the range of 5-20 µT may be observed in human lymphocytes in dependence on the initial state of chromatin and temperature. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa porphobilinogen synthase assembly state regulators: hit discovery and initial SAR studies

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Allen B.; Ramirez, Ursula D.; Stith, Linda; Du, Yanming; Smith, Garry R.; Jaffe, Eileen K.

    2010-01-01

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) catalyzes the first common step in the biosynthesis of the essential heme, chlorophyll and vitamin B12 heme pigments. PBGS activity is regulated by assembly state, with certain oligomers exhibiting biological activity and others either partially or completely inactive, affording an innovative means of allosteric drug action. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBGS is functionally active as an octamer, and inactive as a dimer. We have identified a series of compounds that stabilize the inactive P. aeruginosa dimer by a computational prescreen followed by native PAGE gel mobility shift analysis. From those results, we have prepared related thiadiazoles and evaluated their ability to regulate P. aeruginosa PBGS assembly state. PMID:21643541

  12. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program for 1988. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Feeley (1987) Dr. Joseph J. Molitoris University of Idaho Muhlenberg College Specialty: Electrical Engineering Specialty: Nuclear Physics Prof. Wafa E... Electrical Engineering Specialty: Combustion Diagnostics Dr. Eustace L. Dereniak Dr. William Sutton (1985) University of Arizona University of Oklahoma...Philip D. Olivier (1986) Michigan State University University of Texas Specialty: Industrial/Organ. Psychology Specialty: Electrical Engineering xii

  13. Strategic Financing: Making the Most of the State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D.; Flynn, Margaret J.; Stebbins, Helene

    2004-01-01

    As states build comprehensive early childhood systems, policy leaders will need to be attentive to the funding streams available to communities to achieve desired returns. Most public funding for early care and education, as well as for other health and social services for young children and their families is categorical. Categorical funding…

  14. The Sustainability of a National Reading Reform Initiative in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Rita M.; Dole, Janice A.; Nelson, Kristin L.; Belcastro, Elizabeth G.; Zigmond, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Although there have been any number of national reading reform efforts over the years, there is little evidence that such efforts have been sustained in schools over time. This study focused on addressing 2 questions: To what extent have Reading First schools in 2 states sustained the key elements of this reform over time? To what extent has…

  15. Assessing Outcomes of Higher Education in Colorado: Initial Library Participation in State Legislature Mandated Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Mary L.; And Others

    In response to a state mandate, the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) created an administrative structure, the University Assessment Committee (UAC), to assess the institution's educational merit. Representing the university library was the University Library Assessment Committee (ULAC). The ULAC used two surveys, one for faculty and one for…

  16. USDA food-borne virus research initiatives at Delaware State University

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA ARS Microbial Safety of Aquaculture Products Center of Excellence located on the campus of Delaware State University is conducting research geared toward; 1) improving detection methods for virus contamination of shellfish; 2) understanding how and why viruses persist within shellfish; and ...

  17. The impact of morbid obesity on the state economy: an initial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wachtel, Mitchell S; Ewing, Bradley T

    2006-01-01

    Obesity's impact on a state's economy has not been fully analyzed. This study compared bariatric surgery demographics at a large university hospital to that of a broader region's population statistics. From this comparison, an economic model was derived that evaluated, for the state of New Mexico, the cost of obesity in terms of lost business output, employment, and income. Between September 2003 and September 2005, we analyzed the charts of all of our patients from New Mexico who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass and laparoscopic banding. Input-output analysis estimate margins, the purchase prices for goods and services, and regional purchase coefficients, the percent of spending by local suppliers, were used to model the regional economy. Collected patient data, used in conjunction with IMPLAN model data, were used to estimate, on a regional basis, an industry-by-industry formulation of input-output accounts to calculate multipliers in order to assess the impact of economic costs of the obese on the general economy. Total labor income impacts are nearly 200 million dollars, 1,660 dollars of output income per household and 245 dollars of labor income per household. Obesity cost New Mexico more than 7,300 jobs and cut state and local tax revenues by more than 48 million dollars. Obesity's impact of more than 1.3 billion dollars amounts to 2.5% of New Mexico's gross state product. Governmental measures to combat this menace are warranted.

  18. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Restraint Reduction: A State Initiative to Promote Strength-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBel, Janice; Stromberg, Nan; Duckworth, Ken; Kerzner, Joan; Goldstein, Robert; Weeks, Michael; Harper, Gordon; LaFlair, Lareina; Sudders, Marylou

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the use of restraint and seclusion with children and adolescents in psychiatric inpatient units by promoting a preventive, strength-based model of care. Method: The State Mental Health Authority used data analysis, quality improvement strategies, regulatory oversight, and technical assistance to develop and implement system…

  19. The History and Impact of State Initiatives to Eliminate Affirmative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Susan W.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1995, efforts to prohibit affirmative action have intensified, perhaps most strikingly in higher education. In 1996, California voters adopted Proposition 209 (Prop. 209), an amendment to the state constitution that banned both discrimination and affirmative action programs that give preferences to groups or individuals based on their race,…

  20. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Restraint Reduction: A State Initiative to Promote Strength-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBel, Janice; Stromberg, Nan; Duckworth, Ken; Kerzner, Joan; Goldstein, Robert; Weeks, Michael; Harper, Gordon; LaFlair, Lareina; Sudders, Marylou

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the use of restraint and seclusion with children and adolescents in psychiatric inpatient units by promoting a preventive, strength-based model of care. Method: The State Mental Health Authority used data analysis, quality improvement strategies, regulatory oversight, and technical assistance to develop and implement system…

  1. Presidential Prescriptions for State Policy: Obama's Race to the Top Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, William G.; Magazinnik, Asya

    2017-01-01

    With increasing frequency, U.S. presidents have orchestrated relations between federal and state governments. A defining feature of this "executive federalism" is a pragmatic willingness to both borrow from and reconstitute very different types of past federalisms. A case in point is President Barack Obama's Race to the Top (RttT)…

  2. Job Corps. Comparison of Federal Program with State Youth Training Initiatives. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    The General Accounting Office compared state youth training programs with the Job Corps using the four program features that, taken together, characterize the Job Corps program: (1) serving a severely disadvantaged population, (2) providing basic education instruction, (3) focusing on vocational training services, and (4) providing these services…

  3. The Effect of a State Department of Education Teacher Mentor Initiative on Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Stephen L.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a southern state's department of education program to improve science achievement through embedded professional development of science teachers in the lowest performing schools. The Science Mentor Program provided content and inquiry-based coaching by teacher leaders to science teachers in their own…

  4. The United State of Wyoming: Teacher-to-Teacher Initiative Boosts Reading Scores Statewide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lain, Sheryl

    2014-01-01

    When teachers collaborate in schools, taking collective responsibility to improve instruction and achieve goals, student performance improves and good results happen. Wyoming is one example of a state that uses peer-to-peer professional learning with notable results. Teachers joined together to form a statewide professional community and saw the…

  5. CONCURRENT WORK-EDUCATION (PROGRAMS IN THE 50 STATES 1965-66). INITIAL DRAFT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHILL, WILLIAM JOHN

    A DESCRIPTIVE REPORT OF THE CONDUCT OR STATUS OF CONCURRENT WORK-EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN EACH OF THE 50 STATES IS PRESENTED. DATA ARE REPORTED FOR TWO DISTINCT PROGRAMS--(1) COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, A PROGRAM IN WHICH THE STUDENTS WORK PART-TIME AND STUDY IN A FORMAL CLASSROOM SETTING PART-TIME, AND (2) WORK-STUDY, A PROGRAM IN WHICH STUDENTS IN…

  6. The Educationally Disadvantaged: A National Crisis. The State Youth Initiatives Project. Working Paper #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    Available data reviewed in this paper suggest that at least 30% of elementary and secondary school students in the United States are educationally disadvantaged, and that the proportion will rise rapidly in the future. When these youth reach adulthood, their poor educational foundations will have deleterious economic and social consequences,…

  7. 76 FR 11187 - Due Date of Initial Application Requirements for State Home Construction Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ..., Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse, Government contracts, Grant..., altering, or expanding State home facilities that will furnish specified types of care to veterans. VA has... Facilities; 64.007, Blind Rehabilitation Centers; 64.008, Veterans Domiciliary Care; 64.009, Veterans...

  8. Memphis State University's New Five-year Program For the Initial Preparation of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Robert L.

    A description is presented of a new extended teacher education program at Memphis State University. Instituted in 1985, the program has four objectives: (1) to develop and implement an extended (five-year) program covering all areas of teacher preparation, with institutional recommendation for certification coming only after completion of the…

  9. 20 CFR 658.413 - Initial handling of complaints by the State or local office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... complaint on the JS Complaint/Referral Form prescribed or approved by the ETA. The JS Complaint/Referral Form shall be used for all complaints taken by a State agency, including complaints about unlawful... assist the complainant in filling out the form and shall do so if the complainant desires such...

  10. Sustainability for the Americas Initiative: Land Design Institute, Ball State University

    Treesearch

    J. L. Motloch; Pedro Pacheco; Eloy F. Jr. Casagrande

    2006-01-01

    The Ball State University Land Design Institute (LDI) pursues ecologically and culturally sustainable land design through education, research, outreach, and demonstration. LDI seeks to lead communities (local, regional, global) to sustainable futures. It connects communities and sustainability experts to optimize education about land management, planning, and design...

  11. The Nature of the Initial State Zulu L2 Grammar and Subsequent Interlanguage Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Sibusisiwe

    2000-01-01

    A notable feature of developing interlanguage grammars is the apparent optionality in those areas of grammar where optionality is not characteristic of stable state grammars. In the Valueless Features Hypothesis, it is proposed that the appearance of apparent optionality in the very early stages of interlanguage development is due to the partial…

  12. Risk factors for tuberculosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy initiation in the United States and Canada: implications for tuberculosis screening.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Timothy R; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Freeman, Aimee; Bosch, Ronald J; Brooks, John T; Deeks, Steven G; French, Audrey; Gange, Stephen; Gebo, Kelly A; John Gill, M; Horberg, Michael A; Jacobson, Lisa P; Kirk, Gregory D; Kitahata, Mari M; Klein, Marina B; Martin, Jeffrey N; Rodriguez, Benigno; Silverberg, Michael J; Willig, James H; Eron, Joseph J; Goedert, James J; Hogg, Robert S; Justice, Amy C; McKaig, Rosemary G; Napravnik, Sonia; Thorne, Jennifer; Moore, Richard D

    2011-09-15

    Screening for tuberculosis prior to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation is not routinely performed in low-incidence settings. Identifying factors associated with developing tuberculosis after HAART initiation could focus screening efforts. Sixteen cohorts in the United States and Canada contributed data on persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who initiated HAART December 1995-August 2009. Parametric survival models identified factors associated with tuberculosis occurrence. Of 37845 persons in the study, 145 were diagnosed with tuberculosis after HAART initiation. Tuberculosis risk was highest in the first 3 months of HAART (20 cases; 215 cases per 100000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 131-333 per 100000 person-years). In a multivariate Weibull proportional hazards model, baseline CD4+ lymphocyte count <200, black race, other nonwhite race, Hispanic ethnicity, and history of injection drug use were independently associated with tuberculosis risk. In addition, in a piece-wise Weibull model, increased baseline HIV-1 RNA was associated with increased tuberculosis risk in the first 3 months; male sex tended to be associated with increased risk. Screening for active tuberculosis prior to HAART initiation should be targeted to persons with baseline CD4 <200 lymphocytes/mm³ or increased HIV-1 RNA, persons of nonwhite race or Hispanic ethnicity, history of injection drug use, and possibly male sex.

  13. Infection rates following initial cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement across pediatric hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Hall, Matthew; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Albert, J. Elaine; Jeffries, Howard E.; LaFleur, Bonnie; Dean, J. Michael; Kestle, John R. W.

    2010-01-01

    Object Reported rates of CSF shunt infection vary widely across studies. The study objective was to determine the CSF shunt infection rates after initial shunt placement at multiple US pediatric hospitals. The authors hypothesized that infection rates between hospitals would vary widely even after adjustment for patient, hospital, and surgeon factors. Methods This retrospective cohort study included children 0–18 years of age with uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placement performed between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2005, and recorded in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) longitudinal administrative database from 41 children's hospitals. For each child with 24 months of follow-up, subsequent CSF shunt infections and procedures were determined. Results The PHIS database included 7071 children with uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placement during this time period. During the 24 months of follow-up, these patients had a total of 825 shunt infections and 4434 subsequent shunt procedures. Overall unadjusted 24-month CSF shunt infection rates were 11.7% per patient and 7.2% per procedure. Unadjusted 24-month cumulative incidence rates for each hospital ranged from 4.1 to 20.5% per patient and 2.5–12.3% per procedure. Factors significantly associated with infection (p < 0.05) included young age, female sex, African-American race, public insurance, etiology of intraventricular hemorrhage, respiratory complex chronic condition, subsequent revision procedures, hospital volume, and surgeon case volume. Malignant lesions and trauma as etiologies were protective. Infection rates for each hospital adjusted for these factors decreased to 8.8–12.8% per patient and 1.4–5.3% per procedure. Conclusions Infections developed in > 11% of children who underwent uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placements within 24 months. Patient, hospital, and surgeon factors contributed somewhat to the wide variation in CSF shunt infection rates across hospitals. Additional

  14. Estimating the state of a geophysical system with sparse observations: time delay methods to achieve accurate initial states for prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhe; Rey, Daniel; Ye, Jingxin; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of forecasting the behavior of a complex dynamical system through analysis of observational time-series data becomes difficult when the system expresses chaotic behavior and the measurements are sparse, in both space and/or time. Despite the fact that this situation is quite typical across many fields, including numerical weather prediction, the issue of whether the available observations are "sufficient" for generating successful forecasts is still not well understood. An analysis by Whartenby et al. (2013) found that in the context of the nonlinear shallow water equations on a β plane, standard nudging techniques require observing approximately 70 % of the full set of state variables. Here we examine the same system using a method introduced by Rey et al. (2014a), which generalizes standard nudging methods to utilize time delayed measurements. We show that in certain circumstances, it provides a sizable reduction in the number of observations required to construct accurate estimates and high-quality predictions. In particular, we find that this estimate of 70 % can be reduced to about 33 % using time delays, and even further if Lagrangian drifter locations are also used as measurements.

  15. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2016-08-01

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  16. Effects of the initial molecular states in a high-energy scattering of molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonas, V. B.; Rodionov, I. D.

    Research is reported on direct study of potential energy surfaces (PES) by measuring the vibrational-rotational transition differential cross sections. A laser fluorescence technique is proving to be promising in gaining such data in experiments with molecular beams (Leonas and Rodionov, 1982, in Russian). Since the laser fluorescence technique is still being developed, there is obviously interest in extracting information on PES from the data without selection (particularly of final states). For this, one needs dynamic manifestations of the components of the molecular PES in the state-averaged scattering cross sections. The theoretical prediction and experimental discovery of such an effect in the differential cross section averaged by final states are discussed for small scattering angles corresponding to interaction energies of 1 to 20 eV. The vibrational rainbow (VR) effect is explained by the nonadiabatic vibrational transitions influencing the scattering dynamics during the collision time. In the case of experiments with selection, the intramolecular motion effect on the transition cross section are also of interest because the absence of such an effect leads to an invariancy of experimental data so that they yield less information. Data are treated on the total rotational transition cross sections which have been recently published by Itoh, Kobayashi, and Kaneko (1981), as experimental observations of intramolecular motion effects in high-energy scattering.

  17. Uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock results in a hypercoagulable state modulated by initial fluid resuscitation regimens.

    PubMed

    Riha, Gordon M; Kunio, Nicholas R; Van, Philbert Y; Kremenevskiy, Igor; Anderson, Ross; Hamilton, Gregory J; Differding, Jerome A; Schreiber, Martin A

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have shown large-volume resuscitation modulates coagulopathy and inflammation. Our objective was to analyze the effects of initial bolus fluids used in military and civilian settings on coagulation and inflammation in a prospective, randomized, blinded trial of resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhage. Fifty swine were anesthetized, intubated, and ventilated and had monitoring lines placed. A Grade V liver injury was performed followed by 30 minutes of hemorrhage. After 30 minutes, the liver was packed, and randomized fluid resuscitation was initiated during a 12-minute period with 2 L of normal saline, 2 L of lactated Ringer's solution, 250 mL of 7.5% saline with 3% Dextran, 500 mL of Hextend, or no fluid (NF). Animals were monitored for 2 hours after injury. Thrombelastograms (TEGs), prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen as well as serum interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and tumor necrosis factor α levels were drawn at baseline and after 1 hour and 2 hours. The NF group had less posttreatment blood loss compared with other groups (p < 0.01). Blood loss was similar in the other groups. TEG R values in each group decreased from baseline at 1 and 2 hours (p < 0.02). The groups receiving 2 L of normal saline, 250 mL of 7.5% saline with 3% Dextran, or 500 mL of Hextend had lower TEG maximum amplitude values compared with NF group (p < 0.02). All fluids except lactated Ringer's solution resulted in significant increases in PT compared with NF, whereas all fluids resulted in significant decreases in fibrinogen compared with NF (p < 0.02). Fluid resuscitation groups as well as NF group demonstrated significant increases in inflammatory cytokines from baseline to 1 hour and baseline to 2 hours. There were no significant differences in inflammatory cytokines between groups at 2 hours. Withholding fluid resulted in the least significant change in PT, fibrinogen, and maximum amplitude and in the lowest posttreatment blood loss

  18. An initial estimate of the North Atlantic steady-state geostrophic circulation from GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R. J.; Knudsen, P.; Andersen, O.; Pail, R.

    2011-01-01

    The GOCE satellite mission was launched in 2009 and the first gravity models were released in July 2010. Here we present an initial assessment of the GOCE data in terms of the mean circulation of the North Atlantic. We show that with just two months of data, the estimated circulation from GOCE is already superior to a similar estimate based on 8 years of GRACE observations. This result primarily depends on the fact that the GOCE mean dynamic topography (MDT) is generally less noisy than that obtained from the GRACE data. It therefore requires less smoothing and so there is less attenuation of the oceanographic signal. Our results provide a strong validation of the GOCE mission concept, and we anticipate further substantial improvements as the mission progresses.

  19. Exploiting initial-state dependence to improve the performance of adiabatic TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Johanna I.; Nielsen, Soeren E. B.; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Maitra, Neepa T.; Hunter college City University of New York Collaboration; Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie, Hamburg Collaboration

    Although time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) descriptions of dynamics in non-equilibrium situations have seen exciting successes recently, there have also been studies that throw into doubt the reliability of the approximate exchange-correlation functionals to accurately describe the dynamics. Here we study exact exchange-correlation potentials for few electron systems, found using the global fixed-point iteration method [NRL]. We find that the size of dynamical correlation features that are missing in the currently-used adiabatic approximations depend strongly on the choice of the initial Kohn-Sham wavefunction. With a judicious choice, the dynamical effects can be small over a finite time duration, but sometimes they can get large at longer times. We also examine different starting points, in particular an orbital-dependent potential directly obtained from the Kohn-Sham hole [LFSEM14], for approximate xc functionals: instead of building on an adiabatic approximation.

  20. Proton transport by a bacteriorhodopsin mutant, aspartic acid-85-->asparagine, initiated in the unprotonated Schiff base state.

    PubMed Central

    Dickopf, S; Alexiev, U; Krebs, M P; Otto, H; Mollaaghababa, R; Khorana, H G; Heyn, M P

    1995-01-01

    At alkaline pH the bacteriorhodopsin mutant D85N, with aspartic acid-85 replaced by asparagine, is in a yellow form (lambda max approximately 405 nm) with a deprotonated Schiff base. This state resembles the M intermediate of the wild-type photocycle. We used time-resolved methods to show that this yellow form of D85N, which has an initially unprotonated Schiff base and which lacks the proton acceptor Asp-85, transports protons in the same direction as wild type when excited by 400-nm flashes. Photoexcitation leads in several milliseconds to the formation of blue (630 nm) and purple (580 nm) intermediates with a protonated Schiff base, which decay in tens of seconds to the initial state (400 nm). Experiments with pH indicator dyes show that at pH 7, 8, and 9, proton uptake occurs in about 5-10 ms and precedes the slow release (seconds). Photovoltage measurements reveal that the direction of proton movement is from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side with major components on the millisecond and second time scales. The slowest electrical component could be observed in the presence of azide, which accelerates the return of the blue intermediate to the initial yellow state. Transport thus occurs in two steps. In the first step (milliseconds), the Schiff base is protonated by proton uptake from the cytoplasmic side, thereby forming the blue state. From the pH dependence of the amplitudes of the electrical and photocycle signals, we conclude that this reaction proceeds in a similar way as in wild type--i.e., via the internal proton donor Asp-96. In the second step (seconds) the Schiff base deprotonates, releasing the proton to the extracellular side. PMID:8524795

  1. State of Simulation in Healthcare Education: An Initial Survey in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zichen; Niu, Pengfei; Ji, Xiang; Sweet, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, medical error was the third leading cause of death in the United States.(1) In China, as in the case with the United States, training and assessment are developing as a strategy to reduce the occurrence of such errors. The objective of this study was to assess the current state of the use of simulation-based training in Beijing and to explore the barriers to further development. This study included hospitals in Beijing accredited by the Standardized Residency Training (SRT) program. The questionnaire was designed online and distributed to the SRT management departments by e-mail or instant message. Thirty hospitals were invited to participate in this survey, and 15 responses were completed and met the inclusion criteria. Task trainers (15/15), full-scale mannequins (14/15), standardized patients (12/15), and virtual reality workstations (11/15) were the most common types of simulation modalities available for use. Among the given specialties for SRT, the availability of simulation courses was 2/2 for pediatric internal medicine, 1/1 for pediatric surgery, 10/11 for surgery, 11/14 for internal medicine, 7/9 for anesthesiology, 6/8 for emergency medicine, and 3/9 for obstetrics/gynecology. Of the 13 institutions with available simulation curricula, 12/13 had simulation focused on proficiency-based skill training, 11/13 had medical knowledge learning, 10/13 had skill competency assessment. The main targeted trainees in these hospitals were residents (or postgraduate residents) and medical students (or interns). The top 2 barriers were the shortage of sustainable financial resources (12/15) and advocacy from their institutional authorities (7/15). It is evident that there is a need for more development of training facilities, and for training the "trainers" and administrators. Financial funding, curricular design, and research seem to be crucial for building a long-term, sustainable, effective program.

  2. On fertile ground: An initial evaluation of green care farms in the United States.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Keith A; Chapin, Kate P; Reimer, Zachary; Siffri, Gina

    2017-02-07

    Green care farms (GCF) provide unique opportunities to persons with disabilities to engage in meaningful and therapeutic activities in farm settings. In this pilot study, the researchers examined the feasibility and impact of the first GCF in the United States. Qualitative interviews (N = 19) and thematic analysis were conducted. GCF participants and family members were enthusiastic about participation and identified benefits such as respite and improved mood. Administrators and farmers indicated that GCF challenged the status quo of funding, programming, and farming. Administrators speculated that the future success of GCF relies upon administrative expertise, local relationships, and managing risk and liability.

  3. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir). PMID:28272546

  4. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wojcicki, Janet M

    2014-01-01

    While childhood obesity is a global problem, the extent and severity of the problem in United States, has resulted in a number of new initiatives, including recent hospital initiatives to limit the sale of sweetened beverages and other high calorie drinks in hospital vending machines and cafeterias. These proposed policy changes are not unique to United States, but are more comprehensive in the number of proposed hospitals that they will impact. Meanwhile, however, it is advised, that these initiatives should focus on banning sugar sweetened beverages, including sodas, 100% fruit juice and sports drinks, from hospital cafeterias and vending machines instead of limiting their presence, so as to ensure the success of these programs in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. If US hospitals comprehensively remove sugar sweetened beverages from their cafeterias and vending machines, these programs could subsequently become a model for efforts to address childhood obesity in other areas of the world. Conclusion Hospitals should be a model for health care reform in their communities and removing sugar sweetened beverages is a necessary first step. PMID:23445326

  5. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Wojcicki, Janet M

    2013-06-01

    While childhood obesity is a global problem, the extent and severity of the problem in United States, has resulted in a number of new initiatives, including recent hospital initiatives to limit the sale of sweetened beverages and other high calorie drinks in hospital vending machines and cafeterias. These proposed policy changes are not unique to United States, but are more comprehensive in the number of proposed hospitals that they will impact. Meanwhile, however, it is advised, that these initiatives should focus on banning sugar sweetened beverages, including sodas, 100% fruit juice and sports drinks, from hospital cafeterias and vending machines instead of limiting their presence, so as to ensure the success of these programs in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. If US hospitals comprehensively remove sugar sweetened beverages from their cafeterias and vending machines, these programs could subsequently become a model for efforts to address childhood obesity in other areas of the world. Hospitals should be a model for health care reform in their communities and removing sugar sweetened beverages is a necessary first step. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir).

  7. A three axis turntable's online initial state measurement method based on the high-accuracy laser gyro SINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunfeng; Wei, Guo; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Zhenyu; Wang, Qun; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    As an indispensable equipment in inertial technology tests, the three-axis turntable is widely used in the calibration of various types inertial navigation systems (INS). In order to ensure the calibration accuracy of INS, we need to accurately measure the initial state of the turntable. However, the traditional measuring method needs a lot of exterior equipment (such as level instrument, north seeker, autocollimator, etc.), and the test processing is complex, low efficiency. Therefore, it is relatively difficult for the inertial measurement equipment manufacturers to realize the self-inspection of the turntable. Owing to the high precision attitude information provided by the laser gyro strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) after fine alignment, we can use it as the attitude reference of initial state measurement of three-axis turntable. For the principle that the fixed rotation vector increment is not affected by measuring point, we use the laser gyro INS and the encoder of the turntable to provide the attitudes of turntable mounting plat. Through this way, the high accuracy measurement of perpendicularity error and initial attitude of the three-axis turntable has been achieved.

  8. The Effect of a State Department of Education Teacher Mentor Initiative on Science Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a southern state's department of education program to improve science achievement through embedded professional development of science teachers in the lowest performing schools. The Science Mentor Program provided content and inquiry-based coaching by teacher leaders to science teachers in their own classrooms. The study analyzed the mean scale scores for the science portion of the state's high school graduation test for the years 2004 through 2007 to determine whether schools receiving the intervention scored significantly higher than comparison schools receiving no intervention. The results showed that all schools achieved significant improvement of scale scores between 2004 and 2007, but there were no significant performance differences between intervention and comparison schools, nor were there any significant differences between various subgroups in intervention and comparison schools. However, one subgroup, economically disadvantaged (ED) students, from high-level intervention schools closed the achievement gap with ED students from no-intervention schools across the period of the study. The study provides important information to guide future research on and design of large-scale professional development programs to foster inquiry-based science.

  9. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2016-08-01

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  10. Shock initiation sensitivity and Hugoniot-based equation of state of Composition-B obtained using in situ electromagnetic gauging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, L.; Dattelbaum, Dana; Bartram, Brian; Sheffield, Stephen; Gustavsen, Richard; Handley, Caroline; Shock and Detonation Physics Team; Explosives Modelling Team

    2013-06-01

    Composition-B (Comp-B) is a solid cast explosive comprised of 59.5 wt% cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine (RDX), 39.5 wt% 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and 1 wt% wax. Its initial density depends on formulation method and as a result, the detonation properties of Comp-B have generally been studied at densities of 1.69 g/cm3 and 1.72 g/cm3. The shock initiation sensitivity (Pop-plot) of Comp-B has been reported previously; obtained using both explosively-driven wedge tests and embedded manganin gauge techniques. We describe the results of a series of gas-gun-driven plate-impact initiation experiments on Comp-B (ρ0 = 1.72 g/cm3) using embedded electromagnetic gauges to obtain in situ particle velocity wave profiles at 10 Lagrangian positions in each experiment. From the wave profiles, an unreacted Hugoniot locus, the run-distance-to-detonation, and initiation waveforms are obtained in each experiment. The results indicate that Comp-B at ρ0 = 1.72 g/cm3 is more sensitive than reported previously. Comparisons are made of the new Hugoniot states with an earlier Hugoniot-based EOS. Measurements of the detonation wave profile using photonic Doppler velocimetry are also presented and discussed in the context of ZND detonation theory.

  11. State of Simulation in Healthcare Education: An Initial Survey in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zichen; Niu, Pengfei; Ji, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In 2013, medical error was the third leading cause of death in the United States.1 In China, as in the case with the United States, training and assessment are developing as a strategy to reduce the occurrence of such errors. The objective of this study was to assess the current state of the use of simulation-based training in Beijing and to explore the barriers to further development. Methods: This study included hospitals in Beijing accredited by the Standardized Residency Training (SRT) program. The questionnaire was designed online and distributed to the SRT management departments by e-mail or instant message. Results: Thirty hospitals were invited to participate in this survey, and 15 responses were completed and met the inclusion criteria. Task trainers (15/15), full-scale mannequins (14/15), standardized patients (12/15), and virtual reality workstations (11/15) were the most common types of simulation modalities available for use. Among the given specialties for SRT, the availability of simulation courses was 2/2 for pediatric internal medicine, 1/1 for pediatric surgery, 10/11 for surgery, 11/14 for internal medicine, 7/9 for anesthesiology, 6/8 for emergency medicine, and 3/9 for obstetrics/gynecology. Of the 13 institutions with available simulation curricula, 12/13 had simulation focused on proficiency-based skill training, 11/13 had medical knowledge learning, 10/13 had skill competency assessment. The main targeted trainees in these hospitals were residents (or postgraduate residents) and medical students (or interns). The top 2 barriers were the shortage of sustainable financial resources (12/15) and advocacy from their institutional authorities (7/15). Conclusion: It is evident that there is a need for more development of training facilities, and for training the “trainers” and administrators. Financial funding, curricular design, and research seem to be crucial for building a long-term, sustainable, effective program

  12. GLISSANDO 2: GLauber Initial-State Simulation AND mOre…, ver. 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybczyński, Maciej; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Broniowski, Wojciech; Bożek, Piotr

    2014-06-01

    We present an extended version of GLISSANDO, a Monte-Carlo generator for Glauber-like models of the initial stage of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The increased functionality of the code incorporates a parametrization of shape of nuclei, including light nuclei needed in the NA61 experiment, the nuclear deformation, a possibility of using correlated distributions of nucleons in nuclei read from external files, an option of overlaying distributions of produced particles dependent on the space-time rapidity, the inclusion of the core-corona effect, or the output of the source distributions that can be used in event-by-event hydrodynamics. Together with other features, such as incorporation of various variants of Glauber models, or the implementation of a realistic NN collision profile, the generator offers a realistic and practical approach to describe the early phase of the collision in 3 + 1 dimensions; the predictions may later be used in modeling the intermediate evolution phase, e.g., with hydrodynamics. The software is integrated with the ROOT platform. The supplied scripts compute and plot numerous features of the distributions, such as the multiplicity distributions and centrality classes, harmonic asymmetry coefficients and their correlations, forward-backward correlations, etc. The code can also be used for the proton-nucleus and deuteron-nucleus collisions.

  13. Training initiatives for essential obstetric care in developing countries: a 'state of the art' review.

    PubMed

    Penny, S; Murray, S F

    2000-12-01

    Increased international awareness of the need to provide accessible essential or emergency obstetric and newborn care in developing countries has resulted in the recognition of new training needs and in a number of new initiatives to meet those needs. This paper reviews experience in this area so far. The first section deals with some of the different educational approaches and teaching methods that have now been employed, ranging from the traditional untheorized 'chalk and talk', to competency-based training, to theories of adult learning, problem solving and transferable skills. The second section describes a range of different types of indicators and data sources (learner assessments, user and community assessments, trainer assessments and institutional data) that have been used in the assessment of the effectiveness of such training. The final section of the paper draws together some of the lessons. It considers evaluation design issues such as the inclusion of medium and long term evaluation, the importance of methods that allow for the detection of iatrogenic effects of training, and the roles of community randomized trials and 'before, during and after' studies. Issues identified for the future include comparative work, how to keep training affordable, and where training ought to lie on the continuum between straightforward technical skills acquisition and the more complex learning processes required for demanding professional work.

  14. United States-Mexico cross-border health insurance initiatives: Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Arturo Vargas; Laugesen, Miriam; Caban, Mabel; Rosenau, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    While U.S. health care reform will most likely reduce the overall number of uninsured Mexican-Americans, it does not address challenges related to health care coverage for undocumented Mexican immigrants, who will remain uninsured under the measures of the reform; documented low-income Mexican immigrants who have not met the five-year waiting period required for Medicaid benefits; or the growing number of retired U.S. citizens living in Mexico, who lack easy access to Medicare-supported services. This article reviews two promising binational initiatives that could help address these challenges—Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico; discusses their prospective applications within the context of U.S. health care reform; and identifies potential challenges to their implementation (legal, political, and regulatory), as well as the possible benefits, including coverage of uninsured Mexican immigrants, and their integration into the U.S. health care system (through Salud Migrante), and access to lower-cost Medicare-supported health care for U.S. retirees in Mexico (Medicare in Mexico). PMID:22427168

  15. United States-Mexico cross-border health insurance initiatives: Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Laugesen, Miriam; Caban, Mabel; Rosenau, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    While U.S. health care reform will most likely reduce the overall number of uninsured Mexican-Americans, it does not address challenges related to health care coverage for undocumented Mexican immigrants, who will remain uninsured under the measures of the reform; documented low-income Mexican immigrants who have not met the five-year waiting period required for Medicaid benefits; or the growing number of retired U.S. citizens living in Mexico, who lack easy access to Medicare-supported services. This article reviews two promising binational initiatives that could help address these challenges-Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico; discusses their prospective applications within the context of U.S. health care reform; and identifies potential challenges to their implementation (legal, political, and regulatory), as well as the possible benefits, including coverage of uninsured Mexican immigrants, and their integration into the U.S. health care system (through Salud Migrante), and access to lower-cost Medicare-supported health care for U.S. retirees in Mexico (Medicare in Mexico).

  16. Black holes and fundamental fields in numerical relativity: Initial data construction and evolution of bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirotada; Witek, Helvi; Cardoso, Vitor

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental fields are a natural outcome in cosmology and particle physics and might therefore serve as a proxy for more complex interactions. The equivalence principle implies that all forms of matter gravitate, and one therefore expects relevant, universal imprints of new physics in strong field gravity, such as that encountered close to black holes. Fundamental fields in the vicinities of supermassive black holes give rise to extremely long-lived, or even unstable, configurations, which slowly extract angular momentum from the black hole or simply evolve nonlinearly over long time scales, with important implications for particle physics and gravitational-wave physics. Here, we perform a fully nonlinear study of scalar-field condensates around rotating black holes. We provide novel ways to specify initial data for the Einstein—Klein—Gordon system, with potential applications in a variety of scenarios. Our numerical results confirm the existence of long-lived bar modes, which act as lighthouses for gravitational wave emission: the scalar field condenses outside the black hole geometry and acts as a constant frequency gravitational-wave source for very long time scales. This effect could turn out to be a potential signature of beyond standard model physics and also a promising source of gravitational waves for future gravitational-wave detectors.

  17. Statistical analysis of the correlations between cell performance and its initial states in contact resistive random access memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Yun Feng; Hsieh, Wei Ting; Che Chen, Chun; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2017-04-01

    Variability has been one of the critical challenges in the implementation of large resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays. Wide variations in set/reset, read and cycling characteristics can significantly reduce the design margin and feasibility of a memory array. Predicting the characteristics of RRAM cells is constructive to provide insights and to adjust the memory operations accordingly. In this study, a strong correlation between the cell performance and its initial state is found in contact RRAM (CRRAM) cells by 28 nm CMOS logic technology. Furthermore, a verify-reset operation is proposed to identify the type of conductive filament (CF) in a cell. Distinctive CRRAM characteristics are found to be linked directly to initial CFs, enabling preliminary screening and adaptive resets to address the large variability problems in sizable CRRAM arrays.

  18. Different mechanisms for hole and electron transfer along identical molecular bridges: the importance of the initial state delocalization.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Tarkuç, Simge; Renaud, Nicolas; Houtepen, Arjan J; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2014-06-05

    We report measurements of hole and electron transfer along identical oligo-p-phenylene molecular bridges of increasing length. Although the injection barriers for hole and electron transfer are similar, we observed striking differences in the distance dependence and absolute magnitude of the rates of these two processes. Electron transfer is characterized by an almost distance-independent, fast charge-transfer rate. Hole transfer presents a much slower rate that decreases significantly with the length of the bridge. Time-dependent density functional calculations show that the observed differences can be explained by the delocalization of the respective initial excitation. The evaluation of the initial state is therefore essential when comparing charge-transfer rates between different donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

  19. A Collaborative State of the Science Initiative: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy; Kennedy, Maureen Shawn

    2017-02-01

    : To examine practices for addressing moral distress, a collaborative project was developed by the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, the American Journal of Nursing, and the Journal of Christian Nursing, along with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses and the American Nurses Association. Its purpose was to identify strategies that individuals and systems can use to mitigate the detrimental effects of moral distress and foster moral resilience. On August 11 and 12, 2016, an invitational symposium, State of the Science: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing, was held at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland. Forty-five nurse clinicians, researchers, ethicists, organization representatives, and other stakeholders took part. The result of the symposium was group consensus on recommendations for addressing moral distress and building moral resilience in four areas: practice, education, research, and policy. Participants and the organizations represented were energized and committed to moving this agenda forward.

  20. Implementation and initial test result of a prototype solid state modulator for pulsed magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, Vishal; Mangalvedekar, H.A.; Tillu, Abhijit; Dixit, Kavita P.; Sarukte, Hemant

    2014-07-01

    A solid-state modulator rated for 50 kV, 120A, 4μs and 250 Hz has been designed. The discharging circuit of the modulator is being tested at ∼ 33 kV, 40-80A, at a maximum pulse repetition rate of 30 pps. The paper discusses development and testing of prototype discharging circuit on resistive load and magnetron. The technique used for measurement of pulse transformer leakage inductance, distributed capacitance and stray primary circuit series inductance will also be discussed in detail. It is necessary to have Energy Storage Capacitors with low ESL for these applications (ESL < 40 nH). The method used for evaluating the ESL of locally available metalized polypropylene capacitors will also be presented. (author)

  1. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program. 1985 Technical Report. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Chemistry Department Wright State University Dayton, Ohio 0 0" Abstract Synthetic routes to a novel polybenziridazole tetraamine monomer, N(l) ,N(4...2,59; N, 15.38. El =ass spectrum, m/’e 277 (mA-) PVR (60 MHz, CDC’ 7 3 ppm(m, .5 If, arom .), 7.8 ppm(d, I H, H-6), 8.15 ppm(d, 1 H, H-3), ) 3 ppm(br...H, 4.00; N, 16.00. Found C, 61.78; H, 3.92; N, 15.42. El mass spectrum,, m/e 350 (M-). P.R (60 MHz, CDC! ) 7.3 ppm (i, 10 H, arom ), 8.2 ppm (s, 2 H

  2. A Multi-State Model Examining Patterns of Transitioning Among States of Engagement in Care in HIV-Positive Individuals Initiating Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Jennifer; Loutfy, Mona; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Antoniou, Tony; Burchell, Ann N; Walmsley, Sharon; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina B; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S G; Rourke, Sean B; Tsoukas, Christos; Hogg, Robert; Raboud, Janet

    2016-12-15

    Common measures of engagement in care fail to acknowledge that infrequent follow-up may occur either intentionally among patients with sustained virologic suppression or unintentionally among patients with poor clinical outcomes. Five states of HIV care were defined within the Canadian Observational Cohort Collaboration following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation: (1) guidelines HIV care [suppressed viral load (VL) and CD4 >200 cells per cubic millimeter, no gaps in cART >3 months, no gaps in CD4 or VL measurement >6 months], (2) successful care with decreased frequency of follow-up (as above except no gaps in CD4 or VL measurement >12 months), (3) suboptimal care (unsuppressed VL, CD4 <200 cells per cubic millimeter on 2 consecutive visits, ≥1 gap in cART >3 months, or ≥1 gap in CD4 or VL measurement >12 months), (4) loss to follow-up (no contact for 18 months), and (5) death. Multi-state models were used to determine factors associated with transitioning among states. In total, 7810 participants were included. Younger age, female gender, Indigenous ethnicity, and people who have injected drugs were associated with increased likelihoods of transitioning from guidelines to suboptimal care and decreased likelihoods of transitioning from suboptimal to guidelines care. One-fifth of individuals in successful, decreased follow-up after cART initiation (mean sojourn time 0.72 years) were in suboptimal care in subsequent years. Using routinely collected data, we have developed a flexible framework that characterizes patient transitions among states of HIV clinical care. We have demonstrated that multi-state models provide a useful approach to supplement "cascade of care" work.

  3. An initial probabilistic hazard assessment of oil dispersants approved by the United States National Contingency Plan.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Jason P; Williams, E Spencer; Brooks, Bryan W

    2011-07-01

    Dispersants are commonly applied during oil spill mitigation efforts; however, these industrial chemicals may present risks to aquatic organisms individually and when mixed with oil. Fourteen dispersants are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Availability of environmental effects information for such agents is limited, and individual components of dispersants are largely proprietary. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches including Chemical Toxicity Distributions (CTDs) may be useful as an initial step toward prioritizing environmental hazards from the use of dispersants. In the present study, we applied the CTD approach to two acute toxicity datasets: NCP (the contingency plan dataset) and DHOS (a subset of NCP listed dispersants reevaluated subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill). These datasets contained median lethal concentration (LC50) values for dispersants alone and dispersant:oil mixtures, in two standard marine test species, Menidia beryllina and Mysidopsis bahia. These CTDs suggest that dispersants alone are generally less toxic than oil. In contrast, most dispersant:oil mixtures are more toxic than oil alone. For the two datasets (treated separately because of differing methodologies), CTDs would predict 95% of dispersant:oil mixtures to have acute toxicity values above 0.32 and 0.76 mg/L for Mysidopsis and 0.33 mg/L and 1.06 mg/L for Menidia (for DHOS and NCP, respectively). These findings demonstrate the utility of CTDs as a means to evaluate the comparative ecotoxicity of dispersants alone and in mixture with different oil types. The approaches presented here also provide valuable tools for prioritizing prospective and retrospective environmental assessments of oil dispersants.

  4. The Family Medicine Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management: Impact on Practice in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. METHODS We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. RESULTS Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20-19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women. PMID:23378077

  5. Search for saddle-point electrons using the continuum-distorted-wave eikonal initial-state model

    SciTech Connect

    McCartney, M.

    1995-08-01

    The continuum-distorted-wave eikonal initial-state (CDWEIS) model is used to study the ionization of hydrogen by protons of energy 10--500 keV. Ejected electron spectra are presented and discussed in the context of the saddle-point mechanism. The behavior of the ejected electron spectrum as the charge of the incident projectile is varied is also considered. It is concluded that within its range of validity, CDWEIS does not provide any evidence of the existence of saddle-point electrons.

  6. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  7. The Effect of a State Department of Education Teacher Mentor Initiative on Science Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.

    This study analyzed a state department of education's ability to have actual influence over the improvement of science achievement and proficiency by having direct relationships with science teachers in Georgia's lowest performing schools. The study employed a mixed ANOVA analysis of the mean scale scores and proficiency rates of the science portion of the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) for the years 2004 through 2007 to determine if the intervention by the Science Mentor Program (SMP) had significant effect on the science achievement and proficiency within the cohort of schools, as compared to a set of schools receiving no intervention, on various subgroups within the schools, and on various levels of intervention within the SMP. All data used in this study are available to the public through the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE). SMP schools were selected based on their level of intervention for three consecutive years. Non-SMP schools were selected based on demographic similarities in economically disadvantaged, white, African-American, and students with disabilities to ensure a match of pairings for analyses. The results of this study showed significant improvement of scale scores and proficiency rates between 2004 and 2007. The study showed significant increases in all schools regardless of treatment. The study also showed significant differences in performance within the subgroups. Males, white, non-Economically Disadvantaged, and regular education students were all found to have significantly better performance in both achievement and proficiency rate. Economically Disadvantaged students were found to have a significant difference with regard to treatment groups. There was a significant difference between the mean scale score and proficiency rates of Economically Disadvantaged students in schools receiving high-intervention and schools receiving no-intervention. Further analysis showed that the only significant difference was in 2004, the

  8. Chemical-biological protective clothing: effects of design and initial state on physiological strain.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M

    2008-05-01

    This study examined whether heat strain during low states of chemical and biological protection (CB(low)) impacted tolerance time (TT) after transition to a high state of protection (CB(high)) and whether vents in the uniform reduced heat strain during CB(low) and increased TT. There were eight men who walked at 35 degrees C in CB(low), and then transitioned to CB(high). Subjects wore fatigues in CB(low) with an overgarment during CB(high) (F+OG) or a new 1-piece (1PC) or 2PC uniform throughout CB(low) and CB(high). One condition also tested opened vents in the torso, arms, and legs of the 2PC uniform (2PC(vent)) during CB(low); these vents were closed during CB(high). Also worn were fragmentation and tactical vests and helmet. Heart rates were reduced significantly during CB(low) for F+OG and 2PC(vent) (114 +/- 13) vs. 1 PC and 2PC (122 +/- 18). Rectal temperature (T(re)) increased least in CB(low) for F+OG (0.86 +/- 0.23 degree C) and was significantly lower for 2PC(vent) (1.02 +/- 0.25 degree C) vs. 2PC (1.11 +/- 0.27 degree C). T(re) increased rapidly during CB(high) for F+OG, which had the shortest TT (40 +/- 9 min). Increased thermal strain during CB(low) for 1PC negated its advantage in CB(high) and TT (46 +/- 21 min) was similar to F+OG. Differences in T(re) between 2PC and 2PC(vent) remained during CB(high) whereTT was increased during 2PC(vent) (74 +/- 17 min) vs. 2PC (62 +/- 19 min). It was concluded that heat strain during CB(low) impacted TT during CB(high), and use of vents reduced heat strain during CB(low), thereby increasing TT.

  9. Coordinating across scales: Building a regional marsh bird monitoring program from national and state Initiatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shriver, G.W.; Sauer, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Salt marsh breeding bird populations (rails, bitterns, sparrows, etc.) in eastern North America are high conservation priorities in need of site specific and regional monitoring designed to detect population changes over time. The present status and trends of these species are unknown but anecdotal evidence of declines in many of the species has raised conservation concerns. Most of these species are listed as conservation priorities on comprehensive wildlife plans throughout the eastern U.S. National Wildlife Refuges, National Park Service units, and other wildlife conservation areas provide important salt marsh habitat. To meet management needs for these areas, and to assist regional conservation planning, survey designs are being developed to estimate abundance and population trends for these breeding bird species. The primary purpose of this project is to develop a hierarchical sampling frame for salt marsh birds in Bird Conservation Region (BCR) 30 that will provide the ability to estimate species population abundances on 1) specific sites (i.e. National Parks and National Wildlife Refuges), 2) within states or regions, and 3) within BCR 30. The entire breeding range of Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed and Coastal Plain Swamp sparrows are within BCR 30, providing an opportunity to detect population trends within the entire breeding ranges of two priority species.

  10. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome as the Initial Manifestation of a Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Velver, Karla Victoria; Soto-Garcia, Analy J.; Zapata-Rivera, María Azucena; Montes-Villarreal, Juan; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a life-threatening demyelinating syndrome. The association of ODS with hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) has been seldom reported. The aim of this study was to present and discuss previous cases and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in ODS secondary to HHS. A 47-year-old man arrived to the emergency room due to generalized tonic-clonic seizures and altered mental status. The patient was lethargic and had a Glasgow coma scale of 11/15, muscle strength was 4/5 in both lower extremities, and deep tendon reflexes were diminished. Glucose was 838 mg/dL; serum sodium and venous blood gas analyses were normal. Urinary and plasma ketones were negative. Brain magnetic resonance revealed increased signal intensity on T2-weighted FLAIR images with restricted diffusion on the medulla and central pons. Supportive therapy was started and during the next 3 weeks the patient progressively regained consciousness and muscle strength and was able to feed himself. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and MRI showed no residual damage. In conclusion, the association of ODS with HHS is extremely rare. The exact mechanism by which HHS produces ODS still needs to be elucidated, but we favor a rapid hypertonic insult as the most plausible mechanism. PMID:25431711

  11. Initiation of diverse epigenetic states during nuclear programming of the Drosophila body plan.

    PubMed

    Boija, Ann; Mannervik, Mattias

    2016-08-02

    Epigenetic patterns of histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression. Here, we show that such modifications also accompany the specification of cell identities by the NF-κB transcription factor Dorsal in the precellular Drosophila embryo. We provide evidence that the maternal pioneer factor, Zelda, is responsible for establishing poised RNA polymerase at Dorsal target genes before Dorsal-mediated zygotic activation. At the onset of cell specification, Dorsal recruits the CBP/p300 coactivator to the regulatory regions of defined target genes in the presumptive neuroectoderm, resulting in their histone acetylation and transcriptional activation. These genes are inactive in the mesoderm due to transcriptional quenching by the Snail repressor, which precludes recruitment of CBP and prevents histone acetylation. By contrast, inactivation of the same enhancers in the dorsal ectoderm is associated with Polycomb-repressed H3K27me3 chromatin. Thus, the Dorsal morphogen gradient produces three distinct histone signatures including two modes of transcriptional repression, active repression (hypoacetylation), and inactivity (H3K27me3). Whereas histone hypoacetylation is associated with a poised polymerase, H3K27me3 displaces polymerase from chromatin. Our results link different modes of RNA polymerase regulation to separate epigenetic patterns and demonstrate that developmental determinants orchestrate differential chromatin states, providing new insights into the link between epigenetics and developmental patterning.

  12. Osmotic demyelination syndrome as the initial manifestation of a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Velver, Karla Victoria; Soto-Garcia, Analy J; Zapata-Rivera, María Azucena; Montes-Villarreal, Juan; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a life-threatening demyelinating syndrome. The association of ODS with hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) has been seldom reported. The aim of this study was to present and discuss previous cases and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in ODS secondary to HHS. A 47-year-old man arrived to the emergency room due to generalized tonic-clonic seizures and altered mental status. The patient was lethargic and had a Glasgow coma scale of 11/15, muscle strength was 4/5 in both lower extremities, and deep tendon reflexes were diminished. Glucose was 838 mg/dL; serum sodium and venous blood gas analyses were normal. Urinary and plasma ketones were negative. Brain magnetic resonance revealed increased signal intensity on T2-weighted FLAIR images with restricted diffusion on the medulla and central pons. Supportive therapy was started and during the next 3 weeks the patient progressively regained consciousness and muscle strength and was able to feed himself. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and MRI showed no residual damage. In conclusion, the association of ODS with HHS is extremely rare. The exact mechanism by which HHS produces ODS still needs to be elucidated, but we favor a rapid hypertonic insult as the most plausible mechanism.

  13. Redox States of Initial Atmospheres Outgassed on Rocky Planets and Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    2017-07-01

    The Earth and other rocky planets and planetesimals in the solar system formed through the mixing of materials from various radial locations in the solar nebula. This primordial material likely had a range of oxidation states as well as bulk compositions and volatile abundances. We investigate the oxygen fugacity produced by the outgassing of mixtures of solid meteoritic material, which approximate the primitive nebular materials. We find that the gas composition and oxygen fugacity of binary and ternary mixtures of meteoritic materials vary depending on the proportion of reduced versus oxidized material, and also find that mixtures using differentiated materials do not show the same oxygen fugacity trends as those using similarly reduced but undifferentiated materials. We also find that simply mixing the gases produced by individual meteoritic materials together does not correctly reproduce the gas composition or oxygen fugacity of the binary and ternary mixtures. We provide tabulated fits for the oxygen fugacities of all of the individual materials and binary mixtures that we investigate. These values may be useful in planetary formation models, models of volatile transport on planetesimals or meteorite parent bodies, or models of trace element partitioning during metal-silicate fractionation.

  14. Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States Differentially Prime Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells for Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Nassar, Dany; Beck, Benjamin; Boumahdi, Soufiane; Wang, Li; Brisebarre, Audrey; Dubois, Christine; Nkusi, Erwin; Lenglez, Sandrine; Checinska, Agnieszka; Vercauteren Drubbel, Alizée; Devos, Michael; Declercq, Wim; Yi, Rui; Blanpain, Cédric

    2017-02-02

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells has been associated with metastasis, stemness, and resistance to therapy. Some tumors undergo EMT while others do not, which may reflect intrinsic properties of their cell of origin. However, this possibility is largely unexplored. By targeting the same oncogenic mutations to discrete skin compartments, we show that cell-type-specific chromatin and transcriptional states differentially prime tumors to EMT. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) derived from interfollicular epidermis (IFE) are generally well differentiated, while hair follicle (HF) stem cell-derived SCCs frequently exhibit EMT, efficiently form secondary tumors, and possess increased metastatic potential. Transcriptional and epigenomic profiling revealed that IFE and HF tumor-initiating cells possess distinct chromatin landscapes and gene regulatory networks associated with tumorigenesis and EMT that correlate with accessibility of key epithelial and EMT transcription factor binding sites. These findings highlight the importance of chromatin states and transcriptional priming in dictating tumor phenotypes and EMT.

  15. Measurement of e+e-→γ χc J via initial state radiation at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. L.; Wang, X. L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Shen, C. P.; Wang, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bansal, V.; Bhardwaj, V.; Biswal, J.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Lewis, P.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The process e+e-→γ χc J (J =1 , 2) is studied via initial state radiation using 980 fb-1 of data at and around the ϒ (n S ) (n =1 , 2, 3, 4, 5) resonances collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. No significant signal is observed except from ψ (2 S ) decays. Upper limits on the cross sections between √{s }=3.80 and 5.56 GeV are determined at the 90% credibility level, which range from a few pb to a few tens of pb. We also set upper limits on the decay rate of the vector charmonium [ψ (4040 ), ψ (4160 ), and ψ (4415 )] and charmoniumlike [Y (4260 ), Y (4360 ), and Y (4660 )] states to γ χc J.

  16. Librarian-initiated HIV/AIDS prevention intervention program outcome in rural communities in Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajuwon, G A; Komolafe-Opadeji, H O; Ikhizama, B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to meet the HIV/AIDS information and service needs of citizens living in selected rural, underserved communities in Oyo State, Nigeria. This was a librarian-initiated intervention program (pre-post) study of heads of rural households in Oyo State. A questionnaire was used for pre- and post-intervention assessment. The education covered knowledge about HIV/AIDS, routes of transmission, prevention strategies, and attitude toward persons living with HIV. It increased participants' knowledge about AIDS and improved attitude toward those living with HIV. Provision and dissemination of information on HIV/AIDS through librarians to rural settlers is an important prevention strategy and librarians can make major contributions.

  17. Definition and initial validation of a Lupus Low Disease Activity State (LLDAS).

    PubMed

    Franklyn, Kate; Lau, Chak Sing; Navarra, Sandra V; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Lateef, Aisha; Hamijoyo, Laniyati; Wahono, C Singgih; Chen, Shun Le; Jin, Ou; Morton, Susan; Hoi, Alberta; Huq, Molla; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, Eric F

    2016-09-01

    Treating to low disease activity is routine in rheumatoid arthritis, but no comparable goal has been defined for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We sought to define and validate a Lupus Low Disease Activity State (LLDAS). A consensus definition of LLDAS was generated using Delphi and nominal group techniques. Criterion validity was determined by measuring the ability of LLDAS attainment, in a single-centre SLE cohort, to predict non-accrual of irreversible organ damage, measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI). Consensus methodology led to the following definition of LLDAS: (1) SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2K ≤4, with no activity in major organ systems (renal, central nervous system (CNS), cardiopulmonary, vasculitis, fever) and no haemolytic anaemia or gastrointestinal activity; (2) no new lupus disease activity compared with the previous assessment; (3) a Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment (SELENA)-SLEDAI physician global assessment (scale 0-3) ≤1; (4) a current prednisolone (or equivalent) dose ≤7.5 mg daily; and (5) well tolerated standard maintenance doses of immunosuppressive drugs and approved biological agents. Achievement of LLDAS was determined in 191 patients followed for a mean of 3.9 years. Patients who spent greater than 50% of their observed time in LLDAS had significantly reduced organ damage accrual compared with patients who spent less than 50% of their time in LLDAS (p=0.0007) and were significantly less likely to have an increase in SDI of ≥1 (relative risk 0.47, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.79, p=0.005). A definition of LLDAS has been generated, and preliminary validation demonstrates its attainment to be associated with improved outcomes in SLE. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. An Analysis of Current Energy Policy Initiatives in New Mexico. What are the Potential Impacts to the State's Water Resources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, G. T.; Hart, W. E.; Kobos, P. H.; Malczynski, L. A.; Tidwell, V. C.

    2008-12-01

    Population in New Mexico is increasing rapidly with recent projections showing that the state will add more than 1 million people by 2035. This growth will create a demand for additional energy and water supplies that have yet to be developed. New Mexico currently exports about 50% of the energy generated within the state to neighboring states, and existing power plants predominately utilize traditional fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas. Because traditional electric generation technologies utilize large quantities of water, New Mexico can also be seen as exporting water for the benefit of electricity consumed in neighboring states. As it is, both surface water and groundwater supplies are stretched thin and these internal and external stresses stemming from population growth will have a substantial impact on the state's water resources. In 2004, the Governor laid out a plan to make New Mexico a "Clean Energy State" by implementing renewable portfolio standards, developing renewable energy transmission infrastructure, creating an alternative energy innovation fund and creating state specific tax credits for renewable energy production and manufacturing. Recent work in the National Energy-Water Roadmap has pointed out that certain renewable sources of energy utilize less water than traditional power plants, and technological fixes to existing power plants will result in less water consumption. If New Mexico carries out its energy initiative, what will be the impacts to the state's water resources? Will it be possible to meet competing demands for this water? These questions and others will be analyzed in a decision-support tool that can look at the connection between both the physical and economic systems to see what the tradeoffs might be as a result of specific policy decisions. The ability to plan for future energy needs and understanding potential impacts to the state's limited water resources will be an invaluable tool for decision-makers in New

  19. The initial and final states of electron and energy transfer processes: Diabatization as motivated by system-solvent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Cave, Robert J.; Steele, Ryan P.; Shenvi, Neil

    2009-06-21

    For a system which undergoes electron or energy transfer in a polar solvent, we define the diabatic states to be the initial and final states of the system, before and after the nonequilibrium transfer process. We consider two models for the system-solvent interactions: A solvent which is linearly polarized in space and a solvent which responds linearly to the system. From these models, we derive two new schemes for obtaining diabatic states from ab initio calculations of the isolated system in the absence of solvent. These algorithms resemble standard approaches for orbital localization, namely, the Boys and Edmiston-Ruedenberg (ER) formalisms. We show that Boys localization is appropriate for describing electron transfer [Subotnik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 244101 (2008)] while ER describes both electron and energy transfer. Neither the Boys nor the ER methods require definitions of donor or acceptor fragments and both are computationally inexpensive. We investigate one chemical example, the case of oligomethylphenyl-3, and we provide attachment/detachment plots whereby the ER diabatic states are seen to have localized electron-hole pairs.

  20. Quenched dynamics in interacting one-dimensional systems: Appearance of current carrying steady states from initial domain wall density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett; Gull, Emanuel; Mitra, Aditi

    2011-03-01

    Dynamics arising after an interaction quench in the quantum sine-Gordon model is studied for the case of a system initially prepared in a spatially inhomogeneous domain wall state. The time-evolution of the density, current and equal time correlation functions are studied using the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA) to which quantum corrections are added in order to set the limits on its validity. For weak to moderate strengths of the back-scattering interaction, the domain wall is found to spread out ballistically with the system within the light cone reaching a non-equilibrium steady-state characterized by a net current flow. A steady state current is also found to exist for a quench at the exactly solvable Luther-Emery point. The magnitude of the current decreases with increasing strength of the back-scattering interaction. The two-point correlation function of the variable canonically conjugate to the density reaches a steady state which is spatially oscillating at a wavelength which is inversely related to the current. This was was supported by NSF-DMR (Award no. 1004589).

  1. Ionization probabilities of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe by proton impact for different initial states and impact energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, C. C.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution we present ab initio results for ionization total cross sections, probabilities at zero impact parameter, and impact parameter moments of order +1 and -1 of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe by proton impact in an extended energy range from 100 keV up to 10 MeV. The calculations were performed by using the continuum distorted wave eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS) for energies up to 1 MeV, and using the first Born approximation for larger energies. The convergence of the CDW-EIS to the first Born above 1 MeV is clear in the present results. Our inner-shell ionization cross sections are compared with the available experimental data and with the ECPSSR results. We also include in this contribution the values of the ionization probabilities at the origin, and the impact parameter dependence. These values have been employed in multiple ionization calculations showing very good description of the experimental data. Tables of the ionization probabilities are presented, disaggregated for the different initial bound states, considering all the shells for Ne and Ar, the M-N shells of Kr and the N-O shells of Xe.

  2. Initial state geometry and fluctuations in deformed and asymmetric nuclear collisions in the IP-Glasma framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-01

    The IP-Glasma model of initial conditions based on the ab initio color glass condensate framework successfully explains most of the bulk features of the global data for various systems like p+p, p+A and A+A over a wide range of energies. We employ this framework to study deformed U+U collisions, asymmetric Cu+Au collisions and the effect of deformation in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. A combined study of these heavy ion systems with varying initial geometries can provide a unique opportunity to determine the origin of different sources of fluctuations that affect global observables like multiplicity and flow. We study the sensitivity of multiplicity, eccentricity and their event-by-event distributions to the details of initial state geometry. Results are compared to a two-component MC-Glauber model implementation that includes Negative-Binomial multiplicity fluctuations. We argue that the measurements of global observables for these systems at RHIC can constrain the mechanism of multi-particle production.

  3. Costs and Financial Burden of Initial Hospitalizations for Firearm Injuries in the United States, 2006-2014.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Sarabeth A; Staudenmayer, Kristan L; Tennakoon, Lakshika; Spain, David A; Weiser, Thomas G

    2017-05-01

    To quantify the inflation-adjusted costs associated with initial hospitalizations for firearm-related injuries in the United States. We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify patients admitted for firearm-related injuries from 2006 to 2014. We converted charges from hospitalization to costs, which we inflation-adjusted to 2014 dollars. We used survey weights to create national estimates. Costs for the initial inpatient hospitalization totaled $6.61 billion. The largest proportion was for patients with governmental insurance coverage, totaling $2.70 billion (40.8%) and was divided between Medicaid ($2.30 billion) and Medicare ($0.40 billion). Self-pay individuals accounted for $1.56 billion (23.6%) in costs. From 2006 to 2014, the cost of initial hospitalizations for firearm-related injuries averaged $734.6 million per year. Medicaid paid one third and self-pay patients one quarter of the financial burden. These figures substantially underestimate true health care costs. Public health implications. Firearm-related injuries are costly to the US health care system and are particularly burdensome to government insurance and the self-paying poor.

  4. Flow processes on the catchment scale - modeling of initial structural states and hydrological behavior in an artificial exemplary catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; Hinz, Christoph; Gerke, Horst H.

    2017-04-01

    Landscapes that are heavily disturbed or newly formed by either natural processes or human activity are in a state of disequilibrium. Their initial development is thus characterized by highly dynamic processes under all climatic conditions. The primary distribution and structure of the solid phase (i.e. mineral particles forming the pore space) is one of the decisive factors for the development of hydrological behavior of the eco-hydrological system and therefore (co-) determining for its - more or less - stable final state. The artificially constructed ‚Hühnerwasser' catchment (a 6 ha area located in the open-cast lignite mine Welzow-Süd, southern Brandenburg, Germany) is a landscape laboratory where the initial eco-hydrological development is observed since 2005. The specific formation (or construction) processes generated characteristic sediment structures and distributions, resulting in a spatially heterogeneous initial state of the catchment. We developed a structure generator that simulates the characteristic distribution of the solid phase for such constructed landscapes. The program is able to generate quasi-realistic structures and sediment compositions on multiple spatial levels (1 cm up to 100 m scale). The generated structures can be i) conditioned to actual measurement values (e.g., soil texture and bulk distribution); ii) stochastically generated, and iii) calculated deterministically according to the geology and technical processes at the excavation site. Results are visualized using the GOCAD software package and the free software Paraview. Based on the 3D-spatial sediment distributions, effective hydraulic van-Genuchten parameters are calculated using pedotransfer functions. The hydraulic behavior of different sediment distribution (i.e. versions or variations of the catchment's porous body) is calculated using a numerical model developed by one of us (Caviedes-Voullième). Observation data are available from catchment monitoring are available

  5. Solid-state transformation of nanocrystalline phyllomanganate into tectomanganate: influence of initial layer and interlayer structure.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Lanson, Bruno; Lanson, Martine

    2014-10-01

    In surficial environments, the fate of many elements is influenced by their interactions with the phyllomanganate vernadite, a nano-sized and turbostratic variety of birnessite. To advance our understanding of the surface reactivity of vernadite as a function of pH, synthetic vernadite (δ-MnO2) was equilibrated at pH ranging from 3 to 10 and characterized structurally using chemical methods, thermogravimetry and modelling of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. With decreasing pH, the number of vacant layer sites increases in the octahedral layers of δ-MnO2 (from 0.14 per layer octahedron at pH 10 to 0.17 at pH 3), whereas the number of layer Mn(3+) is, within errors, equal to 0.12 per layer octahedron over the whole pH range. Vacant layer sites are capped by interlayer Mn(3+) sorbed as triple corner-sharing surface complexes (TC sites). The increasing number of interlayer Mn(3+) with decreasing pH (from 0.075 per layer octahedron at pH 10 to 0.175 at pH 3) results in the decrease of the average Mn oxidation degree (from 3.80 ± 0.01 at pH 10 to 3.70 ± 0.01 at pH 3) and in the lowering of the Na/Mn ratio (from 27.66 ± 0.20 at pH 10 to 6.99 ± 0.16 at pH 3). In addition, in-plane unit-cell parameters are negatively correlated to the number of interlayer Mn at TC sites and decrease with decreasing pH (from b = 2.842 Å at pH 10 to b = 2.834 Å at pH 3), layer symmetry being systematically hexagonal with a = b × 3(1/2). Finally, modelling of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicates that crystallite size in the ab plane and along the c* axis decreases with decreasing pH, ranging respectively from 7 nm to 6 nm, and from 1.2 nm to 1.0 nm (pH 10 and 3, respectively). Following their characterization, dry samples were sealed in polystyrene vials, kept in the dark, and re-analysed 4 and 8 years later. With ageing time and despite the dry state, layer Mn(3+) extensively migrates to the interlayer most likely to minimize steric strains

  6. Regional, State, and Local Initiatives in Nanotechnology: Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop, April 1-3, 2009, Oklahoma City, OK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) operates the ONI under a public/private partnership with The State Chamber of Oklahoma. ONI has four...paid staff, government buy-in, and support with dollars tied to state agencies (public) and private partnerships (e.g., state chambers of commerce...South Dakota universities. Run from the Governor’s Department of Tourism and State Development, this program can tailor industry attraction grants

  7. Initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth in a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, A.; Abbot, D. S.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Marotzke, J.

    2011-03-01

    We study the initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth (~635 million years before present) with the state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM. This is the most sophisticated model ever applied to Snowball initiation. A comparison with a pre-industrial control climate shows that the change of surface boundary conditions from present-day to Marinoan, including a shift of continents to low latitudes, induces a global-mean cooling of 4.6 K. Two thirds of this cooling can be attributed to increased planetary albedo, the remaining one third to a weaker greenhouse effect. The Marinoan Snowball Earth bifurcation point for pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide is between 95.5 and 96% of the present-day total solar irradiance (TSI), whereas a previous study with the same model found that it was between 91 and 94% for present-day surface boundary conditions. A Snowball Earth for TSI set to its Marinoan value (94% of the present-day TSI) is prevented by doubling carbon dioxide with respect to its pre-industrial level. A zero-dimensional energy balance model is used to predict the Snowball Earth bifurcation point from only the equilibrium global-mean ocean potential temperature for present-day TSI. We do not find stable states with sea-ice cover above 55%, and land conditions are such that glaciers could not grow with sea-ice cover of 55%. Therefore, none of our simulations qualifies as a "slushball" solution. While uncertainties in important processes and parameters such as clouds and sea-ice albedo suggest that the Snowball Earth bifurcation point differs between climate models, our results contradict previous findings that Snowball Earth initiation would require much stronger forcings.

  8. Laser angle-resolved photoemission as a probe of initial state kz dispersion, final-state band gaps, and spin texture of Dirac states in the Bi2Te3 topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ä; rrälä, Minna; Hafiz, Hasnain; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Jiang, Rui; Riedemann, Trevor; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Kaminski, Adam; Bansil, Arun; Lindroos, Matti

    2016-10-01

    We have obtained angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) spectra from single crystals of the topological insulator material Bi2Te3 using a tunable laser spectrometer. The spectra were collected for 11 different photon energies ranging from 5.57 to 6.70 eV for incident light polarized linearly along two different in-plane directions. Parallel first-principles, fully relativistic computations of photointensities were carried out using the experimental geometry within the framework of the one-step model of photoemission. A reasonable overall accord between theory and experiment is used to gain insight into how properties of the initial- and final-state band structures as well as those of the topological surface states and their spin textures are reflected in the laser-ARPES spectra. Our analysis reveals that laser-ARPES is sensitive to both the initial-state kz dispersion and the presence of delicate gaps in the final-state electronic spectrum.

  9. Creating Workforce Development Systems That Work: An Evaluation of the Initial One-Stop Implementation Experience. Final Report Appendices: State and Local Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; Fedrau, Ruth; Midling, Michael J.; Remboulis, Maria A.; Wolff, Kristin E.

    This appendix includes individual case study profiles of the One-Stop Career Center implementation experiences of the 9 states and 14 local sites included in the study of initial implementation experiences. The 12 state and local profiles are State of Connecticut (CT); CT Works Career Center, New London, CT; CT Works Career Center, Willimantic,…

  10. General adherence to guideline recommendations on initial diagnosis of bladder cancer in the United States and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Karl, Alexander; Adejoro, Oluwakayode; Saigal, Christopher; Konety, Badrinath

    2014-08-01

    Because international guidelines recommend best practices regarding staging of incident bladder cancer, we determined the adherence to such recommendations in the United States, performing a large retrospective database analysis. Patients with the diagnosis of urothelial cancer were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database between 1992 and 2007. Staging procedures were identified and analyzed. As reference for published recommendations, we used the American Urological Association (AUA), European Association of Urology (EAU), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Based on these sources, recommended initial staging of bladder cancer was analyzed. Of all 56,130 patients, 6148 (10.9%) had a cytologic examination, 29,677 (52.9%) had a standard urinalysis, 2882 (5.1%) underwent intravenous pyelography (IVP), 6950 (12.4%) underwent retrograde pyelography (RPG), and 8145 (14.5%) had computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI). There was a significant trend over the years to a higher use of cytologic analysis, standard urinalysis, and CT/MRI. We observed a significant trend toward a lower rate of IVP and a stable use of RPG. The limitation of our study is that claims data are designed for payment processing, not quality measurement. Despite published recommendations on the initial diagnosis of bladder cancer, our data show that less than half of the included patients received all the elements thought to be required for an initial diagnosis of bladder cancer as recommended by guidelines. Greater adherence to recommendations may ensure optimal treatment strategies. Appropriate treatment is critical to patient outcomes, because evidence-based therapeutic management can be practiced only if an accurate assessment of the disease takes place at the time of initial diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Importance of Performance Measurement and MCH Epidemiology Leadership to Quality Improvement Initiatives at the National, State and Local Levels.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Kristin M; Gavin, Loretta; Moran, John W; Kroelinger, Charlan D; Vladutiu, Catherine J; Goodman, David A; Sappenfield, William M

    2016-11-01

    Purpose In recognition of the importance of performance measurement and MCH epidemiology leadership to quality improvement (QI) efforts, a plenary session dedicated to this topic was presented at the 2014 CityMatCH Leadership and MCH Epidemiology Conference. This paper summarizes the session and provides two applications of performance measurement to QI in MCH. Description Performance measures addressing processes of care are ubiquitous in the current health system landscape and the MCH community is increasingly applying QI processes, such as Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of systems impacting MCH populations. QI is maximally effective when well-defined performance measures are used to monitor change. Assessment MCH epidemiologists provide leadership to QI initiatives by identifying population-based outcomes that would benefit from QI, defining and implementing performance measures, assessing and improving data quality and timeliness, reporting variability in measures throughout PDSA cycles, evaluating QI initiative impact, and translating findings to stakeholders. MCH epidemiologists can also ensure that QI initiatives are aligned with MCH priorities at the local, state and federal levels. Two examples of this work, one highlighting use of a contraceptive service performance measure and another describing QI for peripartum hemorrhage prevention, demonstrate MCH epidemiologists' contributions throughout. Challenges remain in applying QI to complex community and systems-level interventions, including those aimed at improving access to quality care. Conclusion MCH epidemiologists provide leadership to QI initiatives by ensuring they are data-informed and supportive of a common MCH agenda, thereby optimizing the potential to improve MCH outcomes.

  12. A Strategic Planning Guide for State-Level Early Childhood Systems-Building Initiatives: From Resources to Results for Young Children and Their Families. Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series. Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullis, Ericka; Sutherland, Carol; Uyeda, Kimberly; Halfon, Neal

    2004-01-01

    The State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (SECCS) Initiative represents a unique opportunity to improve the quality of life for young children and their families, and support them in reaching their full potential. Under the SECCS Initiative, state mother and child health agencies are being asked to apply MCH experience and expertise to a…

  13. Exclusive Production of Ds Ds-, Ds* Ds-, and Ds* Ds*- via e e- Annihilation with Initial-State-Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-10-27

    The authors perform a study of exclusive production of D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, D*{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, and D*{sub s}{sup +}D*{sub s}{sup -} final states in initial-state-radiation events from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium 1{sup --} states. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 525 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -}, D*{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, and D*{sub s}{sup +}D*{sub s}{sup -} mass spectra show evidence of the known {psi} resonances. Limits are extracted for the branching ratios of the decays X(4260) {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}.

  14. A DEM study of oedometric compression of model granular materials Initial state influence, stress ratio, elasticity, irreversibility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Mohamed Hassan; Roux, Jean-Noël; Brisard, Sébastien; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Bornert, Michel

    2017-06-01

    A DEM simulation study of spherical beads with elastic-frictional contacts in oedometric compression is carried out for a wide variety of initial states, differing in solid fraction Φ, coordination number z (independent of Φ in dense systems) and inherent anisotropy. Stress ratio K0 = σ2/σ1, along with z, Φ and force and fabric anisotropies are monitored in compressions in which axial stress σ1 varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude. K0 tends to remain constant if the material was already one-dimensionally compressed in the assembling stage. Otherwise, it decreases steadily over the investigated stress range. K0 relates to force and fabric anisotropy parameters by a simple formula. Elastic moduli may express the response to very small stress increments about the transversely isotropic equilibrated states, although oedometric compression proves an essentially anelastic process, mainly due to friction mobilization. Despite apparent nearly reversible increases of axial strain ɛ1 (or density Φ), especially in dense samples, internal state evolutions are strongly irreversible, as evidenced by changes in z and K0. Fabric changes are reflected by anisotropic elastic moduli.

  15. Structure, initial excited-state relaxation, and energy storage of rhodopsin resolved at the multiconfigurational perturbation theory level.

    PubMed

    Andruniów, Tadeusz; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2004-12-28

    We demonstrate that a "brute force" quantum chemical calculation based on an ab initio multiconfigurational second order perturbation theory approach implemented in a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics strategy can be applied to the investigation of the excited state of the visual pigment rhodopsin (Rh) with a computational error <5 kcal.mol(-1). As a consequence, the simulation of the absorption and fluorescence of Rh and its retinal chromophore in solution allows for a nearly quantitative analysis of the factors determining the properties of the protein environment. More specifically, we demonstrate that the Rh environment is more similar to the "gas phase" than to the solution environment and that the so-called "opsin shift" originates from the inability of the solvent to effectively "shield" the chromophore from its counterion. The same strategy is used to investigate three transient structures involved in the photoisomerization of Rh under the assumption that the protein cavity does not change shape during the reaction. Accordingly, the analysis of the initially relaxed excited-state structure, the conical intersection driving the excited-state decay, and the primary isolable bathorhodopsin intermediate supports a mechanism where the photoisomerization coordinate involves a "motion" reminiscent of the so-called bicycle-pedal reaction coordinate. Most importantly, it is shown that the mechanism of the approximately 30 kcal.mol(-1) photon energy storage observed for Rh is not consistent with a model based exclusively on the change of the electrostatic interaction of the chromophore with the protein/counterion environment.

  16. Fundamental structural characteristics of planar granular assemblies: Self-organization and scaling away friction and initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Takashi; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2017-03-01

    The microstructural organization of a granular system is the most important determinant of its macroscopic behavior. Here we identify the fundamental factors that determine the statistics of such microstructures, using numerical experiments to gain a general understanding. The experiments consist of preparing and compacting isotropically two-dimensional granular assemblies of polydisperse frictional disks and analyzing the emergent statistical properties of quadrons—the basic structural elements of granular solids. The focus on quadrons is because the statistics of their volumes have been found to display intriguing universal-like features [T. Matsushima and R. Blumenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098003]. The dependence of the structures and of the packing fraction on the intergranular friction and the initial state is analyzed, and a number of significant results are found. (i) An analytical formula is derived for the mean quadron volume in terms of three macroscopic quantities: the mean coordination number, the packing fraction, and the rattlers fraction. (ii) We derive a unique, initial-state-independent relation between the mean coordination number and the rattler-free packing fraction. The relation is supported numerically for a range of different systems. (iii) We collapse the quadron volume distributions from all systems onto one curve, and we verify that they all have an exponential tail. (iv) The nature of the quadron volume distribution is investigated by decomposition into conditional distributions of volumes given the cell order, and we find that each of these also collapses onto a single curve. (v) We find that the mean quadron volume decreases with increasing intergranular friction coefficients, an effect that is prominent in high-order cells. We argue that this phenomenon is due to an increased probability of stable irregularly shaped cells, and we test this using a herewith developed free cell analytical model

  17. Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar,D*Dbar, and D*D*bar Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* in initial-state-radiation events, from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* mass spectra show clear evidence of several {psi} resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D} or Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D}*.

  18. Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI): a successful start to a national program in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Jung, R.E.; Bailey, L.L.; Adams, M.J.; Corn, P.S.; Dodd, C.K.; Fellers, G.M.; Sandinski, W.J.; Schwalbe, C.R.; Walls, S.C.; Fisher, R.N.; Gallant, A.L.; Battaglin, W.A.; Green, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Most research to assess amphibian declines has focused on local-scale projects on one or a few species. The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) is a national program in the United States mandated by congressional directive and implemented by the U.S. Department of the Interior (specifically the U.S. Geological Survey, USGS). Program goals are to monitor changes in populations of amphibians across U.S. Department of the Interior lands and to address research questions related to amphibian declines using a hierarchical framework of base-, mid- and apex-level monitoring sites. ARMI is currently monitoring 83 amphibian species (29% of species in the U.S.) at mid- and apex-level areas. We chart the progress of this 5-year-old program and provide an example of mid-level monitoring from 1 of the 7 ARMI regions.

  19. Generation of steady-state nonlinear localized internal waves from initial impulse in a three-layer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Korol, Alexey; Kurkina, Oxana; Kurkin, Andey; Talipova, Tatiana; Giniyatullin, Ayrat

    2017-04-01

    The process of long internal steady-state breather generation from sign-variable initial impulse in a three-layer fluid is studied numerically in the framework of full nonlinear (Euler) and weakly nonlinear (Gardner) hydrodynamic models. Such a wave can influence upon sediment transport, mixing of stratified layers of ocean water and also can lead to development of internal waves of anomalously large amplitudes. The comparison of results is carried out and effect of weak variation of water stratification on the generated internal wave field is studied. The influence of a constant flow on the nonlinear wave generation process is also studied. It is shown that in situations when existence of the solitary waves of the first mode is impossible, solitary waves of the second mode can appear with amplitudes comparable to the leading breather amplitude of the first mode. Keywords: internal waves; breathers; solitons; weakly nonlinear model; full nonlinear model; numerical modeling.

  20. On Baryon-Antibaryon Cross Sections from Initial State Radiation Processes at BABAR and their Surprising Threshold Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pacetti, Simone

    2015-04-14

    BABAR has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e+e- → pp-bar and e+e- → ΛΛ-bar cross sections by means of the initial state radiation technique, which has the advantages of good efficiency and energy resolution, and full angular acceptance in the threshold region. A striking feature of these cross sections is their non-vanishing values at threshold. In the case of charged baryons, the phenomenon is well understood in terms of the Coulomb interaction between the outgoing baryon and antibaryon. However, such an effect is not expected for neutral baryons. We suggest a simple explanation for both charged and neutral baryon pairs based on Coulomb interactions at the valence quark level.

  1. Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI): A successful start to a national program in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Jung, R.E.; Bailey, L.L.; Adams, M.J.; Corn, P.S.; Dodd, C.K.; Fellers, G.M.; Sadinski, W.J.; Schwalbe, C.R.; Walls, S.C.; Fisher, R.N.; Gallant, A.L.; Battaglin, W.A.; Green, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Most research to assess amphibian declines has focused on local-scale projects on one or a few species. The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) is a national program in the United States mandated by congressional directive and implemented by the U.S. Department of the Interior (specifically the U.S. Geological Survey, USGS). Program goals are to monitor changes in populations of amphibians across U.S. Department of the Interior lands and to address research questions related to amphibian declines using a hierarchical framework of base-, mid- and apex-level monitoring sites. ARMI is currently monitoring 83 amphibian species (29% of species in the U.S.) at mid- and apex-level areas. We chart the progress of this 5-year-old program and provide an example of mid-level monitoring from 1 of the 7 ARMI regions.

  2. Observation of e+e-→K+K-J/ψ via initial-state radiation at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. Z.; Shen, C. P.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Das, A.; Dash, M.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Lin, S.-W.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohapatra, D.; Moloney, G. R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Peak, L. S.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Singh, J. B.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zupanc, A.; Zyukova, O.

    2008-01-01

    The process e+e-→K+K-J/ψ is observed for the first time via initial-state radiation. The cross section of e+e-→K+K-J/ψ for center-of-mass energies between threshold and 6.0 GeV is measured using 673fb-1 of data collected with the Belle detector on and off the Υ(4S) resonance. No significant signal for Y(4260)→K+K-J/ψ is observed, and we determine B(Y(4260)→K+K-J/ψ)Γ(Y(4260)→e+e-)<1.2eV/c2 at a 90% confidence level. We also find evidence for e+e-→KS0KS0J/ψ in the same data sample.

  3. Evaluation of Initial and Steady-State Gatifloxacin Pharmacokinetics and Dose in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients by Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Smythe, Wynand; Merle, Corinne S.; Rustomjee, Roxana; Gninafon, Martin; Lo, Mame Bocar; Bah-Sow, Oumou; Olliaro, Piero L.; Lienhardt, Christian; Horton, John; Smith, Peter; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month regimen of gatifloxacin with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide is being evaluated for the treatment of tuberculosis in a phase 3 randomized controlled trial (OFLOTUB). A prior single-dose study found that gatifloxacin exposure increased by 14% in the combination. The aims of the study are to evaluate the initial and steady-state pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin when daily doses are given to patients with newly diagnosed drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis as part of a combination regimen and to evaluate the gatifloxacin dose with respect to the probability of attaining a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target. We describe the population pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin from the first dose to a median of 28 days in 169 adults enrolled in the OFLOTUB trial in Benin, Guinea, Senegal, and South Africa. The probability of achieving a ratio of ≥125 for the area under the concentration time curve to infinity (AUC0–∞) for the free fraction of gatifloxacin over the MIC (fAUC/MIC) was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. The median AUC0–∞ of 41.2 μg · h/ml decreased on average by 14.3% (90% confidence interval [CI], −90.5% to +61.5%) following multiple 400-mg daily doses. At steady state, 90% of patients achieved an fAUC/MIC of ≥125 only when the MIC was <0.125 μg/ml. We conclude that systemic exposure to gatifloxacin declines with repeated daily 400-mg doses when used together with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide, thus compensating for any initial increase in gatifloxacin levels due to a drug interaction. (The OFLOTUB study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00216385.) PMID:23774436

  4. Programs of Study as a State Policy Mandate: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Personal Pathways to Success Initiative. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Cathy; Drew, Sam F.; Withington, Cairen; Griffith, Cathy; Swiger, Caroline M.; Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Stringfield, Samuel C.; Stipanovic, Natalie; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This executive summary outlines key findings from the final technical report of a five-year study of South Carolina's Personal Pathways to Success Initiative, which was authorized by the state's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) in 2005. The Personal Pathways initiative is a K-16, career-focused school reform model intended to improve…

  5. When Is a Diffusion Profile Not a Diffusion Profile? the Importance of Initial State Assumptions in Diffusion Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. J.; Chamberlain, K. J.; Kahl, M.; Potts, N. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.; Wilson, C. J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, diffusion chronometers have evolved from a niche tool into one of routine application, with more practitioners, new tools and increasingly large datasets. As we expand the horizons of diffusional geochronometry, it is worth taking stock of developments in methodologies and data acquisition, and taking time to revisit the underpinnings of the technique. Data collected as part of recent projects on Campi Flegrei, the Bishop Tuff and Fimmvörðuháls-Eyjafjallajökull are here used to investigate the initial state assumption, an absolutely vital aspect underpinning most diffusional work and one that is rarely evaluated despite its fundamental importance. To illustrate the nature of the problem we consider two widely-used element-mineral systems for felsic and mafic systems, respectively. First, barium and strontium profiles within sanidine crystals, modelled independently, can give strongly contrasting timescales from the same crystal zone. We can reconcile the datasets only for a situation where the initial boundary within the crystal was not a sharp step function, but relatively fuzzy before diffusion onset. This fuzziness effectively starts both chronometers off with an apparent, and false, pre-existing timescale, impacting the slower-diffusing barium much more strongly than the faster-diffusing strontium, yielding thousands of years of non-existent diffusion history. By combining both elements, a starting width of tens of microns can be shown, shortening the true diffusive timescales from tens of thousands of years to hundreds. Second, in olivine, we encounter different growth-related problems. Here, Fe-Mg interdiffusion occurs at a rate comparable to growth, with the compound nature of zonation making it difficult to extract the diffusion component. This requires a treatment of changing boundary conditions and sequential growth to generate the curvature seen in natural data, in order to recover timescales for anything but the outermost

  6. Effect of the Initial Synaptic State on the Probability to Induce Long-Term Potentiation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Michele; De Simone, Giada; Migliore, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are the two major forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity in the mammalian neurons, and are directly related to higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Experimentally, they are characterized by a change in the strength of a synaptic connection induced by repetitive and properly patterned stimulation protocols. Although many important details of the molecular events leading to LTP and LTD are known, experimenters often report problems in using standard induction protocols to obtain consistent results, especially for LTD in vivo. We hypothesize that a possible source of confusion in interpreting the results, from any given experiment on synaptic plasticity, can be the intrinsic limitation of the experimental techniques, which cannot take into account the actual state and peak conductance of the synapses before the conditioning protocol. In this article, we investigate the possibility that the same experimental protocol may result in different consequences (e.g., LTD instead of LTP), according to the initial conditions of the stimulated synapses, and can generate confusing results. Using biophysical models of synaptic plasticity and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, we study how, why, and to what extent the phenomena observed at the soma after induction of LTP/LTD reflects the actual (local) synaptic state. The model and the results suggest a physiologically plausible explanation for why LTD induction is experimentally difficult to obtain. They also suggest experimentally testable predictions on the stimulation protocols that may be more effective. PMID:25762316

  7. Studies of sigma(e+ e- to hadrons) at BaBar using Initial State Radiation (ISR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.F.; /Orsay, LAL

    2007-10-24

    We present a review of BaBar results on e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} hadrons using the initial state radiation technique. Cross sections over the {radical}s range from threshold to 4-5 GeV, with very small point-to-point systematic errors, are presented for the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), 2(K{sup +}K{sup -}), 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})2{pi}{sup 0}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sup +}K{sup -}, and p{bar p} final states. The preliminary results of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} cross sections are also presented.

  8. Health care resource utilization before and after perampanel initiation among patients with epilepsy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward; Laliberté, François; Wang, Zhixiao; Barghout, Victoria; Haider, Batool; Lejeune, Dominique; Germain, Guillaume; Choi, Jiyoon; Wagh, Aneesha; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in health care resource utilization following the initiation of perampanel for the treatment of epilepsy in the United States. Health care claims from Symphony Health's Integrated Dataverse database between December 2012 and November 2015 were analyzed. Patients newly initiated on perampanel, having ≥1 epilepsy (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 345.xx, ICD-10-CM code G40.xxx) or nonfebrile convulsion (ICD-9-CM code 780.39, ICD-10-CM code R56.9) diagnosis, and having ≥6 months of baseline and observation periods were included. Patients <12 years old at perampanel initiation were excluded. Of the 2,508 perampanel patients included in the study, the mean [median] (±standard deviation [SD]) age was 35.8 [34] (±16.0) years and 56.2% were female. The mean [median] (±SD) observation duration was 459.8 [462] (±146.3) days in the postperampanel period. The postperampanel period was associated with significantly lower rates of all health care resource utilization outcomes than the pre-period. For the post- versus pre-period, perampanel users had 42.3 versus 53.8 overall hospitalizations per 100 person-years (rate ratio [RR] = 0.80, p < 0.001) and 1,240.2 versus 1,343.8 outpatient visits per 100 person-years (RR = 0.91, p < 0.001). Epilepsy-related hospitalizations and outpatient visits were 25.2 versus 33.6 per 100 person-years (RR = 0.76, p < 0.001) and 327.0 versus 389.0 per 100 person-years (RR = 0.84, p < 0.001), respectively. Additionally, a significantly lower rate of status epilepticus in the post-period (1.8 events per 100 person-years) was observed compared to the pre-period (4.4 events per 100 person-years; RR = 0.43, p < 0.001). The monthly time trend of hospitalizations showed an increasing trend leading up to the initiation of perampanel, after which the hospitalizations decreased steadily. Use of perampanel for the treatment of epilepsy was

  9. Measurement of initial-state-final-state radiation interference in the processes e+e-→μ+μ-γ and e+e-→π+π-γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L. L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Charge asymmetry in the processes e+e- →μ+μ-γ and e+e- →π+π-γ is measured using 232 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at e+e- center-of-mass energies near 10.58 GeV. An observable is introduced and shown to be very robust against detector asymmetries while keeping a large sensitivity to the physical charge asymmetry that results from the interference between initial- and final-state radiation (FSR). The asymmetry is determined as a function of the invariant mass of the final-state tracks from production threshold to a few GeV /c2 . It is compared to the expectation from QED for e+e- →μ+μ-γ , and from theoretical models for e+e- →π+π-γ . A clear interference pattern is observed in e+e- →π+π-γ , particularly in the vicinity of the f2(1270 ) resonance. The inferred rate of lowest-order FSR production is consistent with the QED expectation for e+e- →μ+μ-γ , and is negligibly small for e+e- →π+π-γ .

  10. Integrating Health into Local Climate Response: Lessons from the U.S. CDC Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Mary C; Fox, Mary A; Kaye, Charlotte; Resnick, Beth

    2017-09-20

    Public health has potential to serve as a frame to convey the urgency of behavior change needed to adapt to a changing climate and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Local governments form the backbone of climate-related public health preparedness. Yet local health agencies are often inadequately prepared and poorly integrated into climate change assessments and plans. We reviewed the climate health profiles of 16 states and two cities participating in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative (CRSCI) that aims to build local capacity to assess and respond to the health impacts of climate change. Following recommendations from a recent expert panel strategic review, we present illustrations of emerging promising practice and future directions. We found that CRSCI has strengthened climate preparedness and response in local public health agencies by identifying critical climate-health impacts and vulnerable populations, and has helped integrate health more fully into broader climate planning. Promising practice was found in all three recommendation areas identified by the expert panel (leveraging partnerships, refining assessment methodologies and enhancing communications), particularly with regard to health impacts of extreme heat. Vast needs remain, however, suggesting the need to disseminate CRSCI experience to non-grantees. In conclusion, the CRSCI program approach and selected activities illustrate a way forward toward robust, targeted local preparedness and response that may serve as a useful example for public health departments in the United States and internationally, particularly at a time of uncertain commitment to climate change agreements at the national level. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1838.

  11. Structure, initial excited-state relaxation, and energy storage of rhodopsin resolved at the multiconfigurational perturbation theory level

    PubMed Central

    Andruniów, Tadeusz; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that a “brute force” quantum chemical calculation based on an ab initio multiconfigurational second order perturbation theory approach implemented in a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics strategy can be applied to the investigation of the excited state of the visual pigment rhodopsin (Rh) with a computational error <5 kcal·mol-1. As a consequence, the simulation of the absorption and fluorescence of Rh and its retinal chromophore in solution allows for a nearly quantitative analysis of the factors determining the properties of the protein environment. More specifically, we demonstrate that the Rh environment is more similar to the “gas phase” than to the solution environment and that the so-called “opsin shift” originates from the inability of the solvent to effectively “shield” the chromophore from its counterion. The same strategy is used to investigate three transient structures involved in the photoisomerization of Rh under the assumption that the protein cavity does not change shape during the reaction. Accordingly, the analysis of the initially relaxed excited-state structure, the conical intersection driving the excited-state decay, and the primary isolable bathorhodopsin intermediate supports a mechanism where the photoisomerization coordinate involves a “motion” reminiscent of the so-called bicycle-pedal reaction coordinate. Most importantly, it is shown that the mechanism of the ∼30 kcal·mol-1 photon energy storage observed for Rh is not consistent with a model based exclusively on the change of the electrostatic interaction of the chromophore with the protein/counterion environment. PMID:15604139

  12. Impact of satellite-based lake surface observations on the initial state of HIRLAM weather forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheyrollah Pour, H.; Duguay, C. R.; Rontu, L.; Eerola, K.; Kurzeneva, E.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT) observations are used to improve the lake surface state in the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM), a three-dimensional numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. Satellite-derived LSWT observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) are first evaluated against in-situ measurements for a selection of large to medium-size lakes during the open-water season. Three experiments were then run over northern Europe for two winters (2010-2011 and 2011-2012), which involved the assimilation of remote-sensing LSWT observations into the HIRLAM analysis. In the baseline experiment, the prognostic lake parameterization inside the forecast model provided the background for the LSWT analysis by the lake parameterizations of the Fresh-water Lake model (FLake) integrated in HIRLAM. No satellite observations were used in this experiment. In the second experiment, remote-sensing observations were included along with the FLake model and in-situ observations. In the third experiment, satellite observations were used to correct the background provided by the previous analysis, excluding the FLake parameterization scheme. Results encourage work to describe better the initial state of the lake surface in NWP models by combining satellite observations and lake parameterizations via advanced data assimilation methods. It has been learned that space-borne observations are beneficial for the description of lake surface state even without parameterizations when FLake alone would have led to too early break-up in spring. In order to utilize the space-borne and in-situ observations along with lake parameterization for the improvement of the weather forecast, methods to connect the analyzed LSWT and ice cover to the prognostic in-lake variables are needed to fully benefit from the space-borne observations.

  13. Regional, State, and Local Initiatives in Nanotechnology: Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop, Held in Washington, DC on 30 September-1 October 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    by the NSET Subcommittee, through the NNCO, and by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration. Cover and book design Book design by...Technology. The workshops were organized as a part of a long-range planning effort for the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), a multi-agency...quality of life through coordi- nation of funding, research, and infrastructure development activities at individual agencies. A key part of the NNI

  14. Smoothing the Path: Changing State Policies to Support Early College High School. Case Studies from Georgia, Ohio, Texas, and Utah. Early College High School Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Smoothing the Path" describes successful state-level strategies and policy lessons that have been learned in four states during the development of schools that integrate secondary and postsecondary education. Statewide efforts in the multi-year Early College High School Initiative, which began in Ohio and Utah in 2002 and in Texas and…

  15. Coherence and Polarization Properties of Far Fields Generated by Quasi-Homogeneous Planar Electromagnetic Sources (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-03

    the explicit dependence of all he parameters on the frequency. In order that the elec- romagnetic Gaussian Schell - model source generated by eans of the...the far field gener- ted by a planar electromagnetic Gaussian Schell - model ource are given by the expressions s1 rs, = xx 2 exp− xx 2 k2 2/2...uniformly polarized, quasi- omogeneous Gaussian Schell - model source, which is haracterized by a cross-spectral density matrix J rs ,rs , whose

  16. Quasi-homogeneous hydrogenation with platinum and palladium nanoparticles stabilized by dendritic core-multishell architectures.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Michael; Keilitz, Juliane; Nowag, Sabrina; Parapat, Riny Y; Haag, Rainer; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2011-05-17

    Platinum and palladium nanoparticles, supported and stabilized by polymeric core-shell architectures, proved to be active catalysts for hydrogenation reactions. Here, two different reactions were used as probes to investigate the influence of the polymeric support: the hydrogenation of α-methyl styrene (AMS) to cumene and the partial hydrogenation of 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD). We found that the stability of the nanoparticles and the rate of reaction are higher in the presence of a hydrophobic octadecyl shell within a three-shell polymer system. The kinetic study of AMS hydrogenation showed much higher activities for palladium nanoparticles than for platinum nanoparticles, and the obtained results (e.g., 35 kJ/mol for the activation energy) are of the same order of magnitude as reported earlier for palladium supported on alumina. A methanol/n-heptane biphasic mixture was tested for catalyst recycling and allowed for highly efficient catalyst separation with very low metal leaching.

  17. Competing feedbacks drive state transitions during initial catchment evolution: Examples from post-mining landscape and ecosystems evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Christoph; Wolfgang, Schaaf; Werner, Gerwin

    2014-05-01

    Within the context of severely disturbed landscapes with little or no ecological memory, such as post-mining landscapes, we propose a simple framework that explains the catchment evolution as a result of competing feedbacks influenced by the initial conditions and the atmospheric drivers such as rainfall intermittency and intensity. The first stage of the evolution is dominated by abiotic feedbacks triggered by rainfall and subsequent fluid flow causing particle mobilisation on the surface and in the subsurface leading to flow concentration or in some instances to densification of surface and subsurface substrates. Subsequently, abiotic-biotic feedbacks start to compete in the sense that biological activity generally stabilizes substrate by preventing particle mobilisation and hence contribute to converting the substrate to a habitat. We suggest that these competing feedbacks may generate alternative stable states in particular under semi-arid and arid climatic conditions, while in temperate often energy limited environments biological process "outcompete" abiotic processes leading to a stable state, in particular from the water balance point of view for comparable geomorphic situations. To illustrate this framework, we provide examples from post-mining landscapes, in which soil, water and vegetation was monitored. In case of arid regions in Australia, we provide evidence that the initial conditions of a mine waste disposal "locked" the system into a state that was limited by water and nutrient storage capacity while at the same time it was stable from a geomorphic point of view for the observation period. The cause of the system to be locked in, is the very high hydraulic conductivity of the substrate, that has not undergone any changes during the first years. In contrast to this case study, we illustrate how this framework explains the evolution of an artificial catchment (Hühnerwasser Catchment) in Lusatia (150 km southeast of Berlin, Germany). During the

  18. Elastic Constants of Solids and Fluids with Initial Pressure via a Unified Approach Based on Equations-of-State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The second and third-order Brugger elastic constants are obtained for liquids and ideal gases having an initial hydrostatic pressure p(sub 1). For liquids the second-order elastic constants are C(sub 11) = A + p(sub 1), C(sub 12) = A -- p(sub 1), and the third-order constants are C(sub 111) = --(B + 5A + 3p(sub 1)), C(sub 112) = --(B + A -- p(sub 1)), and C(sub 123) = A -- B -- p1, where A and B are the Beyer expansion coefficients in the liquid equation of state. For ideal gases the second order constants are C(sub 11) = p(sub 1)gamma + p9sub 1), C(sub 12) = p(sub 1)gamma -- p(sub 1), and the third-order constants are C(sub 111) = p(sub 1)(gamma(2) + 4gamma + 3), C(sub 112) = --p(sub 1)(gamma(2) -- 1), and C(sub 123) = --p(sub 1) (gamma(2) -- 2gamma + 1), where gamma is the ratio of specific heats. The inequality of C(sub 11) and C(sub 12) results in a nonzero shear constant C(sub 44) = (1/2)(C(sub 11) C(sub 12)) = p(sub 1) for both liquids and gases. For water at standard temperature and pressure the ratio of terms p1/A contributing to the second-order constants is approximately 4.3 x 10(-5). For atmospheric gases the ratio of corresponding terms is approximately 0.7. Analytical expressions that include initial stresses are derived for the material 'nonlinearity parameters' associated with harmonic generation and acoustoelasticity for fluids and solids of arbitrary crystal symmetry. The expressions are used to validate the relationships for the elastic constants of fluids.

  19. Elastic Constants of Solids and Fluids with Initial Pressure via a Unified Approach Based on Equations-of-State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The second and third-order Brugger elastic constants are obtained for liquids and ideal gases having an initial hydrostatic pressure p(sub 1). For liquids the second-order elastic constants are C(sub 11) = A + p(sub 1), C(sub 12) = A -- p(sub 1), and the third-order constants are C(sub 111) = --(B + 5A + 3p(sub 1)), C(sub 112) = --(B + A -- p(sub 1)), and C(sub 123) = A -- B -- p1, where A and B are the Beyer expansion coefficients in the liquid equation of state. For ideal gases the second order constants are C(sub 11) = p(sub 1)gamma + p9sub 1), C(sub 12) = p(sub 1)gamma -- p(sub 1), and the third-order constants are C(sub 111) = p(sub 1)(gamma(2) + 4gamma + 3), C(sub 112) = --p(sub 1)(gamma(2) -- 1), and C(sub 123) = --p(sub 1) (gamma(2) -- 2gamma + 1), where gamma is the ratio of specific heats. The inequality of C(sub 11) and C(sub 12) results in a nonzero shear constant C(sub 44) = (1/2)(C(sub 11) C(sub 12)) = p(sub 1) for both liquids and gases. For water at standard temperature and pressure the ratio of terms p1/A contributing to the second-order constants is approximately 4.3 x 10(-5). For atmospheric gases the ratio of corresponding terms is approximately 0.7. Analytical expressions that include initial stresses are derived for the material 'nonlinearity parameters' associated with harmonic generation and acoustoelasticity for fluids and solids of arbitrary crystal symmetry. The expressions are used to validate the relationships for the elastic constants of fluids.

  20. Elastic constants of solids and fluids with initial pressure via a unified approach based on equations-of-state.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, John H

    2014-07-01

    The second and third-order Brugger elastic constants are obtained for liquids and ideal gases having an initial hydrostatic pressure p1. For liquids the second-order elastic constants are C₁₁=A+p₁, C₁₂=A-p₁, and the third-order constants are C₁₁₁=-(B+5A+3p₁), C₁₁₂=-(B+A-p₁), and C₁₂₃=A-B-p₁, where A and B are the Beyer expansion coefficients in the liquid equation of state. For ideal gases the second-order constants are C₁₁=p₁γ+p₁, C₁₂=p₁γ-p₁, and the third-order constants are C₁₁₁=-p₁(γ(2)+4γ+3), C₁₁₂=-p₁(γ(2)-1), and C₁₂₃=-p₁ (γ(2)-2γ+1), where γ is the ratio of specific heats. The inequality of C₁₁ and C₁₂ results in a nonzero shear constant C₄₄=(1/2)(C₁₁-C₁₂)=p₁ for both liquids and gases. For water at standard temperature and pressure the ratio of terms p₁/A contributing to the second-order constants is approximately 4.3×10(-5). For atmospheric gases the ratio of corresponding terms is approximately 0.7. Analytical expressions that include initial stresses are derived for the material 'nonlinearity parameters' associated with harmonic generation and acoustoelasticity for fluids and solids of arbitrary crystal symmetry. The expressions are used to validate the relationships for the elastic constants of fluids.

  1. Initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth in a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, A.; Abbot, D. S.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Marotzke, J.

    2010-09-01

    We study the initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth (635 million years before present) with the most sophisticated atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ever used for this purpose, ECHAM5/MPI-OM. A comparison with a pre-industrial control climate shows that the change of surface boundary conditions from present-day to Marinoan, including a shift of continents to low latitudes, induces a global mean cooling of 4.6 K. Two thirds of this cooling can be attributed to increased planetary albedo, the remaining one third to a weaker greenhouse effect. The Marinoan Snowball Earth bifurcation point for pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide is between 95.5 and 96% of the present-day total solar irradiance (TSI), whereas a previous study with the same model found that it was between 91 and 94% for present-day surface boundary conditions. A Snowball Earth for TSI set to its Marinoan value (94% of the present-day TSI) is prevented by quadrupling carbon dioxide with respect to its pre-industrial level. A zero-dimensional energy balance model is used to predict the Snowball Earth bifurcation point from only the equilibrium global mean ocean potential temperature for present-day TSI. We do not find stable states with sea-ice cover above 55%, and land conditions are such that glaciers could not grow with sea-ice cover of 55%. Therefore, none of our simulations qualifies as a "slushball" solution. In summary, our results contradict previous claims that Snowball Earth initiation would require "extreme" forcings.

  2. The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative: A collaborative approach to assessing, evaluating, and advancing the state of the field

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Christina M; Hoover, Mark D; Harper, Stacey L

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative (NDCI), a project of the National Cancer Informatics Program Nanotechnology Working Group (NCIP NanoWG), explores the critical aspect of data curation within the development of informatics approaches to understanding nanomaterial behavior. Data repositories and tools for integrating and interrogating complex nanomaterial datasets are gaining widespread interest, with multiple projects now appearing in the US and the EU. Even in these early stages of development, a single common aspect shared across all nanoinformatics resources is that data must be curated into them. Through exploration of sub-topics related to all activities necessary to enable, execute, and improve the curation process, the NDCI will provide a substantive analysis of nanomaterial data curation itself, as well as a platform for multiple other important discussions to advance the field of nanoinformatics. This article outlines the NDCI project and lays the foundation for a series of papers on nanomaterial data curation. The NDCI purpose is to: 1) present and evaluate the current state of nanomaterial data curation across the field on multiple specific data curation topics, 2) propose ways to leverage and advance progress for both individual efforts and the nanomaterial data community as a whole, and 3) provide opportunities for similar publication series on the details of the interactive needs and workflows of data customers, data creators, and data analysts. Initial responses from stakeholder liaisons throughout the nanoinformatics community reveal a shared view that it will be critical to focus on integration of datasets with specific orientation toward the purposes for which the individual resources were created, as well as the purpose for integrating multiple resources. Early acknowledgement and undertaking of complex topics such as uncertainty, reproducibility, and interoperability is proposed as an important path to addressing key challenges

  3. Title VII and the development and promotion of national initiatives in training primary care clinicians in the United States.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ardis K; Reynolds, P Preston; Kahn, Norman B; Sherwood, Roger A; Pascoe, John M; Goroll, Allan H; Wilson, Modena E H; DeWitt, Thomas G; Rich, Eugene C

    2008-11-01

    The Title VII, Section 747 (Title VII) legislation, which authorizes the Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry grant program, provides statutory authority to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to award contracts and cooperative agreements aimed at enhancing the quality of primary care training in the United States.More than 35 contracts and cooperative agreements have been issued by HRSA with Title VII federal funds, most often to national organizations promoting the training of physician assistants and medical students and representing the primary care disciplines of family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics. These activities have influenced generalist medicine through three mechanisms: (1) building collaboration among the primary care disciplines and between primary care and specialty medicine, (2) strengthening primary care generally through national initiatives designed to develop and implement new models of primary care training, and (3) enhancing the quality of primary care training in specific disease areas determined to be of national importance.The most significant outcomes of the Title VII contracts awarded to national primary care organizations are increased collaboration and enhanced innovation in ambulatory training for students, residents, and faculty. Overall, generalist competencies and education in new content areas have been the distinguishing features of these initiatives. This effort has enhanced not only generalist training but also the general medical education of all students, including future specialists, because so much of the generalist competency agenda is germane to the general medical education mission.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  4. Initial Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Elderly Colorectal Cancer Patients: Patterns of Care in Italy and the United States

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a major component of health-care expenditures in most developed countries. The costs of cancer care are expected to increase due to rising incidence (as the population ages) and increasing use of targeted anticancer therapies. However, epidemiological analysis of patterns of care may be required prior to empirically well-grounded cost analyses. Additionally, comparisons of care between health-care delivery systems and countries can identify opportunities to improve practice. They can also increase understanding of patient outcomes and economic consequences of differences in policies related to cancer screening, treatment, and programs of care. In this study, we compared patterns of colorectal cancer treatment during the first year following diagnosis in two cohorts of elderly patients from some areas of Italy and the United States using cancer registry linked to administrative data. We evaluated hospital use, initial treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation), and timeliness of surgery and adjuvant therapy, taking into account patient characteristics and clinical features, such as stage at diagnosis and the cancer subsite. We observed greater use of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III and IV colon cancer patients and adjuvant therapy in all stages of rectal cancer patients in the US cohort. We found a higher rate of open surgeries in the Italian cohort, a similar rate of hospitalization, but a higher number of hospital days in the Italian cohort. However, in spite of structural differences between the United States and Italy in health-care organization and delivery as well as in data collection, patterns of care and the timing of care in the year after diagnosis are generally similar among patients within stage of disease at diagnosis. Comparative studies of the costs associated with patterns of cancer care will be important for future research. PMID:23962512

  5. Epigenetic states of cells of origin and tumor evolution drive tumor-initiating cell phenotype and tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kin-Hoe; Shin, Dong-Mi; Jenkins, Molly H; Miller, Emily E; Shih, David J; Choi, Seungbum; Low, Benjamin E; Philip, Vivek; Rybinski, Brad; Bronson, Roderick T; Taylor, Michael D; Yun, Kyuson

    2014-09-01

    A central confounding factor in the development of targeted therapies is tumor cell heterogeneity, particularly in tumor-initiating cells (TIC), within clinically identical tumors. Here, we show how activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in neural stem and progenitor cells creates a foundation for tumor cell evolution to heterogeneous states that are histologically indistinguishable but molecularly distinct. In spontaneous medulloblastomas that arise in Patched (Ptch)(+/-) mice, we identified three distinct tumor subtypes. Through cell type-specific activation of the SHH pathway in vivo, we determined that different cells of origin evolved in unique ways to generate these subtypes. Moreover, TICs in each subtype had distinct molecular and cellular phenotypes. At the bulk tumor level, the three tumor subtypes could be distinguished by a 465-gene signature and by differential activation levels of the ERK and AKT pathways. Notably, TICs from different subtypes were differentially sensitive to SHH or AKT pathway inhibitors, highlighting new mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies. In summary, our results show how evolutionary processes act on distinct cells of origin to contribute to tumoral heterogeneity, at both bulk tumor and TIC levels.

  6. Effect of initial-state target polarization on the single ionization of helium by 1-keV electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Li, Xia; Miao, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Xiang-Fu

    2012-07-01

    We report new results of triple differential cross sections for the single ionization of helium by 1-KeV electron impact at the ejection energy of 10 eV. Investigations have been made for both the perpendicular plane and the plane perpendicular to the momentum transfer geometries. The present calculation is based on the three-Coulomb wave function. Here we have also incorporated the effect of target polarization in the initial state. A comparison is made between the present calculation with the results of other theoretical methods and a recent experiment [Dürr M, Dimopoulou C, Najjari B, Dorn A, Bartschat K, Bray I, Fursa D V, Chen Z, Madison D H and Ullrich J 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 032717]. At an impact energy of 1 KeV, the target polarization is found to induce a substantial change of the cross section for the ionization process. We observe that the effect of target polarization plays a dominant role in deciding the shape of triple differential cross sections.

  7. Parents' perceptions of timing of initiation of sexuality discussion with adolescents in Anambra State, South Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emelumadu, O F; Ezeama, N N; Ifeadike, C O; Ubajaka, C F; Adogu, P O U; Umeh, U; Nwamoh, U N; Ukegbu, A U; Onyeonoro, U U

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed at determining the perception of the timing and practice of sexuality discussion among parents in South Eastern Nigeria. A cross-sectional, descriptive, community-based study. The study was carried out in 3 randomly selected Local Government Areas in Anambra State, South Eastern Nigeria. The study participants were parents with adolescent children resident in the study areas for at least 2 years. Most parents opined that sexuality discussion should be initiated after puberty. Only 20% of them discussed reproductive health issues often with their adolescents, while another 20% never discussed such issues with their adolescent children. Topics most commonly discussed bordered on the adverse consequences of sex rather than measures for preventing them. About half of parents were willing to discuss contraception with their adolescent child. Predictors of parent-child communication were age, gender, and educational status. Common reasons for low parental involvement in sexuality discussions were due to their lack of capacity and the perception that discussing such issues before puberty is ill timed. Therefore, measures should be taken to improve the capacity of parents to engage in such conversations to provide sexuality information to their teens. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. GR@PPA 2.8: Initial-state jet matching for weak-boson production processes at hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2012-04-01

    The initial-state jet matching method introduced in our previous studies has been applied to the event generation of single W and Z production processes and diboson (WW, WZ and ZZ) production processes at hadron collisions in the framework of the GR@PPA event generator. The generated events reproduce the transverse momentum spectra of weak bosons continuously in the entire kinematical region. The matrix elements (ME) for hard interactions are still at the tree level. As in previous versions, the decays of weak bosons are included in the matrix elements. Therefore, spin correlations and phase-space effects in the decay of weak bosons are exact at the tree level. The program package includes custom-made parton shower programs as well as ME-based hard interaction generators in order to achieve self-consistent jet matching. The generated events can be passed to general-purpose event generators to make the simulation proceed down to the hadron level. Catalogue identifier: ADRH_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRH_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 112 146 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 596 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran; with some included libraries coded in C and C++ Computer: All Operating system: Any UNIX-like system RAM: 1.6 Mega bytes at minimum Classification: 11.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRH_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 665 External routines: Bash and Perl for the setup, and CERNLIB, ROOT, LHAPDF, PYTHIA according to the user's choice. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No, this version supports only a part of the processes included in the previous versions. Nature of problem: We

  9. Laser angle-resolved photoemission as a probe of initial state kz dispersion, final-state band gaps, and spin texture of Dirac states in the Bi2Te3 topological insulator

    DOE PAGES

    Ärrälä, Minna; Hafiz, Hasnain; Mou, Daixiang; ...

    2016-10-27

    Here, we have obtained angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra from single crystals of the topological insulator material Bi2Te3 using tunable laser spectrometer. The spectra were collected for eleven different photon energies ranging from 5.57 to 6.70 eV for incident light polarized linearly along two different in-plane directions. Parallel first-principles, fully relativistic computations of photo-intensities were carried out using the experimental geometry within the framework of the one-step model of photoemission. Good overall accord between theory and experiment is used to gain insight into how properties of the initial and final state band structures as well as those of the topological surfacemore » states and their spin-textures are reflected in the laser-ARPES spectra. In conclusion, our analysis reveals that laser-ARPES is sensitive to both the initial state kz dispersion and the presence of delicate gaps in the final state electronic spectrum.« less

  10. INDEX - A New United States and Republic of Indonesia Partnership For Exploration of Indonesia's Seas: 2010 Initial Results Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, S. R.; Wirasantosa, S.; Baker, E. T.; Brainard, R. E.; Butterfield, D.; Djamaluddin, R.; Fryer, P.; Holden, J.; McDonough, J.; Potter, J.; Russell, C. W.; Shank, T. M.; Tunnicliffe, V.

    2010-12-01

    INDEX - A New United States and Republic of Indonesia Partnership For Exploration of Indonesia’s Seas: 2010 Initial Results Overview S. Hammond, S. Wirasantosa, E. Baker, R. Brainard, D. Butterfield, R. Djamaluddin, P. Fryer, J. Holden, J. McDonough, J. Potter, C. Russell, T. Shank, V. Tunnicliffe Through a Memorandum of Understanding between the Republic of Indonesia’s (RI) Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,the NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research has begun a formal 5-year partnership with the RI’s Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research for the purpose of exploring Indonesia’s seas. This summer, a US and Indonesian science and technical team, using the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer and the RI Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology's ship Baruna Jaya IV, conducted the first year’s cruises to areas in the Sulawesi and Maluku seas. These were the maiden international expeditions for the Okeanos Explorer (EX) and the first international implementation of the ship’s broad-band, high-definition video “telepresence” system which enabled members of an onshore science and technical team to participate in real-time from Exploration Command Centers in the US and in Jakarta. The EX operated in two areas, one along the western flanks of the Sangihe Arc and the other north of the Talaud Islands. The principal objectives of the cruises were to, (1) produce high-resolution bathymetric maps of both areas using the EX’s EM302 sonar, (2) conduct CTD/rosette surveys of the water column in areas that appeared to have the potential for volcanic and/or hydrothermal activity, and (3) use a two-body ROV system to acquire high-definition video of selected seafloor features and benthic fauna. Among the most interesting features acoustically and visually mapped along the western flank of the Sangihe Arc were several discrete volcanic cones with varying surficial morphologies and

  11. The effect of initial number of trees per acre and thinning densities on timber yields from red pine plantations in the Lake States.

    Treesearch

    Allen L. Lundgren

    1981-01-01

    Describes an analysis of initial density and subsequent thinning options for red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantations in the Lake States. Results showed that the initial number of established trees per acres has a major impact on the amount and quality of timber product yields, with 200 trees per acre (500/ha) thinned to 120 square feet of basal area per acre (27.5...

  12. Alabama's Education Coalition Focuses on Supporting the State's Math, Science and Technology Initiative and on Building Distance Learning Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denson, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Alabama Math Science Technology Educational Coalition (AMSTEC) was formed as a non-profit after a 1998 NASA Linking Leaders program brought in education and corporate leaders to address systemic education reform in Alabama public schools. AMSTEC was instrumental in the creation of the Alabama Math Science Technology Initiative (AMSTI), a K-12 program designed using data from national and international research and local teacher survey. In the face of dwindling government support in a state ranked last in education funding, AMSTEC believes that its best hope for improved STEM education lies in strengthening its community/industry partnerships and building upon the Department of Education's newly created AMSTI program. NASA's GLOBE program is the primary earth science education component being integrated into AMSTI. AMSTI is structured to provide teachers with (1) the materials, equipment, technology and supplies necessary to deliver high quality, inquiry-based instruction; (2) professional development linked directly to the educational resources with the intent of strengthening content knowledge, instructional strategies, and use of assessment tools; and (3) on-site support and mentoring throughout the year in the interest of achieving these goals. Roles for community partners to support these objectives far exceed that of mere funding - especially in the area of mentoring and professional development. Currently, AMSTEC consists of 100+ members including classroom teachers and district officers, education department representatives from higher educational institutions, policy makers and administrators, and government and industry representatives. AMSTEC remains partially tied to NASA fiscally and is administratively housed by the National Space Science and Technology Center's Earth System Science Center. AMSTEC's partnership emphasis is focused on increasing corporate and industry participation to support the implementation of AMSTI and its hub

  13. Using National and State Assessments To Evaluate the Performance of State Education Systems: Learning from the Cases of Kentucky and Maine. Research Report. Statewide Systemic Initiatives (SSI) Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung; McIntire, Walter G.

    This study examined two major questions: do national and state assessments provide consistent information on the performance of state education systems, and what accounts for discrepancies between national and state assessment results if they are found? Data came from national and state assessments in grade 4 and grade 8 mathematics from 1992 to…

  14. The Hard Work of Improving Outcomes for Mothers and Babies: Obstetric and Perinatal Quality Improvement Initiatives Make a Difference at the Hospital, State, and National Levels.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Patrick D; Sabol, Bethany A; Lee King, Patricia Ann; Caughey, Aaron B; Borders, Ann E B

    2017-09-01

    Quality improvement efforts are an increasingly expanding focus for perinatal care providers across the United States. From successful hospital-level initiatives, there has been a growing effort to use and implement quality improvement work in substantive and meaningful ways. This article summarizes the foundations of maternal-focused, birth-focused, and neonatal-focused quality improvement initiatives to highlight the underpinnings and potential future directions of current state-level perinatal quality care collaboratives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of the transition state in polyatomic reactions: Initial state-selected reaction probabilities of the H + CH{sub 4} → H{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Ralph Manthe, Uwe

    2014-11-07

    Full-dimensional calculations of initial state-selected reaction probabilities on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) have been communicated recently [R. Welsch and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 051102 (2014)]. These calculations use the quantum transition state concept, the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach, and graphics processing units to speed up the potential evaluation. Here further results of these calculations and an extended analysis are presented. State-selected reaction probabilities are given for many initial ro-vibrational states. The role of the vibrational states of the activated complex is analyzed in detail. It is found that rotationally cold methane mainly reacts via the ground state of the activated complex while rotationally excited methane mostly reacts via H–H–CH{sub 3}-bending excited states of the activated complex. Analyzing the different contributions to the reactivity of the vibrationally states of methane, a complex pattern is found. Comparison with initial state-selected reaction probabilities computed on the semi-empirical Jordan-Gilbert PES reveals the dependence of the results on the specific PES.

  16. Nailing Jello to the Wall. Forum: What Progress Are the States Making in Initiating Higher Education Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Dan

    The relationship between state government and higher education institutions is discussed. It is noted that, by and large, state governments have left colleges alone until the past two decades. State intrusions have taken the form of accountability statutes, budgeting, performance audits, program review, minimum standards, sunset laws, and more…

  17. Evidence of the Adoption and Implementation of a Statewide Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative in the New York State WIC Program: The "NY Fit WIC" Process Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekhobo, Jackson P.; Egglefield, Katherine; Edmunds, Lynn S.; Shackman, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluations are critical in determining whether outcome evaluations are warranted. This study assessed the extent to which a childhood obesity prevention initiative, "NY Fit WIC", was adopted and implemented by the New York State Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Process data came from…

  18. L2 vs. L3 Initial State: A Comparative Study of the Acquisition of French DPs by Vietnamese Monolinguals and Cantonese-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Yan-Kit Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the initial state of second language acquisition (L2A) and third language acquisition (L3A) from the generative linguistics perspective. We examine the acquisition of the Determiner Phrase (DP) by two groups of beginning French learners: an L2 group (native speakers of Vietnamese who do not speak any English) and an L3 group…

  19. Whose Knowledge, Whose Values? The Contribution of Local Knowledge to Education Policy Processes: A Case Study of Research Development Initiatives in the Small State of Saint Lucia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Keith; Crossley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper draws upon a case study of education in the small Caribbean state of Saint Lucia (population 154,000) to examine how local knowledge and values can influence the education policy process. It is argued that recent research development initiatives have strengthened the ability of Saint Lucia to mediate international education agendas to…

  20. Adapting to Changing Conditions: Accessing State Tobacco Settlement Revenue for Out-of-School Time and Community School Initiatives. Strategy Brief, Volume 1, Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Carol; Wegener, Victoria

    Noting that out-of-school time and community school initiatives are operating in a rapidly changing policy context and that tobacco settlement funds provide a flexible, significant inflow of new state revenue, this strategy brief provides policymakers, community leaders, and program developers with background information on the tobacco settlement…

  1. Programs of Study as a State Policy Mandate: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Personal Pathways to Success Initiative. Final Technical Report: Major Findings and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Cathy; Drew, Sam F.; Withington, Cairen; Griffith, Cathy; Swiger, Caroline M.; Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Stringfield, Samuel C.; Stipanovic, Natalie; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This is the final technical report from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education's (NRCCTE's) five-year longitudinal study of South Carolina's Personal Pathway to Success initiative, which was authorized by the state's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) in 2005. NRCCTE-affiliated researchers at the National…

  2. L2 vs. L3 Initial State: A Comparative Study of the Acquisition of French DPs by Vietnamese Monolinguals and Cantonese-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Yan-Kit Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the initial state of second language acquisition (L2A) and third language acquisition (L3A) from the generative linguistics perspective. We examine the acquisition of the Determiner Phrase (DP) by two groups of beginning French learners: an L2 group (native speakers of Vietnamese who do not speak any English) and an L3 group…

  3. UCAN: A Four-State Rural Systemic Initiative. UCAN Measures of Progress toward Full Implementation: A Guide for Schools/Communities Involved in Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LLamas, Vicente J.

    The Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico-Rural Systemic Initiative (UCAN-RSI) supports standards-based reform in mathematics, technology, and science education for rural students in its states. This guide provides UCAN schools and communities with a set of measures that describe the location of a school/community on the developmental continuum of…

  4. Evidence of the Adoption and Implementation of a Statewide Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative in the New York State WIC Program: The "NY Fit WIC" Process Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekhobo, Jackson P.; Egglefield, Katherine; Edmunds, Lynn S.; Shackman, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluations are critical in determining whether outcome evaluations are warranted. This study assessed the extent to which a childhood obesity prevention initiative, "NY Fit WIC", was adopted and implemented by the New York State Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Process data came from…

  5. Librarian-Initiated Publications Discovery: How Do Digital Depository Librarians Discover and Select Web-Based Government Publications for State Digital Depositories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chi-Shiou; Eschenfelder, Kristin R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of librarian initiated publications discovery (LIPD) in U.S. state digital depository programs using the OCLC Digital Archive to preserve web-based government publications for permanent public access. This paper describes a model of LIPD processes based on empirical investigations of four OCLC DA-based digital…

  6. Programs of Study as a State Policy Mandate: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Personal Pathways to Success Initiative. Technical Appendix B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Cathy; Drew, Sam F.; Withington, Cairen; Griffith, Cathy; Swiger, Caroline M.; Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Stringfield, Samuel C.; Stipanovic, Natalie; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This Technical Appendix discusses how researchers from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) conducted the five-year longitudinal study of South Carolina's Personal Pathway to Success initiative, which was authorized by the state's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) in 2005, and how they defined and…

  7. The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative: A Collaborative Approach to Assessing, Evaluating, and Advancing the State of the Field

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative (NDCI) explores the critical aspect of data curation within the development of informatics approaches to understanding nanomaterial behavior. Data repositories and tools for integrating and interrogating complex nanomaterial datasets are...

  8. The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative: A Collaborative Approach to Assessing, Evaluating, and Advancing the State of the Field

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative (NDCI) explores the critical aspect of data curation within the development of informatics approaches to understanding nanomaterial behavior. Data repositories and tools for integrating and interrogating complex nanomaterial datasets are...

  9. Coriolis coupling effects on the initial-state-resolved dynamics of the N(2D)+H2-->NH+H reaction.

    PubMed

    Defazio, Paolo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2007-11-28

    We present Coriolis coupling effects on the initial-state-resolved dynamics of the insertion reaction N((2)D)+H(2)(X (1)Sigma(g) (+))-->NH(X (3)Sigma(-) and a (1)Delta)+H((2)S), without and with nonadiabatic Renner-Teller (RT) interactions between the NH(2) X (2)B(1) and A (2)A(1) electronic states. We report coupled-channel (CC) Hamiltonian matrix elements, which take into account both Coriolis and RT couplings, use the real wave-packet and flux methods for calculating initial-state-resolved reaction probabilities, and contrast CC with centrifugal-sudden (CS) results. Without RT interactions, Coriolis effects are rather small up to J=40, and the CS approximation can be safely employed for calculating initial-state-resolved, integral cross sections. On the other hand, RT effects are associated with rather large Coriolis couplings, mainly near the linearity of NH(2), and the accuracy of the CS approximation thus breaks down at high collision energies, when the reaction starts on the excited A (2)A(1) surface. We also present the CC-RT distribution of the X (3)Sigma(-) and a (1)Delta electronic states of the NH products.

  10. The FDA Unapproved Drugs Initiative: An Observational Study of the Consequences for Drug Prices and Shortages in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Dhruva, Sanket S; Fox, Erin R; Ross, Joseph S

    2017-10-01

    Hundreds of drug products are currently marketed in the United States without approval from the FDA. The 2006 Unapproved Drugs Initiative (UDI) requires manufacturers to remove these drug products from the market or obtain FDA approval by demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. Once the FDA acts against an unapproved drug, fewer manufacturers remain in the market, potentially enabling drug price increases and greater susceptibility to drug shortages. There is a need for systematic study of the UDI's effect on prices and shortages of all targeted drugs. To examine the clinical evidence for approval and association with prices and shortages of previously unapproved prescription drugs after being addressed by the UDI. Previously unapproved prescription drugs that faced UDI regulatory action or with at least 1 product that received FDA approval through manufacturers' voluntary compliance with the UDI between 2006 and 2015 were identified. The clinical evidence was categorized as either newly conducted clinical trials or use of previously published literature and/or bioequivalence studies to demonstrate safety and efficacy. We determined the change in average wholesale price, presence of shortage, and duration of shortage for each drug during the 2 years before and after UDI regulatory action or approval through voluntary compliance. Between 2006 and 2015, 34 previously unapproved prescription drugs were addressed by the UDI. Nearly 90% of those with a drug product that received FDA approval were supported by literature reviews or bioequivalence studies, not new clinical trial evidence. Among the 26 drugs with available pricing data, average wholesale price during the 2 years before and after voluntary approval or UDI action increased by a median of 37% (interquartile range [IQR] = 23%-204%; P < 0.001). The number of drugs in shortage increased from 17 (50.0%) to 25 (73.5%) during the 2 years before and after, respectively (P = 0.046). The median shortage

  11. First- through Eighth-Grade Retention Rates for All 50 States: A New Method and Initial Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Saliba, Jim

    2012-01-01

    How many students repeat a grade each year? How do retention rates vary across states and over time? Despite extensive research on the predictors and consequences of grade retention, there is no systematic way to quantify state-level retention rates; even national estimates rely on imperfect proxy measures. We present a conceptually simple…

  12. State-to-state photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide ({nu}{sub 2}=0,1|JlM). II. The effect of initial bending on coherence of S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brom, Alrik J. van den; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2005-10-22

    Photodissociation studies using ion imaging are reported, measuring the coherence of the polarization of the S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) fragment from the photolysis of single-quantum state-selected carbonyl sulfide (OCS) at 223 and 230 nm. A hexapole state-selector focuses a molecular beam of OCS parent molecules in the ground state ({nu}{sub 2}=0 vertical bar JM=10) or in the first excited bending state ({nu}{sub 2}=1 vertical bar JlM=111). At 230 nm photolysis the Im[a{sub 1}{sup (1p}{sub arallel}{sup ,perpendicular})] moment for the fast S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) channel increases by about 50% when the initial OCS parent state changes from the vibrationless ground state to the first excited bending state. No dependence on the initial bending state is found for photolysis at 223 nm. We observe separate rings in the slow channel of the velocity distribution of S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) correlating to single CO(J) rotational states. The additional available energy for photolysis at 223 nm is found to be channeled mostly into the CO(J) rotational motion. An improved value for the OC-S bond energy D{sub 0}=4.292 eV is reported.

  13. Leadership for Student Learning: Recognizing the State's Role in Public Education. School Leadership for the 21st Century Initiative: A Report of the Task Force on State Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC.

    Historically states are seen as more comfortable with narrowly focused rules, regulation, and monitoring responsibilities than with broad change. Currently states face revolutionary new arrangements for financing education, overseeing federal commitments, and providing fair and meaningful standards for educational performance. The major…

  14. Building analytic capacity, facilitating partnerships, and promoting data use in state health agencies: a distance-based workforce development initiative applied to maternal and child health epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Kristin M; Kroelinger, Charlan D; Rosenberg, Deborah; Barfield, Wanda D

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the methodology, partnerships, and products developed as a result of a distance-based workforce development initiative to improve analytic capacity among maternal and child health (MCH) epidemiologists in state health agencies. This effort was initiated by the Centers for Disease Control's MCH Epidemiology Program and faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago to encourage and support the use of surveillance data by MCH epidemiologists and program staff in state agencies. Beginning in 2005, distance-based training in advanced analytic skills was provided to MCH epidemiologists. To support participants, this model of workforce development included: lectures about the practical application of innovative epidemiologic methods, development of multidisciplinary teams within and across agencies, and systematic, tailored technical assistance The goal of this initiative evolved to emphasize the direct application of advanced methods to the development of state data products using complex sample surveys, resulting in the articles published in this supplement to MCHJ. Innovative methods were applied by participating MCH epidemiologists, including regional analyses across geographies and datasets, multilevel analyses of state policies, and new indicator development. Support was provided for developing cross-state and regional partnerships and for developing and publishing the results of analytic projects. This collaboration was successful in building analytic capacity, facilitating partnerships and promoting surveillance data use to address state MCH priorities, and may have broader application beyond MCH epidemiology. In an era of decreasing resources, such partnership efforts between state and federal agencies and academia are essential for promoting effective data use.

  15. Determination of the effects of initial glucose on the production of α-amylase from Penicillium sp. under solid-state and submerged fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ertan (İnceoğlu), Figen; Balkan, Bilal; Yarkın, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    The effects of catabolite repression of initial glucose on the synthesis of α-amylase from Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium griseofulvum were investigated under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) systems. The results obtained from either fermentation were compared with each other. In the SmF system, initial glucose concentration above 10 mg/mL completely repressed the production of α-amylase from P. chrysogenum and P. griseofulvum. However, the repression in the SSF system was not complete, even when the glucose level was raised to 160 mg/g. PMID:26019493

  16. Initial excited-state structural dynamics of 6-substituted uracil derivatives: femtosecond angle and bond lengthening dynamics in pyrimidine nucleobase photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Teimoory, Faranak; Loppnow, Glen R

    2014-12-26

    Substituents on the pyrimidine ring of nucleobases appear to play a major role in determining their initial excited-state structural dynamics and resulting photochemistry. To better understand the determinants of nucleobase initial excited-state structural dynamics, we have measured the absorption and resonance Raman excitation profiles of 6-deuterouracil (6-d-U) and 6-methyluracil (6-MeU). Simulation of the resonance Raman excitation profiles and absorption spectrum with a self-consistent, time-dependent formalism shows the effect of the deuterium and methyl group on the photochemically active internal coordinates, i.e. C5C6 stretch and C5X and C6X bends. The methyl group on either the C5 or C6 position of uracil equally increases the excited-state reorganization energies along the C5C6 stretch. However, a lower reorganization energy of the C5X + C6X bends in 6-MeU than uracil and 5-MeU shows that C6 methyl substituents reduce the bending reorganization energy. In addition, deuterium substitution at either C5 or C6 has a much smaller effect on the initial excited-state structural dynamics than methyl substitution, consistent with a mass effect. These results will be discussed in light of the resulting photochemistry of pyrimidine nucleobases.

  17. Child-Initiated Pedagogies: Moving toward Democratically Appropriate Practices in Finland, England, Estonia, and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo; Robertson, Leena; Barbour, Nancy; Pukk, Maarika

    2016-01-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child calls for children to be treated as human beings with a distinct set of rights, instead of as passive objects of care. They can and should be agents in their own lives. Child-initiated pedagogy recognizes this by respecting children's individual and collective views, interests, and motivations.…

  18. Electromagnetic radiation as a probe of the initial state and of viscous dynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujanovic, Gojko; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Luzum, Matthew; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The penetrating nature of electromagnetic signals makes them suitable probes to explore the properties of the strongly interacting medium created in relativistic nuclear collisions. We examine the effects of the initial conditions and shear relaxation time on the spectra and flow coefficients of electromagnetic probes, using an event-by-event 3+1-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic simulation (music).

  19. From Homes to Classrooms to Workrooms: State Initiatives to Meet the Needs of the Changing American Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachar, Sally F.; And Others

    As chair of the National Governors' Association Committee on Human Resources, Governor John R. McKernan, Jr., launched the initiative "From Classrooms to Workrooms: Meeting the Needs of the Changing American Family" in the summer of 1991 to examine the evolving role of the American family in society. This publication details programs…

  20. Child-Initiated Pedagogies: Moving toward Democratically Appropriate Practices in Finland, England, Estonia, and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo; Robertson, Leena; Barbour, Nancy; Pukk, Maarika

    2016-01-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child calls for children to be treated as human beings with a distinct set of rights, instead of as passive objects of care. They can and should be agents in their own lives. Child-initiated pedagogy recognizes this by respecting children's individual and collective views, interests, and motivations.…