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Sample records for queen cell virus

  1. New evidence that Deformed Wing Virus and Black Queen Cell Virus are Multi-host pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The host-range breadth of pathogens can have important consequences for pathogens’ long term evolution and virulence, and play critical roles in the emergence and spread of the new diseases. Black queen cell virus (BQCV) and Deformed wing virus (DWV) are the two most common and prevalent viruses in...

  2. [Research Progress in Black Queen Cell Virus Causing Disease].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Jian; Song, Zhanyun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xianghui; Sui, Jiachen; Wang, Zhenguo; Mou, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In nature, honeybees are the most important pollinators. They play a vital role in both protecting the diversity of natural ecosystems, and maintaining the yield-improving effects of agroecosystems. But in recent years, epidemic disease in bees has caused huge losses. Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV) is a bee pathogen that was first reported in 1955. It mainly infects bee larvae and pupae, making their bodies turn dark and black, and causing a massive decrease in the bee population. More specifically, the virus makes the exterior of the cell walls in the larvae and pupae turn black. BQCV is a seasonal epidemic, spread by means horizontal and vertical transmission, and is often unapparent. BQCV not only infects a variety of bee species, but also spiders, centipedes and other arthropods. It can also be coinfected with other honeybee viruses. In recent years, research has shown that the Nosema intestinal parasite plays an important role in BQCV transmission and bees carrying Nosema that become infected with BQCV have increased mortality. Here we summarize current research on the incidence, prevalence, geographical distribution and transmission of BQCV. PMID:26470541

  3. [Symptomatic Black Queen Cell Virus infection of drone brood in Hessian apiaries].

    PubMed

    Siede, Reinhold; Büchler, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    The Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV) can affect brood of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). In general queen cells are endangered showing dark coloured cell walls as typical symptoms. Worker- and dronebrood can be infected by BQCV but normally without clinical symptoms. This paper describes for the first time a symptomatic BQCV-infection of diseased drone brood found on two bee yards in Hessen/Germany in 2001. The drone larvae were seriously damaged and some of them were dead. Samples of the affected brood were tested for BQCV by the PCR detection method. A BQCV specific nucleic acid fragment was found. The PCR product were sequenced and aligned with the relevant GenBank entry. At the nucleic acid level as well as at the deduced protein level the isolate showed a high similarity with the south african isolate noted in GenBank.

  4. [Symptomatic Black Queen Cell Virus infection of drone brood in Hessian apiaries].

    PubMed

    Siede, Reinhold; Büchler, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    The Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV) can affect brood of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). In general queen cells are endangered showing dark coloured cell walls as typical symptoms. Worker- and dronebrood can be infected by BQCV but normally without clinical symptoms. This paper describes for the first time a symptomatic BQCV-infection of diseased drone brood found on two bee yards in Hessen/Germany in 2001. The drone larvae were seriously damaged and some of them were dead. Samples of the affected brood were tested for BQCV by the PCR detection method. A BQCV specific nucleic acid fragment was found. The PCR product were sequenced and aligned with the relevant GenBank entry. At the nucleic acid level as well as at the deduced protein level the isolate showed a high similarity with the south african isolate noted in GenBank. PMID:12680279

  5. The Effects of Pesticides on Queen Rearing and Virus Titers in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Chen, Yanping; Simonds, Roger

    2013-01-01

    The effects of sublethal pesticide exposure on queen emergence and virus titers were examined. Queen rearing colonies were fed pollen with chlorpyrifos (CPF) alone (pollen-1) and with CPF and the fungicide Pristine® (pollen-2). Fewer queens emerged when larvae from open foraging (i.e., outside) colonies were reared in colonies fed pollen-1 or 2 compared with when those larvae were reared in outside colonies. Larvae grafted from and reared in colonies fed pollen-2 had lower rates of queen emergence than pollen-1 or outside colonies. Deformed wing virus (DWV) and black queen cell virus were found in nurse bees from colonies fed pollen-1 or 2 and in outside colonies. The viruses also were detected in queen larvae. However, we did not detect virus in emerged queens grafted from and reared in outside colonies. In contrast, DWV was found in all emerged queens grafted from colonies fed pollen-1 or 2 either reared in outside hives or those fed pollen-1 or 2. The results suggest that sublethal exposure of CPF alone but especially when Pristine® is added reduces queen emergence possibly due to compromised immunity in developing queens. PMID:26466796

  6. Analysis of the complete genome sequence of black queen cell virus JL1 from infected honeybees in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Song, Z-Y; Feng, X; Zhang, J; Zheng, Y; Wang, X-H; Sui, J-C; Wang, Z-G; Sun, Y

    2016-10-01

    There are six strains of the complete genomic sequences of black queen cell virus (BQCV) published in the GenBank, including South Africa (AF183905), South Korea (JX149531), Hungary 10 (EF517515), Poland 4 (EF517519), Poland 5 (EF517520) and Poland 6 (EF517521). Based on the six BQCV strains published in the GenBank, ten pairs of primers were designed in the present study using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to obtain the first complete genome sequence of a BQCV strain in China, called the BQCV China-JL1 strain (KP119603). A phylogenetic tree was then built to analyse their genetic relationships. The BQCV China-JL1 strain showed 86-93% similarity with the six strains published in the GenBank. The BQCV China-JL1 strain consisted of 8358 nucleotides (nt). The 5'-proximal open reading frame (ORF1) initiated at nt position 546 and terminated at nt position 4676, ORF3 initiated at nt position 4891 and terminated at nt position 5433, and the 3'-proximal ORF (ORF2) was located between nt positions 5750 and 8203.

  7. [Isolation, Identification and Analysis of the Complete Genome Sequence of Black Queen Cell Virus Strain China-JL1].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Jian; Song, Zhanyun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xianghui; Sui, Jiachen; Wang, Zhenguo; Mou, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Honeybee pupae were collected from Jilin apiaries and RNA was extracted for use as a tefnplate for amplification. Based on the complete genome sequences of black queen cell virus (BQCV) published on GenBank, we designed 10 pairs of primers to amplify genes by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Using this approach, we have obtained the first complete genome sequence of a BQCV isolate in China. The genome of the isolated strain, named BQCV-JL1, is composed of 8358 nucleotides and shares between 86% and 93% homology with the complete genome sequences of the other six BQCV strains published on GenBank. ORF 1 of BQCV-JL1 is positioned between nucleot ides (nt) 546 and 4676 (4131 nt), while ORF 2 is located between nt 5750 and 8203. Between the two ORFs of BQCV-JL1 there is a short ORF, called ORF 3, between nt 4891 and 5433 (543 nt). The first functional gene ex- pression domain of the BQCV-JL1 strain is positioned between nt 546 and 5 429, encompassing both ORF 1 and ORF 3. There is an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located before ORF 2, the last three bases of which are CCU (nt 5642-5644). These bases act as an initiation.codon facilitating the translation of ORF 2. The second functional gene expression domain of the BQCV-JL1 strain is located between nt positions 5642 and 8203. The BQCV-JL1 strain was found to share high sequence identity (93%) with the Hungary 10 genotype at the whole-genome level and analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed that the BQCV-JL1 strain also shows close genetic relationships with the South Korea strain, suggesting that both the BQCV-JL1 and South Korea strains may have migrated from European countries. BQCV-JL1 strain was different from the other 6 strains in dividing the nucleotides positions of QRF, which vqs because of the gene mutation.

  8. Viruses Associated with Ovarian Degeneration in Apis mellifera L. Queens

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Laurent; Ravallec, Marc; Tournaire, Magali; Cousserans, François; Bergoin, Max; Dainat, Benjamin; de Miranda, Joachim R.

    2011-01-01

    Queen fecundity is a critical issue for the health of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies, as she is the only reproductive female in the colony and responsible for the constant renewal of the worker bee population. Any factor affecting the queen's fecundity will stagnate colony development, increasing its susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. We discovered a pathology affecting the ovaries, characterized by a yellow discoloration concentrated in the apex of the ovaries resulting from degenerative lesions in the follicles. In extreme cases, marked by intense discoloration, the majority of the ovarioles were affected and these cases were universally associated with egg-laying deficiencies in the queens. Microscopic examination of the degenerated follicles showed extensive paracrystal lattices of 30 nm icosahedral viral particles. A cDNA library from degenerated ovaries contained a high frequency of deformed wing virus (DWV) and Varroa destructor virus 1 (VDV-1) sequences, two common and closely related honeybee Iflaviruses. These could also be identified by in situ hybridization in various parts of the ovary. A large-scale survey for 10 distinct honeybee viruses showed that DWV and VDV-1 were by far the most prevalent honeybee viruses in queen populations, with distinctly higher prevalence in mated queens (100% and 67%, respectively for DWV and VDV-1) than in virgin queens (37% and 0%, respectively). Since very high viral titres could be recorded in the ovaries and abdomens of both functional and deficient queens, no significant correlation could be made between viral titre and ovarian degeneration or egg-laying deficiency among the wider population of queens. Although our data suggest that DWV and VDV-1 have a role in extreme cases of ovarian degeneration, infection of the ovaries by these viruses does not necessarily result in ovarian degeneration, even at high titres, and additional factors are likely to be involved in this pathology. PMID:21283547

  9. Viruses associated with ovarian degeneration in Apis mellifera L. queens.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Laurent; Ravallec, Marc; Tournaire, Magali; Cousserans, François; Bergoin, Max; Dainat, Benjamin; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2011-01-25

    Queen fecundity is a critical issue for the health of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies, as she is the only reproductive female in the colony and responsible for the constant renewal of the worker bee population. Any factor affecting the queen's fecundity will stagnate colony development, increasing its susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. We discovered a pathology affecting the ovaries, characterized by a yellow discoloration concentrated in the apex of the ovaries resulting from degenerative lesions in the follicles. In extreme cases, marked by intense discoloration, the majority of the ovarioles were affected and these cases were universally associated with egg-laying deficiencies in the queens. Microscopic examination of the degenerated follicles showed extensive paracrystal lattices of 30 nm icosahedral viral particles. A cDNA library from degenerated ovaries contained a high frequency of deformed wing virus (DWV) and Varroa destructor virus 1 (VDV-1) sequences, two common and closely related honeybee Iflaviruses. These could also be identified by in situ hybridization in various parts of the ovary. A large-scale survey for 10 distinct honeybee viruses showed that DWV and VDV-1 were by far the most prevalent honeybee viruses in queen populations, with distinctly higher prevalence in mated queens (100% and 67%, respectively for DWV and VDV-1) than in virgin queens (37% and 0%, respectively). Since very high viral titres could be recorded in the ovaries and abdomens of both functional and deficient queens, no significant correlation could be made between viral titre and ovarian degeneration or egg-laying deficiency among the wider population of queens. Although our data suggest that DWV and VDV-1 have a role in extreme cases of ovarian degeneration, infection of the ovaries by these viruses does not necessarily result in ovarian degeneration, even at high titres, and additional factors are likely to be involved in this pathology.

  10. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D.; Kryger, Per

    2016-01-01

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone’s endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure. PMID:27608961

  11. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D; Kryger, Per

    2016-01-01

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone's endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure. PMID:27608961

  12. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D; Kryger, Per

    2016-09-09

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone's endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure.

  13. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens: Evaluating Susceptibility and Infection Routes

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph; Kryger, Per

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed a similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107 in the majority of these queens after nine days. Symptomatic worker bees may transmit sufficient active CBPV particles to the queen through trophallaxis, to cause an overt infection. PMID:24618857

  14. Localization of deformed wing virus infection in queen and drone Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Julie; Tentcheva, Diana; Gauthier, Laurent; de Miranda, Joachim; Cousserans, François; Colin, Marc Edouard; Bergoin, Max

    2006-03-28

    The distribution of deformed wing virus infection within the honey bee reproductive castes (queens, drones) was investigated by in situ hybridization and immunohistology from paraffin embedded sections. Digoxygenin or CY5.5 fluorochrome end-labelled nucleotide probes hybridizing to the 3' portion of the DWV genome were used to identify DWV RNA, while a monospecific antibody to the DWV-VP1 structural protein was used to identify viral proteins and particles. The histological data were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR of dissected organs. Results showed that DWV infection is not restricted to the digestive tract of the bee but spread in the whole body, including queen ovaries, queen fat body and drone seminal vesicles.

  15. Localization of deformed wing virus infection in queen and drone Apis mellifera L

    PubMed Central

    Fievet, Julie; Tentcheva, Diana; Gauthier, Laurent; de Miranda, Joachim; Cousserans, François; Colin, Marc Edouard; Bergoin, Max

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of deformed wing virus infection within the honey bee reproductive castes (queens, drones) was investigated by in situ hybridization and immunohistology from paraffin embedded sections. Digoxygenin or CY5.5 fluorochrome end-labelled nucleotide probes hybridizing to the 3' portion of the DWV genome were used to identify DWV RNA, while a monospecific antibody to the DWV-VP1 structural protein was used to identify viral proteins and particles. The histological data were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR of dissected organs. Results showed that DWV infection is not restricted to the digestive tract of the bee but spread in the whole body, including queen ovaries, queen fat body and drone seminal vesicles. PMID:16569216

  16. Localization of deformed wing virus infection in queen and drone Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Julie; Tentcheva, Diana; Gauthier, Laurent; de Miranda, Joachim; Cousserans, François; Colin, Marc Edouard; Bergoin, Max

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of deformed wing virus infection within the honey bee reproductive castes (queens, drones) was investigated by in situ hybridization and immunohistology from paraffin embedded sections. Digoxygenin or CY5.5 fluorochrome end-labelled nucleotide probes hybridizing to the 3' portion of the DWV genome were used to identify DWV RNA, while a monospecific antibody to the DWV-VP1 structural protein was used to identify viral proteins and particles. The histological data were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR of dissected organs. Results showed that DWV infection is not restricted to the digestive tract of the bee but spread in the whole body, including queen ovaries, queen fat body and drone seminal vesicles. PMID:16569216

  17. Queen pheromone regulates programmed cell death in the honey bee worker ovary.

    PubMed

    Ronai, I; Oldroyd, B P; Vergoz, V

    2016-10-01

    In social insect colonies the presence of a queen, secreting her pheromones, is a key environmental cue for regulating the reproductive state of workers. However, until recently the proximate molecular mechanisms underlying facultative worker sterility were unidentified. Studies into worker oogenesis in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) have indicated that programmed cell death is central to the regulation of oogenesis. Here we investigate how queen pheromone, age of the worker and ovary state affect both programmed cell death and cell number in worker ovaries. We describe a novel method to simultaneously measure programmed cell death (caspase activity) and live cell number (estimated from the amount of adenosine triphosphate) in an insect tissue. Workers exposed to queen pheromone have higher levels of caspase activity in the ovary than those not exposed. Our results suggest that queen pheromone triggers programmed cell death at the mid-oogenesis checkpoint causing the abortion of worker oocytes and reproductive inhibition of the worker caste. Nonetheless, high caspase activity is present in activated ovaries from workers not exposed to queen pheromone. This caspase activity is most likely to be from the nurse cells undergoing programmed cell death, in late oogenesis, for normal oocyte development. Our study shows that the social environment of an organism can influence programmed cell death within a tissue. PMID:27321063

  18. Dynamic changes in host-virus interactions associated with colony founding and social environment in fire ant queens (Solenopsis invicta).

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Fabio; Shoemaker, DeWayne; Grozinger, Christina M

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of host-parasite interactions can change dramatically over the course of a chronic infection as the internal (physiological) and external (environmental) conditions of the host change. When queens of social insects found a colony, they experience changes in both their physiological state (they develop their ovaries and begin laying eggs) and the social environment (they suddenly stop interacting with the other members of the mother colony), making this an excellent model system for examining how these factors interact with chronic infections. We investigated the dynamics of host-viral interactions in queens of Solenopsis invicta (fire ant) as they transition from mating to colony founding/brood rearing to the emergence of the first workers. We examined these dynamics in naturally infected queens in two different social environments, where queens either founded colonies as individuals or as pairs. We hypothesized that stress associated with colony founding plays an important role in the dynamics of host-parasite interactions. We also hypothesized that different viruses have different modalities of interaction with the host that can be quantified by physiological measures and genomic analysis of gene expression in the host. We found that the two most prevalent viruses, SINV-1 and SINV-2, are associated with different fitness costs that are mirrored by different patterns of gene expression in the host. In fact SINV-2, the virus that imposes the significant reduction of a queen's reproductive output is also associated with larger changes of global gene expression in the host. These results show the complexity of interactions between S. invicta and two viral parasites. Our findings also show that chronic infections by viral parasites in insects are dynamic processes that may pose different challenges in the host, laying the groundwork for interesting ecological and evolutionary considerations. PMID:26811788

  19. Deformed wing virus in western honey bees (Apis mellifera) from Atlantic Canada and the first description of an overtly-infected emerging queen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey R; Rogers, Richard E L; Kalkstein, Abby L; Taylor, Benjamin A; Shutler, Dave; Ostiguy, Nancy

    2009-04-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) in western honey bees (Apis mellifera) often remains asymptomatic in workers and drones, and symptoms have never been described from queens. However, intense infections linked to parasitism by the mite Varroa destructor can cause worker wing deformity and death within 67 h of emergence. Ten workers (eight with deformed wings and two with normal wings) and three drones (two with deformed wings and one with normal wings) from two colonies infected with V. destructor from Nova Scotia, Canada, and two newly-emerged queens (one with deformed wings and one with normal wings) from two colonies infected with V. destructor from Prince Edward Island, Canada, were genetically analyzed for DWV. We detected DWV in all workers and drones, regardless of wing morphology, but only in the deformed-winged queen. This is the first report of DWV from Atlantic Canada and the first detection of a symptomatic queen with DWV from anywhere.

  20. Effects of fluvalinate and coumaphos on queen honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in two commercial queen rearing operations.

    PubMed

    Haarmann, Timothy; Spivak, Marla; Weaver, Daniel; Weaver, Binford; Glenn, Tom

    2002-02-01

    We conducted research on the potential impacts of fluvalinate and coumaphos on honey bee, Apis mellifera L., queen viability and health. Queens were reared in colonies that had been treated with differing amounts of both fluvalinate and coumaphos. Pre- and posttreatment samples of both wax and bees were collected from all of the colonies and analyzed for total concentrations of fluvalinate and coumaphos. All queens were measured for queen weight, ovarial weight, and number of sperm in the spermathecae. The queens treated with high doses of fluvalinate weighed significantly less than low-dose or control queens, but otherwise appeared to develop normally. The highest fluvalinate concentrations were observed in the wax and queen cells of the high-dose group. The developing queens in colonies treated with as little as one coumaphos-impregnated strip for more than 24 h suffered a high mortality rate. Several of the queens showed sublethal effects from the coumaphos, including physical abnormalities and atypical behavior. The queens exposed to coumaphos weighed significantly less and had lower ovary weights than the control group queens. The highest coumaphos concentrations were observed in the queen cells and wax of the high-dose groups.

  1. Virus Cell-to-Cell Transmission▿

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, Walther; Sherer, Nathan M.; Jin, Jing; Zhong, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Viral infections spread based on the ability of viruses to overcome multiple barriers and move from cell to cell, tissue to tissue, and person to person and even across species. While there are fundamental differences between these types of transmissions, it has emerged that the ability of viruses to utilize and manipulate cell-cell contact contributes to the success of viral infections. Central to the excitement in the field of virus cell-to-cell transmission is the idea that cell-to-cell spread is more than the sum of the processes of virus release and entry. This implies that virus release and entry are efficiently coordinated to sites of cell-cell contact, resulting in a process that is distinct from its individual components. In this review, we will present support for this model, illustrate the ability of viruses to utilize and manipulate cell adhesion molecules, and discuss the mechanism and driving forces of directional spreading. An understanding of viral cell-to-cell spreading will enhance our ability to intervene in the efficient spreading of viral infections. PMID:20375157

  2. Factors influencing survival duration and choice of virgin queens in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Martin H.; Menezes, Cristiano; Alves, Denise A.; Beveridge, Oliver S.; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera-Lucia; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2013-06-01

    In Melipona quadrifasciata, about 10 % of the females develop into queens, almost all of which are killed. Occasionally, a new queen replaces or supersedes the mother queen or heads a new colony. We investigated virgin queen fate in queenright and queenless colonies to determine the effects of queen behaviour, body mass, nestmate or non-nestmate status, queenright or queenless colony status, and, when queenless, the effect of the time a colony had been queenless, on survival duration and acceptance. None of 220 virgin queens observed in four observation hives ever attacked another virgin queen nor did any of 88 virgin queens introduced into queenright colonies ever attack the resident queen. A new queen was only accepted in a queenless colony. Factors increasing survival duration and acceptance of virgin queens were to emerge from its cell at 2 h of queenlessness, to hide, and to avoid fights with workers. In this way, a virgin queen was more likely to be available when a colony chooses a new queen, 24-48 h after resident queen removal. Running, walking or resting, antennating or trophallaxis, played little or no role, as did the factors body mass or nestmate. "Queen choice" took about 2 h during which time other virgin queens were still being killed by workers. During this agitated process, the bees congregated around the new queen. She inflated her abdomen and some of the workers deposited a substance on internal nest surfaces including the glass lid of the observation hive.

  3. Factors influencing survival duration and choice of virgin queens in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, Martin H; Menezes, Cristiano; Alves, Denise A; Beveridge, Oliver S; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera-Lucia; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2013-06-01

    In Melipona quadrifasciata, about 10% of the females develop into queens, almost all of which are killed. Occasionally, a new queen replaces or supersedes the mother queen or heads a new colony. We investigated virgin queen fate in queenright and queenless colonies to determine the effects of queen behaviour, body mass, nestmate or non-nestmate status, queenright or queenless colony status, and, when queenless, the effect of the time a colony had been queenless, on survival duration and acceptance. None of 220 virgin queens observed in four observation hives ever attacked another virgin queen nor did any of 88 virgin queens introduced into queenright colonies ever attack the resident queen. A new queen was only accepted in a queenless colony. Factors increasing survival duration and acceptance of virgin queens were to emerge from its cell at 2 h of queenlessness, to hide, and to avoid fights with workers. In this way, a virgin queen was more likely to be available when a colony chooses a new queen, 24-48 h after resident queen removal. Running, walking or resting, antennating or trophallaxis, played little or no role, as did the factors body mass or nestmate. "Queen choice" took about 2 h during which time other virgin queens were still being killed by workers. During this agitated process, the bees congregated around the new queen. She inflated her abdomen and some of the workers deposited a substance on internal nest surfaces including the glass lid of the observation hive.

  4. Kinetics of virus production from single cells.

    PubMed

    Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2012-03-01

    The production of virus by infected cells is an essential process for the spread and persistence of viral diseases, the effectiveness of live-viral vaccines, and the manufacture of viruses for diverse applications. Yet despite its importance, methods to precisely measure virus production from cells are lacking. Most methods test infected-cell populations, masking how individual cells behave. Here we measured the kinetics of virus production from single cells. We combined simple steps of liquid-phase infection, serial dilution, centrifugation, and harvesting, without specialized equipment, to track the production of virus particles from BHK cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus. Remarkably, cell-to-cell differences in latent times to virus release were within a factor of two, while production rates and virus yields spanned over 300-fold, highlighting an extreme diversity in virus production for cells from the same population. These findings have fundamental and technological implications for health and disease.

  5. Virus present in the reproductive tract of asymptomatic drones of honey bee (Apis mellifera l.), and possible infection of queen during mating.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda; Roat, Thaisa C; Fernadez, Fernanda C

    2012-07-01

    Virus particles and viral inclusions were detected by transmission electron microscopy examination of sections of the seminal vesicles and mucus gland of asymptomatic young drones from colonies of Apis mellifera lightly infested by Varroa mite. In the mucus gland the infection was found in the muscular sheath and epithelium, while in the seminal vesicle in cells of the outer serosa. Isolated viral particles were also observed in the hemolymph occupying the intercellular spaces of the muscular sheath fibers. In the muscle the virus appeared as polygonal crystalloid inclusions, while in the epithelium mainly inside cytoplasmic vesicles. The infected cells apparently are not damaged. The virus particles are present in the hemolymph and forming more mature structures, as crystalloids, in the muscle. This suggests that the virus is liberated in the body fluid and infects the tissues penetrating the cells through endocytosis. The presence of virus in mucus gland epithelial vesicles raise the possibility of its transference to the gland secretion and therefore, to the semen.

  6. Cell entry of enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Cosset, François-Loic; Lavillette, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Enveloped viruses penetrate their cell targets following the merging of their membrane with that of the cell. This fusion process is catalyzed by one or several viral glycoproteins incorporated on the membrane of the virus. These envelope glycoproteins (EnvGP) evolved in order to combine two features. First, they acquired a domain to bind to a specific cellular protein, named "receptor." Second, they developed, with the help of cellular proteins, a function of finely controlled fusion to optimize the replication and preserve the integrity of the cell, specific to the genus of the virus. Following the activation of the EnvGP either by binding to their receptors and/or sometimes the acid pH of the endosomes, many changes of conformation permit ultimately the action of a specific hydrophobic domain, the fusion peptide, which destabilizes the cell membrane and leads to the opening of the lipidic membrane. The comprehension of these mechanisms is essential to develop medicines of the therapeutic class of entry inhibitor like enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this chapter, we will summarize the different envelope glycoprotein structures that viruses develop to achieve membrane fusion and the entry of the virus. We will describe the different entry pathways and cellular proteins that viruses have subverted to allow infection of the cell and the receptors that are used. Finally, we will illustrate more precisely the recent discoveries that have been made within the field of the entry process, with a focus on the use of pseudoparticles. These pseudoparticles are suitable for high-throughput screenings that help in the development of natural or artificial inhibitors as new therapeutics of the class of entry inhibitors.

  7. 14. Hell Gate Bridge south abutment tower. Queens, Queens Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Hell Gate Bridge south abutment tower. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  8. Mitosis and cell death in the optic lobes of workers, queens and drones of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Roat, Thaisa Cristina; Landim, Carminda da Cruz

    2010-09-01

    Colonies of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, consist of males and two female castes: workers and queens. The castes and males from A. mellifera have a distinct morphology, physiology and behaviour that correlate with their roles in the society and are characterized by some brain polymorphisms. Compound eyes are one of the characteristics that differ among the castes and sexes. A. mellifera is a holometabolous insect; therefore, the development of adult organs during metamorphosis, which will produce these differences, requires the precise coordination of three main programmed cellular processes: proliferation, differentiation and death. These processes take place simultaneously during pupation. Our purpose was to investigate cell division and death in the optic lobes (OL) of workers, queens and males during pupation to identify how the differences in the compound eyes in adults of these classes are achieved. The results showed that OL differentiation follows a similar pattern in the three classes of individuals studied, without structural differences in their development. The main non-structural differences involve cell division, mortality rates and timing. The results suggest a modelling of the brain during differentiation, which contributes to the specific functions of each individual class.

  9. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  10. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area.

  11. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks' genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  12. [Ebola virus reproduction in cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Titenko, A M; Novozhilov, S S; Andaev, E I; Borisova, T I; Kulikova, E V

    1992-01-01

    Ebola-Zaire virus production in Vero and BGM cells was studied. The CPE developed in both cell cultures. The cell monolayer destruction by 80-90% was seen at a low multiplicity of infection in 7-8 days after virus inoculation. An overlay composition was developed for virus titration using plaque assay. The plaque production was shown to be directly proportional to the virus dose. The curve of Ebola virus production in Vero cell culture fluid was determined. At a multiplicity of infection of 0.01 PFU/cell, the maximum virus titer of 10(6.4) PFU/ml was reached in 7 days postinfection. Specific antisera were generated by inoculation of guinea pigs. Indirect immunofluorescent assay was used for testing of virus-specific antigen and antibody.

  13. Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Túlio M.; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P.; Amaral, Mônica F. Z. J.; von Zuben, Lucas G.; Clososki, Giuliano C.; Bento, José M. S.; Oldroyd, Benjamin P.; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B.; Lopes, Norberto P.

    2014-01-01

    In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones. PMID:25502598

  14. Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Túlio M; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P; Amaral, Mônica F Z J; von Zuben, Lucas G; Clososki, Giuliano C; Bento, José M S; Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B; Lopes, Norberto P

    2014-12-12

    In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones.

  15. 'Snow Queen' Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animation consists of two close-up images of 'Snow Queen,' taken several days apart, by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    Snow Queen is the informal name for a patch of bright-toned material underneath the lander.

    Thruster exhaust blew away surface soil covering Snow Queen when Phoenix landed on May 25, 2008, exposing this hard layer comprising several smooth rounded cavities beneath the lander. The RAC images show how Snow Queen visibly changed between June 15, 2008, the 21st Martian day, or sol, of the mission and July 9, 2008, the 44th sol.

    Cracks as long as 10 centimeters (about four inches) appeared. One such crack is visible at the left third and the upper third of the Sol 44 image. A seven millimeter (one-third inch) pebble or clod appears just above and slightly to the right of the crack in the Sol 44 image. Cracks also appear in the lower part of the left third of the image. Other pieces noticeably shift, and some smooth texture has subtly roughened.

    The Phoenix team carefully positioned and focused RAC the same way in both images. Each image is about 60 centimeters, or about two feet, wide. The object protruding in from the top on the right half of the images is Phoenix's thermal and electrical conductivity probe.

    Snow Queen and other ice exposed by Phoenix landing and trenching operations on northern polar Mars is the first time scientists have been able to monitor Martian ice at a place where temperatures are cold enough that the ice doesn't immediately sublimate, or vaporize, away.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Queen signaling in social wasps.

    PubMed

    van Zweden, Jelle S; Bonckaert, Wim; Wenseleers, Tom; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2014-04-01

    Social Hymenoptera are characterized by a reproductive division of labor, whereby queens perform most of the reproduction and workers help to raise her offspring. A long-lasting debate is whether queens maintain this reproductive dominance by manipulating their daughter workers into remaining sterile (queen control), or if instead queens honestly signal their fertility and workers reproduce according to their own evolutionary incentives (queen signaling). Here, we test these competing hypotheses using data from Vespine wasps. We show that in natural colonies of the Saxon wasp, Dolichovespula saxonica, queens emit reliable chemical cues of their true fertility and that these putative queen signals decrease as the colony develops and worker reproduction increases. Moreover, these putative pheromones of D. saxonica show significant conservation with those of Vespula vulgaris and other Vespinae, thereby arguing against fast evolution of signals as a result of a queen-worker arms race ensuing from queen control. Lastly, levels of worker reproduction in these species correspond well with their average colony kin structures, as predicted by the queen signaling hypothesis but not the queen control hypothesis. Altogether, this correlative yet comprehensive analysis provides compelling evidence that honest signaling explains levels of reproductive division of labor in social wasps.

  17. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance “aerobic” glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells. PMID:27034740

  18. 13. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. (See HAER No. NY-88 for further documentation on this site). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  19. 12. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. (See HAER No. NY-88 for further documentation on this site). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  20. 11. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. (See HAER No. NY-88 for further documentation on this site). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  1. Chronic rabies virus infection of cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Wiktor, T J; Clark, H F

    1972-12-01

    Exposure of both mammalian and reptilian cells in tissue culture to different strains of fixed rabies virus resulted in a carrier type of infection. No cytopathic effect was observed in either type of culture; infected cultures could be maintained by cell transfer for unlimited numbers of passages. A consistent pattern of cyclically rising and falling levels of viral infection was observed by fluorescent-antibody staining techniques and by titration of released infectious virus. Resistance to super-infection by vesicular stomatis virus and the production of an interferon-like substance by infected cells indicated that the maintenance of a carrier type of infection may be interferon-mediated. The degree of susceptibility of rabies-infected cells to immunolysis by antirabies antibody in the presence of complement was found to be correlated with the amount of virus maturation occurring by budding through the cell membrane and not with the presence of immunofluorescent antigen in the cytoplasm of infected cells.

  2. Interaction and behavior of virgin and physogastric queens in three Meliponini species (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Ferreira, F H; Silva-Matos, E V; Zucchi, R

    2009-01-01

    We studied the behavior of virgin queens of the stingless bee species Schwarziana quadripunctata, Paratrigona lineata and Tetragona clavipes, investigating internal nest activities, including the cell provisioning and oviposition process. We made direct observation of queen behavior, with the aid of video filming. Forty-four virgin queens of S. quadripunctata were observed; one was larger and more attractive than the others. Miniature queens were more abundant than normal-size queens; both were found in prison chambers. Agonistic behavior between virgin and physogastric queens of P. lineata was observed during attempts at queen supersedure. After the disappearance of the physogastric queen and the appearance of a virgin queen in T. clavipes nests, the brood cells were sealed with pollen alone, but no egg. In all three species, the presence of one or more virgin queens appeared to make the colonies nervous, even though constant production of virgin queens is vital to the survival of the colony and is part of the colony cycle in these bees. PMID:19554769

  3. Neural stem cells attacked by Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Nam; Qian, Xuyu; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li

    2016-07-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus-associated diseases in South America and its threat to spread to other parts of the world has emerged as a global health emergency. Insights from cell and animal models to understand how Zika virus causes severe birth defects may lead to treatments and prevention of these diseases. PMID:27283801

  4. Neural stem cells attacked by Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Nam; Qian, Xuyu; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li

    2016-07-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus-associated diseases in South America and its threat to spread to other parts of the world has emerged as a global health emergency. Insights from cell and animal models to understand how Zika virus causes severe birth defects may lead to treatments and prevention of these diseases.

  5. Presence and Prevalence of Viruses in Local and Migratory Honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Massachusetts▿

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Anna; Drummond, Francis; Tewari, Sunil; Averill, Anne; Burand, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Migratory and local bees in Massachusetts were analyzed for seven viruses. Three were detected: black queen cell virus (BQCV), deformed wing virus (DWV), and sacbrood virus (SBV). DWV was most common, followed closely by BQCV and then by SBV. BQCV and SBV were present at significantly higher rates in the migratory bees assayed, bringing into question the impact that these bees have on the health of local bee populations. PMID:19854916

  6. Cell entry of hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bartosch, Birke . E-mail: Birke.Bartosch@ens-lyon.fr; Cosset, Francois-Loic . E-mail: Francois-Loic.Cosset@ens-lyon.fr

    2006-04-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen, is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus classified in the hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Cell attachment of flaviviruses generally leads to endocytosis of bound virions. Systems that support HCV replication and particle formation in vitro are emerging only now, 16 years after the discovery of the virus. Albeit this limitation, the route of HCV cell entry as well as 'capture' molecules involved in low-affinity interactions for the initial contact of HCV with target cells and potential high-affinity receptor candidates that may mediate HCV trafficking and fusion has been described. The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of different HCV model systems to our current knowledge about structure of the HCV GPs E1 and E2 and their roles in cell entry comprising cell attachment, interactions with cellular receptors, endocytosis, and fusion.

  7. MECHANISM OF CELL WALL PENETRATION BY VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Theodore T.; Lee, Howard H.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of radioactively labelled host cells with T1 or T2 bacteriophages induces a leakage of cellular P and S into the medium. Evidence is presented showing that this increased cell permeability is not the result of complete lysis of a small fraction of the cells, but rather is made up of contributions from all or most of the infected population. This leakage of cellular constituents exhibits the following characteristics: (a) Infection of a cell with a single virus suffices to evoke the reaction; (b) Increasing the multiplicity up to 7 to 8 virus particles per cell does not affect the extent of leakage produced; (c) Some leakage does occur at 0°C., but much less than at 37°C.; (d) Infection by T1 virus results in a smaller amount of leakage than in the case of T2, but the pattern of response to varying virus multiplicity is the same; (e) The P resulting from such leakage contains no DNA and chemically resembles that which elutes in smaller amounts from uninfected cells; (f) At 37°C. the virus-induced leakage reaction appears within a matter of seconds, and usually decreases after 2 to 3 minutes; (g) The reaction is inhibited by 0.025 M Mg++. Theoretical considerations are presented suggesting the place of this reaction in the sequence of events constituting the virus penetration reaction; its relationship to the phenomenon of lysis-from-without; and its resemblance to the leakage reaction produced by electrostatic binding of ionized compounds to cell surfaces. The existence of similar effects in avian-mammalian virus systems is noted. PMID:13163323

  8. Titration of murine leukemia viruses with rat cell line RFL.

    PubMed

    Koga, M

    1977-08-01

    Normal rat embryo cell (RFL) from syncytia after infection with murine leukemia virus. The assay for counting the number of syncytium foci produced in RFL cells is a sensitive method for a direct infectivity assay of murine leukemia virus.

  9. Killing and replacing queen-laid eggs: low cost of worker policing in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, Martin H; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2014-07-01

    Worker honeybees, Apis mellifera, police each other's reproduction by killing worker-laid eggs. Previous experiments demonstrated that worker policing is effective, killing most (∼98%) worker-laid eggs. However, many queen-laid eggs were also killed (∼50%) suggesting that effective policing may have high costs. In these previous experiments, eggs were transferred using forceps into test cells, mostly into unrelated discriminator colonies. We measured both the survival of unmanipulated queen-laid eggs and the proportion of removal errors that were rectified by the queen laying a new egg. Across 2 days of the 3-day egg stage, only 9.6% of the queen-laid eggs in drone cells and 4.1% in worker cells were removed in error. When queen-laid eggs were removed from cells, 85% from drone cells and 61% from worker cells were replaced within 3 days. Worker policing in the honeybee has a high benefit to policing workers because workers are more related to the queen's sons (brothers, r = 0.25) than sister workers' sons (0.15). This study shows that worker policing also has a low cost in terms of the killing of queen-laid eggs, as only a small proportion of queen-laid eggs are killed, most of which are rapidly replaced. PMID:24921604

  10. Killing and replacing queen-laid eggs: low cost of worker policing in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, Martin H; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2014-07-01

    Worker honeybees, Apis mellifera, police each other's reproduction by killing worker-laid eggs. Previous experiments demonstrated that worker policing is effective, killing most (∼98%) worker-laid eggs. However, many queen-laid eggs were also killed (∼50%) suggesting that effective policing may have high costs. In these previous experiments, eggs were transferred using forceps into test cells, mostly into unrelated discriminator colonies. We measured both the survival of unmanipulated queen-laid eggs and the proportion of removal errors that were rectified by the queen laying a new egg. Across 2 days of the 3-day egg stage, only 9.6% of the queen-laid eggs in drone cells and 4.1% in worker cells were removed in error. When queen-laid eggs were removed from cells, 85% from drone cells and 61% from worker cells were replaced within 3 days. Worker policing in the honeybee has a high benefit to policing workers because workers are more related to the queen's sons (brothers, r = 0.25) than sister workers' sons (0.15). This study shows that worker policing also has a low cost in terms of the killing of queen-laid eggs, as only a small proportion of queen-laid eggs are killed, most of which are rapidly replaced.

  11. Preparation of cell cultures and vaccinia virus stocks.

    PubMed

    Earl, P L; Cooper, N; Wyatt, L S; Moss, B; Carroll, M W

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the maintenance of cell lines used with vaccinia virus, both in monolayer cultures and in suspension. The suspended cell culture is then used in the preparation of vaccinia virus stocks. The preparation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) is also presented for use in the production of the highly attenuated and host range-restricted modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) strain of vaccinia virus. Additionally, support protocols are presented for the titration of standard and MVA vaccinia virus stocks.

  12. Molecular anatomy of mouse hepatitis virus persistence: coevolution of increased host cell resistance and virus virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Baric, R S

    1996-01-01

    Persistent infection of murine astrocytoma (DBT) cells with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) has been established. From this in vitro virus-host system, persistence is mediated at the level of cellular MHV receptor (MHVR) expression and increased virus virulence. MHV persistence selects for resistant host cell populations which abate virus replication. Reductions in MHVR expression were significantly associated with increased host resistance, and transfection of MHVR into resistant host cells completely restored the capacity of cells to support efficient replication of MHV strain A59. The emergence of resistant host cells coselected for variant viruses that had increased avidity for MHVR and also recognized different receptors for entry into resistant cells. These data illustrate that MHV persistence in vitro provides a model to identify critical sites of virus-host interaction at the cellular level which are altered during the evolution of host cell resistance to viral infection and the coevolution of virus virulence. PMID:8648732

  13. Reflections on the "N" + "k" Queens Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatham, Doug

    2009-01-01

    The "N" queens problem is a classic puzzle. It asks for an arrangement of "N" mutually non-attacking queens on an "N" x "N" chessboard. We discuss a recent variation called the "N" + "k" queens problem, where pawns are added to the chessboard to allow a greater number of non-attacking queens to be placed on it. We describe some of what is known…

  14. Preparation of Cell Cultures and Vaccinia Virus Stocks.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Catherine A; Earl, Patricia L; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    The culturing of cell lines used with vaccinia virus, both as monolayer and in suspension, is described. The preparation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) is presented for use in the production of the highly attenuated and host range-restricted modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) strain of vaccinia virus. Protocols for the preparation, titration, and trypsinization of vaccinia virus stocks, as well as viral DNA preparation and virus purification methods are also included.

  15. 'Queen of Hearts' Oakleaf Hydrangea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A late-blooming oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) cultivar was released by the U.S. National Arboretum. ‘Queen of Hearts’ has grown 6.5 feet high and 11 feet wide in 11 years. In early summer, it is covered with 11-inch-long inflorescences that are held upright above the foliage. Flowers ...

  16. THE COURSE OF VIRUS-INDUCED RABBIT PAPILLOMAS AS DETERMINED BY VIRUS, CELLS, AND HOST

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, John G.

    1938-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the factors responsible for the observed differences in the course of virus-induced papillomas of the rabbit has shown that some are referable to the virus, others to the cells, and yet others to host influences. The interplay of these factors affords enlightening illustration of the nature of the cell-virus relationship in virus-induced tumors. Retrogression of the rabbit papillomas appears to be consequent on a generalized resistance of host origin, elicited by and directed against the proliferating, virus-infected cells. PMID:19870740

  17. Production of Virus by Mammalian Cells Transformed by Rous Sarcoma and Murine Sarcoma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Artrice F.; Bader, John P.

    1968-01-01

    Cultured cells of mammalian tumors induced by ribonucleic acid (RNA)-containing oncogenic viruses were examined for production of virus. The cell lines were established from tumors induced in rats and hamsters with either Rous sarcoma virus (Schmidt-Ruppin or Bryan strains) or murine sarcoma virus (Moloney strain). When culture fluids from each of the cell lines were examined for transforming activity or production of progeny virus, none of the cell lines was found to be infectious. However, electron microscopic examination of the various cell lines revealed the presence of particles in the rat cells transformed by either Rous sarcoma virus or murine sarcoma virus. These particles, morphologically similar to those associated with murine leukemias, were found both in the extracellular fluid concentrates and in whole-cell preparations. In the latter, they were seen budding from the cell membranes or lying in the intercellular spaces. No viruslike particles were seen in preparations from hamster tumors. Exposure of the rat cells to 3H-uridine resulted in the appearance of labeled particles with densities in sucrose gradients typical of virus (1.16 g/ml.). RNA of high molecular weight was extracted from these particles, and double-labeling experiments showed that this RNA sedimented at the same rate as RNA extracted from Rous sarcoma virus. None of the hamster cell lines gave radioactive peaks in the virus density range, and no extractable high molecular weight RNA was found. These studies suggest that the murine sarcoma virus produces an infection analogous to certain “defective” strains of Rous sarcoma virus, in that particles produced by infected cells have a low efficiency of infection. The control of the host cell over the production and properties of the RNA-containing tumorigenic viruses is discussed. Images PMID:4316021

  18. Neonicotinoid pesticides severely affect honey bee queens.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey R; Troxler, Aline; Retschnig, Gina; Roth, Kaspar; Yañez, Orlando; Shutler, Dave; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Queen health is crucial to colony survival of social bees. Recently, queen failure has been proposed to be a major driver of managed honey bee colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides during development can severely affect queens of western honey bees (Apis mellifera). In pesticide-exposed queens, reproductive anatomy (ovaries) and physiology (spermathecal-stored sperm quality and quantity), rather than flight behaviour, were compromised and likely corresponded to reduced queen success (alive and producing worker offspring). This study highlights the detriments of neonicotinoids to queens of environmentally and economically important social bees, and further strengthens the need for stringent risk assessments to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services that are vulnerable to these substances. PMID:26459072

  19. Neonicotinoid pesticides severely affect honey bee queens.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey R; Troxler, Aline; Retschnig, Gina; Roth, Kaspar; Yañez, Orlando; Shutler, Dave; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-10-13

    Queen health is crucial to colony survival of social bees. Recently, queen failure has been proposed to be a major driver of managed honey bee colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides during development can severely affect queens of western honey bees (Apis mellifera). In pesticide-exposed queens, reproductive anatomy (ovaries) and physiology (spermathecal-stored sperm quality and quantity), rather than flight behaviour, were compromised and likely corresponded to reduced queen success (alive and producing worker offspring). This study highlights the detriments of neonicotinoids to queens of environmentally and economically important social bees, and further strengthens the need for stringent risk assessments to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services that are vulnerable to these substances.

  20. Neonicotinoid pesticides severely affect honey bee queens

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoffrey R.; Troxler, Aline; Retschnig, Gina; Roth, Kaspar; Yañez, Orlando; Shutler, Dave; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Queen health is crucial to colony survival of social bees. Recently, queen failure has been proposed to be a major driver of managed honey bee colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides during development can severely affect queens of western honey bees (Apis mellifera). In pesticide-exposed queens, reproductive anatomy (ovaries) and physiology (spermathecal-stored sperm quality and quantity), rather than flight behaviour, were compromised and likely corresponded to reduced queen success (alive and producing worker offspring). This study highlights the detriments of neonicotinoids to queens of environmentally and economically important social bees, and further strengthens the need for stringent risk assessments to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services that are vulnerable to these substances. PMID:26459072

  1. Queen promiscuity lowers disease within honeybee colonies.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Thomas D; Tarpy, David R

    2007-01-01

    Most species of social insects have singly mated queens, but in some species each queen mates with numerous males to create a colony with a genetically diverse worker force. The adaptive significance of polyandry by social insect queens remains an evolutionary puzzle. Using the honeybee (Apis mellifera), we tested the hypothesis that polyandry improves a colony's resistance to disease. We established colonies headed by queens that had been artificially inseminated by either one or 10 drones. Later, we inoculated these colonies with spores of Paenibacillus larvae, the bacterium that causes a highly virulent disease of honeybee larvae (American foulbrood). We found that, on average, colonies headed by multiple-drone inseminated queens had markedly lower disease intensity and higher colony strength at the end of the summer relative to colonies headed by single-drone inseminated queens. These findings support the hypothesis that polyandry by social insect queens is an adaptation to counter disease within their colonies.

  2. Traditional and Modern Cell Culture in Virus Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hematian, Ali; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Mohebi, Reza; Taherikalani, Morovat; Nasrolahi, Abbas; Amraei, Mansour; Ghafourian, Sobhan

    2016-04-01

    Cell cultures are developed from tissue samples and then disaggregated by mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic methods to extract cells suitable for isolation of viruses. With the recent advances in technology, cell culture is considered a gold standard for virus isolation. This paper reviews the evolution of cell culture methods and demonstrates why cell culture is a preferred method for identification of viruses. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and modern cell culture methods for diagnosis of each type of virus are discussed. Detection of viruses by the novel cell culture methods is considered more accurate and sensitive. However, there is a need to include some more accurate methods such as molecular methods in cell culture for precise identification of viruses.

  3. Traditional and Modern Cell Culture in Virus Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Ali; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Mohebi, Reza; Taherikalani, Morovat; Nasrolahi, Abbas; Amraei, Mansour; Ghafourian, Sobhan

    2016-01-01

    Cell cultures are developed from tissue samples and then disaggregated by mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic methods to extract cells suitable for isolation of viruses. With the recent advances in technology, cell culture is considered a gold standard for virus isolation. This paper reviews the evolution of cell culture methods and demonstrates why cell culture is a preferred method for identification of viruses. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and modern cell culture methods for diagnosis of each type of virus are discussed. Detection of viruses by the novel cell culture methods is considered more accurate and sensitive. However, there is a need to include some more accurate methods such as molecular methods in cell culture for precise identification of viruses. PMID:27169004

  4. A fusion inhibitor prevents spread of immunodeficiency viruses, but not activation of virus-specific T cells, by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Frank, I; Stössel, H; Gettie, A; Turville, S G; Bess, J W; Lifson, J D; Sivin, I; Romani, N; Robbiani, M

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in innate immune responses, and their interactions with T cells are critical for the induction of adaptive immunity. However, immunodeficiency viruses are efficiently captured by DCs and can be transmitted to and amplified in CD4(+) T cells, with potentially deleterious effects on the induction of immune responses. In DC-T-cell cocultures, contact with CD4(+), not CD8(+), T cells preferentially facilitated virus movement to and release at immature and mature DC-T-cell contact sites. This occurred within 5 min of DC-T-cell contact. While the fusion inhibitor T-1249 did not prevent virus capture by DCs or the release of viruses at the DC-T-cell contact points, it readily blocked virus transfer to and amplification in CD4(+) T cells. Higher doses of T-1249 were needed to block the more robust replication driven by mature DCs. Virus accumulated in DCs within T-1249-treated cocultures but these DCs were actually less infectious than DCs isolated from untreated cocultures. Importantly, T-1249 did not interfere with the stimulation of virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses when present during virus-loading of DCs or for the time of the DC-T-cell coculture. These results provide clues to identifying strategies to prevent DC-driven virus amplification in CD4(+) T cells while maintaining virus-specific immunity, an objective critical in the development of microbicides and therapeutic vaccines.

  5. Understanding How Zika Virus Enters and Infects Neural Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that has become a public health concern because of its ability to cause microcephaly. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Tang et al. (2016) and Nowakowski et al. (2016) use human neural stem cell models and single-cell RNA sequencing to investigate Zika virus tropism and potential entry receptors.

  6. Persistent infection of K562 cells by encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed

    Pardoe, I U; Grewal, K K; Baldeh, M P; Hamid, J; Burness, A T

    1990-12-01

    Infection of human erythroleukemic K562 cells by encephalomyocarditis virus readily resulted in establishment of persistently infected cultures. In contrast to the usual typical lytic infection by encephalomyocarditis virus, in which trypan blue staining of cells reaches close to 100% by about 15 h postinfection, K562 cell cultures required 3 to 4 days postinfection to reach a maximum of about 80 to 90% cell staining. The proportion of K562 cells taking up stain gradually decreased to about 10% of those present by about 13 days postinfection; during this time, virus yield per day measured by either plaque or hemagglutination titration fell about 10-fold. The decrease in percent staining was followed by waves of increased staining accompanied by increased virus production. Virus-producing cultures were maintained for over 3 months. Evolution of both virus and cells accompanied establishment of persistence in that plaque size changed from about 7 mm in diameter for the original virus to less than 1.5 mm by day 20 postinfection and most of the cells cloned from persistently infected cultures were resistant to superinfection with the original virus. Resistance was due, at least in part, to reduced virus attachment in that binding of 3H-labeled virus to cloned resistant cells was about 2% of that to uninfected cells.

  7. Archaeal viruses at the cell envelope: entry and egress

    PubMed Central

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R. J.; Quax, Tessa E. F.

    2015-01-01

    The cell envelope represents the main line of host defense that viruses encounter on their way from one cell to another. The cytoplasmic membrane in general is a physical barrier that needs to be crossed both upon viral entry and exit. Therefore, viruses from the three domains of life employ a wide range of strategies for perforation of the cell membrane, each adapted to the cell surface environment of their host. Here, we review recent insights on entry and egress mechanisms of viruses infecting archaea. Due to the unique nature of the archaeal cell envelope, these particular viruses exhibit novel and unexpected mechanisms to traverse the cellular membrane. PMID:26097469

  8. Virulence factors of influenza A viruses: WSN virus neuraminidase required for plaque production in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Schulman, J L; Palese, P

    1977-10-01

    The genetic basis for the distinctive capacity of influenza A/WSN/33 (H0N1) virus (WSN virus) to produce plaques on bovine kidney (MDBK) cells was found to be related to virus neuraminidase. Recombinant viruses that derived only the neuraminidase of WSN virus were capable of producing plaques, whereas recombinant viruses identical to WSN except for neuraminidase did not produce plaques. With viruses that do not contain WSN neuraminidase, infectivity of virus yields from MDBK cells was increased approximately 1,000-fold after in vitro treatment with trypsin. In contrast, no significant increase in infectivity was observed after trypsin treatment of viruses containing WSN neuraminidase. In addition, polyacrylamide gel analysis of proteins of WSN virus obtained after infection of MDBK cells demonstrated that hemagglutinin was present in the cleaved form (HA1 + HA2), whereas only uncleaved hemagglutinin was obtained with a recombinant virus that derived all of its genes from WSN virus except its neuraminidase. These data are in accord with the hypothesis that neuraminidase may facilitate production of infectious particles by removing sialic acid residues and exposing appropriate cleavage sites on hemagglutinin.

  9. Studying NK cell responses to ectromelia virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods for the in vivo study of antiviral NK cell responses using the mouse Orthopoxvirus ectromelia virus as a model, the agent of mousepox. The methods include those specific for the preparation and use of ectromelia virus such as the production of virus stocks in tissue culture and in live mice, the purification of virus stocks, the titration of virus stocks and virus loads in organs, and the infection of mice. The chapter also includes methods for the specific study of NK cell responses in infected mice such as the preparation of organs (lymph nodes, spleen, and liver) for analysis, the study of NK cell responses by flow cytometry, the adoptive transfer of NK cells, the measurement of NK cell cytolytic activity ex vivo and in vivo, and the determination of NK cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine loading or by dilution of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE).

  10. Virus-receptor interactions and receptor-mediated virus entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, José M

    2013-01-01

    The virus particles described in previous chapters are vehicles that transmit the viral genome and the infection from cell to cell. To initiate the infective cycle, the viral genome must therefore translocate from the viral particle to the cytoplasm. Via distinct proteins or motifs in their outermost shell, the particles attach initially to specific molecules on the host cell surface. These virus receptors thus mediate penetration of the viral genome inside the cell, where the intracellular infective cycle starts. The presence of these receptors on the cell surface is a principal determinant of virus host tropism. Viruses can use diverse types of molecules to attach to and enter into cells. In addition, virus-receptor recognition can evolve over the course of an infection, and virus variants with distinct receptor-binding specificities and tropism can appear. The identification of virus receptors and the characterization of virus-receptor interactions have been major research goals in virology for the last two decades. In this chapter, we will describe, from a structural perspective, several virus-receptor interactions and the active role of receptor molecules in virus entry. PMID:23737061

  11. Propagation of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Dannevig, B H; Falk, K; Press, C M

    1995-01-01

    A long-term cell line supporting growth of the infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus has been established. The cell line (SHK-1) was developed from a culture of head kidney leucocytes from Atlantic salmon, and exhibited macrophage-like enzyme reactivities. By means of transmission experiments, ISA infectivity of cell culture medium could be demonstrated from day 5 after infection of SHK-1 cells with ISA-infective tissue homogenate. ISA infectivity of cell culture medium increased following repeated passages of virus. ISA-infected cell cultures develop cytopathic effects (CPE), making quantitation of virus possible. The development of CPE in ISA virus infected cells was inhibited by ammonium chloride, chloroquine and bafilomycin A, suggesting that infection of SHK-1 cells with ISA virus requires a low-pH step. PMID:8581019

  12. African swine fever virus-cell interactions: from virus entry to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Covadonga; Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Angel; Cabezas, Marta; Hernaez, Bruno; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    Viruses have adapted to evolve complex and dynamic interactions with their host cell. The viral entry mechanism determines viral tropism and pathogenesis. The entry of African swine fever virus (ASFV) is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, but other pathways have been described such as macropinocytosis. During endocytosis, ASFV viral particles undergo disassembly in various compartments that the virus passes through en route to the site of replication. This disassembly relies on the acid pH of late endosomes and on microtubule cytoskeleton transport. ASFV interacts with several regulatory pathways to establish an optimal environment for replication. Examples of these pathways include small GTPases, actin-related signaling, and lipid signaling. Cellular cholesterol, the entire cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and phosphoinositides are central molecular networks required for successful infection. Here we report new data on the conformation of the viral replication site or viral factory and the remodeling of the subcellular structures. We review the virus-induced regulation of ER stress, apoptosis and autophagy as key mechanisms of cell survival and determinants of infection outcome. Finally, future challenges for the development of new preventive strategies against this virus are proposed on the basis of current knowledge about ASFV-host interactions.

  13. Expression of baboon endogenous virus in exogenously infected baboon cells.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, G; Foote, L; Heberling, R L; Kalter, S S

    1979-04-01

    Strains of low-passage, fetal diploid, baboon (Papio cynocephalus) fibroblasts were susceptible to exogenous infection with three independent isolates of baboon endogenous virus, as measured by an immunofluorescence assay specific for viral p28. Infectivity of the M7 strain of baboon endogenous virus for baboon cells of fetal skin muscle origin was equivalent to that for human and dog cells in that similar, linear, single-hit titration patterns were obtained. The assay for supernatant RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, however, showed that baboon cells produced only low levels of virus after infection compared with the production by heterologous cells. The results showed that baboon endogenous virus was capable of penetrating baboon cells and that viral genes were expressed in infected cells. Replication of complete infectious virus was restricted, however, indicating that in this primate system homologous cells differentially regulated the expression of viral genes.

  14. Events following the infections of enucleate cells with measles virus.

    PubMed

    Follett, E A; Pringle, C R; Pennington, T H

    1976-08-01

    The development of measles virus (Edmonston) and SSPE measles virus (Horta-Barbosa) has been examined in enucleate BSC 1 cells. New antigen synthesis in measles virus infected enucleate cells has been demonstrated by fluorescent antibody, by the formation of extensive syncytia from enucleate cells alone and by analysis of polypeptide formation by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All polypeptides formed in nucleate cells were also present in enucleate cells but the amount synthesized was reduced to around 20% of that in nucleate cells. There was also a significant reduction in the amount of antigen detected by fluorescent antibody in enucleate as compared to nucleate preparations. Examination of RNA synthesis in infected enucleate cells revealed only a marginal increase in acid-insoluble material. Titration of the output of infectious virus from enucleate cells infected at both 37 and 31 degrees C indicated a consistent reduction of almost two log units compared to nucleate cells. That the enucleate cells were capable of replicating input genome at these times was demonstrated by the successful growth of respiratory syncytial virus, both at 37 and 31 degrees C. SSPE measles virus grew to higher yield in nucleate BSC 1 than measles virus but there was again a reduction of more than two log units in enucleate cells. All polypeptides synthesized in SSPE infected nucleate cells were apparent in enucleate cells.

  15. The use of quantitative PCR to detect Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 DNA from a high proportion of queens and their kittens.

    PubMed

    Thomson, N A; Dunowska, M; Munday, J S

    2015-02-25

    Squamous cell carcinomas are common feline skin cancers that have been associated with infection with Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV-2). Currently, little is known about the epidemiology of FcaPV-2 infection. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time PCR assay to quantify FcaPV-2 DNA in plucked hairs and skin swabs from 11 healthy breeding queens and their kittens. Samples were taken prior to kittening and then 2, 7 and 28 days after kittening to determine the age at which the kittens were first exposed to the virus. FcaPV-2 DNA was amplified from all of the queens and from 91% of the kittens at 2 days of age. There was a wide range in the quantity of FcaPV-2 DNA detected, from 1 to 92,520 copies per swab, and from 0.01 to 234 copies per copy of reference gene DNA in the hair plucks. The quantity of FcaPV-2 DNA detected in samples collected from the kittens was strongly correlated to that of their respective queens and the mean viral DNA load was similar for cats within a household but varied significantly between households. This is the first time that quantitative PCR has been used to detect FcaPV-2 DNA and the results suggest that the virus is ubiquitous but there is a wide variation of viral DNA loads. Kittens appear to be exposed to FcaPV-2 early in life, presumably from direct contact with their queen. These results are important when determining if FcaPV-2 infection of cats is preventable. PMID:25541379

  16. Retrotransposition and Cell-to-Cell Transfer of Foamy Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, Martin; Rammling, Matthias; Juretzek, Thomas; Lindemann, Dirk; Rethwilm, Axel

    2003-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the prototype foamy virus (PFV) replication pathway has been reported to consist of the ability to retrotranspose intracellularly with high efficiency (M. Heinkelein, T. Pietschmann, G. Jármy, M. Dressler, H. Imrich, J. Thurow, D. Lindemann, M. Bock, A. Moebes, J. Roy, O. Herchenröder, and A. Rethwilm, EMBO J. 19:3436-3345, 2000). PFV intracellular retrotransposition (IRT) was reported to be enhanced by coexpression of fusion-defective envelope protein. To investigate the possibility of cell-to-cell transfer of PFV genomes, which could mimic IRT, we performed cocultivation experiments with cells transfected with an IRT-competent and marker gene-expressing PFV vector together with cells expressing a different marker and measured cells positive for both markers. The findings corroborated the initial report on IRT of Env-deficient PFV. Furthermore, they indicated that viral cores that have incorporated fusion-deficient Env can be transferred from cell to cell in a cell type-specific manor. One possible explanation consists of a minor alternative cleavage site in Env that can be used to expose the fusion peptide of the Env transmembrane protein, which appears to be required for virus uptake. PMID:14557671

  17. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  18. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  19. Human dendritic cells as targets of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Marovich, M; Grouard-Vogel, G; Louder, M; Eller, M; Sun, W; Wu, S J; Putvatana, R; Murphy, G; Tassaneetrithep, B; Burgess, T; Birx, D; Hayes, C; Schlesinger-Frankel, S; Mascola, J

    2001-12-01

    Dengue virus infections are an emerging global threat. Severe dengue infection is manifested as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, both of which can be fatal complications. Factors predisposing to complicated disease and pathogenesis of severe infections are discussed. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and ELISA techniques, we studied the cellular targets of dengue virus infection, at both the clinical (in vivo) and the laboratory (in vitro) level. Resident skin dendritic cells are targets of dengue virus infection as demonstrated in a skin biopsy from a dengue vaccine recipient. We show that factors influencing infection of monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells are different. Immature dendritic cells were found to be the cells most permissive for dengue infection and maybe early targets for infection. Immature dendritic cells exposed to dengue virus produce TNF-alpha protein. Some of these immature dendritic cells undergo TNF-alpha mediated maturation as a consequence of exposure to the dengue virus. PMID:11924831

  20. [Study of biological characteristics of the IVpi-189 virus derived from persistent influenza A virus-infected cell line].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Lei-Ying; Na, Li-Xin; Yan, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Bei-Xing

    2011-07-01

    To investigate biological characteristics of the IVpi-189 progeny virus derived from the culture of influenza A virus as a live-attenuated vaccine candidate. Persistent infection of a cultured cell line with influenza A virus (MDCK-IVpi) was established by incubating continuously influenza virus-infected cells at a lower temperature. The infectious progeny virus derived from MDCK-IVpi cells at the 189rd subculture was designated as the IVpi-189 strain of influenza virus. The cytopathic effect induced by IVpi-189 virus was observed under different temperature conditions. The production of infectious progeny virus was examined at 38 and 32 degrees C by plaque titration of cell-associated and released virus. IVpi-189 virus showed cytopathic effect as strong as that of IVwt in infected cell line of MDCK at 32 degrees C. However, when culture temperature was raised to 38 degrees C, the cytopathic effect induced by IVpi-189 virus was delayed and less pronounced. Virus growth in IVpi-189 virus-infected cells at 38 degrees C was significantly reduced as compared with that of IVwt virus, although both viruses yielded nearly equivalent high titers of cell-associated and released virus at 32 degrees C. The reasons of the decreased proliferative ability of IVpi-189 virus at high culture temperature were unrelated with virus inactivation or the release of progeny virus, but associated with the decreased replication of infectious progeny virus in the infected cells. IVpi-189 virus derived from MDCK cells infected persistently with influenza A virus showed biological characteristics as a potential live-attenuated vaccine candidate.

  1. High Genetic Stability of Dengue Virus Propagated in MRC-5 Cells as Compared to the Virus Propagated in Vero Cells

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2008-01-01

    This work investigated the replication kinetics of the four dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1 to DEN-4), including dengue virus type 4 (DEN-4) recovered from an infectious cDNA clone, in Vero cells and in MRC-5 cells grown on Cytodex 1 microcarriers. DEN-1 strain Hawaii, DEN-2 strain NGC, DEN-3 strain H-87, and DEN-4 strain H-241 , and DEN-4 strain 814669 derived from cloned DNA, were used to infect Vero cells and MRC-5 cells grown in serum-free or serum-containing microcarrier cultures. Serum-free and serum-containing cultures were found to yield comparable titers of these viruses. The cloned DNA-derived DEN-4 started genetically more homogeneous was used to investigate the genetic stability of the virus propagated in Vero cells and MRC-5 cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the DEN-4 propagated in MRC-5 cells maintained a high genetic stability, compared to the virus propagated in Vero cells. Amino acid substitutions of Gly104Cys and Phe108Ile were detected at 70%, 60%, respectively, in the envelope (E) protein of DEN-4 propagated in Vero cells, whereas a single mutation of Glu345Lys was detected at 50% in E of the virus propagated in MRC-5 cells. Sequencing of multiple clones of three separate DNA fragments spanning 40% of the genome also indicated that DEN-4 propagated in Vero cells contained a higher number of mutations than the virus growing in MRC-5 cells. Although Vero cells yielded a peak virus titer approximately 1 to 17 folds higher than MRC-5 cells, cloned DEN-4 from MRC-5 cells maintained a greater stability than the virus from Vero cells. Serum-free microcarrier cultures of MRC-5 cells offer a potentially valuable system for the large-scale production of live-attenuated DEN vaccines. PMID:18350148

  2. Enhancement of Virus Replication in An Influenza A Virus NS1-Expresssing 293 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wu Yang; Tao, Xiao Yan; Lyu, Xin Jun; Yu, Peng Cheng; Lu, Zhuo Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus, which is absent from the viral particle, but highly expressed in infected cells, strongly antagonizes the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response. We engineered an NS1-expressing 293 (293-NS1) cell line with no response to IFN stimulation. Compared with the parental 293 cells, the IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells improved the growth capacity of various viruses, but the introduction of NS1 barely enhanced the propagation of Tahyna virus, a negative-strand RNA virus. In particular, fastidious enteric adenovirus that replicates poorly in 293 cells may grow more efficiently in 293-NS1 cells; thus, IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells might be of great value in diagnostic laboratories for the cultivation and isolation of human enteric adenoviruses.

  3. Enhancement of Virus Replication in An Influenza A Virus NS1-Expresssing 293 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wu Yang; Tao, Xiao Yan; Lyu, Xin Jun; Yu, Peng Cheng; Lu, Zhuo Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus, which is absent from the viral particle, but highly expressed in infected cells, strongly antagonizes the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response. We engineered an NS1-expressing 293 (293-NS1) cell line with no response to IFN stimulation. Compared with the parental 293 cells, the IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells improved the growth capacity of various viruses, but the introduction of NS1 barely enhanced the propagation of Tahyna virus, a negative-strand RNA virus. In particular, fastidious enteric adenovirus that replicates poorly in 293 cells may grow more efficiently in 293-NS1 cells; thus, IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells might be of great value in diagnostic laboratories for the cultivation and isolation of human enteric adenoviruses. PMID:27109134

  4. Beyond the Black Queen Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mas, Alix; Jamshidi, Shahrad; Lagadeuc, Yvan; Eveillard, Damien; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The Black Queen Hypothesis, recently proposed to explain an evolution of dependency based on gene loss, is gaining ground. This paper focuses on how the evolution of dependency transforms interactions and the community. Using agent-based modeling we suggest that species specializing in the consumption of a common good escape competition and therefore favor coexistence. This evolutionary trajectory could open the way for novel long-lasting interactions and a need to revisit the classically accepted assembly rules. Such evolutionary events also reshape the structure and dynamics of communities, depending on the spatial heterogeneity of the common good production. Let Black be the new black! PMID:26953598

  5. Bluetongue virus mammalian cell surface receptors: Role of glycosaminologycans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binding and infection rates of bluetongue virus (BTV) on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and glucosaminoglycan deficient and wild type CHO cell lines and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were determined in the presence or absence of GAG and sialic acid antagonists. Data showed that virus binding ...

  6. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V.; Albulescu, Irina C.; van Hemert, Martijn J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied previously using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which CHIKV enters the cell: several studies suggest that CHIKV enters via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while others show that it enters independently of clathrin. Here we applied live-cell microscopy and monitored the cell entry behavior of single CHIKV particles in living cells transfected with fluorescent marker proteins. This approach allowed us to obtain detailed insight into the dynamic events that occur during CHIKV entry. We observed that almost all particles fused within 20 min after addition to the cells. Of the particles that fused, the vast majority first colocalized with clathrin. The average time from initial colocalization with clathrin to the moment of membrane fusion was 1.7 min, highlighting the rapidity of the cell entry process of CHIKV. Furthermore, these results show that the virus spends a relatively long time searching for a receptor. Membrane fusion was observed predominantly from within Rab5-positive endosomes and often occurred within 40 s after delivery to endosomes. Furthermore, we confirmed that a valine at position 226 of the E1 protein enhances the cholesterol-dependent membrane fusion properties of CHIKV. To conclude, our work confirms that CHIKV enters cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and shows that fusion occurs from within acidic early endosomes. IMPORTANCE Since its reemergence in 2004, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has spread rapidly around the world, leading to millions of infections. CHIKV often causes chikungunya fever, a self-limiting febrile illness with severe arthralgia. Currently, no vaccine or specific antiviral treatment against CHIKV is available. A potential antiviral strategy is to interfere with the cell

  7. Easy and Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus by Live Fluorescent Visualization of Virus-Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Shibahara, Nona; Suzuki, Chihiro; Kishikawa, Akiko; Fukushima, Keijo; Takano, Maiko; Suzuki, Fumie; Wada, Hirohisa; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akira; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mumps viruses show diverse cytopathic effects (CPEs) of infected cells and viral plaque formation (no CPE or no plaque formation in some cases) depending on the viral strain, highlighting the difficulty in mumps laboratory studies. In our previous study, a new sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac), was developed for visualization of sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac can easily and rapidly perform histochemical fluorescent visualization of influenza viruses and virus-infected cells without an antiviral antibody and cell fixation. In the present study, the potential utility of BTP3-Neu5Ac for rapid detection of mumps virus was demonstrated. BTP3-Neu5Ac could visualize dot-blotted mumps virus, virus-infected cells, and plaques (plaques should be called focuses due to staining of infected cells in this study), even if a CPE was not observed. Furthermore, virus cultivation was possible by direct pick-up from a fluorescent focus. In conventional methods, visible appearance of the CPE and focuses often requires more than 6 days after infection, but the new method with BTP3-Neu5Ac clearly visualized infected cells after 2 days and focuses after 4 days. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is a precise, easy, and rapid assay for confirmation and titration of mumps virus.

  8. Cell culture adapted sheeppox virus as a challenge virus for potency testing of sheeppox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, M; Bhanuprakash, V; Kallesh, D J; Balamurugan, V; Pande, A; Singh, R K

    2008-10-01

    Sheeppox virus from an outbreak of sheeppox that occurred in Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir, India) in 2000 was isolated by inoculation of susceptible sheep and further re-isolated in cell culture. The field virus, adapted to grow in lamb testes culture, was evaluated for its potential use as challenge virus in potency testing of sheeppox vaccine currently in use. The virus (passage 6) produced severe disease in susceptible sheep when inoculated subcutaneously with a dose of 106.2 TCID50. The virus identity was confirmed by PCR, sequencing of P32 gene and species-specific signature residues identified in deduced aa sequence of the gene. The virus was successfully evaluated for its virulence using two batches of sheep pox vaccines. Use of this field virus enables consistent potency experiments of sheeppox vaccines avoiding use of animals for its propagation and titration.

  9. Cultivation of vaccinia virus in sheep kidney cell cultures.

    PubMed

    SUBRAMANYAM, P; DIVAKARAN, S; VINODRAJ, P

    1961-01-01

    Attempts to find a suitable tissue for the preparation of cell monolayers for the cultivation of vaccinia virus and for the titration of this virus and its antibodies resulted in the use of sheep kidneys procured from freshly slaughtered healthy young sheep. The cultures are easy and economical to prepare and support the multiplication of the virus well. They can be used for the titration of the virus and its antibody and their sensitivity to virus is comparable to that of the chorio-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos. Preliminary trials indicate that the sheep kidney cell culture virus can be freeze-dried without suffering a significant loss in titre. Studies are in progress to determine the efficacy of a vaccine prepared from sheep kidney cell cultures.

  10. Isolation of dengue virus with a human promonocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, W T; Chen, C L; Lee, S S; Chan, C C; Lo, F L; Ko, Y C

    1991-05-01

    In October-November, 1988 there was an outbreak of dengue fever in the Kaoshiung area of southern Taiwan. We collected 100 serum samples from 96 patients at the onset of their fever for virus cultures and identification. A human promonocyte cell line (HL-CZ) established in our laboratory was used and proved to be susceptible for dengue virus propagation. Type 1 dengue virus in the HL-CZ cell culture was identified by immunofluorescence tests using monoclonal antibodies, and also by hemagglutination tests with goose red blood cells. The density of the virus particles, as measured by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, ranged from 1.186 to 1.224 g/ml. The virus yield from this cell culture is comparable with that from the C6/36 mosquito cell line. There was a significant correlation between the antibody responses tested with Western dot blots and hemagglutination inhibition techniques.

  11. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    PubMed

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases.

  12. Interaction of human tumor viruses with host cell surface receptors and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-05-22

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  13. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  14. The ancient Virus World and evolution of cells

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V; Senkevich, Tatiana G; Dolja, Valerian V

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent advances in genomics of viruses and cellular life forms have greatly stimulated interest in the origins and evolution of viruses and, for the first time, offer an opportunity for a data-driven exploration of the deepest roots of viruses. Here we briefly review the current views of virus evolution and propose a new, coherent scenario that appears to be best compatible with comparative-genomic data and is naturally linked to models of cellular evolution that, from independent considerations, seem to be the most parsimonious among the existing ones. Results Several genes coding for key proteins involved in viral replication and morphogenesis as well as the major capsid protein of icosahedral virions are shared by many groups of RNA and DNA viruses but are missing in cellular life forms. On the basis of this key observation and the data on extensive genetic exchange between diverse viruses, we propose the concept of the ancient virus world. The virus world is construed as a distinct contingent of viral genes that continuously retained its identity throughout the entire history of life. Under this concept, the principal lineages of viruses and related selfish agents emerged from the primordial pool of primitive genetic elements, the ancestors of both cellular and viral genes. Thus, notwithstanding the numerous gene exchanges and acquisitions attributed to later stages of evolution, most, if not all, modern viruses and other selfish agents are inferred to descend from elements that belonged to the primordial genetic pool. In this pool, RNA viruses would evolve first, followed by retroid elements, and DNA viruses. The Virus World concept is predicated on a model of early evolution whereby emergence of substantial genetic diversity antedates the advent of full-fledged cells, allowing for extensive gene mixing at this early stage of evolution. We outline a scenario of the origin of the main classes of viruses in conjunction with a specific model of

  15. Virus-specific RNA synthesis in interferon-treated mouse cells productively infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; MacIsaac, P

    1978-01-01

    Mouse cells productively infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus were treated with interferon, and intracellular virus-specific RNA was studied by hybridization with complementary DNA. The steady-state concentration of virus-specific RNA in interferon-treated cells was somewhat greater than that in untreated cells, and the rates of virus-specific RNA synthesis were approximately equal in treated and untreated cells. PMID:691118

  16. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  17. In vivo and in vitro infection dynamics of honey bee viruses

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Dolezal, Adam G.; Goblirsch, Michael J.; Miller, W. Allen; Toth, Amy L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee (Apis mellifera) is commonly infected by multiple viruses. We developed an experimental system for the study of such mixed viral infections in newly emerged honey bees and in the cell line AmE-711, derived from honey bee embryos. When inoculating a mixture of iflavirids [sacbrood bee virus (SBV), deformed wing virus (DWV)] and dicistrovirids [Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV)] in both live bee and cell culture assays, IAPV replicated to higher levels than other viruses despite the fact that SBV was the major component of the inoculum mixture. When a different virus mix composed mainly of the dicistrovirid Kashmir bee virus (KBV) was tested in cell culture, the outcome was a rapid increase in KBV but not IAPV. We also sequenced the complete genome of an isolate of DWV that covertly infects the AmE-711 cell line, and found that this virus does not prevent IAPV and KBV from accumulating to high levels and causing cytopathic effects. These results indicate that different mechanisms of virus-host interaction affect virus dynamics, including complex virus-virus interactions, superinfections, specific virus saturation limits in cells and virus specialization for different cell types. PMID:26923109

  18. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  19. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-07

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  20. CD81 is dispensable for hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell transmission in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Evans, Matthew J; Bitzegeio, Julia; Koutsoudakis, George; Owsianka, Ania M; Angus, Allan G N; Keck, Zhen-Yong; Foung, Steven K H; Pietschmann, Thomas; Rice, Charles M; Patel, Arvind H

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects cells by the direct uptake of cell-free virus following virus engagement with specific cell receptors such as CD81. Recent data have shown that HCV is also capable of direct cell-to-cell transmission, although the role of CD81 in this process is disputed. Here, we generated cell culture infectious strain JFH1 HCV (HCVcc) genomes carrying an alanine substitution of E2 residues W529 or D535 that are critical for binding to CD81 and infectivity. Co-cultivation of these cells with naïve cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) resulted in a small number of cells co-expressing both EGFP and HCV NS5A, showing that the HCVcc mutants are capable of cell-to-cell spread. In contrast, no cell-to-cell transmission from JFH1(DeltaE1E2)-transfected cells occurred, indicating that the HCV glycoproteins are essential for this process. The frequency of cell-to-cell transmission of JFH1(W529A) was unaffected by the presence of neutralizing antibodies that inhibit E2-CD81 interactions. By using cell lines that expressed little or no CD81 and that were refractive to infection with cell-free virus, we showed that the occurrence of viral cell-to-cell transmission is not influenced by the levels of CD81 on either donor or recipient cells. Thus, our results show that CD81 plays no role in the cell-to-cell spread of HCVcc and that this mode of transmission is shielded from neutralizing antibodies. These data suggest that therapeutic interventions targeting the entry of cell-free HCV may not be sufficient in controlling an ongoing chronic infection, but need to be complemented by additional strategies aimed at disrupting direct cell-to-cell viral transmission. PMID:19088272

  1. Translation of tobacco mosaic virus RNA In Acetabularia cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Cairns, E; Sarkar, S; Schweiger, H G

    1978-11-01

    Isolated Acetabularia nuclei were microinjected with Tobacco Mosaic Virus RNA and then implanted into an anucleate posterior fragment of an Acetabularia cell. Injected RNA was translated in the Acetabularia cytoplasm from the first to twelfth day after implantation of the nuclei. The production of specific virus proteins was detected and localized in the Acetabularia cytoplasm by an immunofluorescence precipitation technique.

  2. Comparing alternative methods for holding virgin honey bee queens for one week in mailing cages before mating.

    PubMed

    Bigio, Gianluigi; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2012-01-01

    In beekeeping, queen honey bees are often temporarily kept alive in cages. We determined the survival of newly-emerged virgin honey bee queens every day for seven days in an experiment that simultaneously investigated three factors: queen cage type (wooden three-hole or plastic), attendant workers (present or absent) and food type (sugar candy, honey, or both). Ten queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen survival were analysed. Across all combinations, attendant bees significantly increased survival (18% vs. 53%, p<0.001). In addition, there was an interaction between food type and cage type (p<0.001) with the honey and plastic cage combination giving reduced survival. An additional group of queens was reared and held for seven days using the best method, and then directly introduced using smoke into queenless nucleus colonies that had been dequeened five days previously. Acceptance was high (80%, 8/10) showing that this combination is also suitable for preparing queens for introduction into colonies. Having a simple method for keeping newly-emerged virgin queens alive in cages for one week and acceptable for introduction into queenless colonies will be useful in honey bee breeding. In particular, it facilitates the screening of many queens for genetic or phenotypic characteristics when only a small proportion meets the desired criteria. These can then be introduced into queenless hives for natural mating or insemination, both of which take place when queens are one week old.

  3. Comparing Alternative Methods for Holding Virgin Honey Bee Queens for One Week in Mailing Cages before Mating

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Gianluigi; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In beekeeping, queen honey bees are often temporarily kept alive in cages. We determined the survival of newly-emerged virgin honey bee queens every day for seven days in an experiment that simultaneously investigated three factors: queen cage type (wooden three-hole or plastic), attendant workers (present or absent) and food type (sugar candy, honey, or both). Ten queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen survival were analysed. Across all combinations, attendant bees significantly increased survival (18% vs. 53%, p<0.001). In addition, there was an interaction between food type and cage type (p<0.001) with the honey and plastic cage combination giving reduced survival. An additional group of queens was reared and held for seven days using the best method, and then directly introduced using smoke into queenless nucleus colonies that had been dequeened five days previously. Acceptance was high (80%, 8/10) showing that this combination is also suitable for preparing queens for introduction into colonies. Having a simple method for keeping newly-emerged virgin queens alive in cages for one week and acceptable for introduction into queenless colonies will be useful in honey bee breeding. In particular, it facilitates the screening of many queens for genetic or phenotypic characteristics when only a small proportion meets the desired criteria. These can then be introduced into queenless hives for natural mating or insemination, both of which take place when queens are one week old. PMID:23166832

  4. Chemical Mating Attractants in the Queen Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Gary, N E

    1962-06-01

    Drone attraction to ether extracts of virgin queens (Apis mellifera L.) demonstrated that chemical communication enables the drones to orient themselves to queens during mating flights. The primary source of queen mating attractants is the mandibular glands. Fractionation of mandibular gland lipids yielded several attractive fractions that may act jointly. One fraction was queen substance (9-oxodec-2-enoic acid).

  5. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. 622... ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.493 Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat...

  6. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. 622... ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.493 Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat...

  7. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  8. Diagnostic approaches for viruses and prions in stem cell banks

    SciTech Connect

    Cobo, Fernando . E-mail: fernancobo@fundacionhvn.org; Talavera, Paloma; Concha, Angel

    2006-03-30

    Some stem cell lines may contain an endogenous virus or can be contaminated with exogenous viruses (even of animal origin) and may secrete viral particles or express viral antigens on their surface. Moreover, certain biotechnological products (e.g. bovine fetal serum, murine feeder cells) may contain prion particles. Viral and prion contamination of cell cultures and 'feeder' cells, which is a common risk in all biotechnological products derived from the cell lines, is the most challenging and potentially serious outcome to address, due to the difficulty involved in virus and prion detection and the potential to cause serious disease in recipients of these cell products. Stem cell banks should introduce adequate quality assurance programs like the microbiological control program and can provide researchers with valuable support in the standardization and safety of procedures and protocols used for the viral and prion testing and in validation programs to assure the quality and safety of the cells.

  9. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  10. Nipah Virus Entry and Egress from Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamp, Boris; Dietzel, Erik; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Sauerhering, Lucie; Erbar, Stephanie; Weingartl, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV) infections are transmitted via airway secretions and urine, commonly via the respiratory route. Epithelial surfaces represent important replication sites in both primary and systemic infection phases. NiV entry and spread from polarized epithelial cells therefore determine virus entry and dissemination within a new host and influence virus shedding via mucosal surfaces in the respiratory and urinary tract. To date, there is no knowledge regarding the entry and exit sites of NiV in polarized epithelial cells. In this report, we show for the first time that NiV can infect polarized kidney epithelial cells (MDCK) from both cell surfaces, while virus release is primarily restricted to the apical plasma membrane. Substantial amounts of basolateral infectivity were detected only after infection with high virus doses, at time points when the integrity of the cell monolayer was largely disrupted as a result of cell-to-cell fusion. Confocal immunofluorescence analyses of envelope protein distribution at early and late infection stages suggested that apical virus budding is determined by the polarized sorting of the NiV matrix protein, M. Studies with stably M-expressing and with monensin-treated cells furthermore demonstrated that M protein transport is independent from the glycoproteins, implying that the M protein possesses an intrinsic apical targeting signal. PMID:23283941

  11. Glandular Epithelium as a Possible Source of a Fertility Signal in Ectatomma tuberculatum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Queens

    PubMed Central

    da Hora, Riviane Rodigues; Delabie, Jacques Hubert Charles; dos Santos, Carolina Gonçalves; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The wax layer covering the insect's cuticle plays an important protective role, as for example, uncontrolled water loss. In social insects, wax production is well-known in some bees that use it for nest building. Curiously, mated-fertile queens of the ant Ectatomma tuberculatum produce an uncommon extra-wax coat and, consequently queens (mated-fertile females) are matte due to such extra cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) coat that covers the cuticle and masks the brightness of the queens' cuticle while gynes (virgin-infertile queens) are shiny. In this study, histological analysis showed differences in the epidermis between fertile (i.e., queens or gynes with highly ovarian activity) and infertile females (gynes or workers with non developed ovaries). In fertile females the epidermis is a single layer of cubic cells found in all body segments whereas in infertile females it is a thin layer of flattened cells. Ultrastructural features showed active secretory tissue from fertile females similar to the glandular epithelium of wax-producing bees (type I gland). Different hypotheses related to the functions of the glandular epithelium exclusive to the E. tuberculatum fertile queens are discussed. PMID:20419093

  12. Tin Oxide Nanowires Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Entry and Cell-to-Cell Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Paulowicz, Ingo; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Adelung, Rainer; Shukla, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    The advent of nanotechnology has ushered in the use of modified nanoparticles as potential antiviral agents against diseases such as herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1) (HSV-2), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), monkeypox virus, and hepatitis B virus. Here we describe the application of tin oxide (SnO2) nanowires as an effective treatment against HSV-1 infection. SnO2 nanowires work as a carrier of negatively charged structures that compete with HSV-1 attachment to cell bound heparan sulfate (HS), therefore inhibiting entry and subsequent cell-to-cell spread. This promising new approach can be developed into a novel form of broad-spectrum antiviral therapy especially since HS has been shown to serve as a cellular co-receptor for a number of other viruses as well, including the respiratory syncytial virus, adeno-associated virus type 2, and human papilloma virus. PMID:23110193

  13. Influenza virus and endothelial cells: a species specific relationship

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kirsty R.; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J. B.; Reperant, Leslie A.; Richard, Mathilde; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. The original reservoirs of IAV are wild waterfowl and shorebirds, where virus infection causes limited, if any, disease. Both in humans and in wild waterbirds, epithelial cells are the main target of infection. However, influenza virus can spread from wild bird species to terrestrial poultry. Here, the virus can evolve into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Part of this evolution involves increased viral tropism for endothelial cells. HPAI virus infections not only cause severe disease in chickens and other terrestrial poultry species but can also spread to humans and back to wild bird populations. Here, we review the role of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection in wild birds, terrestrial poultry and humans with a particular focus on HPAI viruses. We demonstrate that whilst the endothelium is an important target of virus infection in terrestrial poultry and some wild bird species, in humans the endothelium is more important in controlling the local inflammatory milieu. Thus, the endothelium plays an important, but species-specific, role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection. PMID:25520707

  14. Monitoring Physiological Changes in Haloarchaeal Cell during Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Svirskaitė, Julija; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Daugelavičius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    The slow rate of adsorption and non-synchronous release of some archaeal viruses have hindered more thorough analyses of the mechanisms of archaeal virus release. To address this deficit, we utilized four viruses that infect Haloarcula hispanica that represent the four virion morphotypes currently known for halophilic euryarchaeal viruses: (1) icosahedral internal membrane-containing SH1; (2) icosahedral tailed HHTV-1; (3) spindle-shaped His1; and (4) pleomorphic His2. To discern the events occurring as the progeny viruses exit, we monitored culture turbidity, as well as viable cell and progeny virus counts of infected and uninfected cultures. In addition to these traditional metrics, we measured three parameters associated with membrane integrity: the binding of the lipophilic anion phenyldicarbaundecaborane, oxygen consumption, and both intra- and extra-cellular ATP levels. PMID:26927156

  15. 75 FR 68397 - DeQueen and Eastern Railroad, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-DeQueen and Eastern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Surface Transportation Board DeQueen and Eastern Railroad, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--DeQueen and Eastern Railroad Company DeQueen and Eastern Railroad, LLC (DQE), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from DeQueen and Eastern Railroad Company...

  16. Imaging of influenza virus sialidase activity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Shunsaku; Takano, Maiko; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Tsubasa; Matsuda, Yukino; Minami, Akira; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Toshihiro; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Thomson, Robin; von Itzstein, Mark; Suzuki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is rich in variation and mutations. It would be very convenient for virus detection and isolation to histochemically detect viral infection regardless of variation and mutations. Here, we established a histochemical imaging assay for influenza virus sialidase activity in living cells by using a new fluorescent sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac). The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay histochemically visualized influenza virus-infected cells regardless of viral hosts and subtypes. Influenza virus neuraminidase-expressed cells, viral focus formation, and virus-infected locations in mice lung tissues were easily, rapidly, and sensitively detected by the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay. Histochemical visualization with the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is extremely useful for detection of influenza viruses without the need for fixation or a specific antibody. This novel assay should greatly improve the efficiency of detection, titration, and isolation of influenza viruses and might contribute to research on viral sialidase.

  17. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; de Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient’s blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible. PMID:27581122

  18. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes da; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo de

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient's blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible.

  19. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes da; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo de

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient's blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible. PMID:27581122

  20. [Culture and control of cells producing bovine leukemia virus].

    PubMed

    Granátová, M

    1987-10-01

    In the field surveys of the occurrence of enzootic bovine leucosis caused by the bovine leucosis virus (BLV), the identification of positive animals is based on the detection of specific antiviral antibodies by serological methods. The reliability of these tests (particularly their sensitivity and specificity) depends on the quality of the virus antigen. The preparation of the antigen is based on the cultivation of BLV virus in cultures of the FLS cell line. A modified procedure of preparing the BLV antigen in the FLS cell culture is described, along with the control of its production by the immunoperoxidase test. PMID:2827363

  1. Growth of respiratory syncytial virus in mink lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeolekar, L R; Damle, R G; Basu, A; Rao, B L

    2002-12-01

    Mink lung epithelial cells (Mv-1-Lu) were tested for their ability to support the growth and serial passage of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro. Indian isolates of RSV induced distinctive cytopathic effect with typical rounding of cells followed by detachment with more than 50 per cent cells showing bright fluorescence using anti-RSV monoclonal antibodies in immunofluorescence test. Serial passage of RSV was possible in Mv-1-Lu cells without loss of sensitivity of the cells for virus growth. Titration of cell associated virus and virus released in the supernatant indicated that 60 per cent of the virus was released in the supernatant, and 40 per cent remained cell associated. Transmission electron microscopic studies of negatively stained RSV particles and ultra-thin sections of RSV infected Mv-1-Lu cells showed roughly spherical particles with club shaped projections, budding from the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicate that Mv-1-Lu cell line is suitable for the growth and propagation of RSV.

  2. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Wang, D.Q.; Maru, M.; Nakajima, K.; Kato, S.; Kurimura, T.; Wakamiya, N. )

    1990-11-01

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity.

  3. Recent progress in research on cell-to-cell movement of rice viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hiraguri, Akihiro; Netsu, Osamu; Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Nyunoya, Hiroshi; Sasaya, Takahide

    2014-01-01

    To adapt to plants as hosts, plant viruses have evolutionally needed the capacity to modify the host plasmodesmata (PD) that connect adjacent cells. Plant viruses have acquired one or more genes that encode movement proteins (MPs), which facilitate the cell-to-cell movement of infectious virus entities through PD to adjacent cells. Because of the diversity in their genome organization and in their coding sequences, rice viruses may each have a distinct cell-to-cell movement strategy. The complexity of their unusual genome organizations and replication strategies has so far hampered reverse genetic research on their genome in efforts to investigate virally encoded proteins that are involved in viral movement. However, the MP of a particular virus can complement defects in cell-to-cell movement of other distantly related or even unrelated viruses. Trans-complementation experiments using a combination of a movement-defective virus and viral proteins of interest to identify MPs of several rice viruses have recently been successful. In this article, we reviewed recent research that has advanced our understanding of cell-to-cell movement of rice viruses. PMID:24904532

  4. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  5. Dengue-2 virus infection of human mononuclear cell lines and establishment of persistent infections.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Kontny, U; Janus, J; Ennis, F A

    1990-01-01

    Twenty three human mononuclear cell lines including ten myelomonocytic cell lines, eight B cell lines and five T cell lines, were examined to determine whether they could be infected with dengue-2 virus. All the cell lines were infected with dengue-2 virus as determined by immunofluorescent staining and by virus titration of culture supernatant fluids. K562, Jiyoye and Jurkat, respectively, showed the highest percentage of infected cells of these myelomonocytic, B and T cell lines. Antibody to dengue-2 virus at subneutralizing concentrations augmented dengue-2 virus infection of myelomonocytic cell lines, but not of B cell lines or of T cell lines. Persistent dengue-2 virus infection was established using a myelomonocytic cell line (K562), a B cell line (Raji), and a T cell line (HSB-2). These cell lines maintained a high percentage (more than 70%) of dengue-2 virus antigen-positive cells for at least 25 weeks. Very low titers of infectious dengue-2 virus were detected in the culture supernatant fluids of the persistently infected cells. Dengue-2 virus antigen-positive Raji cell clones were established from persistently-infected Raji cells using limiting dilutions and all of the cells in these clones were dengue-2 virus antigen-positive. These findings demonstrate that a variety of human mononuclear cell lines can be infected with dengue-2 virus and may be useful as models for the analysis of dengue virus-human cell interactions in dengue virus infections.

  6. Infection of cells by Sindbis virus at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Gongbo; Hernandez, Raquel; Weninger, Keith; Brown, Dennis T. . E-mail: dennis_brown@ncsu.edu

    2007-06-05

    Sindbis virus, which belongs to the family Togaviridae genus Alphavirus infects a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate cells. The initial steps of Sindbis virus infection involve attachment, penetration and uncoating. Two different pathways of infection have been proposed for Alphaviruses. One proposed mechanism involves receptor mediated virion endocytosis followed by membrane fusion triggered by endosome acidification. This virus-host membrane fusion model, well established by influenza virus, has been applied to other unrelated membrane-containing viruses including Alphaviruses. The other mechanism proposes direct penetration of the cell plasma membrane by the virus glycoproteins in the absence of membrane fusion. This alternate model is supported by both ultrastructural [Paredes, A.M., Ferreira, D., Horton, M., Saad, A., Tsuruta, H., Johnston, R., Klimstra, W., Ryman, K., Hernandez, R., Chiu, W., Brown, D.T., 2004. Conformational changes in Sindbis virions resulting from exposure to low pH and interactions with cells suggest that cell penetration may occur at the cell surface in the absence of membrane fusion. Virology 324(2), 373-386] and biochemical [Koschinski, A., Wengler, G., Wengler, G., and Repp, H., 2005. Rare earth ions block the ion pores generated by the class II fusion proteins of alphaviruses and allow analysis of the biological functions of these pores. J. Gen. Virol. 86(Pt. 12), 3311-3320] studies. We have examined the ability of Sindbis virus to infect Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) cells at temperatures which block endocytosis. We have found that under these conditions Sindbis virus infects cells in a temperature- and time-dependent fashion.

  7. Characterization of a novel baboon virus closely resembling human T-cell leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M J; Novembre, F J; Yamshchikov, V F; McClure, H M; Compans, R W

    1996-12-01

    We report the isolation of a virus from a baboon imported from Kenya and the analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the env gene. Comparison of the complete nucleotide sequence of the env gene of different HTLV-1 strains and the baboon T-cell leukemia virus (designated BTLV) indicated similarities ranging from 92.5 to 97.4%. In contrast, only 89.1% similarity was observed between the BTLV env sequence and that of simian T-cell leukemia virus (PtM3). The sequences corresponding to the glycosylation sites, endoproteolytic processing site, and major immunological determinants were strictly conserved between BTLV and HTLV-1. To characterize the expressed protein we used a vaccinia expression system, which indicated that a protein of 62 kDa is encoded by the envelope gene. The protein acquired mostly high mannose modifications and was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum. A fraction of the protein was expressed at the cell surface, where it could induce membrane fusion of target cells. The existence of HTLV-1-like viruses in baboons indicates the potential risk of transmission of such virus from these nonhuman primates to humans, thus highlighting the need for specific screening for such viruses during xenotransplantation.

  8. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  9. Virus Infections of Honeybees Apis Mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Tantillo, Giuseppina; Bottaro, Marilisa; Di Pinto, Angela; Martella, Vito; Di Pinto, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The health and vigour of honeybee colonies are threatened by numerous parasites (such as Varroa destructor and Nosema spp.) and pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa. Among honeybee pathogens, viruses are one of the major threats to the health and well-being of honeybees and cause serious concern for researchers and beekeepers. To tone down the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis of eight honeybee viruses: Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Kakugo virus (KV); Sacbrood virus (SBV); Black Queen cell virus (BQCV); Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV); Kashmir bee virus (KBV); Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV); Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV). The review has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honeybee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research. PMID:27800411

  10. Interference activity of bovine herpes virus 1 strains against Aujeszky's disease virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Peshev, R; Bostandjieva, R; Haralambiev, H

    1997-02-01

    The interference-inducing activity of different low- and high-virulence strains of bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1) against Aujeszky's disease virus was studied by a parallel titration on permissive and non-permissive cell culture. The low-virulence BHV-1 strains possessed better interference-inducing activity than the high-virulence strains. An interference blocking test (IBT) was developed for the detection of BHV-1 antibodies in bovine sera. Comparative results of IBT and the virus neutralisation reaction did not show statistically reliable differences.

  11. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  12. Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queen Reproductive Potential Affects Queen Mandibular Gland Pheromone Composition and Worker Retinue Response

    PubMed Central

    Böröczky, Katalin; Schal, Coby; Tarpy, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive division of labor is one of the defining traits of honey bees (Apis mellifera), with non-reproductive tasks being performed by workers while a single queen normally monopolizes reproduction. The decentralized organization of a honey bee colony is maintained in large part by a bouquet of queen-produced pheromones, the distribution of which is facilitated by contact among workers throughout the hive. Previous studies have shown that the developmental fate of honey bee queens is highly plastic, with queens raised from younger worker larvae exhibiting higher measures of reproductive potential compared to queens raised from older worker larvae. We investigated differences in the chemical composition of the mandibular glands and attractiveness to workers of “high-quality” queens (i.e., raised from first instar worker larvae; more queen-like) and “low-quality” queens (i.e., raised from third instar worker larvae; more worker-like). We characterized the chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of high-quality queens and low-quality queens using GC-MS and used the worker retinue response as a measure of the attractiveness to workers of high-quality queens vs. low-quality queens. We found that queen quality affected the chemical profiles of mandibular gland contents differently across years, showing significant differences in the production of the queen mandibular pheromone (“QMP”) components HVA and 9-HDA in 2010, but no significant differences of any glandular compound in 2012. We also found that workers were significantly more attracted to high-quality queens than to low-quality queens in 2012, possibly because of increased attractiveness of their mandibular gland chemical profiles. Our results indicate that the age at which honey bee larvae enter the “queen-specific” developmental pathway influences the chemical composition of queen mandibular glands and worker behavior. However, these changes are not consistent across years, suggesting

  13. Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queen Reproductive Potential Affects Queen Mandibular Gland Pheromone Composition and Worker Retinue Response.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Juliana; Böröczky, Katalin; Schal, Coby; Tarpy, David R

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive division of labor is one of the defining traits of honey bees (Apis mellifera), with non-reproductive tasks being performed by workers while a single queen normally monopolizes reproduction. The decentralized organization of a honey bee colony is maintained in large part by a bouquet of queen-produced pheromones, the distribution of which is facilitated by contact among workers throughout the hive. Previous studies have shown that the developmental fate of honey bee queens is highly plastic, with queens raised from younger worker larvae exhibiting higher measures of reproductive potential compared to queens raised from older worker larvae. We investigated differences in the chemical composition of the mandibular glands and attractiveness to workers of "high-quality" queens (i.e., raised from first instar worker larvae; more queen-like) and "low-quality" queens (i.e., raised from third instar worker larvae; more worker-like). We characterized the chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of high-quality queens and low-quality queens using GC-MS and used the worker retinue response as a measure of the attractiveness to workers of high-quality queens vs. low-quality queens. We found that queen quality affected the chemical profiles of mandibular gland contents differently across years, showing significant differences in the production of the queen mandibular pheromone ("QMP") components HVA and 9-HDA in 2010, but no significant differences of any glandular compound in 2012. We also found that workers were significantly more attracted to high-quality queens than to low-quality queens in 2012, possibly because of increased attractiveness of their mandibular gland chemical profiles. Our results indicate that the age at which honey bee larvae enter the "queen-specific" developmental pathway influences the chemical composition of queen mandibular glands and worker behavior. However, these changes are not consistent across years, suggesting that other external

  14. [Factors affecting plaque formation by Lassa virus in Vero cells].

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, I S; Vasiuchkov, A D; Mar'iankova, R F; Votiakov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The method of Porterfield and Allison was adapted for titration of the infectious activity of Lassa virus by the plaque formation in Vero cells. The virus was cloned, and the effect of the time of adsorption, pH, temperature, as well as polycations (DEAD-dextran, protamine sulphate) dimethylsuphoxide (DMSO), and trypsin added during adsorption or into the agar overlay on the effectiveness of plaque production by Lassa virus (virus titres, plaque size) were studied. The optimal adsorption time was found to be 1 1/2-2 hours, pH 8.0. The number of plaques produced by the virus was approximately similar at 35 degrees C. The substances under study did not enhance the efficacy of plaque formation, on the contrary, DMSO and high concentrations of polycations decreased plaque size.

  15. Structure and cell biology of archaeal virus STIV.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-yu; Johnson, Johnson E

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of archaeal viruses have revealed novel features of their structures and life cycles when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, yet there are structure-based unifying themes suggesting common ancestral relationships among dsDNA viruses in the three kingdoms of life. Sulfolobus solfataricus and the infecting virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) is one of the well-established model systems to study archaeal virus replication and viral-host interactions. Reliable laboratory conditions to propagate STIV and available genetic tools allowed structural characterization of the virus and viral components that lead to the proposal of common capsid ancestry with PRD1 (bacteriophage), Adenovirus (eukaryotic virus) and PBCV (chlorellavirus). Microarray and proteomics approaches systematically analyzed viral replication and the corresponding host responses. Cellular cryo-electron tomography and thin-section EM studies uncovered the assembly and maturation pathway of STIV and revealed dramatic cellular ultra-structure changes upon infection. The viral-induced pyramid-like protrusions on cell surfaces represent a novel viral release mechanism and previously uncharacterized functions in viral replication. PMID:22482708

  16. Detection of virus-specific antigen in the nuclei or nucleoli of cells infected with Zika or Langat virus.

    PubMed

    Buckley, A; Gould, E A

    1988-08-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with molecular specificities for either the viral envelope glycoprotein (MAb 541) or the non-structural NS1 glycoprotein (MAb 109) were derived using West Nile and yellow fever (YF) viruses respectively. Their antigenic reactivity with a large number of flaviviruses was tested by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Both produced cytoplasmic fluorescent staining patterns with the homologous virus against which they were raised. Additionally, MAb 541 reacted with two substrains of YF virus whereas MAb 109 reacted with Bussuquara, YF and Ntaya viruses. These reactions were exclusively cytoplasmic. Two unexpected patterns of fluorescent labelling were observed when the antibodies were tested with Zika and Langat viruses. MAb 541 produced fluorescent staining of the nuclei, but not the cytoplasm, of cells infected with Zika virus and MAb 109 labelled only the nucleoli of cells infected with Langat virus. Double-labelling experiments showed that the nuclear fluorescent label was confined to virus-infected cells, and antibody absorption experiments with virus-infected cell packs confirmed the virus specificity of the nuclear antigen. The unexpected presence of virus-specific antigen in the nuclei or nucleoli of Zika or Langat virus-infected cells brings into question the role of the nucleus in flavivirus replication.

  17. Optimization of virus detection in cells using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    McClenahan, Shasta D; Uhlenhaut, Christine; Krause, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS)-based virus detection has potential regulatory applications. We studied the ability of one of these approaches, based on degenerate oligonucleotide primer (DOP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), to detect viral sequences in cell lines known to express viral genes or particles. DOP-PCR was highly sensitive for the detection of small quantities of isolated viral sequences. Detected viral sequences included nodavirus, bracovirus, and endogenous retroviruses in High Five cells, porcine circovirus type 1 and porcine endogenous retrovirus in PK15 cells, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 in MJ cells, human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells, human herpesvirus 8 in BCBL-1 cells, and Epstein-Barr Virus in Raji cells. Illumina sequencing (for which primers were most efficiently added using PCR) provided greater sensitivity for virus detection than Roche 454 sequencing. Analyzing nucleic acids extracted both directly from samples and from capsid-enriched preparations provided useful information. Although there are limitations of these methods, these results indicate significant promise for the combination of nonspecific PCR and MPS in identifying contaminants in clinical and biological samples, including cell lines and reagents used to produce vaccines and therapeutic products. PMID:24309095

  18. Measles virus breaks through epithelial cell barriers to achieve transmission

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Measles is a highly contagious disease that causes immunosuppression in patients. Measles virus infection has been thought to begin in the respiratory epithelium and then spread to lymphoid tissue. In this issue of the JCI, Leonard et al. provide data to suggest an alternative model of measles virus pathogenesis (see the related article beginning on page 2448). In human primary epithelial cells and rhesus monkeys in vivo, the authors show that initial infection of respiratory epithelium is not necessary for the virus to enter the host but that viral entry into epithelial cells via interaction of the virus with a receptor located on the basolateral side of the epithelium is required for viral shedding into the airway and subsequent transmission. PMID:18568081

  19. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tongqian; Meng, Xinzhu; Zhang, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal. PMID:26504489

  20. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  1. Differential effect of p7 inhibitors on hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell transmission☆

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, L.W.; Zitzmann, N.; McKeating, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors targeting the hepatitis C virus (HCV) encoded viroporin, p7 prevent virus release in vitro. HCV can transmit by cell-free particle infection of new target cells and via cell-to-cell dependent contact with limited exposure to the extracellular environment. The role of assembly inhibitors in preventing HCV transmission via these pathways has not been studied. We compared the efficacy of three published p7 inhibitors to inhibit cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission of two chimeric HCV strains encoding genotype 2 (GT2) or 5 (GT5) p7 using a recently developed single cycle co-culture assay. The inhibitors reduced the infectivity of extracellular GT2 and GT5 virus by 80–90% and GT2 virus cell-to-cell transmission by 50%. However, all of the p7 inhibitors had minimal effect on GT5 cell contact dependent transmission. Screening a wider panel of diverse viral genotypes demonstrated that p7 viroporin inhibitors were significantly more effective at blocking cell-free virus than cell-to-cell transmission. These results suggest an altered assembly or trafficking of cell-to-cell transmitted compared to secreted virus. These observations have important implications for the validation, therapeutic design and testing of HCV assembly inhibitors. PMID:24157306

  2. NK Cells and Their Ability to Modulate T Cells during Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kevin D.; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Whitmire, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in protection against virus infections, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to thwart NK cell activity. NK cells respond to inflammatory signals at an early stage of virus infection, resulting in proliferation, cytokine production, and cytolytic activity that can reduce virus loads. Moreover, the rapid kinetics of the NK cell response enables NK cells to influence other populations of innate immune cells, affect the inflammatory milieu, and guide adaptive immune responses to infection. Early NK cell interactions with other leukocytes can have long-lasting effects on the number and quality of memory T cells, as well as impact the exhaustion of T cells during chronic infections. The ability of NK cells to modulate T cell responses can be mediated through direct T-NK interactions, cytokine production, or indirectly through dendritic cells and other cell types. Herein, we summarize our current understanding of how NK cells interact with T cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and other cell types involved in adaptive immune responses to virus infection. We outline several mechanisms by which NK cells enhance or suppress adaptive immune response and long-lived immunological memory. PMID:25404045

  3. Idiopathic brood disease syndrome and queen events as precursors of colony mortality in migratory beekeeping operations in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Tarpy, David R; Lengerich, Eugene J; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2013-02-01

    Using standard epidemiological methods, this study set out to quantify the risk associated with exposure to easily diagnosed factors on colony mortality and morbidity in three migratory beekeeping operations. Fifty-six percent of all colonies monitored during the 10-month period died. The relative risk (RR) that a colony would die over the short term (∼50 days) was appreciably increased in colonies diagnosed with Idiopathic Brood Disease Syndrome (IBDS), a condition where brood of different ages appear molten on the bottom of cells (RR=3.2), or with a "queen event" (e.g., evidence of queen replacement or failure; RR=3.1). We also found that several risk factors-including the incidence of a poor brood pattern, chalkbood (CB), deformed wing virus (DWV), sacbrood virus (SBV), and exceeding the threshold of 5 Varroa mites per 100 bees-were differentially expressed in different beekeeping operations. Further, we found that a diagnosis of several factors were significantly more or less likely to be associated with a simultaneous diagnosis of another risk factor. These finding support the growing consensus that the causes of colony mortality are multiple and interrelated.

  4. Superior In Vitro Stimulation of Human CD8+ T-Cells by Whole Virus versus Split Virus Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Eva; Dass, Martin; Wagner, Eva M.; Plachter, Bodo; Probst, Hans Christian; Strand, Dennis; Hartwig, Udo F.; Karner, Anita; Aichinger, Gerald; Kistner, Otfried; Landfester, Katharina; Herr, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses cause considerable morbidity and mortality in the general human population. Protection from severe disease may result from vaccines that activate antigen-presenting DC for effective stimulation of influenza-specific memory T cells. Special attention is paid to vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses, because they are mainly directed against conserved internal influenza proteins thereby presumably mediating cross-protection against circulating seasonal as well as emerging pandemic virus strains. Our study showed that influenza whole virus vaccines of major seasonal A and B strains activated DC more efficiently than those of pandemic swine-origin H1N1 and pandemic-like avian H5N1 strains. In contrast, influenza split virus vaccines had a low ability to activate DC, regardless which strain was investigated. We also observed that whole virus vaccines stimulated virus-specific CD8+ memory T cells much stronger compared to split virus counterparts, whereas both vaccine formats activated CD4+ Th cell responses similarly. Moreover, our data showed that whole virus vaccine material is delivered into the cytosolic pathway of DC for effective activation of virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We conclude that vaccines against seasonal and pandemic (-like) influenza strains that aim to stimulate cross-reacting CD8+ T cells should include whole virus rather than split virus formulations. PMID:25072749

  5. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells. Images PMID:6255459

  6. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease. PMID:26463253

  7. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  8. A Novel Single Virus Infection System Reveals That Influenza Virus Preferentially Infects Cells in G1 Phase

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Ryuta; Sugiura, Tadao; Kume, Shinichiro; Ichikawa, Akihiko; Larsen, Steven; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Nagatsuka, Yasuko; Arai, Fumihito; Suzuki, Yasuo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Fukuda, Toshio; Honda, Ayae

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza virus attaches to sialic acid residues on the surface of host cells via the hemagglutinin (HA), a glycoprotein expressed on the viral envelope, and enters into the cytoplasm by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The viral genome is released and transported in to the nucleus, where transcription and replication take place. However, cellular factors affecting the influenza virus infection such as the cell cycle remain uncharacterized. Methods/Results To resolve the influence of cell cycle on influenza virus infection, we performed a single-virus infection analysis using optical tweezers. Using this newly developed single-virus infection system, the fluorescence-labeled influenza virus was trapped on a microchip using a laser (1064 nm) at 0.6 W, transported, and released onto individual H292 human lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, the influenza virus attached selectively to cells in the G1-phase. To clarify the molecular differences between cells in G1- and S/G2/M-phase, we performed several physical and chemical assays. Results indicated that: 1) the membranes of cells in G1-phase contained greater amounts of sialic acids (glycoproteins) than the membranes of cells in S/G2/M-phase; 2) the membrane stiffness of cells in S/G2/M-phase is more rigid than those in G1-phase by measurement using optical tweezers; and 3) S/G2/M-phase cells contained higher content of Gb3, Gb4 and GlcCer than G1-phase cells by an assay for lipid composition. Conclusions A novel single-virus infection system was developed to characterize the difference in influenza virus susceptibility between G1- and S/G2/M-phase cells. Differences in virus binding specificity were associated with alterations in the lipid composition, sialic acid content, and membrane stiffness. This single-virus infection system will be useful for studying the infection mechanisms of other viruses. PMID:23874406

  9. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  10. Carbohydrate Structure of Sindbis Virus Glycoprotein E2 from Virus Grown in Hamster and Chicken Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Sindbis virus was used as a probe to examine glycosylation processes in two different species of cultured cells. Parallel studies were carried out analyzing the carbohydrate added to Sindbis glycoprotein E2 when the virus was grown in chicken embryo cells and BHK cells. The Pronase glycopeptides of Sindbis glycoprotein E2 were purified by a combination of ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Four glycopeptides were resolved, ranging in molecular weight from 1,800 to 2,700. Structures are proposed for each of the four glycopeptides, based on data obtained by quantitative composition analyses, methylation analyses, and degradation of the glycopeptides using purified exo- and endoglycosidases. The largest three glycopeptides (S1, S2, and S3) have similar structures but differ in the extent of sialylation. All three contain N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, and fucose, in a structure similar to oligosaccharides found on other glycoproteins. Glycopeptide S1 has two residues of sialic acid, whereas glycopeptides S2 and S3 contain 1 and 0 residues of sialic acid, respectively. The smallest glycopeptide, S4, contains only N-acetyglucosamine and mannose, and is also similar to mannose-rich oligosaccharides found on other glycoproteins. Each of the complex glycopeptides (S1, S2, or S3) from virus grown in BHK cells is indistinguishable from the corresponding glycopeptides derived from virus grown in chicken cells. Glycopeptide S4 is also very similar in size, composition, and sugar linkages from virus derived from the two hosts. These results suggest that chicken cells and BHK cells have similar glycosylation mechanisms and glycosylate Sindbis glycoprotein E2 in nearly identical ways. PMID:430605

  11. Exploiting virus stealth technology for xenotransplantation: reduced human T cell responses to porcine cells expressing herpes simplex virus ICP47.

    PubMed

    Crew, Mark D; Phanavanh, Bounleut

    2003-01-01

    Direct recognition of porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins by human T cells is well documented. Eliminating donor (porcine) MHC proteins may therefore be beneficial in pig-to-human xenotransplants. To this end, we have attempted to exploit viral stealth mechanisms to eliminate pig MHC class I cell-surface expression. PK(15) (pig kidney) cells stably transfected with the herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP47 gene [PK(15)-ICP47 cells] exhibited a dramatic reduction of MHC class I cell-surface expression when compared with untransfected PK(15) cells. To test the effect of down-regulation of porcine MHC class I on human cellular immune responses, a human CD8+ enriched T cell line (anti-PK15 T cells) with reactivity towards PK(15) cells was derived by repeated stimulation of human T cells with PK(15) cells stably transfected with the costimulatory molecule B7.1 [PK(15)-B7.1 cells]. Anti-PK15 T cells efficiently lyzed PK(15) cells but not PK(15)-ICP47 (class I negative) cells. Consistent with effector function, anti-PK15 T cells showed a robust proliferative response to PK(15)-B7.1 cells but did not proliferate at all to PK(15)-B7.1 cells which also expressed HSV ICP47. These results suggest that virus stealth technology can be exploited for xenotransplantation.

  12. Cross-species transmission of honey bee viruses in associated arthropods.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Abby L; Singh, Rajwinder; Cox-Foster, Diana L; Rajotte, Edwin; Hoover, Kelli; Ostiguy, Nancy; Holmes, Edward C

    2013-09-01

    There are a number of RNA virus pathogens that represent a serious threat to the health of managed honey bees (Apis mellifera). That some of these viruses are also found in the broader pollinator community suggests the wider environmental spread of these viruses, with the potential for a broader impact on ecosystems. Studies on the ecology and evolution of these viruses in the arthropod community as a whole may therefore provide important insights into these potential impacts. We examined managed A. mellifera colonies, nearby non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators, and other associated arthropods for the presence of five commonly occurring picorna-like RNA viruses of honey bees - black queen cell virus, deformed wing virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus and sacbrood virus. Notably, we observed their presence in several arthropod species. Additionally, detection of negative-strand RNA using strand-specific RT-PCR assays for deformed wing virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus suggests active replication of deformed wing virus in at least six non-Apis species and active replication of Israeli acute paralysis virus in one non-Apis species. Phylogenetic analysis of deformed wing virus also revealed that this virus is freely disseminating across the species sampled in this study. In sum, our study indicates that these viruses are not specific to the pollinator community and that other arthropod species have the potential to be involved in disease transmission in pollinator populations.

  13. Live Cell Imaging of Alphaherpes Virus Anterograde Transport and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew P.; Kratchmarov, Radomir; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in live cell fluorescence microscopy techniques, as well as the construction of recombinant viral strains that express fluorescent fusion proteins have enabled real-time visualization of transport and spread of alphaherpes virus infection of neurons. The utility of novel fluorescent fusion proteins to viral membrane, tegument, and capsids, in conjunction with live cell imaging, identified viral particle assemblies undergoing transport within axons. Similar tools have been successfully employed for analyses of cell-cell spread of viral particles to quantify the number and diversity of virions transmitted between cells. Importantly, the techniques of live cell imaging of anterograde transport and spread produce a wealth of information including particle transport velocities, distributions of particles, and temporal analyses of protein localization. Alongside classical viral genetic techniques, these methodologies have provided critical insights into important mechanistic questions. In this article we describe in detail the imaging methods that were developed to answer basic questions of alphaherpes virus transport and spread. PMID:23978901

  14. Differential Sensitivity of Bat Cells to Infection by Enveloped RNA Viruses: Coronaviruses, Paramyxoviruses, Filoviruses, and Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Markus; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Drexler, Jan Felix; Glende, Jörg; Erdt, Meike; Gützkow, Tim; Losemann, Christoph; Binger, Tabea; Deng, Hongkui; Schwegmann-Weßels, Christel; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Drosten, Christian; Herrler, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Bats (Chiroptera) host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat) or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida) for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S) protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3) were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus) and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed. PMID:24023659

  15. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Markus; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Drexler, Jan Felix; Glende, Jörg; Erdt, Meike; Gützkow, Tim; Losemann, Christoph; Binger, Tabea; Deng, Hongkui; Schwegmann-Weßels, Christel; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Drosten, Christian; Herrler, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Bats (Chiroptera) host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat) or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida) for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S) protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3) were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus) and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed. PMID:24023659

  16. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    PubMed

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Tarpy, David R; Grozinger, Christina M

    2007-10-03

    Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI) or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI). We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone). The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the colony.

  17. Measles virus spread by cell-cell contacts: uncoupling of contact-mediated receptor (CD46) downregulation from virus uptake.

    PubMed

    Firsching, R; Buchholz, C J; Schneider, U; Cattaneo, R; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1999-07-01

    CD46, which serves as a receptor for measles virus (MV; strain Edmonston), is rapidly downregulated from the cell surface after contact with viral particles or infected cells. We show here that the same two CD46 complement control protein (CCP) domains responsible for primary MV attachment mediate its downregulation. Optimal downregulation efficiency was obtained with CD46 recombinants containing CCP domains 1 and 2, whereas CCP 1, alone and duplicated, induced a slight downregulation. Using persistently infected monocytic/promyelocytic U937 cells which release very small amounts of infectious virus, and uninfected HeLa cells as contact partners, we then showed that during contact the formation of CD46-containing patches and caps precedes CD46 internalization. Nevertheless, neither substances inhibiting capping nor the fusion-inhibiting peptide Z-D-Phe-L-Phe-Gly-OH (FIP) blocked CD46 downregulation. Thus, CD46 downregulation can be uncoupled from fusion and subsequent virus uptake. Interestingly, in that system cell-cell contacts lead to a remarkably efficient infection of the target cells which is only partially inhibited by FIP. The finding that the contact of an infected with uninfected cells results in transfer of infectious viral material without significant (complete) fusion of the donor with the recipient cell suggests that microfusion events and/or FIP-independent mechanisms may mediate the transfer of MV infectivity from cell to cell. PMID:10364272

  18. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Asako; Shimada-Beltran, Harumi; Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y.; Javia, Parth A.; Lazarowitz, Sondra G.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010). To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV), which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP), Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein) and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO) to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread. PMID:25414709

  19. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Asako; Shimada-Beltran, Harumi; Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y; Javia, Parth A; Lazarowitz, Sondra G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010). To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV), which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP), Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein) and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO) to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread. PMID:25414709

  20. Requirement of cell nucleus for Sindbis virus replication in cultured Aedes albopictus cells.

    PubMed

    Erwin, C; Brown, D T

    1983-02-01

    The ability of Sindbis virus to grow in enucleated BHK-21 (vertebrate) and Aedes albopictus (invertebrate) cells was tested to determine the dependence of this virus upon nuclear function in these two phylogenetically unrelated hosts. Although both cell types could be demonstrated to produce viable cytoplasts (enucleated cells) which produced virus-specific antigen subsequent to infection. BHK cytoplasts produced a significant number of progeny virions, whereas mosquito cytoplasts did not. The production of vesicular stomatitis virus in mosquito cells was not significantly reduced by enucleation. That such a host function was not essential for vesicular stomatitis virus growth in insect cells is supported by the observation that the production of this virus by mosquito cells is not actinomycin D sensitive. This result agrees with a previously published report in which it was shown that Sindbis virus maturation in invertebrate cells is inhibited by actinomycin D, indicating a possible requirement for host cell nuclear function (Scheefers-Borchel et al., Virology, 110:292-301, 1981).

  1. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  2. Recombinant Measles Viruses Efficiently Entering Cells through Targeted Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Urs; Bullough, Frances; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Russell, Stephen J.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    We sought proof of principle that one of the safest human vaccines, measles virus Edmonston B (MV-Edm), can be genetically modified to allow entry via cell surface molecules other than its receptor CD46. Hybrid proteins consisting of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) or the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) linked to the extracellular (carboxyl) terminus of the MV-Edm attachment protein hemagglutinin (H) were produced. The standard H protein gene was replaced by one coding for H/EGF or H/IGF1 in cDNA copies of the MV genome. Recombinant viruses were rescued and replicated to titers approaching those of the parental strain. MV displaying EGF or IGF1 efficiently entered CD46-negative rodent cells expressing the human EGF or the IGF1 receptor, respectively, and the EGF virus caused extensive syncytium formation and cell death. Taking advantage of a factor Xa protease recognition site engineered in the hybrid H proteins, the displayed domain was cleaved off from virus particles, and specific entry in rodent cells was abrogated. These studies prove that MV can be engineered to selectively eliminate cells expressing a targeted receptor and provide insights into the mechanism of MV entry. PMID:11024120

  3. [Dynamics of the cell cycle in human endothelial cell culture infected with influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Prochukhanova, A R; Lyublinskaya, O G; Azarenok, A A; Nazarova, A V; Zenin, V V; Zhilinskaya, I N

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle in a culture of endothelial cells EAhy 926 infected with influenza virus was investigated. Cytometric analysis of culture, synchronized using contact inhibition, has shown that the exposure to the influenza virus in cells EAhy 926 lengthened S-phase of the cell cycle. This result has been tested and proven on culture EAhy 926 treated with nocodazole. Compared with lung carcinoma cells A549, in which influenza virus provokes the arrest of G0/G1 phase of the cycle, elongation of S-phase of cycle at a similar infection of endothelial culture EAhy 926 indicates that the influenza virus differently affects the dynamics of the cell cycle according to the origin of the infected culture.

  4. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes the current pathophysiologic basis for human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma as well as past, present, and future therapeutic options. Recent findings New studies have been published on allogeneic stem cell transplantation, arsenic trioxide, and bortezomib for this condition. Summary Studies of the molecular biology of human T cell lymphotropic virus-1-induced T cell leukemia/lymphoma have defined a critical role for oncoprotein, Tax, and activation of nuclear factor κB transcription pathways, which have provided rational approaches to improved therapy for T cell leukemia/lymphoma as well as a model for other hematopoietic malignancies characterized by nuclear factor κB activation. PMID:16093798

  5. Endogenous production of infectious Inoue-Melnick virus in a human meningioma cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Y; Inoue, Y K; Hollinshead, A C

    1987-11-01

    We investigated continuous production of Inoue-Melnick virus (IMV) in the MG-1 cell line, established from human meningioma. The infectious virus, identified as a type 1 virus, was mostly recovered extracellularly. Assay of MG-1 cells as infective centers indicated that most of the cells were capable of producing infectious virus. By immunofluorescence, more than 90% of the cells were found to have IMV-associated cytoplasmic antigen(s) (IMCA).

  6. Genetic reincarnation of workers as queens in the Eastern honeybee Apis cerana

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, M J; Tan, K; Wang, Z; Oldroyd, B P; Beekman, M

    2015-01-01

    Thelytokous parthenogenesis, or the asexual production of female offspring, is rare in the animal kingdom, but relatively common in social Hymenoptera. However, in honeybees, it is only known to be ubiquitous in one subspecies of Apis mellifera, the Cape honeybee, A. mellifera capensis. Here we report the appearance of queen cells in two colonies of the Eastern honeybee Apis cerana that no longer contained a queen or queen-produced brood to rear queens from. A combination of microsatellite genotyping and the timing of the appearance of these individuals excluded the possibility that they had been laid by the original queen. Based on the genotypes of these individuals, thelytokous production by natal workers is the most parsimonious explanation for their existence. Thus, we present the first example of thelytoky in a honeybee outside A. mellifera. We discuss the evolutionary and ecological consequences of thelytoky in A. cerana, in particular the role thelytoky may play in the recent invasions by populations of this species. PMID:25052414

  7. Productive persistent infection of hematopoietic cells by human foamy virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S F; Stone, J; Linial, M L

    1996-01-01

    Human foamy virus can establish persistent infections in human hematopoietic cell lines, such as H92.1.7 (erythroblastoid cells), Jurkat (CD4+ T cells), and U937 (myeloid-monocytic cells). The infection is characterized by constant production of infectious viruses (for > 2 1/2 years) with no cytopathic effects on the host cells. Electron microscopy of the infected cells showed a viral morphology similar to that observed for particles produced after acute infection. We have detected, in addition to the full-length form of bel1, a previously described deletion in the bel1 gene of the proviral DNA in these cells. RNA containing this 301-bp deletion, which mapped to the splice donor and acceptor sites of the intron of the bet gene, was also found in encapsidated virion RNA. However, the presence of this defective provirus harboring the deletion in bel1 does not prevent productive persistence in these chronically infected cells, since the virus titer does not decrease during cultivation. PMID:8551590

  8. Vaccinia Virus Induces Programmed Necrosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Archibald, Kyra M; Kulbe, Hagen; Balkwill, Frances R; Öberg, Daniel; McNeish, Iain A

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which oncolytic vaccinia virus induces tumor cell death are poorly understood. We have evaluated cell death pathways following infection of ovarian cancer cells with both wild-type and thymidine kinase-deleted (dTK) Lister strain vaccinia. We show that death does not rely upon classical apoptosis despite the appearances of some limited apoptotic features, including phosphatidylserine externalization and appearance of sub-G1 DNA populations. Vaccinia infection induces marked lipidation of LC3 proteins, but there is no general activation of the autophagic process and cell death does not rely upon autophagy induction. We show that vaccinia induces necrotic morphology on transmission electron microscopy, accompanied by marked by reductions in intracellular adenosine triphosphate, altered mitochondrial metabolism, and release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. This necrotic cell death appears regulated, as infection induces formation of a receptor interacting protein (RIP1)/caspase-8 complex. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of both RIP1 and substrates downstream of RIP1, including MLKL, significantly attenuate cell death. Blockade of TNF-α, however, does not alter virus efficacy, suggesting that necrosis does not result from autocrine cytokine release. Overall, these results show that, in ovarian cancer cells, vaccinia virus causes necrotic cell death that is mediated through a programmed series of events. PMID:23985697

  9. Ebola virus. Two-pore channels control Ebola virus host cell entry and are drug targets for disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yasuteru; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Tidwell, Michael W; Bauta, William E; Klugbauer, Norbert; Grimm, Christian; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Davey, Robert A

    2015-02-27

    Ebola virus causes sporadic outbreaks of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans, but there is no currently approved therapy. Cells take up Ebola virus by macropinocytosis, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles. However, few factors controlling endosomal virus movement are known. Here we find that Ebola virus entry into host cells requires the endosomal calcium channels called two-pore channels (TPCs). Disrupting TPC function by gene knockout, small interfering RNAs, or small-molecule inhibitors halted virus trafficking and prevented infection. Tetrandrine, the most potent small molecule that we tested, inhibited infection of human macrophages, the primary target of Ebola virus in vivo, and also showed therapeutic efficacy in mice. Therefore, TPC proteins play a key role in Ebola virus infection and may be effective targets for antiviral therapy.

  10. Ebola virus. Two-pore channels control Ebola virus host cell entry and are drug targets for disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yasuteru; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Tidwell, Michael W; Bauta, William E; Klugbauer, Norbert; Grimm, Christian; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Davey, Robert A

    2015-02-27

    Ebola virus causes sporadic outbreaks of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans, but there is no currently approved therapy. Cells take up Ebola virus by macropinocytosis, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles. However, few factors controlling endosomal virus movement are known. Here we find that Ebola virus entry into host cells requires the endosomal calcium channels called two-pore channels (TPCs). Disrupting TPC function by gene knockout, small interfering RNAs, or small-molecule inhibitors halted virus trafficking and prevented infection. Tetrandrine, the most potent small molecule that we tested, inhibited infection of human macrophages, the primary target of Ebola virus in vivo, and also showed therapeutic efficacy in mice. Therefore, TPC proteins play a key role in Ebola virus infection and may be effective targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:25722412

  11. Preferential targeting of vesicular stomatitis virus to breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Ira . E-mail: ira.bergman@chp.edu; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Gao Yanhua; Griffin, Judith A.

    2004-12-05

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a candidate for development for cancer therapy. We created a recombinant replicating VSV (rrVSV) with an altered surface protein that targeted preferentially to breast cancer cells. The rrVSV genome contained a single glycoprotein (gp) gene derived from Sindbis virus. This gene expressed a chimeric Sindbis E2 binding gp and the native Sindbis E1 fusion gp. The chimeric E2 binding gp, called Sindbis-SCA-erbb2, was modified to reduce its native binding function and to contain a single chain antibody (SCA) with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor Her2/neu protein, erbb2. These viruses selectively infected, replicated in and killed cells expressing erbb2. The titer of rrVSV on SKBR3 cells, a human breast cancer cell line which highly expresses erbb2 was 3.1 x 10{sup 7}/ml compared with a titer of 7.3 x 10{sup 5}/ml on 143 cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line which does not express erbb2. The titer of rrVSV on D2F2/E2 cells, a mouse mammary cancer cell line stably transfected to express human erbb2 was 2.46 x 10{sup 6}/ml compared with a titer of 5 x 10{sup 4}/ml on the parent D2F2 cells which do not express erbb2. When titered on erbb2-negative cells, non-replicating pseudotype VSV coated with Sindbis-SCA-erbb2 had <3% the titer of pseudotype VSV coated with wild type Sindbis gp indicating that the chimeric Sindbis gp had severely impaired binding to the natural receptor. Analysis of the protein composition of the rrVSV found low expression of the modified Sindbis gp on the virus.

  12. Innate Sensing of Foamy Viruses by Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Réjane; Lepelley, Alice; Gessain, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FV) are nonpathogenic retroviruses that have cospeciated with primates for millions of years. FV can be transmitted through severe bites from monkeys to humans. Viral loads remain generally low in infected humans, and no secondary transmission has been reported. Very little is known about the ability of FV to trigger an innate immune response in human cells. A few previous reports suggested that FV do not induce type I interferon (IFN) in nonhematopoietic cells. Here, we examined how human hematopoietic cells sense FV particles and FV-infected cells. We show that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), and the pDC-like cell line Gen2.2 detect FV, produce high levels of type I IFN, and express the IFN-stimulated gene MxA. Fewer than 20 FV-infected cells are sufficient to trigger an IFN response. Both prototypic and primary viruses stimulated IFN release. Donor cells expressing a replication-defective virus, carrying a mutated reverse transcriptase, induced IFN production by target cells as potently as wild-type virus. In contrast, an FV strain with env deleted, which does not produce viral particles, was inactive. IFN production was blocked by an inhibitor of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1) and by an endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) antagonist (A151). Silencing experiments in Gen2.2 further demonstrated that TLR7 is involved in FV recognition. Therefore, FV are potent inducers of type I IFN by pDCs and by PBMCs. This previously underestimated activation of the innate immune response may be involved in the control of viral replication in humans. PMID:22090096

  13. Women in History--Queen Liliuokalani

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppe, Tina

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Queen Liliuokalani, Hawaii's last monarch. Liliuokalani was born in Hawaii in 1838 into the family of a high chief. She attended the Royal School, run by American missionaries, and received a high quality education and learned to love music, writing and politics. Liliuokalani was given the Christian name "Lydia" as a child.…

  14. Queen Margaret University College's Sustainable, Community Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The new campus of Queen Margaret University College in the United Kingdom is designed to be a sustainable educational and community resource. Early consultation with students and staff on the campus design revealed a strong desire for a sustainable environment, with plenty of green space for all to enjoy. In response to this, the design focuses on…

  15. Globally visualizing the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Qiu-Mei; Sun, En-Ze; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the microtubule-dependent behaviors of viruses in live cells is very meaningful for revealing the mechanisms of virus infection and endocytosis. Herein, we used a quantum dots-based single-particle tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells. We found that the intersection configuration of microtubules can interfere with the transport behaviors of the virus in live cells, which lead to the changing and long-time pausing of the transport behavior of viruses. Our results revealed that most of the viruses moved along straight microtubules rapidly and unidirectionally from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) near the bottom of the cell, and the viruses were confined in the grid of microtubules near the top of the cell and at the MTOC near the bottom of the cell. These results provided deep insights into the influence of entire microtubule geometry on the virus infection.

  16. Coevolution of cells and virus as a mechanism for the persistence of lymphotropic minute virus of mice in L-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, D; Tal, J

    1985-01-01

    Infection of L-cells with minute virus of mice (i), a lymphotropic strain of minute virus of mice, resulted in the emergence of host range mutant viruses capable of a lytic infection that destroys the initially restrictive parental cells. Despite that, the culture was not lysed completely; instead, a persistent infection resulted which lasted at least 150 days. Throughout the persistent infection, extensive changes occurred in both the tissue tropism of the progeny virus and in the phenotypic properties of the cells. Mutant cells were selected which were increasingly restrictive to the replication of the resident virus, but concomitant changes in the virus enabled it to replicate in a subpopulation of the restrictive cells. The persistent infection could be reconstructed by infection of mutant cells with mutant virus; in contrast, neither infection of parental cells with mutant virus nor infection of mutant cells with parental virus led to persistence. On the basis of these results, we suggest that virus-cell coevolution provides the primary mechanism for the initiation and the maintenance of the persistent infection. Images PMID:2410631

  17. Analysis of Lujo Virus Cell Entry using Pseudotype Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Iha, Koichiro; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Nakasone, Naoe; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several arenaviruses are known to cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in sub-Saharan Africa and South America, where VHF is a major public health and medical concern. The biosafety level 4 categorization of these arenaviruses restricts their use and has impeded biological studies, including therapeutic drug and/or vaccine development. Due to difficulties associated with handling live viruses, pseudotype viruses, which transiently bear arenavirus envelope proteins based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or retrovirus, have been developed as surrogate virus systems. Here, we report the development of a pseudotype VSV bearing each envelope protein of various species of arenaviruses (AREpv), including the newly identified Lujo virus (LUJV) and Chapare virus. Pseudotype arenaviruses generated in 293T cells exhibited high infectivity in various mammalian cell lines. The infections by New World and Old World AREpv were dependent on their receptors (human transferrin receptor 1 [hTfR1] and α-dystroglycan [αDG], respectively). However, infection by pseudotype VSV bearing the LUJV envelope protein (LUJpv) occurred independently of hTfR1 and αDG, indicating that LUJpv utilizes an unidentified receptor. The pH-dependent endocytosis of AREpv was confirmed by the use of lysosomotropic agents. The fusion of cells expressing these envelope proteins, except for those expressing the LUJV envelope protein, was induced by transient treatment at low pH values. LUJpv infectivity was inhibited by U18666A, a cholesterol transport inhibitor. Furthermore, the infectivity of LUJpv was significantly decreased in the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-deficient cell line, suggesting the necessity for NPC1 activity for efficient LUJpv infection. IMPORTANCE LUJV is a newly identified arenavirus associated with a VHF outbreak in southern Africa. Although cell entry for many arenaviruses has been studied, cell entry for LUJV has not been characterized. In this study, we found that LUJpv utilizes

  18. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  19. Electron microscopy of Lednice virus in chick embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Jelínková, A; Málková, D; Holubová, J; Novák, M

    1980-01-01

    Replication of Lednice virus in chick embryo cells was studied for 72 hr after inoculation by infectivity titration and the indirect immunofluorescence technique. At 24 and 48 hr after inoculation, electron microscopy revealed spherical virions of uniform morphology, 80-105 nm in diameter, which were localized mostly extracellularly.

  20. Surface lipids of queen-laid eggs do not regulate queen production in a fission-performing ant.

    PubMed

    Ruel, Camille; Lenoir, Alain; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    In animal societies, most collective and individual decision making depends on the presence of reproductive individuals. The efficient transmission of information among reproductive and non-reproductive individuals is therefore a determinant of colony organization. In social insects, the presence of a queen modulates multiple colonial activities. In many species, it negatively affects worker reproduction and the development of diploid larvae into future queens. The queen mostly signals her presence through pheromone emission, but the means by which these chemicals are distributed in the colony are still unclear. In several ant species, queen-laid eggs are the vehicle of the queen signal. The aim of this study was to investigate whether queen-laid eggs of the ant Aphaenogaster senilis possess queen-specific cuticular hydrocarbons and/or Dufour or poison gland compounds, and whether the presence of eggs inhibited larval development into queens. Our results show that the queen- and worker-laid eggs shared cuticular and Dufour hydrocarbons with the adults; however, their poison gland compounds were not similar. Queen-laid eggs had more dimethylalkanes and possessed a queen-specific mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons composed of 3,11 + 3,9 + 3,7-dimethylnonacosane, in higher proportions than did worker-laid eggs. Even though the queen-laid eggs were biochemically similar to the queen, their addition to experimentally queenless groups did not prevent the development of new queens. More studies are needed on the means by which queen ant pheromones are transmitted in the colony, and how these mechanisms correlates with life history traits. PMID:23224071

  1. Surface lipids of queen-laid eggs do not regulate queen production in a fission-performing ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruel, Camille; Lenoir, Alain; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    In animal societies, most collective and individual decision making depends on the presence of reproductive individuals. The efficient transmission of information among reproductive and non-reproductive individuals is therefore a determinant of colony organization. In social insects, the presence of a queen modulates multiple colonial activities. In many species, it negatively affects worker reproduction and the development of diploid larvae into future queens. The queen mostly signals her presence through pheromone emission, but the means by which these chemicals are distributed in the colony are still unclear. In several ant species, queen-laid eggs are the vehicle of the queen signal. The aim of this study was to investigate whether queen-laid eggs of the ant Aphaenogaster senilis possess queen-specific cuticular hydrocarbons and/or Dufour or poison gland compounds, and whether the presence of eggs inhibited larval development into queens. Our results show that the queen- and worker-laid eggs shared cuticular and Dufour hydrocarbons with the adults; however, their poison gland compounds were not similar. Queen-laid eggs had more dimethylalkanes and possessed a queen-specific mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons composed of 3,11 + 3,9 + 3,7-dimethylnonacosane, in higher proportions than did worker-laid eggs. Even though the queen-laid eggs were biochemically similar to the queen, their addition to experimentally queenless groups did not prevent the development of new queens. More studies are needed on the means by which queen ant pheromones are transmitted in the colony, and how these mechanisms correlates with life history traits.

  2. Queen volatiles as a modulator of Tetragonisca angustula drone behavior.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Macario M; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Sánchez, Daniel; Villanueva-Gutiérrez, Rogel; Vandame, Remy

    2011-11-01

    Tetragonisca angustula mating occurs during the virgin queen nuptial flight, usually in the presence of a drone congregation area (DCA). The presence of virgin queen pheromone is considered the trigger for DCA establishment, although this has not been demonstrated experimentally. We established meliponaries, in different habitats, with T. angustula virgin queens during the main drone reproduction period. Eight DCAs were observed in urban areas, and all established outside or near colonies containing at least one virgin queen. The accumulation of drones in the DCAs occurred from 08:00 to 18:00 h and over 3-35 days. The number of drones in DCAs ranged from 60 to 2,000. In field trials, drones were attracted to virgin queens and also, unexpectedly, to physogastric queens. Volatiles collected from both virgin and physogastric queens elicited strong electoantennogram (EAG) responses from drones. Virgin and physogastric queen volatiles were qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different, in chemical composition. The queen's abdomen was the principal source of these compounds. Isopropyl hexanoate (IPH), the most abundant compound in virgin queen volatiles and one of the most abundant in physogastric queen volatiles, was identified as one of the compounds that elicited EAG responses and was demonstrated to attract drones in a field test.

  3. Queen volatiles as a modulator of Tetragonisca angustula drone behavior.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Macario M; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Sánchez, Daniel; Villanueva-Gutiérrez, Rogel; Vandame, Remy

    2011-11-01

    Tetragonisca angustula mating occurs during the virgin queen nuptial flight, usually in the presence of a drone congregation area (DCA). The presence of virgin queen pheromone is considered the trigger for DCA establishment, although this has not been demonstrated experimentally. We established meliponaries, in different habitats, with T. angustula virgin queens during the main drone reproduction period. Eight DCAs were observed in urban areas, and all established outside or near colonies containing at least one virgin queen. The accumulation of drones in the DCAs occurred from 08:00 to 18:00 h and over 3-35 days. The number of drones in DCAs ranged from 60 to 2,000. In field trials, drones were attracted to virgin queens and also, unexpectedly, to physogastric queens. Volatiles collected from both virgin and physogastric queens elicited strong electoantennogram (EAG) responses from drones. Virgin and physogastric queen volatiles were qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different, in chemical composition. The queen's abdomen was the principal source of these compounds. Isopropyl hexanoate (IPH), the most abundant compound in virgin queen volatiles and one of the most abundant in physogastric queen volatiles, was identified as one of the compounds that elicited EAG responses and was demonstrated to attract drones in a field test. PMID:22081302

  4. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. ); June, C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  5. Replication and plaque formation of parainfluenza viruses in an established line of monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Nerome, K; Ishida, M

    1982-05-01

    All four types of parainfluenza virus produced distinct plaques in an established line of monkey kidney cells (LLCMK2) under agar overlay containing trypsin and DEAE dextran. Parallel titration of these viruses in LLCMK2 and primary cynomologous monkey kidney (MK) cells showed that LLCMK2 cells were about tenfold more sensitive than MK cells. When trypsin was added to the fluid medium, the virus yield in LLCMK2 cells was significantly higher than in MK cells.

  6. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  7. African horse sickness virus infects BSR cells through macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Vermaak, Elaine; Conradie, Andelé M; Maree, Francois F; Theron, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Cellular pathways involved in cell entry by African horse sickness virus (AHSV), a member of the Orbivirus genus within the Reoviridae family, have not yet been determined. Here, we show that acidic pH is required for productive infection of BSR cells by AHSV-4, suggesting that the virus is likely internalized by an endocytic pathway. We subsequently analyzed the major endocytic routes using specific inhibitors and determined the consequences for AHSV-4 entry into BSR cells. The results indicated that virus entry is dynamin dependent, but clathrin- and lipid raft/caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways were not used by AHSV-4 to enter and infect BSR cells. Instead, binding of AHSV-4 to BSR cells stimulated uptake of a macropinocytosis-specific cargo and inhibition of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, actin polymerization and cellular GTPases and kinases involved in macropinocytosis significantly inhibited AHSV-4 infection. Altogether, the data suggest that AHSV-4 infects BSR cells by utilizing macropinocytosis as the primary entry pathway.

  8. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  9. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  10. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  11. The Potato virus X TGBp3 protein associates with the ER network for virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Heppler, Marty; Mitra, Ruchira; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Cell-to-cell movement of TGBp3 was studied using biolistic bombardment of plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp3. TGBp3 moves between cells in Nicotiana benthamiana, but requires TGBp1 to move in N. tabacum leaves. In tobacco leaves GFP:TGBp3 accumulated in a pattern resembling the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To determine if the ER network is important for GFP:TGBp3 and for PVX cell-to-cell movement, a single mutation inhibiting membrane binding of TGBp3 was introduced into GFP:TGBp3 and into PVX. This mutation disrupted movement of GFP:TGBp3 and PVX. Brefeldin A, which disrupts the ER network, also inhibited GFP:TGBp3 movement in both Nicotiana species. Two deletion mutations, that do not affect membrane binding, hindered GFP:TGBp3 and PVX cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp2 and GFP:TGBp3 were bombarded to several other PVX hosts and neither protein moved between adjacent cells. In most hosts, TGBp2 or TGBp3 cannot move cell-to-cell.

  12. Sperm use economy of honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens.

    PubMed

    Baer, Boris; Collins, Jason; Maalaps, Kristiina; den Boer, Susanne P A

    2016-05-01

    The queens of eusocial ants, bees, and wasps only mate during a very brief period early in life to acquire and store a lifetime supply of sperm. As sperm cannot be replenished, queens have to be highly economic when using stored sperm to fertilize eggs, especially in species with large and long-lived colonies. However, queen fertility has not been studied in detail, so that we have little understanding of how economic sperm use is in different species, and whether queens are able to influence their sperm use. This is surprising given that sperm use is a key factor of eusocial life, as it determines the fecundity and longevity of queens and therefore colony fitness. We quantified the number of sperm that honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens use to fertilize eggs. We examined sperm use in naturally mated queens of different ages and in queens artificially inseminated with different volumes of semen. We found that queens are remarkably efficient and only use a median of 2 sperm per egg fertilization, with decreasing sperm use in older queens. The number of sperm in storage was always a significant predictor for the number of sperm used per fertilization, indicating that queens use a constant ratio of spermathecal fluid relative to total spermathecal volume of 2.364 × 10(-6) to fertilize eggs. This allowed us to calculate a lifetime fecundity for honeybee queens of around 1,500,000 fertilized eggs. Our data provide the first empirical evidence that honeybee queens do not manipulate sperm use, and fertilization failures in worker-destined eggs are therefore honest signals that workers can use to time queen replacement, which is crucial for colony performance and fitness. PMID:27217944

  13. High virus-to-cell ratios indicate ongoing production of viruses in deep subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Kallmeyer, Jens; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2014-07-01

    Marine sediments cover two-thirds of our planet and harbor huge numbers of living prokaryotes. Long-term survival of indigenous microorganisms within the deep subsurface is still enigmatic, as sources of organic carbon are vanishingly small. To better understand controlling factors of microbial life, we have analyzed viral abundance within a comprehensive set of globally distributed subsurface sediments. Phages were detected by electron microscopy in deep (320 m below seafloor), ancient (∼14 Ma old) and the most oligotrophic subsurface sediments of the world's oceans (South Pacific Gyre (SPG)). The numbers of viruses (10(4)-10(9) cm(-3), counted by epifluorescence microscopy) generally decreased with sediment depth, but always exceeded the total cell counts. The enormous numbers of viruses indicate their impact as a controlling factor for prokaryotic mortality in the marine deep biosphere. The virus-to-cell ratios increased in deeper and more oligotrophic layers, exhibiting values of up to 225 in the deep subsurface of the SPG. High numbers of phages might be due to absorption onto the sediment matrix and a diminished degradation by exoenzymes. However, even in the oldest sediments, microbial communities are capable of maintaining viral populations, indicating an ongoing viral production and thus, viruses provide an independent indicator for microbial life in the marine deep biosphere.

  14. High virus-to-cell ratios indicate ongoing production of viruses in deep subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Kallmeyer, Jens; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2014-07-01

    Marine sediments cover two-thirds of our planet and harbor huge numbers of living prokaryotes. Long-term survival of indigenous microorganisms within the deep subsurface is still enigmatic, as sources of organic carbon are vanishingly small. To better understand controlling factors of microbial life, we have analyzed viral abundance within a comprehensive set of globally distributed subsurface sediments. Phages were detected by electron microscopy in deep (320 m below seafloor), ancient (∼14 Ma old) and the most oligotrophic subsurface sediments of the world's oceans (South Pacific Gyre (SPG)). The numbers of viruses (10(4)-10(9) cm(-3), counted by epifluorescence microscopy) generally decreased with sediment depth, but always exceeded the total cell counts. The enormous numbers of viruses indicate their impact as a controlling factor for prokaryotic mortality in the marine deep biosphere. The virus-to-cell ratios increased in deeper and more oligotrophic layers, exhibiting values of up to 225 in the deep subsurface of the SPG. High numbers of phages might be due to absorption onto the sediment matrix and a diminished degradation by exoenzymes. However, even in the oldest sediments, microbial communities are capable of maintaining viral populations, indicating an ongoing viral production and thus, viruses provide an independent indicator for microbial life in the marine deep biosphere. PMID:24430483

  15. Adaptation of hepatitis A virus to high titre growth in diploid and permanent cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, J P; Mehdi, S; Mauler, R

    1988-01-01

    A hepatitis A virus isolate originally obtained from the feces of a clinically ill patient and passaged in diploid human embryonic kidney and lung cells was adapted to grow in MRC-5, Cercopithecus aethiops muscle and in Vero cells. Three different adaptation methods were applied. Either method proved to be suitable to finally give high virus titres of cell-bound as well as cell-free virus in the supernatant of infected cultures during 10 to 15 passages. An easily performable immunoperoxidase staining method was used for the titration of hepatitis A virus in microtitre plates. Cytopathogenic changes in MRC-5 cell cultures infected with fully adapted virus are described.

  16. Hsp90 inhibitors reduce influenza virus replication in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Geoffrey; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Leung, B.W.; Mayer, Daniel; Schwemmle, Martin Brownlee, George

    2008-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase complex of influenza A virus consists of three subunits PB1, PB2 and PA. Recently, the cellular chaperone Hsp90 was shown to play a role in nuclear import and assembly of the trimeric polymerase complex by binding to PB1 and PB2. Here we show that Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin or its derivative 17-AAG, delay the growth of influenza virus in cell culture resulting in a 1-2 log reduction in viral titre early in infection. We suggest that this is caused by the reduced half-life of PB1 and PB2 and inhibition of nuclear import of PB1 and PA which lead to reduction in viral RNP assembly. Hsp90 inhibitors may represent a new class of antiviral compounds against influenza viruses.

  17. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A.; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J.; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5′ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a

  18. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Virus-Induced Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is the first polyomavirus directly linked to human cancer, and its recent discovery helps to explain many of the enigmatic features of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). MCV is clonally integrated into MCC tumor cells, which then require continued MCV oncoprotein expression to survive. The integrated viral genomes have a tumor-specific pattern of tumor antigen gene mutation that incapacitates viral DNA replication. This human cancer virus provides a new model in which a common, mostly harmless member of the human viral flora can initiate cancer if it acquires a precise set of mutations in a host with specific susceptibility factors, such as age and immune suppression. Identification of this tumor virus has led to new opportunities for early diagnosis and targeted treatment of MCC. PMID:21942528

  19. Screening of Natural Waters for Viruses Which Infect Chlorella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Higashiyama, Takanobu; Fukuda, Takao

    1991-01-01

    By using a plaque assay with the unicellular green alga Chlorella sp. strain NC64A as a host, viruses were screened from natural pond waters collected in Kyoto and Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan. From some samples tested, two kinds of plaques, large (φ = 6 to 10 mm) and small (φ = 2 to 3 mm), were detected with various frequencies. The frequency of plaques in each of the water sources was seasonal; generally, it reached a peak value (8,000 PFU/ml) in May and gradually decreased to the limit of detection (<1) in November before increasing again in early spring. Electron microscopy revealed that the purified and negatively stained viruses were very large (125 to 200 nm) icosahedral particles. The genome isolated from these particles was always a linear double-stranded DNA of 340 to 370 kbp. Electrophoresis patterns of the DNA fragments produced by digestion with restriction enzymes differed considerably from plaque to plaque, even for plaques from the same water source. However, Southern hybridization showed strong homology among all of the virus DNAs tested, indicating relatedness of those viruses. A possible use of the Chlorella virus assay system to monitor the natural population of algal cells and water quality is discussed. Images PMID:16348596

  20. Molecular mechanisms of Ebola virus pathogenesis: focus on cell death

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, L; Agrati, C; Petrosillo, N; Di Caro, A; Capobianchi, M R; Ippolito, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) belongs to the Filoviridae family and is responsible for a severe disease characterized by the sudden onset of fever and malaise accompanied by other non-specific signs and symptoms; in 30–50% of cases hemorrhagic symptoms are present. Multiorgan dysfunction occurs in severe forms with a mortality up to 90%. The EBOV first attacks macrophages and dendritic immune cells. The innate immune reaction is characterized by a cytokine storm, with secretion of numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines, which induces a huge number of contradictory signals and hurts the immune cells, as well as other tissues. Other highly pathogenic viruses also trigger cytokine storms, but Filoviruses are thought to be particularly lethal because they affect a wide array of tissues. In addition to the immune system, EBOV attacks the spleen and kidneys, where it kills cells that help the body to regulate its fluid and chemical balance and that make proteins that help the blood to clot. In addition, EBOV causes liver, lungs and kidneys to shut down their functions and the blood vessels to leak fluid into surrounding tissues. In this review, we analyze the molecular mechanisms at the basis of Ebola pathogenesis with a particular focus on the cell death pathways induced by the virus. We also discuss how the treatment of the infection can benefit from the recent experience of blocking/modulating cell death in human degenerative diseases. PMID:26024394

  1. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  2. Defective interfering influenza viruses and host cells: establishment and maintenance of persistent influenza virus infection in MDBK and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    De, B K; Nayak, D P

    1980-12-01

    WSN (H0N1) influenza virus upon undiluted passages in different species of cells, namely, bovine kidney (MDBK), chicken embryo (CEF), and HeLa cells, produced a varying amount of defective interfering (DI) virus which correlated well with the ability of the species of cell to produce infectious virus. However, the nature of the influenza DI viral RNA produced from a single clonal stock was essentially identical in all three cells types, suggesting that these cells do not exert a great selective pressure in the amplification of specific DI viral RNAs either at early or late passages. DI viruses produced from one subtype (H0N1) could interfere with the replication of infectious viruses belonging to other subtypes (H1N1, H3N2). DI viral RNAs could also replicate with the helper function of other subtype viruses. The persistent infection of MDBK and HeLa cells could be initiated by coinfecting cells with both temperature-sensitive mutants (ts-) and DI influenza viruses. Persistently infected cultures cultures at early passages (up to passage 7) showed a cyclical pattern of cell lysis and virus production (crisis), whereas, at later passages (after passage 20), they produced little or no virus and were resistant to infection by homologous virus but not by heterologous virus. The majority of persistently infected cells, however, contained the complete viral genome since they expressed viral antigens and produced infectious centers. Selection of a slow-growing temperature-sensitive variant rather than the presence of DI virus or interferon appears to be critical in maintaining persistent influenza infection in these cells.

  3. Modeling multiple infection of cells by viruses: challenges and insights

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Dustin; Wodarz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    The multiple infection of cells with several copies of a given virus has been demonstrated in experimental systems, and has been subject to previous mathematical modeling approaches. Such models, especially those based on ordinary differential equations, can be characterized by difficulties and pitfalls. One such difficulty arises from what we refer to as multiple infection cascades. That is, such models subdivide the infected cell population into sub-populations that are carry i viruses, and each sub-population can in principle always be further infected to contain i+1 viruses. In order to study the model with numerical simulations, the infection cascade needs to be cut artificially, and this can influence the results. This is shown here in the context of the simplest setting that involves a single, homogeneous virus population. If the viral replication rate is sufficiently fast, then most infected cells will accumulate in the last member of the infection cascade, leading to incorrect numerical results. This can be observed even with relatively long infection cascades, and in this case computational costs associated with a sufficiently long infection cascade can render this approach impractical. We subsequently examine a more complex scenario where two virus types / strains with different fitness are allowed to compete. Again, we find that the length of the infection cascade can have a crucial influence on the results. Competitive exclusion can be observed for shorter infection cascades, while coexistence can be observed for longer infection cascades. More subtly, the length of the infection cascade can influence the equilibrium level of the populations in numerical simulations. Studying the model in a parameter regime where an increase in the infection cascade length does not influence the results, we examine the effect of multiple infection on the outcome of competition. We find that multiple infection can promote coexistence of virus types if there is a degree

  4. The effect of neurotoxin on rabies virus binding to mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Briggs, D J; Phillips, R M

    1991-08-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells were exposed to alpha bungarotoxin, a neurotoxin known to inhibit rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor located at the neuromuscular junction in muscle tissue. The total amount of 3H-CVS virus that bound to neurotoxin treated cells was separated into specific and non-specific binding using a cold competition assay. Comparison of untreated and neurotoxin treated cells demonstrated that the majority of cell-associated virus in untreated cells was of a specific nature whereas the majority of the cell-associated virus in neurotoxin treated cells was due to non-specific binding.

  5. The replication and titration of iridescent virus type 22 in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Lescott, T; Harrap, K A; Kelly, D C

    1978-01-01

    A plaque assay for iridescent virus type 22 (from Simulium sp.) using Spodoptera frugiperda cells has been devised, and the kinetics of growth of the virus in this cell line have been determined. The virus particle/p.f.u. ratio was 75 +/- 8, and the p.f.u./TCID50 ratio was 0.56 +/- 0.11.

  6. Comparison of immunogenicity of cell-and egg-passaged viruses for manufacturing MDCK cell culture-based influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Shin, Duckhyang; Park, Kuk Jin; Lee, Hyeon; Cho, Eun Young; Kim, Mi Suk; Hwang, Mi Hui; Kim, Soo In; Ahn, Dong Ho

    2015-06-01

    While cell culture-based technology has been recently used for manufacturing influenza vaccines, currently available seed viruses are mostly egg-derived reassortants that are egg-adapted to achieve high virus growth in eggs. For use as viruses for cell culture-based influenza vaccine manufacturing, egg-adapted viral seeds may undergo several passages in manufacturing cell lines. However, the suitability of such cell-passaged viruses for vaccine production remains largely unelucidated. In this study, influenza viruses produced in suspension Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell cultures were compared to those produced in embryonated hen's eggs for manufacturing MDCK cell culture-based influenza vaccines through comparability studies of virus productivity and vaccine immunogenicity. The results indicate no change in the amino acid sequence of the main antigens, including hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), of cell-passaged viruses after three passages in suspension MDCK cells. In lab-scale (3-L) single-use bioreactors, suspension MDCK culture supernatants inoculated with cell-passaged viruses were found to show higher virus productivity, suspension MDCK culture supernatants inoculated with egg-passaged viruses, in respect to the HA titers and HA contents determined by single radial immunodiffusion. Finally, comparable hemagglutination inhibition and influenza-specific IgG titers were determined in the mice immunized with cell culture-based vaccines produced with cell- or egg-passaged viruses. These results indicate that MDCK cell-passaged viruses from egg-adapted viruses, as well as egg-derived seed virus, are suitable for MDCK cell culture-based influenza vaccine production.

  7. Infection of Mosquito Cells (C6/36) by Dengue-2 Virus Interferes with Subsequent Infection by Yellow Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Abrao, Emiliana Pereira; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is one of the most important diseases caused by arboviruses in the world. Yellow fever is another arthropod-borne disease of great importance to public health that is endemic to tropical regions of Africa and the Americas. Both yellow fever and dengue viruses are flaviviruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and then, it is reasonable to consider that in a given moment, mosquito cells could be coinfected by both viruses. Therefore, we decided to evaluate if sequential infections of dengue and yellow fever viruses (and vice-versa) in mosquito cells could affect the virus replication patterns. Using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR-based replication assays in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells with single or sequential infections with both viruses, we demonstrated the occurrence of viral interference, also called superinfection exclusion, between these two viruses. Our results show that this interference pattern is particularly evident when cells were first infected with dengue virus and subsequently with yellow fever virus (YFV). Reduction in dengue virus replication, although to a lower extent, was also observed when C6/36 cells were initially infected with YFV followed by dengue virus infection. Although the importance that these findings have on nature is unknown, this study provides evidence, at the cellular level, of the occurrence of replication interference between dengue and yellow fever viruses and raises the question if superinfection exclusion could be a possible explanation, at least partially, for the reported lack of urban yellow fever occurrence in regions where a high level of dengue transmission occurs.

  8. The effect of induced queen replacement on Nosema spp. infection in honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) colonies.

    PubMed

    Botías, Cristina; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Días, Joyce; García-Palencia, Pilar; Matabuena, María; Juarranz, Angeles; Barrios, Laura; Meana, Aránzazu; Nanetti, Antonio; Higes, Mariano

    2012-04-01

    Microsporidiosis of adult honeybees caused by Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae is a common worldwide disease with negative impacts on colony strength and productivity. Few options are available to control the disease at present. The role of the queen in bee population renewal and the replacement of bee losses due to Nosema infection is vital to maintain colony homeostasis. Younger queens have a greater egg laying potential and they produce a greater proportion of uninfected newly eclosed bees to compensate for adult bee losses; hence, a field study was performed to determine the effect of induced queen replacement on Nosema infection in honey bee colonies, focusing on colony strength and honey production. In addition, the impact of long-term Nosema infection of a colony on the ovaries and ventriculus of the queen was evaluated. Queen replacement resulted in a remarkable decrease in the rates of Nosema infection, comparable with that induced by fumagillin treatment. However, detrimental effects on the overall colony state were observed due to the combined effects of stressors such as the queenless condition, lack of brood and high infection rates. The ovaries and ventriculi of queens in infected colonies revealed no signs of Nosema infection and there were no lesions in ovarioles or epithelial ventricular cells.

  9. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches in targeting dendritic cells with virus vectors.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Fraefel, Cornel

    2015-09-01

    Viruses have evolved efficient strategies to overcome cellular membranes and transfer nucleic acid into a host cell. This property is being exploited in gene therapy which has the goal of delivering therapeutic genes into a patient tissue in order to achieve a clinically relevant effect. An interesting target for virus-mediated gene transfer is the immune system. In fact, the first human gene therapy trial performed involved the implantation of autologous bone marrow cells transduced ex vivo with gamma retrovirus vectors expressing adenosine deaminase in a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency. More recently, targeting transgene expression to dendritic cells (DCs) has become a promising strategy for directing the immune system towards immunity or tolerance. DC targeting has been achieved on a transcriptional level by using DC-specific promoters or by retargeting the tropism of the virus vectors. For example, we and others have developed strategies that support antigen-specific immune tolerance by transducing hematopoietic stem cells with lentivirus- or gamma retrovirus- vectors that transcriptionally target antigen expression to DCs. This review discusses the state of the art of vector-targeting to DCs in preclinical as well as clinical trials.

  10. Royalactin induces queen differentiation in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, Masaki

    2011-05-26

    The honeybee (Apis mellifera) forms two female castes: the queen and the worker. This dimorphism depends not on genetic differences, but on ingestion of royal jelly, although the mechanism through which royal jelly regulates caste differentiation has long remained unknown. Here I show that a 57-kDa protein in royal jelly, previously designated as royalactin, induces the differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens. Royalactin increased body size and ovary development and shortened developmental time in honeybees. Surprisingly, it also showed similar effects in the fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster). Mechanistic studies revealed that royalactin activated p70 S6 kinase, which was responsible for the increase of body size, increased the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase, which was involved in the decreased developmental time, and increased the titre of juvenile hormone, an essential hormone for ovary development. Knockdown of epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) expression in the fat body of honeybees and fruitflies resulted in a defect of all phenotypes induced by royalactin, showing that Egfr mediates these actions. These findings indicate that a specific factor in royal jelly, royalactin, drives queen development through an Egfr-mediated signalling pathway. PMID:21516106

  11. Focus assay for varicella-zoster virus in human embryo cells stained with immunoperoxidase method.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmayerová, H; Mayer, V; Zachar, V

    1986-11-01

    Rapid titration of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) based on staining of virus-infected cells by indirect immunoperoxidase technique (IPA) is described. Cell monolayers were grown in wells of plastic plates (two different diameters). Foci of virus-infected cells as revealed by IPA could be counted either 48 hr post-infection, if cell-associated virus (VZV infected cells) was used as inoculum, or 72 hr p. i. if cell-free virus was used. A linear relationship was observed between virus dilution and number of foci. The first virus was detected 12 hr p. i., the highest titre at 36 hr, when cytopathic effect (CPE) involved about 50% of the monolayer.

  12. A new permanent cell line derived from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) as cell culture model for zoonotic viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approximately 60% of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, with three-fourths derived from wild animals. Many of these zoonotic diseases are transmitted by rodents with important information about their reservoir dynamics and pathogenesis missing. One main reason for the gap in our knowledge is the lack of adequate cell culture systems as models for the investigation of rodent-borne (robo) viruses in vitro. Therefore we established and characterized a new cell line, BVK168, using the kidney of a bank vole, Myodes glareolus, the most abundant member of the Arvicolinae trapped in Germany. Results BVK168 proved to be of epithelial morphology expressing tight junctions as well as adherence junction proteins. The BVK168 cells were analyzed for their infectability by several arbo- and robo-viruses: Vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, cowpox virus, Sindbis virus, Pixuna virus, Usutu virus, Inkoo virus, Puumalavirus, and Borna disease virus (BDV). The cell line was susceptible for all tested viruses, and most interestingly also for the difficult to propagate BDV. Conclusion In conclusion, the newly established cell line from wildlife rodents seems to be an excellent tool for the isolation and characterization of new rodent-associated viruses and may be used as in vitro-model to study properties and pathogenesis of these agents. PMID:21729307

  13. Mosquito and mammalian cells grown on microcarriers for four-serotype dengue virus production: variations in virus titer, plaque morphology, and replication rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2004-03-01

    Dengue (DEN) viruses consisting of four distinct serotypes cause diseases such as dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome in humans. Most of the dengue viruses can be effectively propagated in some mosquito and mammalian cell lines. In this study, we applied microcarrier cell culture technology to study two relevant aspects involving dengue virus, one on biotechnology of cell growth and virus production, and the other on virus biology concerning genetic variation of a virus population. We investigated the growth of C6/36 mosquito cells and Vero cells grown on Cytodex 1 microcarriers. High-titer DEN virus production can be achieved in C6/36 and Vero cells infected at low cell inoculation density, in the lag-phase cell stage, and at low multiplicity of infection (MOI). The maximum titers produced for DEN-1, DEN-3, and DEN-4 viruses were approximately 10- to 10,000-fold lower than for DEN-2 virus produced in C6/36 and Vero cells grown on microcarriers. The DEN-2 virus produced in C6/36 cells displayed far more extensive plaque heterogeneity than in Vero cells. Microcarrier C6/36 mosquito cell culture appeared to be the most effective system for four-serotype DEN virus production. Interestingly, some selected variants of DEN virus may outgrow in Vero cells when using a T-flask culture. These results may provide useful information for DEN vaccine development.

  14. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  15. Vaccinia virus strain differences in cell attachment and entry

    SciTech Connect

    Bengali, Zain; Townsley, Alan C.; Moss, Bernard

    2009-06-20

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain WR can enter cells by a low pH endosomal pathway or direct fusion with the plasma membrane at neutral pH. Here, we compared attachment and entry of five VACV strains in six cell lines and discovered two major patterns. Only WR exhibited pH 5-enhanced rate of entry following neutral pH adsorption to cells, which correlated with sensitivity to bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification. Entry of IHD-J, Copenhagen and Elstree strains were neither accelerated by pH 5 treatment nor prevented by bafilomycin A1. Entry of the Wyeth strain, although not augmented by pH 5, was inhibited by bafilomycin A1. WR and Wyeth were both relatively resistant to the negative effects of heparin on entry, whereas the other strains were extremely sensitive due to inhibition of cell binding. The relative sensitivities of individual vaccinia virus strains to heparin correlated inversely with their abilities to bind to and enter glycosaminoglycan-deficient sog9 cells but not other cell lines tested. These results suggested that that IHD-J, Copenhagen and Elstree have a more limited ability than WR and Wyeth to use the low pH endosomal pathway and are more dependent on binding to glycosaminoglycans for cell attachment.

  16. Cell entry of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is restricted in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Urata, Shuzo; Cho, Yoshitake; Ngo, Nhi; de la Torre, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    In mice persistently infected since birth with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis viurs, viral antigen and RNA are readily detected in most organs and cell types but remarkably absent in skeletal muscle. Here we report that mouse C2C12 myoblasts that are readily infected by LCMV, become highly refractory to LCMV infection upon their differentiation into myotubes. Myotube's resistance to LCMV was not due to an intracellular restriction of virus replication but rather an impaired cell entry mediated by the LCMV surface glycoprotein. Our findings provide an explanation for the observation that in LCMV carrier mice myotubes, which are constantly exposed to blood-containing virus, remain free of viral antigen and RNA despite myotubes express high levels of the LCMV receptor alpha dystroglycan and do not pose an intracellular blockade to LCMV multiplication.

  17. A27L protein mediates vaccinia virus interaction with cell surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Chung, C S; Hsiao, J C; Chang, Y S; Chang, W

    1998-02-01

    Vaccinia virus has a wide host range and infects mammalian cells of many different species. This suggests that the cell surface receptors for vaccinia virus are ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved. Alternatively, different receptors are used for vaccinia virus infection of different cell types. Here we report that vaccinia virus binds to heparan sulfate, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chain of cell surface proteoglycans, during virus infection. Soluble heparin specifically inhibits vaccinia virus binding to cells, whereas other GAGs such as condroitin sulfate or dermantan sulfate have no effect. Heparin also blocks infections by cowpox virus, rabbitpox virus, myxoma virus, and Shope fibroma virus, suggesting that cell surface heparan sulfate could be a general mediator of the entry of poxviruses. The biochemical nature of the heparin-blocking effect was investigated. Heparin analogs that have acetyl groups instead of sulfate groups also abolish the inhibitory effect, suggesting that the negative charges on GAGs are important for virus infection. Furthermore, BSC40 cells treated with sodium chlorate to produce undersulfated GAGs are more refractory to vaccinia virus infection. Taken together, the data support the notion that cell surface heparan sulfate is important for vaccinia virus infection. Using heparin-Sepharose beads, we showed that vaccinia virus virions bind to heparin in vitro. In addition, we demonstrated that the recombinant A27L gene product binds to the heparin beads in vitro. This recombinant protein was further shown to bind to cells, and such interaction could be specifically inhibited by soluble heparin. All the data together indicated that A27L protein could be an attachment protein that mediates vaccinia virus binding to cell surface heparan sulfate during viral infection.

  18. Occurrence of Six Honeybee Viruses in Diseased Austrian Apiaries

    PubMed Central

    Berényi, Olga; Bakonyi, Tamás; Derakhshifar, Irmgard; Köglberger, Hemma; Nowotny, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence, prevalence, and distribution patterns of acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), deformed wing virus (DWV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), and sacbrood virus (SBV) were investigated in 90 Austrian honeybee colonies suffering from symptoms of depopulation, sudden collapse, paralysis, or dark coloring by employing reverse transcription-PCR. Infestation with parasites was also recorded. The samples originated from all parts of Austria. The most prevalent virus was DWV, present in 91% of samples, followed by ABPV, SBV, and BQCV (68%, 49%, and 30%, respectively). CBPV was detected in 10% of colonies, while KBV was not present in any sample. In most samples, more than one virus was identified. The distribution pattern of ABPV, BQCV, CBPV, and SBV varied considerably in the different geographic regions investigated, while DWV was widespread in all Austrian federal states. In bees that showed dark coloring and disorientation, CBPV was always detected. Simultaneous infections of DWV and ABPV were most frequently observed in colonies suffering from weakness, depopulation, and sudden collapse. Bees obtained from apparently healthy colonies within the same apiaries showed a similar distribution pattern of viruses; however, the relative virus load was 10 to 126 times lower than in bees from diseased colonies. A limited number of bee samples from surrounding central European countries (Germany, Poland, Hungary, and Slovenia) were also tested for the presence of the above viruses. Variances were found in the distribution of BQCV and SBV. PMID:16597939

  19. Reduced innate immune response, apoptosis, and virus release in cells cured of respiratory syncytial virus persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Cristina; Melero, José A; Martínez, Isidoro

    2011-02-01

    It has been reported that cell clones isolated at different passages from a culture of HEp-2 cells infected persistently with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) were cured of the virus. Further studies on one of these clones (31C1) are reported here, showing that 31C1 cells can still be infected by HRSV but release low amounts of virus to the culture supernatant, develop smaller and less numerous syncytia than the original HEp-2 cells, and display only a weak innate immune response to the infection. Accordingly, uninfected 31C1 cells, but not clones derived from uninfected HEp-2 cells, express low levels of TLR3 and RIG-I. In addition, 31C1 cells are partly resistant to apoptosis. These results indicate that persistent infection of HEp-2 cells by HRSV has selected cell variants, with changes affecting cell survival, virus growth and the innate immune response that may be valuable for studies of virus-cell interaction. PMID:21093006

  20. Virus-Specific Messenger RNA and Nascent Polypeptides in Polyribosomes of Cells Replicating Murine Sarcoma-Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, G.; Tsuchida, N.; Shanmugam, G.; Green, M.

    1973-01-01

    We present evidence that virus-specific RNA is present in polyribosomes of transformed cells replicating the murine sarcoma-leukemia virus complex and that it serves as messenger RNA for the synthesis of viral-coded proteins. Both virus-specific RNA (detected by hybridization with the [3H]DNA product of the viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase) and nascent viral polypeptides (measured by precipitation with antiserum to purified virus) were found in membrane-bound and free polyribosomes. Membrane-bound polyribosomes contained a higher content of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides. From 60 to 70% of viral RNA sequences were released from polyribosomes with EDTA, consistent with a function as messenger RNA. Maximum amounts of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides were found in the polyribosome region sedimenting at about 350 S. PMID:4352969

  1. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  2. Rabies serogroup viruses in neuroblastoma cells: propagation, "autointerference," and apparently random back-mutation of attenuated viruses to the virulent state.

    PubMed

    Clark, H F

    1980-03-01

    Each of several strains of fixed rabies virus was found to replicate to high titers in C1300 mouse neuroblastoma (clone NA) cells, without adaptation. Rabies serogroup Lagos bat, Mokola, and Duvenhage viruses also replicated efficiently in NA cells. Kotonkan and Obodhiang viruses replicated efficiently after adaptation, to titers not previously obtained in vitro. Infection in NA cells was frequently more cytopathic than in BHK-21 cells, allowing titration of Kotonkan and Obodhiang viruses by plaque assay. Duvenhage virus caused syncytium formation. Serial propagation of rabies viruses at a high multiplicity of infection in NA cells led to a rapid decline in virus yields; similar "autointerference" has not previously been demonstrated with rabies virus in other cell systems. Rabies virus infection in NA cells exhibited extreme sensitivity to interference by experimentally added defective interfering virions. Although several strains of attenuated rabies virus consistently reverted rapidly to virulence after propagation in NA cells, other strains of attenuated rabies and rabies serogroup viruses acquired increased virulence at a more gradual rate or not at all, suggesting that diverse characters may control virulence. When attenuated Flury HEP rabies virus was serially propagated at a low multiplicity of infection in either NA cells or suckling mouse brain, virulence appeared at a very variable rate, indicating that these systems may selectively enhance replication of randomly occurring virulent virus mutants.

  3. Dengue virus-specific suppressor T cells: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Umesh C; Shrivastava, Richa; Tripathi, Raj K; Nagar, Rachna

    2007-08-01

    Dengue virus was the first microorganism that was shown to induce generation of antigen-specific suppressor T (TS) cells in mice. The cascade of the three generations of TS cells (TS1, TS2, TS3) and their secretary products, the suppressor factors (SF1, SF2), was delineated. The TS pathway was proposed to be protective through inhibition of the production of enhancing antibody, which may enhance the severity of dengue disease. The currently second most favoured mechanism of severe dengue disease is the 'cytokine tsunami'. During the last decade, suppressor/regulatory T cells have been studied in greater detail using modern techniques in various diseases, including viral infections. This brief review discusses the role of dengue-specific suppressor T cells in protection and/or induction of severe dengue disease in view of our current understanding of suppressor/regulatory T cells. PMID:17573929

  4. Distribution of bovine virus diarrhoea virus in tissues and white blood cells of cattle during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Bruschke, C J; Weerdmeester, K; Van Oirschot, J T; Van Rijn, P A

    1998-11-01

    This study is performed to gain knowledge about the quantitative distribution of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in tissues and white blood cells (WBC) at different intervals after acute infection. Ten specific pathogen-free calves were intranasally inoculated with 10(5) 50% tissue culture infective dose of the non-cytopathic BVDV strain 4800. Twelve hours after inoculation tonsil biopsies were taken and WBC were collected daily for virus isolation and titration. Each day one calf was killed and virus isolations and titrations were performed from a range of tissues. The results indicate that BVDV first replicates in nasal mucosa and to high titers in the tonsil. The virus then appeared to spread to the regional lymph nodes and then disseminates throughout the body. The virus titers were highest in tonsil, thymus and ileum and were low in the WBC. Also after in vitro infection virus titers in WBC were very low, whereas, they were high in epithelial cells. Although the WBC might not be as important as other cells for replication of BVDV, they may play a role in the spread of the virus throughout the body.

  5. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus detected by separation and incubation of cells from salmonid cavity fluid.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Batts, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus is usually detected by inoculating susceptible cell cultures with cavity ("ovarian") fluid (CF) from spawning females. We identified additional adult carriers of virus in spawning populations of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) by collecting nonerythrocytic cells from CF samples by low-speed centrifugation, culturing the cells for at least 7 d at 15 °C, and then testing the culture medium for virus. Virus appeared in the cultured cells from some samples of CF that remained negative during incubation. In additional samples of CF from these species, the virus titer increased in cultured cells compared with the titer in the original CF sample. With chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha), no negative samples converted to positive during incubation, but the virus titer was retained in incubated CF cells, but not in cell-free CF.

  6. Matricide and queen sex allocation in a yellowjacket wasp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, Kevin J.

    2016-08-01

    In many colonies of social insects, the workers compete with each other and with the queen over the production of the colony's males. In some species of social bees and wasps with annual societies, this intra-colony conflict even results in matricide—the killing of the colony's irreplaceable queen by a daughter worker. In colonies with low effective paternity and high worker-worker relatedness, workers value worker-laid males more than queen-laid males, and thus may benefit from queen killing. Workers gain by eliminating the queen because she is a competing source of male eggs and actively inhibits worker reproduction through policing. However, matricide may be costly to workers if it reduces the production of valuable new queens and workers. Here, I test a theoretical prediction regarding the timing of matricide in a wasp, Dolichovespula arenaria, recently shown to have facultative matricide based on intra-colony relatedness. Using analyses of collected, mature colonies and a surgical manipulation preventing queens from laying female eggs, I show that workers do not preferentially kill queens who are only producing male eggs. Instead, workers sometimes kill queens laying valuable females, suggesting a high cost of matricide. Although matricide is common and typically occurs only in low-paternity colonies, it seems that workers sometimes pay substantial costs in this expression of conflict over male parentage.

  7. Matricide and queen sex allocation in a yellowjacket wasp.

    PubMed

    Loope, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    In many colonies of social insects, the workers compete with each other and with the queen over the production of the colony's males. In some species of social bees and wasps with annual societies, this intra-colony conflict even results in matricide-the killing of the colony's irreplaceable queen by a daughter worker. In colonies with low effective paternity and high worker-worker relatedness, workers value worker-laid males more than queen-laid males, and thus may benefit from queen killing. Workers gain by eliminating the queen because she is a competing source of male eggs and actively inhibits worker reproduction through policing. However, matricide may be costly to workers if it reduces the production of valuable new queens and workers. Here, I test a theoretical prediction regarding the timing of matricide in a wasp, Dolichovespula arenaria, recently shown to have facultative matricide based on intra-colony relatedness. Using analyses of collected, mature colonies and a surgical manipulation preventing queens from laying female eggs, I show that workers do not preferentially kill queens who are only producing male eggs. Instead, workers sometimes kill queens laying valuable females, suggesting a high cost of matricide. Although matricide is common and typically occurs only in low-paternity colonies, it seems that workers sometimes pay substantial costs in this expression of conflict over male parentage. PMID:27350328

  8. Polarized entry and release in epithelial cells of Black Creek Canal virus, a New World hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Ravkov, E V; Nichol, S T; Compans, R W

    1997-02-01

    Black Creek Canal (BCC) virus is a newly identified hantavirus from Florida which is carried by the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) and is associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). We have investigated the interaction of BCC virus with polarized epithelial cells to examine whether entry and release of this virus occur at specific plasma membrane domains. The polarized Vero C1008 monkey kidney cell line was grown on permeable filters and infected with BCC virus either through the apical or basolateral surface. As shown by indirect immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation analysis, cells infected through the apical surface demonstrated a high level of susceptibility to BCC virus infection. In contrast, Vero C1008 cells infected basolaterally exhibited a barely detectable level of BCC virus-synthesized proteins. Titration of virus from apical and basolateral media of infected cells has demonstrated that virus titers released from the apical surface are about 1,200-fold greater than the titer of virus released into the basolateral media. The site of BCC virus release from polarized cells is, therefore, different from that previously described for release of other members of the family Bunyaviridae and may reflect one of the determinants of hantavirus pathogenesis. In addition, we have shown that BCC viral glycoproteins are expressed at the plasma membrane on the apical surface of polarized cells. Electron microscopy studies of the infected cells revealed evidence of BCC virus budding at the plasma membrane. This strongly indicates that, in contrast to most other members of the Bunyaviridae, BCC virus is assembled at the plasma membrane. Since the same site of virus assembly was recently described for Sin Nombre virus, it is likely that all of the new American hantaviruses associated with HPS utilize this same type of virus maturation.

  9. Herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein M and the membrane-associated protein UL11 are required for virus-induced cell fusion and efficient virus entry.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Joong; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Walker, Jason D; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) facilitates virus entry into cells and cell-to-cell spread by mediating fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes and fusion of adjacent cellular membranes. Although virus strains isolated from herpetic lesions cause limited cell fusion in cell culture, clinical herpetic lesions typically contain large syncytia, underscoring the importance of cell-to-cell fusion in virus spread in infected tissues. Certain mutations in glycoprotein B (gB), gK, UL20, and other viral genes drastically enhance virus-induced cell fusion in vitro and in vivo. Recent work has suggested that gB is the sole fusogenic glycoprotein, regulated by interactions with the viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gK, membrane protein UL20, and cellular receptors. Recombinant viruses were constructed to abolish either gM or UL11 expression in the presence of strong syncytial mutations in either gB or gK. Virus-induced cell fusion caused by deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB or the dominant syncytial mutation in gK (Ala to Val at amino acid 40) was drastically reduced in the absence of gM. Similarly, syncytial mutations in either gB or gK did not cause cell fusion in the absence of UL11. Neither the gM nor UL11 gene deletion substantially affected gB, gC, gD, gE, and gH glycoprotein synthesis and expression on infected cell surfaces. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that the membrane protein UL20, which is found as a protein complex with gK, interacted with gM while gM did not interact with other viral glycoproteins. Viruses produced in the absence of gM or UL11 entered into cells more slowly than their parental wild-type virus strain. Collectively, these results indicate that gM and UL11 are required for efficient membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus spread.

  10. Cross-reactive human B cell and T cell epitopes between influenza A and B viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses form different genera, which were originally distinguished by antigenic differences in their nucleoproteins and matrix 1 proteins. Cross-protection between these two genera has not been observed in animal experiments, which is consistent with the low homology in viral proteins common to both viruses except for one of three polymerase proteins, polymerase basic 1 (PB1). Recently, however, antibody and CD4+ T cell epitopes conserved between the two genera were identified in humans. A protective antibody epitope was located in the stalk region of the surface glycoprotein, hemagglutinin, and a CD4+ T cell epitope was located in the fusion peptide of the hemagglutinin. The fusion peptide was also found to contain antibody epitopes in humans and animals. A short stretch of well-conserved peptide was also identified in the other surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase, and antibodies binding to this peptide were generated by peptide immunization in rabbits. Although PB1, the only protein which has relatively high overall sequence homology between influenza A and B viruses, is not considered an immunodominant protein in the T cell responses to influenza A virus infection, amino acid sequence comparisons show that a considerable number of previously identified T cell epitopes in the PB1 of influenza A viruses are conserved in the PB1 of influenza B viruses. These data indicate that B and T cell cross-reactivity exists between influenza A and B viruses, which may have modulatory effects on the disease process and recovery. Although the antibody titers and the specific T cell frequencies induced by natural infection or standard vaccination may not be high enough to provide cross protection in humans, it might be possible to develop immunization strategies to induce these cross-reactive responses more efficiently. PMID:23886073

  11. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection induces autophagy in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Ren, Yan; Guo, Fei; Ni, Wei; Qiao, Jun; Wang, Pengyan; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuangfu

    2014-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae). The signaling pathways and levels of signaling molecules are altered in Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells infected with BVDV. Autophagy is a conservative biological degradation pathway that mainly eliminates and degrades damaged or superfluous organelles and macromolecular complexes for intracellular recycling in eukaryotic cells. Autophagy can also be induced as an effective response to maintain cellular homeostasis in response to different stresses, such as nutrient or growth factor deprivation, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species exposure and pathogen infection. However, the effects of BVDV infection on autophagy in MDBK cells remain unclear. Therefore, we performed an analysis of autophagic activity after BVDV NADL infection using real-time PCR, electron microscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and Western blotting analysis. The results demonstrated that BVDV NADL infection increased autophagic activity and significantly elevated the expression levels of the autophagy-related genes Beclin1 and ATG14 in MDBK cells. However, the knockdown of Beclin1 and ATG14 by RNA interference (RNAi) did not affect BVDV NADL infection-related autophagic activity. These findings provided a novel perspective to elaborate the effects of viral infection on the host cells.

  12. Characterization of a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line for influenza virus production

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi; Huber, Victor C.; McCormick, Kara; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Boon, Adrianus C. M.; Zhu, Longchao; Hause, Ben; Webby, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a porcine intestine epithelial cell line, designated SD-PJEC for the propagation of influenza viruses. The SD-PJEC cell line is a subclone of the IPEC-J2 cell line, which was originally derived from newborn piglet jejunum. Our results demonstrate that SD-PJEC is a cell line of epithelial origin that preferentially expresses receptors of oligosaccharides with Sia2-6Gal modification. This cell line is permissive to infection with human and swine influenza A viruses and some avian influenza viruses, but poorly support the growth of human-origin influenza B viruses. Propagation of swine-origin influenza viruses in these cells results in a rapid growth rate within the first 24 h post-infection and the titres ranged from 4 to 8 log10 TCID50 ml−1. The SD-PJEC cell line was further tested as a potential alternative cell line to Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in conjunction with 293T cells for rescue of swine-origin influenza viruses using the reverse genetics system. The recombinant viruses A/swine/North Carolina/18161/02 (H1N1) and A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 (H3N2) were rescued with virus titres of 7 and 8.25 log10 TCID50 ml−1, respectively. The availability of this swine-specific cell line represents a more relevant substrate for studies and growth of swine-origin influenza viruses. PMID:22739061

  13. THE FATE OF VACCINIA VIRUS ON CULTIVATION IN VITRO WITH KUPFFER CELLS (RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL CELLS)

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Joseph W.; Rous, Peyton

    1938-01-01

    The pathogenic activity of vaccinia virus is in large part suppressed when it is mixed with living Kupffer cells or clasmatocytes in the test-tube and injected intradermally. Vaccinia increases in quantity when introduced into cultures of Kupffer cells in vitro, and survives in immediate association with these elements. No antiviral principle is elaborated by them under such conditions. PMID:19870763

  14. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S.; Evans, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren’t detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories. PMID:27525721

  15. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination.

    PubMed

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S; Evans, David H

    2016-08-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren't detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories.

  16. Functional Analysis of West Nile Virus Proteins in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kaufusi, Pakieli H; Tseng, Alanna; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2016-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) lineage 2 strains have been responsible for large outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease in the United States and Europe between 1999 and 2012. Different strains in this lineage have previously been shown to produce either severe or mild neuroinvasive disease in mice. Phylogenetic and amino acid comparisons between highly or less virulent lineage 2 strains have demonstrated that the nonstructural (NS) gene(s) were most variable. However, the roles of some of the NS proteins in virus life cycle are unknown. The aim of this chapter is to describe simple computational and experimental approaches that can be used to: (1) explore the possible roles of the NS proteins in virus life cycle and (2) test whether the subtle amino acid changes in WNV NS gene products contributed to the evolution of more virulent strains. The computational approaches include methods based on: (1) sequence similarity, (2) sequence motifs, and (3) protein membrane topology predictions. Highlighted experimental procedures include: (1) isolation of viral RNA from WNV-infected cells, (2) cDNA synthesis and PCR amplification of WNV genes, (3) cloning into GFP expression vector, (4) bacterial transformation, (5) plasmid isolation and purification, (6) transfection using activated dendrimers (Polyfect), and (7) immunofluorescence staining of transfected mammalian cells. PMID:27188549

  17. Activation of Complement by Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas F.; Mcintosh, Kenneth; Fishaut, Mark; Henson, Peter M.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected HEp-2 cells in culture to activate complement was investigated. After incubation of cells with various complement sources and buffer, binding of C3b to surfaces of infected cells was demonstrated by immunofluorescence with a double-staining technique. Nonsyncytial and syncytial (i.e., fused, multinucleated) cells were separately enumerated. Also, lysis of RSV-infected cells was assessed by lactic dehydrogenase release. In this system only RSV-infected cells stained for C3b, and they did so only after incubation with functionally active complement. Blocking of classical pathway activation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid diminished the number of infected nonsyncytial cells positively stained for C3b, but had no effect on staining of syncytial cells. Blocking of alternative pathway activation with either zymosan incubation or heat treatment decreased the number of both syncytial and nonsyncytial cells stained for C3b. Decreasing immunoglobulin concentration of the serum used as the complement source also decreased numbers of both cell types stained for C3b. Eliminating specific anti-RSV antibody diminished numbers of both cell types stained for C3b, but staining was not eliminated. Lastly, incubation with functionally active complement markedly increased lactic dehydrogenase release from infected cells. This study demonstrated that RSV-infected nonsyncytial and syncytial cells are able to activate complement by both classical and alternative pathways. Activation of complement by syncytial cells appears to be less dependent on the classical pathway than is activation by nonsyncytial cells, and activation by syncytial cells may require immunoglobulin but not specific antibody. These experiments suggest the possibility of complement activation during respiratory tract infection by RSV. Implications of this are discussed. Images PMID:7263071

  18. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  19. Cell surface receptors for herpes simplex virus are heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The role of cell surface heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was investigated using CHO cell mutants defective in various aspects of glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Binding of radiolabeled virus to the cells and infection were assessed in mutant and wild-type cells. Virus bound efficiently to wild-type cells and initiated an abortive infection in which immediate-early or alpha viral genes were expressed, despite limited production of late viral proteins and progeny virus. Binding of virus to heparan sulfate-deficient mutant cells was severely impaired and mutant cells were resistant to HSV infection. Intermediate levels of binding and infection were observed for a CHO cell mutant that produced undersulfated heparan sulfate. These results show that heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for HSV. PMID:1310996

  20. CD4+ T cells clear virus but augment disease in mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus. Comparison with the effects of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, W H; Record, F M; Openshaw, P J

    1992-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus-specific T cell lines were derived from the spleens of BALB/c mice primed by intranasal infection with RS virus. The lines were expanded by repeated antigenic stimulation in vitro, and separated into CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-enriched fractions by immunomagnetic adhesion. The effects of passive transfer of these fractions into RS virus infected mice were observed. The most severe immunopathological changes were seen in mice receiving CD4+ cells. Transfer of CD4+, CD8+ or both cell fractions caused RS virus-infected mice to become ill and lose weight. Both cell lines caused an increase in the severity of lung pathology (as monitored by bronchoalveolar lavage) with the appearance of lung haemorrhage and polymorphonuclear cell efflux. In addition, recipients of CD4+ cells developed striking pulmonary eosinophilia. In CD4+ cell recipients, 5 x 10(5) cells were sufficient to decrease lung virus titre, whereas 2 x 10(6) CD8+ cells were needed to produce a similar effect. The unseparated T cell line and the CD4+ cell fraction secreted significant amounts of IL-3, IL-4 and IL-5 (P less than 0.001). High levels of IL-2 were produced only by the unseparated T cell line. The CD8+ cell fraction secreted IL-3 only. The results show that, cell-for-cell, CD4+ cells are more anti-viral and more immunopathogenic than CD8+ cells in RS virus infected mice. Such effects may have contributed to the augmented disease seen in some infants vaccinated against RS virus. PMID:1351433

  1. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  2. The surface receptor is a major determinant of the cell tropism of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Herrler, G; Klenk, H D

    1987-07-01

    N-Acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2) has been shown to be a high-affinity receptor determinant for attachment of influenza C virus to erythrocytes (G. N. Rogers, G. Herrler, J. C. Paulson, and H-D. Klenk, 1986, J. Biol. Chem. 261, 5947-5951). In this report the nature of the cell surface receptor for influenza C virus on tissue culture cells was analyzed. Pretreatment with either neuraminidase or neuraminate 9-O-acetylesterase was found to render LLC-MK2 cells resistant to infection by influenza C virus as evidenced by the failure to detect virus release into the medium by hemagglutination titration. Susceptibility to infection was fully restored after incubation of neuraminidase-treated cells with bovine brain gangliosides known to contain Neu5,9Ac2. These results indicate that (i) Neu5,9Ac2 is the primary receptor determinant required for influenza C virus to attach to tissue culture cells and to initiate infection and (ii) gangliosides containing this type of sialic acid are potential receptors for influenza C virus. Several cell lines which are resistant to infection by this virus were able to release influenza C virus into the medium provided they were incubated with bovine brain gangliosides prior to virus infection. This result indicates that lack of appropriate receptors on the cell surface is a major reason for the restricted cell tropism of influenza C virus.

  3. Role of natural killer cells in innate protection against lethal ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Perkins, Jeremy G; Swenson, Dana L; Deal, Emily M; Bosio, Catharine M; Aman, M Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Young, Howard A; Bavari, Sina

    2004-07-19

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1-3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell-mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-gamma secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding of Ebola virus pathogenesis and direct the development of immunotherapeutics, which target the innate immune system, for treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  4. On the origin of cells and viruses: primordial virus world scenario.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-10-01

    It is proposed that the precellular stage of biological evolution unraveled within networks of inorganic compartments that harbored a diverse mix of virus-like genetic elements. This stage of evolution might makes up the Last Universal Cellular Ancestor (LUCA) that more appropriately could be denoted Last Universal Cellular Ancestral State (LUCAS). Such a scenario recapitulates the ideas of J. B. S. Haldane sketched in his classic 1928 essay. However, unlike in Haldane's day, considerable support for this scenario exits today: lack of homology between core DNA replication system components in archaea and bacteria, distinct membrane chemistries and enzymes of lipid biosynthesis in archaea and bacteria, spread of several viral hallmark genes among diverse groups of viruses, and the extant archaeal and bacterial chromosomes appear to be shaped by accretion of diverse, smaller replicons. Under the viral model of precellular evolution, the key components of cells originated as components of virus-like entities. The two surviving types of cellular life forms, archaea and bacteria, might have emerged from the LUCAS independently, along with, probably, numerous forms now extinct. PMID:19845627

  5. Seasonal Dynamics in the Chemistry and Structure of the Fat Bodies of Bumblebee Queens.

    PubMed

    Votavová, Alena; Tomčala, Aleš; Kofroňová, Edita; Kudzejová, Michaela; Šobotník, Jan; Jiroš, Pavel; Komzáková, Olga; Valterová, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Insects' fat bodies are responsible for nutrient storage and for a significant part of intermediary metabolism. Thus, it can be expected that the structure and content of the fat body will adaptively change, if an insect is going through different life stages. Bumblebee queens belong to such insects as they dramatically change their physiology several times over their lives in relation to their solitary overwintering, independent colony foundation stage, and during the colony life-cycle ending in the senescent stage. Here, we report on changes in the ultrastructure and lipid composition of the peripheral fat body of Bombus terrestris queens in relation to seasonal changes in the queens' activity. Six life stages are defined and evaluated in particular: pharate, callow, before and after hibernation, egg-laying, and senescence. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the fat body contained two main cell types-adipocytes and oenocytes. Only adipocytes reveal important changes related to the life phase, and mostly the ration between inclusion and cytoplasm volume varies among particular stages. Both electron microscopy and chemical analyses of lipids highlighted seasonal variability in the quantity of the stored lipids, which peaked prior to hibernation. Triacylglycerols appeared to be the main energy source during hibernation, while the amount of glycogen before and after hibernation remained unchanged. In addition, we observed that the representation of some fatty acids within the triacylglycerols change during the queen's life. Last but not least, we show that fat body cell membranes do not undergo substantial changes concerning phospholipid composition in relation to overwintering. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cold-adaptation strategy of bumblebee queens is more likely to be based on polyol accumulation than on the restructuring of lipid membranes. PMID:26559946

  6. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  7. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  8. Influenza A Virus Polymerase Is a Site for Adaptive Changes during Experimental Evolution in Bat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Daniel S.; Yú, Shuǐqìng; Caì, Yíngyún; Dinis, Jorge M.; Müller, Marcel A.; Jordan, Ingo; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recent identification of highly divergent influenza A viruses in bats revealed a new, geographically dispersed viral reservoir. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of host-restricted viral tropism and the potential for transmission of viruses between humans and bats, we exposed a panel of cell lines from bats of diverse species to a prototypical human-origin influenza A virus. All of the tested bat cell lines were susceptible to influenza A virus infection. Experimental evolution of human and avian-like viruses in bat cells resulted in efficient replication and created highly cytopathic variants. Deep sequencing of adapted human influenza A virus revealed a mutation in the PA polymerase subunit not previously described, M285K. Recombinant virus with the PA M285K mutation completely phenocopied the adapted virus. Adaptation of an avian virus-like virus resulted in the canonical PB2 E627K mutation that is required for efficient replication in other mammals. None of the adaptive mutations occurred in the gene for viral hemagglutinin, a gene that frequently acquires changes to recognize host-specific variations in sialic acid receptors. We showed that human influenza A virus uses canonical sialic acid receptors to infect bat cells, even though bat influenza A viruses do not appear to use these receptors for virus entry. Our results demonstrate that bats are unique hosts that select for both a novel mutation and a well-known adaptive mutation in the viral polymerase to support replication. IMPORTANCE Bats constitute well-known reservoirs for viruses that may be transferred into human populations, sometimes with fatal consequences. Influenza A viruses have recently been identified in bats, dramatically expanding the known host range of this virus. Here we investigated the replication of human influenza A virus in bat cell lines and the barriers that the virus faces in this new host. Human influenza A and B viruses infected cells from geographically and

  9. In Vitro Evolution of Bovine Foamy Virus Variants with Enhanced Cell-Free Virus Titers and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qiuying; Hipp, Michaela; Hugo, Annette; Lei, Janet; Liu, Yang; Kehl, Timo; Hechler, Torsten; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-11-11

    Virus transmission is essential for spreading viral infections and is a highly coordinated process which occurs by cell-free transmission or cell-cell contact. The transmission of Bovine Foamy Virus (BFV) is highly cell-associated, with undetectable cell-free transmission. However, BFV particle budding can be induced by overexpression of wild-type (wt) BFV Gag and Env or artificial retargeting of Gag to the plasma membrane via myristoylation membrane targeting signals, closely resembling observations in other foamy viruses. Thus, the particle release machinery of wt BFV appears to be an excellent model system to study viral adaption to cell-free transmission by in vitro selection and evolution. Using selection for BFV variants with high cell-free infectivity in bovine and non-bovine cells, infectivity dramatically increased from almost no infectious units to about 105-106 FFU (fluorescent focus forming units)/mL in both cell types. Importantly, the selected BFV variants with high titer (HT) cell-free infectivity could still transmit via cell-cell contacts and were neutralized by serum from naturally infected cows. These selected HT-BFV variants will shed light into virus transmission and potential routes of intervention in the spread of viral infections. It will also allow the improvement or development of new promising approaches for antiretroviral therapies.

  10. Determining Influenza Virus Shedding at Different Time Points in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Asghar; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Tavassoti Kheiri, Masoumeh; Jamali, Abbas; Jamaati, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Monitoring of influenza virus shedding and optimization of multiplicities of infection (MOI) is important in the investigation of a virus one step growth cycle and for obtaining a high yield of virus in vaccine development and conventional basic diagnostic methods. However, eluted infectious viruses may still be present immediately after virus inoculation and when cells are washed following virus cultivation which may lead to a false positive virus infectivity assay. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we investigated influenza virus progeny production in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with five different MOI at determined time points. The results were analyzed by end point titration tests and immunofluorescence assay. Results: Higher titers of eluted virus were observed following a high MOI inoculation of virus in cell culture. Most probably, this was the result of sialic acid residues from viral hemagglutin in proteins that were cleaved by neuraminidase glycoproteins on the surface of the influenza virus, which promoted viral spread from the host cell to the culture supernatant or during endocytosis, where viruses recycle to the cell surface by recycling endosomes which culminated in virus shedding without replication. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the pattern of influenza virus progeny production was dose-dependent and not uniform. This production was influenced by several factors, particularly MOI. Understanding the exact features of viral particle propagation has a major impact in producing high virus yields in the development of vaccines. Use of lower MOI (0.01) could result in accurate, precise quantitative assays in virus diagnosis and titration methods. PMID:23862114

  11. Biology of Zika Virus Infection in Human Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Neyret, Aymeric; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Choumet, Valérie; Briant, Laurence; Desprès, Philippe; Amara, Ali; Yssel, Hans

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, that causes a mosquito-borne disease transmitted by the Aedes genus, with recent outbreaks in the South Pacific. Here we examine the importance of human skin in the entry of ZIKV and its contribution to the induction of antiviral immune responses. We show that human dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and immature dendritic cells are permissive to the most recent ZIKV isolate, responsible for the epidemic in French Polynesia. Several entry and/or adhesion factors, including DC-SIGN, AXL, Tyro3, and, to a lesser extent, TIM-1, permitted ZIKV entry, with a major role for the TAM receptor AXL. The ZIKV permissiveness of human skin fibroblasts was confirmed by the use of a neutralizing antibody and specific RNA silencing. ZIKV induced the transcription of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, and MDA5, as well as several interferon-stimulated genes, including OAS2, ISG15, and MX1, characterized by strongly enhanced beta interferon gene expression. ZIKV was found to be sensitive to the antiviral effects of both type I and type II interferons. Finally, infection of skin fibroblasts resulted in the formation of autophagosomes, whose presence was associated with enhanced viral replication, as shown by the use of Torin 1, a chemical inducer of autophagy, and the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The results presented herein permit us to gain further insight into the biology of ZIKV and to devise strategies aiming to interfere with the pathology caused by this emerging flavivirus. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Vector-mediated transmission of ZIKV is initiated when a blood-feeding female Aedes mosquito injects the virus into the skin of its mammalian host, followed by infection of permissive cells via specific receptors. Indeed, skin immune

  12. Synergistic activation of cells by Epstein-Barr virus and B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is initiated by virus binding to the C3dg-C3d receptor CR2. Several workers have implicated this receptor in the control of B-cell activation by examining the effects of antibodies to CR2 and isolated C3d on B-cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here on the activating effects of irradiated EBV, which retains its capacity to bind to CR2 but loses its ability to function as a T-independent B-cell activator. EBV synergized with B-cell growth factor in the induction of uptake of tritiated thymidine by T cell-depleted leukocytes from seronegative donors but did not induce secretion of immunoglobulin. Synergism could be inhibited with an anti-viral antibody that inhibited binding of EBV to CR2. No similar synergism was found between EBV and recombinant interleukin 2, interleukin 1 alpha, or gamma interferon or with the lipid A fraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. EBV may thus initiate B-cell activation as it binds to CR2. Infectious virus may, under normal circumstances, induce the cell to make those growth factors necessary to support B-cell proliferation; the difficulty of transforming cells with transfected EBV DNA may in part reflect the absence of an activation event provided by intact virus as it attaches to CR2. The synergism of EBV and B-cell growth factor more clearly distinguishes the effects of B-cell growth factor from those of interleukin 1 and interleukin 2 in other models of B-cell activation. Thus, this may be a useful model for further delineation of unique effects of B-cell growth factor on B-cell function. PMID:3027404

  13. Three mechanisms of Red Queen dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Khibnik, A. I.; Kondrashov, A. S.

    1997-01-01

    Models describing systems of coevolving populations often have asymptotically non-equilibrium dynamics (Red Queen dynamics (RQD)). We claim that if evolution is much slower than ecological changes, RQD arises due to either fast ecological processes, slow genetical processes, or to their interaction. The three corresponding generic types of RQD can be studied using singular perturbation theory and have very different properties and biological implications. We present simple examples of ecological, genetical, and ecogenetical RQD and describe how they may be recognized in natural populations. In particular, ecogenetical RQD often involve alternations of long epochs with radically different dynamics.

  14. Queen succession through asexual reproduction in termites.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kenji; Vargo, Edward L; Kawatsu, Kazutaka; Labadie, Paul E; Nakano, Hiroko; Yashiro, Toshihisa; Tsuji, Kazuki

    2009-03-27

    The evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction may involve important tradeoffs because asexual reproduction can double an individual's contribution to the gene pool but reduces diversity. Moreover, in social insects the maintenance of genetic diversity among workers may be important for colony growth and survival. We identified a previously unknown termite breeding system in which both parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction are conditionally used. Queens produce their replacements asexually but use normal sexual reproduction to produce other colony members. These findings show how eusociality can lead to extraordinary reproductive systems and provide important insights into the advantages and disadvantages of sex.

  15. Phospholipid Synthesis in Sindbis Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Marilynn R. F.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    We investigated the metabolic requirements for the decrease in phospholipid synthesis previously observed by Pfefferkorn and Hunter in primary cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Sindbis virus. The incorporation of 32PO4 into all classes of phospholipids was found to decline at the same rate and to the same extent; thus, incorporation of 14C-choline into acid-precipitable form provided a convenient measure of phospholipid synthesis that was used in subsequent experiments. Experiments with temperature-sensitive mutants suggested that some viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was essential for the inhibition of choline incorporation, but that functional viral structural proteins were not required. The reduction in phospholipid synthesis was probably a secondary effect of infection resulting from viral inhibition of the cellular RNA and protein synthesis. All three inhibitory effects required about the same amount of viral RNA synthesis; the inhibition of host RNA and protein synthesis began sooner than the decline in phospholipid synthesis; and both actinomycin D and cycloheximide inhibited 14C-choline incorporation in uninfected cells. In contrast, incorporation of 14C-choline into BHK-21 cells was not decreased by 10 hr of exposure to actinomycin D and declined only slowly after cycloheximide treatment. Growth of Sindbis virus in BHK cells did not cause the marked stimulation of phospholipid synthesis seen in picornavirus infections of other mammalian cells; however, inhibition was seen only late in infection. PMID:5530011

  16. Curcumin Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets. PMID:22847000

  17. Inhibition of Enveloped Virus Infection of Cultured Cells by Valproic Acid▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a short-chain fatty acid commonly used for treatment of neurological disorders. As VPA can interfere with cellular lipid metabolism, its effect on the infection of cultured cells by viruses of seven viral families relevant to human and animal health, including eight enveloped and four nonenveloped viruses, was analyzed. VPA drastically inhibited multiplication of all the enveloped viruses tested, including the zoonotic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and West Nile virus (WNV), while it did not affect infection by the nonenveloped viruses assayed. VPA reduced vesicular stomatitis virus infection yield without causing a major blockage of either viral RNA or protein synthesis. In contrast, VPA drastically abolished WNV RNA and protein synthesis, indicating that this drug can interfere the viral cycle at different steps of enveloped virus infection. Thus, VPA can contribute to an understanding of the crucial steps of viral maturation and to the development of future strategies against infections associated with enveloped viruses. PMID:21106740

  18. First molecular detection of co-infection of honey bee viruses in asymptomatic Bombus atratus in South America.

    PubMed

    Reynaldi, F J; Sguazza, G H; Albicoro, F J; Pecoraro, M R; Galosi, C M

    2013-11-01

    Pollination is critical for food production and has the particularity of linking natural ecosystems with agricultural production systems. Recently, losses of bumblebee species have been reported worldwide. In this study, samples from a commercial exploitation of bumblebees of Argentina with a recent history of deaths were studied using a multiplex PCR for the detection of the honey bee viruses most frequently detected in South America. All samples analysed were positive for co-infections with Deformed wing virus, Black queen cell virus and Sacbrood virus. This is the first report of infection of Bombus atratus with honey bee viruses. A better understanding of viral infections in bumblebees and of the epidemiology of viruses could be of great importance as bumblebees can serve as possible viral reservoirs, resulting in pathogen spillover towards honey bees and native bumblebees. PMID:24789396

  19. In Vitro Evolution of Bovine Foamy Virus Variants with Enhanced Cell-Free Virus Titers and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qiuying; Hipp, Michaela; Hugo, Annette; Lei, Janet; Liu, Yang; Kehl, Timo; Hechler, Torsten; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Virus transmission is essential for spreading viral infections and is a highly coordinated process which occurs by cell-free transmission or cell–cell contact. The transmission of Bovine Foamy Virus (BFV) is highly cell-associated, with undetectable cell-free transmission. However, BFV particle budding can be induced by overexpression of wild-type (wt) BFV Gag and Env or artificial retargeting of Gag to the plasma membrane via myristoylation membrane targeting signals, closely resembling observations in other foamy viruses. Thus, the particle release machinery of wt BFV appears to be an excellent model system to study viral adaption to cell-free transmission by in vitro selection and evolution. Using selection for BFV variants with high cell-free infectivity in bovine and non-bovine cells, infectivity dramatically increased from almost no infectious units to about 105–106 FFU (fluorescent focus forming units)/mL in both cell types. Importantly, the selected BFV variants with high titer (HT) cell-free infectivity could still transmit via cell-cell contacts and were neutralized by serum from naturally infected cows. These selected HT–BFV variants will shed light into virus transmission and potential routes of intervention in the spread of viral infections. It will also allow the improvement or development of new promising approaches for antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26569290

  20. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel “in-cell infection” mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified “in-cell infection” as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that “in-cell infection” is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs. PMID:25916549

  1. Honeybee colony disorder in crop areas: the role of pesticides and viruses.

    PubMed

    Simon-Delso, Noa; San Martin, Gilles; Bruneau, Etienne; Minsart, Laure-Anne; Mouret, Coralie; Hautier, Louis

    2014-01-01

    As in many other locations in the world, honeybee colony losses and disorders have increased in Belgium. Some of the symptoms observed rest unspecific and their causes remain unknown. The present study aims to determine the role of both pesticide exposure and virus load on the appraisal of unexplained honeybee colony disorders in field conditions. From July 2011 to May 2012, 330 colonies were monitored. Honeybees, wax, beebread and honey samples were collected. Morbidity and mortality information provided by beekeepers, colony clinical visits and availability of analytical matrix were used to form 2 groups: healthy colonies and colonies with disorders (n = 29, n = 25, respectively). Disorders included: (1) dead colonies or colonies in which part of the colony appeared dead, or had disappeared; (2) weak colonies; (3) queen loss; (4) problems linked to brood and not related to any known disease. Five common viruses and 99 pesticides (41 fungicides, 39 insecticides and synergist, 14 herbicides, 5 acaricides and metabolites) were quantified in the samples.The main symptoms observed in the group with disorders are linked to brood and queens. The viruses most frequently found are Black Queen Cell Virus, Sac Brood Virus, Deformed Wing Virus. No significant difference in virus load was observed between the two groups. Three acaricides, 5 insecticides and 13 fungicides were detected in the analysed samples. A significant correlation was found between the presence of fungicide residues and honeybee colony disorders. A significant positive link could also be established between the observation of disorder and the abundance of crop surface around the beehive. According to our results, the role of fungicides as a potential stressor for honeybee colonies should be further studied, either by their direct and/or indirect impacts on bees and bee colonies.

  2. Honeybee Colony Disorder in Crop Areas: The Role of Pesticides and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Delso, Noa; San Martin, Gilles; Bruneau, Etienne; Minsart, Laure-Anne; Mouret, Coralie; Hautier, Louis

    2014-01-01

    As in many other locations in the world, honeybee colony losses and disorders have increased in Belgium. Some of the symptoms observed rest unspecific and their causes remain unknown. The present study aims to determine the role of both pesticide exposure and virus load on the appraisal of unexplained honeybee colony disorders in field conditions. From July 2011 to May 2012, 330 colonies were monitored. Honeybees, wax, beebread and honey samples were collected. Morbidity and mortality information provided by beekeepers, colony clinical visits and availability of analytical matrix were used to form 2 groups: healthy colonies and colonies with disorders (n = 29, n = 25, respectively). Disorders included: (1) dead colonies or colonies in which part of the colony appeared dead, or had disappeared; (2) weak colonies; (3) queen loss; (4) problems linked to brood and not related to any known disease. Five common viruses and 99 pesticides (41 fungicides, 39 insecticides and synergist, 14 herbicides, 5 acaricides and metabolites) were quantified in the samples.The main symptoms observed in the group with disorders are linked to brood and queens. The viruses most frequently found are Black Queen Cell Virus, Sac Brood Virus, Deformed Wing Virus. No significant difference in virus load was observed between the two groups. Three acaricides, 5 insecticides and 13 fungicides were detected in the analysed samples. A significant correlation was found between the presence of fungicide residues and honeybee colony disorders. A significant positive link could also be established between the observation of disorder and the abundance of crop surface around the beehive. According to our results, the role of fungicides as a potential stressor for honeybee colonies should be further studied, either by their direct and/or indirect impacts on bees and bee colonies. PMID:25048715

  3. In vitro infection of mouse pancreatic islet cells with coxsackie viruses.

    PubMed

    Bopegamage, S A; Petrovicová, A

    1994-10-01

    We have demonstrated the ability of 4 standard coxsackie viruses (B4, B5, A7, and A9) and one fresh isolate (A7) from a newly diabetic child with homologous serological response, to infect in vitro grown mouse pancreatic islet cells. Up to the 9th day after infection the multiplication of viruses in the cells was proved using virus titration and immunofluorescence test. Isolated pancreatic cells proved to be a suitable model for detailed studies of experimental infection of pancreatic cells with coxsackie viruses.

  4. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  5. Helper virus is not required for in vitro erythroid transformation of hematopoietic cells by Friend virus.

    PubMed

    Hankins, W D; Krantz, S B

    1980-09-01

    The Friend polycythemia virus complex (FVP), consisting of the replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) and a helper Friend murine leukemia virus (MuLV-F), produces erythroleukemia within 2-3 weeks in vivo. We have recently reported in vitro transformation of bone marrow cells by FVP, producing clusters of erythroid colonies (erythroid bursts) 4-6 days after infection. In contrast to uninfected bone marrow cells, FVP-treated cells proliferated and differentiated (synthesized hemoglobin) in the absence of added erythropoietin, the physiologic regulator of erythropoiesis. The relative roles of helper murine leukemia virus (MuLV) and SFFV in the in vitro erythroid transformation have now been examined. Pseudotype studies and the finding that cloned MuLV-F (free of SFFV) did not induce burst formation indicated that SFFV was essential for this in vitro effect of FVP. Because SFFV could not be obtained free of helper MuLV, we assessed the requirement of MuLV in the transformation by kinetic analyses of helper-deficient and helper-excess FVP preparations. Whereas helper-excess FVP gave single-hit kinetics both in vivo and in vitro, the helper-deficient FVP followed multiple-hit kinetics when titrated for spleen focus formation in vivo. Addition of MuLV-F to helper-deficient FVP prior to injection resulted in a marked enhancement of spleen focus formation and a conversion from multiple-hit to single-hit kinetics. In contrast, titration of this same preparation for erythroid burst transformation in vitro yielded single-hit kinetics, and the addition of helper MuLV-F had no effect. The time course of burst development was similar with or without added MuLV-F. Unlike burst transformation, SFFV production by these infected cultures followed multiple-hit kinetics. Addition of MuLV-F at the time of infection led to an enhancement of SFFV production and conversion of the titration curve from multiple-hit to single-hit. These data are consistent with the idea that

  6. A chimeric measles virus with a lentiviral envelope replicates exclusively in CD4+/CCR5+ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mourez, Thomas; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Cayet, Nadege; Tangy, Frederic

    2011-10-25

    We generated a replicating chimeric measles virus in which the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins were replaced with the gp160 envelope glycoprotein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). Based on a previously cloned live-attenuated Schwarz vaccine strain of measles virus (MV), this chimera was rescued at high titers using reverse genetics in CD4+ target cells. Cytopathic effect consisted in the presence of large cell aggregates evolving to form syncytia, as observed during SIV infection. The morphology of the chimeric virus was identical to that of the parent MV particles. The presence of SIV gp160 as the only envelope protein on chimeric particles surface altered the cell tropism of the new virus from CD46+ to CD4+ cells. Used as an HIV candidate vaccine, this MV/SIVenv chimeric virus would mimic transient HIV-like infection, benefiting both from HIV-like tropism and the capacity of MV to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  7. Workers make the queens in melipona bees: identification of geraniol as a caste determining compound from labial glands of nurse bees.

    PubMed

    Jarau, Stefan; van Veen, Johan W; Twele, Robert; Reichle, Christian; Gonzales, Eduardo Herrera; Aguilar, Ingrid; Francke, Wittko; Ayasse, Manfred

    2010-06-01

    Reproductive division of labor in advanced eusocial honey bees and stingless bees is based on the ability of totipotent female larvae to develop into either workers or queens. In nearly all species, caste is determined by larval nutrition. However, the mechanism that triggers queen development in Melipona bees is still unresolved. Several hypotheses have been proposed, ranging from the proximate (a genetic determination of caste development) to the ultimate (a model in which larvae have complete control over their own caste fate). Here, we showed that the addition of geraniol, the main compound in labial gland secretions of nurse workers, to the larval food significantly increases the number of larvae that develop into queens. Interestingly, the proportion of queens in treated brood exactly matched the value (25%) predicted by the two-locus, two-allele model of genetic queen determination, in which only females that are heterozygous at both loci are capable of developing into queens. We conclude that labial gland secretions, added to the food of some cells by nurse bees, trigger queen development, provided that the larvae are genetically predisposed towards this developmental pathway. In Melipona beecheii, geraniol acts as a primer pheromone representing the first caste determination substance identified to date.

  8. Sex allocation conflict in ants: when the queen rules.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Hervé; Chapuisat, Michel

    2006-02-01

    Insect societies are paramount examples of cooperation, yet they also harbor internal conflicts whose resolution depends on the power of the opponents. The male-haploid, female-diploid sex-determining system of ants causes workers to be more related to sisters than to brothers, whereas queens are equally related to daughters and sons. Workers should thus allocate more resources to females than to males, while queens should favor an equal investment in each sex. Female-biased sex allocation and manipulation of the sex ratio during brood development suggest that workers prevail in many ant species. Here, we show that queens of Formica selysi strongly influenced colony sex allocation by biasing the sex ratio of their eggs. Most colonies specialized in the production of a single sex. Queens in female-specialist colonies laid a high proportion of diploid eggs, whereas queens in male-specialist colonies laid almost exclusively haploid eggs, which constrains worker manipulation. However, the change in sex ratio between the egg and pupae stages suggests that workers eliminated some male brood, and the population sex-investment ratio was between the queens' and workers' equilibria. Altogether, these data provide evidence for an ongoing conflict between queens and workers, with a prominent influence of queens as a result of their control of egg sex ratio.

  9. Alternative mating behaviors of the queen polymorphic ant Temnothorax longispinosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kenneth J.; Kennedy, David

    2007-11-01

    Mating behaviors of ants fall into two categories: female calling, in which a female alate releases pheromones that attract males, and male swarming, in which large male aggregations attract females. Female calling is common in species with queens that return to their natal nest to found colonies dependently after mating, while male swarming is common in species with queens that disperse to found independently. In some species that display both founding strategies, a queen-size polymorphism has evolved in which dependent-founding queens are smaller than independent-founding queens. Dependent founding is likely difficult if gynes (virgin queens) are mating in distant swarms. Therefore, a queen may adopt one or the other mating strategy based on its size and founding behavior. We investigated mating behaviors in the queen-polymorphic ant, Temnothorax longispinosus. Observations in laboratory mating arenas indicated that small gynes exhibited significantly lower flight activity than large gynes. Both forms mated in male swarms, and neither form exhibited female calling. The reduced flight activity of the small morph may facilitate returning to the natal nest after mating, provided the mating swarm is located nearby. Therefore, alternative colony-founding behaviors may be possible without the evolution of female-calling behavior; however, the reduced flight activity of small morphs may require that mating swarms are not distant from the natal nest.

  10. Alternative mating behaviors of the queen polymorphic ant Temnothorax longispinosus.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kenneth J; Kennedy, David

    2007-11-01

    Mating behaviors of ants fall into two categories: female calling, in which a female alate releases pheromones that attract males, and male swarming, in which large male aggregations attract females. Female calling is common in species with queens that return to their natal nest to found colonies dependently after mating, while male swarming is common in species with queens that disperse to found independently. In some species that display both founding strategies, a queen-size polymorphism has evolved in which dependent-founding queens are smaller than independent-founding queens. Dependent founding is likely difficult if gynes (virgin queens) are mating in distant swarms. Therefore, a queen may adopt one or the other mating strategy based on its size and founding behavior. We investigated mating behaviors in the queen-polymorphic ant, Temnothorax longispinosus. Observations in laboratory mating arenas indicated that small gynes exhibited significantly lower flight activity than large gynes. Both forms mated in male swarms, and neither form exhibited female calling. The reduced flight activity of the small morph may facilitate returning to the natal nest after mating, provided the mating swarm is located nearby. Therefore, alternative colony-founding behaviors may be possible without the evolution of female-calling behavior; however, the reduced flight activity of small morphs may require that mating swarms are not distant from the natal nest. PMID:17653686

  11. Biological properties of a hemagglutinin mutant of influenza virus selected by host cells.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, D M; Deom, C M; Schulze, I T

    1984-11-01

    Chick embryo fibroblast (CEF)-grown stocks of the WSN strain of influenza A(HINI) contain two variants which were designated F and C for fuzzy and clear plaque morphology on Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. During growth in MDBK cells plaque-isolated F virus was completely replaced by C virus (L. Noronha-Blob and I.T. Schulze (1976), Virology 69, 314-322). The parental (F) and the mutant (C) viruses contain hemagglutinins which differ in their ability to bind to host cells. In addition, the host cells from which the purified viruses are obtained affect their binding properties. Thus, as compared to MDBK-grown F virus (FBK), MDBK-grown C virus (CBK) produced high amounts of mRNA and high virus yields in MDBK cells. CBK had greater affinity for SA alpha 2,3Gal and SA alpha 2,6Gal linkages on derivatized human erythrocytes than did FBK, independent of whether neuraminidase was present on the virions. CBK was also resistant to components of calf serum which inhibited FBK hemagglutination at 37 degrees. As compared to FBK, CBK had increased ability to bind to both MDBK cells and CEF at 37 degrees in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of neuraminidase. In addition, when cells with virus bound at 0 degrees were transferred to 37 degrees, CBK remained cell associated whereas about 80% of FBK dissociated from both cells. Thus, mutation from F to C increased the ability of the virus to associate with MDBK cell receptors. Studies carried out with F and C viruses from both cells indicated that the expression of the mutation depended in part on the host cells in which the virus was grown and in part on the cells used to measure the binding properties. A model relating these observations to selection of HA variants in nature is presented.

  12. [Comparative study of the differential susceptibility of different cell lines to pandemic H1N1v influenza viruses and avian influenza, swine influenza, and human influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Danilenko, D M; Smirnova, T D; Gudkova, T M; Eropkin, M Iu; Kiselev, O I

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation characteristics of influenza viruses of different origin were tested in various human and animal cell cultures. Pandemic H1N1v influenza and swine influenza viruses were shown to have a low infectious activity in virtually all the test lines. In spite of this, the replication of this group of viruses may be detected by de novo NP synthesis. These viruses are able to activate programmed cell death. Moreover, a low inoculative virus dose exerts a stimulating effect on cell proliferation in both suspension and monolayer cell lines.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus infection and replication in a human epithelial cell system.

    PubMed

    Li, Q X; Young, L S; Niedobitek, G; Dawson, C W; Birkenbach, M; Wang, F; Rickinson, A B

    1992-03-26

    Epstein-Barr virus, a human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential, infects two target tissues in vivo: B lymphocytes, where the infection is largely non-productive, and stratified squamous epithelium in which virus replication occurs. The interaction with B cells, initiated through virus binding to the B-cell surface molecule CR2 (ref. 4), has been studied in vitro and the virus 'latent' genes associated with B-cell growth transformation defined. By comparison, viral infection of epithelium remains poorly understood, reflecting the lack of an appropriate cell-culture model. Here we describe the development of such a model using as targets CR2-expressing transfected cells of two independent human epithelial lines. A high proportion of these cells bind virus and become actively infected, expressing the small EBER RNAs (small non-polyadenylated virus-coded RNAs) and the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 but not other latent proteins; thereafter, under conditions favouring epithelial differentiation, up to 30% of the cells can be induced to enter virus productive cycle with some progressing to full virus replication. We find significant differences between laboratory virus strains in their ability to infect epithelium that do not correlate with their B-cell growth-transforming activity. PMID:1312681

  14. [Varicella-zoster virus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, H; Inoue, T; Okoshi, Y; Mori, S; Ohashi, K; Maeda, Y; Sasaki, T; Okuyama, Y; Hiruma, K; Sakamaki, H

    2000-01-01

    Of 264 patients aged 15 years or more who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 1989 and September 1998 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 47 were infected by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). In 2 patients, visceral disease preceded cutaneous dissemination. One of these patients exhibited gastrointestinal symptoms followed by disseminated skin rash 6 days later. In the other patient, epigastralgia developed and was followed by seizures secondary to meningitis; the appearance of a skin rash 5 days after these initial symptoms yielded the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of VZV infection are important, especially for patients who present with visceral symptoms suspected to be due to VZV. PMID:10695394

  15. High-titer replication of nondefective Sendai virus in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Famulari, N G; Fleissner, E

    1976-02-01

    Egg-grown Sendai virus was adapted to growth in a bovine kidney cell line (MDBK cells) by serial passage under defined conditions. The adapted virus contained only 50S RNA and was highly infectious for MDBK cells. Infection of these cells with a high multiplicity of adapted virus resulted in a yield of 10(8) MDBK-infectious units/ml by 18 h, accompanied by severe cytopathic changes in the host. Cell fusion did not occur. Examination of the proteins of the adapted virus revealed that despite the high infectivity of this virus for MDBK cells the virions contained considerable quantities of Fo, the precursor to the F glycoprotein that is responsible for cell fusion and high infectivity in other systems.

  16. Chemical Mutagenesis of Dengue Virus Type 4 Yields Mutant Viruses Which Are Temperature Sensitive in Vero Cells or Human Liver Cells and Attenuated in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, Joseph E.; Johnson, Daniel H.; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T.; Murphy, Brian R.; Whitehead, Stephen S.

    2001-01-01

    A recombinant live attenuated dengue virus type 4 (DEN4) vaccine candidate, 2AΔ30, was found previously to be generally well tolerated in humans, but a rash and an elevation of liver enzymes in the serum occurred in some vaccinees. 2AΔ30, a non-temperature-sensitive (non-ts) virus, contains a 30-nucleotide deletion (Δ30) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the viral genome. In the present study, chemical mutagenesis of DEN4 was utilized to generate attenuating mutations which may be useful in further attenuation of the 2AΔ30 candidate vaccine. Wild-type DEN4 2A virus was grown in Vero cells in the presence of 5-fluorouracil, and a panel of 1,248 clones were isolated. Twenty ts mutant viruses were identified that were ts in both simian Vero and human liver HuH-7 cells (n = 13) or only in HuH-7 cells (n = 7). Each of the 20 ts mutant viruses possessed an attenuation phenotype, as indicated by restricted replication in the brains of 7-day-old mice. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 20 ts mutant viruses identified nucleotide substitutions in structural and nonstructural genes as well as in the 5′ and 3′ UTRs, with more than one change occurring, in general, per mutant virus. A ts mutation in the NS3 protein (nucleotide position 4995) was introduced into a recombinant DEN4 virus possessing the Δ30 deletion, thereby creating rDEN4Δ30-4995, a recombinant virus which is ts and more attenuated than rDEN4Δ30 virus in the brains of mice. We are assembling a menu of attenuating mutations that should be useful in generating satisfactorily attenuated recombinant dengue vaccine viruses and in increasing our understanding of the pathogenesis of dengue virus. PMID:11559806

  17. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  18. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ashish; Murray, John M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  19. FBJ osteosarcoma virus in tissue culture. III. Isolation and characterization of non-virus-producing FBJ-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A; Kazan, P L; Reilly, C A; Finkel, M P

    1978-01-01

    Hamster and rat cell lines have been established that have been transformed by FBJ murine sarcoma virus (FBJ-MuSV) but that do not produce virus. The hamster cell line originated from an osteosarcoma that appeared in a hamster inoculated at birth with an extract of a CFNo1 mouse FBJ-osteosarcoma. The rat cell line was obtained by transferring the FBJ-MuSV genome to normal rat kidney cells in the absence of the FBJ type C virus (FBJ-MuLV), which, usually in high concentration, accompanies the FBJ-MuSV. Both transformed hamster and rat cell lines contain the FBJ-MuSV genome, which can be rescued by ecotropic and xenotropic murine type C viruses. This rescued genome produces characteristic FBJ-MuSV foci in tissue culture and, in appropriate animal hosts, induces osteosarcomas typical of those induced by FBJ-MuSV. FBJ-MuSV was isolated originally from a parosteal osteosarcoma that occurred naturally in a mouse. Since there was no previous history of passage of the agent through any other animal species, these non-virus-producing hamster and rat cells transformed by FBJ-MuSV should be very helpful in molecular studies examining the origin of spontaneous sarcoma genomes in mice. PMID:206718

  20. Sensitivity of cervical carcinoma cells to vesicular stomatitis virus-induced oncolysis: potential role of human papilloma virus infection.

    PubMed

    Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Niknejad, Nima; Wang, Jiahu; Auer, Rebecca; Weberpals, Johanne I; Bell, John C; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2012-08-01

    High-risk carcinogenic subtypes of human papilloma virus (HPV) are associated with the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix (CC) and a subset of head and neck (HNSCC). Recurrent metastatic diseases of these sites display a dismal prognosis. Therefore, there is an urgent need to uncover innovative therapeutic strategies in this clinical setting. Oncolytic viruses, including vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), were identified due to their ability to specifically target tumor cells that generally display defects in interferon (IFN) signaling. HPV expressed proteins can inhibit IFN signaling; therefore, HPV-infected cells may be particularly sensitive to VSV oncolysis. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of four CC (HPV+) and four HNSCC (HPV-) derived cell lines to VSV oncolysis. Interestingly, the CC cell lines were consistently more sensitive to VSV cytotoxicity than the HNSCC cell lines tested. Exogenous IFN addition or infection with two attenuated VSV variants that are more susceptible to IFN inhibition failed to attenuate VSV oncolysis in hypersensitive CC cell lines. Furthermore, the expression of HPV-E6, that inhibits IFN receptor signaling, in the VSV-resistant HNSCC cell line SCC25 attenuated VSV-induced IFN response and significantly enhanced VSV cytotoxicity. Finally, differential VSV infection and replication was confirmed in xenograft murine tumor models and explant tumor tissues from two patients with CC. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HPV-infected cells are susceptible to oncolytic virus therapy and that this approach may represent a novel therapeutic approach in HPV positive CC and HNSCC patients.

  1. Invariant NKT Cell Response to Dengue Virus Infection in Human

    PubMed Central

    Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Chan-in, Wilawan; Opasawaschai, Anunya; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue viral infection is a global health threat without vaccine or specific treatment. The clinical outcome varies from asymptomatic, mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). While adaptive immune responses were found to be detrimental in the dengue pathogenesis, the roles of earlier innate events remain largely uninvestigated. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells represent innate-like T cells that could dictate subsequent adaptive response but their role in human dengue virus infection is not known. We hypothesized that iNKT cells play a role in human dengue infection. Methods Blood samples from a well-characterized cohort of children with DF, DHF, in comparison to non-dengue febrile illness (OFI) and healthy controls at various time points were studied. iNKT cells activation were analyzed by the expression of CD69 by flow cytometry. Their cytokine production was then analyzed after α-GalCer stimulation. Further, the CD1d expression on monocytes, and CD69 expression on conventional T cells were measured. Results iNKT cells were activated during acute dengue infection. The level of iNKT cell activation associates with the disease severity. Furthermore, these iNKT cells had altered functional response to subsequent ex vivo stimulation with α-GalCer. Moreover, during acute dengue infection, monocytic CD1d expression was also upregulated and conventional T cells also became activated. Conclusion iNKT cells might play an early and critical role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue viral infection in human. Targeting iNKT cells and CD1d serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for severe dengue infection in the future. PMID:24945350

  2. Dominant inhibitory Ras delays Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Joe, A K; Ferrari, G; Jiang, H H; Liang, X H; Levine, B

    1996-01-01

    Mature neurons are more resistant than dividing cells or differentiating neurons to Sindbis virus-induced apoptotic death. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitogenic signal transduction pathways may influence susceptibility to Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis. Since Ras, a 21-kDa GTP-binding protein, plays an important role in cellular proliferation and neuronal differentiation, we investigated the effect of an inducible dominant inhibitory Ras on Sindbis virus-induced death of a rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12 cells. Dexamethasone induction of dominant inhibitory Ras (Ha Ras(Asn17)) expression in transfected PC12 cell lines (MMTV-M17-21 and GSrasDN6 cells) resulted in a marked delay in Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis, compared with infected, uninduced cells. The delay in death after Sindbis virus infection in induced versus uninduced PC12 cells was not associated with differences in viral titers or viral infectivity. No delay in Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis was observed in Ha Ras(Asn17)-transfected PC12 cells if dexamethasone induction was initiated less than 12 h before Sindbis virus infection or in wild-type PC12 cells infected with a chimeric Sindbis virus construct that expresses Ha Ras(Asn17). The delay in Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis in induced Ha Ras(Asn17)-transfected PC12 cells was associated with a decrease in cellular DNA synthesis as measured by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Thus, in PC12 cells, inducible dominant inhibitory Ras inhibits cellular proliferation and delays Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway is a determinant of neuronal susceptibility to Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis. PMID:8892895

  3. Reciprocal Regulation of AKT and MAP Kinase Dictates Virus-Host Cell Fusion ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nishi R.; Mani, Prashant; Nandwani, Neha; Mishra, Rajakishore; Rana, Ajay; Sarkar, Debi P.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family bind to their host cells by using hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), which enhances fusion protein (F)-mediated membrane fusion. Although respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 5 of this family are suggested to trigger host cell signaling during infection, the virus-induced intracellular signals dictating virus-cell fusion await elucidation. Using an F- or HN-F-containing reconstituted envelope of Sendai virus, another paramyxovirus, we revealed the role and regulation of AKT1 and Raf/MEK/ERK cascades during viral fusion with liver cells. Our observation that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation promotes viral fusion via ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, whereas AKT1 attenuates fusion by promoting phosphorylation of F protein, indicates a counteractive regulation of viral fusion by reciprocal activation of AKT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, establishing a novel conceptual framework for a therapeutic strategy. PMID:20164223

  4. Efficient influenza B virus propagation due to deficient interferon-induced antiviral activity in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Frensing, Timo; Seitz, Claudius; Heynisch, Bjoern; Patzina, Corinna; Kochs, Georg; Reichl, Udo

    2011-09-22

    Influenza B virus infections are mainly restricted to humans, which is partially caused by the inability of influenza B virus NS1 protein to counteract the innate immune response of other species. However, for cell culture-based influenza vaccine production non-human cells, such as Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, are commonly used. Therefore, the impact of cellular pathogen defence mechanisms on influenza B virus propagation in MDCK cells was analysed in this study. Activation of the cellular antiviral defence by interferon stimulation slowed down influenza B virus replication at early time points but after 48h the same virus titres were reached in stimulated and control cells. Furthermore, suppression of the antiviral host defence by transient expression of a viral antagonist, the rabies virus phosphoprotein, could not increase influenza B virus replication. Finally, canine Myxovirus resistance (Mx) proteins showed no antiviral activity in an influenza B virus-specific minireplicon assay in contrast to the murine Mx1 protein. Taken together, these results indicate that an insufficient antiviral defence in MDCK cells promotes efficient influenza B virus replication favouring the use of MDCK cells in influenza vaccine production.

  5. Detection of C-type virus by immunoferritin technique in bat lung cell line chronically infected with bovine leucosis virus.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, D; Patrascu, I V; Apostol, I; Mazilu, M

    1980-01-01

    Reported in this paper are morphological studies and tests for the detection of Type-C particles from a line of bat lung cells chronically infected with bovine leucosis virus. The immunoferritin technique was used. Ferritin labelling of Type-C particles was regularly accompanied by black-spot arrangement of ferritin around the virus envelope, which provided evidence to the specificity of this immunochemical technique. PMID:6260052

  6. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cell lines used for somatic cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Stringfellow, David A; Riddell, Kay P; Givens, M Daniel; Galik, Patricia K; Sullivan, Eddie; Dykstra, Christine C; Robl, James; Kasinathan, Poothapillai

    2005-03-01

    Culture of cell lines from fetuses or postnatal animals is an essential part of somatic cell cloning. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is commonly used in media for propagation of these cells. Unfortunately, bovine fetuses and postnatal animals as well as FBS are all possible sources of non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) which is widely distributed among cattle. This study was prompted when screening of samples sent to veterinary diagnostic labs revealed that 15 of 39 fetal fibroblast cell lines used in cloning research were positive for BVDV as determined by various assays including reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Goals of the research were to use both virus isolation and reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) to confirm which of the cell lines were actually infected with BVDV and to assay samples of media, FBS and the earliest available passages of each cell line in an attempt to determine the source of the viral infections. Sequence analysis of amplified cDNA from all isolates was performed to provide a definitive link between possible sources of virus and infected cell lines. Only 5 of the 39 cell lines were actually infected with BVDV. Three of these five lines were not infected at the earliest cryopreserved passage, leading to the conclusion that they likely became infected after culture in media containing contaminated FBS. In fact, sequence comparison of the amplified cDNA from one lot of FBS confirmed that it was the source of infection for one of these cell lines. Since BVDV was isolated from the remaining two cell lines at the earliest available passage, the fetuses from which they were established could not be ruled out as the source of the virus.

  7. Natural killer T cell strategies to combat Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Priatel, John J; Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Rusung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection results in rapid loss of CD1d expression from the surface of infected B cells, thus enabling the virus to evade immune recognition by natural killer T (NKT) cells. Using pharmacologic means to boost CD1d expression, potent NKT cell effector functions can be elicited toward EBV-infected B cells, suggesting the promise of novel strategies to target EBV-associated diseases such as some B-cell malignancies. PMID:25050206

  8. Immunoelectron microscopic studies on haemagglutinin and haemolysin of measles virus in infected HEp2 cells.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M A; Fraser, K B; Dermott, E; Shirodaria, P V

    1982-03-01

    The antigenic determinants of the haemagglutinin and haemolysin antigens of measles virus were located at the surface of HEp2 cells infected with measles virus and on measles virions released from these cells, using immunoelectron microscopy. Antisera specific for haemagglutinin or haemolysin antigen and peroxidase-conjugated antiglobulin were used. Treatment of the infected cells with trypsin removed the virus spikes and prevented binding by the anti-haemagglutinin serum, while the reaction with anti-haemolysin serum was unaltered. This suggests that the antigenic determinants for measles haemagglutinin reside on the spike, while the antigenic determinants for haemolysin reside on, or are close to, the virus membrane. PMID:6175729

  9. [Bovine serum albumin inhibits the adsorption of respiratory syncytial virus on MDBK cells].

    PubMed

    Fassi Fihri, O; Mohanty, J; Elazhary, Y

    1993-01-01

    In order to obtain optimal bovine respiratory syncytial virus adsorption to host cells, the effect of several products (fetal bovine serum, bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin and cytochrome c) was studied. The adsorption of the virus to MDBK cells was higher in the presence of 2% than in the presence of 5% fetal bovine serum. Adsorption was inhibited in the presence of bovine serum albumin at concentrations > 0.2% when added before or at the same time as the virus. Ovalbumin and cytochrome c did not inhibit adsorption. These results will allow the study of virus adsorption on cell receptors.

  10. ANTIGENIC PROPERTIES OF MURINE SARCOMA VIRUS-TRANSFORMED BALB/3T3 NONPRODUCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    1972-01-01

    The isolation of clonal lines of murine sarcoma virus-transformed, non-producer BALB/3T3 cells has provided a model system for determining whether RNA tumor virus-transformed cells possess virus-specific transplantation antigens. MSV nonproducer cells (K-234) were clonally derived from an inbred mouse cell line, BALB/3T3. A parallel virus-producing cell line was obtained by infection of the MSV nonproducer cells with Rauscher leukemia virus. K-234 was much more tumorigenic than K-234(R). Preimmunization of syngeneic mice with either K-234(R) or with UV-inactivated Rauscher leukemia virus induced transplantation resistance to subsequent challenge with K-234(R), but not with K-234. In contrast, mice preimmunized with nonproducer cells were not made resistant to subsequent challenge with the homologous cells. Antisera prepared from mice immunized with K-234(R) were specifically cytotoxic and positive by fluorescent antibody staining for K-234(R) target cells, but not to either BALB/3T3 or K-234. The results show that MSV nonproducer cells lack detectable transplantation antigens and suggest that the transplantation resistance to the producing cells is attributable to maturing virus at the cell surface. PMID:4550769

  11. Canine Distemper Virus Epithelial Cell Infection Is Required for Clinical Disease but Not for Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Wong, Xiao-Xiang; Hinkelmann, Sarah; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the importance of infection of epithelial cells for morbillivirus pathogenesis, we took advantage of the severe disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) in ferrets. To obtain a CDV that was unable to enter epithelial cells but retained the ability to enter immune cells, we transferred to its attachment (H) protein two mutations shown to interfere with the interaction of measles virus H with its epithelial receptor, human nectin-4. As expected for an epithelial receptor (EpR)-blind CDV, this virus infected dog and ferret epithelial cells inefficiently and did not cause cell fusion or syncytium formation. On the other hand, the EpR-blind CDV replicated in cells expressing canine signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), the morbillivirus immune cell receptor, with similar kinetics to those of wild-type CDV. While ferrets infected with wild-type CDV died within 12 days after infection, after developing severe rash and fever, animals infected with the EpR-blind virus showed no clinical signs of disease. Nevertheless, both viruses spread rapidly and efficiently in immune cells, causing similar levels of leukopenia and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation activity, two indicators of morbillivirus immunosuppression. Infection was documented for airway epithelia of ferrets infected with wild-type CDV but not for those of animals infected with the EpR-blind virus, and only animals infected with wild-type CDV shed virus. Thus, epithelial cell infection is necessary for clinical disease and efficient virus shedding but not for immunosuppression. PMID:22278252

  12. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, O.; Sugahara, T.

    1981-08-01

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells.

  13. A novel T cell evasion mechanism in persistent RNA virus infection.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Jack T; Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Chivero, Ernest T; Klinzman, Donna; Kaufman, Thomas M; Chang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and GB virus type C (GBV-C) are associated with impaired T cell function despite the fact that HCV replicates in hepatocytes and GBV-C in a small proportion of lymphocytes. Recently, we showed that HCV and GBV-C E2-envelope proteins reduce T cell activation via the T cell receptor (TCR) by competing for phosphorylation with a critical kinase in the TCR signaling cascade (Lck). E2 interfered with TCR signaling in E2 expressing cells and in bystander cells. The bystander effect was mediated by virus particles and extracellular microvesicular particles (exosomes). Multiple kinase substrate sites are predicted to reside on viral structural proteins and based on bioinformatic predictions, many RNA virus pathogens may interfere with TCR signaling via a similar mechanism. Identification of T cell inhibitory effects of virus structural proteins may provide novel approaches to enhance the immunogenicity and memory of viral vaccines.

  14. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  15. In vitro translation of mRNA species from cells infected with Machupo virus.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, I S; Stelmakh, T A; Stchesljenok, E P; Shkolina, T V

    1987-01-01

    RNA from Machupo virus infected cells was centrifuged in a linear sucrose gradient and RNAs from gradient fractions were tested separately for template activity in a cell-free protein synthesizing system from rabbit reticulocytes. Fraction 15-16 S programmed the synthesis of protein that migrated in SDS-polyacrylamide gel like the nucleocapsid protein of a purified virus. The synthesis of virus glycoproteins was not detected in the system.

  16. MDCK-SIAT1 cells show improved isolation rates for recent human influenza viruses compared to conventional MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ding Yuan; Barr, Ian G; Mosse, Jenny A; Laurie, Karen L

    2008-07-01

    The ability to isolate and propagate influenza virus is an essential tool for the yearly surveillance of circulating virus strains and to ensure accurate clinical diagnosis for appropriate treatment. The suitability of MDCK-SIAT1 cells, engineered to express increased levels of alpha-2,6-linked sialic acid receptors, as an alternative to conventional MDCK cells for isolation of circulating influenza virus was assessed. A greater number of influenza A (H1N1 and H3N2) and B viruses from stored human clinical specimens collected between 2005 and 2007 were isolated following inoculation in MDCK-SIAT1 cells than in MDCK cells. In addition, a higher titer of virus was recovered following culture in MDCK-SIAT1 cells. All A(H1N1) viruses recovered from MDCK-SIAT1 cells were able to agglutinate both turkey and guinea pig red blood cells (RBC), while half of the A(H3N2) viruses recovered after passage in MDCK-SIAT1 cells lost the ability to agglutinate turkey RBC. Importantly, the HA-1 domain of the hemagglutinin gene was genetically stable after passaging in MDCK-SIAT1 cells, a feature not always seen following MDCK cell or embryonated chicken egg passage of human influenza virus. These data indicate that the MDCK-SIAT1 cell line is superior to conventional MDCK cells for isolation of human influenza virus from clinical specimens and may be used routinely for the isolation and propagation of current human influenza viruses for surveillance, diagnostic, and research purposes.

  17. Susceptibility of bovine umbilical cord endothelial cells to bovine herpesviruses and pseudocowpox virus.

    PubMed

    Wellenberg, G J; Verstraten, E R A M; Jongejan, F; Van Oirschot, J T

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the susceptibility of bovine umbilical cord endothelial (BUE) cells to bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 1, BHV2, BHV4 and BHV5, and to pseudocowpox virus. The detection limits and growth curves of these viruses in BUE cells were compared with those in Vero, Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK). or bovine fetal diploid lung (BFDL) cells. Detection limits were determined by inoculating cell cultures with serial 10-fold dilutions of these viruses, and growth curves by titration of virus, harvested at various times after infecting cells at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1. The detection limits of BHV2 and BHV4 were lower in BUE cells than in Vero or MDBK cells, and cytopathic effects were observed earlier in BUE cells. In addition, BHV2 and BHV4 grew to higher titres in BUE cells than in Vero or MDBK cells. BUE cells appeared to be equally susceptible to BHV5, but less susceptible to BHV1.1 and BHVI.2 than MDBK cells. The study showed that BUE cells are highly susceptible to BHV2 and BHV4. and that the use of BUE cells can improve the laboratory diagnosis of these viruses. The use of BUE cells could also improve the isolation and growth of pseudocowpox virus.

  18. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  19. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-07-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin's lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they seem to

  20. Component(s) of Sendai virus that can induce interferon in mouse spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Hosaka, Y

    1983-01-01

    To identify the active component of Sendai virus that induces interferon in mouse spleen cells, infectious and noninfectious viruses, envelope particles derived from them, and isolated hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins were examined for interferon induction. The interaction between membranous structures containing Sendai virus HN glycoprotein and the receptors on the cell surface was shown to be sufficient for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells, suggesting that the actual inducer of interferon in mouse spleen cells is the HN glycoprotein of Sendai virus. When mouse spleen cells were stimulated in vitro with Sendai virus grown in eggs or LLC-MK2 cells or with membranous structures containing glycoproteins obtained from these viruses, interferon could be detected in the culture fluid. Furthermore, isolated HN glycoprotein per se could induce interferon in the cells. A linear correlation was found between the titer of interferon induced and the hemagglutinating activity of the membranous structure containing the HN glycoprotein. It was concluded from these findings that HN glycoprotein was the active component of Sendai virus responsible for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells and that viral RNA and F glycoprotein were not required. The results also showed that the interaction between HN glycoprotein and receptors on the cell surface triggered production of type I interferon (IFN-alpha and IFN-beta). Although when Sendai virus was incubated at 56 degrees C for 5 min it lost its hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities, it induced a considerable amount of interferon in the culture fluid of mouse spleen cells. The interferon-inducing ability of heat-inactivated virus could be absorbed with mouse spleen cells but not with sheep erythrocytes or mouse erythrocytes, indicating that the inactivated virus retained ability to bind to mouse lymphoid cells. PMID:6301988

  1. Characterisation of virus-specific peripheral blood cell cytokine responses following vaccination or infection with classical swine fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Graham, Simon P; Everett, Helen E; Johns, Helen L; Haines, Felicity J; La Rocca, S Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Wright, Ian K; Drew, Trevor; Crooke, Helen R

    2010-04-21

    Existing live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccines provide a rapid onset of complete protection but pose problems in discriminating infected amongst vaccinated animals. With a view to providing additional information on the cellular mechanisms that may contribute to protection, which in turn may aid the development of the next generation of CSFV vaccines, we explored the kinetics of the cytokine responses from peripheral blood cells of pigs vaccinated with an attenuated C-strain vaccine strain and/or infected with a recent CSFV isolate. Peripheral blood cells were isolated over the course of vaccination/infection and stimulated in vitro with C-strain or UK2000/7.1 viruses. Virus-specific responses of peripheral blood cells isolated from C-strain vaccinated pigs were dominated by the production of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma production in response to the C-strain virus was first detected in vaccinates 9 days post-vaccination and was sustained over the period of observation. In contrast, cells from challenge control animals did not secrete IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with C-strain or UK2000/7.1 viruses. Supernatants from UK2000/7.1 infected animals contained significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from day 8 post-infection and these cytokines were present in both virus and mock stimulated cultures. The results suggest that the C-strain virus is a potent inducer of a type-1 T cell response, which may play a role in the protection afforded by such vaccines, whereas the pro-inflammatory cytokine responses observed in cultures from infected pigs may reflect a pathological pro-inflammatory cascade initiated in vivo following the replication and spread of CSFV.

  2. Comparison of host cell gene expression in cowpox, monkeypox or vaccinia virus-infected cells reveals virus-specific regulation of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal-borne orthopoxviruses, like monkeypox, vaccinia and the closely related cowpox virus, are all capable of causing zoonotic infections in humans, representing a potential threat to human health. The disease caused by each virus differs in terms of symptoms and severity, but little is yet know about the reasons for these varying phenotypes. They may be explained by the unique repertoire of immune and host cell modulating factors encoded by each virus. In this study, we analysed the specific modulation of the host cell’s gene expression profile by cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infection. We aimed to identify mechanisms that are either common to orthopoxvirus infection or specific to certain orthopoxvirus species, allowing a more detailed description of differences in virus-host cell interactions between individual orthopoxviruses. To this end, we analysed changes in host cell gene expression of HeLa cells in response to infection with cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus, using whole-genome gene expression microarrays, and compared these to each other and to non-infected cells. Results Despite a dominating non-responsiveness of cellular transcription towards orthopoxvirus infection, we could identify several clusters of infection-modulated genes. These clusters are either commonly regulated by orthopoxvirus infection or are uniquely regulated by infection with a specific orthopoxvirus, with major differences being observed in immune response genes. Most noticeable was an induction of genes involved in leukocyte migration and activation in cowpox and monkeypox virus-infected cells, which was not observed following vaccinia virus infection. Conclusion Despite their close genetic relationship, the expression profiles induced by infection with different orthopoxviruses vary significantly. It may be speculated that these differences at the cellular level contribute to the individual characteristics of cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus

  3. Distinct cell tropism of canine distemper virus strains to adult olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Techangamsuwan, Somporn; Haas, Ludwig; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2009-09-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) can enter the brain via infection of olfactory neurons. Whether olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are also infected by CDV, and if yes, how they respond to the virus has remained enigmatic. Here, we exposed adult canine OECs in vitro to several attenuated (CDV-2544, CDV-R252, CDV-Ond, CDV-OndeGFP) and one virulent CDV strain (CDV-5804PeGFP) and studied their susceptibility compared to Schwann cells, a closely related cell type sharing the phagocytizing activity. We show that OECs and Schwann cells were infected by CDV strains albeit to different levels. Ten days post-infection (dpi), a mild to severe cytopathic effect ranging from single cell necrosis to layer detachment was noted. The percentage of infection increased during 10 dpi and viral progenies were detected in each culture using virus titration. Interestingly, CDV-2544, CDV-OndeGFP, and CDV-5804PeGFP predominantly infected OECs, while CDV-Ond targeted Schwann cells. No significant differences were found between the virulent and attenuated CDV strains. The observation of a CDV strain-specific cell tropism is evidence for significant molecular differences between OECs and Schwann cells. Whether these differences are either related to strain-specific distemper pathogenesis or support a role of OECs during CDV infection and virus spread needs to be addressed in future studies.

  4. Expression of Factor X in BHK-21 Cells Promotes Low Pathogenic Influenza Viruses Replication.

    PubMed

    Shahsavandi, Shahla; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Majid; Masoudi, Shahin; Izadi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    A cDNA clone for factor 10 (FX) isolated from chicken embryo inserted into the mammalian cell expression vector pCDNA3.1 was transfected into the baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell line. The generated BHK-21 cells with inducible expression of FX were used to investigate the efficacy of the serine transmembrane protease to proteolytic activation of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) with monobasic cleavage site. Data showed that the BHK-21/FX stably expressed FX after ten serial passages. The cells could proteolytically cleave the HA of low pathogenic avian influenza virus at multiplicity of infection 0.01. Growth kinetics of the virus on BHK-21/FX, BHK-21, and MDCK cells were evaluated by titrations of virus particles in each culture supernatant. Efficient multicycle viral replication was markedly detected in the cell at subsequent passages. Virus titration demonstrated that BHK-21/FX cell supported high-titer growth of the virus in which the viral titer is comparable to the virus grown in BHK-21 or MDCK cells with TPCK-trypsin. The results indicate potential application for the BHK-21/FX in influenza virus replication procedure and related studies.

  5. [Cultivation of the transmissible gastroenteritis virus in a continuous cell line].

    PubMed

    Belopopska, P; Motovski, A

    1984-01-01

    Cell cultures of the permanent cell line SPEV to which the transmissive gastroenteritis virus had already been adapted were used to culture the virus and carry out the virus-neutralization test. Use was made of a cell suspension of a variable density--300 and 500 thou cells per cm3. Both variants of the cell suspension were comparatively studied in terms of growth, the production of a monolayer, susceptibility to infection, and titer of the virus obtained, using 4 test tubes with the virus at various rates of dilution which were kept under observation daily, keeping a record of the infected and noninfected cell cultures. The amount of the virus was determined by titration. It was found that the monolayer was produced more rapidly in the suspension containing 500 thou cells/cm3. In that case infection could be performed at the 24th hour. The cytopathic effect was more pronounced, and the titer of the virus obtained was higher. Successful attempts were made with the virus-neutralization test with the infection of the cell cultures in suspension. Thus, the entire procedure was shown to be labour-saving as the time for investigation of the sera was shortened.

  6. A primary chicken tracheal cell culture system for the study of infection with avian respiratory viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major route of infection of avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in chickens is through cells of the airway epithelium. Here we describe the development and optimization of conditions for culture of tracheal epithelial cells from chicken embryos as well as their use in st...

  7. Contribution of Endocytic Motifs in the Cytoplasmic Tail of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein B to Virus Replication and Cell-Cell Fusion▿

    PubMed Central

    Beitia Ortiz de Zarate, Igor; Cantero-Aguilar, Lilia; Longo, Magalie; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Rozenberg, Flore

    2007-01-01

    The use of endocytic pathways by viral glycoproteins is thought to play various functions during viral infection. We previously showed in transfection assays that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) is transported from the cell surface back to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and that two motifs of gB cytoplasmic tail, YTQV and LL, function distinctly in this process. To investigate the role of each of these gB trafficking signals in HSV-1 infection, we constructed recombinant viruses in which each motif was rendered nonfunctional by alanine mutagenesis. In infected cells, wild-type gB was internalized from the cell surface and concentrated in the TGN. Disruption of YTQV abolished internalization of gB during infection, whereas disruption of LL induced accumulation of internalized gB in early recycling endosomes and impaired its return to the TGN. The growth of both recombinants was moderately diminished. Moreover, the fusion phenotype of cells infected with the gB recombinants differed from that of cells infected with the wild-type virus. Cells infected with the YTQV-mutated virus displayed reduced cell-cell fusion, whereas giant syncytia were observed in cells infected with the LL-mutated virus. Furthermore, blocking gB internalization or impairing gB recycling to the cell surface, using drugs or a transdominant negative form of Rab11, significantly reduced cell-cell fusion. These results favor a role for endocytosis in virus replication and suggest that gB intracellular trafficking is involved in the regulation of cell-cell fusion. PMID:17913800

  8. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  9. Queen pheromones: The chemical crown governing insect social life.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke

    2010-11-01

    Group-living species produce signals that alter the behavior and even the physiology of their social partners. Social insects possess especially sophisticated chemical communication systems that govern every aspect of colony life, including the defining feature of eusociality: reproductive division of labor. Current evidence hints at the central importance of queen pheromones, but progress has been hindered by the fact that such pheromones have only been isolated in honeybees. In a pair of papers on the ant Lasius niger, we identified and investigated a queen pheromone regulating worker sterility. The cuticular hydrocarbon 3-methylhentriacontane (3-MeC(31)) is correlated with queen maturity and fecundity and workers are also more likely to execute surplus queens that have low amounts of this chemical. Experiments with synthetic 3-MeC(31) found that it inhibits ovarian development in queenless workers and lowers worker aggression towards objects coated with it. Production of 3-MeC(31) by queens was depressed by an experimental immune challenge, and the same chemical was abundant on queenlaid eggs, suggesting that the workers' responses to the queen are conditional on her health and fecundity. Together with other studies, these results indicate that queen pheromones are honest signals of quality that simultaneously regulate multiple social behaviors.

  10. Queen pheromones: The chemical crown governing insect social life.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke

    2010-11-01

    Group-living species produce signals that alter the behavior and even the physiology of their social partners. Social insects possess especially sophisticated chemical communication systems that govern every aspect of colony life, including the defining feature of eusociality: reproductive division of labor. Current evidence hints at the central importance of queen pheromones, but progress has been hindered by the fact that such pheromones have only been isolated in honeybees. In a pair of papers on the ant Lasius niger, we identified and investigated a queen pheromone regulating worker sterility. The cuticular hydrocarbon 3-methylhentriacontane (3-MeC(31)) is correlated with queen maturity and fecundity and workers are also more likely to execute surplus queens that have low amounts of this chemical. Experiments with synthetic 3-MeC(31) found that it inhibits ovarian development in queenless workers and lowers worker aggression towards objects coated with it. Production of 3-MeC(31) by queens was depressed by an experimental immune challenge, and the same chemical was abundant on queenlaid eggs, suggesting that the workers' responses to the queen are conditional on her health and fecundity. Together with other studies, these results indicate that queen pheromones are honest signals of quality that simultaneously regulate multiple social behaviors. PMID:21331238

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Chikungunya Virus Infected Microgial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abere, Bizunesh; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Auewarakul, Prasert; Paemanee, Atchara; Kittisenachai, Suthathip; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a recently re-emerged public health problem in many countries bordering the Indian Ocean and elsewhere. Chikungunya fever is a relatively self limiting febrile disease, but the consequences of chikungunya fever can include a long lasting, debilitating arthralgia, and occasional neurological involvement has been reported. Macrophages have been implicated as an important cell target of CHIKV with regards to both their role as an immune mediator, as well evidence pointing to long term viral persistence in these cells. Microglial cells are the resident brain macrophages, and so this study sought to define the proteomic changes in a human microglial cell line (CHME-5) in response to CHIKV infection. GeLC-MS/MS analysis of CHIKV infected and mock infected cells identified some 1455 individual proteins, of which 90 proteins, belonging to diverse cellular pathways, were significantly down regulated at a significance level of p<0.01. Analysis of the protein profile in response to infection did not support a global inhibition of either normal or IRES-mediated translation, but was consistent with the targeting of specific cellular pathways including those regulating innate antiviral mechanisms. PMID:22514668

  12. Antimicrobial peptides from amphibian skin potently inhibit human immunodeficiency virus infection and transfer of virus from dendritic cells to T cells.

    PubMed

    VanCompernolle, Scott E; Taylor, R Jeffery; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Jiang, Jiyang; Youree, Bryan E; Bowie, John H; Tyler, Michael J; Conlon, J Michael; Wade, David; Aiken, Christopher; Dermody, Terence S; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Unutmaz, Derya

    2005-09-01

    Topical antimicrobicides hold great promise in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Amphibian skin provides a rich source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides including some that have antiviral activity. We tested 14 peptides derived from diverse amphibian species for the capacity to inhibit HIV infection. Three peptides (caerin 1.1, caerin 1.9, and maculatin 1.1) completely inhibited HIV infection of T cells within minutes of exposure to virus at concentrations that were not toxic to target cells. These peptides also suppressed infection by murine leukemia virus but not by reovirus, a structurally unrelated nonenveloped virus. Preincubation with peptides prevented viral fusion to target cells and disrupted the HIV envelope. Remarkably, these amphibian peptides also were highly effective in inhibiting the transfer of HIV by dendritic cells (DCs) to T cells, even when DCs were transiently exposed to peptides 8 h after virus capture. These data suggest that amphibian-derived peptides can access DC-sequestered HIV and destroy the virus before it can be transferred to T cells. Thus, amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides show promise as topical inhibitors of mucosal HIV transmission and provide novel tools to understand the complex biology of HIV capture by DCs.

  13. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    SciTech Connect

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-04-15

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction.

  14. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B; Baker, Timothy S; Kuhn, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions.

  15. Visualizing interactions between Sindbis virus and cells by single particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williard, Mary

    2005-03-01

    Sindbis virus infects both mammalian and insect cells. Though not pathogenic in humans, Sindbis is a model for many mosquito- borne viruses that cause human disease, such as West Nile virus. We have used real-time single particle fluorescence microscopy to observe individual Sindbis virus particles as they infect living cells. Fluorescent labels were incorporated into both the viral coat proteins and the lipid envelope of the virus. Kinetics characteristic of free diffusion in solution, slower diffusion inside cells, attachment to spots on the cell surface, and motor protein transport inside cells have been observed. Dequenching of the membrane label is used to report membrane fusion events during the infection process. Tracking individual viral particles allows multiple pathways to be determined without the requirement of synchronicity.

  16. Virus-host interactions in persistently FMDV-infected cells derived from bovine pharynx.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, V; Pacheco, J M; Larocco, Michael; Gladue, D P; Pauszek, S J; Smoliga, G; Krug, P W; Baxt, B; Borca, M V; Rodriguez, L

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) produces a disease in cattle characterized by vesicular lesions and a persistent infection with asymptomatic low-level production of virus in pharyngeal tissues. Here we describe the establishment of a persistently infected primary cell culture derived from bovine pharynx tissue (PBPT) infected with FMDV serotype O1 Manisa, where surviving cells were serially passed until a persistently infected culture was generated. Characterization of the persistent virus demonstrated changes in its plaque size, ability to grow in different cell lines, and change in the use of integrins as receptors, when compared with the parental virus. These results demonstrate the establishment of persistently infected PBPT cell cultures where co-adaptation has taken place between the virus and host cells. This in vitro model for FMDV persistence may help further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the cattle carrier state.

  17. Infectio: a Generic Framework for Computational Simulation of Virus Transmission between Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yakimovich, Artur; Yakimovich, Yauhen; Schmid, Michael; Mercer, Jason; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell mechanisms, depending on the cell type, the nature of the virus, or the phase of the infection cycle. The mode of viral transmission has a large impact on disease development, the outcome of antiviral therapies or the efficacy of gene therapy protocols. The transmission mode of viruses can be addressed in tissue culture systems using live-cell imaging. Yet even in relatively simple cell cultures, the mechanisms of viral transmission are difficult to distinguish. Here we present a cross-platform software framework called “Infectio,” which is capable of simulating transmission phenotypes in tissue culture of virtually any virus. Infectio can estimate interdependent biological parameters, for example for vaccinia virus infection, and differentiate between cell-cell and cell-free virus spreading. Infectio assists in elucidating virus transmission mechanisms, a feature useful for designing strategies of perturbing or enhancing viral transmission. The complexity of the Infectio software is low compared to that of other software commonly used to quantitate features of cell biological images, which yields stable and relatively error-free output from Infectio. The software is open source (GPLv3 license), and operates on the major platforms (Windows, Mac, and Linux). The complete source code can be downloaded from http://infectio.github.io/index.html. IMPORTANCE Infectio presents a generalized platform to analyze virus infection spread between cells. It allows the simulation of plaque phenotypes from image-based assays. Viral plaques are the result of virus spreading from primary infected cells to neighboring cells. This is a complex process and involves neighborhood effects at cell-cell contact sites or fluid dynamics in the extracellular medium. Infectio differentiates between two major modes of virus transmission between cells, allowing in silico testing of hypotheses about

  18. Infectio: a Generic Framework for Computational Simulation of Virus Transmission between Cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimovich, Artur; Yakimovich, Yauhen; Schmid, Michael; Mercer, Jason; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Greber, Urs F

    2016-01-01

    Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell mechanisms, depending on the cell type, the nature of the virus, or the phase of the infection cycle. The mode of viral transmission has a large impact on disease development, the outcome of antiviral therapies or the efficacy of gene therapy protocols. The transmission mode of viruses can be addressed in tissue culture systems using live-cell imaging. Yet even in relatively simple cell cultures, the mechanisms of viral transmission are difficult to distinguish. Here we present a cross-platform software framework called "Infectio," which is capable of simulating transmission phenotypes in tissue culture of virtually any virus. Infectio can estimate interdependent biological parameters, for example for vaccinia virus infection, and differentiate between cell-cell and cell-free virus spreading. Infectio assists in elucidating virus transmission mechanisms, a feature useful for designing strategies of perturbing or enhancing viral transmission. The complexity of the Infectio software is low compared to that of other software commonly used to quantitate features of cell biological images, which yields stable and relatively error-free output from Infectio. The software is open source (GPLv3 license), and operates on the major platforms (Windows, Mac, and Linux). The complete source code can be downloaded from http://infectio.github.io/index.html. IMPORTANCE Infectio presents a generalized platform to analyze virus infection spread between cells. It allows the simulation of plaque phenotypes from image-based assays. Viral plaques are the result of virus spreading from primary infected cells to neighboring cells. This is a complex process and involves neighborhood effects at cell-cell contact sites or fluid dynamics in the extracellular medium. Infectio differentiates between two major modes of virus transmission between cells, allowing in silico testing of hypotheses about spreading

  19. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Magaldi, Monica; Rosas, Maria F.; Borrego, Belen; Brocchi, Emiliana; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-05-10

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV ({approx} 5 log) and VSV ({approx} 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells.

  20. Bat airway epithelial cells: a novel tool for the study of zoonotic viruses.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, Isabella; Ehlen, Lukas; Kallies, René; Wollny, Robert; Corman, Victor M; Cottontail, Veronika M; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A

    2014-01-01

    Bats have been increasingly recognized as reservoir of important zoonotic viruses. However, until now many attempts to isolate bat-borne viruses in cell culture have been unsuccessful. Further, experimental studies on reservoir host species have been limited by the difficulty of rearing these species. The epithelium of the respiratory tract plays a central role during airborne transmission, as it is the first tissue encountered by viral particles. Although several cell lines from bats were established recently, no well-characterized, selectively cultured airway epithelial cells were available so far. Here, primary cells and immortalized cell lines from bats of the two important suborders Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat) and Eidolon helvum (Straw-colored fruit bat), were successfully cultured under standardized conditions from both fresh and frozen organ specimens by cell outgrowth of organ explants and by the use of serum-free primary cell culture medium. Cells were immortalized to generate permanent cell lines. Cells were characterized for their epithelial properties such as expression of cytokeratin and tight junctions proteins and permissiveness for viral infection with Rift-Valley fever virus and vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana. These cells can serve as suitable models for the study of bat-borne viruses and complement cell culture models for virus infection in human airway epithelial cells. PMID:24454736

  1. Mandibular gland components of european and africanized honey bee queens (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Pankiw, T; Winston, M L; Plettner, E; Slessor, K N; Pettis, J S; Taylor, O R

    1996-04-01

    The composition of the five-component honey bee queen mandibular gland pheromone (QMP) of mated European honey bee queens was compared to those of virgin and drone-laying (i.e., laying only haploid unfertilized eggs that develop into males), European queens and Africanized mated queens. QMP of mated European queens showed significantly greater quantities of individual components than all queen types compared, except for a significantly greater quantity of 9-hydroxy-(E)-2-decenoic acid (9-HDA) found in Africanized queens. Glands of European drone-laying queens contained quantities intermediate between virgin and mated queens, reflecting their intermediate reproductive state and age. QMP ontogeny shifts from a high proportion of 9-keto-(E)-2-decenoic acid (ODA) in young unmated queens to roughly equal proportions of ODA and 9-HDA in mated queens. A biosynthetic shift occurs after mating that results in a greater proportion of 9-HDA, methylp-hydroxybenzoate (HOB), and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylethanol (HVA) production, accompanied by a decreased proportion of ODA. Africanized QMP proportions of ODA and 9-HDA were significantly different from European queens. A quantitative definition of a "queen equivalent" of QMP is proposed for the various queen types, and a standard queen equivalent for mated European honeybee queen mandibular gland pheromone is adopted as 200µg ODA, 80µg 9-HDA, 20µg HOB, and 2 µg HVA.

  2. Differential evolution of eastern equine encephalitis virus populations in response to host cell type.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, L A; Scott, T W

    2001-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) cycle between hosts in two widely separated taxonomic groups, vertebrate amplifying hosts and invertebrate vectors, both of which may separately or in concert shape the course of arbovirus evolution. To elucidate the selective pressures associated with virus replication within each portion of this two-host life cycle, the effects of host type on the growth characteristics of the New World alphavirus, eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus, were investigated. Multiple lineages of an ancestral EEE virus stock were repeatedly transferred through either mosquito or avian cells or in alternating passages between these two cell types. When assayed in both cell types, derived single host lineages exhibited significant differences in infectivity, growth pattern, plaque morphology, and total virus yield, demonstrating that this virus is capable of host-specific evolution. Virus lineages grown in alternation between the two cell types expressed intermediate phenotypes consistent with dual adaptation to both cellular environments. Both insect-adapted and alternated lineages greatly increased in their ability to infect insect cells. These results indicate that different selective pressures exist for virus replication within each portion of the two-host life cycle, and that alternation of hosts selects for virus populations well adapted for replication in both host systems. PMID:11290699

  3. Connections matter − how viruses use cell–cell adhesion components

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Mathieu; Generous, Alex; Sinn, Patrick L.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epithelium is a highly organized type of animal tissue. Except for blood and lymph vessels, epithelial cells cover the body, line its cavities in single or stratified layers and support exchange between compartments. In addition, epithelia offer to the body a barrier to pathogen invasion. To transit through or to replicate in epithelia, viruses have to face several obstacles, starting from cilia and glycocalyx where they can be neutralized by secreted immunoglobulins. Tight junctions and adherens junctions also prevent viruses to cross the epithelial barrier. However, viruses have developed multiple strategies to blaze their path through the epithelium by utilizing components of cell–cell adhesion structures as receptors. In this Commentary, we discuss how viruses take advantage of the apical junction complex to spread. Whereas some viruses quickly disrupt epithelium integrity, others carefully preserve it and use cell adhesion proteins and their cytoskeletal connections to rapidly spread laterally. This is exemplified by the hidden transmission of enveloped viruses that use nectins as receptors. Finally, several viruses that replicate preferentially in cancer cells are currently used as experimental cancer therapeutics. Remarkably, these viruses use cell adhesion molecules as receptors, probably because – to reach tumors and metastases – oncolytic viruses must efficiently traverse or break epithelia. PMID:26046138

  4. Structural Co-Evolution of Viruses and Cells in the Primordial World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Bamford, Jaana K. H.

    2008-04-01

    Viruses and cells co-evolve due to the parasitic nature of viruses. Yet there are no models suggesting how the unicellular organisms and their viruses might co-evolve structurally. Here, in this study, we plunge into this unexplored field from a wide perspective and try to describe some of the intriguing ways in which viruses may have shaped the cellular life forms on the ancient Earth. At first we propose a scenario where viruses act as a driving force in the emergence of bacterial cell walls by providing favorable intermediates for the otherwise improbable steps in the cell wall generation. We also discuss the role of viruses in the evolution of cell surface components such as receptors and second membranes. Finally we focus on hypothetical proto-viruses, the selfish abusers of the RNA-world, in explaining some of the very early stages in the origin and evolution of life. Proto-viruses may be responsible for creating the first true cells in order to support their selfish needs. In this model we also suggest a logical pathway to explaining the emergence of modern viruses.

  5. Cell fusion by haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) viruses and its application for titration of virus infectivity and neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, J; Takashima, I; Hashimoto, N

    1985-01-01

    Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome viruses, are members of the family Bunyaviridae. They cause cell to cell fusion from within under acidic conditions. This phenomenon was found to occur under a pH range of between 4.9 to 6.3 for all the viruses examined. The pH range which causes cell fusion was similar to that reported for the La Crosse virus of the Bunyaviridae, hence indicating that this property is a common biological characteristic among this family of viruses. Titration of virus infectivity and neutralizing antibody was done by counting the number of fused cell foci produced in infected Vero cell monolayers after low pH treatment. This method was simpler and more rapid than the ordinary plaque formation method or that of counting infected cell foci by IFA or immunoenzyme assay. In addition, this method may also be applicable in the detection of other enveloped viruses which do not cause a typical cytopathic effect.

  6. [Chronic infection of BHK-21 cells by the Machupo virus. The development of the system and properties of the virus produced by cells of this line].

    PubMed

    Trofimov, N M; Petkevich, A S; Erofeeva, N I; Fidarov, F M; Moroz, A G

    1984-01-01

    A new model of chronic infection of BHK-21 cells with Machupo virus has been obtained. The chronically infected culture of BHK-21-M cells differed morphologically from the control culture by the presence of giant mono- and multinuclear forms with granular cytoplasm and by an increase in the number of small rounded cells. In the system of BHK-21-M cells, the persisting virus was produced permanently but the per cent of infected cells determined by indirect immunofluorescence and the infectious centre method was not high (12-17%). The main factor contributing to the development of Machupo virus persistence in this cell system appears to consist in the formation of defective interfering particles.

  7. Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P; Holt, J

    2008-07-28

    In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how

  8. Chromosome Studies of Virus-infected Semi-continuous Human Embryonic Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, A. J.; Taylor, P. E.; Jacobs, J. P.; Jones, C. A.

    1970-01-01

    Semi-continuous human embryonic liver cells infected with San Carlos virus 3 exhibited an increased frequency of chromosomal breaks and other chromosomal abnormalities when compared with uninoculated control cultures. The chromosomes of cells inoculated with AR-17 virus retained their normal structure. The strain of liver cells used in this study is essentially diploid. It represents the first strain of diploid cells so far described from human liver. ImagesFigs. 2-3Fig. 1 PMID:4985032

  9. Susceptibility of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells to Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shih-Cheng; Shen, Ching-I; Lin, Ho; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Lai, Ping-Shan; Su, Hong-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be efficiently directed to become immature neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPCs) and functional mature neural cells, including neurotransmitter-secreting neurons and glial cells. Investigating the susceptibility of these hESCs-derived neural cells to neurotrophic viruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), provides insight into the viral cell tropism in the infected human brain. We demonstrate that hESC-derived NPCs are highly vulnerable to JEV infection at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI). In addition, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-expressing glial cells are also susceptible to JEV infection. In contrast, only a few mature neurons were infected at MOI 10 or higher on the third day post-infection. In addition, functional neurotransmitter-secreting neurons are also resistant to JEV infection at high MOI. Moreover, we discover that vimentin intermediate filament, reported as a putative neurovirulent JEV receptor, is highly expressed in NPCs and glial cells, but not mature neurons. These results indicate that the expression of vimentin in neural cells correlates to the cell tropism of JEV. Finally, we further demonstrate that membranous vimentin is necessary for the susceptibility of hESC-derived NPCs to JEV infection.

  10. RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-Taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajwinder; Levitt, Abby L; Rajotte, Edwin G; Holmes, Edward C; Ostiguy, Nancy; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Lipkin, W Ian; Depamphilis, Claude W; Toth, Amy L; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2010-12-22

    Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera) malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD), has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus) in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV), nearby non

  11. RNA Viruses in Hymenopteran Pollinators: Evidence of Inter-Taxa Virus Transmission via Pollen and Potential Impact on Non-Apis Hymenopteran Species

    PubMed Central

    Rajotte, Edwin G.; Holmes, Edward C.; Ostiguy, Nancy; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Lipkin, W. Ian; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Toth, Amy L.; Cox-Foster, Diana L.

    2010-01-01

    Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera) malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD), has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus) in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV), nearby non

  12. RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-Taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajwinder; Levitt, Abby L; Rajotte, Edwin G; Holmes, Edward C; Ostiguy, Nancy; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Lipkin, W Ian; Depamphilis, Claude W; Toth, Amy L; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2010-01-01

    Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera) malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD), has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus) in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV), nearby non

  13. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Doepke, Mandy; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Todt, Daniel; Wölk, Benno; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Geffers, Robert; Lauber, Chris; Kaderali, Lars; Penin, François; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular infectivity point to

  14. Measles virus C protein suppresses gamma-activated factor formation and virus-induced cell growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-25

    Measles virus (MeV) produces two accessory proteins, V and C, from the P gene. These accessory proteins have been reported to contribute to efficient virus proliferation through the modulation of host cell events. Our previous paper described that Vero cell-adapted strains of MeV led host cells to growth arrest through the upregulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), and wild strains did not. In the present study, we found that C protein expression levels varied among MeV strains in infected SiHa cells. C protein levels were inversely correlated with IRF-1 expression levels and with cell growth arrest. Forced expression of C protein released cells from growth arrest. C-deficient recombinant virus efficiently upregulated IRF-1 and caused growth arrest more efficiently than the wild-type virus. C protein preferentially bound to phosphorylated STAT1 and suppressed STAT1 dimer formation. We conclude that MeV C protein suppresses IFN-{gamma} signaling pathway via inhibition of phosphorylated STAT1 dimerization.

  15. Archetype JC virus efficiently replicates in COS-7 cells, simian cells constitutively expressing simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed

    Hara, K; Sugimoto, C; Kitamura, T; Aoki, N; Taguchi, F; Yogo, Y

    1998-07-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV), the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), is ubiquitous in humans, infecting children asymptomatically and then persisting in the kidney. Renal JCV is not latent but replicates to excrete progeny in the urine. The renal-urinary JCV DNAs carry the archetype regulatory region that generates various rearranged regulatory regions occurring in JCVs derived from the brains of PML patients. Tissue cultures that support the efficient growth of archetype JCV have not been reported. We studied whether archetype JCV could replicate in COS-7 cells, simian cells transformed with an origin-defective mutant of simian virus 40 (SV40). Efficient JCV replication, as detected by a hemagglutination assay, was observed in cultures transfected with five of the six archetype DNAs. The progeny JCVs could be passaged to fresh COS-7 cells. However, when the parental cells of COS-7 not expressing T antigen were transfected with archetype JCV DNAs, no viral replication was detected, indicating that SV40 T antigen is essential for the growth of JCV in COS-7 cells. The archetype regulatory region was conserved during viral growth in COS-7 cells, although a small proportion of JCV DNAs underwent rearrangements outside the regulatory region. We then attempted to recover archetype JCV from urine by viral culture in COS-7 cells. Efficient JCV production was observed in COS-7 cells infected with five of the six JCV-positive urine samples examined. Thus, COS-7 cells should be of use not only for the production of archetype JCV on a large scale but also for the isolation of archetype JCV from urine.

  16. Isolation of swine influenza virus in cell cultures and embryonated chicken eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Gauger, Phillip C

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus isolation is a procedure to obtain a live and infectious virus that can be used for antigenic characterization, pathogenesis investigation, and vaccine production. Embryonated chicken egg inoculation is traditionally considered the "gold standard" method for influenza virus isolation and propagation. However, many primary cells and continuous cell lines have also been examined or developed for influenza virus isolation and replication. Specifically, swine influenza virus (SIV) isolation and propagation have been attempted and compared in embryonated chicken eggs, some primary porcine cells, and a number of continuous cell lines. Currently Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells remain the most commonly used cell line for isolation, propagation, and titration of SIV. Virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs or in different cell lines offers alternative approaches when SIV isolation in MDCK cells is unsuccessful. Nasal swabs, lung tissues, and oral fluids are three major specimen types for SIV isolation. In this chapter, we describe the procedures of sample processing, SIV isolation in MDCK cells and in embryonated chicken eggs, as well as methods used for confirming the virus isolation results.

  17. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  18. The multiplication of an influenza C virus in an established line of canine kidney (MDCK) cells.

    PubMed

    Nerome, K; Ishida, M

    1978-04-01

    JJ/50 and four other strains of influenza C virus grew in an established line of canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Multicycle virus growth was markedly enhanced by the addition of trypsin to the culture medium and these viruses could be passaged serially in this system. The addition of appropriate concentrations of trypsin to the agar overlay medium enabled plaquing of influenza C/JJ/50 virus. Titration by plaque assay on MDCK cells was more sensitive than that by intra-amniotic inoculation of fertile hens' eggs.

  19. Timing of Galectin-1 Exposure Differentially Modulates Nipah Virus Entry and Syncytium Formation in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Omai B.; Yun, Tatyana; Pernet, Olivier; Aguilar, Hector C.; Park, Arnold; Bowden, Thomas A.; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nipah virus (NiV) is a deadly emerging enveloped paramyxovirus that primarily targets human endothelial cells. Endothelial cells express the innate immune effector galectin-1 that we have previously shown can bind to specific N-glycans on the NiV envelope fusion glycoprotein (F). NiV-F mediates fusion of infected endothelial cells into syncytia, resulting in endothelial disruption and hemorrhage. Galectin-1 is an endogenous carbohydrate-binding protein that binds to specific glycans on NiV-F to reduce endothelial cell fusion, an effect that may reduce pathophysiologic sequelae of NiV infection. However, galectins play multiple roles in regulating host-pathogen interactions; for example, galectins can promote attachment of HIV to T cells and macrophages and attachment of HSV-1 to keratinocytes but can also inhibit influenza entry into airway epithelial cells. Using live Nipah virus, in the present study, we demonstrate that galectin-1 can enhance NiV attachment to and infection of primary human endothelial cells by bridging glycans on the viral envelope to host cell glycoproteins. In order to exhibit an enhancing effect, galectin-1 must be present during the initial phase of virus attachment; in contrast, addition of galectin-1 postinfection results in reduced production of progeny virus and syncytium formation. Thus, galectin-1 can have dual and opposing effects on NiV infection of human endothelial cells. While various roles for galectin family members in microbial-host interactions have been described, we report opposing effects of the same galectin family member on a specific virus, with the timing of exposure during the viral life cycle determining the outcome. IMPORTANCE Nipah virus is an emerging pathogen that targets endothelial cells lining blood vessels; the high mortality rate (up to 70%) in Nipah virus infections results from destruction of these cells and resulting catastrophic hemorrhage. Host factors that promote or prevent Nipah virus

  20. Vertical-transmission routes for deformed wing virus of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Yue, Constanze; Schröder, Marion; Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2007-08-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a viral pathogen of the European honeybee (Apis mellifera), associated with clinical symptoms and colony collapse when transmitted by the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. In the absence of V. destructor, DWV infection does not result in visible symptoms, suggesting that mite-independent transmission results in covert infections. True covert infections are a known infection strategy for insect viruses, resulting in long-term persistence of the virus in the population. They are characterized by the absence of disease symptoms in the presence of the virus and by vertical transmission of the virus. To demonstrate vertical transmission and, hence, true covert infections for DWV, a detailed study was performed on the vertical-transmission routes of DWV. In total, 192 unfertilized eggs originating from eight virgin queens, and the same number of fertilized eggs from the same queens after artificial insemination with DWV-negative (three queens) or DWV-positive (five queens) semen, were analysed individually. The F0 queens and drones and F1 drones and workers were also analysed for viral RNA. By in situ hybridization, viral sequences were detected in the ovary of an F0 queen that had laid DWV-positive unfertilized eggs and was inseminated with DWV-positive semen. In conclusion, vertical transmission of DWV from queens and drones to drone and worker offspring through unfertilized and fertilized eggs, respectively, was demonstrated. Viral sequences in fertilized eggs can originate from the queen, as well as from drones via DWV-positive semen.

  1. Avian Influenza Viruses, Inflammation, and CD8(+) T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongfang; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulate naturally in wild aquatic birds, infect domestic poultry, and are capable of causing sporadic bird-to-human transmissions. AIVs capable of infecting humans include a highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, first detected in humans in 1997, and a low pathogenic AIV H7N9, reported in humans in 2013. Both H5N1 and H7N9 cause severe influenza disease in humans, manifested by acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and high mortality rates of 60% and 35%, respectively. Ongoing circulation of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses in wild birds and poultry, and their ability to infect humans emphasizes their epidemic and pandemic potential and poses a public health threat. It is, thus, imperative to understand the host immune responses to the AIVs so we can control severe influenza disease caused by H5N1 or H7N9 and rationally design new immunotherapies and vaccines. This review summarizes our current knowledge on AIV epidemiology, disease symptoms, inflammatory processes underlying the AIV infection in humans, and recent studies on universal pre-existing CD8(+) T cell immunity to AIVs. Immune responses driving the host recovery from AIV infection in patients hospitalized with severe influenza disease are also discussed.

  2. Avian Influenza Viruses, Inflammation, and CD8+ T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongfang; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulate naturally in wild aquatic birds, infect domestic poultry, and are capable of causing sporadic bird-to-human transmissions. AIVs capable of infecting humans include a highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, first detected in humans in 1997, and a low pathogenic AIV H7N9, reported in humans in 2013. Both H5N1 and H7N9 cause severe influenza disease in humans, manifested by acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and high mortality rates of 60% and 35%, respectively. Ongoing circulation of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses in wild birds and poultry, and their ability to infect humans emphasizes their epidemic and pandemic potential and poses a public health threat. It is, thus, imperative to understand the host immune responses to the AIVs so we can control severe influenza disease caused by H5N1 or H7N9 and rationally design new immunotherapies and vaccines. This review summarizes our current knowledge on AIV epidemiology, disease symptoms, inflammatory processes underlying the AIV infection in humans, and recent studies on universal pre-existing CD8+ T cell immunity to AIVs. Immune responses driving the host recovery from AIV infection in patients hospitalized with severe influenza disease are also discussed. PMID:26973644

  3. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  4. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  5. Guiding plant virus particles to integrin-displaying cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovlid, Marisa L.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Laufer, Burkhardt; Lau, Jolene L.; Kuzelka, Jane; Wang, Qian; Hyypiä, Timo; Nemerow, Glen R.; Kessler, Horst; Manchester, Marianne; Finn, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are structurally regular, highly stable, tunable nanomaterials that can be conveniently produced in high yields. Unmodified VNPs from plants and bacteria generally do not show tissue specificity or high selectivity in binding to or entry into mammalian cells. They are, however, malleable by both genetic and chemical means, making them useful scaffolds for the display of large numbers of cell- and tissue-targeting ligands, imaging moieties, and/or therapeutic agents in a well-defined manner. Capitalizing on this attribute, we modified the genetic sequence of the Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) coat protein to display an RGD oligopeptide sequence derived from human adenovirus type 2 (HAdV-2). Concurrently, wild-type CPMV was modified via NHS acylation and Cu(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) chemistry to attach an integrin-binding cyclic RGD peptide. Both types of particles showed strong and selective affinity for several different cancer cell lines that express RGD-binding integrin receptors.Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are structurally regular, highly stable, tunable nanomaterials that can be conveniently produced in high yields. Unmodified VNPs from plants and bacteria generally do not show tissue specificity or high selectivity in binding to or entry into mammalian cells. They are, however, malleable by both genetic and chemical means, making them useful scaffolds for the display of large numbers of cell- and tissue-targeting ligands, imaging moieties, and/or therapeutic agents in a well-defined manner. Capitalizing on this attribute, we modified the genetic sequence of the Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) coat protein to display an RGD oligopeptide sequence derived from human adenovirus type 2 (HAdV-2). Concurrently, wild-type CPMV was modified via NHS acylation and Cu(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) chemistry to attach an integrin-binding cyclic RGD peptide. Both types of particles showed strong and selective affinity

  6. Virus and Cell RNAs Expressed during Epstein-Barr Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott

    2006-01-01

    Changes in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell RNA levels were assayed following immunoglobulin G (IgG) cross-linking-induced replication in latency 1-infected Akata Burkitt B lymphoblasts. EBV replication as assayed by membrane gp350 expression was ∼5% before IgG cross-linking and increased to more than 50% 48 h after induction. Seventy-two hours after IgG cross-linking, gp350-positive cells excluded propidium iodide as well as gp350-negative cells. EBV RNA levels changed temporally in parallel with previously defined sensitivity to inhibitors of protein or viral DNA synthesis. BZLF1 immediate-early RNA levels doubled by 2 h and reached a peak at 4 h, whereas BMLF1 doubled by 4 h with a peak at 8 h, and BRLF1 doubled by 8 h with peak at 12 h. Early RNAs peaked at 8 to 12 h, and late RNAs peaked at 24 h. Hybridization to intergenic sequences resulted in evidence for new EBV RNAs. Surprisingly, latency III (LTIII) RNAs for LMP1, LMP2, EBNALP, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, and BARTs were detected at 8 to 12 h and reached maxima at 24 to 48 h. EBNA2 and LMP1 were at full LTIII levels by 48 h and localized to gp350-positive cells. Thus, LTIII expression is a characteristic of late EBV replication in both B lymphoblasts and epithelial cells in immune-comprised people (J. Webster-Cyriaque, J. Middeldorp, and N. Raab-Traub, J. Virol. 74:7610-7618, 2000). EBV replication significantly altered levels of 401 Akata cell RNAs, of which 122 RNAs changed twofold or more relative to uninfected Akata cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase levels were significantly affected. Late expression of LTIII was associated with induction of NF-κB responsive genes including IκBα and A20. The exclusion of propidium, expression of EBV LTIII RNAs and proteins, and up-regulation of specific cell RNAs are indicative of vital cell function late in EBV replication. PMID:16474161

  7. Azathioprine inhibits vaccinia virus replication in both BSC-40 and RAG cell lines acting on different stages of virus cycle.

    PubMed

    Damaso, Clarissa R A; Oliveira, Marcus F; Massarani, Susana M; Moussatché, Nissin

    2002-08-15

    In the present study we demonstrate that azathioprine (AZA) inhibits vaccinia virus (VV) replication in both BSC-40 and RAG cell lines, acting on different stages of virus cycle. In BSC-40 cells, early protein synthesis was not significantly affected, but late gene expression was severely impaired. In RAG cells all stages of gene expression were completed during synchronous infection in the presence of the drug. The onset of DNA replication was not affected in RAG cells, but a severe inhibition was observed in BSC-40 cells. Electron microscopic analysis of VV-infected RAG cells treated with AZA revealed brick-shaped particles presenting abnormal definition of the internal structure. Purified virions from AZA-treated RAG cells presented several modifications of the protein content, a lesser amount of DNA, and a lower PFU:particle ratio. Our results suggest that in VV-infected RAG cells AZA interfered with virus morphogenesis, whereas in BSC-40 cells the replicative cycle was inhibited at the DNA replication stage.

  8. Ultrastructure of the intramandibular gland of workers and queens of the stingless bee, Melipona quadrifasciata.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda; Gracioli-Vitti, Luciana F; Abdalla, Fábio C

    2011-01-01

    The intramandibular glands of workers and queens of Melipona quadrifasciata Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Apidae), at different ages and from different functional groups, were studied using light and transmission electron microscopy. The results demonstrated that these glands are composed of two types of secretory structures: 1.A hypertrophied epidermis on the dorsal side of the mandible that is an epithelial gland. 2. Free secretory cells filling the inner spaces of the appendices that constitute a unicellular gland. The epithelial gland is larger in the young (1-2-day-old workers), and the gland becomes involuted during the nurse worker stage. The unicellular glands of the workers posses some secretion during all of the studied phases, but secretory activity is more intensive in the foraging workers. Vesicles of secretion are absent in the unicellular glands of queens. These results demonstrate that these glands show functional adaptations in different castes corresponding to the functions of each caste.

  9. Ultrastructure of the Intramandibular Gland of Workers and Queens of the Stingless Bee, Melipona quadrifasciata

    PubMed Central

    Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda; Gracioli-Vitti, Luciana F.; Abdalla, Fábio C.

    2011-01-01

    The intramandibular glands of workers and queens of Melipona quadrifasciata Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Apidae), at different ages and from different functional groups, were studied using light and transmission electron microscopy. The results demonstrated that these glands are composed of two types of secretory structures: 1.A hypertrophied epidermis on the dorsal side of the mandible that is an epithelial gland. 2. Free secretory cells filling the inner spaces of the appendices that constitute a unicellular gland. The epithelial gland is larger in the young (1-2-day-old workers), and the gland becomes involuted during the nurse worker stage. The unicellular glands of the workers posses some secretion during all of the studied phases, but secretory activity is more intensive in the foraging workers. Vesicles of secretion are absent in the unicellular glands of queens. These results demonstrate that these glands show functional adaptations in different castes corresponding to the functions of each caste. PMID:22220493

  10. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  11. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. movement protein | virion-associated protein | Biacore

  12. 6K2-induced vesicles can move cell to cell during turnip mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Romain; Jiang, Jun; Wan, Juan; Agbeci, Maxime; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    To successfully infect plants, viruses replicate in an initially infected cell and then move to neighboring cells through plasmodesmata (PDs). However, the nature of the viral entity that crosses over the cell barrier into non-infected ones is not clear. The membrane-associated 6K2 protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) induces the formation of vesicles involved in the replication and intracellular movement of viral RNA. This study shows that 6K2-induced vesicles trafficked toward the plasma membrane and were associated with plasmodesmata (PD). We demonstrated also that 6K2 moved cell-to-cell into adjoining cells when plants were infected with TuMV. 6K2 was then fused to photo-activable GFP (6K2:PAGFP) to visualize how 6K2 moved intercellularly during TuMV infection. After activation, 6K2:PAGFP-tagged vesicles moved to the cell periphery and across the cell wall into adjacent cells. These vesicles were shown to contain the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and viral RNA. Symplasmic movement of TuMV may thus be achieved in the form of a membrane-associated viral RNA complex induced by 6K2. PMID:24409170

  13. The archetype enhancer of simian virus 40 DNA is duplicated during virus growth in human cells and rhesus monkey kidney cells but not in green monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Frank J; Greenlee, John E; Carney, Helen

    2003-05-25

    Archetype SV40, obtained directly from its natural host, is characterized by a single 72-bp enhancer element. In contrast, SV40 grown in cell culture almost invariably exhibits partial or complete duplication of the enhancer region. This distinction has been considered important in studies of human tumor material, since SV40-associated tumor isolates have been described having a single enhancer region, suggesting natural infection as opposed to possible contamination by laboratory strains of virus. However, the behavior of archetypal SV40 in cultured cells has never been methodically studied. In this study we reengineered nonarchetypal 776-SV40 to contain a single 72-bp enhancer region and used this reengineered archetypal DNA to transfect a number of simian and human cell lines. SV40 DNA recovered from these cells was analyzed by restriction endonuclease analysis, PCR, and DNA sequencing. Reengineered archetype SV40 propagated in green monkey TC-7 or BSC-1 kidney cells remained without enhancer region duplication even after extensive serial virus passage. Archetype SV40 grown in all but one of the rhesus or human cell lines initially appeared exclusively archetypal. However, when virus from these cell types was transferred to green monkey cells, variants with partial enhancer duplication appeared after as little as a single passage. These findings suggest (1) that virus with a single 72-bp enhancer may persist in cultured cells of simian and human origin; (2) that variants with partially duplicated enhancer regions may arise within cell lines in quantities below limits of detection; (3) that these variants may enjoy a selective advantage in cell types other than those from which they arose (e.g., green monkey kidney cells); and (4) that certain cell lines may support a selective growth advantage for the variants without supporting their formation. Our data indicate that enhancer duplication may also occur in human as well as rhesus kidney cells. Thus, detection of

  14. Live Cell Reporter Systems for Positive-Sense Single Strand RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ren, Linzhu; Peng, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xinrong; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Cell-based reporter systems have facilitated studies of viral replication and pathogenesis, virus detection, and drug susceptibility testing. There are three types of cell-based reporter systems that express certain reporter protein for positive-sense single strand RNA virus infections. The first type is classical reporter system, which relies on recombinant virus, reporter virus particle, or subgenomic replicon. During infection with the recombinant virus or reporter virus particle, the reporter protein is expressed and can be detected in real time in a dose-dependent manner. Using subgenomic replicon, which are genetically engineered viral RNA molecules that are capable of replication but incapable of producing virions, the translation and replication of the replicon could be tracked by the accumulation of reporter protein. The second type of reporter system involves genetically engineered cells bearing virus-specific protease cleavage sequences, which can sense the incoming viral protease. The third type is based on viral replicase, which can report the specific virus infection via detection of the incoming viral replicase. This review specifically focuses on the major technical breakthroughs in the design of cell-based reporter systems and the application of these systems to the further understanding and control of viruses over the past few decades. PMID:26728654

  15. BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after pediatric stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Beom; Cho, Bin; Kang, Jin Han

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common stem cell transplantation-related complication. The incidence of early-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is related to the pretransplant conditioning regimen, has decreased with the concomitant use of mesna and hyperhydration. However, late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is usually caused by the BK virus, continues to develop. Although the BK virus is the most common pathogenic microorganism of poststem cell transplantation late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, pediatricians outside the hemato-oncology and nephrology specialties tend to be unfamiliar with hemorrhagic cystitis and the BK virus. Moreover, no standard guidelines for the early diagnosis and treatment of BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after stem cell transplantation have been established. Here, we briefly introduce poststem cell transplantation BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis.

  16. [Study on the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin-Jun; Shen, Xin-Xin; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Hao; Wang, Li-Hua; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2014-05-01

    To study the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein, peptides were synthesized according to the amino acid sequences of B cell linear epitopes. Linear epitopes predicted by bioinformatics analysis were evaluated with immunological techniques. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that titers of antibodies to peptides (355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein) were above 1:12 800 in mouse sera. The antibodies recognized denatured rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in Western blot analysis. Purified anti-peptide antibodies recognized natural rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in BHK-21 cells in indirect fluorescent antibody test. The 355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein were validated as B cell linear epitopes.

  17. A novel, cell-specific attenuation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kienzle, T E; Chen, T M; Mrak, R E; Stroop, W G

    2001-04-01

    We have observed a cell-specific attenuation of herpes simplex virus type 1 strain 17syn+ in vivo that was dependent upon the cell type used to grow the virus. Direct corneal infection of rabbits with 17syn+ propagated in Vero cells caused 60% (6 of 10) to develop severe central nervous system (CNS) disease as evidenced by seizures and/or paralysis; all neurologically impaired rabbits died. In contrast, infection of rabbits with 17syn+ propagated in BHK-21 cells induced seizures and was fatal in 10% (1 of 10). The cell-specific attenuation of a 17syn+ occurred after one growth cycle in BHK-21 cells. To determine whether the decreased virulence of the BHK-21 cell-grown virus correlated with a less severe CNS inflammatory reaction, CNS tissues from rabbits infected with 17syn+ grown in Vero and BHK-21 cells were compared. Histopathological analyses revealed no differences in the location or severity of inflammatory lesions from rabbits infected with virus grown in either cell type. Virus-induced corneal disease was less dependent upon the cell type used to propagate the virus as there were no significant differences in the type or severity of observed corneal lesions. Possible explanations based on differences between Vero and BHK-21 cells are discussed.

  18. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  19. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  20. Micro-Raman spectroscopy study of ALVAC virus infected chicken embryo cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Hu, Ningjie; Dykes, Ava C.; Yu, Qigui; Zinin, Pavel V.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Micro- Raman spectroscopic investigation of ALVAC virus and of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells and the cells infected with ALVAC virus labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) were performed with a 785 nm laser. Good quality Micro-Raman spectra of the Alvac II virus were obtained. These spectra show that the ALVAC II virus contains buried tyrosine residues and the coat protein of the virus has α-helical structure. A comparison of Raman spectra of normal and virus infected chicken embryo fibroblast cells revealed that the virus infected cells show additional bands at 535, 928, and 1091 cm-1, respectively, corresponding to δ(C-O-C) glycosidic ring, protein α-helix, and DNA (O-P-O) modes. In addition, the tyrosine resonance double (833 and 855 cm-1) shows reversal in the intensity of the higher-frequency band as compared to the normal cells that can be used to identify the infected cells. In the C-H stretching region, the infected cells show bands with higher intensity as compared to that of the corresponding bands in the normal cells. We also found that the presence of GFP does not affect the Raman spectra of samples when using a 785 nm micro-Raman system because the green fluorescence wavelength of GFP is well below the Stokes-Raman shifted spectral region.

  1. Follicular dendritic cells and human immunodeficiency virus infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Sonya L.; Tew, J. Grant; Tew, John G.; Szakal, Andras K.; Burton, Gregory F.

    1995-10-01

    LARGE amounts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) localize on follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in the follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues following viral infection1,2. During clinical latency, active viral infection occurs primarily at these sites3,4. As HIV on FDC is in the form of immune complexes5, some of which may be formed with neutralizing antibody, we investigated whether HIV on FDC is infectious. We report here that HIV on FDC is highly infectious. Furthermore, FDC can convert neutralized HIV into an infectious form even in the presence of a vast excess of neutralizing antibody. Thus FDC may provide a mechanism whereby HIV infection can continue in the presence of neutralizing antibody.

  2. STUDIES OF THE HEMOLYSIS OF RED BLOOD CELLS BY MUMPS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Soule, David W.; Marinetti, Guido V.; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1959-01-01

    Hemolysis of chicken red blood cells by mumps virus is associated with the release of sphingomyelin from the stromal lipoprotein and the destruction of 65 per cent of the sphingomyelin of the red cell stroma. However, the virus had no effect on isolated phosphatides extracted from the erythrocytes. The hemolytic action of the virus and changes in sphingomyelin content of the erythrocytes fail to occur at a pH of 6.0. The viral hemolysis of human erythrocytes is not associated with similar alterations in their content of sphingomyelin. The absence of lecithin from sheep erythrocytes, which are also lysed by mumps virus, is additional evidence that a viral lecithinase is not associated with the hemolytic property of mumps virus. Mumps virus concentrated from the amniotic fluid of viral infected chick embryos contains about 7 per cent phosphatide, 60 per cent of which is sphingomyelin. PMID:13664871

  3. Cell autonomous regulation of herpes and influenza virus infection by the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Rachel S; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Nagy, Andras D; Nicoll, Michael P; Efstathiou, Stacey; O'Neill, John S; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-09-01

    Viruses are intracellular pathogens that hijack host cell machinery and resources to replicate. Rather than being constant, host physiology is rhythmic, undergoing circadian (∼24 h) oscillations in many virus-relevant pathways, but whether daily rhythms impact on viral replication is unknown. We find that the time of day of host infection regulates virus progression in live mice and individual cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpes and influenza A virus infections are enhanced when host circadian rhythms are abolished by disrupting the key clock gene transcription factor Bmal1. Intracellular trafficking, biosynthetic processes, protein synthesis, and chromatin assembly all contribute to circadian regulation of virus infection. Moreover, herpesviruses differentially target components of the molecular circadian clockwork. Our work demonstrates that viruses exploit the clockwork for their own gain and that the clock represents a novel target for modulating viral replication that extends beyond any single family of these ubiquitous pathogens.

  4. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    PubMed

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones.

  5. Apiology: royal secrets in the queen's fat body.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B

    2011-07-12

    Royalactin, a component of royal jelly, induces queen differentiation in honeybees. Surprisingly, royalactin has a similar effect on growth in fruit flies, highlighting many unexpected features of growth regulation by the insect fat tissue.

  6. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Charles F; Acosta, André L; Dorneles, Andressa L; Dos Santos, Patrick D S; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-08-17

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies.

  7. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Charles F.; Acosta, André L.; Dorneles, Andressa L.; dos Santos, Patrick D. S.; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-01-01

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies. PMID:27530246

  8. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Queens County, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Queens County, NY AGENCY: Federal Highway... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Bridge Rehabilitation and Interchange Improvements Project... considered will not have a significant impact on the environment. To address these bridge conditions,...

  9. A Critical Look at the Queen Bee Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Jane; Kushner, Richard

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the popular "Queen Bee" stereotype of successful female executives, and concludes that the stereotype is too narrow in focus and fails to take into account complex psychological and experiential variables. (Author/EJT)

  10. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Charles F; Acosta, André L; Dorneles, Andressa L; Dos Santos, Patrick D S; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-01-01

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies. PMID:27530246

  11. Salmonid fish viruses and cell interactions at early steps of the infective cycle.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, A I; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, S; Pérez-Prieto, S I

    2008-07-01

    A flow cytometric virus-binding assay that directly visualizes the binding and entry of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and virus haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) to several cell lines was established. The highest efficiency of binding was shown by the BF-2 cell line and this was used to study, at the attachment level, the interactions of these cells with salmonid fish viruses in coinfections, and to further determine if the earliest stage of the viral growth cycle could explain the previously described loss of infectivity of IHNV when IPNV is present. Our results demonstrated that IPNV binds to around 88% of cells either in single or dual infections, whereas IHNV attachment always decreased in the presence of any of the other viruses. VHSV binding was not affected by IPNV, but coinfection with IHNV reduced the percentage of virus-binding cells, which suggests competition for viral receptors or co-receptors. Internalization of the adsorbed IHNV was not decreased by coinfection with IPNV, so the hypothetical competence could be restricted to the binding step. Treatment of the cells with antiviral agents, such as amantadine or chloroquine, did not affect the binding of IPNV and VHSV, but reduced IHNV binding by more than 30%. Tributylamine affected viral binding of the three viruses to different degrees and inhibited IPNV or IHNV entry in a large percentage of cells treated for 30 min. Tributylamine also inhibited IHNV cytopathic effects in a dose-dependent manner, decreasing the virus yield by 4 log of the 50% endpoint titre, at 10 mm concentration. IPNV was also inhibited, but at a lower level. The results of this study support the hypothesis that IHNV, in contrast to VHSV or IPNV, is less efficient at completing its growth cycle in cells with a simultaneous infection with IPNV. It can be affected at several stages of viral infection and is more sensitive to the action of antiviral compounds. PMID

  12. Chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus as a candidate dengue vaccine: quantitation of the dengue virus-specific CD8 T-cell response.

    PubMed

    van Der Most, R G; Murali-Krishna, K; Ahmed, R; Strauss, J H

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against DEN-2 virus challenge, indicating that protection was mediated by the DEN-2 virus prM- and E-specific immune responses. YF/DEN vaccine-primed CD8 T cells expanded and were efficiently recruited into the central nervous systems of DEN-2 virus challenged mice. At 5 days after challenge, 3 to 4% of CD8 T cells in the spleen were specific for the prM and E proteins, and 34% of CD8 T cells in the central nervous system recognized these proteins. Depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells, or both, strongly reduced the protective efficacy of the YF/DEN virus, stressing the key role of the antiviral T-cell response.

  13. Cell-mediated immune responses of lambs to challenge with bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A K; Woldehiwet, Z

    1995-01-01

    The lamb is a good model to study the pathogenesis and immune responses to infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as lambs experimentally infected with bovine or human RSV may develop overt clinical disease. In the present study the development of cellular cytotoxic responses was studied in splenic, pulmonary and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from lambs after primary and secondary infection with bovine RSV. Infection with bovine RSV was followed by the appearance of cytotoxic cells in the peripheral blood, the spleen and lung lavage fluids. These effector cells lysed virus-infected targets in a self-restricted manner. Depletion techniques revealed that cytotoxic activity was largely due to OvCD8+ cells. When effector cells obtained from primed lambs were stimulated with inactivated bovine RSV or with virus-infected cells in vitro, virus-specific cytotoxicity was significantly increased. PMID:7544251

  14. The Wnt pathway: a key network in cell signalling dysregulated by viruses.

    PubMed

    van Zuylen, Wendy J; Rawlinson, William D; Ford, Caroline E

    2016-09-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites dependent on host cells for survival. Viral infection of a cell activates a panel of pattern recognition receptors that mediate antiviral host responses to inhibit viral replication and dissemination. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to evade and subvert this antiviral host response, including encoding proteins that hijack, mimic and/or manipulate cellular processes such as the cell cycle, DNA damage repair, cellular metabolism and the host immune response. Currently, there is an increasing interest whether viral modulation of these cellular processes, including the cell cycle, contributes to cancer development. One cellular pathway related to cell cycle signalling is the Wnt pathway. This review focuses on the modulation of this pathway by human viruses, known to cause (or associated with) cancer development. The main mechanisms where viruses interact with the Wnt pathway appear to be through (i) epigenetic modification of Wnt genes; (ii) cellular or viral miRNAs targeting Wnt genes; (iii) altering specific Wnt pathway members, often leading to (iv) nuclear translocation of β-catenin and activation of Wnt signalling. Given that diverse viruses affect this signalling pathway, modulating Wnt signalling could be a generalised critical process for the initiation or maintenance of viral pathogenesis, with resultant dysregulation contributing to virus-induced cancers. Further study of this virus-host interaction may identify options for targeted therapy against Wnt signalling molecules as a means to reduce virus-induced pathogenesis and the downstream consequences of infection. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Wnt pathway: a key network in cell signalling dysregulated by viruses.

    PubMed

    van Zuylen, Wendy J; Rawlinson, William D; Ford, Caroline E

    2016-09-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites dependent on host cells for survival. Viral infection of a cell activates a panel of pattern recognition receptors that mediate antiviral host responses to inhibit viral replication and dissemination. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to evade and subvert this antiviral host response, including encoding proteins that hijack, mimic and/or manipulate cellular processes such as the cell cycle, DNA damage repair, cellular metabolism and the host immune response. Currently, there is an increasing interest whether viral modulation of these cellular processes, including the cell cycle, contributes to cancer development. One cellular pathway related to cell cycle signalling is the Wnt pathway. This review focuses on the modulation of this pathway by human viruses, known to cause (or associated with) cancer development. The main mechanisms where viruses interact with the Wnt pathway appear to be through (i) epigenetic modification of Wnt genes; (ii) cellular or viral miRNAs targeting Wnt genes; (iii) altering specific Wnt pathway members, often leading to (iv) nuclear translocation of β-catenin and activation of Wnt signalling. Given that diverse viruses affect this signalling pathway, modulating Wnt signalling could be a generalised critical process for the initiation or maintenance of viral pathogenesis, with resultant dysregulation contributing to virus-induced cancers. Further study of this virus-host interaction may identify options for targeted therapy against Wnt signalling molecules as a means to reduce virus-induced pathogenesis and the downstream consequences of infection. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27273590

  16. A fast track influenza virus vaccine produced in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Manon M J; Hashimoto, Yoshifumi

    2011-07-01

    The viral surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) has been recognized as a key antigen in the host response to influenza virus in both natural infection and vaccination because neutralizing antibodies directed against HA can mitigate or prevent infection. The baculovirus-insect cell system can be used for the production of recombinant HA molecules and is suitable for influenza vaccine production where annual adjustment of the vaccine is required. This expression system is generally considered safe with minimal potential for growth of human pathogens. Extensive characterization of this novel cell substrate has been performed, none of which has revealed the presence of adventitious agents. Multiple clinical studies have demonstrated that the vaccine is safe, well-tolerated and immunogenic. The baculovirus-insect cell system could, therefore, be used for the expedited production of a safe and efficacious influenza vaccine. As a result, this technology should provide a fast track worldwide solution for newly emerging influenza strains or pandemic preparedness within a few years. PMID:21784229

  17. Visualization of the African swine fever virus infection in living cells by incorporation into the virus particle of green fluorescent protein-p54 membrane protein chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Hernaez, Bruno . E-mail: hernaez@inia.es; Escribano, Jose M. . E-mail: escriban@inia.es; Alonso, Covadonga . E-mail: calonso@inia.es

    2006-06-20

    Many stages of African swine fever virus infection have not yet been studied in detail. To track the behavior of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in the infected cells in real time, we produced an infectious recombinant ASFV (B54GFP-2) that expresses and incorporates into the virus particle a chimera of the p54 envelope protein fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The incorporation of the fusion protein into the virus particle was confirmed immunologically and it was determined that p54-EGFP was fully functional by confirmation that the recombinant virus made normal-sized plaques and presented similar growth curves to the wild-type virus. The tagged virus was visualized as individual fluorescent particles during the first stages of infection and allowed to visualize the infection progression in living cells through the viral life cycle by confocal microscopy. In this work, diverse potential applications of B54GFP-2 to study different aspects of ASFV infection are shown. By using this recombinant virus it was possible to determine the trajectory and speed of intracellular virus movement. Additionally, we have been able to visualize for first time the ASFV factory formation dynamics and the cytophatic effect of the virus in live infected cells. Finally, we have analyzed virus progression along the infection cycle and infected cell death as time-lapse animations.

  18. Invariant NKT Cells Regulate the CD8 T Cell Response during Theiler's Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Lennart T.; Mas, Magali; Beaudoin, Lucie; Bauer, Jan; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Lehuen, Agnès; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Liblau, Roland S.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are innate lymphocytes with a broad tissue distribution. Here we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the central nervous system (CNS) in the absence of inflammation. Their presence in the CNS dramatically augments following inoculation of C57Bl/6 mice with the neurotropic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). At the peak of inflammation the cellular infiltrate comprises 45 000 iNKT cells for 1 250 CD8 T cells specific for the immunodominant TMEV epitope. To study the interaction between these two T cell subsets, we infected both iNKT cell deficient Jα18-/- mice and iNKT cell enriched Vα14 transgenic mice with TMEV. The CD8 T cell response readily cleared TMEV infection in the iNKT cell deficient mice. However, in the iNKT cell enriched mice TMEV infection persisted and was associated with significant mortality. This was caused by the inhibition of the CD8 T cell response in the cervical lymph nodes and spleen after T cell priming. Taken together we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the CNS in the absence of inflammation and that their enrichment is associated with the inhibition of the anti-viral CD8 T cell response and an augmented mortality during acute encephalomyelitis. PMID:24498175

  19. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Poehlmann, Stefan

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.

  20. Identification of a sarcoma virus-coded phosphoprotein in nonproducer cells transformed by Kirsten or Harvey murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Shih, T Y; Weeks, M O; Young, H A; Scholnick, E M

    1979-07-15

    A similar protein of 21,000 MW (p21) coded for by Harvey or Kirsten murine sarcoma virus has been identified in nonproducer cells transformed by these two viruses. Antisera prepared from rats bearing tumors induced by syngeneic transplantation of NRK cells transformed by Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MuSV) specifically precipitated the Ha-MuSV p21 from a nonproducer Balb/c mouse cell and a nonproducer dog cell transformed by Ha-MuSV. The same antisera also precipitated a similar protein, Ki-MuSV p21, from a nonproducer mink cell transformed by Kirsten murine sarcoma virus (Ki-MuSV). Both the p21 of Ha-MuSV and of Ki-MuSV are phosphoproteins. Previous studies have reported a virus-specific p21 polypeptide from translation of Ha-MuSV RNA in cell-free protein synthesis systems (W. P. Parks and E. M. Scolnick, 1977, J. Virol. 22, 711-719; T. Y. Shih, D. R. Williams, M. O. Weeks, J. M. Maryak, W. C. Vass, and E. M. Scolnick, 1978, J. Virol 27, 45-55). This p21 protein was specifically precipitated by the same anti-tumor sera. Similarly, a p21 polypeptide translated from Ki-MuSV RNA was also specifically precipitated by the antitumor sera. Therefore, it is concluded that the p21 of Ha-MuSV and Ki-MuSV are homologous proteins coded for bv homologous sequences found in the recombinant genomes of Ha-MuSV and Ki-MuSV.

  1. Simian virus 40-permissive cell interactions: selection and characterization of spontaneously arising monkey cells that are resistant to simian virus 40 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J H; DePamphilis, M; Berg, P

    1976-01-01

    A fraction of permissive cells survive simian virus 40 (SV40) infection. The frequency of such surviving cells depends only upon the concentration of infecting virus, both parental and progeny, to which the cells are exposed during the course of selection. Surviving clones, which can be freed of virus by cloning in the presence of SV40 antiserum, are indistinguishable from parental cells in their growth of characteristics and display no SV40 antigen; thus they are not transformed. Most surviving clones are less than 10% as susceptible as parental cells to SV40 infection; 5 to 10% are less than 1% as susceptible. None of these SV40-resistant clones is absolutely resistant to SV40 infection. Analysis of 16 independently arising resistant clones indicates that they all block SV40 infection at an early stage after adsorption and eclipse but before full uncoating. Viral mutants have been isolated that partially overcome the block to infection in these cells; these host range viruses plaque on resistant lines fivefold more efficiently than wild-type SV40 and have a characteristic plaque morphology. Fluctuation analysis indicates that resistant cells arise spontaneously during the growth of normally susceptible permissive cells. Thus, SV40-resistant cells are selected for, not induced by, SV40 infection. Images PMID:185424

  2. Social context predicts recognition systems in ant queens.

    PubMed

    Dreier, S; D'Ettorre, P

    2009-03-01

    Recognition of group-members is a key feature of sociality. Ants use chemical communication to discriminate nestmates from intruders, enhancing kin cooperation and preventing parasitism. The recognition code is embedded in their cuticular chemical profile, which typically varies between colonies. We predicted that ants might be capable of accurate recognition in unusual situations when few individuals interact repeatedly, as new colonies started by two to three queens. Individual recognition would be favoured by selection when queens establish dominance hierarchies, because repeated fights for dominance are costly; but it would not evolve in absence of hierarchies. We previously showed that Pachycondyla co-founding queens, which form dominance hierarchies, have accurate individual recognition based on chemical cues. Here, we used the ant Lasius niger to test the null hypothesis that individual recognition does not occur when co-founding queens do not establish dominance hierarchies. Indeed, L. niger queens show a similar level of aggression towards both co-foundresses and intruders, indicating that they are unable of individual recognition, contrary to Pachycondyla. Additionally, the variation in chemical profiles of Lasius and Pachycondyla queens is comparable, thus informational constraints are unlikely to apply. We conclude that selection pressure from the social context is of crucial significance for the sophistication of recognition systems.

  3. Asexual queen succession in the higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus

    PubMed Central

    Fougeyrollas, Romain; Dolejšová, Klára; Sillam-Dussès, David; Roy, Virginie; Poteaux, Chantal; Hanus, Robert; Roisin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Asexual queen succession (AQS), in which workers, soldiers and dispersing reproductives are produced sexually while numerous non-dispersing queens arise through thelytokous parthenogenesis, has recently been described in three species of lower termites of the genus Reticulitermes. Here, we show that AQS is not an oddity restricted to a single genus of lower termites, but a more widespread strategy occurring also in the most advanced termite group, the higher termites (Termitidae). We analysed the genetic structure in 10 colonies of the Neotropical higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus (Syntermitinae) using five newly developed polymorphic microsatellite loci. The colonies contained one primary king accompanied either by a single primary queen or by up to almost 200 neotenic queens. While the workers, the soldiers and most future dispersing reproductives were produced sexually, the non-dispersing neotenic queens originated through thelytokous parthenogenesis of the founding primary queen. Surprisingly, the mode of thelytoky observed in E. neotenicus is most probably automixis with central fusion, contrasting with the automixis with terminal fusion documented in Reticulitermes. The occurrence of AQS based on different mechanisms of ploidy restoration raises the hypothesis of an independent evolutionary origin of this unique reproductive strategy in individual lineages of lower and higher termites. PMID:26019158

  4. Asexual queen succession in the higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus.

    PubMed

    Fougeyrollas, Romain; Dolejšová, Klára; Sillam-Dussès, David; Roy, Virginie; Poteaux, Chantal; Hanus, Robert; Roisin, Yves

    2015-06-22

    Asexual queen succession (AQS), in which workers, soldiers and dispersing reproductives are produced sexually while numerous non-dispersing queens arise through thelytokous parthenogenesis, has recently been described in three species of lower termites of the genus Reticulitermes. Here, we show that AQS is not an oddity restricted to a single genus of lower termites, but a more widespread strategy occurring also in the most advanced termite group, the higher termites (Termitidae). We analysed the genetic structure in 10 colonies of the Neotropical higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus (Syntermitinae) using five newly developed polymorphic microsatellite loci. The colonies contained one primary king accompanied either by a single primary queen or by up to almost 200 neotenic queens. While the workers, the soldiers and most future dispersing reproductives were produced sexually, the non-dispersing neotenic queens originated through thelytokous parthenogenesis of the founding primary queen. Surprisingly, the mode of thelytoky observed in E. neotenicus is most probably automixis with central fusion, contrasting with the automixis with terminal fusion documented in Reticulitermes. The occurrence of AQS based on different mechanisms of ploidy restoration raises the hypothesis of an independent evolutionary origin of this unique reproductive strategy in individual lineages of lower and higher termites.

  5. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  6. A model for persistent infection with Epstein-Barr virus: the stealth virus of human B cells.

    PubMed

    Thorley-Lawson, D A; Babcock, G J

    1999-01-01

    Most adult humans are infected benignly and for life with the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus. EBV has been a focus of research because of its status as a candidate tumor virus for a number of lymphomas and carcinomas. In vitro EBV has the ability to establish a latent infection in proliferating B lymphoblasts. This is the only system available for studying human herpesvirus latency in culture and has been extremely useful for elucidating how EBV promotes cellular growth. However, to understand how EBV survives in the healthy host and what goes awry, leading to disease, it is essential to know how EBV establishes and maintains a persistent infection in vivo. Early studies on the mechanism of EBV persistence produced inconclusive and often contradictory results because the techniques available were crude and insensitive. Recent advances in PCR technology and the application of sophisticated cell fractionation techniques have now provided new insights into the behavior of the virus. Most dramatically it has been shown that EBV in vivo does not establish latency in a proliferating lymphoblast, but in a resting memory B cell. The contrasting behaviors of being able to establish a latent infection in proliferating B blasts and resting memory B cells can be resolved in terms of a model where EBV performs its complete life cycle in B lymphocytes. The virus achieves this not by disrupting normal B cell biology but by using it.

  7. Avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-receptor interactions: From classical genetics to novel insights into virus-cell membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.J.O.; Elleder, D.; Young, J.A.T. . E-mail: jyoung@salk.edu

    2006-01-05

    For over 40 years, avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV)-receptor interactions have been employed as a useful model system to study the mechanism of retroviral entry into cells. Pioneering studies on this system focused upon the genetic basis of the differential susceptibilities of different lines of chickens to infection by distinct subgroups of ASLV. These studies led to the definition of three distinct autosomal recessive genes that were predicted to encode cellular receptors for different viral subgroups. They also led to the concept of viral interference, i.e. the mechanism by which infection by one virus can render cells resistant to reinfection by other viruses that use the same cellular receptor. Here, we review the contributions that analyses of the ASLV-receptor system have made in unraveling the mechanisms of retroviral entry into cells and focus on key findings such as identification and characterization of the ASLV receptor genes and the subsequent elucidation of an unprecedented mechanism of virus-cell fusion. Since many of the initial findings on this system were published in the early volumes of Virology, this subject is especially well suited to this special anniversary issue of the journal.

  8. Evidence that the respiratory syncytial virus polymerase complex associates with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells: a proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Pitt, Andrew R.; Brown, Gaie; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-12-05

    The interaction between the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) polymerase complex and lipid rafts was examined in HEp2 cells. Lipid-raft membranes were prepared from virus-infected cells and their protein content was analysed by Western blotting and mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed the presence of the N, P, L, M2-1 and M proteins. However, these proteins appeared to differ from one another in their association with these structures, with the M2-1 protein showing a greater partitioning into raft membranes compared to that of the N, P or M proteins. Determination of the polymerase activity profile of the gradient fractions revealed that 95% of the detectable viral enzyme activity was associated with lipid-raft membranes. Furthermore, analysis of virus-infected cells by confocal microscopy suggested an association between these proteins and the raft-lipid, GM1. Together, these results provide evidence that the RSV polymerase complex is able to associate with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells.

  9. The effect of avian influenza virus NS1 allele on virus replication and innate gene expression in avian cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean; Xing, Zheng; Li, Jinling; Mendoza, Kristelle; Perez, Daniel; Reed, Kent; Cardona, Carol

    2013-12-01

    The NS1 gene encoded by Type A influenza virus circulates as two alleles, the A and B allele. The immunomodulatory properties of the NS1 A allele have been thoroughly examined; however, comparisons of allele function have been predominantly made in mammalian systems. Here we show that counter to the current understanding of allele function in mammals, the two alleles similarly regulate elements of the type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway, including the interferon-inducible genes Mx and 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase (2'-5' OAS), and IL-6, which share the same induction pathway as the interferons in embryo fibroblasts from chickens, turkeys or ducks. Replication of two reassortant viruses demonstrated that the B allele virus replicates more and to higher titers than the A allele virus in duck cells; however, the A allele virus replicates more in the cells from chickens and turkeys. Finally, chimeric constructs were used to identify a region of the NS1 gene that conferred the statistically significant differences in expression and replication observed between the alleles.

  10. Theiler's virus infection in nude mice: viral RNA in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1988-01-01

    Infection of athymic (nu/nu) mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in an acute encephalitis which resembles poliomyelitis. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to delineate the presence of viral proteins and RNA in the nervous systems of nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's virus. This system permits the analysis of a viral infection in the absence of an effective immune response. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigen was found in the processes and cell bodies of neurons and glial cells. Besides the presence of viral antigen in these cell types, by in situ hybridization, Theiler's virus RNA was also found in cells associated with vascular endothelium in the brains and spinal cords of these infected mice. Theiler's virus RNA-positive endothelial cells were observed not only near the primary lesions but also away from demonstrable lesions in normal-appearing regions in the central nervous system. Earlier work had suggested an intra-axonal dissemination for this virus (M. C. Dal Canto and H. L. Lipton, Am. J. Pathol. 106:20-29, 1982). Our findings are consistent with this model but also suggest an additional mechanism for virus spread within the central nervous system, i.e., by infecting vascular cells and crossing the blood-brain barrier. Lastly, after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection, not only glial cells but also endothelial cells express major histocompatibility complex class II (la) antigen on their surface (M. Rodriguez, M. L. Pierce, and E. A. Howie, J. Immunol. 138:3438-3442, 1987). Our demonstration of Theiler's virus-infected endotheliumlike cells may explain interactions of virus products in stimulating antigen presentation. Images PMID:2843661

  11. Theiler's virus infection in nude mice: viral RNA in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1988-10-01

    Infection of athymic (nu/nu) mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in an acute encephalitis which resembles poliomyelitis. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to delineate the presence of viral proteins and RNA in the nervous systems of nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's virus. This system permits the analysis of a viral infection in the absence of an effective immune response. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigen was found in the processes and cell bodies of neurons and glial cells. Besides the presence of viral antigen in these cell types, by in situ hybridization, Theiler's virus RNA was also found in cells associated with vascular endothelium in the brains and spinal cords of these infected mice. Theiler's virus RNA-positive endothelial cells were observed not only near the primary lesions but also away from demonstrable lesions in normal-appearing regions in the central nervous system. Earlier work had suggested an intra-axonal dissemination for this virus (M. C. Dal Canto and H. L. Lipton, Am. J. Pathol. 106:20-29, 1982). Our findings are consistent with this model but also suggest an additional mechanism for virus spread within the central nervous system, i.e., by infecting vascular cells and crossing the blood-brain barrier. Lastly, after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection, not only glial cells but also endothelial cells express major histocompatibility complex class II (la) antigen on their surface (M. Rodriguez, M. L. Pierce, and E. A. Howie, J. Immunol. 138:3438-3442, 1987). Our demonstration of Theiler's virus-infected endotheliumlike cells may explain interactions of virus products in stimulating antigen presentation.

  12. Mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to necrosis in NSCLC cells treated with oncolytic measles virus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Jiang, Aiqin; Chen, Aiping; Dahlhaus, Meike; Gonzalez, Patrick; Beltinger, Christian; Wei, Jiwu

    2014-06-15

    Although apoptotic phenomena have been observed in malignant cells infected by measles virus vaccine strain Edmonston B (MV-Edm), the precise oncolytic mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we found that MV-Edm induced autophagy and sequestosome 1-mediated mitophagy leading to decreased cytochrome c release, which blocked the pro-apoptotic cascade in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). The decrease of apoptosis by mitophagy favored viral replication. Persistent viral replication sustained by autophagy ultimately resulted in necrotic cell death due to ATP depletion. Importantly, when autophagy was impaired in NSCLCs MV-Edm-induced cell death was significantly abrogated despite of increased apoptosis. Taken together, our results define a novel oncolytic mechanism by which mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to more efficient necrosis in NSCLCs following MV-Edm infection. This provides a foundation for future improvement of oncolytic virotherapy or antiviral therapy.

  13. Inability to detect human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2-specific antibodies in a patient coinfected with HIV-1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2, and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele; Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Sato, Neuza Satomi; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Arilson Akira

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and can cause chronic infections in the host. Usually, the diagnosis of such viruses employs serological assays; however, some difficulties in confirming HTLV-2 infection have been reported in high-risk populations in Brazil. We present data of an unusual case of coinfection with HIV-1, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HCV in a male IDU in which HTLV-2 was detected only by molecular assays. Comparative analysis of retroviruses from 2002 and 2012 showed identical HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 sequences (LTR, env, and tax), and a change in HIV-1 tropism from CXCR4 to CCR5. No mutation was detected in the hot points of the env region of the HTLV-2 isolate that justified the lack of rgp46-II-specific antibodies. These data emphasize the need for molecular assays to diagnose HTLV-2 in high-risk populations in Brazil.

  14. Inability to Detect Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2-Specific Antibodies in a Patient Coinfected with HIV-1, Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1, Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2, and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Sato, Neuza Satomi; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Arilson Akira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and can cause chronic infections in the host. Usually, the diagnosis of such viruses employs serological assays; however, some difficulties in confirming HTLV-2 infection have been reported in high-risk populations in Brazil. We present data of an unusual case of coinfection with HIV-1, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HCV in a male IDU in which HTLV-2 was detected only by molecular assays. Comparative analysis of retroviruses from 2002 and 2012 showed identical HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 sequences (LTR, env, and tax), and a change in HIV-1 tropism from CXCR4 to CCR5. No mutation was detected in the hot points of the env region of the HTLV-2 isolate that justified the lack of rgp46-II-specific antibodies. These data emphasize the need for molecular assays to diagnose HTLV-2 in high-risk populations in Brazil. PMID:23875602

  15. Creation and characterization of a cell-death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhilei; Simeon, Rudo; Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Rice, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes the creation and characterization of a hepatoma cell line, n4mBid, that supports all stages of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle and strongly reports HCV infection by a cell-death phenotype. The n4mBid cell line is derived from the highly HCV-permissive Huh-7.5 hepatoma cell line and contains a modified Bid protein (mBid) that is cleaved and activated by the HCV serine protease NS3-4A. N4mBid exhibited a 10–20 fold difference in cell viability between the HCV-infected and mock-infected states, while the parental Huh-7.5 cells showed <2 fold difference under the same conditions. The pronounced difference in n4mBid cell viability between the HCV- and mock-infected states in a 96-well plate format points to its usefulness in cell survival-based high-throughput screens for anti-HCV molecules. The degree of cell death was found to be proportional to the intracellular load of HCV. HCV-low n4mBid cells, expressing an anti-HCV short hairpin RNA, showed a significant growth advantage over naïve cells and could be rapidly enriched after HCV infection, suggesting the possibility of using n4mBid cells for the cell survival-based selection of genetic anti-HCV factors. PMID:20188762

  16. Application of immunoassay of encephalomyocarditis virus in cell culture with enzyme-labeled virus-specific monoclonal antibodies for rapid detection of virus, neutralizing antibodies, and interferon.

    PubMed

    Vlaspolder, F; Harmsen, T; van Veenendaal, D; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1988-12-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)-specific monoclonal antibody UM 21.1 labeled with horseradish peroxidase was used to detect EMCV in L-cell monolayers. This direct enzyme immunoassay of EMCV, performed in wells of 96-well plates, could be applied for various purposes, such as early detection of virus multiplication, determination of 50% tissue culture infective doses, and rapid titration of interferon and EMCV-neutralizing antibodies. Multiplication of EMCV is indicated by a rapid increase of the absorbance values measured against EMCV-infected L cells starting as early as 4.5 h after virus inoculation. The early rise of absorbance (i.e., virus multiplication) is inhibited by interferon, allowing its rapid titration. Preincubation of the virus inoculum with neutralizing antibodies also yielded decreased absorbance values. With the latter enzyme immunoassay for neutralizing antibodies, performed after an infection period of 8 h, antibody titers measured were comparable to those obtained with a conventional plaque reduction test. We assume that similar assays could be developed for other picornaviruses (e.g., polioviruses).

  17. Evaluation of cytokine gene expression after avian influenza virus infection in avian cell lines and primary cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The innate immune responses elicited by avian influenza virus (AIV) infection has been studied by measuring cytokine gene expression by relative real time PCR (rRT-PCR) in vitro, using both cell lines and primary cell cultures. Continuous cell lines offer advantages over the use of primary cell cult...

  18. Cytotoxic T cells against herpes simplex virus in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, K; Kahan, A; Ayed, K; Hamza, M

    1990-01-01

    Lymphocytes from 36 patients with Behçet's disease (20 in remission and 16 in active phase) were stimulated in vitro with herpes simplex virus and then tested for their ability to generate cytotoxic T cell responses to the virus. Significant cytotoxic responses were found. CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations from the patients in remission generated specific cytotoxic activity against autologous target cells. These observations suggested that CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells may have an important host response in herpes virus infection in Behçet's disease. PMID:2168823

  19. Impaired antiviral response of adenovirus-transformed cell lines supports virus replication.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Mandy; Breitwieser, Theresa; Lipps, Christoph; Wirth, Dagmar; Jordan, Ingo; Reichl, Udo; Frensing, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the innate immune response represents one of the most important cellular mechanisms to limit virus replication and spread in cell culture. Here, we examined the effect of adenoviral gene expression on the antiviral response in adenovirus-transformed cell lines; HEK293, HEK293SF and AGE1.HN. We demonstrate that the expression of the early region protein 1A in these cell lines impairs their ability to activate antiviral genes by the IFN pathway. This property may help in the isolation of newly emerging viruses and the propagation of interferon-sensitive virus strains.

  20. Infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Vydelingum, S; Ilonen, J; Salonen, R; Marusyk, R; Salmi, A

    1989-01-01

    A stable temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus (MV ts38) was used to study the mechanism of virus-mediated immune suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures released infectious virus at 32 degrees C, whereas no virus was released at 37 degrees C, although both viral RNA and viral proteins were synthesized. However, the response of the lymphoid cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and herpes simplex virus antigen was decreased in the presence of MV ts38 at 37 degrees C. The viability of infected cells was not diminished, therefore excluding cell death as a reason for immunosuppression. Interleukin 2 did not play a role in the inhibitory effect of MV ts38. Antibodies to alpha interferon partially reversed the inhibitory effect of the virus infection on lymphocyte mitogenesis, thus implying that alpha interferon plays a role in the immunosuppression. Depletion experiments indicated that adherent cells play a greater role in the measles virus-induced immunosuppression than nonadherent cells. However, monocyte maturation to macrophages had no effect on the degree of immunosuppression. Images PMID:2911119

  1. Identification of gene biomarkers for respiratory synctial virus infection in a bronchical epithelial cell line

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection involves complex virus-host interplay. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in RSV-infected BEAS-2B cells to discover novel signaling pathways and biomarkers. We hybridized RNAs from RSV- or vehicle-treated BEAS-2B to ...

  2. Virus-host interactions in persistently FMDV-infected cells derived from bovine pharynx

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) produces a disease in cattle characterized by vesicular lesions and a persistent infection with asymptomatic low-level production of virus. Here we describe the establishment of a persistently infected primary cell culture derived from bovine pharynx tissue (PBPT)...

  3. The haemagglutinin protein is an important determinant of measles virus tropism for dendritic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ohgimoto, S; Ohgimoto, K; Niewiesk, S; Klagge, I M; Pfeuffer, J; Johnston, I C; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Weidmann, A; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    2001-08-01

    Recombinant measles viruses (MV) in which the authentic glycoprotein genes encoding the fusion and the haemagglutinin (H) proteins of the Edmonston (ED) vaccine strains were swapped singly or doubly for the corresponding genes of a lymphotropic MV wild-type virus (strain WTF) were used previously to investigate MV tropism in cell lines in tissue culture. When these recombinants and their parental strains, the molecular ED-based clone (ED-tag) and WTF, were used to infect cotton rats, only viruses expressing the MV WTF H protein replicated in secondary lymphatic tissues and caused significant immunosuppression. In vitro, viruses containing the ED H protein revealed a tropism for human peripheral blood lymphocytes as documented by enhanced binding and virus production, whereas those containing the WTF H protein replicated well in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DC). This did not correlate with more efficient binding of these viruses to DC, but with an enhancement of uptake, virus spread, accumulation of viral antigens and virus production. Thus, replacement of the ED H protein with WTF H protein was sufficient to confer the DC tropism of WTF to ED-tag in vitro. This study suggests that the MV H protein plays an important role in determining cell tropism to immune cells and this may play an important role in the induction of immunosuppression in vivo. PMID:11457989

  4. Transcriptomic response to injury sheds light on the physiological costs of reproduction in ant queens.

    PubMed

    von Wyschetzki, Katharina; Lowack, Helena; Heinze, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    The trade-off between reproduction and longevity is widespread among multicellular organisms. As an important exception, the reproductive females of perennial social insects (ants, honeybees, termites) are simultaneously highly fertile and very long-lived relative to their nonreproductive nestmates. The observation that increased fecundity is not coupled with decreased lifespan suggests that social insect queens do not have to reallocate resources between reproduction and self-maintenance. If queens have to compensate for the costs of reproduction on the level of the individual, the activation of other energy-demanding physiological processes might force them to reduce the production of eggs. To test this hypothesis in ant queens, we increased immunity costs by injury and measured the effect of this treatment on egg-laying rates and genomewide gene expression. Amputation of both middle legs led to a temporary decrease in egg-laying rates and affected the expression of 947 genes corresponding to 9% of the transcriptome. The changes comprised the upregulation of the immune and wound healing response on the one hand, and the downregulation of germ cell development, central nervous system development and learning ability on the other hand. Injury strongly influenced metabolism by inducing catabolism and repressing amino acid and nitrogen compound metabolism. By comparing our results to similar transcriptomic studies in insects, we found a highly consistent upregulation of immune genes due to sterile and septic wounding. The gene expression changes, complemented by the temporary decline of egg-laying rates, clearly reveal a trade-off between reproduction and the immune response in social insect queens. PMID:26880273

  5. DESC1 and MSPL Activate Influenza A Viruses and Emerging Coronaviruses for Host Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Pawel; Blazejewska, Paulina; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Welsch, Kathrin; Nehlmeier, Inga; Wu, Qingyu; Schneider, Heike; Bertram, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates the influenza virus and coronavirus surface proteins. Expression of TMPRSS2 is essential for the spread and pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza viruses in mice. In contrast, H3N2 viruses are less dependent on TMPRSS2 for viral amplification, suggesting that these viruses might employ other TTSPs for their activation. Here, we analyzed TTSPs, reported to be expressed in the respiratory system, for the ability to activate influenza viruses and coronaviruses. We found that MSPL and, to a lesser degree, DESC1 are expressed in human lung tissue and cleave and activate the spike proteins of the Middle East respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion. In addition, we show that these proteases support the spread of all influenza virus subtypes previously pandemic in humans. In sum, we identified two host cell proteases that could promote the amplification of influenza viruses and emerging coronaviruses in humans and might constitute targets for antiviral intervention. IMPORTANCE Activation of influenza viruses by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity and the enzymes responsible are potential targets for antiviral intervention. The present study demonstrates that two cellular serine proteases, DESC1 and MSPL, activate influenza viruses and emerging coronaviruses in cell culture and, because of their expression in human lung tissue, might promote viral spread in the infected host. Antiviral strategies aiming to prevent viral activation might thus need to encompass inhibitors targeting MSPL and DESC1. PMID:25122802

  6. Eddies off the Queen Charlotte Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The bright red, green, and turquoise patches to the west of British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands and Alaska's Alexander Archipelago highlight the presence of biological activity in the ocean. These colors indicate high concentrations of chlorophyll, the primary pigment found in phytoplankton. Notice that there are a number of eddies visible in the Pacific Ocean in this pseudo-color scene. The eddies are formed by strong outflow currents from rivers along North America's west coast that are rich in nutrients from the springtime snowmelt running off the mountains. This nutrient-rich water helps stimulate the phytoplankton blooms within the eddies. (For more details, read Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea.) To the west of the eddies in the water, another type of eddy-this one in the atmosphere-forms the clouds into the counterclockwise spiral characteristic of a low pressure system in the Northern Hemisphere. (Click on the image above to see it at full resolution; or click to see the scene in true-color.) The snow-covered mountains of British Columbia are visible in the upper righthand corner of the image. This scene was constructed using SeaWiFS data collected on June 13, 2002. SeaWiFS image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  7. The Role of B Cells for in Vivo T Cell Responses to a Friend Virus-Induced Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Kirk R.; Klarnet, Jay P.; Gieni, Randall S.; Hayglass, Kent T.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1990-08-01

    B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells and accessory cells for T cell responses. This study evaluated the role of B cells in the induction of protective T cell immunity to a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced leukemia (FBL). B cell-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor-specific CD4^+ helper and CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell responses after priming with FBL or a recombinant vaccinia virus containing F-MuLV antigens. Moreover, these mice had diminished T cell responses to the vaccinia viral antigens. Tumor-primed T cells transferred into B cell-deficient mice effectively eradicated disseminated FBL. Thus, B cells appear necessary for efficient priming but not expression of tumor and viral T cell immunity.

  8. Virion-associated HIV-1 Vpr: variable amount in virus particles derived from cells upon virus infection or proviral DNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Tungaturthi, P; Cartas, M; Tomkowicz, B; Rizvi, T A; Khan, S A; Kalyanaraman, V S; Srinivasan, A

    2001-04-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Vpr is a virion-associated protein implicated to have a role in AIDS pathogenesis. In regard to the amount of Vpr incorporated into virus particles, the published data vary widely. To address this, we quantitated Vpr in virus particles derived from diverse sources that are used to evaluate the biological effect of Vpr. Virus particles from infected cells showed only a small amount of Vpr. Interestingly, virus particles from cells cotransfected with HIV-1 proviral DNA lacking Vpr coding sequences (NLDeltaVpr) and a Vpr expression plasmid showed a drastic increase (29.4-fold) in the incorporation of Vpr. Furthermore, cotransfection involving NLDeltaVpr and different concentrations of Vpr expression plasmid resulted in virus particles containing Vpr in proportion to the Vpr expression plasmid used. The differences in virus particles with respect to Vpr as revealed by these studies should be taken into account in assessing the effect of Vpr.

  9. Shared alterations in NK cell frequency, phenotype, and function in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3- CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56(dim) cell fraction compared to CD56(bright) cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56(dim) NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections. PMID:16160163

  10. [Biochemical characteristics of a calf leukemia virus in chronically infected cells].

    PubMed

    Argirova, R

    1979-01-01

    Studied were the conditions of cultivation of FLK cells chronically infected with a calf leucosis virus. The gradient values of density were compared to those of the murine sarcoma virus--1.14--1.15 vs, 1.17--1.18/cm3. Established were the parameters of the reverse transcriptase reaction for the calf leukosis virus (Magnesium-dependent reverse transcriptase). Data showed that the calf leucosis virus may not resolutely be referred either to the B- or the the C-type of retroviruses. PMID:92095

  11. Quantitative analysis of virus and plasmid trafficking in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, Thibault; Dauty, Emmanuel; Holcman, David

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular transport of DNA carriers is a fundamental step of gene delivery. By combining both theoretical and numerical approaches we study here single and several viruses and DNA particles trafficking in the cell cytoplasm to a small nuclear pore. We present a physical model to account for certain aspects of cellular organization, starting with the observation that a viral trajectory consists of epochs of pure diffusion and epochs of active transport along microtubules. We define a general degradation rate to describe the limitations of the delivery of plasmid or viral particles to a nuclear pore imposed by various types of direct and indirect hydrolysis activity inside the cytoplasm. By replacing the switching dynamics by a single steady state stochastic description, we obtain estimates for the probability and the mean time for the first one of many particles to go from the cell membrane to a small nuclear pore. Computational simulations confirm that our model can be used to analyze and interpret viral trajectories and estimate quantitatively the success of nuclear delivery.

  12. Can thymic epithelial cells be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1?

    PubMed

    Moreira-Ramos, Klaysa; Castro, Flávia Madeira Monteiro de; Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Savino, Wilson

    2011-09-01

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is the cause of adult T cell leukaemias/lymphoma. Because thymic epithelial cells (TEC) express recently defined receptors for the virus, it seemed conceivable that these cells might be a target for HTLV-1 infection. We developed an in vitro co-culture system comprising HTLV-1+-infected T cells and human TECs. Infected T cells did adhere to TECs and, after 24 h, the viral proteins gp46 and p19 were observed in TECs. After incubating TECs with culture supernatants from HTLV-1+-infected T cells, we detected gp46 on TEC membranes and the HTLV-1 tax gene integrated in the TEC genome. In conclusion, the human thymic epithelium can be infected in vitro by HTLV-1, not only via cell-cell contact, but also via exposure to virus-containing medium. PMID:22012233

  13. [Testing the susceptibility of cultured cells to infection with bovine leukemia virus].

    PubMed

    Bobáková, M; Lesník, F; Vrtiak, O J

    1985-05-01

    Different cell cultures were studied for their susceptibility to bovine leucosis virus infection. Syncytial assay was used for this study. The FLS/BLV+ cell line served as virus source. Cell lines BHK-21 and ZP-1/58 were found to be susceptible to syncytium formation. Large cells with one to three large nuclei, and loose nuclei reaching the size of syncytium were observed to occur in the BHK-21 and ZP-1/58 cell lines, apart from the syncytial formations. The virus specificity of the syncytia arising in these two cell lines was confirmed by the immunofluorescence assay. In the case of the immunoperoxidase assay, a positive result was obtained only in the BHK-21 cell line. The occurrence of syncytia and large nuclei was observed even in the cases when the BHK-21 cells were infected with the lymphocytes of leucotic cows. PMID:2992148

  14. Virgin honeybee queens fail to suppress worker fertility but not fertility signalling.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Margarita; Malka, Osnat; Hefetz, Abraham

    2013-03-01

    Queen mating status in social insects is a matter of crucial importance for workers because of its influence on the queen's productivity and consequently their fitness. Behavioural and physiological reactions of workers to the queens mating status have been studied as a proxy to mechanisms maintaining insect sociality. Here we show that unmated honeybee queens have considerably impaired capacity to trigger worker sterility and cooperative behaviour in comparison to mated (and thus more productive) queens and that under unmated queens social harmony in honeybee societies and queen's dominant position are somewhat compromised. Together with this it is shown that honeybee workers exposed to unmated queens despite being active reproductively and behaving accordingly display an impaired ability to advertise their fertility compared to queenless workers. These findings suggest that reproductive development, behavioural reactions and production of fertility signals are differentially regulated and differently influenced by the queen's presence. PMID:23232436

  15. Temperature-sensitive tumorigenicity of cells transformed by a mutant of Moloney sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Klarlund, J K; Forchhammer, J

    1980-01-01

    Normal rat kidney cells were nonproductively infected either with CP27, a mutant of Moloney sarcoma virus that is temperature-sensitive for maintenance of transformation, or with the parental wild-type virus. The nonproducer cells were inoculated into the tails of athymic nude mice that were subsequently incubated at 28 or 36 degrees C. CP27-infected cells induced tumors only at 28 degrees C, whereas cells infected with wild-type Moloney sarcoma virus were tumorigenic at both temperatures. Tumors induced at 28 degrees C by wild-type virus-infected cells grew faster after shift of the mice to 36 degrees C. In contrast, tumors induced by CP27-infected cells regressed upon shift to 36 degrees C, indicating that continuous expression of viral functions is required for persistence and growth of the tumors. After regression, secondary tumor growth was observed late after upshift of temperature-sensitive tumors. Cells recovered from these late-appearing tumors were tumorigenic at the nonpermissive temperature, and tumors induced by these cells did not regress after upshift. Virus rescued from these recovered cells retained the temperature-sensitivity for focus formation, indicating that the occurrence of the phenotypically wild-type cells was due to host cell modifications rather than to reversion of the CP27 genome. Images PMID:6929500

  16. Ebola virus VP40 late domains are not essential for viral replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Ebihara, Hideki; Takada, Ayato; Noda, Takeshi; Kobasa, Darwyn; Jasenosky, Luke D; Watanabe, Shinji; Kim, Jin H; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2005-08-01

    Ebola virus particle formation and budding are mediated by the VP40 protein, which possesses overlapping PTAP and PPXY late domain motifs (7-PTAPPXY-13). These late domain motifs have also been found in the Gag proteins of retroviruses and the matrix proteins of rhabdo- and arenaviruses. While in vitro studies suggest a critical role for late domain motifs in the budding of these viruses, including Ebola virus, it remains unclear as to whether the VP40 late domains play a role in Ebola virus replication. Alteration of both late domain motifs drastically reduced VP40 particle formation in vitro. However, using reverse genetics, we were able to generate recombinant Ebola virus containing mutations in either or both of the late domains. Viruses containing mutations in one or both of their late domain motifs were attenuated by one log unit. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy did not reveal appreciable differences between the mutant and wild-type viruses released from infected cells. These findings indicate that the Ebola VP40 late domain motifs enhance virus replication but are not absolutely required for virus replication in cell culture. PMID:16051823

  17. The Challenge of Respiratory Virus Infections in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Boeckh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory virus infections in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumonvirus, parainfluenzaviruses, and influenza viruses are well known for their potential to cause fatal pneumonia, information is emerging only recently on the significance of the newly discovered viruses such as human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1, and human bocavirus. Lymphopenia seems to be the most recent risk factors for progression to lower respiratory tract disease. Airflow obstruction is another complication of respiratory virus infections after HCT, and data to date indicate this complication may occur following parainfluenza virus and RSV infection. Infection control procedures are key for prevention. Unfortunately, there are no randomized treatment studies, which make the interpretation of the literature on interventions difficult. This article reviews the spectrum of pathogens, epidemiology, risk factors and clinical manifestations of infection, as well as recent advances in diagnostic and clinical management. PMID:18785968

  18. Association of Paramecium bursaria Chlorella viruses with Paramecium bursaria cells: ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Yashchenko, Varvara V; Gavrilova, Olga V; Rautian, Maria S; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2012-05-01

    Paramecium bursaria Chlorella viruses were observed by applying transmission electron microscopy in the native symbiotic system Paramecium bursaria (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) and the green algae Chlorella (Chlorellaceae, Trebouxiophyceae). Virus particles were abundant and localized in the ciliary pits of the cortex and in the buccal cavity of P. bursaria. This was shown for two types of the symbiotic systems associated with two types of Chlorella viruses - Pbi or NC64A. A novel quantitative stereological approach was applied to test whether virus particles were distributed randomly on the Paramecium surface or preferentially occupied certain zones. The ability of the virus to form an association with the ciliate was investigated experimentally; virus particles were mixed with P. bursaria or with symbiont-free species P. caudatum. Our results confirmed that in the freshwater ecosystems two types of P. bursaria -Chlorella symbiotic systems exist, those without Chlorella viruses and those associated with a large amount of the viruses. The fate of Chlorella virus particles at the Paramecium surface was determined based on obtained statistical data and taking into account ciliate feeding currents and cortical reorganization during cell division. A life cycle of the viruses in the complete symbiotic system is proposed.

  19. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A.; Fraser, Mark E.; Scott, Jordan L.; Soni, Smita P.; Jones, Keaton R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. IMPORTANCE The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. PMID

  20. Cell-to-Cell Contact as an Efficient Mode of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Diverse Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shosuke; Nishikawa, Jun; Takada, Kenzo

    1998-01-01

    We show clear evidence for direct infection of various human epithelial cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro. The successful infection was achieved by using recombinant EBV (Akata strain) carrying a selective marker gene but without any other artificial operations, such as introduction of the known EBV receptor (CD21) gene or addition of polymeric immunoglobulin A against viral gp350 in culture. Of 21 human epithelial cell lines examined, 18 became infected by EBV, as ascertained by the detection of EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 expression in the early period after virus exposure, and the following selection culture easily yielded a number of EBV-infected clones from 15 cell lines. None of the human fibroblasts and five nonhuman-derived cell lines examined was susceptible to the infection. By comparison, cocultivation with virus producers showed ≈800-fold-higher efficiency of infection than cell-free infection did, suggesting the significance of direct cell-to-cell contact as a mode of virus spread in vivo. Most of the epithelial cell lines infectable with EBV were negative for CD21 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. The majority of EBV-infected clones established from each cell line invariably expressed EBNA1, EBV-encoded small RNAs, rightward transcripts from the BamHI-A region of the virus genome, and latent membrane protein (LMP) 2A, but not the other EBNAs or LMP1. This restricted form of latent viral gene expression, which is a central issue for understanding epithelial oncogenesis by EBV, resembled that seen in EBV-associated gastric carcinoma and LMP1-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The results indicate that direct infection of epithelial cells by EBV may occur naturally in vivo, and this could be mediated by an unidentified, epithelium-specific binding receptor for EBV. The EBV convertants are viewed, at least in terms of viral gene expression, as in vitro analogs of EBV-associated epithelial tumor cells, thus facilitating

  1. Use of simian virus 40 replication to amplify Epstein-Barr virus shuttle vectors in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, S S; Krysan, P J; Calos, M P; DuBridge, R B

    1988-01-01

    We have increased the copy number of Epstein-Barr virus vectors that also carry the origin of replication of simian virus 40 (SV40) by providing a transient dose of SV40 T antigen. T antigen was supplied in trans by transfection of a nonreplicating plasmid which expresses T antigen into cells carrying Epstein-Barr virus-SV40 vectors. A significant increase in vector copy number occurred over the next few days. We also observed a high frequency of intramolecular recombination when the vector carried a repeat segment in direct orientation, but not when the repeat was in inverted orientation or absent. Furthermore, by following the mutation frequency for a marker on the vector after induction of SV40 replication, it was determined that SV40 replication generates a detectable increase in the deletion frequency but no measurable increase in the frequency of point mutations. Images PMID:2843671

  2. Roles of cell signaling pathways in cell-to-cell contact-mediated Epstein-Barr virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Nanbo, Asuka; Terada, Haruna; Kachi, Kunihiro; Takada, Kenzo; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2012-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gamma herpesvirus, establishes a life-long latent infection in B lymphocytes and epithelial cells following primary infection. Several lines of evidence indicate that the efficiency of EBV infection in epithelial cells is accelerated up to 10(4)-fold by coculturing with EBV-infected Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells compared to infection with cell-free virions, indicating that EBV infection into epithelial cells is mainly mediated via cell-to-cell contact. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this pathway are poorly understood. Here, we establish a novel assay to assess cell-to-cell contact-mediated EBV transmission by coculturing an EBV-infected BL cell line with an EBV-negative epithelial cell line under stimulation for lytic cycle induction. By using this assay, we confirmed that EBV was transmitted from BL cells to epithelial cells via cell-to-cell contact but not via cell-to-cell fusion. The inhibitor treatments of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways blocked EBV transmission in addition to lytic induction. The blockage of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway impaired EBV transmission coupled with the inhibition of lytic induction. Knockdown of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB reduced viral transmission. Moreover, these signaling pathways were activated in cocultured BL cells and in epithelial cells. Finally, we observed that viral replication was induced in cocultured BL cells. Taken together, our data suggest that cell-to-cell contact induces multiple cell signaling pathways in BL cells and epithelial cells, contributing to the induction of the viral lytic cycle in BL cells and the enhancement of viral transmission to epithelial cells. PMID:22718812

  3. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. PMID:27512666

  4. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells.

  5. Active influenza virus neuraminidase is expressed in monkey cells from cDNA cloned in simian virus 40 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1983-01-01

    We have replaced the late genes of simian virus 40 (SV40) with a cloned cDNA copy of the neuraminidase (NA; EC 3.2.1.18) gene of the WSN (H1N1) strain of human influenza virus. When the SV40-NA recombinant virus was complemented in a lytic infection of monkey cells with a helper virus containing an early region deletion mutant, influenza NA was expressed and readily detected by immunofluorescence as well as by immunoprecipitation of in vivo labeled proteins with monoclonal antibodies against NA. In addition, the expressed NA exhibited enzymatic activity by cleaving the sialic acid residue from alpha-2,3-sialyllactitol. The expressed protein was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface, and it possessed the same molecular weight as the NA of WSN virus grown in monkey cells. Because the structure of NA is quite different from that of other integral membrane proteins and includes an anchoring region at the NH2 terminus consisting of hydrophobic amino acids, we also constructed deletion mutants of NA in this region. Replacement of DNA coding for the first 10 NH2-terminal amino acids with SV40 and linker sequences had no apparent effect on NA expression, glycosylation, transport to the cell surface, or enzymatic activity. However, further deletion of NA DNA encoding the first 26 amino acids abolished NA expression. These data suggest that the hydrophobic NH2-terminal region is multifunctional and is important in biosynthesis and translocation of NA across the membrane as well as in anchoring the protein. Images PMID:6306656

  6. Augmentation of virus secretion by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein is cell type independent and occurs in cultured human primary macrophages and lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, U; Clouse, K A; Strebel, K

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific Vpu protein is a small integral membrane phosphoprotein that induces degradation of the virus receptor CD4 in the endoplasmic reticulum and, independently, increases the release of progeny virions from infected cells. To address the importance of Vpu for virus replication in primary human cells such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), we used three different sets of monocyte-tropic molecular clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: a primary isolate, AD8+, and two chimeric variants of the T-cell-tropic isolate NL4-3 carrying the env determinants of either AD8+ or SF162 monocyte-tropic primary isolates. Isogenic variants of these chimeric viruses were constructed to express either wild-type Vpu or various mutants of Vpu. The effects of these mutations in the vpu gene on virus particle secretion from infected MDM or PBMC were assessed by determination of the release of virion-associated reverse transcriptase into culture supernatants, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of pelleted virions, and steady-state or pulse-chase metabolic labeling. Wild-type Vpu increased virus release four- to sixfold in MDM and two- to threefold in PBMC, while nonphosphorylated Vpu and a C-terminal truncation mutant of Vpu were partially active on virus release in primary cells. These results demonstrate that Vpu regulates virus release in primary lymphocyte and macrophage cultures in a similar manner and to a similar extent to those previously observed in HeLa cells or CD4+ T-cell lines. Thus, our findings provide evidence that Vpu functions in a variety of human cells, both primary cells and continuous cell lines, and mutations in Vpu affect its biological activity independent of the cell type and virus isolate used. PMID:7494279

  7. Mutations in the capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus affecting encapsidation eliminate vesicle induction in planta: implications for virus cell-to-cell spread.

    PubMed

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Rao, A L N

    2013-08-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses are known to rearrange the endomembrane network to make it more conducive for replication, maturation, or egress. Our previous transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis showed that ectopic expression of wild-type (wt) capsid protein (CP) of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) has an intrinsic property of modifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to induce vesicles similar to those present in wt BMV infection. In this study, we evaluated the functional significance of CP-mediated vesicle induction to the BMV infection cycle in planta. Consequently, the cytopathologic changes induced by wt CP or its mutants defective in virion assembly due to mutations engineered in either N- or C-proximal domains were comparatively analyzed by TEM in two susceptible (Nicotiana benthamiana and Chenopodium quinoa) and one nonhost (N. clevelandii) plant species. The results showed that in susceptible hosts, CP-mediated ER-derived vesicle induction is contingent on the expression of encapsidation-competent CP. In contrast, unlike in N. benthamiana and C. quinoa, transient expression of wt CP in nonhost N. clevelandii plants eliminated vesicle induction. Additionally, comparative source-to-sink analysis of virus spread in leaves of N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii coexpressing wt BMV and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) showed that despite trans-encapsidation, CMV failed to complement the defective cell-to-cell movement of BMV. The significance and relation of CP-mediated vesicle induction to virus cell-to-cell movement are discussed.

  8. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  9. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  10. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-09-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity.

  11. Antiviral Activity of Porcine Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 against Swine Viruses in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Chang, Hongtao; Yang, Xia; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Chuanqing; Zhao, Jun

    2015-11-17

    Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), as an important transcription factor, is abundantly induced upon virus infections and participates in host antiviral immune responses. However, the roles of porcine IRF1 (poIRF1) in host antiviral defense remain poorly understood. In this study, we determined that poIRF1 was upregulated upon infection with viruses and distributed in nucleus in porcine PK-15 cells. Subsequently, we tested the antiviral activities of poIRF1 against several swine viruses in cells. Overexpression of poIRF1 can efficiently suppress the replication of viruses, and knockdown of poIRF1 promotes moderately viral replication. Interestingly, overexpression of poIRF1 enhances dsRNA-induced IFN-β and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activation, whereas knockdown of poIRF1 cannot significantly affect the activation of IFN-β promoter induced by RNA viruses. This study suggests that poIRF1 plays a significant role in cellular antiviral response against swine viruses, but might be dispensable for IFN-β induction triggered by RNA viruses in PK-15 cells. Given these results, poIRF1 plays potential roles in cellular antiviral responses against swine viruses.

  12. Apoptosis induced by Oropouche virus infection in HeLa cells is dependent on virus protein expression.

    PubMed

    Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Gomes, Rogério; Proença-Módena, José Luiz; da Silva, Andrei Furlan; Carminati, Patricia Oliveira; Silva, Maria Lucia; Santos, Rodrigo Ivo Marques; Arruda, Eurico

    2010-04-01

    Oropouche (OROV) is a single-stranded RNA arbovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, which has caused over half a million cases of febrile illness in Brazil in the past 30 years. OROV fever has been registered almost exclusively in the Amazon region, but global warming, deforestation and redistribution of vectors and animal reservoirs increases the risk of Oropouche virus emergence in other areas. OROV causes a cytolytical infection in cultured cells with characteristic cytopathic effect 48h post-infection. We have studied the mechanisms of apoptosis induced by OROV in HeLa cells and found that OROV causes DNA fragmentation detectable by gel electrophoresis and by flow cytometric analysis of the Sub-G1 population at 36h post-infection. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome C and activation of caspases 9 and 3 were also detected by western blot analysis. Lack of apoptosis induced by UV-inactivated OROV reveals that virus-receptor binding is not sufficient to induce cell death. Results obtained in cells treated with chloroquine and cycloheximide indicated that viral uncoating and replication are required for apoptosis induction by OROV. Furthermore, treatment of the cells with pan-caspase inhibitor prevented OROV-induced apoptosis without affecting virus progeny production. The results show that OROV infection in vitro causes apoptosis by an intracellular pathway involving mitochondria, and activated by a mechanism dependent on viral replication and protein synthesis.

  13. Virus replication cycle of white spot syndrome virus in secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfeng; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; De Gryse, Gaëtan M A; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Van Tuan, Vo; Van Thuong, Khuong; Bossier, Peter; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-09-01

    The replication cycle of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was investigated in secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei. The secondary cells formed a confluent monolayer at 24 h post-reseeding, and this monolayer could be maintained for 10 days with a viability of 90 %. Binding of WSSV to cells reached a maximum (73 ± 3 % of cells and 4.84 ± 0.2 virus particles per virus-binding cell) at 120 min at 4 °C. WSSV entered cells by endocytosis. The co-localization of WSSV and early endosomes was observed starting from 30 min post-inoculation (p.i.). Double indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that all cell-bound WSSV particles entered these cells in the period between 0 and 60 min p.i. and that the uncoating of WSSV occurred in the same period. After 1 h inoculation at 27 °C, the WSSV nucleocapsid protein VP664 and envelope protein VP28 started to be synthesized in the cytoplasm from 1 and 3 h p.i., and were transported into nuclei from 3 and 6 h p.i., respectively. The percentage of cells that were VP664- and VP28-positive in their nuclei peaked (50 ± 4 %) at 12 h p.i. Quantitative PCR showed that WSSV DNA started to be synthesized from 6 h p.i. In vivo titration of the supernatants showed that the progeny WSSV were released from 12 h p.i. and peaked at 18 h p.i. In conclusion, the secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ were proven to be ideal for examination of the replication cycle of WSSV.

  14. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent genes in nasal T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, J; Brink, A; Oudejans, J J; van den Brule, A J; van den Tweel, J G; Jiwa, N M; de Bruin, P C; Meijer, C J

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the expression of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus encoded latent genes in nasal T-cell lymphomas in The Netherlands. METHODS: Seven europid (Dutch) cases of nasal T cell lymphoma were investigated for the presence of EB virus by RNA in situ hybridisation (EBER). The expression of the EB virus encoded genes BARF0, EBNA1, EBNA2, LMP1, LMP2A, LMP2B, and ZEBRA was studied at the mRNA level using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. At the protein level the expression was investigated of EBNA2 and LMP1 by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In all seven nasal T cell lymphomas EBER was detected in the nuclei of virtually all tumour cells. BARF0 mRNA was detected in all samples. EBNA1 mRNA was found in six cases, LMP1 mRNA in five, LMP2A mRNA in three, LMP2B mRNA in one, and ZEBRA mRNA in one. EBNA2 mRNA was not found in any case. At the protein level occasional LMP1 positive tumour cells were seen in only one case. The EBNA2 protein was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal T cell lymphomas in The Netherlands are strongly associated with EB virus. The virus shows a type II latency pattern (EBNA1+, LMP1+, EBNA2-) that seems to be similar to the EB virus associated nasal T cell lymphomas in oriental countries. Images PMID:8666691

  15. The use of COS-1 cells for studies of field and laboratory African swine fever virus samples.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Carolina; Bustos, María José; Carrascosa, Angel L

    2010-03-01

    Different naturally occurring, cell adapted or genetically manipulated stocks of African swine fever virus were able to infect directly cultures of COS-1 cells, producing extensive cytopathic effects and amounts from 10(6) to 10(7) of infective progeny virus per ml. The induction of late virus-specific proteins, demonstrated by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, and the development of lysis plaques by all the virus samples tested so far, allowed the optimization of both titration and diagnostic assays, as well as the proposal of a method for selection of virus clones during the generation of virus mutants with specific gene deletions.

  16. Titration of adenovirus by counting cells containing virus-induced inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Weber, J

    1972-05-01

    A new method for the titration of adenovirus types 2 and 12 based on the enumeration of viral inclusions in infected cells was devised and evaluated. The technique gave virus titers comparable to those obtained by the plaque assay procedure.

  17. Cellular targets for improved manufacturing of virus-based biopharmaceuticals in animal cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana F; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Coroadinha, Ana S

    2014-12-01

    The past decade witnessed the entry into the market of new virus-based biopharmaceuticals produced in animal cells such as oncolytic vectors, virus-like particle vaccines, and gene transfer vectors. Therefore, increased attention and investment to optimize cell culture processes towards enhanced manufacturing of these bioproducts is anticipated. Herein, we review key findings on virus-host interactions that have been explored in cell culture optimization. Approaches supporting improved productivity or quality of vector preparations are discussed, mainly focusing on medium design and genetic manipulation. This review provides an integrated outline for current and future efforts in exploring cellular targets for the optimization of cell culture manufacturing of virus-based biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Membrane Proteins of Vero Cells: Exploration of Potential Proteins Responsible for Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Vero cells are highly susceptible to many viruses in humans and animals, and its membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for virus entry. In our study, the MP proteome of the Vero cells was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. Six hundred twenty-seven proteins, including a total of 1839 peptides, were identified in MP samples of the Vero cells. In 627 proteins, 307 proteins (48.96%) were annotated in terms of biological process of gene ontology (GO) categories; 356 proteins (56.78%) were annotated in terms of molecular function of GO categories; 414 proteins (66.03%) were annotated in terms of cellular components of GO categories. Of 627 identified proteins, seventeen proteins had been revealed to be virus receptor proteins. The resulting protein lists and highlighted proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of virus infection of Vero cells. PMID:24286161

  19. Effect of human alpha A interferon on influenza virus replication in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Ransohoff, R M; Maroney, P A; Nayak, D P; Chambers, T M; Nilsen, T W

    1985-12-01

    To determine the molecular mechanism whereby interferon induces resistance to influenza virus, we began an investigation of influenza virus replication in MDBK cells treated with recombinant human alpha A interferon. Negative- and positive-strand virus-specific RNA accumulation was monitored by blot hybridization with cloned probes. Primary transcription (transcription of infecting viral negative strands by the virion-associated polymerase) was inhibited by interferon treatment of MDBK cells. At moderate levels of interferon treatment (10 U/ml), this inhibition was restricted to transcripts of polymerase genes, whereas at higher levels of interferon treatment (50 U/ml), accumulation of all primary transcripts was markedly inhibited. Secondary transcripts and viral negative strands did not accumulate to any significant extent in interferon-treated MDBK cells. These results suggest that interferon-induced mechanisms which inhibit influenza virus replication in MDBK cells act at the level of primary transcription.

  20. Ultrastructural studies on the replication of herpes simplex virus in PK and XTC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ciampor, F; Szántó, J

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes showed the following characteristics of restricted replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV 1) strains MA and HSZP in PK and XTC-2 cells: 1) minimal cytopathic changes in PK cells as compared to more pronounced alterations in XTC-2 cells; 2) formation of single nucleocapsids or their absence in the nuclei of PK cells infected with the HSZP strain; 3) lack of budding and envelopment and absence of reduplication of the nuclear membrane; 4) persistence of partially uncoated virions within the endocytic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of PK cells; and 5) formation of dense inclusion bodies in addition to the presence of defective virions in the cytoplasm of XTC-2 cells and vacuolation of their cytoplasmic membranes. The replication of HSV 1 in PK and XTC-2 cells seemed to be blocked at both early and late stages of virus replication. At low multiplicity of infection, no virus particles were formed.

  1. Clinical Outcomes Associated With Respiratory Virus Detection Before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Englund, Janet A.; Farney, Robert M.; Minerich, Elisa L.; Kuypers, Jane; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. The management of respiratory virus infections prior to hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is difficult. We examined whether respiratory virus detection before HCT influenced the requirement for bronchoscopy, hospitalization, and overall survival following HCT. Methods. Pre-HCT and weekly post-HCT nasal washes were collected through day 100 from patients with and without symptoms. Samples were tested by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses 1–4, influenza A and B, human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, and human rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and bocavirus. Results. Of 458 patients, 116 (25%) had respiratory viruses detected pre-HCT. Overall, patients with viruses detected pre-HCT had fewer days alive and out of the hospital and lower survival at day 100 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–4.5; P = .007) than patients with negative samples; this risk was also present with rhinovirus alone (aHR for mortality, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2–5.5; P = .01). No difference in bronchoscopy incidence was seen in patients with and without respiratory viruses (aHR, 1.3; 95% CI, .8–2.0; P = .32). In symptomatic patients, those with respiratory viruses detected had increased overall mortality compared with patients without viruses detected (unadjusted HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.0–12.1; P = .05); among asymptomatic patients, detection of respiratory viruses was not associated with increased mortality. Conclusions. These data support routine testing for respiratory viruses among symptomatic patients before HCT, and delay of transplant with virus detection when feasible, even for detection of rhinovirus alone. Further study is needed to address whether asymptomatic patients should undergo screening for respiratory virus detection before HCT. PMID:25847977

  2. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses.

  3. The Host Cell Receptors for Measles Virus and Their Interaction with the Viral Hemagglutinin (H) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (H) protein of measles virus (MeV) interacts with a cellular receptor which constitutes the initial stage of infection. Binding of H to this host cell receptor subsequently triggers the F protein to activate fusion between virus and host plasma membranes. The search for MeV receptors began with vaccine/laboratory virus strains and evolved to more relevant receptors used by wild-type MeV. Vaccine or laboratory strains of measles virus have been adapted to grow in common cell lines such as Vero and HeLa cells, and were found to use membrane cofactor protein (CD46) as a receptor. CD46 is a regulator that normally prevents cells from complement-mediated self-destruction, and is found on the surface of all human cells, with the exception of erythrocytes. Mutations in the H protein, which occur during adaptation and allow the virus to use CD46 as a receptor, have been identified. Wild-type isolates of measles virus cannot use the CD46 receptor. However, both vaccine/laboratory and wild-type strains can use an immune cell receptor called signaling lymphocyte activation molecule family member 1 (SLAMF1; also called CD150) and a recently discovered epithelial receptor known as Nectin-4. SLAMF1 is found on activated B, T, dendritic, and monocyte cells, and is the initial target for infections by measles virus. Nectin-4 is an adherens junction protein found at the basal surfaces of many polarized epithelial cells, including those of the airways. It is also over-expressed on the apical and basal surfaces of many adenocarcinomas, and is a cancer marker for metastasis and tumor survival. Nectin-4 is a secondary exit receptor which allows measles virus to replicate and amplify in the airways, where the virus is expelled from the body in aerosol droplets. The amino acid residues of H protein that are involved in binding to each of the receptors have been identified through X-ray crystallography and site-specific mutagenesis. Recombinant measles “blind” to

  4. Noninvasive and label-free determination of virus infected cells by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin. B.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the detection of virus-infected cells. Adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells was successfully detected at 12, 24, and 48 h after initiating the infection. The score plot of principal component analysis discriminated the spectra of the infected cells from those of the control cells. The viral infection was confirmed by the conventional immunostaining method performed 24 h after the infection. The newly developed method provides a fast and label-free means for the detection of virus-infected cells.

  5. Noninvasive and label-free determination of virus infected cells by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin B; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the detection of virus-infected cells. Adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells was successfully detected at 12, 24, and 48 h after initiating the infection. The score plot of principal component analysis discriminated the spectra of the infected cells from those of the control cells. The viral infection was confirmed by the conventional immunostaining method performed 24 h after the infection. The newly developed method provides a fast and label-free means for the detection of virus-infected cells.

  6. Immunofluorescence on avian sarcoma virus-transformed cells: localization of the src gene product.

    PubMed

    Rohrschneider, L R

    1979-01-01

    The localization of the avian sarcoma virus src gene product (termed p60src) was examined by indirect immunofluorescence in cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus, subgroup D (SR-RSV-D). Antiserum to p60src was obtained from rabbits bearing SR-RSV-D-induced tumors, and immunofluorescence was performed on chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed with SR-RSV-D, as well as normal rat kidney (NRK) cells transformed by the same virus (termed SR-RK cells). Both acetone and formaldehyde fixation were used for the immunofluorescence tests. The specificity of the anti-tumor serum was first demonstrated in both cell systems by gel electrophoresis of immunoprecipitates prepared from 35S--methionine-labeled cells. Anti-tumor serum precipitated p60src from SR-RSV-D-transformed CEF but not from CEF infected with a transformation-defective mutant of SR-RSV-D. All viral structural proteins and precursors contained in these immunoprecipitates could be eliminated by competition with unlabeled virus. Similar experiments on SR-RK cells indicated that no viral proteins other than p60src were expressed in these cells, and this observation was supported by immunofluorescence tests using antiserum to whole virus. For immunofluorescence localization of p60src, reactions with viral structural proteins were blocked with unlabeled virus. This presaturation step, obligatory for p60src detection in the SR-RSV-D-transformed CEF, was unnecessary when antitumor serum was tested on SR-RK cells, since p60src was the only viral protein detectable in these cells. With acetone-fixed cells, p60src-specific immunofluorescence revealed a characteristic fluorescence pattern which was similar in both cell systems. The principal pattern was diffuse and situated in the cytoplasm. A clear nuclear fluorescence was never observed. Immunofluorescence on formaldehyde-fixed cells also indicated the cytoplasmic location of p60src and revealed a specific subcytoplasmic concentration

  7. Virus-Free Human Placental Cell Lines To Study Genetic Functions | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.

  8. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus-host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Wommack, K Eric; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-11-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus-host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus-host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage-host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host-virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  9. Contained indirect viable-cell membrane immunofluorescence microassay for surface antigen analysis of cells infected with hazardous viruses.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, M W; Bigner, D D

    1977-01-01

    A microtechnique for an indirect viable-cell membrane immunofluorescence titration assay was developed using Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-producing cells and monospecific rabbit antisera to F-MuLV structural antigens. The assay was sensitive and displayed little variation within or between assays. Since moderate-risk tumor viruses, such as recently discovered primate oncornaviruses or feline leukemia virus (FeLV), may be hazardous to laboratory personnel, the assay was adapted for containment of cells infected with such viruses. Cells producing gibbon ape lymphoma virus or FeLV were grown in class III containment cabinets and transferred in sealed flasks to a class II laminar-flow cabinet, where the assay was performed. This micromethod not only conserved reagents but also minimized the numbers of moderate-risk tumor virus-infected cells handled at one time. Centrifugation was contained using custom-made devices shown to form a gas-tight seal over microtiter plates. Interspecies reactivity of monospecific rabbit antisera against F-MuLV structural antigen gp71, but not against p12, was demonstrated for surface antigens on FeLV-producing cells.

  10. Differences in mushroom bodies morphogenesis in workers, queens and drones of Apis mellifera: neuroblasts proliferation and death.

    PubMed

    Roat, Thaisa Cristina; da Cruz Landim, Carminda

    2010-06-01

    Apis mellifera is an interesting model to neurobiological studies. It has a relatively small brain that commands the complex learning and memory tasks demanded by the social organization. An A. mellifera colony is made up of a queen, thousands of workers and a varying number of drones. The latter are males, whereas the former are the two female castes. These three phenotypes differ in morphology, physiology and behavior, correlated with their respective functions in the society. Such differences include the morphology and architecture of their brains. To understand the processes generating such polymorphic brains we characterized the cell division and cell death dynamics which underlie the morphogenesis of the mushroom bodies, through several methods suitable for evidence the time and place of occurrence. Cell death was detected in mushroom bodies of last larval instar and mainly in black-eyed pupae. Cell division was observed in mushroom bodies, primarily at the start of metamorphosis, exhibiting temporal differences among workers, queens and males.

  11. Plaque assay of Sendai virus in monolayers of a clonal line of porcine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, H

    1976-02-01

    The MN strain of Sendai virus formed distinct plaques in monolayers of PS-Y15 cells, an established porcine kidney cell line. The plaque-forming ability was neutralized by specific antibody to the virus. A linear relationship was found between the concentration of virus and the number of plaques. The sensitivity of this assay was about equal to that of the in ovo titration. When applied to the serum neutralization test, the end points obtained were comparable to those of the hemagglutination-inhibition and complement-fixation tests.

  12. Nonhuman Transferrin Receptor 1 Is an Efficient Cell Entry Receptor for Ocozocoautla de Espinosa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shuĭqìng; Mazur, Steven; Dŏng, Lián; Janosko, Krisztina; Zhāng, Téngfēi; Müller, Marcel A.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Bavari, Sina; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocozocoautla de Espinosa virus (OCEV) is a novel, uncultured arenavirus. We found that the OCEV glycoprotein mediates entry into grivet and bat cells through transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) binding but that OCEV glycoprotein precursor (GPC)-pseudotyped retroviruses poorly entered 53 human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, OCEV and Tacaribe virus could use bat, but not human, TfR1. Replacing three human TfR1 amino acids with their bat ortholog counterparts transformed human TfR1 into an efficient OCEV and Tacaribe virus receptor. PMID:24109228

  13. Application of speckle dynamics for studying metabolic activity of cell cultures with herpes virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Bakharev, A. A.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhaylova, J. A.; Borodin, E. M.; Poryvayeva, A. P.; Glinskikh, N. P.

    2014-05-01

    The report considers the results of the experiments in which digital values of light intensity I and the image area correlation index η values were recorded on a real-time basis for one or two days. Three cell cultures with viruses along with intact cultures were investigated. High correlation of dependence of η values on time t values was demonstrated for three cultures. The η=η(t) and I=I(t) dependences for cells with and without viruses differ considerably. It was shown that the presence of viruses could be determined as early as ten minutes after measurements were started.

  14. Imaging and characterizing influenza A virus mRNA transport in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Han, Han; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Hong-Ping; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Xian-En

    2008-09-01

    The mechanisms of influenza A virus mRNA intracellular transport are still not clearly understood. Here, we visualized the distribution and transport of influenza A virus mRNA in living cells using molecular beacon (MB) technology. Confocal-FRAP measurements determined that the transport of influenza A virus intronless mRNA, in both nucleus and cytoplasm, was energy dependent, being similar to that of Poly(A)(+) RNA. Drug inhibition studies in living cells revealed that the export of influenza A virus mRNA is independent of the CRM1 pathway, while the function of RNA polymerase II (RNAP-II) may be needed. In addition, viral NS1 protein and cellular TAP protein were found associated with influenza A virus mRNA in the cell nucleus. These findings characterize influenza A virus mRNA transport in living cells and suggest that influenza A virus mRNA may be exported from the nucleus by the cellular TAP/p15 pathway with NS1 protein and RNAP-II participation.

  15. Metabolic stress in infected cells may represent a therapeutic target for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Menéndez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, there are thousands of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection per day. The effectiveness of current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is relative; to prioritize finding vaccines and/or cure-oriented initiatives should be reinforced because there is little room, if any, for procrastination. Basic and clinical findings on HIV-1 reservoirs suggest that disruption of virus latency is feasible. Because the goal is curing HIV-1 infection, we should be aware that the challenge is to eradicate the viruses of every single infected cell and consequently acting upon virus latency is necessary but not sufficient. The large majority of the virus reservoir, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, is readily accessible but other minor reservoirs, where ART does not diffuse, require innovative strategies. The situation closely resembles that currently faced in the treatment of cancer. Exploiting the fact that histone deacetylase inhibitors, mainly vorinostat, may disrupt the latency of HIV-1, we propose to supplement this effect with a programmed interference in the metabolic stress of infected cells. Metformin and chloroquine are cheap and accessible modulators of pro-survival mechanisms to which viruses are constantly confronted to generate alternative energy sources and maximize virus production. Metformin restrains the use of the usurped cellular biosynthetic machinery by viral genes and chloroquine contributes to death of infected cells. We suggest that the combination of vorinostat, chloroquine and metformin should be combined with ART to pursue viral eradication in infected cells. PMID:23639282

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor–engineered T cells as oncolytic virus carriers

    PubMed Central

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Tantalo, Daniela GM; Afsahi, Arya; Hammill, Joanne A; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered T cells in adoptive transfer therapies has shown significant promise in treating hematological cancers. However, successes treating solid tumors are much less prevalent. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have the capacity to induce specific lysis of tumor cells and indirectly impact tumor growth via vascular shutdown. These viruses bear natural abilities to associate with lymphocytes upon systemic administration, but therapeutic doses must be very high in order to evade antibodies and other components of the immune system. As T cells readily circulate through the body, using these cells to deliver OVs directly to tumors may provide an ideal combination. Our studies demonstrate that loading chimeric antigen receptor–engineered T cells with low doses of virus does not impact receptor expression or function in either murine or human T cells. Engineered T cells can deposit virus onto a variety of tumor targets, which can enhance the tumoricidal activity of the combination treatment. This concept appears to be broadly applicable, as we observed similar results using murine or human T cells, loaded with either RNA or DNA viruses. Overall, loading of engineered T cells with OVs represents a novel combination therapy that may increase the efficacy of both treatments. PMID:27119109

  17. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  18. Small tumor virus genomes are integrated near nuclear matrix attachment regions in transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Shera, K A; Shera, C A; McDougall, J K

    2001-12-01

    More than 15% of human cancers have a viral etiology. In benign lesions induced by the small DNA tumor viruses, viral genomes are typically maintained extrachromosomally. Malignant progression is often associated with viral integration into host cell chromatin. To study the role of viral integration in tumorigenesis, we analyzed the positions of integrated viral genomes in tumors and tumor cell lines induced by the small oncogenic viruses, including the high-risk human papillomaviruses, hepatitis B virus, simian virus 40, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. We show that viral integrations in tumor cells lie near cellular sequences identified as nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs), while integrations in nonneoplastic cells show no significant correlation with these regions. In mammalian cells, the nuclear matrix functions in gene expression and DNA replication. MARs play varied but poorly understood roles in eukaryotic gene expression. Our results suggest that integrated tumor virus genomes are subject to MAR-mediated transcriptional regulation, providing insight into mechanisms of viral carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the viral oncoproteins serve as invaluable tools for the study of mechanisms controlling cellular growth. Similarly, our demonstration that integrated viral genomes may be subject to MAR-mediated transcriptional effects should facilitate elucidation of fundamental mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression.

  19. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales.

  20. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales. PMID:27572161

  1. An electron microscopic study of MDBK cells persistently infected with Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    McNulty, M S; Gowans, E J; Louza, A C; Fraser, G

    1977-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of a line of MDBK cells persistently infected with Newcastle disease virus (MDBKpi cells) revealed the presence of cytoplasmic aggregates of both smooth and granular nucleocapsids. Only granular nucleocapsids aligned under modified areas of plasma membrane and were incorporated into virus particles. On the grounds of morphogenesis, there was no apparent explanation for the persistent, not-cytocidal nature of the infection. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates of smooth nucleocapsids were present in MDBKpi cells which had been held without subculture for between 40 and 130 days (aged MDBKpi cells). Modified areas of plasma membrane with associated alignment of nucleocapsids were not present in aged MDBKpi cells, and neither budding nor released virus particles were observed, indicating a block in virus maturation. It is suggested that the granular material coating granular nucleocapsids allows them to interact with modified areas of plasma membrane, thereby inducing virus budding. A deficiency of this material, as apparently occurs in aged MDBKpi cells, would therefore cause a block in virus maturation. The nature of this granular material is discussed, and we suggest that it consists of M protein.

  2. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  3. Presence of Nosema ceranae associated with honeybee queen introductions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Irene; Cepero, Almudena; Pinto, Maria Alice; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; De la Rúa, Pilar

    2014-04-01

    Microsporidiosis caused by Nosema species is one of the factors threatening the health of the honeybee (Apis mellifera), which is an essential element in agriculture mainly due to its pollination function. The dispersion of this pathogen may be influenced by many factors, including various aspects of beekeeping management such as introduction of queens with different origin. Herein we study the relation of the presence and distribution of Nosema spp. and the replacement of queens in honeybee populations settled on the Atlantic Canary Islands. While Nosema apis has not been detected, an increase of the presence and distribution of Nosema ceranae during the last decade has been observed in parallel with a higher frequency of foreign queens. On the other hand, a reduction of the number of N. ceranae positive colonies was observed on those islands with continued replacement of queens. We suggest that such replacement could help maintaining low rates of Nosema infection, but healthy queens native to these islands should be used in order to conserve local honeybee diversity.

  4. Presence of Nosema ceranae associated with honeybee queen introductions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Irene; Cepero, Almudena; Pinto, Maria Alice; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; De la Rúa, Pilar

    2014-04-01

    Microsporidiosis caused by Nosema species is one of the factors threatening the health of the honeybee (Apis mellifera), which is an essential element in agriculture mainly due to its pollination function. The dispersion of this pathogen may be influenced by many factors, including various aspects of beekeeping management such as introduction of queens with different origin. Herein we study the relation of the presence and distribution of Nosema spp. and the replacement of queens in honeybee populations settled on the Atlantic Canary Islands. While Nosema apis has not been detected, an increase of the presence and distribution of Nosema ceranae during the last decade has been observed in parallel with a higher frequency of foreign queens. On the other hand, a reduction of the number of N. ceranae positive colonies was observed on those islands with continued replacement of queens. We suggest that such replacement could help maintaining low rates of Nosema infection, but healthy queens native to these islands should be used in order to conserve local honeybee diversity. PMID:24568841

  5. The evolution of queen pheromones in the ant genus Lasius.

    PubMed

    Holman, L; Lanfear, R; d'Ettorre, P

    2013-07-01

    Queen pheromones are among the most important chemical messages regulating insect societies yet they remain largely undiscovered, hindering research into interesting proximate and ultimate questions. Identifying queen pheromones in multiple species would give new insight into the selective pressures and evolutionary constraints acting on these ubiquitous signals. Here, we present experimental and comparative evidence that 3-methylalkanes, hydrocarbons present on the queen's cuticle, are a queen pheromone throughout the ant genus Lasius. Interspecific variation in the chemical profile is consistent with 3-methylalkanes evolving more slowly than other types of hydrocarbons, perhaps due to differential selection or evolutionary constraints. We argue that the sensory ecology of the worker response imposes strong stabilizing selection on queen pheromones relative to other hydrocarbons. 3-Methylalkanes are also strongly physiologically and genetically coupled with fecundity in at least one Lasius species, which may translate into evolutionary constraints. Our results highlight how honest signalling could minimize evolutionary conflict over reproduction, promoting the evolution and maintenance of eusociality. PMID:23662630

  6. Bumblebee size polymorphism and worker response to queen pheromone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Queen pheromones are chemical signals produced by reproductive individuals in social insect colonies. In many species they are key to the maintenance of reproductive division of labor, with workers beginning to reproduce individually once the queen pheromone disappears. Recently, a queen pheromone that negatively affects worker fecundity was discovered in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris, presenting an exciting opportunity for comparisons with analogous queen pheromones in independently-evolved eusocial lineages such as honey bees, ants, wasps and termites. I set out to replicate this discovery and verify its reproducibility. Using blind, controlled experiments, I found that n-pentacosane (C25) does indeed negatively affect worker ovary development. Moreover, the pheromone affects both large and small workers, and applies to workers from large, mature colonies as well as young colonies. Given that C25 is readily available and that bumblebees are popular study organisms, I hope that this replication will encourage other researchers to tackle the many research questions enabled by the discovery of a queen pheromone. PMID:25289189

  7. Do sexist organizational cultures create the Queen Bee?

    PubMed

    Derks, Belle; Ellemers, Naomi; van Laar, Colette; de Groot, Kim

    2011-09-01

    'Queen Bees' are senior women in masculine organizational cultures who have fulfilled their career aspirations by dissociating themselves from their gender while simultaneously contributing to the gender stereotyping of other women. It is often assumed that this phenomenon contributes to gender discrimination in organizations, and is inherent to the personalities of successful career women. We argue for a social identity explanation and examine organizational conditions that foster the Queen Bee phenomenon. Participants were 94 women holding senior positions in diverse companies in The Netherlands who participated in an on-line survey. In line with predictions, indicators of the Queen Bee phenomenon (increased gender stereotyping and masculine self-descriptions) were found mostly among women who indicated they had started their career with low gender identification and who had subsequently experienced a high degree of gender discrimination on their way up. By contrast, the experience of gender discrimination was unrelated to signs of the Queen Bee phenomenon among women who indicated to be highly identified when they started their career. Results are discussed in light of social identity theory, interpreting the Queen Bee phenomenon as an individual mobility response of low gender identified women to the gender discrimination they encounter in their work.

  8. Detection and identification of putative bacterial endosymbionts and endogenous viruses in tick cell lines.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, M Pilar; Dalby, Matthew J; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Fazakerley, John K; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2012-06-01

    As well as being vectors of many viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens of medical and veterinary importance, ticks harbour a variety of microorganisms which are not known to be pathogenic for vertebrate hosts. Continuous cell lines established from ixodid and argasid ticks could be infected with such endosymbiotic bacteria and endogenous viruses, but to date very few cell lines have been examined for their presence. DNA and RNA extracted from over 50 tick cell lines deposited in the Roslin Wellcome Trust Tick Cell Biobank (http://tickcells.roslin.ac.uk) were screened for presence of bacteria and RNA viruses, respectively. Sequencing of PCR products amplified using pan-16S rRNA primers revealed the presence of DNA sequences from bacterial endosymbionts in several cell lines derived from Amblyomma and Dermacentor spp. ticks. Identification to species level was attempted using Rickettsia- and Francisella-specific primers. Pan-Nairovirus primers amplified PCR products of uncertain specificity in cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus, Hyalomma, Ixodes, Carios, and Ornithodoros spp. ticks. Further characterisation attempted with primers specific for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus segments confirmed the absence of this arbovirus in the cells. A set of pan-Flavivirus primers did not detect endogenous viruses in any of the cell lines. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of endogenous reovirus-like viruses in many of the cell lines; only 4 of these lines gave positive results with primers specific for the tick Orbivirus St Croix River virus, indicating that there may be additional, as yet undescribed 'tick-only' viruses inhabiting tick cell lines.

  9. Detection and identification of putative bacterial endosymbionts and endogenous viruses in tick cell lines☆

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, M. Pilar; Dalby, Matthew J.; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Fazakerley, John K.; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    As well as being vectors of many viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens of medical and veterinary importance, ticks harbour a variety of microorganisms which are not known to be pathogenic for vertebrate hosts. Continuous cell lines established from ixodid and argasid ticks could be infected with such endosymbiotic bacteria and endogenous viruses, but to date very few cell lines have been examined for their presence. DNA and RNA extracted from over 50 tick cell lines deposited in the Roslin Wellcome Trust Tick Cell Biobank (http://tickcells.roslin.ac.uk) were screened for presence of bacteria and RNA viruses, respectively. Sequencing of PCR products amplified using pan-16S rRNA primers revealed the presence of DNA sequences from bacterial endosymbionts in several cell lines derived from Amblyomma and Dermacentor spp. ticks. Identification to species level was attempted using Rickettsia- and Francisella-specific primers. Pan-Nairovirus primers amplified PCR products of uncertain specificity in cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus, Hyalomma, Ixodes, Carios, and Ornithodoros spp. ticks. Further characterisation attempted with primers specific for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagi