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Sample records for quenched lattice gauge

  1. Magnetic-Field-Induced Insulator-Conductor Transition in SU(2) Quenched Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Buividovich, P.V.; Kharzeev, D.; Chernodub, M.N., Kalaydzhyan, T., Luschevskaya, E.V., and M.I. Polikarpov

    2010-09-24

    We study the correlator of two vector currents in quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a chirally invariant lattice Dirac operator with a constant external magnetic field. It is found that in the confinement phase the correlator of the components of the current parallel to the magnetic field decays much slower than in the absence of a magnetic field, while for other components the correlation length slightly decreases. We apply the maximal entropy method to extract the corresponding spectral function. In the limit of zero frequency this spectral function yields the electric conductivity of quenched theory. We find that in the confinement phase the external magnetic field induces nonzero electric conductivity along the direction of the field, transforming the system from an insulator into an anisotropic conductor. In the deconfinement phase the conductivity does not exhibit any sizable dependence on the magnetic field.

  2. Magnetic-field-induced insulator-conductor transition in SU(2) quenched lattice gauge theory.

    PubMed

    Buividovich, P V; Chernodub, M N; Kharzeev, D E; Kalaydzhyan, T; Luschevskaya, E V; Polikarpov, M I

    2010-09-24

    We study the correlator of two vector currents in quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a chirally invariant lattice Dirac operator with a constant external magnetic field. It is found that in the confinement phase the correlator of the components of the current parallel to the magnetic field decays much slower than in the absence of a magnetic field, while for other components the correlation length slightly decreases. We apply the maximal entropy method to extract the corresponding spectral function. In the limit of zero frequency this spectral function yields the electric conductivity of quenched theory. We find that in the confinement phase the external magnetic field induces nonzero electric conductivity along the direction of the field, transforming the system from an insulator into an anisotropic conductor. In the deconfinement phase the conductivity does not exhibit any sizable dependence on the magnetic field. PMID:21230764

  3. The chiral magnetic effect and chiral symmetry breaking in SU(3) quenched lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Braguta, V. V.; Buividovich, P. V. Kalaydzhyan, T. Kuznetsov, S. V. Polikarpov, M. I.

    2012-04-15

    We study some properties of the non-Abelian vacuum induced by strong external magnetic field. We perform calculations in the quenched SU(3) lattice gauge theory with tadpole-improved Luescher-Weisz action and chirally invariant lattice Dirac operator. The following results are obtained: The chiral symmetry breaking is enhanced by the magnetic field. The chiral condensate depends on the strength of the applied field as a power function with exponent {nu} = 1.6 {+-} 0.2. There is a paramagnetic polarization of the vacuum. The corresponding susceptibility and other magnetic properties are calculated and compared with the theoretical estimations. There are nonzero local fluctuations of the chirality and electromagnetic current, which grow with the magnetic field strength. These fluctuations can be a manifestation of the Chiral Magnetic Effect.

  4. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  5. Gauge Configurations for Lattice QCD from The Gauge Connection

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Gauge Connection is an experimental archive for lattice QCD and a repository of gauge configurations made freely available to the community. Contributors to the archive include the Columbia QCDSP collaboration, the MILC collaboration, and others. Configurations are stored in QCD archive format, consisting of an ASCII header which defines various parameters, followed by binary data. NERSC has also provided some utilities and examples that will aid users in handling the data. Users may browse the archive, but are required to register for a password in order to download data. Contents of the archive are organized under four broad headings: Quenched (more than 1200 configurations); Dynamical, Zero Temperature (more than 300 configurations); MILC Improved Staggered Asqtad Lattices (more than 7000 configurations); and Dynamical, Finite Temperature (more than 1200 configurations)

  6. Machines for lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1989-05-01

    The most promising approach to the solution of the theory of strong interactions is large scale numerical simulation using the techniques of lattice gauge theory. At the present time, computing requirements for convincing calculations of the properties of hadrons exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful commercial supercomputers. This has led to the development of massively parallel computers dedicated to lattice gauge theory. This talk will discuss the computing requirements behind these machines, and general features of the components and architectures of the half dozen major projects now in existence. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/..cap alpha.., where ..cap alpha.. is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit ..cap alpha.. ..-->.. 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This will be the emphasis of the first lecture. In the second lecture, the author reviews the essential ingredients of formulating QCD on the lattice and discusses scaling and the continuum limit. In the last lecture the author summarizes the status of some of the main results. He also mentions the bottlenecks and possible directions for research. 88 refs.

  8. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  9. A lattice formulation of chiral gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.

    1996-08-01

    We present a method for implementing gauge theories of chiral fermions on the lattice. Discussed topics include: the lattice as a UV regulator, a chiral QED model, modification of the fermion determinant, large gauge-field momenta, and a non-perturbative problem.

  10. BB Potentials in Quenched Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold; Kostas Orginos; Martin J. Savage

    2007-12-01

    The potentials between two B-mesons are computed in the heavy-quark limit using quenched lattice QCD at $m_\\pi\\sim 400~{\\rm MeV}$. Non-zero central potentials are clearly evident in all four spin-isospin channels, (I,s_l) = (0,0) , (0,1) , (1,0) , (1,1), where s_l is the total spin of the light degrees of freedom. At short distance, we find repulsion in the $I\

  11. Numerical techniques for lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1981-02-06

    The motivation for formulating gauge theories on a lattice is reviewed. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are then discussed for these systems. Finally, the Monte Carlo methods are combined with renormalization group analysis to give strong numerical evidence for confinement of quarks by non-Abelian gauge fields.

  12. Entanglement of Distillation for Lattice Gauge Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Acoleyen, Karel; Bultinck, Nick; Haegeman, Jutho; Marien, Michael; Scholz, Volkher B.; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We study the entanglement structure of lattice gauge theories from the local operational point of view, and, similar to Soni and Trivedi [J. High Energy Phys. 1 (2016) 1], we show that the usual entanglement entropy for a spatial bipartition can be written as the sum of an undistillable gauge part and of another part corresponding to the local operations and classical communication distillable entanglement, which is obtained by depolarizing the local superselection sectors. We demonstrate that the distillable entanglement is zero for pure Abelian gauge theories at zero gauge coupling, while it is in general nonzero for the non-Abelian case. We also consider gauge theories with matter, and show in a perturbative approach how area laws—including a topological correction—emerge for the distillable entanglement. Finally, we also discuss the entanglement entropy of gauge fixed states and show that it has no relation to the physical distillable entropy.

  13. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  14. Anomalies, gauge field topology, and the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2011-04-15

    Motivated by the connection between gauge field topology and the axial anomaly in fermion currents, I suggest that the fourth power of the naive Dirac operator can provide a natural method to define a local lattice measure of topological charge. For smooth gauge fields this reduces to the usual topological density. For typical gauge field configurations in a numerical simulation, however, quantum fluctuations dominate, and the sum of this density over the system does not generally give an integer winding. On cooling with respect to the Wilson gauge action, instanton like structures do emerge. As cooling proceeds, these objects tend shrink and finally 'fall through the lattice.' Modifying the action can block the shrinking at the expense of a loss of reflection positivity. The cooling procedure is highly sensitive to the details of the initial steps, suggesting that quantum fluctuations induce a small but fundamental ambiguity in the definition of topological susceptibility.

  15. Lattice Landau Gauge via Stereographic Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Smekal, L.; Mehta, D.; Sternbeck, A.

    alexander.jorkowski@student.adelaide.edu.au, dhagash.mehta@adelaide.edu.au, andre.sternbeck@adelaide.edu.au The complete cancellation of Gribov copies and the Neuberger 0/0 problem of lattice BRST can be avoided in modified lattice Landau gauge. In compact U(1), where the problem is a lattice artifact, there remain to be Gribov copies but their number is exponentially reduced. Moreover, there is no cancellation of copies there as the sign of the Faddeev-Popov determinant is posi- tive. Applied to the maximal Abelian subgroup this avoids the perfect cancellation amongst the remaining Gribov copies for SU(N) also. In addition, based on a definition of gauge fields on the lattice as stereographically-projected link variables, it provides a framework for gauge fixed Monte-Carlo simulations. This will include all Gribov copies in the spirit of BRST. Their average is not zero, as demonstrated explicitly in simple models. This might resolve present discrepancies between gauge-fixed lattice and continuum studies of QCD Green’s functions.

  16. PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM A SIMULATION OF QUENCHED QCD WITH OVERL AP FERMIONS ON A LARGE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    BERRUTO,F.GARRON,N.HOELBLING,D.LELLOUCH,L.REBBI,C.SHORESH,N.

    2003-07-15

    We simulate quenched QCD with the overlap Dirac operator. We work with the Wilson gauge action at {beta} = 6 on an 18{sup 3} x 64 lattice. We calculate quark propagators for a single source point and quark mass ranging from am{sub 4} = 0.03 to 0.75. We present here preliminary results based on the propagators for 60 gauge field configurations.

  17. Chiral and continuum extrapolation of partially quenched lattice results

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Allton; W. Armour; D.B. Leinweber; A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-04-01

    The vector meson mass is extracted from a large sample of partially quenched, two-flavor lattice QCD simulations. For the first time, discretization, finite-volume and partial quenching artifacts are treated in a unified chiral effective field theory analysis of the lattice simulation results.

  18. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  19. Jarzynski's theorem for lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, Michele; Costagliola, Gianluca; Nada, Alessandro; Panero, Marco; Toniato, Arianna

    2016-08-01

    Jarzynski's theorem is a well-known equality in statistical mechanics, which relates fluctuations in the work performed during a nonequilibrium transformation of a system, to the free-energy difference between two equilibrium ensembles. In this article, we apply Jarzynski's theorem in lattice gauge theory, for two examples of challenging computational problems, namely the calculation of interface free energies and the determination of the equation of state. We conclude with a discussion of further applications of interest in QCD and in other strongly coupled gauge theories, in particular for the Schrödinger functional and for simulations at finite density using reweighting techniques.

  20. Lattice gauge theory and Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1988-11-01

    Lattice gauge theory is now the primary non-perturbative technique for quantum field theory. The lattice represents an ultraviolet cutoff, and renormalization group arguments show how the bare coupling must be varied to obtain the continuum limit. Expansions in the inverse of the coupling constant demonstrate quark confinement in the strong coupling limit. Numerical simulation has become the approach to calculating hadronic properties. The basic algorithms for obtaining appropriately weighted gauge field configurations are discussed. Algorithms for treating fermionic fields, which still require considerably more computer time than needed for purely bosonic simulations, are also discussed. Some particularly promising recent approaches are based on global accept-reject steps and should display a rather favorable dependence of computer time on the system volume. 39 refs.

  1. Gauge covariant fermion propagator in quenched, chirally symmetric quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Dong, Z.; Munczek, H.J.

    1995-08-01

    The chirally symmetric solution of the massless, quenched, Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) for the fermion propagator in three- and four-dimensional quantum electrodynamics was obtained. The DSEs are a valuable nonperturbative tool for studying field theories. In recent years a good deal of progress was made in addressing the limitations of the DSE approach in the study of Abelian gauge theories. Key to this progress is an understanding of the role of the dressed fermion/gauge-boson vertex in ensuring gauge covariance and multiplicative renormalizability of the solution of the fermion DSE. The solutions we obtain are manifestly gauge covariant and a general gauge covariance constraint on the fermion/gauge-boson vertex is presented, which motivates a vertex Ansatz that, for the first time, both satisfies the Ward identity when the fermion self-mass is zero and ensures gauge covariance of the fermion propagator. This research facilitates gauge-invariant, nonperturbative studies of continuum quantum electrodynamics and has already been used by others in studies of the chiral phase transition.

  2. Lattice gauge theories and Monte Carlo algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1988-10-01

    Lattice gauge theory has become the primary tool for non-perturbative calculations in quantum field theory. These lectures review some of the foundations of this subject. The first lecture reviews the basic definition of the theory in terms of invariant integrals over group elements on lattice bonds. The lattice represents an ultraviolet cutoff, and renormalization group arguments show how the bare coupling must be varied to obtain the continuum limit. Expansions in the inverse of the coupling constant demonstrate quark confinement in the strong coupling limit. The second lecture turns to numerical simulation, which has become an important approach to calculating hadronic properties. Here I discuss the basic algorithms for obtaining appropriately weighted gauge field configurations. The third lecture turns to algorithms for treating fermionic fields, which still require considerably more computer time than needed for purely bosonic simulations. Some particularly promising recent approaches are based on global accept-reject steps and should display a rather favorable dependence of computer time on the system volume. 34 refs.

  3. Parallel supercomputers for lattice gauge theory.

    PubMed

    Brown, F R; Christ, N H

    1988-03-18

    During the past 10 years, particle physicists have increasingly employed numerical simulation to answer fundamental theoretical questions about the properties of quarks and gluons. The enormous computer resources required by quantum chromodynamic calculations have inspired the design and construction of very powerful, highly parallel, dedicated computers optimized for this work. This article gives a brief description of the numerical structure and current status of these large-scale lattice gauge theory calculations, with emphasis on the computational demands they make. The architecture, present state, and potential of these special-purpose supercomputers is described. It is argued that a numerical solution of low energy quantum chromodynamics may well be achieved by these machines.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C

    1980-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations done for four-dimensional lattice gauge systems are described, where the gauge group is one of the following: U(1); SU(2); Z/sub N/, i.e., the subgroup of U(1) consisting of the elements e 2..pi..in/N with integer n and N; the eight-element group of quaternions, Q; the 24- and 48-element subgroups of SU(2), denoted by T and O, which reduce to the rotation groups of the tetrahedron and the octahedron when their centers Z/sub 2/, are factored out. All of these groups can be considered subgroups of SU(2) and a common normalization was used for the action. The following types of Monte Carlo experiments are considered: simulations of a thermal cycle, where the temperature of the system is varied slightly every few Monte Carlo iterations and the internal energy is measured; mixed-phase runs, where several Monte Carlo iterations are done at a few temperatures near a phase transition starting with a lattice which is half ordered and half disordered; measurements of averages of Wilson factors for loops of different shape. 5 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  5. Monte Carlo methods in lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The mass of the O/sup +/ glueball for SU(2) gauge theory in 4 dimensions is calculated. This computation was done on a prototype parallel processor and the implementation of gauge theories on this system is described in detail. Using an action of the purely Wilson form (tract of plaquette in the fundamental representation), results with high statistics are obtained. These results are not consistent with scaling according to the continuum renormalization group. Using actions containing higher representations of the group, a search is made for one which is closer to the continuum limit. The choice is based upon the phase structure of these extended theories and also upon the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation to the renormalizaiton group on the lattice. The mass of the O/sup +/ glueball for this improved action is obtained and the mass divided by the square root of the string tension is a constant as the lattice spacing is varied. The other topic studied is the inclusion of dynamical fermions into Monte Carlo calculations via the pseudo fermion technique. Monte Carlo results obtained with this method are compared with those from an exact algorithm based on Gauss-Seidel inversion. First applied were the methods to the Schwinger model and SU(3) theory.

  6. Atomic quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields coupled to fermionic matter: from string breaking to evolution after a quench.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, D; Dalmonte, M; Müller, M; Rico, E; Stebler, P; Wiese, U-J; Zoller, P

    2012-10-26

    Using a Fermi-Bose mixture of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice, we construct a quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge theory coupled to fermionic matter. The construction is based on quantum links which realize continuous gauge symmetry with discrete quantum variables. At low energies, quantum link models with staggered fermions emerge from a Hubbard-type model which can be quantum simulated. This allows us to investigate string breaking as well as the real-time evolution after a quench in gauge theories, which are inaccessible to classical simulation methods.

  7. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel, A

    2008-05-30

    In this document we describe work done under the SciDAC-1 Project National Computerational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory. The objective of this project was to construct the computational infrastructure needed to study quantim chromodynamics (QCD). Nearly all high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States working on the numerical study of QCD are involved in the project, as are Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A list of the serior participants is given in Appendix A.2. The project includes the development of community software for the effective use of the terascale computers, and the research and development of commodity clusters optimized for the study of QCD. The software developed as part of this effort is pubicly available, and is being widely used by physicists in the United States and abroad. The prototype clusters built with SciDAC-1 fund have been used to test the software, and are available to lattice guage theorists in the United States on a peer reviewed basis.

  8. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Chiral logs and the quenched approximation on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrucci, Stefania

    1997-12-01

    The phenomenological success of the quenched approximation has been impressive in obtaining accurate results for the mass spectrum and other aspects of hadron structure. However, an independent theoretical estimate of the systematic error introduced by quenching is still missing. To this end, it can be useful to consider chiral theories which, at the one-loop level, introduced peculiar non analytical terms (the so-called chiral logs). Sharpe showed that when this framework is adapted to the quenched approximation, the dependence of the pion mass squared on the quark mass can be described by an anomalous power δ (the 'hairpin' diagram on the pion mass shell) associated with flavor singlet loops and enhanced chiral logs. Treating the hairpin as a momentum independent mass insertion, he estimated δ≃0.2. However, numerical calculations in quenched lattice quantum chromodynamics show little or no evidence for chiral logs at such a level. The following work determines the anomalous power numerically by studying the pion mass as a function of the bare quark mass, as well as its volume dependence. Sources of systematic error are carefully examined. Last, the coefficient of the chiral log is calculated from the two quark-loops pion propagator. The results consistently indicate a value for the anomalous power that is approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the earlier theoretical estimate, in particular/delta = 0.013(2)From this one can see that for all pion masses considered, the systematic error introduced by quenching is small and always within the statistical error. Finally, by a direct calculation of the topological susceptibility of the lattice configurations, I conclude that the reason why the anomalous power is so small is a strong momentum dependence giving rise to a suppression of the hairpin at momenta comparable with the pion mass.

  10. Finite temperature quenches of fermions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian G.; Hulet, Randall G.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Although interaction quenches are known to drive interesting dynamics, most prior work has focused on quenches initiated from states that are well below the system's ordering temperature. Motivated by experiments with ultracold fermions in optical lattices, which currently are outside of this regime, we study interaction quenches in the Fermi-Hubbard model that start from finite-temperature initial states. We show that interesting dynamics occurs even under these conditions. A particularly important scenario is quenching to non-interacting systems, which despite its simplicity has been the focus of recent work as a prototype for integrability and prethermalization. In the limit where the temperature T is much greater than the tunneling t, we find that there is transient growth of short-ranged correlations. However, the steady state created in this case is essentially trivial: it is equivalent to an equilibrium T / t = ∞ state. We find more interesting steady states for large, but finite, T / t . We calculate the associated experimental observables by combining a high- T expansion of the interacting initial state with the exact calculation of the non-interacting dynamics.

  11. Quenched dynamics of superconducting Dirac fermions on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming; Xie, X. C.; X. C. Xie's group Team

    We study the BCS paring dynamics for the superconducting Dirac fermions on honeycomb lattice after a sudden quench of pairing strength. We observe two distinct phases, one is the synchronized phase with undamped oscillations of paring amplitude; the other phase has the paring amplitude oscillates from positive to negative. The exact phase transition point is given by investigating the integrability of the system. Different from the previous work on normal superconducting fermions, which has three distinct phases, our results shows the absence of the Landau damped phase and over damped phase. Moreover, we present a linear analysis in the weakly quenched regime, showing that in a rather long time scale, the dynamics can be approximated as the periodic oscillation with 2Δ∞ angular frequency along with the logarithmic decay of the pairing amplitude, in contrast of the t - 1 / 2 decay for the normal fermions, namely the Landau damped phase. The presenter's advisor.

  12. SU(3) lattice gauge autocorrelations with anisotropic action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Terrence; Nenkov, Constantine; Peardon, Mike

    1997-02-01

    We report results of autocorrelation measurements in pure SU(3) lattice gauge theory. The computations are performed on the CONVEX SPP1200 parallel platform within the CANOPY programming environment. The focus of our analysis is on typical autocorrelation times and optimization of the mixing ratio between overrelaxation and pseudo-heatbath sweeps for generating gauge field configurations. We study second order tadpole-improved approximation of the Wilson action in the gluon sector, which offers the advantage on smaller lattices (8 3 × 16 and 6 3 × 12 - 30). We also make use of anisotropic lattices, with temporal lattice spacing smaller than the spatial spacing, which prove useful for calculating noisy correlation functions with large spatial lattice discretization (of the order of 0.4 fm).

  13. A construction of lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert

    1995-02-01

    Path integration over Euclidean chiral fermions is replaced by the quantum mechanics of an auxiliary system of non-interacting fermions. Our construction avoids the no-go theorem and faithfully maintains all the known important features of chiral fermions, including the violation of some perturbative conservation laws by gauge field configurations of non-trivial topology.

  14. Lattice gauge theory as a nuclear many-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.; Bloom, S.D.; Snyderman, N.J.

    1986-10-15

    We discuss the conceptual connection between lattice quantum chromodynamics and a nuclear many-body problem. We begin with an illustrative example of how the 0(3) nonlinear sigma model in (1+1) dimensions can be computed with a nuclear shell-model code with a speed which is competitive with other approaches. We then describe progress toward the implementation of this technology in lattice SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge theory.

  15. Lattice gauge theory as a nuclear many-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.; Bloom, S.D.; Snyderman, N.J.

    1986-05-01

    The conceptual connection between lattice quantum chromodynamics and a nuclear many-body problem is discussed. An illustrative example is given now the 0(3) nonlinear sigma model in (1 + 1) dimensions can be computered with a nuclear shell-model code with a speed which is competitive with other approaches. Progress toward the implementation of this technology in lattice SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge theory is described. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  16. THE EARLY DAYS OF LATTICE GAUGE THEORY.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2003-06-09

    I discuss some of the historical circumstances that drove us to use the lattice as a non-perturbative regulator. This approach has had immense success, convincingly demonstrating quark confinement and obtaining crucial properties of the strong interactions from first principles. I wrap up with some challenges for the future.

  17. Calculation of Helium nuclei in quenched lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ukawa, A.

    2011-10-24

    We present results for the binding energies for {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He nuclei calculated in quenched lattice QCD at the lattice spacing of a = 0.128 fm with a heavy quark mass corresponding to m{sub {pi}} = 0.8 GeV. Enormous computational cost for the nucleus correlation functions is reduced by avoiding redundancy of equivalent contractions stemming from permutation symmetry of protons or neutrons in the nucleus and various other symmetries. To distinguish a bound state from an attractive scattering state, we investigate the volume dependence of the energy difference between the ground state of the nucleus channel and the free multi-nucleon state by changing the spatial extent of the lattice from 3.1 fm to 12.3 fm. A finite energy difference left in the infinite spatial volume limit leads to the conclusion that the measured ground states are bounded. It is also encouraging that the measured binding energies and the experimental ones show the same order of magnitude.

  18. Nonlocal Hamiltonian gauge theories and their connection with lattice Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Ktorides, C.N.; Mavromatos, N.E.

    1985-06-15

    We introduce the concept of primitive Hamiltonian density for nonlocal Abelian gauge theories. We subsequently study the local limit both with respect to the continuum and with respect to a lattice structure introduced via hypercubic cells. The non-Abelian case is also discussed.

  19. B0-B0 mixing in quenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Onogi, T.; Tsutsui, N.; Ukawa, A.; Yamada, N.; Yoshié, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present our results of lattice calculations of B parameters, which parametrize ΔB=2 transition amplitudes together with the leptonic decay constant. Calculations are made in the quenched approximation at β=5.7, 5.9, 6.0 and 6.1, using NRQCD action for heavy quarks and the O(a)-improved Wilson action for light quarks. The operators are perturbatively renormalized including the correction of O(αs/(aM)m) (m⩾0). We examine the scaling behavior of B parameters, and discuss the systematic uncertainties based on the results with several different truncations of higher order terms in 1/M and αs expansions. We find BBd(mb)=0.84(3)(5), BBs/BBd=1.020(21)(+15-16)(+5-0) and BSs(mb)=0.85(1)(5)(+1- 0) in the quenched approximation. The errors represent statistical and systematic errors as well as the uncertainty in the determination of strange quark mass.

  20. Cold Atoms in Non-Abelian Gauge Potentials: From the Hofstadter Moth to Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osterloh, K.; Baig, M.; Santos, L.; Zoller, P.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-07-01

    We demonstrate how to create artificial external non-Abelian gauge potentials acting on cold atoms in optical lattices. The method employs atoms with k internal states, and laser assisted state sensitive tunneling, described by unitary kxk matrices. The single-particle dynamics in the case of intense U(2) vector potentials lead to a generalized Hofstadter butterfly spectrum which shows a complex mothlike structure. We discuss the possibility to realize non-Abelian interferometry (Aharonov-Bohm effect) and to study many-body dynamics of ultracold matter in external lattice gauge fields.

  1. Effects of the quark field on the ghost propagator of lattice Landau gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Sadataka; Nakajima, Hideo

    2006-05-01

    Infrared features of the ghost propagator of color-diagonal and color antisymmetric ghost propagator of quenched SU(2) and quenched SU(3) are compared with those of unquenched Kogut-Susskind fermion SU(3) lattice Landau gauge. We compare (i) the fluctuation of the ghost propagator (ii) the ghost condensate parameter v of the local composite operator (LCO) approach, and (iii) the Binder cumulant of color antisymmetric ghost propagator between quenched and unquenched configurations. The color-diagonal SU(3) ghost dressing function of unquenched configurations has weaker singularity than the quenched configurations. In both cases fluctuations become large in q<0.5 GeV. The ghost condensate parameter v in the ghost propagator of the unquenched MILC{sub c} configuration samples is {approx}0.002-0.04 GeV{sup 2} while that of the SU(2) parallel tempering samples is consistent with 0. The Binder cumulant defined as U(q)=1-(1/3)(<{phi}-vector{sup 4}>/(<{phi}-vector{sup 2}>){sup 2}), where {phi}-vector(q) is the color antisymmetric ghost propagator measured by the sample average of gauge fixed configurations via parallel tempering method, becomes {approx}4/9 in all the momentum region. The Binder cumulant of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator of quenched SU(2) can be explained by the 3D Gaussian distribution, but that of the unquenched MILC{sub c} deviates slightly from that of the eight-dimensional Gaussian distribution. The stronger singularity and large fluctuation in the quenched configuration could be the cause of the deviation of the Kugo-Ojima confinement parameter c from 1, and the presence of ordering in the ghost propagator of unquenched configurations makes it closer to 1.

  2. Quench and Transport Dynamics in Disordered Atomic Hubbard Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Brian

    I will give an overview of our experiments using ultracold atom gases trapped in optical lattices to probe transport, dynamics, and relaxation in disordered Hubbard models. By introducing disorder to naturally clean optical lattices using focused optical speckle, we realize variants of the disordered Bose- and Fermi-Hubbard models. In these systems, the distribution of Hubbard parameters is fully known, and the ratio of characteristic energy scales is completely tunable. I will discuss two measurements. In the first, we observe localization via transport measurements in the metallic regime of the Fermi-Hubbard model. We observe three phenomena consistent with many-body localization: localization at non-zero temperature, localization across a range of temperatures, and interaction-induced delocalization. These measurements show agreement with a mean-field theory in a limited parameter regime. In a separate experiment using bosonic atoms, we measure excitations following a quantum quench of disorder. Via comparison to state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations that capture all aspects of the experiments--including all the particles--we show that the onset of excitations corresponds to the superfluid-Bose-glass transition. I will discuss how this behavior is reminiscent of the quantum Kibble-Zurek effect. This work is funded by the NSF and ARO.

  3. Covariant Gauge on the Lattice: A New Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Mendes, Tereza; Santos, Elton M. S.

    2009-10-02

    We derive a new implementation of linear covariant gauges on the lattice, based on a minimizing functional that can be interpreted as the Hamiltonian of a spin-glass model in a random external magnetic field. We show that our method solves most problems encountered in earlier implementations, mostly related to the no-go condition formulated by Giusti [Nucl. Phys. B498, 331 (1997)]. We carry out tests in the SU(2) case in four space-time dimensions. We also present preliminary results for the transverse gluon propagator at different values of the gauge parameter xi.

  4. Tunneling Dynamics and Gauge Potentials in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S. K.; Teo, B. K.; Raithel, G.

    1999-09-01

    We study periodic well-to-well tunneling of 87Rb atoms on adiabatic potential surfaces of a 1D optical lattice. The observed dependence of the lowest-band tunneling period on the depth of the adiabatic potential can only be explained by an additional intensity-independent gauge potential predicted by Dum et al. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with our quantum Monte Carlo wave-function simulations and band structure calculations.

  5. Tight-binding lattices with an oscillating imaginary gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    We consider non-Hermitian dynamics of a quantum particle hopping on a one-dimensional tight-binding lattice made of N sites with asymmetric hopping rates induced by a time-periodic oscillating imaginary gauge field. A deeply different behavior is found depending on the lattice topology. While in a linear chain (open boundary conditions) an oscillating field can lead to a complex quasienergy spectrum via a multiple parametric resonance; in a ring topology (Born-von Karman periodic boundary conditions) an entirely real quasienergy spectrum can be found and the dynamics is pseudo-Hermitian. In the large-N limit, parametric instability and pseudo-Hermitian dynamics in the two different lattice topologies are physically explained on the basis of a simple picture of wave-packet propagation.

  6. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  7. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices. PMID:26684222

  8. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, D.; Widmer, P.; Rico, E.; Hafezi, M.; Rabl, P.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2014-12-15

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability.

  9. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, D.; Widmer, P.; Rico, E.; Hafezi, M.; Rabl, P.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2014-01-01

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability. PMID:25512676

  10. Feynman Gauge on the Lattice: New Results and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Mendes, Tereza; Nakamura, Gilberto M.; Santos, Elton M. S.

    2011-05-24

    We have recently introduced a new implementation of the Feynman gauge on the lattice, based on a minimizing functional that extends in a natural way the Landau-gauge case, while preserving all the properties of the continuum formulation. The only remaining difficulty with our approach is that, using the standard (compact) discretization, the gluon field is bounded, while its four-divergence satisfies a Gaussian distribution, i.e. it is unbounded. This can give rise to convergence problems when a numerical implementation is attempted. In order to overcome this problem, one can use different discretizations for the gluon field, or consider an SU(N{sub c}) group with sufficiently large N{sub c}. Here we discuss these two possible solutions.

  11. Lattice Gauge Theory and the Origin of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2013-08-01

    Most of the mass of everyday objects resides in atomic nuclei/ the total of the electrons' mass adds up to less than one part in a thousand. The nuclei are composed of nucleons---protons and neutrons---whose nuclear binding energy, though tremendous on a human scale, is small compared to their rest energy. The nucleons are, in turn, composites of massless gluons and nearly massless quarks. It is the energy of these confined objects, via $M=E/c^2$, that is responsible for everyday mass. This article discusses the physics of this mechanism and the role of lattice gauge theory in establishing its connection to quantum chromodynamics.

  12. MATRIX PRODUCT VARIATIONAL FORMULATION FOR LATTICE GAUGE THEORY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGIHARA,T.

    2004-09-21

    For hamiltonian lattice gauge theory, we introduce the matrix product ansatz inspired from density matrix renormalization group. In this method, wavefunction of the target state is assumed to be a product of finite matrices. As a result, the energy becomes a simple function of the matrices, which can be evaluated using a computer. The minimum of the energy function corresponds to the vacuum state. We show that the S = 1/2 Heisenberg chain model are well described with the ansatz. The method is also applied to the two-dimensional S = 1/2 Heisenberg and U(1) plaquette chain models.

  13. Lattice gauge theory on the Intel parallel scientific computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Steven

    1990-08-01

    Intel Scientific Computers (ISC) has just started producing its third general of parallel computer, the iPSC/860. Based on the i860 chip that has a peak performance of 80 Mflops and with a current maximum of 128 nodes, this computer should achieve speeds in excess of those obtainable on conventional vector supercomputers. The hardware, software and computing techniques appropriate for lattice gauge theory calculations are described. The differences between a staggered fermion conjugate gradient program written under CANOPY and for the iPSC are detailed.

  14. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  15. Topics in Lattice Gauge Theory and Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komijani, Javad

    This dissertation contains two completely independent parts. In Part 1, I investigate effective field theories and their applications in lattice gauge theory. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as a part of the standard model (SM) describes the physics of quarks and gluons. There are several numerical and analytical methods to tackle the QCD problems. Lattice QCD is the dominant numerical method. Effective field theories, on the other hand, provide analytic methods to describe the low-energy dynamics of QCD. To use the effective theories in lattice QCD, I develop chiral perturbation theory for heavy-light mesons with staggered quarks---an implementation of fermions on lattice. I use this effective chiral theory to study the pattern of taste splitting in masses of the mesons with staggered quarks. I also calculate the leptonic decay constant of the heavy-light mesons with staggered quarks to one-loop order in the chiral expansion. The resulting chiral formula provides a suitable fit form to combine and analyze a large number of decay constants of heavy-light mesons computed from different lattice ensembles with various choices of input parameters. I perform a comprehensive chiral fit to the lattice data for D mesons computed by the MILC collaboration. Consequently, I determine the physical values of the decay constants of D mesons. These precise results place narrow restrictions on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix elements. In Part 2, I introduce the concept of a nonlinear eigenvalue problem by investigating three nonlinear differential equations. First, equation y'(x) = cos[pixy(x)] is investigated. A discrete set of initial conditions y(0) = an, leading to unstable separatrix behavior, are identified as the eigenvalues of the problem. I calculate the asymptotic behavior of the initial conditions an and their corresponding solutions for large n by reducing the equation to a linear one-dimensional random-walk problem. Second, I investigate equation y''(x)=6[y( x

  16. Simulation of non-Abelian gauge theories with optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Tagliacozzo, L; Celi, A; Orland, P; Mitchell, M W; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    Many phenomena occurring in strongly correlated quantum systems still await conclusive explanations. The absence of isolated free quarks in nature is an example. It is attributed to quark confinement, whose origin is not yet understood. The phase diagram for nuclear matter at general temperatures and densities, studied in heavy-ion collisions, is not settled. Finally, we have no definitive theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Though we have theories that could underlie such physics, we lack the tools to determine the experimental consequences of these theories. Quantum simulators may provide such tools. Here we show how to engineer quantum simulators of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. The systems we consider have several applications: they can be used to mimic quark confinement or to study dimer and valence-bond states (which may be relevant for high-temperature superconductors). PMID:24162080

  17. Simulation of non-Abelian gauge theories with optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Orland, P.; Mitchell, M. W.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-10-01

    Many phenomena occurring in strongly correlated quantum systems still await conclusive explanations. The absence of isolated free quarks in nature is an example. It is attributed to quark confinement, whose origin is not yet understood. The phase diagram for nuclear matter at general temperatures and densities, studied in heavy-ion collisions, is not settled. Finally, we have no definitive theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Though we have theories that could underlie such physics, we lack the tools to determine the experimental consequences of these theories. Quantum simulators may provide such tools. Here we show how to engineer quantum simulators of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. The systems we consider have several applications: they can be used to mimic quark confinement or to study dimer and valence-bond states (which may be relevant for high-temperature superconductors).

  18. Unifying all classical spin models in a lattice gauge theory.

    PubMed

    De las Cuevas, G; Dür, W; Briegel, H J; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2009-06-12

    The partition function of all classical spin models, including all discrete standard statistical models and all Abelian discrete lattice gauge theories (LGTs), is expressed as a special instance of the partition function of the 4D Z2 LGT. This unifies all classical spin models with apparently very different features in a single complete model. This result is applied to establish a new method to compute the mean-field theory of Abelian discrete LGTs with d > or = 4, and to show that computing the partition function of the 4D Z2 LGT is computationally hard (#P hard). The 4D Z2 LGT is also proved to be approximately complete for Abelian continuous models. The proof uses techniques from quantum information.

  19. Infrared features of unquenched finite temperature lattice Landau gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Sadataka; Nakajima, Hideo

    2007-09-01

    The color diagonal and color antisymmetric ghost propagators slightly above T{sub c} of N{sub f}=2 MILC 24{sup 3}x12 lattices are measured and compared with zero-temperature unquenched N{sub f}=2+1 MILC{sub c} 20{sup 3}x64 and MILC{sub f} 28{sup 3}x96 lattices and zero-temperature quenched 56{sup 4} {beta}=6.4 and 6.45 lattices. The expectation value of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator {phi}{sup c}(q) is zero, but its Binder cumulant, which is consistent with that of N{sub c}{sup 2}-1 dimensional Gaussian distribution below T{sub c}, decreases above T{sub c}. Although the color diagonal ghost propagator is temperature independent, the l{sup 1} norm of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator is temperature dependent. The expectation value of the ghost condensate observed at zero-temperature unquenched configuration is consistent with 0 in T>T{sub c}. We also measure transverse, magnetic, and electric gluon propagator and extract gluon screening masses. The running coupling measured from the product of the gluon dressing function and the ghost dressing function are almost temperature independent, but the effect of A{sup 2} condensate observed at zero temperature is consistent with 0 in T>T{sub c}. The transverse gluon dressing function at low temperature has a peak in the infrared at low temperature, but it becomes flatter at high temperature. The magnetic gluon propagator at high momentum depends on the temperature. These data imply that the magnetic gluon propagator and the color antisymmetric ghost propagator are affected by the presence of dynamical quarks, and there are strong nonperturbative effects through the temperature-dependent color antisymmetric ghost propagator.

  20. An analysis of the nucleon spectrum from lattice partially-quenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    W. Armour; Allton, C. R.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2010-09-01

    The chiral extrapolation of the nucleon mass, Mn, is investigated using data coming from 2-flavour partially-quenched lattice simulations. The leading one-loop corrections to the nucleon mass are derived for partially-quenched QCD. A large sample of lattice results from the CP-PACS Collaboration is analysed, with explicit corrections for finite lattice spacing artifacts. The extrapolation is studied using finite range regularised chiral perturbation theory. The analysis also provides a quantitative estimate of the leading finite volume corrections. It is found that the discretisation, finite-volume and partial quenching effects can all be very well described in this framework, producing an extrapolated value of Mn in agreement with experiment. This procedure is also compared with extrapolations based on polynomial forms, where the results are less encouraging.

  1. Study of Z(N) gauge theories on a three-dimensional pseudorandom lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Pertermann, D.; Ranft, J. )

    1988-01-01

    Using the simplicial pseudorandom version of lattice gauge theory the authors study simple Z(eta) gauge models in D = 3 dimensions. In this formulation it is possible to interpolate continuously between a regular simplicial lattice and a pseudorandom lattice. Calculating average plaquette expectation values they look for the phase transitions of the Z(eta) gauge models with eta = 2 and 3. They find all the phase transitions to be of first order, also in the case of the Z(2) model. The critical couplings increase with the irregularity of the lattice.

  2. Scalar meson in dynamical and partially quenched two-flavor QCD: Lattice results and chiral loops

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, S.; Dawson, C.; Izubuchi, T.; Orginos, K.; Soni, A.

    2004-11-01

    This is an exploratory study of the lightest nonsinglet scalar qq state on the lattice with two dynamical quarks. Domain wall fermions are used for both sea and valence quarks on a 16{sup 3}x32 lattice with an inverse lattice spacing of 1.7 GeV. We extract the scalar meson mass 1.58{+-}0.34 GeV from the exponential time dependence of the dynamical correlators with m{sub val}=m{sub sea} and N{sub f}=2. Since this statistical error bar from dynamical correlators is rather large, we analyze also the partially quenched lattice correlators with m{sub val}{ne}m{sub sea}. They are positive for m{sub val}{>=}m{sub sea} and negative for m{sub val}quenching, we derive the scalar correlator within the partially quenched chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) and find it describes lattice correlators well. The leading unphysical contribution in partially quenched ChPT comes from the exchange of the two pseudoscalar fields and is also positive for m{sub val}{>=}m{sub sea} and negative for m{sub val}quenched lattice correlators, the correlators are positive and exponentially falling. The resulting scalar meson mass 1.51{+-}0.19 GeV from the partially quenched correlators is consistent with the dynamical result and has an appreciably smaller error bar.

  3. Proposals for quantum simulating simple lattice gauge theory models using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Unmuth-Yockey, Judah; Bazavov, Alexei; Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    We derive an effective spin Hamiltonian for the (1 +1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the strongly coupled region by integrating out the link variables. With finite spin truncations, the Hamiltonian can be matched with a 1-dimensional two-species Bose Hubbard model in the strong-coupling limit that can be implemented with cold atoms on an optical lattice. We study the phase diagram of the original Abelian Higgs model with Monte Carlo simulation and Tensor Renormalization Group methods. The results show a crossover line which terminates near the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition point. The effective quantum Hamiltonian is also studied with the DMRG method, and we find that they have a similar behavior. We discuss practical experimental implementations for our quantum simulator. Species-dependent optical lattices and ladder systems with double-well potentials are considered. We show how to obtain each of the interaction parameters required in the Bose-Hubbard model that we obtained, and confirm the possibility of tuning these interactions to the region in which our mapping is valid. We emphasize that this proposal for quantum simulating a gauge theory uses a manifestly gauge-invariant formulation and Gauss's Law is therefore automatically satisfied. Supported by DoD ARO under Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0119 and by the NSF under Grants No. DMR-1411345.

  4. Two-point functions of quenched lattice QCD in Numerical Stochastic Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, F.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Torrero, C.

    2011-05-23

    We summarize the higher-loop perturbative computation of the ghost and gluon propagators in SU(3) Lattice Gauge Theory. Our final aim is to compare with results from lattice simulations in order to expose the genuinely non-perturbative content of the latter. By means of Numerical Stochastic Perturbation Theory we compute the ghost and gluon propagators in Landau gauge up to three and four loops. We present results in the infinite volume and a{yields}0 limits, based on a general fitting strategy.

  5. An analysis of the nucleon spectrum from lattice partially-quenched QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, W.; Allton, C. R.; Leinweber, D. B.; Thomas, A. W.; Young, R. D.; Physics; Swansea Univ.; Univ. of Adelaide; Coll. of William and Mary

    2010-09-01

    The chiral extrapolation of the nucleon mass, M{sub n}, is investigated using data coming from 2-flavour partially-quenched lattice simulations. A large sample of lattice results from the CP-PACS Collaboration is analysed using the leading one-loop corrections, with explicit corrections for finite lattice spacing artifacts. The extrapolation is studied using finite-range regularised chiral perturbation theory. The analysis also provides a quantitative estimate of the leading finite volume corrections. It is found that the discretisation, finite volume and partial quenching effects can all be very well described in this framework, producing an extrapolated value of Mn in agreement with experiment. Furthermore, determinations of the low energy constants of the nucleon mass's chiral expansion are in agreement with previous methods, but with significantly reduced errors. This procedure is also compared with extrapolations based on polynomial forms, where the results are less encouraging.

  6. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  7. Sudden-quench dynamics of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer states in deep optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuske, Marlon; Mathey, L.; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-08-01

    We determine the exact dynamics of an initial Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of ultracold atoms in a deep hexagonal optical lattice. The dynamical evolution is triggered by a quench of the lattice potential such that the interaction strength Uf is much larger than the hopping amplitude Jf. The quench initiates collective oscillations with frequency | Uf|/2 π in the momentum occupation numbers and imprints an oscillating phase with the same frequency on the BCS order parameter Δ . The oscillation frequency of Δ is not reproduced by treating the time evolution in mean-field theory. In our theory, the momentum noise (i.e., density-density) correlation functions oscillate at frequency | Uf|/2 π as well as at its second harmonic. For a very deep lattice, with zero tunneling energy, the oscillations of momentum occupation numbers are undamped. Nonzero tunneling after the quench leads to dephasing of the different momentum modes and a subsequent damping of the oscillations. The damping occurs even for a finite-temperature initial BCS state, but not for a noninteracting Fermi gas. Furthermore, damping is stronger for larger order parameter and may therefore be used as a signature of the BCS state. Finally, our theory shows that the noise correlation functions in a honeycomb lattice will develop strong anticorrelations near the Dirac point.

  8. Simplicial pseudorandom lattice study of a three-dimensional Abelian gauge model, the regular lattice as an extremum of the action

    SciTech Connect

    Pertermann, D.; Ranft, J.

    1986-09-15

    We introduce a simplicial pseudorandom version of lattice gauge theory. In this formulation it is possible to interpolate continuously between a regular simplicial lattice and a pseudorandom lattice. Using this method we study a simple three-dimensional Abelian lattice gauge theory. Calculating average plaquette expectation values, we find an extremum of the action for our regular simplicial lattice. Such a behavior was found in analytical studies in one and two dimensions.

  9. SU(3) Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators using the logarithmic lattice gluon field definition

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgenfritz, Ernst-Michael; Menz, Christoph; Mueller-Preussker, Michael; Schiller, Arwed; Sternbeck, Andre

    2011-03-01

    We study the Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators of SU(3) gauge theory, employing the logarithmic definition for the lattice gluon fields and implementing the corresponding form of the Faddeev-Popov matrix. This is necessary in order to consistently compare lattice data for the bare propagators with that of higher-loop numerical stochastic perturbation theory. In this paper we provide such a comparison, and introduce what is needed for an efficient lattice study. When comparing our data for the logarithmic definition to that of the standard lattice Landau gauge we clearly see the propagators to be multiplicatively related. The data of the associated ghost-gluon coupling matches up almost completely. For the explored lattice spacings and sizes discretization artifacts, finite size, and Gribov-copy effects are small. At weak coupling and large momentum, the bare propagators and the ghost-gluon coupling are seen to be approached by those of higher-order numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  10. Gluon and ghost propagators in the Landau gauge: Deriving lattice results from Schwinger-Dyson equations

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Papavassiliou, J.; Binosi, D.

    2008-07-15

    We show that the application of a novel gauge-invariant truncation scheme to the Schwinger-Dyson equations of QCD leads, in the Landau gauge, to an infrared finite gluon propagator and a divergent ghost propagator, in qualitative agreement with recent lattice data.

  11. Permanent quark confinement in four-dimensional hierarchical lattice gauge theories of Migdal-Kadanoff type

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, K.R.

    1985-08-05

    Permanent quark confinement is established for four-dimensional hierarchical lattice gauge theories in which the Migdal-Kadanoff approximate renormalization recursion formulas hold exactly. This holds for gauge groups G = SU(N) as well as G = U(N).

  12. Anomalous diffusion in a quenched-trap model on fractal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaguchi, Tomoshige; Akimoto, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    Models with mixed origins of anomalous subdiffusion have been considered important for understanding transport in biological systems. Here one such mixed model, the quenched-trap model (QTM) on fractal lattices, is investigated. It is shown that both ensemble- and time-averaged mean-square displacements (MSDs) show subdiffusion with different scaling exponents, i.e., this system shows weak ergodicity breaking. Moreover, time-averaged MSD exhibits aging and converges to a random variable following the modified Mittag-Leffler distribution. It is also shown that the QTM on a fractal lattice cannot be reduced to the continuous-time random walks if the spectral dimension of the fractal lattice is less than 2.

  13. Anomalous diffusion in a quenched-trap model on fractal lattices.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Tomoshige; Akimoto, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    Models with mixed origins of anomalous subdiffusion have been considered important for understanding transport in biological systems. Here one such mixed model, the quenched-trap model (QTM) on fractal lattices, is investigated. It is shown that both ensemble- and time-averaged mean-square displacements (MSDs) show subdiffusion with different scaling exponents, i.e., this system shows weak ergodicity breaking. Moreover, time-averaged MSD exhibits aging and converges to a random variable following the modified Mittag-Leffler distribution. It is also shown that the QTM on a fractal lattice cannot be reduced to the continuous-time random walks if the spectral dimension of the fractal lattice is less than 2.

  14. Strong-coupling study of the Gribov ambiguity in lattice Landau gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Axel; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Spielmann, Daniel; Sternbeck, André; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2010-07-01

    We study the strong-coupling limit β=0 of lattice SU(2) Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. In this limit the lattice spacing is infinite, and thus all momenta in physical units are infinitesimally small. Hence, the infrared behavior can be assessed at sufficiently large lattice momenta. Our results show that at the lattice volumes used here, the Gribov ambiguity has an enormous effect on the ghost propagator in all dimensions. This underlines the severity of the Gribov problem and calls for refined studies also at finite β. In turn, the gluon propagator only mildly depends on the Gribov ambiguity.

  15. Decorated tensor network renormalization for lattice gauge theories and spin foam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Mizera, Sebastian; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Tensor network techniques have proved to be powerful tools that can be employed to explore the large scale dynamics of lattice systems. Nonetheless, the redundancy of degrees of freedom in lattice gauge theories (and related models) poses a challenge for standard tensor network algorithms. We accommodate for such systems by introducing an additional structure decorating the tensor network. This allows to explicitly preserve the gauge symmetry of the system under coarse graining and straightforwardly interpret the fixed point tensors. We propose and test (for models with finite Abelian groups) a coarse graining algorithm for lattice gauge theories based on decorated tensor networks. We also point out that decorated tensor networks are applicable to other models as well, where they provide the advantage to give immediate access to certain expectation values and correlation functions.

  16. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Krieg, S.; Lellouch, L.; Lippert, Th.; Portelli, A.; Sastre, A.; Szabo, K. K.; Varnhorst, L.; Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on Nf=2 +1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ɛ =0.73 (2 )(5 )(17 ), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, mu=2.27 (6 )(5 )(4 ) and md=4.67 (6 )(5 )(4 ) MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2 G e V and the isospin breaking ratios mu/md=0.485 (11 )(8 )(14 ), R =38.2 (1.1 )(0.8 )(1.4 ), and Q =23.4 (0.4 )(0.3 )(0.4 ). Our results exclude the mu=0 solution to the strong C P problem by more than 24 standard deviations.

  17. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Z; Hoelbling, C; Krieg, S; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K K; Varnhorst, L

    2016-08-19

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on N_{f}=2+1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ϵ=0.73(2)(5)(17), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, m_{u}=2.27(6)(5)(4) and m_{d}=4.67(6)(5)(4)  MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2  GeV and the isospin breaking ratios m_{u}/m_{d}=0.485(11)(8)(14), R=38.2(1.1)(0.8)(1.4), and Q=23.4(0.4)(0.3)(0.4). Our results exclude the m_{u}=0 solution to the strong CP problem by more than 24 standard deviations.

  18. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Z; Hoelbling, C; Krieg, S; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K K; Varnhorst, L

    2016-08-19

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on N_{f}=2+1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ϵ=0.73(2)(5)(17), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, m_{u}=2.27(6)(5)(4) and m_{d}=4.67(6)(5)(4)  MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2  GeV and the isospin breaking ratios m_{u}/m_{d}=0.485(11)(8)(14), R=38.2(1.1)(0.8)(1.4), and Q=23.4(0.4)(0.3)(0.4). Our results exclude the m_{u}=0 solution to the strong CP problem by more than 24 standard deviations. PMID:27588847

  19. Lattice gauge theory simulations in the quantum information era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmonte, M.; Montangero, S.

    2016-07-01

    The many-body problem is ubiquitous in the theoretical description of physical phenomena, ranging from the behaviour of elementary particles to the physics of electrons in solids. Most of our understanding of many-body systems comes from analysing the symmetric properties of Hamiltonian and states: the most striking examples are gauge theories such as quantum electrodynamics, where a local symmetry strongly constrains the microscopic dynamics. The physics of such gauge theories is relevant for the understanding of a diverse set of systems, including frustrated quantum magnets and the collective dynamics of elementary particles within the standard model. In the last few years, several approaches have been put forward to tackle the complex dynamics of gauge theories using quantum information concepts. In particular, quantum simulation platforms have been put forward for the realisation of synthetic gauge theories, and novel classical simulation algorithms based on quantum information concepts have been formulated. In this review, we present an introduction to these approaches, illustrating the basics concepts and highlighting the connections between apparently very different fields, and report the recent developments in this new thriving field of research.

  20. The exact decomposition of gauge variables in lattice Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Akihiro; Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Shinohara, Toru

    2010-07-01

    In this Letter, we consider lattice versions of the decomposition of the Yang-Mills field a la Cho-Faddeev-Niemi, which was extended by Kondo, Shinohara and Murakami in the continuum formulation. For the SU (N) gauge group, we propose a set of defining equations for specifying the decomposition of the gauge link variable and solve them exactly without using the ansatz adopted in the previous studies for SU (2) and SU (3). As a result, we obtain the general form of the decomposition for SU (N) gauge link variables and confirm the previous results obtained for SU (2) and SU (3).

  1. Finite-size scaling tests for SU(3) lattice gauge theory with color sextet fermions

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The observed slow running of the gauge coupling in SU(3) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of color sextet fermions naturally suggests it is a theory with one relevant coupling, the fermion mass, and that at zero mass correlation functions decay algebraically. I perform a finite-size scaling study on simulation data at two values of the bare gauge coupling with this assumption and observe a common exponent for the scaling of the correlation length with the fermion mass, y{sub m}{approx}1.5. An analysis of the scaling of valence Dirac eigenvalues at one of these bare couplings produces a similar number.

  2. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density in the phase-quenched approximation.

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, J. B.; Sinclair, D. K.; High Energy Physics; Univ Maryland

    2008-06-01

    QCD at a finite quark-number chemical potential {mu} has a complex fermion determinant, which precludes its study by standard lattice QCD simulations. We therefore simulate lattice QCD at finite {mu} in the phase-quenched approximation, replacing the fermion determinant with its magnitude. (The phase-quenched approximation can be considered as simulating at finite isospin chemical potential 2{mu} for N{sub f}/2 u-type and N{sub F}/2 d-type quark flavors.) These simulations are used to study the finite-temperature transition for small {mu}, where there is some evidence that the position (and possibly the nature) of this transition is unchanged by this approximation. We look for the expected critical endpoint for 3-flavor QCD. Here, it has been argued that the critical point at zero {mu} would become the critical endpoint at small {mu}, for quark masses just above the critical mass. Our simulations indicate that this does not happen, and there is no such critical endpoint for small {mu}. We discuss how we might adapt techniques used for imaginary {mu} to improve the signal/noise ratio and strengthen our conclusions, using results from relatively low statistics studies.

  3. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density in the phase-quenched approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, J. B.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2008-06-01

    QCD at a finite quark-number chemical potential {mu} has a complex fermion determinant, which precludes its study by standard lattice QCD simulations. We therefore simulate lattice QCD at finite {mu} in the phase-quenched approximation, replacing the fermion determinant with its magnitude. (The phase-quenched approximation can be considered as simulating at finite isospin chemical potential 2{mu} for N{sub f}/2 u-type and N{sub f}/2 d-type quark flavors.) These simulations are used to study the finite-temperature transition for small {mu}, where there is some evidence that the position (and possibly the nature) of this transition is unchanged by this approximation. We look for the expected critical endpoint for 3-flavor QCD. Here, it has been argued that the critical point at zero {mu} would become the critical endpoint at small {mu}, for quark masses just above the critical mass. Our simulations indicate that this does not happen, and there is no such critical endpoint for small {mu}. We discuss how we might adapt techniques used for imaginary {mu} to improve the signal/noise ratio and strengthen our conclusions, using results from relatively low statistics studies.

  4. Food for thought: Five lectures on lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these lectures are the heavy anti qq potential, glueballs, the chiral transition with dynamical fermions, Weak interaction matrix elements on the lattice and Monte Carlo renormalization group. Even though for the most part these lectures are reviews, many new results and ideas are also presented. The emphasis is on critical analysis of existing data, exposing bottlenecks and a discussion of open problems. Five individual papers have been indexed separately.

  5. Cold-atom quantum simulation of U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Kuno, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the possible methods to construct a quantum simulator of the U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model using cold atoms in an optical lattice. These methods require no severe fine tunings of parameters of atomic-interactions in contrast with the other previous literature. We propose some realistic experimental setups to realize the atomic quantum simulator of the U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model in a two-dimensional optical lattice. Our target gauge-Higgs model has a nontrivial phase structure, i.e., existence of the phase boundary between confinement and Higgs phases, and this phase boundary is to be observed by cold-atom experiments. As a reference to such experiments, we make numerical simulations of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation and observe the real-time dynamics of the atomic simulators. Clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some lights upon various unsolved problems including the inflation process of the early universe.

  6. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report Indiana University Component

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, Steven Arthur; DeTar, Carleton; Tousaint, Doug

    2014-07-24

    This is the closeout report for the Indiana University portion of the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory project supported by the United States Department of Energy under the SciDAC program. It includes information about activities at Indian University, the University of Arizona, and the University of Utah, as those three universities coordinated their activities.

  7. Z2 gauge theory for valence bond solids on the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Huh, Yejin; Kim, Yong Baek

    2015-11-01

    We present an effective Z2 gauge theory that captures various competing phases in spin-1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnets: the topological Z2 spin liquid (SL) phase, and the 12-site and 36-site valence bond solid (VBS) phases. Our effective theory is a generalization of the recent Z2 gauge theory proposed for SL phases by Wan and Tchernyshyov. In particular, we investigate possible VBS phases that arise from vison condensations in the SL. In addition to the 12-site and 36-site VBS phases, there exists 6-site VBS that is closely related to the symmetry-breaking valence bond modulation patterns observed in the recent density matrix renormalization group simulations. We find that our results have remarkable consistency with a previous study using a different Z2 gauge theory. Motivated by the lattice geometry in the recently reported vanadium oxyfluoride kagome antiferromagnet, our gauge theory is extended to incorporate lowered symmetry by inequivalent up and down triangles. We investigate effects of this anisotropy on the 12-site, 36-site, and 6-site VBS phases. The 12-site VBS is stable to anisotropy while the 36-site VBS undergoes severe dimer melting. Interestingly, any analog of the 6-site VBS is not found in this approach. We discuss the implications of these findings and also compare the results with a different type of Z2 gauge theory used in previous studies.

  8. Z2 gauge theory for valence bond solids on the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Huh, Yejin; Kim, Yong Baek

    We present an effective Z2 gauge theory that captures various competing phases in spin-1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnets: the topological Z2 spin liquid (SL) phase, and the 12-site and 36- site valence bond solid (VBS) phases. Our effective theory is a generalization of the recent Z2 gauge theory proposed for SL phases by Wan and Tchernyshyov. In particular, we investigate possible VBS phases that arise from vison condensations in the SL. In addition to the 12-site and 36-site VBS phases, there exists 6-site VBS that is closely related to the symmetry-breaking valence bond modulation patterns observed in the recent density matrix renormalization group simulations. We find that our results have remarkable consistency with a previous study using a different Z2 gauge theory. Motivated by the lattice geometry in the recently reported vanadium oxyfluoride kagome antiferromagnet, our gauge theory is extended to incorporate lowered symmetry by inequivalent up- and down-triangles. We investigate effects of this anisotropy on the 12-site, 36-site, and 6-site VBS phases. Particularly, interesting dimer melting effects are found in the 36-site VBS. We discuss the implications of our findings and also compare the results with a different type of Z2 gauge theory used in previous studies.

  9. Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Esteban A; Muschik, Christine A; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Erhard, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Hauke, Philipp; Dalmonte, Marcello; Monz, Thomas; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-06-23

    Gauge theories are fundamental to our understanding of interactions between the elementary constituents of matter as mediated by gauge bosons. However, computing the real-time dynamics in gauge theories is a notorious challenge for classical computational methods. This has recently stimulated theoretical effort, using Feynman's idea of a quantum simulator, to devise schemes for simulating such theories on engineered quantum-mechanical devices, with the difficulty that gauge invariance and the associated local conservation laws (Gauss laws) need to be implemented. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a digital quantum simulation of a lattice gauge theory, by realizing (1 + 1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model) on a few-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer. We are interested in the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism, describing the instability of the bare vacuum due to quantum fluctuations, which manifests itself in the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs. To make efficient use of our quantum resources, we map the original problem to a spin model by eliminating the gauge fields in favour of exotic long-range interactions, which can be directly and efficiently implemented on an ion trap architecture. We explore the Schwinger mechanism of particle-antiparticle generation by monitoring the mass production and the vacuum persistence amplitude. Moreover, we track the real-time evolution of entanglement in the system, which illustrates how particle creation and entanglement generation are directly related. Our work represents a first step towards quantum simulation of high-energy theories using atomic physics experiments-the long-term intention is to extend this approach to real-time quantum simulations of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. PMID:27337339

  10. Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Esteban A.; Muschik, Christine A.; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Erhard, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Hauke, Philipp; Dalmonte, Marcello; Monz, Thomas; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Gauge theories are fundamental to our understanding of interactions between the elementary constituents of matter as mediated by gauge bosons. However, computing the real-time dynamics in gauge theories is a notorious challenge for classical computational methods. This has recently stimulated theoretical effort, using Feynman’s idea of a quantum simulator, to devise schemes for simulating such theories on engineered quantum-mechanical devices, with the difficulty that gauge invariance and the associated local conservation laws (Gauss laws) need to be implemented. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a digital quantum simulation of a lattice gauge theory, by realizing (1 + 1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model) on a few-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer. We are interested in the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism, describing the instability of the bare vacuum due to quantum fluctuations, which manifests itself in the spontaneous creation of electron–positron pairs. To make efficient use of our quantum resources, we map the original problem to a spin model by eliminating the gauge fields in favour of exotic long-range interactions, which can be directly and efficiently implemented on an ion trap architecture. We explore the Schwinger mechanism of particle–antiparticle generation by monitoring the mass production and the vacuum persistence amplitude. Moreover, we track the real-time evolution of entanglement in the system, which illustrates how particle creation and entanglement generation are directly related. Our work represents a first step towards quantum simulation of high-energy theories using atomic physics experiments—the long-term intention is to extend this approach to real-time quantum simulations of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories.

  11. Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Esteban A.; Muschik, Christine A.; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Erhard, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Hauke, Philipp; Dalmonte, Marcello; Monz, Thomas; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Gauge theories are fundamental to our understanding of interactions between the elementary constituents of matter as mediated by gauge bosons. However, computing the real-time dynamics in gauge theories is a notorious challenge for classical computational methods. This has recently stimulated theoretical effort, using Feynman’s idea of a quantum simulator, to devise schemes for simulating such theories on engineered quantum-mechanical devices, with the difficulty that gauge invariance and the associated local conservation laws (Gauss laws) need to be implemented. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a digital quantum simulation of a lattice gauge theory, by realizing (1 + 1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model) on a few-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer. We are interested in the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism, describing the instability of the bare vacuum due to quantum fluctuations, which manifests itself in the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs. To make efficient use of our quantum resources, we map the original problem to a spin model by eliminating the gauge fields in favour of exotic long-range interactions, which can be directly and efficiently implemented on an ion trap architecture. We explore the Schwinger mechanism of particle-antiparticle generation by monitoring the mass production and the vacuum persistence amplitude. Moreover, we track the real-time evolution of entanglement in the system, which illustrates how particle creation and entanglement generation are directly related. Our work represents a first step towards quantum simulation of high-energy theories using atomic physics experiments—the long-term intention is to extend this approach to real-time quantum simulations of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories.

  12. Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Esteban A; Muschik, Christine A; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Erhard, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Hauke, Philipp; Dalmonte, Marcello; Monz, Thomas; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    Gauge theories are fundamental to our understanding of interactions between the elementary constituents of matter as mediated by gauge bosons. However, computing the real-time dynamics in gauge theories is a notorious challenge for classical computational methods. This has recently stimulated theoretical effort, using Feynman's idea of a quantum simulator, to devise schemes for simulating such theories on engineered quantum-mechanical devices, with the difficulty that gauge invariance and the associated local conservation laws (Gauss laws) need to be implemented. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a digital quantum simulation of a lattice gauge theory, by realizing (1 + 1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model) on a few-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer. We are interested in the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism, describing the instability of the bare vacuum due to quantum fluctuations, which manifests itself in the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs. To make efficient use of our quantum resources, we map the original problem to a spin model by eliminating the gauge fields in favour of exotic long-range interactions, which can be directly and efficiently implemented on an ion trap architecture. We explore the Schwinger mechanism of particle-antiparticle generation by monitoring the mass production and the vacuum persistence amplitude. Moreover, we track the real-time evolution of entanglement in the system, which illustrates how particle creation and entanglement generation are directly related. Our work represents a first step towards quantum simulation of high-energy theories using atomic physics experiments-the long-term intention is to extend this approach to real-time quantum simulations of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories.

  13. A highly optimized vectorized code for Monte Carlo simulations of SU(3) lattice gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkai, D.; Moriarty, K. J. M.; Rebbi, C.

    1984-01-01

    New methods are introduced for improving the performance of the vectorized Monte Carlo SU(3) lattice gauge theory algorithm using the CDC CYBER 205. Structure, algorithm and programming considerations are discussed. The performance achieved for a 16(4) lattice on a 2-pipe system may be phrased in terms of the link update time or overall MFLOPS rates. For 32-bit arithmetic, it is 36.3 microsecond/link for 8 hits per iteration (40.9 microsecond for 10 hits) or 101.5 MFLOPS.

  14. Charmonium-Nucleon Interaction from Quenched Lattice QCD with Relativistic Heavy Quark Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2009-10-01

    Low energy charmonium-nucleon interaction is of particular interest in this talk. A heavy quarkonium state like the charmonium does not share the same quark flavor with the nucleon so that cc-nucleon interaction might be described by the gluonic van der Waals interaction, which is weak but attractive. Therefore, the information of the strength of cc-nucleon interaction is vital for considering the possibility of the formation of charmonium bound to nuclei. We will present the preliminary results for the scattering length and the interaction range of charmonium-nucleon s-wave scattering from quenched lattice QCD. These low-energy quantities can provide useful constraints on the phenomenological cc-nucleon potential, which is required for precise prediction of the binding energy of nuclear-bound charmonium in exact few body calculations. Our simulations are performed at a lattice cutoff of 1/a=2.0 GeV with the nonperturbatively O(a) improved Wilson action for the light quark and a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quark. A new attempt of calculating the cc-nucleon potential through the Bethe-Salpeter wave function will be also discussed.

  15. Doubled lattice Chern-Simons-Yang-Mills theories with discrete gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspar, S.; Mesterházy, D.; Olesen, T. Z.; Vlasii, N. D.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2016-11-01

    We construct doubled lattice Chern-Simons-Yang-Mills theories with discrete gauge group G in the Hamiltonian formulation. Here, these theories are considered on a square spatial lattice and the fundamental degrees of freedom are defined on pairs of links from the direct lattice and its dual, respectively. This provides a natural lattice construction for topologically-massive gauge theories, which are invariant under parity and time-reversal symmetry. After defining the building blocks of the doubled theories, paying special attention to the realization of gauge transformations on quantum states, we examine the dynamics in the group space of a single cross, which is spanned by a single link and its dual. The dynamics is governed by the single-cross electric Hamiltonian and admits a simple quantum mechanical analogy to the problem of a charged particle moving on a discrete space affected by an abstract electromagnetic potential. Such a particle might accumulate a phase shift equivalent to an Aharonov-Bohm phase, which is manifested in the doubled theory in terms of a nontrivial ground-state degeneracy on a single cross. We discuss several examples of these doubled theories with different gauge groups including the cyclic group Z(k) ⊂ U(1) , the symmetric group S3 ⊂ O(2) , the binary dihedral (or quaternion) group D¯2 ⊂ SU(2) , and the finite group Δ(27) ⊂ SU(3) . In each case the spectrum of the single-cross electric Hamiltonian is determined exactly. We examine the nature of the low-lying excited states in the full Hilbert space, and emphasize the role of the center symmetry for the confinement of charges. Whether the investigated doubled models admit a non-Abelian topological state which allows for fault-tolerant quantum computation will be addressed in a future publication.

  16. Radiative contribution to the effective potential in composite Higgs models from lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrand, Thomas; Golterman, Maarten; Jay, William I.; Neil, Ethan T.; Shamir, Yigal; Svetitsky, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    We develop methods to calculate the electroweak gauge boson contribution to the effective Higgs potential in the context of composite Higgs models, using lattice gauge theory. The calculation is analogous to that of the electromagnetic mass splitting of the pion multiplet in QCD. We discuss technical details of carrying out this calculation, including modeling of the momentum and fermion-mass dependence of the underlying current-current correlation function, direct integration of the correlation function over momentum, and fits based on the minimal-hadron approximation. We show results of a numerical study using valence overlap fermions, carried out in an SU(4) gauge theory with two flavors of Dirac fermions in the two-index antisymmetric representation.

  17. A Deconstruction Lattice Description of the D1/D5 Brane World-Volume Gauge Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Giedt, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I genermore » alize the deconstruction lattice formulation of Endres and Kaplan to two-dimensional super-QCD with eight supercharges, denoted by (4,4), and bifundamental matter. I specialize to a particularly interesting (4,4) gauge theory, with gauge group U ( N c ) × U ( N f ) , and U ( N f ) being weakly gauged. It describes the infrared limit of the D1/D5 brane system, which has been studied extensively as an example of the AdS 3 /CFT 2 correspondence. The construction here preserves two supercharges exactly and has a lattice structure quite similar to that which has previously appeared in the deconstruction approach, that is, site, link, and diagonal fields with both the Bose and Fermi statistics. I remark on possible applications of the lattice theory that would test the AdS 3 /CFT 2 correspondence, particularly one that would exploit the recent worldsheet instanton analysis of Chen and Tong.« less

  18. Canonical transformations and loop formulation of SU(N) lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Manu; Sreeraj, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    We construct canonical transformations to reformulate SU(N) Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory in terms of a set of fundamental loop and string flux operators along with their canonically conjugate loop and string electric fields. The canonical relations between the initial SU(N) link operators and the final SU(N) loop and string operators, consistent with SU(N) gauge transformations, are explicitly constructed over the entire lattice. We show that as a consequence of SU(N) Gauss laws all SU(N) string degrees of freedom become cyclic and decouple from the physical Hilbert space Hp. The Kogut-Susskind Hamiltonian rewritten in terms of the fundamental physical loop operators has global SU(N) invariance. There are no gauge fields. We further show that the (1 /g2 ) magnetic field terms on plaquettes create and annihilate the fundamental plaquette loop fluxes while the (g2 ) electric field terms describe all their interactions. In the weak coupling (g2→0 ) continuum limit the SU(N) loop dynamics is described by SU(N) spin Hamiltonian with nearest neighbor interactions. In the simplest SU(2) case, where the canonical transformations map the SU(2) loop Hilbert space into the Hilbert spaces of hydrogen atoms, we analyze the special role of the hydrogen atom dynamical symmetry group S O (4 ,2 ) in the loop dynamics and the spectrum. A simple tensor network ansatz in the SU(2) gauge invariant hydrogen atom loop basis is discussed.

  19. Numerical evaluation of the Bose-ghost propagator in minimal Landau gauge on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Mendes, Tereza

    2016-07-01

    We present numerical details of the evaluation of the so-called Bose-ghost propagator in lattice minimal Landau gauge, for the SU(2) case in four Euclidean dimensions. This quantity has been proposed as a carrier of the confining force in the Gribov-Zwanziger approach and, as such, its infrared behavior could be relevant for the understanding of color confinement in Yang-Mills theories. Also, its nonzero value can be interpreted as direct evidence of Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin-symmetry breaking, which is induced when restricting the functional measure to the first Gribov region Ω . Our simulations are done for lattice volumes up to 1204 and for physical lattice extents up to 13.5 fm. We investigate the infinite-volume and continuum limits.

  20. Realizing non-Abelian gauge potentials in optical square lattices: an application to atomic Chern insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, N.; Gerbier, F.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-07-01

    We describe a scheme to engineer non-Abelian gauge potentials on a square optical lattice using laser-induced transitions. We emphasize the case of two-electron atoms, where the electronic ground state g is laser-coupled to a metastable state e within a state-dependent optical lattice. In this scheme, the alternating pattern of lattice sites hosting g and e states depicts a chequerboard structure, allowing for laser-assisted tunnelling along both spatial directions. In this configuration, the nuclear spin of the atoms can be viewed as a ‘flavour’ quantum number undergoing non-Abelian tunnelling along nearest-neighbour links. We show that this technique can be useful to simulate the equivalent of the Haldane quantum Hall model using cold atoms trapped in square optical lattices, offering an interesting route to realize Chern insulators. The emblematic Haldane model is particularly suited to investigate the physics of topological insulators, but requires, in its original form, complex hopping terms beyond nearest-neighbouring sites. In general, this drawback inhibits a direct realization with cold atoms, using standard laser-induced tunnelling techniques. We demonstrate that a simple mapping allows us to express this model in terms of matrix hopping operators that are defined on a standard square lattice. This mapping is investigated for two models that lead to anomalous quantum Hall phases. We discuss the practical implementation of such models, exploiting laser-induced tunnelling methods applied to the chequerboard optical lattice.

  1. Yang-Mills theory on a momentum lattice: Gauge invariance, chiral invariance, and no fermion doubling

    SciTech Connect

    Berube, D.; Kroeger, H.; Lafrance, R.; Marleau, L. )

    1991-02-15

    We discuss properties of a noncompact formulation of gauge theories with fermions on a momentum ({ital k}) lattice. (a) This formulation is suitable to build in Fourier acceleration in a direct way. (b) The numerical effort to compute the action (by fast Fourier transform) goes essentially like log{ital V} with the lattice volume {ital V}. (c) For the Yang-Mills theory we find that the action conserves gauge symmetry and chiral symmetry in a weak sense: On a finite lattice the action is invariant under infinitesimal transformations with compact support. Under finite transformations these symmetries are approximately conserved and they are restored on an infinite lattice and in the continuum limit. Moreover, these symmetries also hold on a finite lattice under finite transformations, if the classical fields, instead of being {ital c}-number valued, take values from a finite Galois field. (d) There is no fermion doubling. (e) For the {phi}{sup 4} model we investigate the transition towards the continuum limit in lattice perturbation theory up to second order. We compute the two- and four-point functions and find local and Lorentz-invariant results. (f) In QED we compute a one-loop vacuum polarization and find in the continuum limit the standard result. (g) As a numerical application, we compute the propagator {l angle}{phi}({ital k}){phi}({ital k}{prime}){r angle} in the {phi}{sup 4} model, investigate Euclidean invariance, and extract {ital m}{sub {ital R}} as well as {ital Z}{sub {ital R}}. Moreover we compute {l angle}{ital F}{sub {mu}{nu}}({ital k}){ital F}{sub {mu}{nu}}({ital k}{prime}){r angle} in the SU(2) model.

  2. Gauge-invariant implementation of the Abelian-Higgs model on optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Meurice, Y.; Tsai, S.-W.; Unmuth-Yockey, J.; Zhang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    We present a gauge-invariant effective action for the Abelian-Higgs model (scalar electrodynamics) with a chemical potential μ on a (1 +1 )-dimensional lattice. This formulation provides an expansion in the hopping parameter κ which we test with Monte Carlo simulations for a broad range of the inverse gauge coupling βp l=1 /g2 and small values of the scalar self-coupling λ . In the opposite limit of infinitely large λ , the partition function can be written as a traced product of local tensors which allows us to write exact blocking formulas. Gauss's law is automatically satisfied and the introduction of μ has consequences only if we have an external electric field, g2=0 or an explicit gauge symmetry breaking. The time-continuum limit of the blocked transfer matrix can be obtained numerically and, for g2=0 and a spin-1 truncation, the small volume energy spectrum is identical to the low energy spectrum of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model in the limit of large on-site repulsion. We extend this procedure for finite βp l and derive a spin-1 approximation of the Hamiltonian. It involves new terms corresponding to transitions among the two species in the Bose-Hubbard model. We propose an optical lattice implementation involving a ladder structure.

  3. Twenty-first Century Lattice Gauge Theory: Results from the QCD Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) reduces the strong interactions, in all their variety, to an elegant nonabelian gauge theory. It clearly and elegantly explains hadrons at short distances, which has led to its universal acceptance. Since its advent, however, many of its long-distance, emergent properties have been believed to be true, without having been demonstrated to be true. This paper reviews a variety of results in this regime that have been established with lattice gauge theory, directly from the QCD Lagrangian. This body of work sheds light on the origin of hadron masses, its interplay with dynamical symmetry breaking, as well as on other intriguing features such as the phase structure of QCD. In addition, nonperturbative QCD is quantitatively important to many aspects of particle physics (especially the quark flavor sector), nuclear physics, and astrophysics. This review also surveys some of the most interesting connections to those subjects.

  4. Chiral Lagrangians from lattice gauge theories in the strong coupling limit

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Taro; Nishigaki, Shinsuke M.

    2001-07-01

    We derive nonlinear {sigma} models (chiral Lagrangians) over symmetric spaces U(n), U(2n)/Sp(2n), and U(2n)/O(2n) from U(N), O(N), and Sp(2N) lattice gauge theories coupled to n flavors of staggered fermions, in the large-N and g{sup 2}N limit. To this end, we employ Zirnbauer{close_quote}s color-flavor transformation. We prove the spatial homogeneity of the vacuum configurations of mesons by explicitly solving the large-N saddle point equations, and thus establish these patterns of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the above limit.

  5. Critical exponents in U(1) lattice gauge theory with a monopole term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, G.; Kerler, W.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate critical properties of the phase transition in the four-dimensional compact U(1) lattice gauge theory supplemented by a monopole term for values of the monopole coupling λ such that the transition is of second order. It has been previously shown that at λ = 0.9 the critical exponent is already characteristic of a second-order transition and that it is different from the one of the Gaussian case. In the present study we perform a finite size analysis at λ = 1.1 to get information wether the value of this exponent is universal.

  6. Deconfinement Phase Transition in a 3D Nonlocal U(1) Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Gaku; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo; Sakakibara, Kazuhiko

    2005-06-03

    We introduce a 3D compact U(1) lattice gauge theory having nonlocal interactions in the temporal direction, and study its phase structure. The model is relevant for the compact QED{sub 3} and strongly correlated electron systems like the t-J model of cuprates. For a power-law decaying long-range interaction, which simulates the effect of gapless matter fields, a second-order phase transition takes place separating the confinement and deconfinement phases. For an exponentially decaying interaction simulating matter fields with gaps, the system exhibits no signals of a second-order transition.

  7. Analogue of Rashba pseudo-spin-orbit coupling in photonic lattices by gauge field engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnik, Y.; Bandres, M. A.; Stützer, S.; Lumer, Y.; Rechtsman, M. C.; Szameit, A.; Segev, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present, theoretically and experimentally, the observation of the Rashba effect in photonic lattices, where the effect is brought about by an artificial gauge field, induced by the geometry of the system. In doing that, we demonstrate a particular form of coupling between pseudospin and momentum, resulting in spin-dependent shifts in the spectrum. Our system consists of two coupled, oppositely tilted waveguide arrays, where the evolution of an optical beam allows for probing the dynamics of the evolving wave packets, and the formation of spectral splitting. We show that the Rashba effect can be amplified or decreased through optical nonlinear effects, which correspond to mean-field interactions in various systems such as cold-atom lattices and exciton-polariton condensates.

  8. Vectorizing the Monte Carlo algorithm for lattice gauge theory calculations on the CDC cyber 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkai, D.; Moriarty, K. J. M.

    1982-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory is a technique for studying quantum field theory free of divergences. All the Monte Carlo computer calculations up to now have been performed on scalar machines. A technique has been developed for effectively vectorizing this class of Monte Carlo problems. The key for vectorizing is in finding groups in finding groups of points on the space-time lattice which are independent of each other. This requires a particular ordering of points along diagonals. A technique for matrix multiply is used which enables one to get the whole of the result matrix in one pass. The CDC CYBER 205 is most suitable for this class of problems using random "index-lists" (arising from the ordering algorithm and the use of random numbers) due to the hardware implementation of "GATHER" and "SCATTER" operations performing at a streaming-rate. A preliminary implementation of this method has executed 5 times faster than on the CDC 7600 system.

  9. Realization of the Harper Hamiltonian with Artificial Gauge Fields in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios; Kennedy, Colin; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Systems of charged particles in magnetic fields have led to many discoveries in science-such as the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects-and have become important paradigms of quantum many-body physics. We have proposed and implemented a scheme which realizes the Harper Hamiltonian, a lattice model for charged particles in magnetic fields, whose energy spectrum is the fractal Hofstadter butterfly. We experimentally realize this Hamiltonian for ultracold, charge neutral bosonic particles of 87Rb in a two-dimensional optical lattice by creating an artificial gauge field using laser-assisted tunneling and a potential energy gradient provided by gravity. Laser-assisted tunneling processes are characterized by studying the expansion of the atoms in the lattice. Furthermore, this scheme can be extended to realize spin-orbit coupling and the spin Hall effect for neutral atoms in optical lattices by modifying the motion of atoms in a spin-dependent way by laser recoil and Zeeman shifts created with a magnetic field gradient. Major advantages of our scheme are that it does not rely on near-resonant laser light to couple different spin states and should work even for fermionic particles. Our work is a step towards studying novel topological phenomena with ultracold atoms. Currently at the RAND Corporation.

  10. Quantum magnetism of spinor bosons in optical lattices with synthetic non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-10-01

    We study quantum magnetism of interacting spinor bosons at integer fillings hopping in a square lattice in the presence of non-Abelian gauge fields. In the strong-coupling limit, this leads to the rotated ferromagnetic Heisenberg model, which is a new class of quantum spin model. We introduce Wilson loops to characterize frustrations and gauge equivalent classes. For a special equivalent class, we identify a spin-orbital entangled commensurate ground state. It supports not only commensurate magnons, but also a gapped elementary excitation: incommensurate magnons with two gap minima continuously tuned by the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength. At low temperatures, these magnons lead to dramatic effects in many physical quantities such as density of states, specific heat, magnetization, uniform susceptibility, staggered susceptibility, and various spin-correlation functions. The commensurate magnons lead to a pinned central peak in the angle-resolved light or atom Bragg spectroscopy. However, the incommensurate magnons split it into two located at their two gap minima. At high temperatures, the transverse spin-structure factors depend on the SOC strength explicitly. The whole set of Wilson loops can be mapped out by measuring the specific heat at the corresponding orders in the high-temperature expansion. We argue that one gauge may be realized in current experiments and other gauges may also be realized in future experiments. The results achieved along the exact solvable line sets up the stage to investigate dramatic effects when tuning away from it by various means. We sketch the crucial roles to be played by these magnons at other equivalent classes, with spin anisotropic interactions and in the presence of finite magnetic fields. Various experimental detections of these phenomena are discussed.

  11. Program package for multicanonical simulations of U(1) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, Alexei; Berg, Bernd A.

    2009-11-01

    We document our Fortran 77 code for multicanonical simulations of 4D U(1) lattice gauge theory in the neighborhood of its phase transition. This includes programs and routines for canonical simulations using biased Metropolis heatbath updating and overrelaxation, determination of multicanonical weights via a Wang-Landau recursion, and multicanonical simulations with fixed weights supplemented by overrelaxation sweeps. Measurements are performed for the action, Polyakov loops and some of their structure factors. Many features of the code transcend the particular application and are expected to be useful for other lattice gauge theory models as well as for systems in statistical physics. Catalogue identifier: AEET_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEET_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 376 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 205 183 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code Operating system: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code Classification: 11.5 Nature of problem: Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation of U(1) lattice gauge theory close to its phase transition. Measurements and analysis of the action per plaquette, the specific heat, Polyakov loops and their structure factors. Solution method: Multicanonical simulations with an initial Wang-Landau recursion to determine suitable weight

  12. Biased and greedy random walks on two-dimensional lattices with quenched randomness: The greedy ant within a disordered environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, T. L.; Melchert, O.; Hartmann, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    The main characteristics of biased greedy random walks (BGRWs) on two-dimensional lattices with real-valued quenched disorder on the lattice edges are studied. Here the disorder allows for negative edge weights. In previous studies, considering the negative-weight percolation (NWP) problem, this was shown to change the universality class of the existing, static percolation transition. In the presented study, four different types of BGRWs and an algorithm based on the ant colony optimization heuristic were considered. Regarding the BGRWs, the precise configurations of the lattice walks constructed during the numerical simulations were influenced by two parameters: a disorder parameter ρ that controls the amount of negative edge weights on the lattice and a bias strength B that governs the drift of the walkers along a certain lattice direction. The random walks are “greedy” in the sense that the local optimal choice of the walker is to preferentially traverse edges with a negative weight (associated with a net gain of “energy” for the walker). Here, the pivotal observable is the probability that, after termination, a lattice walk exhibits a total negative weight, which is here considered as percolating. The behavior of this observable as function of ρ for different bias strengths B is put under scrutiny. Upon tuning ρ, the probability to find such a feasible lattice walk increases from zero to 1. This is the key feature of the percolation transition in the NWP model. Here, we address the question how well the transition point ρc, resulting from numerically exact and “static” simulations in terms of the NWP model, can be resolved using simple dynamic algorithms that have only local information available, one of the basic questions in the physics of glassy systems.

  13. An essay on lattice QCD: the Wilson loop in 2+1 dimensions using SU(2) as gauge group

    SciTech Connect

    Grise, Graziela; Chiapparini, M.; Kodama, T.

    2004-12-02

    We present here some basic results of our study about Wilson loop in 2+1 dimensions using SU(2) as gauge group. These results are very well known and we are using them to comprehend the established computational methods for lattice QCD.

  14. Fortran code for SU(3) lattice gauge theory with and without MPI checkerboard parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Bernd A.; Wu, Hao

    2012-10-01

    We document plain Fortran and Fortran MPI checkerboard code for Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of pure SU(3) lattice gauge theory with the Wilson action in D dimensions. The Fortran code uses periodic boundary conditions and is suitable for pedagogical purposes and small scale simulations. For the Fortran MPI code two geometries are covered: the usual torus with periodic boundary conditions and the double-layered torus as defined in the paper. Parallel computing is performed on checkerboards of sublattices, which partition the full lattice in one, two, and so on, up to D directions (depending on the parameters set). For updating, the Cabibbo-Marinari heatbath algorithm is used. We present validations and test runs of the code. Performance is reported for a number of currently used Fortran compilers and, when applicable, MPI versions. For the parallelized code, performance is studied as a function of the number of processors. Program summary Program title: STMC2LSU3MPI Catalogue identifier: AEMJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26666 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 233126 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 compatible with the use of Fortran 90/95 compilers, in part with MPI extensions. Computer: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran 77 or Fortran 90/95, when needed with MPI extensions. Operating system: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 6.1 with OpenMPI + pgf77 11.8-0, Centos 5.3 with OpenMPI + gfortran 4.1.2, Cray XT4 with MPICH2 + pgf90 11.2-0. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI extensions. Number of processors used: 2 to 11664 RAM: 200 Mega bytes per process. Classification: 11

  15. Kaon B parameter in quenched QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrand, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    I calculate the kaon B parameter BK, defined via 8(mKfK)2BK/3=, with a lattice simulation in the quenched approximation. The lattice simulation uses an action possessing exact lattice chiral symmetry, an overlap action. Computations are performed at two lattice spacings, about 0.13 and 0.09 fm (parametrized by Wilson gauge action couplings β=5.9 and 6.1) with nearly the same physical volumes and quark masses. I describe particular potential difficulties which arise due to the use of such a lattice action in finite volume. The continuum-extrapolated result for quenched BNDRK(μ=2 GeV)=0.55(7) where the uncertainty includes statistics, extrapolation, and an estimate of uncertainty from the choice of matching factor and strange quark mass.

  16. Dicke superradiance as a nondestructive probe for quantum quenches in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brinke, Nicolai; Schützhold, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    We study Dicke superradiance as collective and coherent absorption and (time-delayed) emission of photons from an ensemble of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Since this process depends on the coherence properties of the atoms (e.g., superfluidity), it can be used as a probe for their quantum state. In analogy to pump-probe spectroscopy in solid-state physics, this detection method facilitates the investigation of nonequilibrium phenomena and is less invasive than time-of-flight experiments or direct (projective) measurements of the atom number (or parity) per lattice site, which both destroy properties of the quantum state such as phase coherence.

  17. Pair correlations as a signature of entanglement: A bosonic mixture in gauge field ring lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Molina, L.; Reyes, S. A.; Arévalo, E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the pair-superfluid phase and entanglement of a Bose-Bose mixture of ultracold atoms in a ring lattice in the presence of a synthetic gauge field. Special attention is given to a quantum phase transition region of the phase diagram observed in the parameter space that characterizes the intra- and inter- species interactions of the system. In the scenario of large interaction, it is shown that the ground and excited states of the lowest-energy band exhibit features of a pair-superfluid phase. We demonstrate that in the subspace associated with the lowest-energy band there is a maximally entangled eigenstate that is a perfect pair-superfluid. We suggest to use this connection between the bipartite entanglement and the pair-superfluidity as a signature of the presence of entanglement in the eigenstates associated with the lowest-energy band. Moreover, we find strong indications that the interference pattern of the pair-superfluid phase in momentum space can be used as a tool for the characterization of the entanglement in the ground state.

  18. SU (2) lattice gauge theory in 2 + 1 dimensions: Critical couplings from twisted boundary conditions and universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Sam R.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    We present a precision determination of the critical coupling βc for the deconfinement transition in pure SU (2) gauge theory in 2 + 1 dimensions. This is possible from universality, by intersecting the center vortex free energy as a function of the lattice coupling β with the exactly known value of the interface free energy in the 2D Ising model at criticality. The method allows us to find critical couplings with unprecedented numerical accuracy. Results for lattices with different numbers of sites Nt along the Euclidean time direction are used to determine how β varies with temperature for a given Nt around the deconfinement transition.

  19. Artificial Gauge Field and Topological Phase in a Conventional Two-dimensional Electron Gas with Antidot Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Likun; Lou, Wenkai; Cheng, F.; Zou, Y. L.; Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Born-Oppemheimer approximation, we divide the total electron Hamiltonian in a spin-orbit coupled system into the slow orbital motion and the fast interband transition processes. We find that the fast motion induces a gauge field on the slow orbital motion, perpendicular to the electron momentum, inducing a topological phase. From this general designing principle, we present a theory for generating artificial gauge field and topological phase in a conventional two-dimensional electron gas embedded in parabolically graded GaAs/InxGa1−xAs/GaAs quantum wells with antidot lattices. By tuning the etching depth and period of the antidot lattices, the band folding caused by the antidot potential leads to the formation of minibands and band inversions between neighboring subbands. The intersubband spin-orbit interaction opens considerably large nontrivial minigaps and leads to many pairs of helical edge states in these gaps. PMID:26471126

  20. Regions of tunneling dynamics for few bosons in an optical lattice subjected to a quench of the imposed harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Koutentakis, Georgios; Schmelcher, Peter; Theory Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2016-05-01

    Recent experimental advances have introduced an interplay in the trapping length scales of the lattice and the harmonic confinement. This fact motivates the investigation to prepare atomic gases at certain quantum states by utilizing a composite atomic trap consisting of a lattice potential that is embedded inside an overlying harmonic trap. In the present work, we examine how frequency modulations of the overlying harmonic trap stimulate the dynamics of an 1D few-boson gas. The gas is initially prepared at a highly confined state, and the subsequent dynamics induced by a quench of the harmonic trap frequency to a lower value is examined. It is shown that a non-interacting gas always diffuses to the outer sites. In contrast the response of the interacting system is more involved and is dominated by a resonance, which is induced by the bifurcation of the low-lying eigenstates. Our study reveals that the position of the resonance depends both on the atom number and the interaction coupling, manifesting its many body nature. The corresponding mean field treatment as well as the single-band approximation have been found to be inadequate for the description of the tunneling dynamics in the interacting case. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  1. Bloch oscillations and quench dynamics of interacting bosons in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, K. W.; Jiang, L.; Tiesinga, E.; Johnson, P. R.

    2014-02-01

    We study the dynamics of interacting superfluid bosons in a one-dimensional vertical optical lattice after a sudden increase of the lattice potential depth. We show that this system can be exploited to investigate the effects of strong interactions on Bloch oscillations. We perform theoretical modeling of this system, identify experimental challenges, and explore a regime of Bloch oscillations characterized by interaction-induced matter-wave collapse and revivals which modify the Bloch oscillations dynamics. In addition, we study three dephasing mechanisms: finite value of tunneling, effective three-body interactions, and a background harmonic potential. We also find that the center-of-mass motion in the presence of finite tunneling goes through collapse and revivals, giving an example of quantum transport where interaction-induced revivals are important. We quantify the effects of residual harmonic trapping on the momentum distribution dynamics and show the occurrence of an interaction-modified temporal Talbot effect. Finally, we analyze the prospects and challenges of exploiting Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in the strongly interacting regime for precision measurement of the gravitational acceleration g.

  2. Gauge cooling in complex Langevin for lattice QCD with heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Erhard; Sexty, Dénes; Stamatescu, Ion-Olimpiu

    2013-06-01

    We employ a new method, "gauge cooling", to stabilize complex Langevin simulations of QCD with heavy quarks. The results are checked against results obtained with reweighting; we find agreement within the estimated errors, except for strong gauge coupling in the confinement region. The method allows us to go to previously unaccessible high densities.

  3. GAUGE3. Two-Dimensional Neutron Diffusion-Depletion for Hexagonal Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, P.; Shirley, G.

    1993-09-01

    GAUGE3 is a two-dimensional few-group neutron diffusion-depletion program with a uniform triangular spatial mesh for calculations involving reactors with hexagonal core configurations. GAUGE3 calculates the effective multiplication factor and the spatial distribution of the neutron flux and power.

  4. Generalizing the Tomboulis-Yaffe inequality to SU(N) lattice gauge theories and general classical spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, Takuya

    2009-08-15

    We extend the inequality of Tomboulis and Yaffe in SU(2) lattice gauge theory (LGT) to SU(N) LGT and to general classical spin systems, by use of reflection positivity. Basically the inequalities guarantee that a system in a box that is sufficiently insensitive to boundary conditions has a non-zero mass gap. We explicitly illustrate the theorem in some solvable models. Strong-coupling expansion is then utilized to discuss some aspects of the theorem. Finally, a conjecture for exact expression to the off-axis mass gap of the triangular Ising model is presented. The validity of the conjecture is tested in multiple ways.

  5. Non-Abelian SU(2) Lattice Gauge Theories in Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacapo, A.; Rico, E.; Sabín, C.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a digital quantum simulator of non-Abelian pure-gauge models with a superconducting circuit setup. Within the framework of quantum link models, we build a minimal instance of a pure SU(2) gauge theory, using triangular plaquettes involving geometric frustration. This realization is the least demanding, in terms of quantum simulation resources, of a non-Abelian gauge dynamics. We present two superconducting architectures that can host the quantum simulation, estimating the requirements needed to run possible experiments. The proposal establishes a path to the experimental simulation of non-Abelian physics with solid-state quantum platforms.

  6. Non-Abelian SU(2) Lattice Gauge Theories in Superconducting Circuits.

    PubMed

    Mezzacapo, A; Rico, E; Sabín, C; Egusquiza, I L; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-12-11

    We propose a digital quantum simulator of non-Abelian pure-gauge models with a superconducting circuit setup. Within the framework of quantum link models, we build a minimal instance of a pure SU(2) gauge theory, using triangular plaquettes involving geometric frustration. This realization is the least demanding, in terms of quantum simulation resources, of a non-Abelian gauge dynamics. We present two superconducting architectures that can host the quantum simulation, estimating the requirements needed to run possible experiments. The proposal establishes a path to the experimental simulation of non-Abelian physics with solid-state quantum platforms. PMID:26705616

  7. Final Report for "Infrared Fixed Points in Multiflavor Lattice Gauge Theory"

    SciTech Connect

    Meurice, Yannick; Sinclair, Donald K.

    2013-09-27

    The goal of the grant was to apply methods that we have developed with spin and pure gauge models to models with dynamical fermions which are considered as candidates for an alternative to the Higgs mechanism. The work on SU(3) with fundamental quarks and with sextet quarks is described.

  8. Lattice extraction of K{yields}{pi}{pi} amplitudes to next-to-leading order in partially quenched and in full chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Laiho, Jack; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We show that it is possible to construct {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} to next-to-leading order (NLO) using partially quenched chiral perturbation theory (PQChPT) from amplitudes that are computable on the lattice. We demonstrate that none of the needed amplitudes require 3-momentum on the lattice for either the full theory or the partially quenched theory; nondegenerate quark masses suffice. Furthermore, we find that the electro-weak penguin ({delta}I=3/2 and 1/2) contributions to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} in PQChPT can be determined to NLO using only degenerate (m{sub K}=m{sub {pi}}) K{yields}{pi} computations without momentum insertion. Issues pertaining to power divergent contributions, originating from mixing with lower dimensional operators, are addressed. Direct calculations of K{yields}{pi}{pi} at unphysical kinematics are plagued with enhanced finite volume effects in the (partially) quenched theory, but in simulations when the sea quark mass is equal to the up and down quark mass the enhanced finite volume effects vanish to NLO in PQChPT. In embedding the QCD penguin left-right operator onto PQChPT an ambiguity arises, as first emphasized by Golterman and Pallante. With one version [the 'PQS' (patially quenched singlet)] of the QCD penguin, the inputs needed from the lattice for constructing K{yields}{pi}{pi} at NLO in PQChPT coincide with those needed for the full theory. Explicit expressions for the finite logarithms emerging from our NLO analysis to the above amplitudes also are given.

  9. Negative refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices with nonuniform artificial gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the reflection and refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices exposed to a nonuniform artificial magnetic field. The introduction of the nonuniform artificial magnetic field to the optical lattice for suitable designer magnetic potential barrier can lead to a series of intriguing reflection and refraction phenomena of atoms, including reflection, positive refraction, negative refraction and atomic matter wave splitting. Both the occurrence and the distribution of these reflection and refraction scenarios can be coherently controlled by the nonuniform artificial magnetic field. In particular, the regions close to the boundary of reflection demonstrate two more interesting propagation modes, i.e., a reflected branch of atoms comprising a positive or negative refracted branch of atoms with almost same atom population will be excited simultaneously at the magnetic potential barrier. The results can be a guide for the coherent control of the matter waves in optical lattices and the design of new atom optics devices.

  10. Global asymmetry of many-qubit correlations: A lattice-gauge-theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Mark S.; Ericsson, Marie; Johansson, Markus; Sjoeqvist, Erik; Sudbery, Anthony; Vedral, Vlatko

    2011-09-15

    We introduce a bridge between the familiar gauge field theory approaches used in many areas of modern physics such as quantum field theory and the stochastic local operations and classical communication protocols familiar in quantum information. Although the mathematical methods are the same, the meaning of the gauge group is different. The measure we introduce, ''twist,'' is constructed as a Wilson loop from a correlation-induced holonomy. The measure can be understood as the global asymmetry of the bipartite correlations in a loop of three or more qubits; if the holonomy is trivial (the identity matrix), the bipartite correlations can be globally untwisted using general local qubit operations, the gauge group of our theory, which turns out to be the group of Lorentz transformations familiar from special relativity. If it is not possible to globally untwist the bipartite correlations in a state using local operations, the twistedness is given by a nontrivial element of the Lorentz group, the correlation-induced holonomy. We provide several analytical examples of twisted and untwisted states for three qubits, the most elementary nontrivial loop one can imagine.

  11. Residual meson-meson interaction from lattice gauge simulation in a simple QED{sub 2+1} model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Canosa; H. Fiebig

    1995-08-01

    The residual interaction for a meson-meson system is computed utilizing the cumulant, or cluster, expansion of the momentum-space time correlation matrix. The cumulant expansion serves to define asymptotic, or free, meson-meson operators. The definition of an effective interaction is then based on a comparison of the full (interacting) and the free (noninteracting) time correlation matrices. The proposed method, which may straight forwardly be transcribed to other hadron-hadron systems, here is applied to a simple 2+1 dimensional U(1) lattice gauge model tuned such that it is confining. Fermions are treated in the staggered scheme. The effective interaction exhibits a repulsive core and attraction at intermediate relative distances. These findings are consistent with an earlier study of the same model utilizing L{umlt u}scher's method where scattering phase shifts are obtained directly.

  12. Charmonium Spectrum from Quenched QCD with Overlap Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    S. Tamhankar; A. Alexandru; Y. Chen; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; J.B. Zhang

    2005-07-20

    We present the first study of the charmonium spectrum using overlap fermions, on quenched configurations. Simulations are performed on 16{sup 3} x 72 lattices, with Wilson gauge action at {beta} = 6.3345. We demonstrate that we have discretization errors under control at about 5%. We obtain 88(4) MeV for hyperfine splitting using the {sub 0} scale, and 121(6) MeV using the (1{bar P}-1{bar S}) scale. This paper raises the possibility that the discrepancy between the lattice results and the experimental value for charmonium hyperfine splitting can be resolved using overlap fermions to simulate the charm quark on lattice.

  13. Bosons with Artificial Gauge Fields and Mott Physics on the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidanovic, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-03-01

    We study bosons in the tight-binding model on the honeycomb lattice introduced by Haldane. We analyze the ground state topology and quasiparticle properties in the Mott phase by applying bosonic dynamical mean field theory, strong-coupling perturbation theory, exact diagonalization and numerical evaluations of sample Hall conductivity. The phase diagram also contains two different superfluid phases. The quasiparticle dynamics, number fluctuations, and local currents are measurable in cold atom experiments.

  14. Phase of the fermion determinant in QED3 using a gauge invariant lattice regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, Nikhil; Narayanan, Rajamani

    2015-07-01

    We use canonical formalism to study the fermion determinant in different three-dimensional Abelian gauge-field backgrounds that contain nonzero magnetic and electric flux in order to understand the nonperturbative contributions to the parity-odd and parity-even parts of the phase. We show that a certain phase associated with free fermion propagation along a closed path in a momentum torus is responsible for the parity anomaly in a background with nonzero electric flux. We consider perturbations around backgrounds with nonzero magnetic flux to understand the structure of the parity-breaking perturbative term at finite temperature and mass.

  15. Chiral Spin Liquids in Triangular-Lattice SU (N ) Fermionic Mott Insulators with Artificial Gauge Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Pierre; Lajkó, Miklós; Wietek, Alexander; Penc, Karlo; Mila, Frédéric; Läuchli, Andreas M.

    2016-10-01

    We show that, in the presence of a π /2 artificial gauge field per plaquette, Mott insulating phases of ultracold fermions with SU (N ) symmetry and one particle per site generically possess an extended chiral phase with intrinsic topological order characterized by an approximate ground space of N low-lying singlets for periodic boundary conditions, and by chiral edge states described by the SU(N ) 1 Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten conformal field theory for open boundary conditions. This has been achieved by extensive exact diagonalizations for N between 3 and 9, and by a parton construction based on a set of N Gutzwiller projected fermionic wave functions with flux π /N per triangular plaquette. Experimental implications are briefly discussed.

  16. Chiral logarithms in quenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; S. J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F. X. Lee; K. F. Liu; N. Mathur; and J. B. Zhang

    2004-08-01

    The quenched chiral logarithms are examined on a 163x28 lattice with Iwasaki gauge action and overlap fermions. The pion decay constant fpi is used to set the lattice spacing, a = 0.200(3) fm. With pion mass as low as {approx}180 MeV, we see the quenched chiral logarithms clearly in mpi2/m and fP, the pseudoscalar decay constant. The authors analyze the data to determine how low the pion mass needs to be in order for the quenched one-loop chiral perturbation theory (chiPT) to apply. With the constrained curve-fitting method, they are able to extract the quenched chiral logarithmic parameter delta together with other low-energy parameters. Only for mpi<=300 MeV do we obtain a consistent and stable fit with a constant delta which they determine to be 0.24(3)(4) (at the chiral scale Lambdachi = 0.8 GeV). By comparing to the 123x28 lattice, they estimate the finite volume effect to be about 2.7% for the smallest pion mass. They also fitted the pion mass to the form for the re-summed cactus diagrams and found that its applicable region is extended farther than the range for the one-loop formula, perhaps up to mpi {approx}500-600 MeV. The scale independent delta is determined to be 0.20(3) in this case. The authors study the quenched non-analytic terms in the nucleon mass and find that the coefficient C1/2 in the nucleon mass is consistent with the prediction of one-loop chiPT. They also obtain the low energy constant L5 from fpi. They conclude from this study that it is imperative to cover only the range of data with the pion mass less than {approx}300 MeV in order to examine the chiral behavior of the hadron masses and decay constants in quenched QCD and match them with quenched one-loop chiPT.

  17. Topological phase transitions with non-Abelian gauge potentials on square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao-Hua; Li, Jian; Ting, C. S.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the topological phase transition on interacting square lattices via the non-Abelian potential by employing the real-space cellular dynamical mean-field theory combining with the continuous-time Monte Carlo method. For a weak on-site Hubbard interaction, a topological band insulating state with a pair of gapless edge states is induced by a next-nearest-neighbor hopping. A phase transition from the metallic phase to the Mott insulating phase is observed when the interaction is increased. These two phases can be distinguished by detecting whether a bulk gap in the K-dependent spectral function exists. The whole phase diagrams as functions of the interaction, next-nearest-neighbor hopping energy, and temperature are presented. The experimental setup to observe these new interesting phase transitions is also discussed.

  18. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: The Stefan Boltzmann law in a small box and the pressure deficit in hot SU(N) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliozzi, Ferdinando

    2007-05-01

    The blackbody radiation in a box L3 with periodic boundary conditions in thermal equilibrium at a temperature T is affected by finite-size effects. These bring about modifications of the thermodynamic functions which can be expressed in a closed form in terms of the dimensionless parameter LT. For instance, when LT ~ 4—corresponding to the value where the most reliable SU(N) gauge lattice simulations have been performed above the deconfining temperature Tc—the deviation of the free energy density from its thermodynamic limit is about 5%. This may account for almost half of the pressure deficit observed in lattice simulations at T ~ 4Tc.

  19. Jamming and percolation in random sequential adsorption of extended objects on a triangular lattice with quenched impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski-Petković, Lj; Lončarević, I.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) on a triangular lattice with defects is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The lattice is initially randomly covered by point-like impurities at a certain concentration p. The deposited objects are formed by self-avoiding random walks on the lattice. Jamming coverage {θ\\text{jam}} and percolation threshold θ \\text{p}\\ast are determined for a wide range of impurity concentrations p for various object shapes. Rapidity of the approach to the jamming state is found to be independent on the impurity concentration. The jamming coverage {θ\\text{jam}} decreases with the impurity concentration p and this decrease is more prominent for objects of larger size. For a certain defect concentration, decrease of the jamming coverage with the length of the walk \\ell making the object is found to obey an exponential law, {θ\\text{jam}}={θ0}+{θ1}{{\\text{e}}-\\ell /r} . The results for RSA of polydisperse mixtures of objects of various sizes suggest that, in the presence of impurities, partial jamming coverage of small objects can have even larger values than in the case of an ideal lattice. Percolation in the presence of impurities is also studied and it is found that the percolation threshold θ \\text{p}\\ast is practically insensitive to the concentration of point defects p. Percolation can be reached at highest impurity concentrations with angled objects, and the critical defect concentration p c is lowest for the most compact objects.

  20. Overlap fermions on a 20{sup 4} lattice

    SciTech Connect

    K.-F. Liu; Shao-Jing Dong; Frank X. Lee; Jianbo Zhang

    1994-03-01

    We report results on hadron masses, fitting of the quenched chiral log, and quark masses from Neuberger's overlap fermion on a quenched 20{sup 4} lattice with lattice spacing a = 0.15 fm. We used the improved gauge action which is shown to lower the density of small eigenvalues for H{sup 2} as compared to the Wilson gauge action. This makes the calculation feasible on 64 nodes of CRAY-T3E. Also presented is the pion mass on a small volume (6{sup 3} x 12 with a Wilson gauge action at beta = 5.7). We find that for configurations that the topological charge Q {ne} 0, the pion mass tends to a constant and for configurations with trivial topology, it approaches zero possibly linearly with the quark mass.

  1. Z(2) gauge neural network and its phase structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takafuji, Yusuke; Nakano, Yuki; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    We study general phase structures of neural-network models that have Z(2) local gauge symmetry. The Z(2) spin variable Si=±1 on the i-th site describes a neuron state as in the Hopfield model, and the Z(2) gauge variable J=±1 describes a state of the synaptic connection between j-th and i-th neurons. The gauge symmetry allows for a self-coupling energy among J’s such as JJJ, which describes reverberation of signals. Explicitly, we consider the three models; (I) an annealed model with full and partial connections of J, (II) a quenched model with full connections where J is treated as a slow quenched variable, and (III) a quenched three-dimensional lattice model with the nearest-neighbor connections. By numerical simulations, we examine their phase structures paying attention to the effect of the reverberation term, and compare them with each other and with the annealed 3D lattice model which has been studied beforehand. By noting the dependence of thermodynamic quantities upon the total number of sites and the connectivity among sites, we obtain a coherent interpretation to understand these results. Among other things, we find that the Higgs phase of the annealed model is separated into two stable spin-glass phases in the quenched models (II) and (III).

  2. Nonperturbative renormalization of the axial current in Nf=3 lattice QCD with Wilson fermions and a tree-level improved gauge action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulava, John; Della Morte, Michele; Heitger, Jochen; Wittemeier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We nonperturbatively determine the renormalization factor of the axial vector current in lattice QCD with Nf=3 flavors of Wilson-clover fermions and the tree-level Symanzik-improved gauge action. The (by now standard) renormalization condition is derived from the massive axial Ward identity, and it is imposed among Schrödinger functional states with large overlap on the lowest lying hadronic state in the pseudoscalar channel, in order to reduce kinematically enhanced cutoff effects. We explore a range of couplings relevant for simulations at lattice spacings of ≈0.09 fm and below. An interpolation formula for ZA(g02) , smoothly connecting the nonperturbative values to the 1-loop expression, is provided together with our final results.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann study of hydrodynamic effects in lamellar ordering process of two-dimensional quenched block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai-Xu; Jia, Yu-Xi; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2008-10-14

    By incorporating self-consistent field theory with lattice Boltzmann method, a model for polymer melts is proposed. Compared with models based on Ginzburg-Landau free energy, our model does not employ phenomenological free energies to describe systems and can consider the chain topological details of polymers. We use this model to study the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the dynamics of microphase separation for block copolymers. In the early stage of phase separation, an exponential growth predicted by Cahn-Hilliard treatment is found. Simulation results also show that the effect of hydrodynamic interactions can be neglected in the early stage. For the late stage of phase separation, it is easy to see the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the ordering process of lamellae phase. From the analysis of structure factor curves, we find that the growth of domains is faster if hydrodynamic interactions are introduced. Furthermore, the scaling of the pattern dynamics is investigated for the late stage at zero thermal noise. By studying the behavior of scaling exponents of the structure factor and the nematic order-parameter correlation function C(nn), we can see that the effects of hydrodynamic interactions lead to bigger growth exponent for both functions. PMID:19045162

  4. Continuum limit of quenched theories

    SciTech Connect

    Holdom, B.

    1989-02-27

    We study chiral-symmetry breaking in quenched gauge theories with ultraviolet cutoff ..lambda.., to all orders in the gauge coupling. For large ..lambda../kappa, where kappa is the chiral-symmetry-breaking scale, we derive ..lambda../kappaproportionalexp(const/ ..sqrt..(..cap alpha..-..cap alpha../sub c/) as ..cap alpha --> cap alpha../sub c/+. This is a gauge-invariant, universal consequence of quenched theories. But we argue that this relation does not define a ..beta.. function. We also obtain an explicit expression for the self-energy ..sigma..(p) which applies over most of the range kappa

  5. Methods of Contemporary Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeenko, Yuri

    2002-08-01

    Preface; Part I. Path Integrals: 1. Operator calculus; 2. Second quantization; 3. Quantum anomalies from path integral; 4. Instantons in quantum mechanics; Part II. Lattice Gauge Theories: 5. Observables in gauge theories; 6. Gauge fields on a lattice; 7. Lattice methods; 8. Fermions on a lattice; 9. Finite temperatures; Part III. 1/N Expansion: 10. O(N) vector models; 11. Multicolor QCD; 12. QCD in loop space; 13. Matrix models; Part IV. Reduced Models: 14. Eguchi-Kawai model; 15. Twisted reduced models; 16. Non-commutative gauge theories.

  6. Methods of Contemporary Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeenko, Yuri

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Path Integrals: 1. Operator calculus; 2. Second quantization; 3. Quantum anomalies from path integral; 4. Instantons in quantum mechanics; Part II. Lattice Gauge Theories: 5. Observables in gauge theories; 6. Gauge fields on a lattice; 7. Lattice methods; 8. Fermions on a lattice; 9. Finite temperatures; Part III. 1/N Expansion: 10. O(N) vector models; 11. Multicolor QCD; 12. QCD in loop space; 13. Matrix models; Part IV. Reduced Models: 14. Eguchi-Kawai model; 15. Twisted reduced models; 16. Non-commutative gauge theories.

  7. Matrix product states for gauge field theories.

    PubMed

    Buyens, Boye; Haegeman, Jutho; Van Acoleyen, Karel; Verschelde, Henri; Verstraete, Frank

    2014-08-29

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study (1+1)-dimensional one flavor quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground-state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study full quantum nonequilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field. PMID:25215973

  8. On the Locality and Scaling of Overlap Fermions at Coarse Lattice Spacings

    SciTech Connect

    Terrence Draper; Nilmani Mathur; Jianbo Zhang; Andrei Alexandru; Ying Chen; Shao-Jing Dong; Ivan Horvath; Frank X. Lee; Keh-Fei Liu; Sonali Tamhankar

    2006-11-07

    The overlap fermion offers the considerable advantage of exact chiral symmetry on the lattice, but is numerically intensive. This can be made affordable while still providing large lattice volumes, by using coarse lattice spacing, given that good scaling and localization properties are established. Here, using overlap fermions on quenched Iwasaki gauge configurations, we demonstrate directly that, with appropriate choice of negative Wilson's mass, the overlap Dirac operator's range is comfortably small in lattice units for each of the lattice spacings 0.20 fm, 0.17 fm, and 0.13 fm (and scales to zero in physical units in the continuum limit). In particular, our direct results contradict recent speculation that an inverse lattice spacing of 1 GeV is too low to have satisfactory localization. Furthermore, hadronic masses (available on the two coarser lattices) scale very well.

  9. Holographic Jet Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficnar, Andrej

    In this dissertation we study the phenomenon of jet quenching in quark-gluon plasma using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We start with a weakly coupled, perturbative QCD approach to energy loss, and present a Monte Carlo code for computation of the DGLV radiative energy loss of quarks and gluons at an arbitrary order in opacity. We use the code to compute the radiated gluon distribution up to n=9 order in opacity, and compare it to the thin plasma (n=1) and the multiple soft scattering (n=infinity) approximations. We furthermore show that the gluon distribution at finite opacity depends in detail on the screening mass mu and the mean free path lambda. In the next part, we turn to the studies of how heavy quarks, represented as "trailing strings" in AdS/CFT, lose energy in a strongly coupled plasma. We study how the heavy quark energy loss gets modified in a "bottom-up" non-conformal holographic model, constructed to reproduce some properties of QCD at finite temperature and constrained by fitting the lattice gauge theory results. The energy loss of heavy quarks is found to be strongly sensitive to the medium properties. We use this model to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA of charm and bottom quarks in an expanding plasma with Glauber initial conditions, and comment on the range of validity of the model. The central part of this thesis is the energy loss of light quarks in a strongly coupled plasma. Using the standard model of "falling strings", we present an analytic derivation of the stopping distance of light quarks, previously available only through numerical simulations, and also apply it to the case of Gauss-Bonnet higher derivative gravity. We then present a general formula for computing the instantaneous energy loss in non-stationary string configurations. Application of this formula to the case of falling strings reveals interesting phenomenology, including a modified Bragg-like peak at late times and an approximately linear path dependence. Based

  10. On the scaling properties of quenched QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, William A.; Love, Sherwin T.; Miransky, Vladimir A.

    1990-06-17

    Critical scaling laws are studied in quenched quantum electrodynamics with induced four-fermion interactions that drive the theory to criticality. The critical exponents are calculated in the quenched, planar model and the physical picture extracted is consistent with recent results from lattice simulations. Near criticality, a composite scalar state plays an essential role in the effective dynamics.

  11. A quenched study of the Schroedinger functional with chirally rotated boundary conditions: non-perturbative tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Jennifer; Jansen, Karl; Renner, Dru B.; Shindler, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The use of chirally rotated boundary conditions provides a formulation of the Schroedinger functional that is compatible with automatic O(a) improvement of Wilson fermions up to O(a) boundary contributions. The elimination of bulk O(a) effects requires the non-perturbative tuning of the critical mass and one additional boundary counterterm. We present the results of such a tuning in a quenched setup for several values of the renormalized gauge coupling, from perturbative to non-perturbative regimes, and for a range of lattice spacings. We also check that the correct boundary conditions and symmetries are restored in the continuum limit.

  12. The decay constants f(B) and f(D+) from three-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; El-Khadra, A.X.; Evans, R.T.; Freeland, E.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.; Jain, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab /Fermilab /Washington U., St. Louis

    2007-01-01

    We present new preliminary results for the leptonic decay constants f{sub B} and f{sub D+} determined in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD at lattice spacings a = 0.09, 0.12 and 0.15 fm. Results are obtained using the MILC Collaboration gauge configuration ensembles, clover heavy quarks in the Fermilab interpretation and improved staggered light quarks. Decay constants, computed at partially quenched combinations of the valence and sea light quark masses, are used to determine the low-energy parameters of staggered chiral perturbation theory. The physical decay constants are found in an extrapolation using the parameterized chiral formula.

  13. Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

  14. Supersymmetry on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Georg; Catterall, Simon

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the motivations, difficulties and progress in the study of supersymmetric lattice gauge theories focusing in particular on 𝒩 = 1 and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills in four dimensions. Brief reviews of the corresponding lattice formalisms are given and current results are presented and discussed. We conclude with a summary of the main aspects of current work and prospects for the future.

  15. Building projected entangled pair states with a local gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Burrello, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Tensor network states, and in particular projected entangled pair states (PEPS), suggest an innovative approach for the study of lattice gauge theories, both from a pure theoretic point of view, and as a tool for the analysis of the recent proposals for quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories. In this paper we present a framework for describing locally gauge invariant states on lattices using PEPS. The PEPS constructed hereby shall include both bosonic and fermionic states, suitable for all combinations of matter and gauge fields in lattice gauge theories defined by either finite or compact Lie groups.

  16. General gauge mediation and deconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2010-11-01

    We locate a supersymmetry breaking hidden sector and supersymmetric standard model on different lattice points of an orbifold moose. The hidden sector is encoded in a set of current correlators and the effects of the current correlators are mediated by the lattice site gauge groups with "lattice hopping" functions and through the bifundamental matter that links the lattice sites together. We show how the gaugino mass, scalar mass and Casimir energy of the lattice can be computed for a general set of current correlators and then give specific formulas when the hidden sector is specified to be a generalised messenger sector. The results reproduce the effect of five dimensional gauge mediation from a purely four dimensional construction.

  17. The static quark potential from the gauge independent Abelian decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cundy, Nigel; Cho, Y. M.; Lee, Weonjong; Leem, Jaehoon

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the relationship between colour confinement and the gauge independent Cho-Duan-Ge Abelian decomposition. The decomposition is defined in terms of a colour field n; the principle novelty of our study is that we have used a unique definition of this field in terms of the eigenvectors of the Wilson Loop. This allows us to establish an equivalence between the path-ordered integral of the non-Abelian gauge fields and an integral over an Abelian restricted gauge field which is tractable both theoretically and numerically in lattice QCD. We circumvent path ordering without requiring an additional path integral. By using Stokes' theorem, we can compute the Wilson Loop in terms of a surface integral over a restricted field strength, and show that the restricted field strength may be dominated by certain structures, which occur when one of the quantities parametrising the colour field n winds itself around a non-analyticity in the colour field. If they exist, these structures will lead to an area law scaling for the Wilson Loop and provide a mechanism for quark confinement. Unlike most studies of confinement using the Abelian decomposition, we do not rely on a dual-Meissner effect to create the inter-quark potential. We search for these structures in quenched lattice QCD. We perform the Abelian decomposition, and compare the electric and magnetic fields with the patterns expected theoretically. We find that the restricted field strength is dominated by objects which may be peaks of a single lattice spacing in size or extended string-like lines of electromagnetic flux. The objects are not isolated monopoles, as they generate electric fields in addition to magnetic fields, and the fields are not spherically symmetric, but may be either caused by a monopole/anti-monopole condensate, some other types of topological objects, or a combination of these. Removing these peaks removes the area law scaling of the string tension, suggesting that they are responsible for

  18. Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Tereza; Cucchieri, Attilio; Mihara, Antonio

    2007-02-27

    The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

  19. Hyperon-nucleon force from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemura, Hidekatsu; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Aoki, Sinya; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2009-03-01

    We calculate potentials between a proton and a Ξ0 (hyperon with strangeness -2) through the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter wave function, employing quenched lattice QCD simulations with the plaquette gauge action and the Wilson quark action on (4.5 fm)4 lattice at the lattice spacing a ≃ 0.14 fm. The ud quark mass in our study corresponds to mπ ≃ 0.37 and 0.51 GeV, while the s quark mass corresponds to the physical value of mK. The central pΞ0 potential has a strong (weak) repulsive core in the S10 (S31) channel for r ≲ 0.6 fm, while the potential has attractive well at medium and long distances (0.6 fm ≲ r ≲ 1.2 fm) in both channels. The sign of the pΞ0 scattering length and its quark mass dependence indicate a net attraction in both channels at low energies.

  20. Cool flame quench distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryason, P. R.; Hirsch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a brief experimental investigation are presented which confirm the expectation that cool flame quenching distances should be larger than hot flame quenching distances. It is also discovered that whereas quenching distances for hot flames reach their minimum values near stoichiometric conditions, cool flame quenching distances are least under rich conditions. Rich conditions are well known to favor cool flame formation.

  1. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  2. Topological index theorem on the lattice through the spectral flow of staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcoiti, V.; Follana, E.; Vaquero, A.; Di Carlo, G.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate numerically the spectral flow introduced by Adams for the staggered Dirac operator on realistic (quenched) gauge configurations. We obtain clear numerical evidence that the definition works as expected: there is a clear separation between crossings near and far away from the origin, and the topological charge defined through the crossings near the origin agrees, for most configurations, with the one defined through the near-zero modes of large taste-singlet chirality of the staggered Dirac operator. The crossings are much closer to the origin if we improve the Dirac operator used in the definition, and they move towards the origin as we decrease the lattice spacing.

  3. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  4. Topological Quantum Phase Transition in Synthetic Non-Abelian Gauge Potential: Gauge Invariance and Experimental Detections

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fadi; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Ye, Jinwu; Fan, Heng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The method of synthetic gauge potentials opens up a new avenue for our understanding and discovering novel quantum states of matter. We investigate the topological quantum phase transition of Fermi gases trapped in a honeycomb lattice in the presence of a synthetic non-Abelian gauge potential. We develop a systematic fermionic effective field theory to describe a topological quantum phase transition tuned by the non-Abelian gauge potential and explore its various important experimental consequences. Numerical calculations on lattice scales are performed to compare with the results achieved by the fermionic effective field theory. Several possible experimental detection methods of topological quantum phase transition are proposed. In contrast to condensed matter experiments where only gauge invariant quantities can be measured, both gauge invariant and non-gauge invariant quantities can be measured by experimentally generating various non-Abelian gauges corresponding to the same set of Wilson loops. PMID:23846153

  5. Even parity excitations of the nucleon in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. N. Hedditch; W. Kamleh; D. B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A. G. Williams; J. M. Zanotti

    2007-09-01

    We study the spectrum of the even parity excitations of the nucleon in quenched lattice QCD. We extend our earlier analysis by including an expanded basis of nucleon interpolating fields, increasing the physical size of the lattice, including more configurations to enhance statistics and probing closer to the chiral limit. With a review of world lattice data, we conclude that there is little evidence of the Roper resonance in quenched lattice QCD.

  6. Lambda-Nucleon Potential Calculated from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2011-10-21

    We present our studies of Lambda-Nucleon ({Lambda}N) interaction by using lattice QCD. The equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) amplitude of the lowest energy scattering state of a proton-{Lambda} system is calculated from lattice QCD. In this report, two different types of gauge configurations are employed: (i) Quenched QCD configurations at {beta} = 5.7 (a = 0.1416(9) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x48 lattice, whose spatial volume is (4.5 fm){sup 3}.(ii)2+1 flavor full QCD configurations generated by the PACS-CS collaboration at {beta} = 1.9 (a = 0.0907(13) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x64 lattice, whose spatial volume is (2.90 fm){sup 3}. The spin-singlet central potential is calculated from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 0 state, whereas the spin-triplet central potential as well as the tensor potential are deduced simultaneously from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 1 state by dividing it into the S-wave and the D-wave components.

  7. Electric Polarizability of Neutral Hadrons from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Christensen; Walter Wilcox; Frank X. Lee; Leming Zhou

    2004-08-01

    By simulating a uniform electric field on a lattice and measuring the change in the rest mass, we calculate the electric polarizability of neutral mesons and baryons using the methods of quenched lattice QCD. Specifically, we measure the electric polarizability coefficient from the quadratic response to the electric field for 10 particles: the vector mesons {rho}{sup 0} and K{sup *0}; the octet baryons n, {Sigma}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub o}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub s}{sup 0}, and {Xi}{sup 0}; and the decouplet baryons {Delta}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup 0}, and {Xi}{sup 0}. Independent calculations using two fermion actions were done for consistency and comparison purposes. One calculation uses Wilson fermions with a lattice spacing of a = 0.10 fm. The other uses tadpole improved Luesher-Weiss gauge fields and clover quark action with a lattice spacing a = 0.17 fm. Our results for neutron electric polarizability are compared to experiment.

  8. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  9. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  10. Baryon Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sinya

    2010-05-12

    We report on new attempt to investigate baryon interactions in lattice QCD. From the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) wave function, we have successfully extracted the nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials in quenched QCD simulations, which reproduce qualitative features of modern NN potentials. The method has been extended to obtain the tensor potential as well as the central potential and also applied to the hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions, in both quenched and full QCD.

  11. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  12. Variational method for lattice spectroscopy with ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Tommy; Hagen, Christian; Gattringer, Christof; Glozman, Leonid Ya.; Lang, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the variational method used in lattice spectroscopy calculations. In particular we address the role of ghost contributions which appear in quenched or partially quenched simulations and have a nonstandard euclidean time dependence. We show that the ghosts can be separated from the physical states. Our result is illustrated with numerical data for the scalar meson.

  13. Short-distance matrix elements for $D$-meson mixing for 2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Lüscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3 GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators.

  14. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  15. Interquark potential with finite quark mass from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-08-26

    We present an investigation of the interquark potential determined from the q ̄q Bethe-Salpeter (BS) amplitude for heavy quarkonia in lattice QCD. The q ̄q potential at finite quark mass m(q) can be calculated from the equal-time and Coulomb gauge BS amplitude through the effective Schrödinger equation. The definition of the potential itself requires information about a kinetic mass of the quark. We then propose a self-consistent determination of the quark kinetic mass on the same footing. To verify the proposed method, we perform quenched lattice QCD simulations with a relativistic heavy-quark action at a lattice cutoff of 1/a≈2.1  GeV in a range 1.0≤m(q)≤3.6 GeV. Our numerical results show that the q ̄q potential in the m(q)→∞ limit is fairly consistent with the conventional one obtained from Wilson loops. The quark-mass dependence of the q ̄q potential and the spin-spin potential are also examined.

  16. Quantum quench in an atomic one-dimensional Ising chain.

    PubMed

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Kirilov, E; Lauber, K; Weinmann, P; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2013-08-01

    We study nonequilibrium dynamics for an ensemble of tilted one-dimensional atomic Bose-Hubbard chains after a sudden quench to the vicinity of the transition point of the Ising paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition. The quench results in coherent oscillations for the orientation of effective Ising spins, detected via oscillations in the number of doubly occupied lattice sites. We characterize the quench by varying the system parameters. We report significant modification of the tunneling rate induced by interactions and show clear evidence for collective effects in the oscillatory response. PMID:23952393

  17. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  18. Density of states in gauge theories.

    PubMed

    Langfeld, Kurt; Lucini, Biagio; Rago, Antonio

    2012-09-14

    The density of states is calculated for the SU(2), SU(3), and a compact U(1) lattice gauge theories using a modified version of the Wang-Landau algorithm. We find that the density of states of the SU(2) gauge theory can be reliably calculated over a range of 120,000 orders of magnitude for lattice sizes as big as 20(4). We demonstrate the potential of the algorithm by reproducing the SU(2) average action, its specific heat, and the critical couplings of the weak first order transition in U(1).

  19. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-28

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain (1/2)-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  20. Nonperturbative Regulator for Chiral Gauge Theories?

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Dorota M; Kaplan, David B

    2016-05-27

    We propose a nonperturbative gauge-invariant regulator for d-dimensional chiral gauge theories on the lattice. The method involves simulating domain wall fermions in d+1 dimensions with quantum gauge fields that reside on one d-dimensional surface and are extended into the bulk via gradient flow. The result is a theory of gauged fermions plus mirror fermions, where the mirror fermions couple to the gauge fields via a form factor that becomes exponentially soft with the separation between domain walls. The resultant theory has a local d-dimensional interpretation only if the chiral fermion representation is anomaly free. A physical realization of this construction would imply the existence of mirror fermions in the standard model that are invisible except for interactions induced by vacuum topology, and which could gravitate differently than conventional matter. PMID:27284646

  1. Renormalized Polyakov loop in the deconfined phase of SU(N) gauge theory and gauge-string duality.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Oleg

    2009-05-29

    We use gauge-string duality to analytically evaluate the renormalized Polyakov loop in pure Yang-Mills theories. For SU(3), the result is in quite good agreement with lattice simulations for a broad temperature range.

  2. Different lattice geometries with a synthetic dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszalski, Dominik; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of creating different geometries with the help of an extra synthetic dimension in optical lattices is studied. The additional linear potential together with Raman-assisted tunnelings are used to engineer well-controlled tunnelings between available states. The great flexibility of the system allows us to obtain different geometries of synthetic lattices with the possibility for adding synthetic gauge fields.

  3. Quenching: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Basketter, D

    2000-11-01

    Fragrance chemicals are a frequently reported cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), a matter which has recently come into considerable prominence, to the point that legislation in Europe is under serious consideration. Certain skin-sensitizing fragrance chemicals have been reported by the producing industry to be rendered safe (quenched), at least in terms of ACD, when they are used in the presence of a specific quenching agent. Accordingly, it seemed timely to review this apparent quenching phenomenon, considering the available data and potential mechanistic hypotheses that might be used to explain it. If it is correct, it should be a phenomenon of potentially enormous value in the elimination of the allergenic properties of at least a proportion of common skin sensitizers. Whilst there is some evidence in man for the occurrence of quenching during the induction of skin sensitization, a much more substantial body of work has failed to find supportive evidence in various animals models, at a chemical level or at elicitation in human subjects with existing allergy. On balance, it is concluded that quenching of fragrance allergens is a phenomenon still awaiting positive evidence of existence.

  4. Lattice fields and strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1989-06-01

    I review the lattice formulation of gauge theories and the use of numerical methods to investigate nonperturbative phenomena. These methods are directly applicable to studying hadronic matter at high temperatures. Considerable recent progress has been made in numerical algorithms for including dynamical fermions in such calculations. Dealing with a nonvanishing baryon density adds new unsolved challenges. 33 refs.

  5. Applications of partially quenched chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Golterman, M.F.; Leung, K.C.

    1998-05-01

    Partially quenched theories are theories in which the valence- and sea-quark masses are different. In this paper we calculate the nonanalytic one-loop corrections of some physical quantities: the chiral condensate, weak decay constants, Goldstone boson masses, B{sub K}, and the K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude, using partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. Our results for weak decay constants and masses agree with, and generalize, results of previous work by Sharpe. We compare B{sub K} and the K{sup +} decay amplitude with their real-world values in some examples. For the latter quantity, two other systematic effects that plague lattice computations, namely, finite-volume effects and unphysical values of the quark masses and pion external momenta, are also considered. We find that typical one-loop corrections can be substantial. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. The Quench Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the methodology of the Quench Action, which is an effective representation for the calculation of time-dependent expectation values of physical operators following a generic out-of-equilibrium state preparation protocol (for example a quantum quench). The representation, originally introduced in Caux and Essler (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 257203), is founded on a mixture of exact data for overlaps together with variational reasonings. It is argued to be quite generally valid and thermodynamically exact for arbitrary times after the quench (from short times all the way up to the steady state), and applicable to a wide class of physically relevant observables. Here, we introduce the method and its language, give an overview of some recent results, suggest a roadmap and offer some perspectives on possible future research directions.

  7. Microstructural analysis of martensite constituents in quenching and partitioning steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santofimia, M.J.; Petrov, R.H.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-06-01

    A methodology to distinguish martensite formed in the first quench (M1) from martensite formed in the second quench (M2) of the Quenching and Partitioning process is presented, enabling the study of the structural characteristics of both microstructural constituents. Investigations show that M1 displays larger block size and less lattice imperfections than M2, differences that can be related to their respective carbon contents. - Highlights: • An approach to distinguish “old” from “new” martensite in Q and P steels is presented • Methodology allows separate characterization of microstructure and crystallography “Old” martensite has larger block size and more perfect lattice than the “new” one • The differences between the old and new martensite depend on their carbon contents.

  8. 3. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING QUENCH TOWER, WITH QUENCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING QUENCH TOWER, WITH QUENCH IN PROGRESS, WILPUTTE BATTERY, COAL PRE-HEATING UNIT, INCLINE CONVEYOR AND BATHHOUSE. - Alabama By-Products Company, Coke Plant, Highway 79 (Pinson Valley Parkway), Tarrant City, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Tomography of Band Insulators from Quench Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Philipp; Lewenstein, Maciej; Eckardt, André

    2014-07-01

    We propose a simple scheme for tomography of band-insulating states in one- and two-dimensional optical lattices with two sublattice states. In particular, the scheme maps out the Berry curvature in the entire Brillouin zone and extracts topological invariants such as the Chern number. The measurement relies on observing—via time-of-flight imaging—the time evolution of the momentum distribution following a sudden quench in the band structure. We consider two examples of experimental relevance: the Harper model with π flux and the Haldane model on a honeycomb lattice. Moreover, we illustrate the performance of the scheme in the presence of a parabolic trap, noise, and finite measurement resolution.

  10. Monopoles, Abelian projection, and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Claudio; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Lepori, Luca; Pucci, Fabrizio

    2010-04-15

    A direct connection is proved between the non-Abelian Bianchi Identities (NABI's) and the Abelian Bianchi identities for the 't Hooft tensor. As a consequence, the existence of a nonzero magnetic current is related to the violation of the NABI's and is a gauge-invariant property. The construction allows us to show that not all Abelian projections can be used to expose monopoles in lattice configurations: each field configuration with nonzero magnetic charge identifies its natural projection, up to gauge transformations which tend to unity at large distances. It is shown that the so-called maximal-Abelian gauge is a legitimate choice. It is also proven, starting from the NABI, that monopole condensation is a physical gauge-invariant phenomenon, independent of the choice of the Abelian projection.

  11. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  12. Lattice study of meson correlators in the {epsilon}-regime of two-flavor QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukaya, H.; Aoki, S.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Matsufuru, H.; Noaki, J.; Ogawa, K.; Onogi, T.

    2008-04-01

    We calculate mesonic two-point functions in the {epsilon}-regime of two-flavor QCD on the lattice with exact chiral symmetry. We use gauge configurations of size 16{sup 3}x32 at a{approx}0.11 fm generated with dynamical overlap fermions. The sea quark mass is fixed at around 3 MeV and the valence quark mass is varied in the range 1-4 MeV, both of which are in the {epsilon}-regime. We find a good consistency with the expectations from the next-to-leading order calculation in the {epsilon}-expansion of (partially quenched) chiral perturbation theory. From a fit we obtain the pion decay constant F=87.3(5.6) MeV and the chiral condensate {sigma}{sup MS}=[239.8(4.0) MeV]{sup 3} up to next-to-next-to-leading order contributions.

  13. A lattice approach to spinorial quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renteln, Paul; Smolin, Lee

    1989-01-01

    A new lattice regularization of quantum general relativity based on Ashtekar's reformulation of Hamiltonian general relativity is presented. In this form, quantum states of the gravitational field are represented within the physical Hilbert space of a Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory. The gauge field of the theory is a complexified SU(2) connection which is the gravitational connection for left-handed spinor fields. The physical states of the gravitational field are those which are annihilated by additional constraints which correspond to the four constraints of general relativity. Lattice versions of these constraints are constructed. Those corresponding to the three-dimensional diffeomorphism generators move states associated with Wilson loops around on the lattice. The lattice Hamiltonian constraint has a simple form, and a correspondingly simple interpretation: it is an operator which cuts and joins Wilson loops at points of intersection.

  14. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  15. Characterizing Water Quenching Systems with a Quench Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, B. Lynn; Li, Zhichao; Freborg, Andrew M.

    2014-12-01

    Quench probes have been used effectively to characterize the quality of quenchants for many years. For this purpose, a variety of commercial probes, as well as the necessary data acquisition system for determining the time-temperature data for a set of standardized test conditions, are available for purchase. The type of information obtained from such probes provides a good basis for comparing media, characterizing general cooling capabilities, and checking media condition over time. However, these data do not adequately characterize the actual production quenching process in terms of heat transfer behavior in many cases, especially when high temperature gradients are present. Faced with the need to characterize water quenching practices, including conventional and intensive practices, a quench probe was developed. This paper describes that probe, the data collection system, the data gathered for both intensive quenching and conventional water quenching, and the heat transfer coefficients determined for these processes. Process sensitivities are investigated and highlight some intricacies of quenching.

  16. A new quenching alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R.J.; Faulkner, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    The quenching of ferrous alloys implies the controlled extraction of heat from a part at a rate sufficient to harden the part and still control the desired dimensional limitations. Quenchants in common use today are: molten metals, molten salts, petroleum oils, polymer solutions, water, and salt/water solutions. Each type of quenchant has its benefits and limitations. With current waste legislation and the trends toward environmentally friendlier industrial working fluids, many of these quenching products are coming under close scrutiny by the users and legislators. The most widely used quenchant is petroleum oil due to its favorable heat extraction characteristics. The dependence upon imports, price vulnerability, and contamination potential have caused suppliers and users to look into alternative products. Research into renewable resource, non-petroleum, vegetable oils has been going on globally for several years. The drawbacks encountered with many vegetable oils were widely known and only years of research enabled them to be overcome. The presently formulated product not only performs as well as petroleum oil but shows some characteristics better than those of the petroleum products, especially in the biodegradability and ecological aspects of the products. Stability and reproducible quenching properties have been proven with over two and one half years of field testing.

  17. Fixed point structure of quenched, planar quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.T.

    1986-07-01

    Gauge theories exhibiting a hierarchy of fermion mass scales may contain a pseudo-Nambu-Boldstone boson of spontaneously broken scale invariance. The relation between scale and chiral symmetry breaking is studied analytically in quenched, planar quantum electrodynamics in four dimensions. The model possesses a novel nonperturbative ultraviolet fixed point governing its strong coupling phase which requires the mixing of four fermion operators. 12 refs.

  18. Non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbier, Fabrice; Goldman, Nathan; Lewenstein, Maciej; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    Building a universal quantum computer is a central goal of emerging quantum technologies, which has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Unfortunately, this future does not seem to be very close at hand. However, quantum computers built for a special purpose, i.e. quantum simulators , are currently developed in many leading laboratories. Many schemes for quantum simulation have been proposed and realized using, e.g., ultracold atoms in optical lattices, ultracold trapped ions, atoms in arrays of cavities, atoms/ions in arrays of traps, quantum dots, photonic networks, or superconducting circuits. The progress in experimental implementations is more than spectacular. Particularly interesting are those systems that simulate quantum matter evolving in the presence of gauge fields. In the quantum simulation framework, the generated (synthetic) gauge fields may be Abelian, in which case they are the direct analogues of the vector potentials commonly associated with magnetic fields. In condensed matter physics, strong magnetic fields lead to a plethora of fascinating phenomena, among which the most paradigmatic is perhaps the quantum Hall effect. The standard Hall effect consists in the appearance of a transverse current, when a longitudinal voltage difference is applied to a conducting sample. For quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors at low temperatures placed in very strong magnetic fields, the transverse conductivity, the ratio between the transverse current and the applied voltage, exhibits perfect and robust quantization, independent for instance of the material or of its geometry. Such an integer quantum Hall effect, is now understood as a deep consequence of underlying topological order. Although such a system is an insulator in the bulk, it supports topologically robust edge excitations which carry the Hall current. The robustness of these chiral excitations against backscattering explains the universality of the quantum Hall effect. Another

  19. Infrared divergences, mass shell singularities and gauge dependence of the dynamical fermion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok K.; Frenkel, J.; Schubert, C.

    2013-03-01

    We study the behavior of the dynamical fermion mass when infrared divergences and mass shell singularities are present in a gauge theory. In particular, in the massive Schwinger model in covariant gauges we find that the pole of the fermion propagator is divergent and gauge dependent at one loop, but the leading singularities cancel in the quenched rainbow approximation. On the other hand, in physical gauges, we find that the dynamical fermion mass is finite and gauge independent at least up to one loop.

  20. Validation of a novel fiber optic strain gauge in a cryogenic and high magnetic field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Scott; Lakrimi, M.'hamed; Thomas, Adrian M.; Gao, Yunxin; Blakes, Hugh; Gibbens, Paul; Looi, Mengche

    2010-10-01

    We report on the first operation of an easy to use low cost novel fiber optic strain gauge (FOSG) in cryogenic and magnetic field environments. The FOSGs were mounted on a superconducting coil and resin impregnated. The gauges detected resin shrinkage upon curing. On cooldown, the FOSG monitored the thermal contraction strains of the coil and the electromagnetic strain during energization. The coil was deliberately quenched, in excess of 175 times, and again the FOSG detected the quenches and measured the thermal expansion-induced strains and subsequent re-cooling of the coil after a quench. Agreement with FEA predictions was very good.

  1. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  2. Coal liquefaction quenching process

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.; Yeh, Chung-Liang; Donath, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

  3. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  4. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  5. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  6. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  7. HIP quench technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.; Westerlund, J.; Zimmerman, F.X.

    1996-12-31

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is a viable production process today for densifying metals, ceramics, and composites to achieve fully dense parts. One major drawback for conventional HIPing is the long ten to twelve hour cycle time resulting in low productivity and high processing cost. Drastic furnace improvements have been made in the late 1980`s with the advent of Uniform Rapid Cooling (URC) called HIP Quenching. This innovation allows floor/floor cycles as short as four to five hours with one hour soak depending on the material to be HIPed. A flow device such as a fan is utilized at the base of the furnace for forced gas convection in promoting main features to: (1) accelerate time for heating, soaking and cooling; (2) add combined solution heat treating; and (3) reduce thermal distortion of parts with varying cross-sections. All three points promise to positively effect better economy with improved property and quality to promote the HIP process further. This paper describes the URC technology and illustrates a couple of HIP Quench studies made for a turbine disc and efficient High Speed Steel powder consolidation.

  8. The Kirchhoff gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Heras, Jose A. . E-mail: heras@phys.lsu.edu

    2006-05-15

    We discuss the Kirchhoff gauge in classical electrodynamics. In this gauge, the scalar potential satisfies an elliptical equation and the vector potential satisfies a wave equation with a nonlocal source. We find the solutions of both equations and show that, despite of the unphysical character of the scalar potential, the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the scalar and vector potentials are given by their well-known retarded expressions. We note that the Kirchhoff gauge pertains to the class of gauges known as the velocity gauge.

  9. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  10. Lattice QCD and the Jefferson Laboratory Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Konstantinos Orginos

    2011-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory provides our only means of performing \\textit{ab initio} calculations in the non-perturbative regime. It has thus become an increasing important component of the Jefferson Laboratory physics program. In this paper, we describe the contributions of lattice QCD to our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, focusing on the structure of hadrons, the calculation of the spectrum and properties of resonances, and finally on deriving an understanding of the QCD origin of nuclear forces.

  11. Measured Strain of Nb3Sn Coils During Excitation and Quench

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lietzke, S.; Mattafirri,M.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.

    2005-04-16

    The strain in a high field Nb{sub 3}Sn coil was measured during magnet assembly, cool-down, excitation and spot heater quenches. Strain was measured with a full bridge strain gauge mounted directly over the turns and impregnated with the coil. Two such coils were placed in a ''common coil'' fashion capable of reaching 11T at 4.2K. The measured steady state strain in the coil is compared with results obtained using the FEM code ANSYS. During quenches, the transient strain (due to temperature rise) was also measured and compared with the calculated mechanical time response to a quench.

  12. Quenched QED in the chiral limit. [QED (quantum electrodynamics)

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermark, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    The main goal in this project has been to understand, through analytical methods, whether there could be a continuum limit for QED. This possibility is motivated by recent lattice simulations on quenched QED which apparently exhibit a chiral phase transition at strong coupling in the chiral limit. Another goal is to develop a novel perturbation expansion which may also be usefully applied to other theories. The author begins with the general expression for the chiral order parameter, ([bar [psi

  13. An improved single-plaquette gauge action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Bögli, M.; Holland, K.; Niedermayer, F.; Pepe, M.; Wenger, U.; Wiese, U. J.

    2016-03-01

    We describe and test a nonperturbatively improved single-plaquette lattice action for 4-d SU(2) and SU(3) pure gauge theory, which suppresses large fluctuations of the plaquette, without requiring the naive continuum limit for smooth fields. We tune the action parameters based on torelon masses in moderate cubic physical volumes, and investigate the size of cut-off effects in other physical quantities, including torelon masses in asymmetric spatial volumes, the static quark potential, and gradient flow observables. In 2-d O(N) models similarly constructed nearest-neighbor actions have led to a drastic reduction of cut-off effects, down to the permille level, in a wide variety of physical quantities. In the gauge theories, we find significant reduction of lattice artifacts, and for some observables, the coarsest lattice result is very close to the continuum value. We estimate an improvement factor of 40 compared to using the Wilson gauge action to achieve the same statistical accuracy and suppression of cut-off effects.

  14. Infrared abelian dominance and dual Higgs mechanisms in MA gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Amemiya, K.; Ichie, H.

    We study infrared abelian dominance and the dual Higgs mechanism in the maximally abelian (MA) gauge using the lattice QCD Monte Carlo simulation. In the MA gauge, the off-diagonal gluon phase tends to be random, and the off-diagonal gluon Aμ± acquires the effective mass as Moff ≅ 1.2 GeV. From the monopole current in the MA gauge, we extract the dual gluon field Bμ and estimate the dual gluon mass as mB ≅ 0.5 GeV. The QCD-monopole structure is also investigated in terms of off-diagonal gluons. From the lattice QCD in the MA gauge, the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory can be constructed as a realistic infrared effective theory based on QCD

  15. Organic synthesis by quench reactions.

    PubMed

    Park, W K; Hochstim, A R

    1975-01-01

    The effects of chemical quench reactions on the formation of organic compounds at a water surface under simulated primordial earth conditions were investigated for the study of chemical evolution. A mixture of gaseous methane and ammonia over a water surface was exposed to an arc discharge between an electrode and the water surface. This discharge served as a source of dissociated, ionized and excited atomic and molecular species. Various organic molecules were formed in the gaseous, aqueous, and solid states by a subsequent quenching of these reactive species on the water surface. The effects of these water-surface quench reactions were assessed by comparing the amounts of synthesized molecules to the amounts which formed during the discharge of an arc above the water level. The results showed that: (1) the water-surface quench reaction permitted faster rates of formation of an insoluble solid and (2) the quench discharge yielded twice as much amino acids and 17 times more insoluble solids by weight than the other discharge. The highest yield of amino acids with the quench reaction was 9 x 10-7 molecules per erg of input energy. These observations indicate that quench reactions on the oceans, rain, and clouds that would have followed excitation by lightning and shock waves may have played an important role in the prebiotic milieu. Furthermore, the possibility exists that quench reactions can be exploited for the synthesis of organic compounds on a larger scale from simple starting materials.

  16. Quench Crucibles Reinforced with Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Carrasquillo, Edgar; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKehnie, N.

    2008-01-01

    Improved crucibles consisting mainly of metal-reinforced ceramic ampules have been developed for use in experiments in which material specimens are heated in the crucibles to various high temperatures, then quenched by, for example, plunging the crucibles into water at room temperature. In a traditional quench crucible, the gap between the ampule and the metal cartridge impedes the transfer of heat to such a degree that the quench rate (the rate of cooling of the specimen) can be too low to produce the desired effect in the specimen. One can increase the quench rate by eliminating the metal cartridge to enable direct quenching of the ampule, but then the thermal shock of direct quenching causes cracking of the ampule. In a quench crucible of the present improved type, there is no gap and no metal cartridge in the traditional sense. Instead, there is an overlay of metal in direct contact with the ampule, as shown on the right side of the figure. Because there is no gap between the metal overlay and the ampule, the heat-transfer rate can be much greater than it is in a traditional quench crucible. The metal overlay also reinforces the ampule against cracking.

  17. CHARMONIUM EXCITED STATES FROM LATTICE QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2007-11-20

    We apply the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators to demonstrate the feasibility of extracting multiple excited states in charmonium from lattice QCD. The calculation is performed in the quenched approximation to QCD, using the clover fermion action on an anisotropic lattice. A crucial element of our approach is a knowledge of the continuum limit of the interpolating operators, providing important additional information on the spin assignment of the states, even at a single value of the lattice spacing. Though we find excited-state masses that are systematically high with respect to the quark potential model, and the experimental masses where known, we attribute this as most likely an artifact of the quenched approximation.

  18. LHC magnet quench protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  19. F(1) for B (forward) D*ln from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Kronfeld, P.B. Mackenzie and J.N. Simone

    2002-07-12

    The authors would like to determine |V{sub cb}| from the exclusive semi-leptonic decay B{yields}D*lv. The differential decay rate is d{Lambda}/dw = G{sub F}{sup 2}/4{pi}{sup 3}(w{sup 2}-1){sup 1/2}m{sub D*}{sup 3} (m{sub B}-m{sub D*}){sup 2}G(w)|V{sub cb}|{sup 2}|F{sub B{yields}D*}(w)|{sup 2}, where w = v {center_dot} v{prime} and G(1) = 1. At zero recoil (w = 1) heavy-quark symmetry requires F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) to be close to 1. So, |V{sub cb}| is determined by dividing measurements of d{Lambda}/dw by the phase space and well-known factors, and extrapolating to w {yields} 1. This yields |V{sub cb}|F{sub B{yields}D*}(1), and F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) is taken from ''theory''. To date models [1] or a combination of a rigorous inequality plus judgement [2] have been used to estimate F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) - 1. In this work [3] they calculate F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) with lattice gauge theory, in the so-called quenched approximation, but the uncertainty from quenching is included in the error budget.

  20. Transverse momentum dependent quark densities from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch,Philipp Hagler,John Negele,Andreas Schafer

    2011-10-01

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non-local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC/LHPC lattices. We discuss the basic concepts of the method, including renormalization of the gauge link. Results obtained with a simplified operator geometry show visible dipole deformations of spin-dependent quark momentum densities.

  1. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  2. Entanglement entropy and nonabelian gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William

    2014-11-01

    Entanglement entropy has proven to be an extremely useful concept in quantum field theory. Gauge theories are of particular interest, but for these systems the entanglement entropy is not clearly defined because the physical Hilbert space does not factor as a tensor product according to regions of space. Here we review a definition of entanglement entropy that applies to abelian and nonabelian lattice gauge theories. This entanglement entropy is obtained by embedding the physical Hilbert space into a product of Hilbert spaces associated to regions with boundary. The latter Hilbert spaces include degrees of freedom on the entangling surface that transform like surface charges under the gauge symmetry. These degrees of freedom are shown to contribute to the entanglement entropy, and the form of this contribution is determined by the gauge symmetry. We test our definition using the example of two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, and find that it agrees with the thermal entropy in de Sitter space, and with the results of the Euclidean replica trick. We discuss the possible implications of this result for more complicated gauge theories, including quantum gravity.

  3. Quench ring for a gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Denbleyker, A.L.

    1989-01-31

    This patent describes a gasifier for the high temperature combustion of a carbonaceous fuel to produce a usable gas, which gasifier includes an insulated shell having a combustion chamber in which the fuel is burned at an elevated temperature and pressure, a quench chamber in the shell holding a liquid bath for cooling products of combustion, a constricted throat communicating the respective combustion chamber and quench chamber, and an elongated dip tube having an inner wall which defines a flow guide path between the combustion chamber and the quench chamber, and having opposed upper and lower edges.

  4. Kagome Chiral Spin Liquid as a Gauged U (1 ) Symmetry Protected Topological Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yin-Chen; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Pollmann, Frank; Moessner, R.

    2015-12-01

    While the existence of a chiral spin liquid (CSL) on a class of spin-1 /2 kagome antiferromagnets is by now well established numerically, a controlled theoretical path from the lattice model leading to a low-energy topological field theory is still lacking. This we provide via an explicit construction starting from reformulating a microscopic model for a CSL as a lattice gauge theory and deriving the low-energy form of its continuum limit. A crucial ingredient is the realization that the bosonic spinons of the gauge theory exhibit a U (1 ) symmetry protected topological (SPT) phase, which upon promoting its U (1 ) global symmetry to a local gauge structure ("gauging"), yields the CSL. We suggest that such an explicit lattice-based construction involving gauging of a SPT phase can be applied more generally to understand topological spin liquids.

  5. Kagome Chiral Spin Liquid as a Gauged U(1) Symmetry Protected Topological Phase.

    PubMed

    He, Yin-Chen; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Pollmann, Frank; Moessner, R

    2015-12-31

    While the existence of a chiral spin liquid (CSL) on a class of spin-1/2 kagome antiferromagnets is by now well established numerically, a controlled theoretical path from the lattice model leading to a low-energy topological field theory is still lacking. This we provide via an explicit construction starting from reformulating a microscopic model for a CSL as a lattice gauge theory and deriving the low-energy form of its continuum limit. A crucial ingredient is the realization that the bosonic spinons of the gauge theory exhibit a U(1) symmetry protected topological (SPT) phase, which upon promoting its U(1) global symmetry to a local gauge structure ("gauging"), yields the CSL. We suggest that such an explicit lattice-based construction involving gauging of a SPT phase can be applied more generally to understand topological spin liquids.

  6. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam

    2006-09-07

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  7. Holographic quenches with a gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    In order to holographically model quenches with a gapped final hamiltonian, we consider a gravity-scalar theory in anti-de Sitter space with an infrared hard wall. We allow a time dependent profile for the scalar field at the wall. This induces an energy exchange between bulk and wall and generates an oscillating scalar pulse. We argue that such backgrounds are the counterpart of quantum revivals in the dual field theory. We perform a qualitative comparison with the quench dynamics of the massive Schwinger model, which has been recently analyzed using tensor network techniques. Agreement is found provided the width of the oscillating scalar pulse is inversely linked to the energy density communicated by the quench. We propose this to be a general feature of holographic quenches.

  8. Rain Gauges Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  9. The Abelian Higgs model on Optical Lattice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Bazavov, Alexei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    We study the Lattice Gauge Theory of the U(1)-Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions in the strongly coupled regime. We discuss the plaquette corrections to the effective theory where link variables are integrated out. We discuss matching with the second-order perturbation theory effective Hamiltonian for various Bose-Hubbard models. This correspondence can be exploited for building a lattice gauge theory simulator on optical lattices. We propose to implement the quantum rotors which appear in the Hamiltonian formulation using Bose mixtures or p-orbitals. Recent progress on magnetic effects in 2+1 dimensions will be discussed. Supported by the Army Research Office of the Department of Defense under Award Number W911NF-13-1-0119.

  10. QED vacuum polarization on a momentum lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, H.; Lafrance, R.; Marleau, L. )

    1992-12-15

    We study the effect of a momentum ([ital k]) lattice as a regulator of quantum field theory. An an example, we compute the vacuum polarization in noncompact (linearized) QED from [ital k]-lattice perturbation theory to one-loop order and study the continuum limit. The amplitude has a finite part plus logarithmically, linearly, and quadratically divergent terms. The amplitude violates gauge invariance (Ward identity) and Lorentz (Euclidean) invariance and is nonlocal. For example, the linear term [similar to][Lambda][vert bar][ital k][vert bar] is nonlocal. Renormalization requires nonlocal counterterms, which is not inconsistent because the original action on the [ital k] lattice already has a nonlocality. We explicitly give the counterterms, which render the amplitude Lorentz and gauge invariant to recover the standard result.

  11. Non-Abelian gauge invariance and the infrared approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.h.; Fried, H.M.; Grandou, T.

    1988-02-15

    Two constructions are given of infrared approximations, defined by a nonlocal configuration-space restrictions, which preserve the local, non-Abelian gauge invariance of SU(N) two-dimensional QCD (QCD/sub 2/). These continuum infrared methods are used to estimate the quenched order parameter in the strong-coupling, or chiral, limit and are compared to a previous calculation where gauge invariance was not manifest. Both constructions provide results which, in the chiral limit, differ from each other and from the previous estimation by an inessential, multiplicative scaling factor.

  12. Lattice study of quark and glue momenta and angular momenta in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, M.; Doi, T.; Yang, Y. B.; Chakraborty, B.; Dong, S. J.; Draper, T.; Glatzmaier, M.; Gong, M.; Lin, H. W.; Liu, K. F.; Mankame, D.; Mathur, N.; Streuer, T.; χ QCD Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We report a complete calculation of the quark and glue momenta and angular momenta in the proton. These include the quark contributions from both the connected and disconnected insertions. The quark disconnected insertion loops are computed with Z4 noise, and the signal-to-noise ratio is improved with unbiased subtractions. The glue operator is comprised of gauge-field tensors constructed from the overlap operator. The calculation is carried out on a 1 63×24 quenched lattice at β =6.0 for Wilson fermions with κ =0.154 , 0.155, and 0.1555, which correspond to pion masses at 650, 538, and 478 MeV, respectively. The chirally extrapolated u and d quark momentum/angular momentum fraction is found to be 0.64 (5 )/0.70 (5 ), the strange momentum/angular momentum fraction is 0.024 (6 )/0.023 (7 ), and that of the glue is 0.33 (6 )/0.28 (8 ). The previous study of quark spin on the same lattice revealed that it carries a fraction of 0.25(12) of proton spin. The orbital angular momenta of the quarks are then obtained from subtracting the spin from their corresponding angular momentum components. We find that the quark orbital angular momentum constitutes 0.47(13) of the proton spin with almost all of it coming from the disconnected insertions.

  13. Coulomb branches for rank 2 gauge groups in 3 d N=4 gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Sperling, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    The Coulomb branch of 3-dimensional N=4 gauge theories is the space of bare and dressed BPS monopole operators. We utilise the conformal dimension to define a fan which, upon intersection with the weight lattice of a GNO-dual group, gives rise to a collection of semi-groups. It turns out that the unique Hilbert bases of these semi-groups are a sufficient, finite set of monopole operators which generate the entire chiral ring. Moreover, the knowledge of the properties of the minimal generators is enough to compute the Hilbert series explicitly. The techniques of this paper allow an efficient evaluation of the Hilbert series for general rank gauge groups. As an application, we provide various examples for all rank two gauge groups to demonstrate the novel interpretation.

  14. Non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbier, Fabrice; Goldman, Nathan; Lewenstein, Maciej; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    Building a universal quantum computer is a central goal of emerging quantum technologies, which has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Unfortunately, this future does not seem to be very close at hand. However, quantum computers built for a special purpose, i.e. quantum simulators , are currently developed in many leading laboratories. Many schemes for quantum simulation have been proposed and realized using, e.g., ultracold atoms in optical lattices, ultracold trapped ions, atoms in arrays of cavities, atoms/ions in arrays of traps, quantum dots, photonic networks, or superconducting circuits. The progress in experimental implementations is more than spectacular. Particularly interesting are those systems that simulate quantum matter evolving in the presence of gauge fields. In the quantum simulation framework, the generated (synthetic) gauge fields may be Abelian, in which case they are the direct analogues of the vector potentials commonly associated with magnetic fields. In condensed matter physics, strong magnetic fields lead to a plethora of fascinating phenomena, among which the most paradigmatic is perhaps the quantum Hall effect. The standard Hall effect consists in the appearance of a transverse current, when a longitudinal voltage difference is applied to a conducting sample. For quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors at low temperatures placed in very strong magnetic fields, the transverse conductivity, the ratio between the transverse current and the applied voltage, exhibits perfect and robust quantization, independent for instance of the material or of its geometry. Such an integer quantum Hall effect, is now understood as a deep consequence of underlying topological order. Although such a system is an insulator in the bulk, it supports topologically robust edge excitations which carry the Hall current. The robustness of these chiral excitations against backscattering explains the universality of the quantum Hall effect. Another

  15. Some thermodynamic aspects of pure glue, fuzzy bags, and gauge/string duality

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Oleg

    2007-10-15

    The thermodynamic properties of an SU(3) gauge theory without quarks are calculated using a string formulation for 1.2T{sub c}{<=}T{<=}3T{sub c}. The results are in good agreement with the lattice data. We also comment on SU(N) gauge theories.

  16. K{sup 0}-K{sup 0} mixing beyond the standard model and CP-violating electroweak penguins in quenched QCD with exact chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, Ronald; Howard, Joseph; Rebbi, Claudio; Garron, Nicolas; Hoelbling, Christian; Lellouch, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    We present results for the {delta}S=2 matrix elements which are required to study neutral kaon mixing in the standard model (SM) and beyond . We also provide leading chiral order results for the matrix elements of the electroweak penguin operators which give the dominant {delta}I=3/2 contribution to direct CP violation in K{yields}{pi}{pi} decays. Our calculations were performed with Neuberger fermions on two sets of quenched Wilson gauge configurations at inverse lattice spacings of approximately 2.2 GeV and 1.5 GeV. All renormalizations were implemented nonperturbatively in the regularization-independent/momentum (RI/MOM) scheme, where we accounted for subleading operator product expansion corrections and discretization errors. We find ratios of non-SM to SM matrix elements which are roughly twice as large as in the only other dedicated lattice study of these amplitudes. On the other hand, our results for the electroweak penguin matrix elements are in good agreement with two recent domain-wall fermion calculations. As a by-product of our study, we determine the strange quark mass. Our main results are summarized and discussed in Sec. VII. Within our statistics, we find no evidence for scaling violations.

  17. Superfluid - Mott transition in the presence of artificial gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasic, Ivana; Petrescu, Alex; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-05-01

    Several recent cold atom experiments reported implementation of artificial gauge fields in optical lattice systems, paving the way toward observation of new phases of matter. Here we study the tight-binding model on the honeycomb lattice introduced by Haldane, for lattice bosons. We analyze the ground state topology and quasiparticle properties in the Mott phase by applying bosonic dynamical mean field theory, strong-coupling perturbation theory and exact diagonalization. The phase diagram also contains two different superfluid phases. The quasiparticle dynamics, number fluctuations, and local currents are measurable in cold atom experiments.

  18. The Saga of Landau-Gauge Propagators: Gathering New Ammo

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Mendes, Tereza

    2011-05-23

    Compelling evidence has recently emerged from lattice simulations in favor of the massive solution of the Schwinger-Dyson equations of Landau-gauge QCD. The main objections to these lattice results are based on possible Gribov-copy effects. We recently installed at IFSC-USP a new GPU cluster dedicated to the study of Green's functions. We present here our point of view on the Saga and the status of our project. We also show data for the 2D case on a 2560{sup 2} lattice.

  19. Spin Hall effects for cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shi-Liang; Fu, Hao; Wu, C.-J.; Zhang, S.-C.; Duan, L.-M. /Michigan U., MCTP

    2010-03-16

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe spin Hall effects with cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential. Under an appropriate configuration, the cold atoms moving in a spatially varying laser field experience an effective spin-dependent gauge potential. Through numerical simulation, we demonstrate that such a gauge field leads to observable spin Hall currents under realistic conditions. We also discuss the quantum spin Hall state in an optical lattice.

  20. Coulomb gauge approach for charmonium meson and hybrid radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Peng; Yepez-Martínez, Tochtli; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-01-22

    We consider the lowest order interaction of the Foldy-Wouthuysen QED and QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge approach, to describe radiative transitions between conventional and hybrids charmonium mesons. The results are compared to potential quark models and lattices calculations.

  1. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  2. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  3. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  4. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  5. Hamiltonian truncation approach to quenches in the Ising field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovszky, T.; Mestyán, M.; Collura, M.; Kormos, M.; Takács, G.

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to lattice systems where powerful numerical techniques such as matrix product state based methods are available to study the non-equilibrium dynamics, the non-equilibrium behaviour of continuum systems is much harder to simulate. We demonstrate here that Hamiltonian truncation methods can be efficiently applied to this problem, by studying the quantum quench dynamics of the 1 + 1 dimensional Ising field theory using a truncated free fermionic space approach. After benchmarking the method with integrable quenches corresponding to changing the mass in a free Majorana fermion field theory, we study the effect of an integrability breaking perturbation by the longitudinal magnetic field. In both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases of the model we find persistent oscillations with frequencies set by the low-lying particle excitations not only for small, but even for moderate size quenches. In the ferromagnetic phase these particles are the various non-perturbative confined bound states of the domain wall excitations, while in the paramagnetic phase the single magnon excitation governs the dynamics, allowing us to capture the time evolution of the magnetisation using a combination of known results from perturbation theory and form factor based methods. We point out that the dominance of low lying excitations allows for the numerical or experimental determination of the mass spectra through the study of the quench dynamics.

  6. Ballistic quench-induced correlation waves in ultracold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, John P.; Bohn, John L.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the wave-packet dynamics of a pair of particles that undergoes a rapid change of scattering length. The short-range interactions are modeled in the zero-range limit, where the quench is accomplished by switching the boundary condition of the wave function at vanishing particle separation. This generates a correlation wave that propagates rapidly to nonzero particle separations. We have derived universal, analytic results for this process that lead to a simple phase-space picture of the quench-induced scattering. Intuitively, the strength of the correlation wave relates to the initial contact of the system. We find that, in one spatial dimension, the k-4 tail of the momentum distribution contains a ballistic contribution that does not originate from short-range pair correlations, and a similar conclusion can hold in other dimensionalities depending on the quench protocol. We examine the resultant quench-induced transport in an optical lattice in one dimension, and a semiclassical treatment is found to give quantitatively accurate estimates for the transport probabilities.

  7. Gauge coupling unification in gauge-Higgs grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamatsu, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    We discuss renormalization group equations for gauge coupling constants in gauge-Higgs grand unification on five-dimensional Randall-Sundrum warped space. We show that all four-dimensional Standard Model gauge coupling constants are asymptotically free and are effectively unified in SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unified theories on 5D Randall-Sundrum warped space.

  8. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-23

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  9. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-01

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until `forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  10. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  11. The Fermilab lattice supercomputer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Mark; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Pham, T.; Zmuda, T.; Hockney, George; Eichten, E.; Mackenzie, P.; Thacker, H. B.; Toussaint, D.

    1989-06-01

    The ACPMAPS system is a highly cost effective, local memory MIMD computer targeted at algorithm development and production running for gauge theory on the lattice. The machine consists of a compound hypercube of crates, each of which is a full crossbar switch containing several processors. The processing nodes are single board array processors based on the Weitek XL chip set, each with a peak power of 20 MFLOPS and supported by 8MBytes of data memory. The system currently being assembled has a peak power of 5 GFLOPS, delivering performance at approximately $250/MFLOP. The system is programmable in C and Fortran. An underpinning of software routines (CANOPY) provides an easy and natural way of coding lattice problems, such that the details of parallelism, and communication and system architecture are transparent to the user. CANOPY can easily be ported to any single CPU or MIMD system which supports C, and allows the coding of typical applications with very little effort.

  12. Natural Poincare gauge model

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrovandi, R.; Pereira, J.G.

    1986-05-15

    Because it acts on space-time and is not semisimple, the Poincare group cannot lead to a gauge theory of the usual kind. A candidate model is discussed which keeps itself as close as possible to the typical gauge scheme. Its field equations are the Yang-Mills equations for the Poincare group. It is shown that there exists no Lagrangian for these equations.

  13. Δ S = 2 and Δ I = {3}/{2} matrix elements in quenched QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, Laurent; Lin, C.-J. David; Ukqcd Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    We present preliminary results for BK, B{3}/{2}7 and B{3}/{2}8 from two high-statistics lattice computations. These calculations are performed at β = 6.0 and 6.2 in the quenched approximation, using mean-field-improved Sheikholeslami-Wohlert fermionic actions.

  14. B and D mesons in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2000-10-17

    Computational and theoretical developments in lattice QCD calculations of B and D mesons are surveyed. Several topical examples are given: new ideas for calculating the HQET parameters {bar {Lambda}} and {lambda}{sub 1}; form factors needed to determine {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar}; bag parameters for the mass differences of the B mesons; and decay constants. Prospects for removing the quenched approximation are discussed.

  15. Landau gauge Yang-Mills correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrol, Anton K.; Fister, Leonard; Mitter, Mario; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Strodthoff, Nils

    2016-09-01

    We investigate Landau gauge S U (3 ) Yang-Mills theory in a systematic vertex expansion scheme for the effective action with the functional renormalization group. Particular focus is put on the dynamical creation of the gluon mass gap at nonperturbative momenta and the consistent treatment of quadratic divergences. The nonperturbative ghost and transverse gluon propagators as well as the momentum-dependent ghost-gluon, three-gluon and four-gluon vertices are calculated self-consistently with the classical action as the only input. The apparent convergence of the expansion scheme is discussed and within the errors, our numerical results are in quantitative agreement with available lattice results.

  16. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; D. B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti

    2005-03-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark, with minimal quark content $uudd\\bar{s}$, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large $20^{3} \\times 40$ lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  17. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; James Zanotti

    2005-02-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark, with minimal quark content uudd{bar s}, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large 20{sup 3} x 40 lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  18. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  19. Thermalization of topological entropy after a quantum quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yu; Hamma, Alioscia; Fan, Heng

    2016-09-01

    Topologically ordered quantum phases are robust in the sense that perturbations in the Hamiltonian of the system will not change the topological nature of the ground-state wave function. However, in order to exploit topological order for applications such as self-correcting quantum memories and information processing, these states need to be also robust both dynamically and at finite temperature in the presence of an environment. It is well known that systems like the toric code in two spatial dimensions are fragile in temperature. In this paper, we show a completely analytic treatment of the toric code away from equilibrium, after a quantum quench of the system Hamiltonian. We show that, despite being subject to unitary evolution (and at zero temperature), the long-time behavior of the topological entropy is thermal, therefore vanishing. If the quench preserves a local gauge structure, there is a residual long-lived topological entropy. This also is the thermal behavior in presence of such gauge constraints. The result is obtained by studying the time evolution of the topological 2-Rényi entropy in a fully analytical, exact way.

  20. Chiral and continuum extrapolation of partially-quenched hadron masses

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Allton; Wes Armour; Derek Leinweber; Anthony Thomas; Ross Young

    2005-09-29

    Using the finite-range regularization (FRR) of chiral effective field theory, the chiral extrapolation formula for the vector meson mass is derived for the case of partially-quenched QCD. We re-analyze the dynamical fermion QCD data for the vector meson mass from the CP-PACS collaboration. A global fit, including finite lattice spacing effects, of all 16 of their ensembles is performed. We study the FRR method together with a naive polynomial approach and find excellent agreement ({approx}1%) with the experimental value of M{sub {rho}} from the former approach. These results are extended to the case of the nucleon mass.

  1. Hadron spectroscopy on a 32 3 × 48 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemi, K.; de Forcrand, Ph.; Fujisaki, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hege, H. C.; Hioki, S.; Makino, J.; Miyamura, O.; Nakamura, A.; Okuda, M.; Stamatescu, I. O.; Tago, Y.; Takaishi, T.; QCD TARO (QCD on Thousand cell A Ray processorOmnipurpose) Collaboration

    We report the first results of a hadron spectrum measurement by the QCD_TARO Collaboration with the massively parallel computer AP1000. The main memory of AP1000 is currently 8Gbytes (final goal : 16 Gbytes), which allows us to treat rather large lattices. We measure the quenched Wilson spectrum on a 32 3 × 48 lattice at β = 6.3. We obtain a good agreement with an empirical curve on the Edinburgh plot.

  2. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Osborne, M.G.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled. 6 figs.

  3. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Osborne, Matthew G.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled.

  4. Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  5. More on Gribov copies and propagators in Landau-gauge Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Fixing a gauge in the nonperturbative domain of Yang-Mills theory is a nontrivial problem due to the presence of Gribov copies. In particular, there are different gauges in the nonperturbative regime which all correspond to the same definition of a gauge in the perturbative domain. Gauge-dependent correlation functions may differ in these gauges. Two such gauges are the minimal Landau gauge and the absolute Landau gauge, both corresponding to the perturbative Landau gauge. These, and their numerical implementation, are described and presented in detail. Other choices will also be discussed. This investigation is performed, using numerical lattice gauge theory calculations, by comparing the propagators of gluons and ghosts for the minimal Landau gauge and the absolute Landau gauge in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. It is found that the propagators are different in the far infrared and even at energy scales of the order of half a GeV. In particular, the finite-volume effects are also modified. This is observed in two and three dimensions. Some remarks on the four-dimensional case are provided as well.

  6. Strong Coupling Gauge Theories in LHC ERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, H.; Harada, M.; Tanabashi, M.; Yamawaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    AdS/QCD, light-front holography, and the nonperturbative running coupling / Stanley J. Brodsky, Guy de Teramond and Alexandre Deur -- New results on non-abelian vortices - Further insights into monopole, vortex and confinement / K. Konishi -- Study on exotic hadrons at B-factories / Toru Iijima -- Cold compressed baryonic matter with hidden local symmetry and holography / Mannque Rho -- Aspects of baryons in holographic QCD / T. Sakai -- Nuclear force from string theory / K. Hashimoto -- Integrating out holographic QCD back to hidden local symmetry / Masayasu Harada, Shinya Matsuzaki and Koichi Yamawaki -- Holographic heavy quarks and the giant Polyakov loop / Gianluca Grignani, Joanna Karczmarek and Gordon W. Semenoff -- Effect of vector-axial-vector mixing to dilepton spectrum in hot and/or dense matter / Masayasu Harada and Chihiro Sasaki -- Infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators compatible with color confinement in Yang-Mills theory with the Gribov horizon / Kei-Ichi Kondo -- Chiral symmetry breaking on the lattice / Hidenori Fukaya [for JLQCD and TWQCD collaborations] -- Gauge-Higgs unification: Stable Higgs bosons as cold dark matter / Yutaka Hosotani -- The limits of custodial symmetry / R. Sekhar Chivukula ... [et al.] -- Higgs searches at the tevatron / Kazuhiro Yamamoto [for the CDF and D[symbol] collaborations] -- The top triangle moose / R. S. Chivukula ... [et al.] -- Conformal phase transition in QCD like theories and beyond / V. A. Miransky -- Gauge-Higgs unification at LHC / Nobuhito Maru and Nobuchika Okada -- W[symbol]W[symbol] scattering in Higgsless models: Identifying better effective theories / Alexander S. Belyaev ... [et al.] -- Holographic estimate of Muon g - 2 / Deog Ki Hong -- Gauge-Higgs dark matter / T. Yamashita -- Topological and curvature effects in a multi-fermion interaction model / T. Inagaki and M. Hayashi -- A model of soft mass generation / J. Hosek -- TeV physics and conformality / Thomas Appelquist -- Conformal

  7. Axisymmetric magnetic gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.L.; Alrick, K.R.; Fritz, J.N.

    1994-05-01

    Axisymmetric magnetic (ASM) gauges are useful diagnostic tools in the study of the conversion of energy from underground explosions to distant seismic signals. Requiring no external power, they measure the strength (particle velocity) of the emerging shock wave under conditions that would destroy most instrumentation. Shock pins are included with each gauge to determine the angle of the shock front. For the Non-Proliferation Experiment, two ASM gauges were installed in the ANFO mixture to monitor the detonation wave and 10 were grouted into boreholes at various ranges in the surrounding rock (10 to 64 m from the center of explosion). These gauges were of a standard 3.8-inch-diameter design. In addition, two unique Jumbo ASM gauges (3-ft by 3-ft in cross section) were grouted to the wall of a drift at a range of 65 m. We discuss issues encountered in data analysis, present the results of our measurements, and compare these results with those of model simulations of the experiment.

  8. Rapid-quench axially staged combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Feitelberg, Alan S.; Schmidt, Mark Christopher; Goebel, Steven George

    1999-01-01

    A combustor cooperating with a compressor in driving a gas turbine includes a cylindrical outer combustor casing. A combustion liner, having an upstream rich section, a quench section and a downstream lean section, is disposed within the outer combustor casing defining a combustion chamber having at least a core quench region and an outer quench region. A first plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a first diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the core region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. A second plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a second diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the outer region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. In an alternative embodiment, the combustion chamber quench section further includes at least one middle region and at least a third plurality of quench holes disposed within the liner at the quench section having a third diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to at least one middle region of the quench section of the combustion chamber.

  9. Formation and Dynamics of Antiferromagnetic Correlations in Tunable Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Desbuquois, Rémi; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-12-01

    We report on the observation of antiferromagnetic correlations of ultracold fermions in a variety of optical lattice geometries that are well described by the Hubbard model, including dimers, 1D chains, ladders, isolated and coupled honeycomb planes, as well as square and cubic lattices. The dependence of the strength of spin correlations on the specific geometry is experimentally studied by measuring the correlations along different lattice tunneling links, where a redistribution of correlations between the different lattice links is observed. By measuring the correlations in a crossover between distinct geometries, we demonstrate an effective reduction of the dimensionality for our atom numbers and temperatures. We also investigate the formation and redistribution time of spin correlations by dynamically changing the lattice geometry and studying the time evolution of the system. Time scales ranging from a sudden quench of the lattice geometry to an adiabatic evolution are probed.

  10. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  11. Commensurability effects in holographic homogeneous lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomas; Krikun, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    An interesting application of the gauge/gravity duality to condensed matter physics is the description of a lattice via breaking translational invariance on the gravity side. By making use of global symmetries, it is possible to do so without scarifying homogeneity of the pertinent bulk solutions, which we thus term as "homogeneous holographic lattices." Due to their technical simplicity, these configurations have received a great deal of attention in the last few years and have been shown to correctly describe momentum relaxation and hence (finite) DC conductivities.

  12. Diagrammatic analysis of QCD gauge transformations and gauge cancellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. J.; Lam, C. S.

    1996-02-01

    Diagrammatic techniques are invented to implement QCD gauge transformations. These techniques can be used to discover how gauge-dependent terms are canceled among diagrams to yield gauge-invariant results in the sum. In this way a multiloop pinching technique can be developed to change ordinary vertices into background-gauge vertices. The techniques can also be used to design new gauges to simplify calculations by reducing the number of gauge-dependent terms present in the intermediate steps. Two examples are discussed to illustrate this aspect of the applications. ¢ 1996 The American Physical Society.

  13. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  14. Hopf-algebraic renormalization of QED in the linear covariant gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kißler, Henry

    2016-09-01

    In the context of massless quantum electrodynamics (QED) with a linear covariant gauge fixing, the connection between the counterterm and the Hopf-algebraic approach to renormalization is examined. The coproduct formula of Green's functions contains two invariant charges, which give rise to different renormalization group functions. All formulas are tested by explicit computations to third loop order. The possibility of a finite electron self-energy by fixing a generalized linear covariant gauge is discussed. An analysis of subdivergences leads to the conclusion that such a gauge only exists in quenched QED.

  15. Topological phases for fermionic cold atoms on the Lieb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N.; Urban, D. F.; Bercioux, D.

    2011-06-15

    We investigate the properties of the Lieb lattice, that is, a face-centered square lattice, subjected to external gauge fields. We show that an Abelian gauge field leads to a peculiar quantum Hall effect, which is a consequence of the single Dirac cone and the flat band characterizing the energy spectrum. Then we explore the effects of an intrinsic spin-orbit term--a non-Abelian gauge field--and demonstrate the occurrence of the quantum spin Hall effect in this model. Besides, we obtain the relativistic Hamiltonian describing the Lieb lattice at low energy and derive the Landau levels in the presence of external Abelian and non-Abelian gauge fields. Finally, we describe concrete schemes for realizing these gauge fields with cold fermionic atoms trapped in an optical Lieb lattice. In particular, we provide a very efficient method to reproduce the intrinsic (Kane-Mele) spin-orbit term with assisted-tunneling schemes. Consequently, our model could be implemented in order to produce a variety of topological states with cold atoms.

  16. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  17. Chiral lattice fermions with correct vacuum polarization and chiral anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, C. )

    1991-04-15

    An action for chiral lattice fermions is proposed, which avoids the Nielsen-Ninomiya theorem by virtue of its nonlocality and nonbilinearity. The action is constructed by eliminating the extra fermion modes with a gauge-violating Majorana-type Wilson mass, which is then rendered invariant by an integration over gauge transformations. The free propagator is calculated, and the one-loop vacuum polarization is shown to be identical to that for Wilson fermions, even at nonzero lattice spacing. Also the chiral anomaly is shown to be the same as for Wilson fermions in the continuum limit.

  18. Exploring hyperons and hypernuclei with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.R.; Bedaque, P.F.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we outline a program for lattice QCD that wouldprovide a first step toward understanding the strong and weakinteractions of strange baryons. The study of hypernuclear physics hasprovided a significant amount of information regarding the structure andweak decays of light nuclei containing one or two Lambda's, and Sigma's.From a theoretical standpoint, little is known about the hyperon-nucleoninteraction, which is required input for systematic calculations ofhypernuclear structure. Furthermore, the long-standing discrepancies inthe P-wave amplitudes for nonleptonic hyperon decays remain to beunderstood, and their resolution is central to a better understanding ofthe weak decays of hypernuclei. We present a framework that utilizesLuscher's finite-volume techniques in lattice QCD to extract thescattering length and effective range for Lambda-N scattering in both QCDand partially-quenched QCD. The effective theory describing thenonleptonic decays of hyperons using isospin symmetry alone, appropriatefor lattice calculations, is constructed.

  19. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  20. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  1. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  2. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  3. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual

  4. Extended gauge sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1995-02-01

    Present and future prospects for the discovery of new gauge bosons, Z{prime} and W{prime}, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider searches for the W{prime} of the Left-Right Symmetric Model.

  5. Finite quantum gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  6. Global Equity Gauge Alliance.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, Antoinette

    2007-01-01

    The lack of attention to equity in health, health care and determinants of health is a burden to the attainment of good health in many countries. With this underlying problem as a basis, a series of meetings took place between 1999 and 2000, culminating in the creation the Global Equity Gauge Alliance (GEGA). G EGA is an international network of groups in developing countries, mainly Asia, Africa and Latin America, which develop projects designed to confront and mitigate inequities in health, know as Equity Gauges. Equity Gauges aim to contribute towards the sustained decline in inequities in both the broad sociopolitical determinants of health, as well as inequities in the health system. Their approach is based on three broad spheres of action, known as "pillars": 1) measurement and monitoring, 2) advocacy, and 3) community empowerment. Through a series of examples from local or national level gauges, this paper showcases their work promoting the interaction between research and evidence-based policy formulation and implementation, and the interaction between the community and policy makers. PMID:17665716

  7. Geometry and symmetries in lattice spinor gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2012-09-15

    Lattice spinor gravity is a proposal for regularized quantum gravity based on fermionic degrees of freedom. In our lattice model the local Lorentz symmetry is generalized to complex transformation parameters. The difference between space and time is not put in a priori, and the euclidean and the Minkowski quantum field theory are unified in one functional integral. The metric and its signature arise as a result of the dynamics, corresponding to a given ground state or cosmological solution. Geometrical objects as the vierbein, spin connection or the metric are expectation values of collective fields built from an even number of fermions. The quantum effective action for the metric is invariant under general coordinate transformations in the continuum limit. The action of our model is found to be also invariant under gauge transformations. We observe a 'geometrical entanglement' of gauge- and Lorentz-transformations due to geometrical objects transforming non-trivially under both types of symmetry transformations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We formulate the geometrical aspects of a proposal for a lattice regularized model of quantum gravity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vierbein shows an entanglement between Lorentz symmetry and gauge symmetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Euclidean and Minkowski signatures of the collective metric and the vierbein are described within the same functional integral.

  8. RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON GAUGE-INVARIANT VARIABLES IN GAUGE THEORIES, VOLUME 20

    SciTech Connect

    VAN BAAL,P.; ORLAND,P.; PISARSKI,R.

    2000-06-01

    This four-day workshop focused on the wide variety of approaches to the non-perturbative physics of QCD. The main topic was the formulation of non-Abelian gauge theory in orbit space, but some other ideas were discussed, in particular the possible extension of the Maldacena conjecture to nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The idea was to involve most of the participants in general discussions on the problem. Panel discussions were organized to further encourage debate and understanding. Most of the talks roughly fell into three categories: (1) Variational methods in field theory; (2) Anti-de Sitter space ideas; (3) The fundamental domain, gauge fixing, Gribov copies and topological objects (both in the continuum and on a lattice). In particular some remarkable progress in three-dimensional gauge theories was presented, from the analytic side by V.P. Nair and mostly from the numerical side by O. Philipsen. This work may ultimately have important implications for RHIC experiments on the high-temperature quark-gluon plasma.

  9. Driving magnetic order in a manganite by ultrafast lattice excitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Forst, M.; Tobey, R. I.; Wall, S.; Bromberger, H.; Khanna, V.; Cavalieri, A. L.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, W. S.; Moore, R.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Trigo, M.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Hill, J. P.; Cavalleri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Femtosecond midinfrared pulses are used to directly excite the lattice of the single-layer manganite La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. Magnetic and orbital orders, as measured by femtosecond resonant soft x-ray diffraction with an x-ray free-electron laser, are reduced within a few picoseconds. This effect is interpreted as a displacive exchange quench, a prompt shift in the equilibrium value of the magnetic- and orbital-order parameters after the lattice has been distorted. Control of magnetism through ultrafast lattice excitation may be of use for high-speed optomagnetism.

  10. What lattice theorists can do for superstring/M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    The gauge/gravity duality provides us with nonperturbative formulation of superstring/M-theory. Although inputs from gauge theory side are crucial for answering many deep questions associated with quantum gravitational aspects of superstring/M-theory, many of the important problems have evaded analytic approaches. For them, lattice gauge theory is the only hope at this moment. In this review I give a list of such problems, putting emphasis on problems within reach in a five-year span, including both Euclidean and real-time simulations.

  11. Some comments on unitarity gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Osorio, M. A.; Martinez-Pascual, E.; Toscano, J. J.

    2004-04-01

    A pedagogical discussion on the unitarity gauge within the context of Hamiltonian path integral formalism is presented. A model based on the group O(N), spontaneously broken down to the subgroup O(N - 1), is used to illustrate the main aspects of this gauge-fixing procedure. Among the issues, discussed with some extent, are: (1) the structure of model's constraints following the Dirac's method, (2) the gauge-fixing procedure, using the unitarity gauge for the massive gauge fields and the Coulomb one for the massless gauge fields, (3) the absence of BRST symmetry in this gauge-fixing procedure and its implications on the renormalizability of the theory, and (4) the static role of the ghost and anti-ghost fields associated with the massive gauge fields and how their contributions can be eliminated by using the dimensional regularization scheme.

  12. Transverse momentum dependent quark densities from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch,Philipp Hagler,John Negele,Andreas Schafer

    2011-02-01

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non-local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC/LHPC lattices. Results obtained with a simpli?ed operator geometry show visible dipole de- formations of spin-dependent quark momentum densities. We discuss the basic concepts of the method, including renormalization of the gauge link, and an ex- tension to a more elaborate operator geometry that would allow us to analyze process-dependent TMDs such as the Sivers-function.

  13. Transverse momentum distributions inside the nucleon from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch, Philipp Hagler, John Negele, Andreas Schafer

    2010-06-01

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non-local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC/LHPC lattices. Results obtained with a simplified operator geometry show visible dipole deformations of spin-dependent quark momentum densities. We discuss the basic concepts of the method, including renormalization of the gauge link, and an extension to a more elaborate operator geometry that would allow us to analyze process-dependent TMDs such as the Sivers-function.

  14. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    SciTech Connect

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  15. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE PAGES

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixedmore » point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.« less

  16. Nuclear forces from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2011-05-06

    Lattice QCD construction of nuclear forces is reviewed. In this method, the nuclear potentials are constructed by solving the Schroedinger equation, where equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions are regarded as quantum mechanical wave functions. Since the long distance behavior of equal-time NBS wave functions is controlled by the scattering phase, which is in exactly the same way as scattering wave functions in quantum mechanics, the resulting potentials are faithful to the NN scattering data. The derivative expansion of this potential leads to the central and the tensor potentials at the leading order. Some of numerical results of these two potentials are shown based on the quenched QCD.

  17. Visualization Tools for Lattice QCD - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro

    2012-03-15

    Our research project is about the development of visualization tools for Lattice QCD. We developed various tools by extending existing libraries, adding new algorithms, exposing new APIs, and creating web interfaces (including the new NERSC gauge connection web site). Our tools cover the full stack of operations from automating download of data, to generating VTK files (topological charge, plaquette, Polyakov lines, quark and meson propagators, currents), to turning the VTK files into images, movies, and web pages. Some of the tools have their own web interfaces. Some Lattice QCD visualization have been created in the past but, to our knowledge, our tools are the only ones of their kind since they are general purpose, customizable, and relatively easy to use. We believe they will be valuable to physicists working in the field. They can be used to better teach Lattice QCD concepts to new graduate students; they can be used to observe the changes in topological charge density and detect possible sources of bias in computations; they can be used to observe the convergence of the algorithms at a local level and determine possible problems; they can be used to probe heavy-light mesons with currents and determine their spatial distribution; they can be used to detect corrupted gauge configurations. There are some indirect results of this grant that will benefit a broader audience than Lattice QCD physicists.

  18. P T -invariant Weyl semimetals in gauge-symmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepori, L.; Fulga, I. C.; Trombettoni, A.; Burrello, M.

    2016-08-01

    Weyl semimetals typically appear in systems in which either time-reversal (T ) or inversion (P ) symmetry is broken. Here we show that in the presence of gauge potentials these topological states of matter can also arise in fermionic lattices preserving both T and P . We analyze in detail the case of a cubic lattice model with π fluxes, discussing the role of gauge symmetries in the formation of Weyl points and the difference between the physical and the canonical T and P symmetries. We examine the robustness of this P T -invariant Weyl semimetal phase against perturbations that remove the chiral sublattice symmetries, and we discuss further generalizations. Finally, motivated by advances in ultracold-atom experiments and by the possibility of using synthetic magnetic fields, we study the effect of random perturbations of the magnetic fluxes, which can be compared to a local disorder in realistic scenarios.

  19. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  20. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Hudson, Michael J.; Balogh, Michael L.; Smith, Russell J.; Power, Chris; Oman, Kyle A.; Krane, Brad

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation in cluster galaxies, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. We combine these orbits with models of star formation followed by environmental quenching, comparing model predictions with observed bulge and disc colours and stellar absorption line-strength indices of luminous cluster galaxies. Models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc is quenched upon infall are acceptable fits to the data. An exponential disc quenching time-scale of 3-3.5 Gyr is preferred. Quenching in lower mass groups prior to infall (`pre-processing') provides better fits, with similar quenching time-scales. Models with short (≲1 Gyr) quenching time-scales yield excessively steep cluster-centric gradients in disc colours and Balmer line indices, even if quenching is delayed for several Gyr. The data slightly prefer models where quenching occurs only for galaxies falling within ˜0.5r200. These results imply that the environments of rich clusters must impact star formation rates of infalling galaxies on relatively long time-scales, indicative of gentler quenching mechanisms such as slow `strangulation' over more rapid ram-pressure stripping.

  1. 27 CFR 19.289 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production gauge. 19.289... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Gauging Rules for Gauging § 19.289 Production gauge. (a) General requirements for production gauges. A proprietor must gauge all spirits by...

  2. Synthetic gauge flux and Weyl points in acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Chen, Wen-Jie; He, Wen-Yu; Chan, C. T.

    We consider acoustic systems comprising a honeycomb lattice in the xy plane and periodic along the z direction. As kz is a good quantum number here, for each fixed kz, this system can be treated as a reduced two-dimensional system. By engineering the interlayer coupling in the z-direction, we show that we can realize effective inversion symmetry breaking and synthetic staggered gauge flux in the reduced two-dimensional system. The realizations of chiral edge states for fixed values of kz are direct consequences of the staggered gauge flux. And we then show that the synthetic gauge flux is closely related to the Weyl points in the three-dimensional band structure. This work was supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (Grant No. AoE/P-02/12).

  3. Renormalized strong-coupling quenched QED in four dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, F.T.; Sizer, T.; Williams, A.G. |

    1997-03-01

    We study renormalized quenched strong-coupling QED in four dimensions in an arbitrary covariant gauge. Above the critical coupling leading to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, we show that there is no finite chiral limit. This behavior is found to be independent of the detailed choice of photon-fermion proper vertex in the Dyson-Schwinger equation formalism, provided that the vertex is consistent with the Ward-Takahashi identity and multiplicative renormalizability. We show that the finite solutions previously reported lie in an unphysical regime of the theory with multiple solutions and ultraviolet oscillations in the mass functions. This study is consistent with the assertion that in four dimensions strong coupling QED does not have a continuum limit in the conventional sense. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Observations on staggered fermions at nonzero lattice spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2006-06-01

    We show that the use of the fourth-root trick in lattice QCD with staggered fermions corresponds to a nonlocal theory at nonzero lattice spacing, but argue that the nonlocal behavior is likely to go away in the continuum limit. We give examples of this nonlocal behavior in the free theory, and for the case of a fixed topologically nontrivial background gauge field. In both special cases, the nonlocal behavior indeed disappears in the continuum limit. Our results invalidate a recent claim that at nonzero lattice spacing an additive mass renormalization is needed because of taste-symmetry breaking.

  5. The K+ K+ scattering length from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-09-11

    The K+K+ scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks. Three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, which includes the leading effects of the finite lattice spacing, is used to extrapolate the results of the lattice calculation to the physical value of mK + /fK + . We find mK^+ aK^+ K^+ = â~0.352 ± 0.016, where the statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.

  6. Holographic quenches and anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammon, Martin; Grieninger, Sebastian; Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Macedo, Rodrigo P.; Melgar, Luis

    2016-09-01

    We study the response of the chiral magnetic effect due to continuous quenches induced by time dependent electric fields within holography. Concretely, we consider a holographic model with dual chiral anomaly and compute the electric current parallel to a constant, homogeneous magnetic field and a time dependent electric field in the probe approximation. We explicitly solve the PDEs by means of pseudospectral methods in spatial and time directions and study the transition to an universal "fast" quench response. Moreover, we compute the amplitudes, i.e., residues of the quasi normal modes, by solving the (ODE) Laplace transformed equations. We investigate the possibility of considering the asymptotic growth rate of the amplitudes as a well defined notion of initial time scale for linearized systems. Finally, we highlight the existence of Landau level resonances in the electrical conductivity parallel to a magnetic field at finite frequency and show explicitly that these only appear in presence of the anomaly. We show that the existence of these resonances induces, among others, a long-lived AC electric current once the electric field is switched off.

  7. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory’s main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, iron-chromium-nickel, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. The system is described and some initial results are presented.

  8. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory's main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  9. Evolution of the Hofstadter butterfly in a tunable optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, F.; Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in realizing artificial gauge fields on optical lattices promise experimental detection of topologically nontrivial energy spectra. Self-similar fractal energy structures generally known as Hofstadter butterflies depend sensitively on the geometry of the underlying lattice, as well as the applied magnetic field. The recent demonstration of an adjustable lattice geometry [L. Tarruell, D. Greif, T. Uehlinger, G. Jotzu, and T. Esslinger, Nature (London) 483, 302 (2012), 10.1038/nature10871] presents a unique opportunity to study this dependence. In this paper, we calculate the Hofstadter butterflies that can be obtained in such an adjustable lattice and find three qualitatively different regimes. We show that the existence of Dirac points at zero magnetic field does not imply the topological equivalence of spectra at finite field. As the real-space structure evolves from the checkerboard lattice to the honeycomb lattice, two square-lattice Hofstadter butterflies merge to form a honeycomb lattice butterfly. This merging is topologically nontrivial, as it is accomplished by sequential closings of gaps. Ensuing Chern number transfer between the bands can be probed with the adjustable lattice experiments. We also calculate the Chern numbers of the gaps for qualitatively different spectra and discuss the evolution of topological properties with underlying lattice geometry.

  10. A streamlined method for chiral fermions on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.; Kovacs, E.V.

    1992-11-10

    We discussed the use of renormalization counterterms to restore the chiral gauge symmetry in a lattice theory of Wilson fermions. We show that a large class of counterterms can be implemented automatically by making a simple modification to the fermion determinant.

  11. The static force from lattice QCD with two dynamical quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Leder, B.; Knechtli, F.

    2011-05-23

    We report on the measurement of the static force from HYP-smeared Wilson loops in two flavour QCD. We analyse the quark mass dependence of the force at three lattice spacings. The QCD static force around distance r{sub 0} is compared with the force obtained from pure gauge theory, potential models and perturbation theory.

  12. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  13. Spreading of correlations and Loschmidt echo after quantum quenches of a Bose gas in the Aubry-André potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Gullo, Nicola; Dell'Anna, Luca

    2015-12-01

    We study the spreading of density-density correlations and the Loschmidt echo, after different sudden quenches in an interacting one-dimensional Bose gas on a lattice, also in the presence of a superimposed aperiodic potential. We use a time dependent Bogoliubov approach to calculate the evolution of the correlation functions and employ the linked cluster expansion to derive the Loschmidt echo.

  14. CATASTROPHIC QUENCHING IN {alpha}{Omega} DYNAMOS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-03-20

    At large magnetic Reynolds numbers, magnetic helicity evolution plays an important role in astrophysical large-scale dynamos. The recognition of this fact led to the development of the dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, which predicts catastrophically low mean fields in open systems. Here, we show that in oscillatory {alpha}{Omega} dynamos this formalism predicts an unphysical magnetic helicity transfer between scales. An alternative technique is proposed where this artifact is removed by using the evolution equation for the magnetic helicity of the total field in the shearing advective gauge. In the traditional dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, this can be described by an additional magnetic helicity flux of small-scale fields that does not appear in homogeneous {alpha}{sup 2} dynamos. In {alpha}{Omega} dynamos, the alternative formalism is shown to lead to larger saturation fields than what has been obtained in some earlier models with the traditional formalism. We have compared the predictions of the two formalisms to results of direct numerical simulations, finding that the alternative formulation provides a better fit. This suggests that worries about catastrophic dynamo behavior in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number are unfounded.

  15. Jet quenching and holographic thermalization with a chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Elena; Kundu, Arnab; Yang, Di-Lun

    2014-03-01

    We investigate jet quenching of virtual gluons and thermalization of a strongly-coupled plasma with a non-zero chemical potential via the gauge/gravity duality. By tracking a charged shell falling in an asymptotic AdS d+1 background for d = 3 and d = 4, which is characterized by the AdS-Reissner-Nordström-Vaidya (AdS-RN-Vaidya) geometry, we extract a thermalization time of the medium with a non-zero chemical potential. In addition, we study the falling string as the holographic dual of a virtual gluon in the AdS-RN-Vaidya spacetime. The stopping distance of the massless particle representing the tip of the falling string in such a spacetime could reveal the jet quenching of an energetic light probe traversing the medium in the presence of a chemical potential. We find that the stopping distance decreases when the chemical potential is increased in both AdS-RN and AdS-RN-Vaidya spacetimes, which correspond to the thermalized and thermalizing media respectively. Moreover, we find that the soft gluon with an energy comparable to the thermalization temperature and chemical potential in the medium travels further in the non-equilibrium plasma. The thermalization time obtained here by tracking a falling charged shell does not exhibit, generically, the same qualitative features as the one obtained studying non-local observables. This indicates that — holographically — the definition of thermalization time is observer dependent and there is no unambiguos definition.

  16. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Konstantinos; Richards, David G.

    2015-03-01

    The solution of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this paper, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  17. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Kostas; Richards, David

    2015-02-05

    The solution of QCD on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this study, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  18. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  19. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  20. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  1. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  2. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  3. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2016-07-12

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  4. Colloquium: Artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dalibard, Jean; Gerbier, Fabrice; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Oehberg, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    When a neutral atom moves in a properly designed laser field, its center-of-mass motion may mimic the dynamics of a charged particle in a magnetic field, with the emergence of a Lorentz-like force. In this Colloquium the physical principles at the basis of this artificial (synthetic) magnetism are presented. The corresponding Aharonov-Bohm phase is related to the Berry's phase that emerges when the atom adiabatically follows one of the dressed states of the atom-laser interaction. Some manifestations of artificial magnetism for a cold quantum gas, in particular, in terms of vortex nucleation are discussed. The analysis is then generalized to the simulation of non-Abelian gauge potentials and some striking consequences are presented, such as the emergence of an effective spin-orbit coupling. Both the cases of bulk gases and discrete systems, where atoms are trapped in an optical lattice, are addressed.

  5. Pressure-induced quenching of the charge-density-wave state observed by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.

    2010-05-03

    We report an x-ray diffraction study on the charge-density-wave (CDW) LaTe{sub 3} and CeTe{sub 3} compounds as a function of pressure. We extract the lattice constants and the CDW modulation wave-vector, and provide direct evidence for a pressure-induced quenching of the CDW phase. We observe subtle differences between the chemical and mechanical compression of the lattice. We account for these with a scenario where the effective dimensionality in these CDW systems is dependent on the type of lattice compression and has a direct impact on the degree of Fermi surface nesting and on the strength of fluctuation effects.

  6. Gauge Blocks - A Zombie Technology.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Gauge blocks have been the primary method for disseminating length traceability for over 100 years. Their longevity was based on two things: the relatively low cost of delivering very high accuracy to users, and the technical limitation that the range of high precision gauging systems was very small. While the first reason is still true, the second factor is being displaced by changes in measurement technology since the 1980s. New long range sensors do not require master gauges that are nearly the same length as the part being inspected, and thus one of the primary attributes of gauge blocks, wringing stacks to match the part, is no longer needed. Relaxing the requirement that gauges wring presents an opportunity to develop new types of end standards that would increase the accuracy and usefulness of gauging systems. PMID:27096119

  7. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  8. Quantum equivalence of noncommutative and Yang-Mills gauge theories in 2D and matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ydri, Badis

    2007-05-15

    We construct noncommutative U(1) gauge theory on the fuzzy sphere S{sub N}{sup 2} as a unitary 2Nx2N matrix model. In the quantum theory the model is equivalent to a non-Abelian U(N) Yang-Mills theory on a two-dimensional lattice with two plaquettes. This equivalence holds in the 'fuzzy sphere' phase where we observe a 3rd order phase transition between weak-coupling and strong-coupling phases of the gauge theory. In the matrix phase we have a U(N) gauge theory on a single point.

  9. [The quenching phenomenon or antigenic extinction].

    PubMed

    Giménez Camarasa, J M

    1985-01-01

    The new concept of "quenching" is exposed for its diffusion and Knowledge. This phenomenon occurs in nature, industry and in clinic dermatology. Doctors working in contact dermatitis suffer contradictions and paradoxic reactions due to "quenching situations". Most important bibliography on this theme is commented.

  10. Coulomb gauge ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2010-12-01

    A numerical study of the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation in Coulomb gauge is performed and solutions for the ghost propagator found. As input, lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used. It is shown that in order to solve completely, the equation must be supplemented by a nonperturbative boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum), which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until forced to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The renormalization is shown to be largely independent of the boundary condition. The boundary condition and the pattern of the solutions can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity. The connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is explored.

  11. Five-dimensional Gauge-Higgs Unification: a Standard Model-like Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Maurizio; Irges, Nikos; Knechtli, Francesco; Moir, Graham

    2015-09-01

    We study the viability of five-dimensional gauge theories as candidates for the origin of the Higgs field and its mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking. Within the framework of lattice field theory, we consider the simplest model of an SU(2) gauge theory. We construct this theory on a five-dimensional orbifold which explicitly breaks the gauge symmetry to U(1) at the fixed points of the orbifold. Using anisotropic gauge couplings, we find that this theory exhibits three distinct phases which we label as confined, Higgs and hybrid. Within the Higgs phase, close to the Higgs-hybrid phase transition, we find that the ratio of the Higgs to gauge boson masses takes Standard Model-like values. Precisely in this region of the phase diagram, we find dimensional reduction via localisation.

  12. Diquark mass differences from unquenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yujiang; Cai, Hao; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Zhaofeng; Qiao, Hao-Xue; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2016-07-01

    We calculate diquark correlation functions in the Landau gauge on the lattice using overlap valence quarks and 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations. Quark masses are extracted from the scalar part of quark propagators in the Landau gauge. The scalar diquark quark mass difference and axial vector scalar diquark mass difference are obtained for diquarks composed of two light quarks and of a strange and a light quark. The light sea quark mass dependence of the results is examined. Two lattice spacings are used to check the discretization effects. The coarse and fine lattices are of sizes 243 × 64 and 323 × 64 with inverse spacings 1/a = 1.75(4) GeV and 2.33(5) GeV, respectively. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11575197, 10835002, 11405178, 11335001), joint funds of NSFC (U1232109), MG and ZL are partially supported by the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS (2015013, 2011013), YC and ZL acknowledge support of NSFC and DFG (CRC110)

  13. Hamiltonian approach to 1 + 1 dimensional Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, H. Schleifenbaum, W.

    2009-04-15

    We study the Hamiltonian approach to 1 + 1 dimensional Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge, considering both the pure Coulomb gauge and the gauge where in addition the remaining constant gauge field is restricted to the Cartan algebra. We evaluate the corresponding Faddeev-Popov determinants, resolve Gauss' law and derive the Hamiltonians, which differ in both gauges due to additional zero modes of the Faddeev-Popov kernel in the pure Coulomb gauge. By Gauss' law the zero modes of the Faddeev-Popov kernel constrain the physical wave functionals to zero colour charge states. We solve the Schroedinger equation in the pure Coulomb gauge and determine the vacuum wave functional. The gluon and ghost propagators and the static colour Coulomb potential are calculated in the first Gribov region as well as in the fundamental modular region, and Gribov copy effects are studied. We explicitly demonstrate that the Dyson-Schwinger equations do not specify the Gribov region while the propagators and vertices do depend on the Gribov region chosen. In this sense, the Dyson-Schwinger equations alone do not provide the full non-abelian quantum gauge theory, but subsidiary conditions must be required. Implications of Gribov copy effects for lattice calculations of the infrared behaviour of gauge-fixed propagators are discussed. We compute the ghost-gluon vertex and provide a sensible truncation of Dyson-Schwinger equations. Approximations of the variational approach to the 3 + 1 dimensional theory are checked by comparison to the 1 + 1 dimensional case.

  14. A thermal equation for flame quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A E , Jr; Berlad, A I

    1956-01-01

    An approximate thermal equation was derived for quenching distance based on a previously proposed diffusional treatment. The quenching distance was expressed in terms of the thermal conductivity, the fuel mole fraction, the heat capacity, the rate of the rate-controlling chemical reaction, a constant that depends on the geometry of the quenching surface, and one empirical constant. The effect of pressure on quenching distance was shown to be inversely proportional to the pressure dependence of the flame reaction, with small correction necessitated by the effect of pressure on flame temperature. The equation was used with the Semenov equation for burning velocity to show that the quenching distance was inversely proportional to burning velocity and pressure at any given initial temperature and equivalence ratio.

  15. Transient Loschmidt echo in quenched Ising chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Carla; Schiró, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We study the response to sudden local perturbations of highly excited quantum Ising spin chains. The key quantity encoding this response is the overlap between time-dependent wave functions, which we write as a transient Loschmidt Echo. Its asymptotics at long time differences contain crucial information about the structure of the highly excited nonequilibrium environment induced by the quench. We compute the echo perturbatively for a weak local quench but for arbitrarily large global quench, using a cumulant expansion. Our perturbative results suggest that the echo decays exponentially, rather than power law as in the low-energy orthogonality catastrophe, a further example of quench-induced decoherence already found in the case of quenched Luttinger liquids. The emerging decoherence scale is set by the strength of the local potential and the bulk excitation energy.

  16. QUENCH STUDIES AND PREHEATING ANALYSIS OF SEAMLESS

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli; Eremeev, Grigory

    2013-09-01

    One of the alternative manufacturing technologies for SRF cavities is hydroforming from seamless tubes. Although this technology has produced cavities with gradient and Q-values comparable to standard EBW/EP cavities, a few questions remain. One of these questions is whether the quench mechanism in hydroformed cavities is the same as in standard electron beam welded cavities. Towards this effort Jefferson Lab performed quench studies on 2 9 cell seamless hydroformed cavities. These cavities include DESY's - Z163 and Z164 nine-cell cavities hydroformed at DESY. Initial Rf test results Z163 were published in SRF2011. In this report we will present post JLAB surface re-treatment quench studies for each cavity. The data will include OST and T-mapping quench localization as well as quench location preheating analysis comparing them to the observations in standard electron beam welded cavities.

  17. Perspectives in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2007-12-01

    Preface -- Fixed point actions, symmetries and symmetry transformations on the lattice / P. Hasenfratz -- Algorithms for dynamical fennions / A. D. Kennedy -- Applications of chiral perturbation theory to lattice QCD / Stephen R. Sharpe -- Lattice QCD with a chiral twist / S. Sint -- Non-perturbative QCD: renormalization, O(A) - Improvement and matching to Heavy Quark effective theory / Rainer Sommer.

  18. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the Ω×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  19. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  20. Quartic gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian

    1998-08-01

    We review the recent progress in studying the anomalous electroweak quartic gauge boson couplings (QGBCs) at the LHC and the next generation high energy e±e- linear colliders (LCs). The main focus is put onto the strong electroweak symmetry breaking scenario in which the non-decoupling guarantees sizable new physics effects for the QGBCs. After commenting upon the current low energy indirect bounds and summarizing the theoretical patterns of QGBCs predicted by the typical resonance/non-resonance models, we review our systematic model-independent analysis on bounding them via WW-fusion and WWZ/ZZZ-production. The interplay of the two production mechanisms and the important role of the beam-polarization at the LCs are emphasized. The same physics may be similarly and better studied at a multi-TeV muon collider with high luminosity.

  1. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  2. String Theory and Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Maldacena, Juan

    2009-02-20

    We will see how gauge theories, in the limit that the number of colors is large, give string theories. We will discuss some examples of particular gauge theories where the corresponding string theory is known precisely, starting with the case of the maximally supersymmetric theory in four dimensions which corresponds to ten dimensional string theory. We will discuss recent developments in this area.

  3. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2006-01-17

    Radiative transitions between charmonium states offer an insight into the internal structure of heavy-quark bound states within QCD. We compute, for the first time within lattice QCD, the transition form-factors of various multipolarities between the lightest few charmonium states. In addition, we compute the experimentally unobservable, but physically interesting vector form-factors of the {eta}{sub c}, J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c0}. To this end we apply an ambitious combination of lattice techniques, computing three-point functions with heavy domain wall fermions on an anisotropic lattice within the quenched approximation. With an anisotropy {xi} = 3 at a{sub s} {approx} 0.1 fm we find a reasonable gross spectrum and a hyperfine splitting {approx}90 MeV, which compares favorably with other improved actions. In general, after extrapolation of lattice data at non-zero Q{sup 2} to the photopoint, our results agree within errors with all well measured experimental values. Furthermore, results are compared with the expectations of simple quark models where we find that many features are in agreement; beyond this we propose the possibility of constraining such models using our extracted values of physically unobservable quantities such as the J/{psi} quadrupole moment. We conclude that our methods are successful and propose to apply them to the problem of radiative transitions involving hybrid mesons, with the eventual goal of predicting hybrid meson photoproduction rates at the GlueX experiment.

  4. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  5. Jet quenching from QCD evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Emerman, Alexander; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Ovanesyan, Grigory; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in soft-collinear effective theory with Glauber gluons have led to the development of a new method that gives a unified description of inclusive hadron production in reactions with nucleons and heavy nuclei. We show how this approach, based on the generalization of the DGLAP evolution equations to include final-state medium-induced parton shower corrections for large Q2 processes, can be combined with initial-state effects for applications to jet quenching phenomenology. We demonstrate that the traditional parton energy loss calculations can be regarded as a special soft-gluon emission limit of the general QCD evolution framework. We present phenomenological comparison of the SCETG -based results on the suppression of inclusive charged hadron and neutral pion production in √{sNN }=2.76 TeV lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider to experimental data. We also show theoretical predictions for the upcoming √{sNN }≃5.1 TeV Pb +Pb run at the LHC.

  6. Matrix elements of four-fermion operators with quenched Wilson fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    1997-04-01

    We present results for the matrix elements of a variety of four-fermion operators calculated using quenched Wilson fermions. Our simulations are done on 170 lattices of size 323×64 at β=6.0. We find BK=0.74+/-0.04+/-0.05, BD=0.78+/-0.01, B3/27=0.58+/-0.02+0.07-0.03, B3/28=0.81+/-0.03+0.03-0.02, with all results being in the NDR scheme at μ=2 GeV. We also calculate the B parameter for the operator Qs, which is needed in the study of the difference of B-meson lifetimes. Our best estimate is BS(NDR,μ=1/a=2.33 GeV) =0.80+/-0.01. This is given at the lattice scale since the required two-loop anomalous dimension matrix is not known. In all these estimates, the first error is statistical, while the second is due to the use of truncated perturbation theory to match continuum and lattice operators. Errors due to quenching and lattice discretization are not included. We also present new results for the perturbative matching coefficients, extending the calculation to all Lorentz scalar four-fermion operators, and using NDR as the continuum scheme.

  7. Latest Lattice Results for Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and computational advances have enabled not only the masses of the ground states, but also some of the low-lying excited states to be calculated using Lattice Gauge Theory. In this talk, I look at recent progress aimed at understanding the spectrum of baryon excited states, including both baryons composed of the light $u$ and $d$ quarks, and of the heavier quarks. I then describe recent work aimed at understanding the radiative transitions between baryons, and in particular the $N-{\\rm Roper}$ transition. I conclude with the prospects for future calculations.

  8. Study of hadron deformation in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Koutsou, Giannis

    2008-11-01

    We develop the formalism for the evaluation of density-density correlators in lattice QCD that includes techniques for the computation of the all-to-all propagators involved. A novel technique in this context is the implementation of the one-end trick in the meson sector. Density-density correlators provide a gauge invariant definition for the hadron wave function and yield information on hadron deformation. We evaluate density-density correlators using two degenerate flavors of dynamical Wilson fermions for the pion, the rho meson, the nucleon, and the {delta}. Using the one-end trick we obtain results that clearly show deformation of the rho meson.

  9. Lattice QCD calculation using VPP500

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong; Ohta, Shigemi

    1995-02-01

    A new vector parallel supercomputer, Fujitsu VPP500, was installed at RIKEN earlier this year. It consists of 30 vector computers, each with 1.6 GFLOPS peak speed and 256 MB memory, connected by a crossbar switch with 400 MB/s peak data transfer rate each way between any pair of nodes. The authors developed a Fortran lattice QCD simulation code for it. It runs at about 1.1 GFLOPS sustained per node for Metropolis pure-gauge update, and about 0.8 GFLOPS sustained per node for conjugate gradient inversion of staggered fermion matrix.

  10. Lattice study of large Nc QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrand, Thomas; Liu, Yuzhi

    2016-08-01

    We present a lattice simulation study of large Nc regularities of meson and baryon spectroscopy in S U (Nc) gauge theory with two flavors of dynamical fundamental representation fermions. Systems investigated include Nc=2 , 3, 4, and 5, over a range of fermion masses parametrized by a squared pseudoscalar to vector meson mass ratio between about 0.2 to 0.7. Good agreement with large Nc scaling is observed in the static potential, in meson masses and decay constants, and in baryon spectroscopy.

  11. Extracting Electric Polarizabilities from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-05-01

    Charged and neutral, pion and kaon electric polarizabilities are extracted from lattice QCD using an ensemble of anisotropic gauge configurations with dynamical clover fermions. We utilize classical background fields to access the polarizabilities from two-point correlation functions. Uniform background fields are achieved by quantizing the electric field strength with the proper treatment of boundary flux. These external fields, however, are implemented only in the valence quark sector. A novel method to extract charge particle polarizabilities is successfully demonstrated for the first time.

  12. A study of Θ+(ududs¯) in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ting-Wai; Hsieh, Tung-Han

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the mass spectrum of the pentaquark baryon ( ududs¯) in quenched lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. Using 3 different interpolating operators, we measure the 3×3 correlation matrix and obtain the eigenvalues A(t) with ± parity. For odd parity states, A(t) deviates from pure exponential decay even at large t, which implies that it cannot be a resonance with narrow decay width, thus is ruled out as a candidate of Θ(1540). For even parity states, they behave like usual resonances seen in quenched lattice QCD, and the mass of the lowest lying J=1/2 state is determined to be 1583 ± 121 MeV.

  13. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  14. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  15. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  16. Consecutive quenches and the safety leads

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.

    1984-04-30

    The safety leads of the Energy Saver were designed to handle occasional quenches. In order to save capital investment in another system of plumbing they involve no gas cooling. In their design optimization was sought on the ratio of load capability (for a single quench) to steady state heat leak into the liquid helium environment. Reference 1 describes the design considerations and tests on a prototype made out of constanta. The actual production models are made out of 304 Stainless Steel rods 13/16'' diameter by 48.66'' long/sup 2/ wrapped in Kapton film for electrical insulation. Here the behavior of production models relevant for consecutive quenches is analyzed.

  17. Gauge invariants and correlators in flavoured quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Paolo; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study the construction of holomorphic gauge invariant operators for general quiver gauge theories with flavour symmetries. Using a characterisation of the gauge invariants in terms of equivalence classes generated by permutation actions, along with representation theory results in symmetric groups and unitary groups, we give a diagonal basis for the 2-point functions of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic operators. This involves a generalisation of the previously constructed Quiver Restricted Schur operators to the flavoured case. The 3-point functions are derived and shown to be given in terms of networks of symmetric group branching coefficients. The networks are constructed through cutting and gluing operations on the quivers.

  18. Coulomb versus physical string tension on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, Giuseppe; Quandt, Markus; Reinhardt, Hugo; Vogt, Hannes

    2015-08-01

    From continuum studies it is known that the Coulomb string tension σC gives an upper bound for the physical (Wilson) string tension σW [D. Zwanziger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 102001 (2003)]. How does such a relationship translate to the lattice, however? In this paper we give evidence that on the lattice, while the two string tensions are related at zero temperature, they decouple at finite temperature. More precisely, we show that on the lattice the Coulomb gauge confinement scenario is always tied to the spatial string tension, which is known to survive the deconfinement phase transition and to cause screening effects in the quark-gluon plasma. Our analysis is based on the identification and elimination of center vortices, which allows us to control the physical string tension and study its effect on the Coulomb gauge observables. We also show how alternative definitions of the Coulomb potential may sense the deconfinement transition; however, a true static Coulomb gauge order parameter for the phase transition is still elusive on the lattice.

  19. Dynamics for QCD on an Infinite Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundling, Hendrik; Rudolph, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    We prove the existence of the dynamics automorphism group for Hamiltonian QCD on an infinite lattice in R^3, and this is done in a C*-algebraic context. The existence of ground states is also obtained. Starting with the finite lattice model for Hamiltonian QCD developed by Kijowski, Rudolph (cf. J Math Phys 43:1796-1808 [15], J Math Phys 46:032303 [16]), we state its field algebra and a natural representation. We then generalize this representation to the infinite lattice, and construct a Hilbert space which has represented on it all the local algebras (i.e., kinematics algebras associated with finite connected sublattices) equipped with the correct graded commutation relations. On a suitably large C*-algebra acting on this Hilbert space, and containing all the local algebras, we prove that there is a one parameter automorphism group, which is the pointwise norm limit of the local time evolutions along a sequence of finite sublattices, increasing to the full lattice. This is our global time evolution. We then take as our field algebra the C*-algebra generated by all the orbits of the local algebras w.r.t. the global time evolution. Thus the time evolution creates the field algebra. The time evolution is strongly continuous on this choice of field algebra, though not on the original larger C*-algebra. We define the gauge transformations, explain how to enforce the Gauss law constraint, show that the dynamics automorphism group descends to the algebra of physical observables and prove that gauge invariant ground states exist.

  20. Quantum Quenches in a Spinor Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Lamacraft, Austen

    2007-04-20

    We discuss the ordering of a spin-1 condensate when quenched from its paramagnetic phase to its ferromagnetic phase by reducing the magnetic field. We first elucidate the nature of the equilibrium quantum phase transition. Quenching rapidly through this transition reveals XY ordering either at a specific wave vector, or the ''light-cone'' correlations familiar from relativistic theories, depending on the end point of the quench. For a quench proceeding at a finite rate the ordering scale is governed by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The creation of vortices through growth of the magnetization fluctuations is also discussed. The long-time dynamics again depends on the end point, conserving the order parameter in a zero field, but not at a finite field, with differing exponents for the coarsening of magnetic order. The results are discussed in the light of a recent experiment by Sadler et al.

  1. Torus CLAS12-Superconducting Magnet Quench Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V S; Elouadhiri, L; Ghoshal, P K; Kashy, D; Makarov, A; Pastor, O; Quettier, L; Velev, G; Wiseman, M

    2014-06-01

    The JLAB Torus magnet system consists of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration. These coils are wound with SSC-36 Nb-Ti superconductor and have the peak magnetic field of 3.6 T. The first coil manufacturing based on the JLAB design began at FNAL. The large magnet system dimensions (8 m diameter and 14 MJ of stored energy) dictate the need for quench protection. Each coil is placed in an aluminum case mounted inside a cryostat and cooled by 4.6 K supercritical helium gas flowing through a copper tube attached to the coil ID. The large coil dimensions and small cryostat thickness drove the design to challenging technical solutions, suggesting that Lorentz forces due to transport currents and eddy currents during quench and various failure scenarios are analyzed. The paper covers the magnet system quench analysis using the OPERA3d Quench code.

  2. Torus CLAS12-Superconducting Magnet Quench Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. S.; Elouadhiri, L.; Ghoshal, P. K.; Kashy, D.; Makarov, A.; Pastor, O.; Quettier, L.; Velev, G.; Wiseman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The JLAB Torus magnet system consists of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration. These coils are wound with SSC-36 Nb-Ti superconductor and have the peak magnetic field of 3.6 T. The first coil manufacturing based on the JLAB design began at FNAL. The large magnet system dimensions (8 m diameter and 14 MJ of stored energy) dictate the need for quench protection. Each coil is placed in an aluminum case mounted inside a cryostat and cooled by 4.6 K supercritical helium gas flowing through a copper tube attached to the coil ID. The large coil dimensions and small cryostat thickness drove the design to challenging technical solutions, suggesting that Lorentz forces due to transport currents and eddy currents during quench and various failure scenarios are analyzed. The paper covers the magnet system quench analysis using the OPERA3d Quench code.

  3. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  4. Quenching gas for detectors of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1974-01-22

    Operation of detectors of charged particles such as wire counters and Geiger-Muller tubes is improved by filling the counters with a quenching-gas mixture of argon, isobutane and methylchloroform. (Official Gazette)

  5. Rapid quenching effects in PVC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. D.; Mandell, J. F.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Using a specially constructed microbalance for hydrostatic weighing, density changes in PVC thin films (with no additives, 30-100 micrometers thick), due to rapid quenching (approximately 300 C/sec) through the glass transition temperature, have been observed. The more severe the quench, the greater is the free volume content. Isobaric volume recovery of PVC has also been studied by volume dilatometry. Both show aging of relaxing molecular rearrangements takes place as a linear function of logarithmic aging time at room temperature. Distribution of retardation times and Primak's distributed activation energy spectra have been applied to the volume recovery data. The concomitant changes in mechanical properties of PVC after quenching have been monitored by tensile creep and stress-strain to failure. All reflect the presence of excess free volume content, due to rapid quenching.

  6. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  7. Gauge unification of fundamental forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    The following sections are included: * I. Fundamental Particles, Fundamental Forces, and Gauge Unification * II. The Emergence of Spontaneously Broken SU(2)×U(1) Gauge Theory * III. The Present and Its Problems * IV. Direct Extrapolation from the Electroweak to the Electronuclear * A. The three ideas * B. Tests of electronuclear grand unification * V. Elementarity: Unification with Gravity and Nature of Charge * A. The quest for elementarity, prequarks (preons and pre-preons * B. Post-Planck physics, supergravity, and Einstein's dreams * C. Extended supergravity, SU(8) preons, and composite gauge fields * Appendix A: Examples of Grand Unifying Groups * Appendix B: Does the Grand Plateau really exist * References

  8. Binding phenomena and fluorescence quenching. I: Descriptive quantum principles of fluorescence quenching using a supermolecule approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callis, Patrik R.

    2014-12-01

    Principal aspects of fluorescence and quenching are placed on an equal footing consistent with microscopic quantum concepts familiar to all who use fluorescence in the study of association of ligands with proteins. Quenching of fluorophores involved in determination of ligand binding to proteins is described in terms of generic quantum principles using a framework in which the fluorophore and quencher are together considered a “supermolecule”. Quenching then becomes just another form of internal conversion, which in turn leads to new language for defining “dynamic” and “static” quenching, for which there exist disparate definitions. The benefit of casting quenching in this manner, and citing relevant literature, has been to expand the vocabulary and mental imagery associated with quenching.

  9. Lattice calculation of the decay of primordial Higgs condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, Kari; Nurmi, Sami; Rusak, Stanislav; Weir, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We study the resonant decay of the primordial Standard Model Higgs condensate after inflation into SU(2) gauge bosons on the lattice. We find that the non-Abelian interactions between the gauge bosons quickly extend the momentum distribution towards high values, efficiently destroying the condensate after the onset of backreaction. For the inflationary scale H = 108 GeV, we find that 90% of the Higgs condensate has decayed after n~ 10 oscillation cycles. This differs significantly from the Abelian case where, given the same coupling strengths, most of the condensate would persist after the resonance.

  10. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: `quenched` matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our `quenched` matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints.

  11. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong.

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: quenched' matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our quenched' matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints.

  12. Radiation-affected laminar flame quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Tabaczynski, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    A radiation number describing all effects of radiation (emission, absorption, and scattering) near a wall is introduced. The increase in the Peclet number characterizing the flame quench distance and the decrease in flame temperature are shown in terms of this radiation number. Finally, the above considerations have made it possible to qualitatively show that the contribution of radiation to the heat transfer and the laminar flame quenching in small diesel engines can be as much as 35 percent. 27 references.

  13. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-11-08

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

  14. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream.

  15. Quantum Hall physics with cold atoms in cylindrical optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łåcki, Mateusz; Pichler, Hannes; Sterdyniak, Antoine; Lyras, Andreas; Lembessis, Vassilis E.; Al-Dossary, Omar; Budich, Jan Carl; Zoller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study various realizations of a Hofstadter-Hubbard model on a cylinder geometry with fermionic cold atoms in optical lattices. The cylindrical optical lattice is created by copropagating Laguerre-Gauss beams, i.e., light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. By strong focusing of the light beams we create a real-space optical lattice in the form of rings, which are offset in energy. A second set of Laguerre-Gauss beams then induces a Raman-hopping between these rings, imprinting phases corresponding to a synthetic magnetic field (artificial gauge field). In addition, by rotating the lattice potential, we achieve a slowly varying flux through the hole of the cylinder, which allows us to probe the Hall response of the system as a realization of Laughlin's thought experiment. We study how in the presence of interactions fractional quantum Hall physics could be observed in this setup.

  16. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in two dimensional lattice super QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Veernala, Aarti

    2015-10-02

    We report on a non-perturbative study of two dimensional N=(2,2) super QCD. Our lattice formulation retains a single exact supersymmetry at non-zero lattice spacing, and contains Nf fermions in the fundamental representation of a U(Nc) gauge group. The lattice action we employ contains an additional Fayet-Iliopoulos term which is also invariant under the exact lattice supersymmetry. This work constitutes the first numerical study of this theory which serves as a toy model for understanding some of the issues that are expected to arise in four dimensional super QCD. As a result, we present evidence that the exact supersymmetry breaks spontaneously when Nf < Nc in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  17. Glueball Spectrum and Matrix Elements on Anisotropic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Alexandru; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; C. Morningstar; M. Peardon; S. Tamhankar; B.L. Young; J.B. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The glueball-to-vacuum matrix elements of local gluonic operators in scalar, tensor, and pseudoscalar channels are investigated numerically on several anisotropic lattices with the spatial lattice spacing ranging from 0.1fm - 0.2fm. These matrix elements are needed to predict the glueball branching ratios in J/{psi} radiative decays which will help identify the glueball states in experiments. Two types of improved local gluonic operators are constructed for a self-consistent check and the finite volume effects are studied. We find that lattice spacing dependence of our results is very weak and the continuum limits are reliably extrapolated, as a result of improvement of the lattice gauge action and local operators. We also give updated glueball masses with various quantum numbers.

  18. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in two dimensional lattice super QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Catterall, Simon; Veernala, Aarti

    2015-10-02

    We report on a non-perturbative study of two dimensional N=(2,2) super QCD. Our lattice formulation retains a single exact supersymmetry at non-zero lattice spacing, and contains Nf fermions in the fundamental representation of a U(Nc) gauge group. The lattice action we employ contains an additional Fayet-Iliopoulos term which is also invariant under the exact lattice supersymmetry. This work constitutes the first numerical study of this theory which serves as a toy model for understanding some of the issues that are expected to arise in four dimensional super QCD. As a result, we present evidence that the exact supersymmetry breaks spontaneouslymore » when Nf < Nc in agreement with theoretical expectations.« less

  19. Beyond the standard gauging: gauge symmetries of Dirac sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios; Deser, Andreas; Jonke, Larisa; Strobl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the general conditions that have to be met for a gauged extension of a two-dimensional bosonic σ-model to exist. In an inversion of the usual approach of identifying a global symmetry and then promoting it to a local one, we focus directly on the gauge symmetries of the theory. This allows for action functionals which are gauge invariant for rather general background fields in the sense that their invariance conditions are milder than the usual case. In particular, the vector fields that control the gauging need not be Killing. The relaxation of isometry for the background fields is controlled by two connections on a Lie algebroid L in which the gauge fields take values, in a generalization of the common Lie-algebraic picture. Here we show that these connections can always be determined when L is a Dirac structure in the H-twisted Courant algebroid. This also leads us to a derivation of the general form for the gauge symmetries of a wide class of two-dimensional topological field theories called Dirac σ-models, which interpolate between the G/G Wess-Zumino-Witten model and the (Wess-Zumino-term twisted) Poisson sigma model.

  20. Observation of localized flat-band modes in a quasi-one-dimensional photonic rhombic lattice.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Thomson, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the photonic realization of a dispersionless flat band in a quasi-one-dimensional photonic lattice fabricated by ultrafast laser inscription. In the nearest neighbor tight binding approximation, the lattice supports two dispersive and one nondispersive (flat) band. We experimentally excite superpositions of flat-band eigenmodes at the input of the photonic lattice and show the diffractionless propagation of the input states due to their infinite effective mass. In the future, the use of photonic rhombic lattices, together with the successful implementation of a synthetic gauge field, will enable the observation of Aharonov-Bohm photonic caging.

  1. Fuzzy bags, Polyakov loop and gauge/string duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fen

    2014-11-01

    Confinement in SU(N) gauge theory is due to the linear potential between colored objects. At short distances, the linear contribution could be considered as the quadratic correction to the leading Coulomb term. Recent lattice data show that such quadratic corrections also appear in the deconfined phase, in both the thermal quantities and the Polyakov loop. These contributions are studied systematically employing the gauge/string duality. "Confinement" in N = 4 SU(N) Super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory could be achieved kinematically when the theory is defined on a compact space manifold. In the large-N limit, deconfinement of N = 4 SYM on {{Bbb S}^3} at strong coupling is dual to the Hawking-Page phase transition in the global Anti-de Sitter spacetime. Meantime, all the thermal quantities and the Polyakov loop achieve significant quadratic contributions. Similar results can also be obtained at weak coupling. However, when confinement is induced dynamically through the local dilaton field in the gravity-dilaton system, these contributions can not be generated consistently. This is in accordance with the fact that there is no dimension-2 gauge-invariant operator in the boundary gauge theory. Based on these results, we suspect that quadratic corrections, and also confinement, should be due to global or non-local effects in the bulk spacetime.

  2. Wormholes, emergent gauge fields, and the weak gravity conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the question of reconstructing bulk gauge fields as boundary operators in AdS/CFT. In the presence of the wormhole dual to the thermofield double state of two CFTs, the existence of bulk gauge fields is in some tension with the microscopic tensor factorization of the Hilbert space. I explain how this tension can be resolved by splitting the gauge field into charged constituents, and I argue that this leads to a new argument for the "principle of completeness", which states that the charge lattice of a gauge theory coupled to gravity must be fully populated. I also claim that it leads to a new motivation for (and a clarification of) the "weak gravity conjecture", which I interpret as a strengthening of this principle. This setup gives a simple example of a situation where describing low-energy bulk physics in CFT language requires knowledge of high-energy bulk physics. This contradicts to some extent the notion of "effective conformal field theory", but in fact is an expected feature of the resolution of the black hole information problem. An analogous factorization issue exists also for the gravitational field, and I comment on several of its implications for reconstructing black hole interiors and the emergence of spacetime more generally.

  3. Wormholes, emergent gauge fields, and the weak gravity conjecture

    DOE PAGES

    Harlow, Daniel

    2016-01-20

    This paper revisits the question of reconstructing bulk gauge fields as boundary operators in AdS/CFT. In the presence of the ormhole dual to the thermo field double state of two CFTs, the existence of bulk gauge fields is in some tension with the microscopic tensor factorization of the Hilbert space. Here, I explain how this tension can be resolved by splitting the gauge field into charged constituents, and I argue that this leads to a new argument for the "principle of completeness", which states that the charge lattice of a gauge theory coupled to gravity must be fully populated. Imore » also claim that it leads to a new motivation for (and a clarification of) the "weak gravity conjecture", which I interpret as a strengthening of this principle. This setup gives a simple example of a situation where describing low-energy bulk physics in CFT language requires knowledge of high-energy bulk physics. Furthermore, this contradicts to some extent the notion of "effective conformal field theory", but in fact is an expected feature of the resolution of the black hole information problem. An analogous factorization issue exists also for the gravitational field, and I comment on several of its implications for reconstructing black hole interiors and the emergence of spacetime more generally.« less

  4. Quench antenna studies of mechanical and quench performance in Fermilab interaction region quadrupoles for LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Feher, S.; Hocker, A.; Lamm, M.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    As part of the US-LHC collaboration, Fermilab has built and tested seventeen high gradient quadrupole magnets, assembled into nine cryostats, for installation at the Large Hadron Collider Interaction Regions. Most of these magnets have only quarter coil voltage taps for quench characterization, but the magnetic measurement warm bore is instrumented with a quench antenna for localization and characterization. We report on studies using the quench antenna for pre-production prototype (with extensive voltage taps) and 17 production magnets. These include a summary of quench localization and development characteristics, as well as general features of flux changes observed during training ramps.

  5. The decay constants f(B+) and f(D+) from three-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.; DeTar, Carleton; Levkova, L.; Di Pierro, Massimo; El-Khadra, Aida Xenia; Evans, R.T.; Jain, R.; Freeland, Elizabeth Dawn; Gottlieb, Steven A.; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; /U. Pacific, Stockton /Fermilab /Simon Fraser U. /Arizona U. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-01-01

    We present new results for f{sub B+} and f{sub D+} from the MILC 2+1 flavor a = 0.09fm 'fine' lattice. We use clover heavy quarks in the Fermilab interpretation and improved staggered light quarks. Lattice results from partially quenched QCD fix the parameters of staggered chiral perturbation theory which is used in the extrapolation to the physical decay constants.

  6. Nonequilibrium phase transition in directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-01-01

    On directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices in two dimensions with quenched connectivity disorder we study the critical properties of the dynamics evolution of public opinion in social influence networks using a simple spin-like model. The system is treated by applying Monte Carlo simulations. We show that directed links on these random lattices may lead to phase diagram with first- and second-order social phase transitions out of equilibrium.

  7. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  8. Engineering novel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Optical lattices have developed into a widely used and highly recognized tool to study many-body quantum physics with special relevance for solid state type systems. One of the most prominent reasons for this success is the high degree of tunability in the experimental setups. While at the beginning quasi-static, cubic geometries were mainly explored, the focus of the field has now shifted toward new lattice topologies and the dynamical control of lattice structures. In this review we intend to give an overview of the progress recently achieved in this field on the experimental side. In addition, we discuss theoretical proposals exploiting specifically these novel lattice geometries. PMID:23828639

  9. Fractal calculus involving gauge function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmankhaneh, Alireza K.; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2016-08-01

    Henstock-Kurzweil integral or gauge integral is the generalization of the Riemann integral. The functions which are not integrable because of singularity in the senses of Lebesgue or Riemann are gauge integrable. In this manuscript, we have generalized Fα-calculus using the gauge integral method for the integrating of the functions on fractal set subset of real-line where they have singularities. The suggested new method leads to the wider class of functions on the fractal subset of real-line that are *Fα-integrable. Using gauge function we define *Fα-derivative of functions their Fα-derivative is not exist. The reported results can be used for generalizing the fundamental theorem of Fα-calculus.

  10. Sequestered gravity in gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Benakli, Karim; Quiros, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel mechanism of supersymmetry breaking embeddable in string theory and simultaneously sharing the main advantages of (sequestered) gravity and gauge mediation. It is driven by a Scherk-Schwarz deformation along a compact extra dimension, transverse to a brane stack supporting the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. This fixes the magnitude of the gravitino mass, together with that of the gauginos of a bulk gauge group, at a scale as high as 10^{10} GeV. Supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the observable sector dominantly by gauge interactions using massive messengers transforming non-trivially under the bulk and Standard Model gauge groups and leading to a neutralino LSP as dark matter candidate. The Higgsino mass μ and soft Higgs-bilinear B_μ term could be generated at the same order of magnitude as the other soft terms by effective supergravity couplings as in the Giudice-Masiero mechanism.

  11. Density of states and Fisher's zeros in compact U(1) pure gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Berg, B. A.; Du, Daping; Meurice, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We present high-accuracy calculations of the density of states using multicanonical methods for lattice gauge theory with a compact gauge group U(1) on 44, 64, and 84 lattices. We show that the results are consistent with weak and strong coupling expansions. We present methods based on Chebyshev interpolations and Cauchy theorem to find the (Fisher’s) zeros of the partition function in the complex β=1/g2 plane. The results are consistent with reweighting methods whenever the latter are accurate. We discuss the volume dependence of the imaginary part of the Fisher’s zeros, the width and depth of the plaquette distribution at the value of β where the two peaks have equal height. We discuss strategies to discriminate between first- and second-order transitions and explore them with data at larger volume but lower statistics. Higher statistics and even larger lattices are necessary to draw strong conclusions regarding the order of the transition.

  12. Hard amplitudes in gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, S.J.

    1991-03-01

    In this lecture series 1 presents recent developments in perturbation theory methods for gauge theories for processes with many partons. These techniques and results are useful in the calculation of cross sections for processes with many final state partons which have applications in the study of multi-jet phenomena in high-energy colliders. The results illuminate many important and interesting properties of non-abelian gauge theories. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Very small ionization pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A very small ionization pressure gauge has been developed to operate in the pressure range 10/sup -6/ Torr to 100..mu... A metal construction and external cooling fins result in a very rugged device with exceptionally small outgassing properties. The gauge also incorporates a replaceable filament-grid assembly on a single plug which allows the simple replacement of both the filament and the grid when needed.

  14. Duality of gauge field singularities and the structure of the flux tube in Abelian-projected SU(2) gauge theory and the dual Abelian Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Y.; Koma, M.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Suzuki, T.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2003-11-01

    The structure of the flux-tube profile in Abelian-projected (AP) SU(2) gauge theory in the maximally Abelian gauge is studied. The connection between the AP flux tube and the classical flux-tube solution of the U(1) dual Abelian Higgs model is clarified in terms of the path-integral duality transformation. This connection suggests that the electric photon and the magnetic monopole parts of the Abelian Wilson loop can act as separate sources creating the Coulombic and the solenoidal electric field inside a flux tube. The conjecture is confirmed by a lattice simulation which shows that the AP flux tube is composed of these two contributions.

  15. Hyperon-Nulceon Scattering from Fully-Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Elizabetta Pallante; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage

    2007-10-01

    We present results of the first fully-dynamical lattice QCD determination of hyperon-nucleon scattering. One s-wave phase shift was determined for n{Lambda} scattering in both spin-channels at pion masses of 350, 490, and 590 MeV, and for n{Sigma}^- scattering in both spin channels at pion masses of 490, and 590 MeV. The calculations were performed with domain-wall valence quarks on dynamical, staggered gauge configurations with a lattice spacing of b ~0.125 fm.

  16. Charmed meson decay constants in three-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; Freeland, Elizabeth D.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.; El-Khadra, Aida X.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Menscher, D.; Maresca, F.; Nobes, M.; Okamoto, M.; Renner, D.B.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Trottier, H.D.; /Art Inst. of Chicago /Columbia U. /Washington U., St. Louis /Utah U. /DePaul U. /Indiana U. /APS, New York /U. Pacific, Stockton /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab /Cornell U., LEPP /Arizona U. /UC, Santa Barbara /Simon Fraser U.

    2005-06-01

    The authors present the first lattice QCD calculation with realistic sea quark content of the D{sup +}-meson decay constant f{sub D+}. They use the MILC Collaboration's publicly available ensembles of lattice gauge fields, which have a quark sea with two flavors (up and down) much lighter than a third (strange). They obtain f{sub D+} = 201 {+-} 3 {+-} 17 MeV, where the errors are statistical and a combination of systematic errors. They also obtain f{sub D{sub s}} = 249 {+-} 3 {+-} 16 MeV for the D{sub s} meson.

  17. Group theoretical construction of extended baryon operators in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Subhasish Basak; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; Urs Heller; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Ikuro Sato; Stephen Wallace

    2005-06-01

    The design and implementation of large sets of spatially-extended, gauge-invariant operators for use in determining the spectrum of baryons in lattice QCD computations are described. Group theoretical projections onto the irreducible representations of the symmetry group of a cubic spatial lattice are used in all isospin channels. The operators are constructed to maximize overlaps with the low-lying states of interest, while minimizing the number of sources needed in computing the required quark propagators. Issues related to the identification of the spin quantum numbers of the states in the continuum limit are addressed.

  18. Gauging Quantum Groups: Yang-Baxter Joining Yang-Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong-Shi

    This review is an expansion of my talk at the conference on Sixty Years of Yang-Mills Theory. I review and explain the line of thoughts that lead to a recent joint work with Hu and Geer [Hu et al., arXiv:1502.03433] on the construction, exact solutions and ubiquitous properties of a class of quantum group gauge models on a honey-comb lattice. Conceptually the construction achieves a synthesis of the ideas of Yang-Baxter equations with those of Yang-Mills theory. Physically the models describe topological anyonic states in 2D systems.

  19. Gauging quantum groups: Yang-Baxter joining Yang-Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-02-01

    This review is an expansion of my talk at the conference on Sixty Years of Yang-Mills Theory. I review and explain the line of thoughts that lead to a recent joint work with Hu and Geer [Hu et al., arXiv:1502.03433] on the construction, exact solutions and ubiquitous properties of a class of quantum group gauge models on a honey-comb lattice. Conceptually the construction achieves a synthesis of the ideas of Yang-Baxter equations with those of Yang-Mills theory. Physically the models describe topological anyonic states in 2D systems.

  20. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  1. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  2. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  3. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  4. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  5. 49 CFR 230.73 - Air gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air gauges. 230.73 Section 230.73 Transportation... Signal Equipment § 230.73 Air gauges. (a) Location. Air gauges shall be so located that they may be conveniently read by the engineer from his or her usual position in the cab. No air gauge may be more than...

  6. 49 CFR 230.73 - Air gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air gauges. 230.73 Section 230.73 Transportation... Signal Equipment § 230.73 Air gauges. (a) Location. Air gauges shall be so located that they may be conveniently read by the engineer from his or her usual position in the cab. No air gauge may be more than...

  7. 27 CFR 19.91 - Gauging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or wine shall be made in accordance with 27 CFR part 30 and as provided in this part. However, the... alcoholic flavoring materials be gauged by the methods provided in 27 CFR part 30. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859..., Wines Or Alcoholic Flavoring Materials § 19.91 Gauging. (a) Gauging of spirits and wine. Gauges shall...

  8. 49 CFR 230.73 - Air gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air gauges. 230.73 Section 230.73 Transportation... Signal Equipment § 230.73 Air gauges. (a) Location. Air gauges shall be so located that they may be conveniently read by the engineer from his or her usual position in the cab. No air gauge may be more than...

  9. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  10. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  11. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  12. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  13. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  14. Quench Protection of DI-BSCCO Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Ueno, E.; Kato, T.; Hayashi, K.

    Quench protection is one of the most important requirements for the practical application of high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) coils. Quench protection requires that early detection of a developing quench event is followed by rapid reduction of the operating current. However, such quench detection is very difficult because HTS wire produces heat only locally due to the very slow propagation velocity of a normal zone. Excellent high voltage insulation performance is required if the current is to be reduced rapidly in a large-scale superconducting application with very large inductance. Thus it is important to investigate the behavior of coils with various decay time constants, and to detect voltages on very short time scales. This goal remains to be achieved. In the present study we built test coil and a full-scale pole coil for a 20 MW motor for use in experiments on quench protection, and parameterized the relation between the decay time constant and the detecting voltage, using a conventional balance circuit to detect the quench, which was generated by gradually raising the temperature of the coils. The results verify that a balance circuit can be used for quench detection. For example, when the current decay time constant is 4 seconds, the test coil can be protected even with a detecting voltage of 0.15 volts, despite a significant heat production rate of 126 W. We also confirmed that the full-scale pole coil, with a decay time constant of 20 seconds, can be protected with a detecting voltage of 0.06 V.

  15. Projected Entangled Pair States with non-Abelian gauge symmetries: An SU(2) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Wahl, Thorsten B.; Burrello, Michele; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    Over the last years, Projected Entangled Pair States have demonstrated great power for the study of many body systems, as they naturally describe ground states of gapped many body Hamiltonians, and suggest a constructive way to encode and classify their symmetries. The PEPS study is not only limited to global symmetries, but has also been extended and applied for local symmetries, allowing to use them for the description of states in lattice gauge theories. In this paper we discuss PEPS with a local, SU(2) gauge symmetry, and demonstrate the use of PEPS features and techniques for the study of a simple family of many body states with a non-Abelian gauge symmetry. We present, in particular, the construction of fermionic PEPS able to describe both two-color fermionic matter and the degrees of freedom of an SU(2) gauge field with a suitable truncation.

  16. Experiments and analysis of lateral piezoresistance gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.K.W.

    1993-07-01

    The response of lateral piezoresistance gauges to shock wave uniaxial strain loading has been examined in a combined experimental and calculational effort. Plate impact experiments provided lateral gauge data which were analyzed using quasi-static and dynamic inclusion analyses. Experimental data showed that the response of the lateral gauge output depended upon the matrix material and gauge emplacement method. The calculations indicated that these differences were due to complex gauge-matrix interactions. These interactions were influenced by the stress and strain distributions in and around the gauge, plasticity effects, properties of the gauge and matrix materials, and emplacement conditions.

  17. Topological growing of Laughlin states in synthetic gauge fields.

    PubMed

    Grusdt, Fabian; Letscher, Fabian; Hafezi, Mohammad; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2014-10-10

    We suggest a scheme for the preparation of highly correlated Laughlin states in the presence of synthetic gauge fields, realizing an analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect in photonic or atomic systems of interacting bosons. It is based on the idea of growing such states by adding weakly interacting composite fermions along with magnetic flux quanta one by one. The topologically protected Thouless pump ("Laughlin's argument") is used to create two localized flux quanta and the resulting hole excitation is subsequently filled by a single boson, which, together with one of the flux quanta, forms a composite fermion. Using our protocol, filling 1/2 Laughlin states can be grown with particle number N increasing linearly in time and strongly suppressed number fluctuations. To demonstrate the feasibility of our scheme, we consider two-dimensional lattices subject to effective magnetic fields and strong on-site interactions. We present numerical simulations of small lattice systems and also discuss the influence of losses.

  18. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  19. 40 CFR 63.7295 - What requirements must I meet for quenching?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... each quench tower and backup quench station at a new or existing coke oven battery. (1) For the... quenching. (b) For each quench tower at a new or existing coke oven battery and each backup quench...

  20. 40 CFR 63.7295 - What requirements must I meet for quenching?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... each quench tower and backup quench station at a new or existing coke oven battery. (1) For the... quenching. (b) For each quench tower at a new or existing coke oven battery and each backup quench...

  1. 40 CFR 63.7295 - What requirements must I meet for quenching?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... each quench tower and backup quench station at a new or existing coke oven battery. (1) For the... quenching. (b) For each quench tower at a new or existing coke oven battery and each backup quench...

  2. 40 CFR 63.7295 - What requirements must I meet for quenching?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... each quench tower and backup quench station at a new or existing coke oven battery. (1) For the... quenching. (b) For each quench tower at a new or existing coke oven battery and each backup quench...

  3. Exploring Hyperons and Hypernuclei with Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F. Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2005-01-01

    In this work we outline a program for lattice QCD that would provide a first step toward understanding the strong and weak interactions of strange baryons. The study of hypernuclear physics has provided a significant amount of information regarding the structure and weak decays of light nuclei containing one or two Lambda's, and Sigma's. From a theoretical standpoint, little is known about the hyperon-nucleon interaction, which is required input for systematic calculations of hypernuclear structure. Furthermore, the long-standing discrepancies in the P-wave amplitudes for nonleptonic hyperon decays remain to be understood, and their resolution is central to a better understanding of the weak decays of hypernuclei. We present a framework that utilizes Luscher's finite-volume techniques in lattice QCD to extract the scattering length and effective range for Lambda-N scattering in both QCD and partially-quenched QCD. The effective theory describing the nonleptonic decays of hyperons using isospin symmetry alone, appropriate for lattice calculations, is constructed.

  4. Lattice QCD studies of pentaquarks and exotics

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Lasscock; John Hedditch; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; Anthony Williams; Ross Young; James Zanotti

    2005-09-14

    The possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark has motivated a number of studies into its nature using lattice QCD. Initial studies focused on spin-1/2 states and more recently also spin-3/2 states. Here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with both spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 using the FLIC fermion action. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e. binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the spin-1/2 channels or in the J{sup P} = 3/2{sup -} channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar 3/2{sup +} channel. We also present the results of our study into exotic meson states using hybrid meson interpolators with explicit gluonic degrees of freedom. We find a candidate for the J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson which has a mass consistent with the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) experimental candidate.

  5. Lattice studies of quantum chromodynamics-like theories with many fermionic degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    DeGrand, Thomas

    2011-07-13

    I give an elementary introduction to the study of gauge theories coupled to fermions with many degrees of freedom. Besides their intrinsic interest, these theories are candidates for non-perturbative extensions of the Higgs sector of the standard model. While related to quantum chromodynamics, these systems can exhibit very different behaviour from it: they can possess a running gauge coupling with an infrared-attractive fixed point. I briefly survey recent lattice work in this area.

  6. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  11. Probing the Bose glass-superfluid transition using quantum quenches of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldgin, Carolyn; Ray, Ushnish; Russ, Philip; Chen, David; Ceperley, David M.; Demarco, Brian

    2016-07-01

    The disordered Bose-Hubbard model--a paradigm for strongly correlated and disordered bosonic systems--is central to our understanding of quantum phase transitions. Despite extensive theoretical work on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model, little is known about the impact of temperature, the dynamical behaviour of quantum phases, and how equilibrium is affected during quantum phase transitions. These issues are critically important to applications such as quantum annealing and electronics based on quantum phase transitions. Here, we use a quantum quench of disorder in an ultracold lattice gas to dynamically probe the superfluid-Bose glass quantum phase transition at non-zero temperature ( Fig. 1). By measuring excitations generated during the quench, we provide evidence for superfluid puddles in the Bose glass phase and produce a superfluid-Bose glass phase diagram consistent with completely constrained, finite temperature, and equilibrium quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The residual energy from the quench, which is an efficacy measure for optimization through quantum annealing, is unchanged for quench times spanning nearly a hundred tunnelling times.

  12. THE EMMA LATTICE DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.; RUGGIERO, A.; MACHIDA, S.; KOSCIELNIAK, S.

    2007-06-25

    EMMA is a 10 to 20 MeV electron ring designed to test our understanding of beam dynamics in a relativistic linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG). This paper describes the design of the EMMA lattice. We begin with a summary of the experimental goals that impact the lattice design, and then outline what motivated the choice for the basic lattice parameters, such as the type of cells, the number of cells, and the RF frequency. We next list the different configurations that we wish to operate the machine in so as to accomplish our experimental goals. Finally, we enumerate the detailed lattice parameters, showing how these parameters result from the various lattice configurations.

  13. Quench-protection studies on CBA magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A.J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Ghosh, A.; Robins, K.; Sampson, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    Results from quench studies on both short-cable samples and prototype Colliding Beam Accelerator project magnets are presented. The quantity of paramount interest is ..integral..I/sup 2/dt which is a monotonic function of the maximum conductor temperature obtained in a quench. Conductor damage in short samples has been observed for ..integral..I/sup 2/dt greater than or equal to 8.4 x 10/sup 6/ amp/sup 2/-sec at 50 kG and 4.2/sup 0/K. Each magnet is equipped with spot heaters in various locations so that systematic studies of quench propagation under controlled conditions can be made. Values of ..integral..I/sup 2/dt as a function of current, location, bath temperature, and cooling mode (single-phase helium versus two-phase helium) are presented. The magnets are able to absorb their own energy with a modest margin of safety for the type of quenches expected in an accelerator environment. In order to obtain an additional margin of safety, a quench-protection scheme which employs current shunting diodes across each magnet half has been adopted.

  14. An investigation of meson spectroscopy on isotropic clover lattices at the SU(3) flavor-symmetric point

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David G.; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2014-06-23

    We present an investigation of the excited meson spectrum at the N_f= 3 point obtained on isotropic clover lattices with a plaquette Wilson gauge action, and a NP-improved clover fermion action, at a lattice spacing of a \\simeq 0.08 fm, and compare with corresponding calculations on an anisotropic lattice at fine temporal lattice spacing but a spatial lattice spacing of a_s \\simeq 0.125 fm. The methodology adopted follows that employed in the calculation of the spectrum on anisotropic lattices, and we test the efficacy of that approach for isotropic lattices. In particular, we explore the extent to which rotational symmetry for predominantly single-hadron states is realized. By comparison of the energy levels with that obtained using the anisotropic lattice, we obtain an indication of discretization uncertainties in the single-hadron spectrum.

  15. A study of pentaquarks on the lattice with overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect

    N. Mathur; F.X. Lee; A. Alexandru; C. Bennhold; Y. Chen; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; K.F. Liu; S. Tamhankar; J.B. Zhang

    2004-10-01

    We present a quenched lattice QCD calculation of spin-1/2 five-quark states with uudd{bar s} quark content for both positive and negative parities. We do not observe any bound pentaquark state in these channels for either I = 0 or I = 1. The states we found are consistent with KN scattering states which are checked to exhibit the expected volume dependence of the spectral weight. The results are based on overlap-fermion propagators on two lattices, 12{sup 3} x 28 and 16{sup 3} x 28, with the same lattice spacing of 0.2 fm, and pion mass as low as {approx} 180 MeV.

  16. Dissipative time evolution of a chiral state after a quantum quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Stefan; Sheikhan, Ameneh; Kollath, Corinna

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of fermionic atoms in a high-finesse optical resonator after a sudden switch on of the coupling between the atoms and the cavity. The atoms are additionally confined by optical lattices to a ladder geometry. The tunneling mechanism on a rung of a ladder is induced by a cavity-assisted Raman process. At long times after the quantum quench the arising steady state can carry a chiral current. In this work we employ exact diagonalization techniques on small system sizes to study the dissipative attractor dynamics after the quench towards the steady state and deviations of the properties of the steady state from predictions obtained by adiabatically eliminating the cavity mode.

  17. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Richard B.

    2007-05-01

    A fluorescent clock reaction is described that is based on the principles of the Landolt iodine reaction but uses the potent fluorescence quenching properties of triiodide to abruptly extinguish the ultraviolet fluorescence of optical brighteners present in liquid laundry detergents. The reaction uses easily obtained household products. One variation illustrates the sequential steps and mechanisms of the reaction; other variations maximize the dramatic impact of the demonstration; and a variation that uses liquid detergent in the Briggs Rauscher reaction yields a striking oscillating luminescence. The iodine fluorescence quenching clock reaction can be used in the classroom to explore not only the principles of redox chemistry and reaction kinetics, but also the photophysics of fluorescent pH probes and optical quenching.

  18. Quenching the firefly bioluminescence by various ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huateng; Bai, Haixiu; Jiang, Tianyu; Ma, Zhao; Cheng, Yanna; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-02-01

    The luciferase reporter gene assay system is broadly applied in various biomedical aspects, including signaling pathway dissection, transcriptional activity analysis, and genetic toxicity testing. It significantly improves the experimental accuracy and reduces the experimental error by the addition of an internal control. In the current research, we discovered some specific ions that could selectively inhibit firefly luciferase while having a negligible effect on renilla luciferase in vitro in the dual-reporter gene assay. We showed that these ionic compounds had a high potential of being utilized as quench-and-activate reagents in the dual-reporter assay. Furthermore, results from kinetic studies on ion-mediated quenching effects indicated that different ions have distinct inhibition modes. Our study is anticipated to guide a more affordable design of quench-and-activate reagents in biomedicine and pharmaceutical analysis.

  19. Neutron and proton electric dipole moments from Nf=2 +1 domain-wall fermion lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Eigo; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Soni, Amarjit; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-05-01

    We present a lattice calculation of the neutron and proton electric dipole moments (EDMs) with Nf=2 +1 flavors of domain-wall fermions. The neutron and proton EDM form factors are extracted from three-point functions at the next-to-leading order in the θ vacuum of QCD. In this computation, we use pion masses of 0.33 and 0.42 GeV and 2.7 fm3 lattices with Iwasaki gauge action, and a 0.17 GeV pion and a 4.6 fm3 lattice with I-DSDR gauge action, all generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. The all-mode averaging technique enables an efficient and high statistics calculation. Chiral behavior of lattice EDMs is discussed in the context of baryon chiral perturbation theory. In addition, we also show numerical evidence on the relationship of three- and two-point correlation functions with the local topological charge distribution.

  20. Numerical Study of the Ghost-Ghost-Gluon Vertex on the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, A.; Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-12-02

    It is well known that, in Landau gauge, the renormalization function of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex Z-tilde1 (p2) is finite and constant, at least to all orders of perturbation theory. On the other hand, a direct non-perturbative verification of this result using numerical simulations of lattice QCD is still missing. Here we present a preliminary numerical study of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex and of its corresponding renormalization function using Monte Carlo simulations in SU(2) lattice Landau gauge. Data were obtained in 4 dimensions for lattice couplings {beta} = 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and lattice sides N = 4, 8, 16.

  1. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  2. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  3. Hadron Physics and Confinement Physics in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Amemiya, K.; Ichie, H.; Ishii, N.; Matsufuru, H.; Nakajima, N.; Nemoto, Y.; Oka, M.; Takahashi, T. T.

    2001-10-01

    We are aiming to construct Quark Hadron Physics and Confinement Physics based on QCD. Using SU(3)c lattice QCD, we are investigating the three-quark potential at T=0 and T≠=0, mass spectra of positive and negative-parity baryons in the octet and the decuplet representations of the SU(3) flavor, glueball properties at T=0 and T≠0. We study also Confinement Physics using lattice QCD. In the maximally abelian (MA) gauge, the off-diagonal gluon amplitude is strongly suppressed, and then the off-diagonal gluon phase shows strong randomness, which leads to a large effective off-diagonal gluon mass, Moff≃1.2 GeV. Due to the large off-diagonal gluon mass in the MA gauge, infrared QCD is abelianized like nonabelian Higgs theories. In the MA gauge, there appears a macroscopic network of the monopole world-line covering the whole system. From the monopole current, we extract the dual gluon field Bμ, and examine the longitudinal magnetic screening. We obtain mB≃0.5 GeV in the infrared region, which indicates the dual Higgs mechanism by monopole condensation. From infrared abelian dominance and infrared monopole condensation, low-energy QCD in the MA gauge is described with the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory.

  4. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation.

  5. Soliton splitting in quenched classical integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayun, O.; Semenyakin, M.

    2016-08-01

    We take a soliton solution of a classical non-linear integrable equation and quench (suddenly change) its non-linearity parameter. For that we multiply the amplitude or the width of a soliton by a numerical factor η and take the obtained profile as a new initial condition. We find the values of η for which the post-quench solution consists of only a finite number of solitons. The parameters of these solitons are found explicitly. Our approach is based on solving the direct scattering problem analytically. We demonstrate how it works for Korteweg–de Vries, sine-Gordon and non-linear Schrödinger integrable equations.

  6. Axial couplings of heavy hadrons from domain-wall lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    W. Detmold, C.J.D. Lin, S. Meinel

    2011-12-01

    We calculate matrix elements of the axial current for static-light mesons and baryons in lattice QCD with dynamical domain wall fermions. We use partially quenched heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory in a finite volume to extract the axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3} from the data. These axial couplings allow the prediction of strong decay rates and enter chiral extrapolations of most lattice results in the b sector. Our calculations are performed with two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV.

  7. Quantum gauge theories from geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galehouse, Daniel C.

    2006-03-01

    Geometrical theories have been developed to describe quantum interacting particles with full mathematical covariance. They possess a sophisticated gauge structure that derives from the fundamental properties of the geometry. These theories are all implicitly quantized and come in three known types: Weyl, non-compactified Kaluza-Klein, and, as presented here, Dirac. The spin one-half particle is a conformal wave in an eight dimensional Riemannian space. The coordinates transform locally as spinors and project into space time to give the known gravitational and electromagnetic forces. The gauge structure of the weak interactions appears as well, as in this space the electron transforms into a neutrino under hyper-rotations. The possibility of including the strong interactions and the corresponding gauge system is discussed.

  8. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  9. Self-modulating pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, D. Jr.; Lanni, C.P.

    1979-08-07

    An ion gauge is disclosed having a reduced x-ray limit and means for measuring that limit. The gauge comprises an ion gauge of the Bayard-Alpert type having a short collector and having means for varying the grid-collector voltage. The x-ray limit (i.e. the collector current resulting from x-rays striking the collector) may then be determined by the formula: I/sub x/ = ..cap alpha..I/sub l/ - I/sub h//..cap alpha.. - l where: I/sub x/ = x-ray limit, I/sub l/ and I/sub h/ = the collector current at the lower and higher grid voltage respectively; and, ..cap alpha.. = the ratio of the collector current due to positive ions at the higher voltage to that at the lower voltage.

  10. Construction of the Dual Ginzburg-Landau Theory from the Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Amemiya, K.; Ichie, H.; Koma, Y.

    2002-09-01

    We roughly review the QCD physics and then introduce recent topics on the confinement physics. In the maximally abelian (MA) gauge, the low-energy QCD is abelianized owing to the effective off-diagonal gluon mass Moff ≃ 1.2GeV induced by the MA gauge fixing. We demonstrate the construction of the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory from the low-energy QCD in the MA gauge in terms of the lattice QCD evidences on infrared abelian dominance and infrared monopole condensation.

  11. Phase Transition in Gauge Theories, Monopoles and the Multiple Point Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.

    This review is devoted to the Multiple Point Principle (MPP), according to which several vacuum states with the same energy density exist in Nature. The MPP is implemented to the Standard Model (SM), Family replicated gauge group model (FRGGM) and phase transitions in gauge theories with/without monopoles. Using renormalization group equations for the SM, the effective potential in the two-loop approximation is investigated, and the existence of its postulated second minimum at the fundamental scale is confirmed. Phase transitions in the lattice gauge theories are reviewed. The lattice results for critical coupling constants are compared with those of the Higgs monopole model, in which the lattice artifact monopoles are replaced by the point-like Higgs scalar particles with magnetic charge. Considering our (3+1)-dimensional space-time as, in some way, discrete or imagining it as a lattice with a parameter a = λP, where λP is the Planck length, we have investigated the additional contributions of monopoles to the β-functions of renormalization group equations for running fine structure constants αi(μ) (i = 1, 2, 3 correspond to the U(1), SU(2) and SU(3) gauge groups of the SM) in the FRGGM extended beyond the SM at high energies. It is shown that monopoles have Nfam times smaller magnetic charge in the FRGGM than in the SM (Nfam is a number of families in the FRGGM). We have estimated also the enlargement of a number of fermions in the FRGGM leading to the suppression of the asymptotic freedom in the non-Abelian theory. We have reviewed that, in contrast to the case of the Anti-grand-unified-theory (AGUT), there exists a possibility of unification of all gauge interactions (including gravity) near the Planck scale due to monopoles. The possibility of the [SU(5)]3 or [SO(10)]3 unification at the GUT-scale ~1018 GeV is briefly considered.

  12. SU(2) quark potential on a body-centered-hypercubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celmaster, William; Moriarty, K. J. M.

    1986-06-01

    Wilson loops are computed in SU(2) gauge theory on a 144 body-centered-hypercubic lattice. From these, the interquark potential is extracted as a function of β. The string tension does not follow the asymptotic scaling curve. Nevertheless, by comparing the trajectory to previous data on high-temperature deconfinement we find compelling evidence for scaling and universality up to a lattice spacing a=0.77/ √σ .

  13. Dark coupling and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Rigolin, S. E-mail: llopezho@ulb.ac.be E-mail: stefano.rigolin@pd.infn.it

    2010-11-01

    We study a coupled dark energy-dark matter model in which the energy-momentum exchange is proportional to the Hubble expansion rate. The inclusion of its perturbation is required by gauge invariance. We derive the linear perturbation equations for the gauge invariant energy density contrast and velocity of the coupled fluids, and we determine the initial conditions. The latter turn out to be adiabatic for dark energy, when assuming adiabatic initial conditions for all the standard fluids. We perform a full Monte Carlo Markov Chain likelihood analysis of the model, using WMAP 7-year data.

  14. Interferometry with synthetic gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a compact atom interferometry scheme for measuring weak, time-dependent accelerations. Our proposal uses an ensemble of dilute trapped bosons with two internal states that couple to a synthetic gauge field with opposite charges. The trapped gauge field couples spin to momentum to allow time-dependent accelerations to be continuously imparted on the internal states. We generalize this system to reduce noise and estimate the sensitivity of such a system to be S{approx}10{sup -7}(m/s{sup 2}/{radical}(Hz)).

  15. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andrasi, A.; Taylor, John C.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > The Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge of QCD contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term. > We investigate the UV divergences from higher order graphs. > We find that they cannot be absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. - Abstract: In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  16. Dynamics of gauge field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Stephon; Jyoti, Dhrubo; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marcianò, Antonino

    2015-05-05

    We analyze the existence and stability of dynamical attractor solutions for cosmological inflation driven by the coupling between fermions and a gauge field. Assuming a spatially homogeneous and isotropic gauge field and fermion current, the interacting fermion equation of motion reduces to that of a free fermion up to a phase shift. Consistency of the model is ensured via the Stückelberg mechanism. We prove the existence of exactly one stable solution, and demonstrate the stability numerically. Inflation arises without fine tuning, and does not require postulating any effective potential or non-standard coupling.

  17. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite measurements should not be viewed as a replacement for stream gauges. However, occasionally it is suggested that because satellite-based measurements can provide river discharge, a motivation for satellite approaches is an increasing lack of stream gauges. This is an argument for more stream gauges, but not necessarily for satellite measurements. Rather, in-situ and spaceborne methods of estimating discharge are complementary. Stream gauges provide frequent measurements at one point in the river reach whereas satellites have the potential to measure throughout all reaches but at orbital repeat intervals of days to weeks. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT) is an opportunity to further develop these complements. The motivation for SWOT, and indeed for any satellite based method of estimating discharge, should not be as a replacement for stream gauges. Scientific and application uses should motivate the measurements. For example, understanding floods with their dynamic water surfaces are best sampled from remote platforms that provide water surface elevations throughout the floodwave. As another example, today’s water and energy balance models are giving outputs at increasing spatial resolution and are making use of water surface elevations throughout the modeled basin. These models require a similar resolution in the calibrating and validating observations. We should also be aware of practical limitations. In addition to providing spatially distributed hydrodynamic measurements on rivers, SWOT will be able to measure storage changes in the estimated 30 million lakes in the world that are larger than a hectare. Knowing the storage changes in these lakes is especially important in certain regions such as the Arctic but gauging even a small fraction of these is impractical. Another motivator for satellite methods is that even in the presence of stream gauges, discharge data is not always well shared throughout all countries

  18. Supersymmetric N=2 gauge theory with arbitrary gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchiev, Michael Yu.

    2010-10-01

    A new universal model to implement the Seiberg-Witten approach to low-energy properties of the supersymmetric N=2 gauge theory with an arbitrary compact simple gauge group, classical or exceptional, is suggested. It is based on the hyperelliptic curve, whose genus equals the rank of the gauge group. The weak and strong coupling limits are reproduced. The magnetic and electric charges of light dyons, which are present in the proposed model comply with recent predictions derived from the general properties of the theory. The discrete chiral symmetry is implemented, the duality condition is reproduced, and connections between monodromies at weak and strong coupling are established. It is found that the spectra of monopoles and dyons are greatly simplified when vectors representing the scalar and dual fields in the Cartan algebra are aligned along the Weyl vector. This general feature of the theory is used for an additional verification of the model. The model predicts the identical analytic structures of the coupling constants for the theories based on the SU(r+1) and Sp(2r) gauge groups.

  19. Improvement of the Gyocenter-Gauge (G-Gauge) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhi; Qin, Hong

    2011-10-01

    The gyrocenter-gauge (g-gauge) algorithm was improved to simulate rf waves propagating in the three-dimensional sheared magnetic field. The conventional local gyro-center coordinate system (X , Y , Z , μ , θ , u) is constructed on the local magnetic field. When particle travel in a sheared magnetic field, the coordinates of particles must be transformed between different local coordinate systems. To avoid these transformation, a new geometric approach is developed to construct a global Cartesian gyro-center coordinate system (X , Y , Z ,vx ,vy ,vz) , where (X , Y , Z) is the coordinate of the gyro-center, and (vx ,vy ,vz) is the velocity of particle. In the g-gauge theory, the perturbation of distribution function, is obtained from the Lie derivative of gyro-center distribution function F along the perturbing vector field G. The evolution of the first order perturbed distribution contains a term LτLG F =L[τ, G] F , where τ is the Hamilton vector field of unperturbed world-line of particles. It is proved that vector field [τ , G] may be directly solved from the electromagnetic fields. In the improved algorithm, LG F is calculated by integrating along the unperturbed world-line. The improved g-gauge algorithm has been successfully applied to study the propagation and evolution of rf waves in three-dimensional inhomogeneous magnetic field.

  20. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  1. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  2. Asymptotic energy of lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weigen; Zhang, Zuhe

    2009-04-01

    The energy of a simple graph G arising in chemical physics, denoted by E(G), is defined as the sum of the absolute values of eigenvalues of G. As the dimer problem and spanning trees problem in statistical physics, in this paper we propose the energy per vertex problem for lattice systems. In general for a type of lattice in statistical physics, to compute the entropy constant with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are different tasks with different hardness and may have different solutions. We show that the energy per vertex of plane lattices is independent of the toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions. In particular, the asymptotic formulae of energies of the triangular, 33.42, and hexagonal lattices with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are obtained explicitly.

  3. Electromagnetic mass splittings of the low lying hadrons and quark masses from 2+1 flavor lattice QCD+QED

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Tom; Zhou Ran; Doi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Uno, Shunpei; Yamada, Norikazu

    2010-11-01

    Results computed in lattice QCD+QED are presented for the electromagnetic mass splittings of the low-lying hadrons. These are used to determine the renormalized, nondegenerate, light quark masses. It is found that m{sub u}{sup MS}=2.24(10)(34), m{sub d}{sup MS}=4.65(15)(32), and m{sub s}{sup MS}=97.6(2.9)(5.5) MeV at the renormalization scale 2 GeV, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We find the lowest-order electromagnetic splitting (m{sub {pi}{sup +}}-m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sub QED}=3.38(23) MeV, the splittings including next-to-leading order, (m{sub {pi}{sup +}}-m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sub QED}=4.50(23) MeV, (m{sub K{sup +}}-m{sub K{sup 0}}){sub QED}=1.87(10) MeV, and the m{sub u}{ne}m{sub d} contribution to the kaon mass difference, (m{sub K{sup +}}-m{sub K{sup 0}}){sub (m{sub u}-m{sub d})}=-5.840(96) MeV. All errors are statistical only, and the next-to-leading-order pion splitting is only approximate in that it does not contain all next-to-leading-order contributions. We also computed the proton-neutron mass difference, including for the first time, QED interactions in a realistic 2+1 flavor calculation. We find (m{sub p}-m{sub n}){sub QED}=0.383(68) MeV, (m{sub p}-m{sub n}){sub (m{sub u}-m{sub d})}=-2.51(14) MeV (statistical errors only), and the total m{sub p}-m{sub n}=-2.13(16)(70) MeV, where the first error is statistical, and the second, part of the systematic error. The calculations are carried out on QCD ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations, using domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action (gauge coupling {beta}=2.13 and lattice cutoff a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1.78 GeV). We use two lattice sizes, 16{sup 3} and 24{sup 3} ((1.8 fm){sup 3} and (2.7 fm){sup 3}), to address finite-volume effects. Noncompact QED is treated in the quenched approximation. The valence pseudoscalar meson masses in our study cover a range of about 250 to 700 MeV, though we use only those up to about 400 MeV to quote final results. We

  4. Quasilocal charges in integrable lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilievski, Enej; Medenjak, Marko; Prosen, Tomaž; Zadnik, Lenart

    2016-06-01

    We review recent progress in understanding the notion of locality in integrable quantum lattice systems. The central concept concerns the so-called quasilocal conserved quantities, which go beyond the standard perception of locality. Two systematic procedures to rigorously construct families of quasilocal conserved operators based on quantum transfer matrices are outlined, specializing on anisotropic Heisenberg XXZ spin-1/2 chain. Quasilocal conserved operators stem from two distinct classes of representations of the auxiliary space algebra, comprised of unitary (compact) representations, which can be naturally linked to the fusion algebra and quasiparticle content of the model, and non-unitary (non-compact) representations giving rise to charges, manifestly orthogonal to the unitary ones. Various condensed matter applications in which quasilocal conservation laws play an essential role are presented, with special emphasis on their implications for anomalous transport properties (finite Drude weight) and relaxation to non-thermal steady states in the quantum quench scenario.

  5. Dynamic quenching in single photosystem II supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Gruber, J Michael; Xu, Pengqi; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Krüger, Tjaart P J; Alexandre, Maxime T A; Valkunas, Leonas; Croce, Roberta; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a huge pigment-protein supercomplex responsible for the primary steps of photosynthesis in green plants. Its light-harvesting antenna exhibits efficient transfer of the absorbed excitation energy to the reaction center and also contains a well-regulated protection mechanism against over-excitation in strong light conditions. The latter is based on conformational changes in antenna complexes that open up excitation decay channels resulting in considerable fluorescence quenching. Meanwhile, fluorescence blinking, observed in single antennas, is likely caused by a similar mechanism. Thus the question arises whether this effect is also present in and relevant to the native supramolecular organization of a fully assembled PSII. To further investigate energy transfer and quenching in single PSII, we performed single-molecule experiments on PSII supercomplexes at 5 °C. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity and mean lifetime allowed us to distinguish detached antennas and specifically analyze PSII supercomplexes. The average fluorescence lifetime in PSII of about 100-150 ps, measured under our extreme excitation conditions, is surprisingly similar to published ensemble lifetime data of photochemical quenching in PSII of a similar size. In our case, this lifetime is nevertheless caused by either one or multiple quenched antennas or by a quencher in the reaction center. The observed reversible light-induced changes in fluorescence intensity on a millisecond timescale are reminiscent of blinking subunits. Our results therefore directly illustrate how environmental control over a fluctuating antenna can regulate light-harvesting in plant photosynthesis. PMID:27604572

  6. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  7. Quenching of the fluorescence of NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslavsky, S.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The fluorescence yield of NO2 was monitored at 25 C with incident wavelengths of 4047, 4358, and 4800A at fluorescence wavelengths of 4860, 5577, and 6300A. The NO2 pressure was varied between 0.004 and 0.080 torr. Measurements were taken both in the absence of foreign gases and in the presence of up to 30 torr. He, N2, and O2 at each NO2 pressure. In the absence of foreign gases, the self quenching follows a Stern-Volmer quenching mechanism, but foreign-gas quenching shows marked deviations from this mechanism. Both from lifetime and kinetic considerations, it is argued that the electronic state formed by absorption of the radiation cannot be the emitting state. Emission occurs from several vibrational levels of the emitting state, the various vibrational levels being formed by collisional cascade reactions. The appropriate quenching rate constant ratios were measured and tabulated. Even the two electronic state mechanism is insufficient to explain all the observations.

  8. Dynamic quenching in single photosystem II supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Gruber, J Michael; Xu, Pengqi; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Krüger, Tjaart P J; Alexandre, Maxime T A; Valkunas, Leonas; Croce, Roberta; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a huge pigment-protein supercomplex responsible for the primary steps of photosynthesis in green plants. Its light-harvesting antenna exhibits efficient transfer of the absorbed excitation energy to the reaction center and also contains a well-regulated protection mechanism against over-excitation in strong light conditions. The latter is based on conformational changes in antenna complexes that open up excitation decay channels resulting in considerable fluorescence quenching. Meanwhile, fluorescence blinking, observed in single antennas, is likely caused by a similar mechanism. Thus the question arises whether this effect is also present in and relevant to the native supramolecular organization of a fully assembled PSII. To further investigate energy transfer and quenching in single PSII, we performed single-molecule experiments on PSII supercomplexes at 5 °C. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity and mean lifetime allowed us to distinguish detached antennas and specifically analyze PSII supercomplexes. The average fluorescence lifetime in PSII of about 100-150 ps, measured under our extreme excitation conditions, is surprisingly similar to published ensemble lifetime data of photochemical quenching in PSII of a similar size. In our case, this lifetime is nevertheless caused by either one or multiple quenched antennas or by a quencher in the reaction center. The observed reversible light-induced changes in fluorescence intensity on a millisecond timescale are reminiscent of blinking subunits. Our results therefore directly illustrate how environmental control over a fluctuating antenna can regulate light-harvesting in plant photosynthesis.

  9. Gauge invariance and the physical spectrum in the two-Higgs-doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Axel; Pedro, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    Observable states are gauge invariant. In a non-Abelian gauge theory, these are necessarily composite operators. We investigate the spectrum of these operators in the two-Higgs-doublet model. For this purpose, we are working along the lines of the Fröhlich-Morchio-Strocchi mechanism to relate the physical spectrum to the spectrum of the elementary particles. We also investigate the consequences of spontaneous breaking of the global (custodial) symmetry group. Finally, we briefly comment on how to test the results using lattice methods.

  10. Hamiltonian Approach to Yang-Mills Theory in Coulomb Gauge--Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, Hugo; Campagnari, Davide R.; Leder, Markus; Burgio, Giuseppe; Quandt, Markus; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Weber, Axel

    2011-05-24

    I briefly review results obtained within the variational Hamiltonian approach to Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge and confront them with recent lattice data. The variational approach is extended to non-Gaussian wave functionals including three- and four-gluon kernels in the exponential of the vacuum wave functional and used to calculate the three-gluon vertex. A new functional renormalization group flow equation for Hamiltonian Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge is solved for the gluon and ghost propagator under the assumption of ghost dominance. The results are compared to those obtained in the variational approach.

  11. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  12. Artificial Staggered Magnetic Field for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2011-03-01

    Uniform magnetic fields are ubiquitous in nature, but this is not the case for staggered magnetic fields. In this talk, I will discuss an experimental set-up for cold atoms recently proposed by us, which allows for the realization of a ``staggered gauge field'' in a 2D square optical lattice. If the lattice is loaded with bosons, it may be described by an effective Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, with complex and anisotropic hopping coefficients. A very rich phase diagram emerges: besides the usual Mott-insulator and zero-momentum condensate, a new phase with a finite momentum condensate becomes the ground-state at strong gauge fields. By using the technique of Feshbach resonance, the dynamics of a coherent superposition of a vortex-carrying atomic condensate and a conventional zero-momentum molecular condensate can also be studied within the same scheme. On the other hand, if the lattice is loaded with fermions, a highly tunable, graphene-like band structure can be realized, without requiring the honeycomb lattice symmetry. When the system is loaded with a mixture of bosons and two-species fermions, several features of the high-Tc phase diagram can be reproduced. A dome-shaped unconventional superconducting region arises, surrounded by a non-Fermi liquid and a Fermi liquid at low and high doping, respectively. We acknowledge financial support from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  13. Measuring the aspect ratio renormalization of anisotropic-lattice gluons

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, M.; Drummond, I. T.; Horgan, R. R.; Shanahan, H.; Peardon, M.

    2001-04-01

    Using tadpole-improved actions we investigate the consistency between different methods of measuring the aspect ratio renormalization of anisotropic-lattice gluons for bare aspect ratios {chi}{sub 0}=4,6,10 and inverse lattice spacing in the range a{sub s}{sup -1}=660--840 MeV. The tadpole corrections to the action, which are established self-consistently, are defined for two cases, mean link tadpoles in the Landau gauge and gauge invariant mean plaquette tadpoles. Parameters in the latter case exhibited no dependence on the spatial lattice size L, while in the former, parameters showed only a weak dependence on L easily extrapolated to L={infinity}. The renormalized anisotropy {chi}{sub R} was measured using both the torelon dispersion relation and the sideways potential method. There is general agreement between these approaches, but there are discrepancies which are evidence for the presence of lattice artifact contributions. For the torelon these are estimated to be O({alpha}{sub S}a{sub s}{sup 2}/R{sup 2}), where R is the flux-tube radius. We also present some new data that suggest that rotational invariance is established more accurately for the mean-link action than the plaquette action.

  14. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  15. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  16. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  17. The influence of containerless undercooling and rapid solid-state quenching on the superconductive and magnetic properties of some clustering alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of clustering alloy systems and the manner in which they are influenced by rapid quenching from a containerless undercooled melt are discussed. It was postulated that rapid quenching under such conditions would result in highly disordered metastable alloys, and furthermore, that alloys in such conditions would possess physical properties characteristically different from those of alloys in the annealed equilibrium state. The scope of the program is essentially to gauge the influence of containerless undercooling on the submicrostructure of clustering-type alloys, using certain physical properties as diagnostic tools. Microstructures and macrostructures were to be examined using optical- and scanning-electron microscopy.

  18. The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.S.; Tanner, D.A.; Truman, C.E.; Paradowska, A.M.; Wimpory, R.C.

    2012-03-15

    The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity

  19. Quenched Disorder in Magnetic Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchau, Brian James

    In quenched systems, the disorder is frozen on the time scale of the thermodynamic variables. The replica trick is a method which is used to overcome some of the mathematical difficulties of quenched disorder by allowing one to average out the degrees of freedom associated with the quenched disorder before tracing over the thermodynamic variables. Although the replica trick uses a mathematically illegal interchange of limits, in all known situations it gives the same results as a nonreplica method. The replica method, in conjunction with the Mermin -Wagner-Hohenberg inequality is first applied to the random field Ising model (RFIM). Domain wall models for the RFIM of Pytte, Imry and Mukamel and of Grinstein and Ma are presented. Our inequality places a lower bound on the width of domain walls in the RFIM. This then gives three as the lower critical dimension (the dimension below which ferromagnetism is absent) in agreement with some, but not all, of the earlier results. A dynamical method of Martin Siggia and Rose, to calculate quenched averages without the use of replicas is presented. However the method is as yet unsuccessful when applied to the XY model with a quenched random field. Finally, the replica trick, in conjunction with the renormalization group is applied to study the low temperature region of the two-dimensional XY model in the presence of a uniaxial random field, which points in the plus or minus x direction with equal probability. Kosterlitz style recursion valid for weak fields are generated and we find that the system develops a phase that has long-range order with Ising symmetry for nonzero temperature and small values of the random field.

  20. Changing anyonic ground degeneracy with engineered gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobanera, Emilio; Ulrich, Jascha; Hassler, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    For systems of lattice anyons such as Majoranas and parafermions, the unconventional quantum statistics determines a set of global symmetries (e.g., fermion parity for Majoranas) admitting no relevant perturbations. Any operator that breaks these symmetries explicitly would violate locality if added to the Hamiltonian. As a consequence, the associated quasidegeneracy of topologically nontrivial phases is protected, at least partially, by locality via the symmetries singled out by quantum statistics. We show that it is possible to bypass this type of protection by way of specifically engineered gauge fields, in order to modify the topological structure of the edge of the system without destroying the topological order completely. To illustrate our ideas in a concrete setting, we focus on the Z6 parafermion chain. Starting in the topological phase of the chain (sixfold ground degeneracy), we show that a gauge field with restricted dynamics acts as a relevant perturbation, driving a transition to a phase with threefold degeneracy and Z3 parafermion edge modes. The transition from the Z3 to the topologically trivial phase occurs on a critical line in the three-state Potts universality class. We also investigate numerically the emergence of Majorana edge modes when the Z6 chain is coupled to a differently restricted gauge field.

  1. Meteorology Gauges for Spatial Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometers have been commercially available for many years. In addition, many versions have been built at JPL for various projects. This activity is aimed at improving the accuracy of such interferometers from the 1-30 nanometer level to the picometer level for use in the proposes Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) as metrology gauges.

  2. Gauge fields, nonlinear realizations, supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    This is a brief survey of the all-years research activity in the Sector "Supersymmetry" (the former Markov Group) at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics. The focus is on the issues related to gauge fields, spontaneously broken symmetries in the nonlinear realizations approach, and diverse aspects of supersymmetry.

  3. Bakeable McLeod gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreisman, W. S. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    A low pressure gauge of the McLeod type demonstrating superior performance and measuring characteristics is described. A mercury reservoir which is kept in a vacuum at all times as well as bakeable glass components to reduce contamination are featured.

  4. Gauged multisoliton baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of U (1 ) gauged modification of the 2 +1 -dimensional planar Skyrme model with a particular choice of the symmetry breaking potential term which combines a short-range repulsion and a long-range attraction. In the absence of the gauge interaction, the multisolitons of the model are aloof, as they consist of the individual constituents which are well separated. A peculiar feature of the model is that there are usually several different stable static multisoliton solutions of rather similar energy in a topological sector of given degree. We investigate the pattern of the solutions and find new previously unknown local minima. It is shown that coupling of the aloof planar multi-Skyrmions to the magnetic field strongly affects the pattern of interaction between the constituents. We analyze the dependency of the structure of the solutions, their energies, and magnetic fluxes on the strength of the gauge coupling. It is found that, generically, in the strong coupling limit, the coupling to the gauge field results in effective recovery of the rotational invariance of the configuration.

  5. Universal Sign Control of Coupling in Tight-Binding Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Robert; Poli, Charles; Heinrich, Matthias; Arkinstall, Jake; Weihs, Gregor; Schomerus, Henning; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We present a method of locally inverting the sign of the coupling term in tight-binding systems, by means of inserting a judiciously designed ancillary site and eigenmode matching of the resulting vertex triplet. Our technique can be universally applied to all lattice configurations, as long as the individual sites can be detuned. We experimentally verify this method in laser-written photonic lattices and confirm both the magnitude and the sign of the coupling by interferometric measurements. Based on these findings, we demonstrate how such universal sign-flipped coupling links can be embedded into extended lattice structures to impose a Z2-gauge transformation. This opens a new avenue for investigations on topological effects arising from magnetic fields with aperiodic flux patterns or in disordered systems.

  6. Exploring strange nucleon form factors on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, Ronald; Brower, Richard C.; Clark, Michael A.; Fleming, George T.; Osborn, James C.; Rebbi, Claudio; Schaich, David

    2012-03-01

    We discuss techniques for evaluating sea quark contributions to hadronic form factors on the lattice and apply these to an exploratory calculation of the strange electromagnetic, axial, and scalar form factors of the nucleon. We employ the Wilson gauge and fermion actions on an anisotropic 243×64 lattice, probing a range of momentum transfer with Q2<1GeV2. The strange electric and magnetic form factors, GEs(Q2) and GMs(Q2), are found to be small and consistent with zero within the statistics of our calculation. The lattice data favor a small negative value for the strange axial form factor GAs(Q2) and exhibit a strong signal for the bare strange scalar matrix element ⟨N|s¯s|N⟩0. We discuss the unique systematic uncertainties affecting the latter quantity relative to the continuum, as well as prospects for improving future determinations with Wilson-like fermions.

  7. Spin-orbit coupling in a strontium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Tobias; Bromley, Sarah; Kolkowitz, Shimon; Zhang, Xibo; Wall, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic gauge fields are a promising tool for creating complex Hamiltonians with ultracold neutral atoms that may mimic the fractional Quantum Hall effect and other topological states. A promising approach is to use spin-orbit coupling to treat an internal degree of freedom as an effective `synthetic' spatial dimension. Here, this synthetic dimension is comprised by the internal ground and excited states used for high-precision clock spectroscopy in a fermionic strontium optical lattice clock. We report on our progress towards this goal in a system where atoms tunnel through a 1D optical lattice during clock interrogation. We present measurements of the lattice band structure under varying Lamb-Dicke parameters and in a regime where s-wave collisions are expected to contribute density dependent frequency shifts.

  8. ``Heavy-water Lattice and Heavy-Quark''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Ssi, Wh-

    Refer to Birgitt Roettger-Roessler: ``Feelings at the Margins'', 2014 retrieved the Vienna, 2006 UNIDO Research Programme: Combating Marginalization and Poverty through Industrial Development/COMPID. Also from Vienna, on Feb 18-22, 1963 reported Technical Report Series 20 about ``Heavy Water Lattice''. Failed to relates scale-invariant properties of public-Debt growth to convergence in perturbation theory, sought JH Field: ``Convergence & Gauge Dependence Properties:..''. Furthers, in GP Lepage: ``On the Viabilities of Lattice Perturbation Theory'', 1992 stated: ``in terms of physical quantities, like the heavy-quark potential, greatly enhanced the predictive power of lattice perturbation theory''. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  9. Tunable nonequilibrium dynamics of field quenches in spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Mostame, Sarah; Castelnovo, Claudio; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji L.

    2014-01-01

    We present nonequilibrium physics in spin ice as a unique setting that combines kinematic constraints, emergent topological defects, and magnetic long-range Coulomb interactions. In spin ice, magnetic frustration leads to highly degenerate yet locally constrained ground states. Together, they form a highly unusual magnetic state—a “Coulomb phase”—whose excitations are point-like defects—magnetic monopoles—in the absence of which effectively no dynamics is possible. Hence, when they are sparse at low temperature, dynamics becomes very sluggish. When quenching the system from a monopole-rich to a monopole-poor state, a wealth of dynamical phenomena occur, the exposition of which is the subject of this article. Most notably, we find reaction diffusion behavior, slow dynamics owing to kinematic constraints, as well as a regime corresponding to the deposition of interacting dimers on a honeycomb lattice. We also identify potential avenues for detecting the magnetic monopoles in a regime of slow-moving monopoles. The interest in this model system is further enhanced by its large degree of tunability and the ease of probing it in experiment: With varying magnetic fields at different temperatures, geometric properties—including even the effective dimensionality of the system—can be varied. By monitoring magnetization, spin correlations or zero-field NMR, the dynamical properties of the system can be extracted in considerable detail. This establishes spin ice as a laboratory of choice for the study of tunable, slow dynamics. PMID:24379372

  10. Supersymmetric composite gauge fields with compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2016-06-01

    We study supersymmetric composite gauge theory, supplemented with compensator mechanism. As our first example, we give the formulation of N = 1 supersymmetric non-Abelian composite gauge theory without the kinetic term of a non-Abelian gauge field. The important ingredient is the Proca-Stueckelberg-type compensator scalar field that makes the gauge-boson field equation non-singular, i.e., the field equation can be solved for the gauge field algebraically as a perturbative expansion. As our second example, we perform the gauging of chiral-symmetry for N = 1 supersymmetry in four dimensions by a composite gauge field. These results provide supporting evidence for the consistency of the mechanism that combines the composite gauge field formulations and compensator formulations, all unified under supersymmetry.

  11. Inter-comparison of automatic rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The Ocean Acoustics Division (OAD) of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in cooperation with NOAA/NESDIS and NASA, has deployed six rain gauges for calibration and intercomparison purposes. These instruments include: (1) a weighing rain gauge, (2) a RM Young Model 50202 capacitance rain gauge, (3) a ScTI ORG-705 (long path) optical rain gauge, (4) a ScTI ORG-105 (mini-ORG) optical rain gauge, (5) a Belfort Model 382 tipping bucket rain gauge, and (6) a Distromet RD-69 disdrometer. The system has been running continuously since July 1993. During this time period, roughly 150 events with maximum rainfall rate over 10 mm/hr and 25 events with maximum rainfall rates over 100 mm/hr have been recorded. All rain gauge types have performed well, with intercorrelations 0.9 or higher. However, limitations for each type of rain gauge have been observed.

  12. Quench Protection for the MICE Cooling Channel Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xing Long; Xu, Feng Yu; Wang, Li; Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Liu, X.K.; Jia, Lin Xiang; Amm, Kathleen

    2008-08-02

    This paper describes the passive quench protection system selected for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) cooling channel coupling magnet. The MICE coupling magnet will employ two methods of quench protection simultaneously. The most important method of quench protection in the coupling magnet is the subdivision of the coil. Cold diodes and resistors are put across the subdivisions to reduce both the voltage to ground and the hot-spot temperature. The second method of quench protection is quench-back from the mandrel, which speeds up the spread of the normal region within the coils. Combining quench back with coil subdivision will reduce the hot spot temperature further. This paper explores the effect on the quench process of the number of coil sub-divisions, the quench propagation velocity within the magnet, and the shunt resistance.

  13. 1. SUBMERGED QUENCH INCINERATOR. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Rocky Mountain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SUBMERGED QUENCH INCINERATOR. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Submerged Quench Incinerator, 3940 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 930 feet West of Road NS-4, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  14. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  15. Yang-Mills vacuum in Coulomb gauge in D=2+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Feuchter, C.; Reinhardt, H.

    2008-04-15

    The variational approach to the Hamilton formulation of Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge developed by the present authors previously is applied to Yang-Mills theory in 2+1 dimensions and is confronted with the existing lattice data. We show that the resulting Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSE) yield consistent solutions in 2+1 dimensions only for infrared divergent ghost form factor and gluon energy. The obtained numerical solutions of the DSE reproduce the analytic infrared results and are in satisfactory agreement with the existing lattice date in the whole momentum range.

  16. Infrared behavior of the ghost-gluon vertex in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleifenbaum, W.; Maas, A.; Wambach, J.; Alkofer, R.

    2005-07-01

    A semiperturbative calculation of the ghost-gluon vertex in Landau-gauge Yang-Mills theory in four and three Euclidean space-time dimensions is presented. Nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators are employed, which have previously been calculated from a truncated set of Dyson-Schwinger equations and which are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with corresponding lattice results. Our results for the ghost-gluon vertex show only relatively small deviations from the tree-level one in agreement with recent lattice data. In particular, we do not see any sign for a singular behavior of the ghost-gluon vertex in the infrared.

  17. Single photon detection with self-quenching multiplication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A photoelectronic device and an avalanche self-quenching process for a photoelectronic device are described. The photoelectronic device comprises a nanoscale semiconductor multiplication region and a nanoscale doped semiconductor quenching structure including a depletion region and an undepletion region. The photoelectronic device can act as a single photon detector or a single carrier multiplier. The avalanche self-quenching process allows electrical field reduction in the multiplication region by movement of the multiplication carriers, thus quenching the avalanche.

  18. 27 CFR 19.768 - Gauge record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proprietor shall prepare a gauge record to show: (a) Serial number, commencing with “1” at the start of each calendar or fiscal year; (b) Reason for making the gauge: (1) Production gauge and entry for deposit in the... the production account for redistillation; (4) Repackaging of spirits of 190 degrees or more of...

  19. 27 CFR 19.304 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Distilled Spirits Rules for Production of Spirits § 19.304 Production gauge. A proprietor must gauge all spirits by determining the quantity... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Production gauge....

  20. 27 CFR 19.304 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production gauge. 19.304... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Distilled Spirits Rules for Production of Spirits § 19.304 Production gauge. A proprietor must gauge all spirits by determining the...