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Sample records for quercus serrata thunb

  1. Enhancement of root respiration and photosynthesis in Quercus serrata Thunb. seedlings by long-term aluminum treatment.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Rie; Takenaka, Chisato

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the effects of long-term (17 months) aluminum (Al) treatment on the growth, root respiration rate, nutrient uptake rate, and photosynthetic activity of two-year-old Quercus serrata Thunb. seedlings. The seedlings were cultivated by supplying a nutrient solution with or without Al twice a week for 17 months in siliceous sand. After 5- and 17-month treatments, growth, root respiration rate, photosynthetic activity, and the concentration of minerals in the roots and leaves were measured. Al treatment for 5 and 17 months markedly enhanced the growth and photosynthetic activity, and Al treatment for 17 months stimulated the root respiration rate. Although Al treatment for 17 months significantly decreased the Ca, Mg, and P concentrations in leaves, this decrease did not cause deficiency symptoms because of significant increases in shoot biomass and photosynthetic activity. The results of this study reveal that an increase in photosynthetic activity supports growth enhancement induced by Al treatment in Q. serrata seedlings, and suggest that Al may act as a trigger in activating some metabolic functions that can induce growth.

  2. Gross nitrogen retranslocation within a canopy of Quercus serrata saplings.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Miki U

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) retranslocation within tree canopies has been intensively studied and assumed to function as a one-way process (e.g., from older to newer leaves). However, recent studies have found that both N output and input occur in individual leaves, suggesting that 'gross' N retranslocation exists behind 'net' N retranslocation. In the present study, the amount and direction of gross N retranslocation within a canopy of deciduous oak Quercus serrata Thunb. ex. Murray saplings were investigated. Labeling was conducted with leaves of Q. serrata saplings cultivated under conditions of low-N (LN) or high-N (HN) fertility. Subsequently, N movement within the canopy was traced. Leaves at two different positions in the canopy (top and lateral) were labeled to determine the direction of gross N retranslocation. To detect seasonal differences, the leaf-labeling experiment was conducted twice during the early and late phases of the growing season. In addition, to compare the quantitative importance of gross N retranslocation and root N uptake, the latter was determined by labeling Q. serrata roots. The N-labeling experiment revealed gross N retranslocation among leaves, i.e., from top to lateral, lateral to top and lateral to lateral positions. Gross N retranslocation was quantitatively more important than root uptake, especially for plants cultivated at LN fertility. Season also affected the amount of gross N retranslocation, and these effects differed between LN and HN fertilities. These findings suggest that N allocation within a canopy is controlled dynamically by both gross N output and input. The mechanisms controlling gross N output and input likely function as key determinants of N allocation within a tree canopy.

  3. Shoot development and extension of Quercus serrata saplings in response to insect damage and nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Mizumachi, Eri; Mori, Akira; Osawa, Naoya; Akiyama, Reiko; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2006-07-01

    Plants have the ability to compensate for damage caused by herbivores. This is important to plant growth, because a plant cannot always avoid damage, even if it has developed defence mechanisms against herbivores. In previous work, we elucidated the herbivory-induced compensatory response of Quercus (at both the individual shoot and whole sapling levels) in both low- and high-nutrient conditions throughout one growing season. In this study, we determine how the compensatory growth of Quercus serrata saplings is achieved at different nutrient levels. Quercus serrata saplings were grown under controlled conditions. Length, number of leaves and percentage of leaf area lost on all extension units (EUs) were measured. Both the probability of flushing and the length of subsequent EUs significantly increased with an increase in the length of the parent EU. The probability of flushing increased with an increase in leaf damage of the parent EU, but the length of subsequent EUs decreased. This indicates that EU growth is fundamentally regulated at the individual EU level. The probabilities of a second and third flush were significantly higher in plants in high-nutrient soil than those in low-nutrient soil. The subsequent EUs of damaged saplings were also significantly longer at high-nutrient conditions. An increase in the probability of flushes in response to herbivore damage is important for damaged saplings to produce new EUs; further, shortening the length of EUs helps to effectively reproduce foliage lost by herbivory. The probability of flushing also varied according to soil nutrient levels, suggesting that the compensatory growth of individual EUs in response to local damage levels is affected by the nutrients available to the whole sapling.

  4. Modeling of stomatal conductance to estimate stomatal ozone uptake by Fagus crenata, Quercus serrata, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Betula platyphylla.

    PubMed

    Kinose, Yoshiyuki; Azuchi, Fumika; Uehara, Yui; Kanomata, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To construct stomatal conductance models and estimate stomatal O3 uptake for Fagus crenata, Quercus serrata, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Betula platyphylla, stomatal conductance (gs) was measured in seedlings of the four tree species. Better estimates of gs were made by incorporating the acute effects of O3 on gs into the models and the models could explain 34-52% of the variability in gs. Although the O3 concentration was relatively high in spring from April to May, COU of F. crenata, Q. serrata and Q. mongolica var. crispula were relatively low and the ratios of COU in spring to total COU in one year were 16.8% in all tree species because of low gs limited mainly by leaf pre-maturation and/or low temperature. The COU of B. platyphylla were relatively high mainly because of rapid leaf maturation and lower optimal temperature for stomatal opening.

  5. Foliage nitrogen turnover: differences among nitrogen absorbed at different times by Quercus serrata saplings

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miki U.; Mizumachi, Eri; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen turnover within plants has been intensively studied to better understand nitrogen use strategies. However, differences among the nitrogen absorbed at different times are not completely understood and the fate of nitrogen absorbed during winter is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, nitrogen absorbed at different times of the year (growing season, winter and previous growing season) was traced, and the within-leaf nitrogen turnover of a temperate deciduous oak Quercus serrata was investigated. Methods The contributions of nitrogen absorbed at the three different times to leaf construction, translocation during the growing season, and the leaf-level resorption efficiency during leaf senescence were compared using 15N. Key Results Winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen significantly contributed to leaf construction, although the contribution was smaller than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen. On the other hand, the leaf-level resorption efficiency of winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen was higher than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen, suggesting that older nitrogen is better retained in leaves than recently absorbed nitrogen. Conclusions The results demonstrate that nitrogen turnover in leaves varies with nitrogen absorption times. These findings are important for understanding plant nitrogen use strategies and nitrogen cycles in forest ecosystems. PMID:21515608

  6. Fine root morphological traits determine variation in root respiration of Quercus serrata.

    PubMed

    Makita, Naoki; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Dannoura, Masako; Kominami, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Takeo; Ishii, Hiroaki; Kanazawa, Yoichi

    2009-04-01

    Fine root respiration is a significant component of carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. Although fine roots differ functionally from coarse roots, these root types have been distinguished based on arbitrary diameter cut-offs (e.g., 2 or 5 mm). Fine root morphology is directly related to physiological function, but few attempts have been made to understand the relationships between morphology and respiration of fine roots. To examine relationships between respiration rates and morphological traits of fine roots (0.15-1.4 mm in diameter) of mature Quercus serrata Murr., we measured respiration of small fine root segments in the field with a portable closed static chamber system. We found a significant power relationship between mean root diameter and respiration rate. Respiration rates of roots<0.4 mm in mean diameter were high and variable, ranging from 3.8 to 11.3 nmol CO2 g(-1) s(-1), compared with those of larger diameter roots (0.4-1.4 mm), which ranged from 1.8 to 3.0 nmol CO2 g(-1) s(-1). Fine root respiration rate was positively correlated with specific root length (SRL) as well as with root nitrogen (N) concentration. For roots<0.4 mm in diameter, SRL had a wider range (11.3-80.4 m g(-1)) and was more strongly correlated with respiration rate than diameter. Our results indicate that a more detailed classification of fine roots<2.0 mm is needed to represent the heterogeneity of root respiration and to evaluate root biomass and root morphological traits.

  7. Mycoheterotrophic growth of Cephalanthera falcata (Orchidaceae) in tripartite symbioses with Thelephoraceae fungi and Quercus serrata (Fagaceae) in pot culture condition.

    PubMed

    Yagame, Takahiro; Yamato, Masahide

    2013-03-01

    Mixotrophy, obtaining carbon by mycoheterotrophy and photosynthesis, has been suggested in Cephalanthera species (Orchidaceae) by analyses on stable isotopes of carbon. In this study, we examined the growth of Cephalanthera falcata in pot cultured tripartite symbioses with Thelephoraceae fungi and Quercus serrata. Mycorrhizal fungi were isolated from roots of C. falcata in natural habitats. Two fungal isolates identified as Thelephoraceae were cultured and inoculated to fine roots of non-mycorrhizal seedlings of Q. serrata (Fagaceae). After the ectomycorrhizal formation, non-mycorrhizal seedlings of C. falcata were co-planted. The pots with tripartite symbioses were cultured in greenhouse for 30 months, and growth of C. falcata seedlings was examined. Fresh weight of C. falcata seedlings was significantly increased by the tripartite symbioses even in those with no shoot, thus providing further evidence for the mycoheterotrophic nature of this orchid. The achievement of seedling culture in tripartite symbioses would be valuable for conserving many forest orchids and for conducting experiments to understand their physiology and ecology.

  8. Growth overcompensation against O3 exposure in two Japanese oak species, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Quercus serrata, grown under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Komatsu, Masabumi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Tobita, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effects of elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3) on the growth of two mid-successional oak species native to East Asia, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Quercus serrata, we measured gas exchange and biomass allocation in seedlings (initially 1-year-old) grown under combinations of elevated CO2 (550 μmol mol(-1)) and O3 (twice-ambient) for two growing seasons in an open-field experiment in which root growth was not limited. Both the oak species showed a significant growth enhancement under the combination of elevated CO2 and O3 (indicated by total dry mass; over twice of ambient-grown plants, p < .05), which probably resulted from a preferable biomass partitioning into leaves induced by O3 and a predominant enhancement of photosynthesis under elevated CO2. Such an over-compensative response in the two Japanese oak species resulted in greater plant growth under the combination of elevated CO2 and O3 than elevated CO2 alone.

  9. Anaerobic co-digestion of steam-treated Quercus serrata chips and sewage sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hidaka, Taira; Sakurai, Kensuke; Tsumori, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The biodegradation of Quercus serrata chips was evaluated by anaerobic digestion under various steam explosion conditions. In continuous experiments, untreated chips (W₀) and chips steam-treated at less than 1.0 MPa (W₁) and 2.0 MPa (W₄) were co-digested with sewage sludge (S₁ and S₂) taken from two different wastewater treatment plants. The apparent methane yield of W₁ and W₄ co-digested with S₁ (thermophilic) was 261 dm(3)/kgVS (volatile solids) and 248 dm(3)/kgVS, respectively. The apparent methane yield of W₄ co-digested with S₂ was 258 dm(3)/kgVS (mesophilic) and 271 dm(3)/kgVS (thermophilic). Methane production was inhibited by W₀ due to components released during hydrolysis. The methane conversion ratio of pretreated chips obtained in batch experiments varied from 40.5% to 53.8% (mesophilic) and from 49.0% to 63.7% (thermophilic). The methane conversion ratio increased with decreasing acid-soluble lignin content in the chips.

  10. The effects of localized heating and disbudding on cambial reactivation and formation of earlywood vessels in seedlings of the deciduous ring-porous hardwood, Quercus serrata

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Kayo; Nabeshima, Eri; Begum, Shahanara; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Yasue, Koh; Funada, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The networks of vessel elements play a vital role in the transport of water from roots to leaves, and the continuous formation of earlywood vessels is crucial for the growth of ring-porous hardwoods. The differentiation of earlywood vessels is controlled by external and internal factors. The present study was designed to identify the limiting factors in the induction of cambial reactivation and the differentiation of earlywood vessels, using localized heating and disbudding of dormant stems of seedlings of a deciduous ring-porous hardwood, Quercus serrata. Methods Localized heating was achieved by wrapping an electric heating ribbon around stems. Disbudding involved removal of all buds. Three treatments were initiated on 1 February 2012, namely heating, disbudding and a combination of heating and disbudding, with untreated dormant stems as controls. Cambial reactivation and differentiation of vessel elements were monitored by light and polarized-light microscopy, and the growth of buds was followed. Key Results Cambial reactivation and differentiation of vessel elements occurred sooner in heated seedlings than in non-heated seedlings before bud break. The combination of heating and disbudding of seedlings also resulted in earlier cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements than in non-heated seedlings. A few narrow vessel elements were formed during heating after disbudding, while many large earlywood vessel elements were formed in heated seedlings with buds. Conclusions The results suggested that, in seedlings of the deciduous ring-porous hardwood Quercus serrata, elevated temperature was a direct trigger for cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements. Bud growth was not essential for cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements, but might be important for the continuous formation of wide vessel elements. PMID:24685716

  11. The effects of localized heating and disbudding on cambial reactivation and formation of earlywood vessels in seedlings of the deciduous ring-porous hardwood, Quercus serrata.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kayo; Nabeshima, Eri; Begum, Shahanara; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Yasue, Koh; Funada, Ryo

    2014-05-01

    The networks of vessel elements play a vital role in the transport of water from roots to leaves, and the continuous formation of earlywood vessels is crucial for the growth of ring-porous hardwoods. The differentiation of earlywood vessels is controlled by external and internal factors. The present study was designed to identify the limiting factors in the induction of cambial reactivation and the differentiation of earlywood vessels, using localized heating and disbudding of dormant stems of seedlings of a deciduous ring-porous hardwood, Quercus serrata. Localized heating was achieved by wrapping an electric heating ribbon around stems. Disbudding involved removal of all buds. Three treatments were initiated on 1 February 2012, namely heating, disbudding and a combination of heating and disbudding, with untreated dormant stems as controls. Cambial reactivation and differentiation of vessel elements were monitored by light and polarized-light microscopy, and the growth of buds was followed. Cambial reactivation and differentiation of vessel elements occurred sooner in heated seedlings than in non-heated seedlings before bud break. The combination of heating and disbudding of seedlings also resulted in earlier cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements than in non-heated seedlings. A few narrow vessel elements were formed during heating after disbudding, while many large earlywood vessel elements were formed in heated seedlings with buds. The results suggested that, in seedlings of the deciduous ring-porous hardwood Quercus serrata, elevated temperature was a direct trigger for cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements. Bud growth was not essential for cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements, but might be important for the continuous formation of wide vessel elements.

  12. [Cloning, expression and functional identification of a type III polyketide synthase gene from Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin-cui; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Jie-yin; Guo, Chao-tan; Chen, Guo-shen; Abe, Ikuro; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    A cDNA encoding novel type III polyketide synthase (PKS) was cloned and sequenced from young leaves of Chinese club moss Huperzia serrata (Thunb.) Trev. by RT-PCR using degenerated primers based on the conserved sequences of known CHSs, and named as H. serrata PKS2. The terminal sequences of cDNA were obtained by the 3'- and 5'-RACE method. The full-length cDNA of H. serrata PKS2 contained a 1212 bp open reading frame encoding a 46.4 kDa protein with 404 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of H. serrata PKS2 showed 50%-66% identities to those of other chalcone synthase super family enzymes of plant origin. The recombinant H. serrata PKS2 was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus and showed unusually versatile catalytic potency to produce various aromatic tetraketides, including chalcones, benzophenones, phloroglucinols, and acridones. In particular, the enzyme accepted bulky starter substrates N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA, and carried out three condensations with malonyl-CoA to produce 1, 3-dihydroxy-N-methylacridone. Interestingly, H. serrata PKS2 lacks most of the consensus active site sequences with acridone synthase from Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae).

  13. Molecular characterization of Trichuris serrata.

    PubMed

    Ketzis, Jennifer K; Verma, Ashutosh; Burgess, Graham

    2015-05-01

    Trichuris serrata, a whipworm of cats, can cause inflammation in the cecum and upper portion of the large intestine. It is unknown if the virulence and pathology of T. serrata differ from Trichuris campanula, the other species in cats. Distinguishing the species based on egg size is challenging. In addition, Trichuris eggs can be difficult to distinguish from Capillaria spp. This paper presents the first molecular description of T. serrata. The 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was sequenced from male adult worms sourced from two unrelated cats on St. Kitts. Based on the analysis of 651 base pairs, T. serrata was found to be different than any other Trichuris species for which published sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene is available. A dendrogram was developed using Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6.0, and evolutionary history was inferred using the minimum evolution method. T. serrata was found to be most closely related to Trichuris vulpis, the Trichuris of dogs. Further development of the methodology could enable distinguishing T. serrata, T. campanula, and Capillaria spp. infections in cats and aid in diagnosis.

  14. Four new steroids from the endophytic fungus Chaetomium sp. M453 derived of Chinese herbal medicine Huperzia serrata.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei-Xue; Li, Zhe; Chen, Yao; Yang, Yin-He; Li, Guo-Hong; Zhao, Pei-Ji

    2017-03-01

    An endophytic fungus, Chaetomium sp. M453, was isolated from Huperzia serrata (Thunb. ex Murray) Trev. and subjected to phytochemical investigation. Three unusual C25 steroids, neocyclocitrinols E-G (1-3), and 3β-hydroxy-5,9-epoxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (4) together with three known steroids were isolated from solid fermentation products of the fungus, which were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses, including 1D-, 2D-NMR, and HR-ESI-MS experiments. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis and CD analyses. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of compounds 1-4 were tested in vitro. Compound 4 showed weak acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  15. Extraction and Characterization of Boswellia Serrata Gum as Pharmaceutical Excipient.

    PubMed

    Panta, Sumedha; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript deals with the purification and characterization of Boswellia serrata gum as a suspending agent. The Boswellia serrata gum was purchased as crude material, purified and further characterized in terms of organoleptic properties and further micromeritic studies were carried out to characterize the polymer as a pharmaceutical excipient. The suspending properties of the polymer were also evaluated. The results showed that the extracted gum possesses optimum organoleptic as well as micromeritic and suspending properties. To characterize Boswellia serrata gum as a natural excipient. Boswellia serrata gum, paracetamol, distilled water. The results showed that the extracted gum possesses optimum organoleptic as well as micromeritic and suspending properties. It is concluded from the research work that the gum extracted from Boswellia serrata shows the presence of carbohydrates after chemical tests. All the organoleptic properties evaluated were found to be acceptable. The pH was found to be slightly acidic. Swelling Index reveals that the gum swells well in water. Total ash value was within the limits. The values of angle of repose and Carr's Index of powdered gum powder showed that the flow property was good. IR spectra confirmed the presence of alcohol, amines, ketones, anhydrides and aromatic rings. The suspending properties of Boswellia serrata gum were found to be higher as compared to gum acacia while the flow rate of Boswellia serrata gum (1% suspension) was less than gum acacia (1% suspension). The viscosity measurement of both Boswellia serrata gum suspension and gum acacia suspension showed approximately similar results.

  16. [HPLC-FPS establishment of Iris japonica Thunb].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-zhuan; Luo, Ai-qin; Liu, Li-wen; Fang, Min; Deng, Yu-lin

    2006-09-01

    Samples extracted from the root of Iris japonica Thunb were analyzed and the optimal HPLC chromatographic conditions was confirmed. Through analyzing the chromatography, the HPLC-FPS of Iris japonica Thunb was established.

  17. Isoprene emission from the major native Quercus spp. in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Akira; Kawawata, Yuijun

    Broad-leaved Quercus trees are the major species in the temperate zone of Japan and other countries in Asia. In the present study, attempts were made to identify isoprene emitters among various Quercus tree species native to Japan, and the emission characteristics of each species were investigated. By using a branch-enclosure method, four deciduous trees taxonomically positioned in the section Prinus, Quercus serrata, Q. mongolica var. crispula, Q. aliena, and Q. dentate, were identified as isoprene emitters. Two other deciduous trees in the section Cerris, Q. acutissima, and Q. variabilis, emitted neither isoprene nor monoterpene. The evergreen tree species Q. acuta, Q. glauca, Q. salicina, Q. myrsinaefolia, and Q. sessilifolia included in the section Cyclobalanopsis were also identified as non-emitters. Cuvette measurements revealed that the temperature and light dependence of isoprene emissions from the four plant species were similar to that previously reported for many other plant species. However, the initial slope of the isoprene emission against photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) was higher than the slope proposed by the G93 algorithm. Online monitoring of isoprene emission was occasionally conducted, and the results revealed a difference in the response time against PPF between PPF increase and decrease measurements even at the same PPF and temperature. The ratio of carbon emitted as isoprene to carbon fixed by photosynthesis was calculated as 3-15% at 35 °C. The emission rates standardized to 30 °C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PPF of the four emitter Quercus spp. were 18-30 nmol m -2 s -1.

  18. Kalopanax septemlobus (Thunb. ex A. Murr.) Koidz

    Treesearch

    Paula M. Pijut

    2008-01-01

    The genus Kalopanax comprises 1 species of deciduous, small to medium-sized tree that is native to China, Japan, eastern Russia, and Korea (LHBH 1976; Ohashi 1994). Castor-aralia—K. septemlobus (Thunb. ex A. Murr.) Koidz.—was introduced in 1865 and has been used primarily for ornamental purposes, as a shade tree yielding a tropical...

  19. Volatile Organic Compound Emission from Quercus suber, Quercus canariensis, and its hybridisation product Quercus afares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, S.; Bracho Nuñez, A.; Staudt, M.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    Oaks represent one of the most important plant genera in the Northern hemisphere and include many intensively VOC emitting species. The major group constitutes the isoprene emitters, but also monoterpene emitters and non-emitters can be found. These variations in the oak species might partly be due to their propensity for inter- and intraspecific hybridisation. This study addresses the foliar VOC production of the former hybridisation product the deciduous Quercus afares and its parents, two very distant species: the evergreen monoterpene emitter Quercus suber and the deciduous isoprene emitter Quercus canariensis. The measurements were performed in Southern France, applying two different methods. Plants were investigated in situ in the field with a portable gas exchange measuring system as well as in the laboratory on cut branches with an adapted enclosure system. Quercus afares was found to be a monoterpene emitting species. However, the monoterpene emission was lower and the composition different to that of Quercus suber. Whereas Quercus suber trees belonged to the pinene type most individuals of Quercus afares were identified to represent a limonene type. Quercus canariensis emitted besides high amounts of isoprene also linalool and (Z)-3-hexenylacetate. Emissions from Quercus suber and Quercus afares were higher in the field measurements than in the laboratory on cut branches whereas Quercus canariensis exhibited lower isoprene emissions from cut branches. The results demonstrate the need of further emission studies on a plant species level.

  20. Isoprene Emission from Quercus Serrata in the deciduous broad-leaved forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, M.; Tani, A.; Kominami, Y.; Takanashi, S.; Kosugi, Y.; Tohno, S.

    2006-12-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Isoprene is a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emitted by many plant species. Isoprene emission contributes to the reactive carbon budget entering the troposphere. In Japan efforts to measure and understand the mechanism controlling BVOC emissions and to establish their emission inventories for the country have not been extensive, despite the fact that Japan has a large area of forests composed of coniferous and/or deciduous tree species (about 70% of total land area) and that forestry statistics across Japan are available (Tani et al. 2002). 2. METHODS The measurements were taken in the deciduous broad-leaved forest, Yamashiro, Kyoto. The isoprene emission, net assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), air and leaf temperature, relative humidity was measured on June, July, August 2006 using a LI-6400 portable photosynthesis system (Li-Cor Inc., Lincoln, NE, USA). Isoprene samples from the LI-6400 cuvette was trapped by adsorbents (Tenax 200mg and Carbotrap 100mg) packed into stainless steel tubes (Perkin Elmer). Samples were analyzed using GC-MS system (Shimadzu QP5050A). Samples underwent two stage thermal desorption (Perkin-Elmer ATD). 3. RESULTS The obvious effect of PAR on isoprene emissions and photosynthesis rates were investigated. Temporal variations of isoprene emissions and photosynthesis rates for sun leaves and a shade leaves were investigated. Isoprene sampling term is 7:00-9:00, 9:00-11:00, 11:00-13:00, 13:00-15:00, 15:00-17:00, and 17:00-18:30. Number of samples is 4-6 leaves. Both sun leaves and shade leaves, isoprene emissions reached their peak around noon, while for sun leaves the largest photosynthesis rates during morning and the subsequent decrease were observed as shown. Carbon ratio (carbon of isoprene emission /carbon of photosynthesis by mass unit) were about 1-3%. REFERENCES Tani, A., Nozoe, S., Aoki, M., Hewiit, C. N., 2002. Monoterpene fluxes measured above a Japanese red pine forest at Oshiba plateau, Japan. Atmospheric Environment, 36(21) : 41-52. Tani, A., Fushimi, K., 2005. Effects of temperature and light intensity on isoprene emission of Edgeworthia chrysantha. J. Agric. Meteorol, 61(2): 113-122.

  1. Description, host range and distribution of a new Macrodiplosis species (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) that induces leaf-margin fold galls on deciduous Quercus (Fagaceae) with comparative notes on Palaearctic congeners.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wanggyu; Yukawa, Junichi; Harris, Keith M; Minami, Tsuneo; Matsuo, Kazunori; Skrzypczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-06-20

    A gall midge that induces upwardly folded leaf-margin galls on Quercus serrata, Q. mongolica and Q. dentata (Fagaceae) in Japan and South Korea is described as Macrodiplosis selenis sp. n. (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). M. selenis is distinguished from Palaearctic congeners by a combination of morphological characters. Genetic differences supported the result of morphological comparison and indicated that M. selenis is closely related to the European M. roboris, whose gall is similar to that of M. selenis.

  2. [Study progress in Sinomenium acutum (Thunb.) Rehd. et Wils].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Liling; Li, Rui

    2002-03-01

    This article reviewed the progress in the study of the pharmacognosy, chemical compositions, pharmacological actions and clinical practices of Sinomenium acutum (Thunb.) Rehd. et Wils. An expectation for the further development and utilization of this plant was put forward.

  3. [Determination of five boswellic acids in Boswellia serrata].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Xia, Lei; Song, Zhiqian; Li, Qing; Wang, Chao; Zeng, Linyan; Liu, Zhenli

    2011-05-01

    To develop an HPLC method for determinating the contents of five boswellic acids in Boswellia serrata. Analysis was performed on a zorbax SB C18 column eluted with acetonitrile-0.1% phosphoric acid in water as mobile phases in gradient elution and the detection wavelengths were 210 nm and 250 nm. The five ingredients were separated well. The content ranges of alpha-boswellic acid, beta-boswellic acid, 3-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid and 11-keto-beta-acetyl- boswellic acid were 8.68-16.1, 53.5-246.9, 38.4-192.9, 4.48-5.81, 32.7-44.2 mg x g(-1), respectively. The contents of five individual boswellic acids were different in 12 batches of B. serrata samples.

  4. Boswellia Serrata, A Potential Antiinflammatory Agent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Z.

    2011-01-01

    The resin of Boswellia species has been used as incense in religious and cultural ceremonies and in medicines since time immemorial. Boswellia serrata (Salai/Salai guggul), is a moderate to large sized branching tree of family Burseraceae (Genus Boswellia), grows in dry mountainous regions of India, Northern Africa and Middle East. Oleo gum-resin is tapped from the incision made on the trunk of the tree and is then stored in specially made bamboo basket for removal of oil content and getting the resin solidified. After processing, the gum-resin is then graded according to its flavour, colour, shape and size. In India, the States of Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh are the main source of Boswellia serrata. Regionally, it is also known by different names. The oleo gum-resins contain 30-60% resin, 5-10% essential oils, which are soluble in the organic solvents, and the rest is made up of polysaccharides. Gum-resin extracts of Boswellia serrata have been traditionally used in folk medicine for centuries to treat various chronic inflammatory diseases. The resinous part of Boswellia serrata possesses monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes, tetracyclic triterpenic acids and four major pentacyclic triterpenic acids i.e. β-boswellic acid, acetyl-β-boswellic acid, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid and acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid, responsible for inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes. Out of these four boswellic acids, acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid is the most potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, an enzyme responsible for inflammation. PMID:22457547

  5. [Study on cutting and gemmae propagation of Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Long, Hua; Li, Qing; Li, Li; Huang, Li-hua

    2014-07-01

    An efficient and stable artificial propagation system of Huperzia serrata was established by developing the wild semi-assisted reproductive system with gemmae or the cutting of stem tip. The study was explored in the forest farm of Yantuozhai, Gaowangjie,Guzhang County, Xiangxi state and designed as a L9 (3(4)) orthogonal experiment, which consisted of three factors including cutting length, NAA concentration and soak time, to research their effect on rooting of perennial branches attached tip. The experiment also investigated the gemmae's occurrence, distribution and growth development through wild observation of two years and the gemmae germination of placed in different soil layers were studied. In the original habitat, the best treatment was the cutting of 6 cm length with NAA 20 mg/L immersing for 5 min. The white adventitious root occurred 60 d later whose survival rated up to 90%. The cutting growth increased distinctly after 210 d. The gemmaes developed in July to September every year, matured in March to April next year. After separated from the mother plants, the gemmaes could germinate and grow as seedlings when the condition was suitable. Germination experiments showed that light and humidity were the main factors affecting gemmae germination. It is feasible to establish the cutting propagation of Huperzia serrata in natural habitat. An efficient and stable regeneration system was developed with gemmae's artificial germination. This study is of great significance to alleviate the meager resources of Huperzia serrata.

  6. New heterocyclic compounds from Ranunculus ternatus Thunb.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zi-Ming; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Yang, Ya-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Five new heterocyclic compounds, 5-α-d-fructofuranosylmethyl-furfural (1), 5-β-d-fructofuranosylmethyl-furfural (2), 5-β-d-fructopyranosylmethyl-furfural (3), 4-(2-((2S-2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)methyl)-5-formyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)butanoic acid (4), and 3S,4S-4,5,8-trihydroxy-3-(prop-1-en-2-yl)isochroman-1-one (5), were obtained from the root of Ranunculus ternatus Thunb., which is a traditional Chinese anti-tuberculosis medicine. Their structures were elucidated by UV, IR, HRESIMS, NMR data, and the comparison of experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. Notably, compounds 1-3 are rarely occurring furfural fructosides in natural sources. These heterocyclic compounds could be further studied for the synthetic chemists and pharmacologists due to the source and structural properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibitory effect of triterpenoids from Dillenia serrata (Dilleniaceae) on prostaglandin E2 production and quantitative HPLC analysis of its koetjapic acid and betulinic acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jalil, Juriyati; Sabandar, Carla W; Ahmat, Norizan; Jamal, Jamia A; Jantan, Ibrahim; Aladdin, Nor-Ashila; Muhammad, Kartiniwati; Buang, Fhataheya; Mohamad, Hazni Falina; Sahidin, Idin

    2015-02-16

    The crude methanol extracts and fractions of the root and stem barks of Dillenia serrata Thunb. showed 64% to 73% inhibition on the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide-induced human whole blood using a radioimmunoassay technique. Three triterpenoids isolated from the root bark of the plant, koetjapic (1), 3-oxoolean-12-en-30-oic (2), and betulinic (3) acids, exhibited significant concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on PGE2 production with IC50 values of 1.05, 1.54, and 2.59 μM, respectively, as compared with the positive control, indomethacin (IC50 = 0.45 μM). Quantification of compounds 1 and 3 in the methanol extracts and fractions were carried out by using a validated reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method. The ethyl acetate fraction of the stem bark showed the highest content of both compound 1 (15.1%) and compound 3 (52.8%). The strong inhibition of the extracts and fractions on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymatic activity was due to the presence of their major constituents, especially koetjapic and betulinic acids.

  8. Simultaneously preparative purification of Huperzine A and Huperzine B from Huperzia serrata by macroporous resin and preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongchao; Liang, Hao; Kuang, Pengqun; Yuan, Qipeng; Wang, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) and Huperzine B (HupB) are natural alkaloids existed in Lycopodium plants. They both have potential clinical application for treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD). For the purpose of better utilizing the limited plant resources, a quick and low cost method to separate and purify HupA and HupB from Huperzia serrata (Thunb. ex Murray) was established in this paper. Low polarity macroporous resin SP850 was selected from eight kinds of resins during initial purification. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was proved to be the best acid modifier reagent among all acids used in our experiment for improving separation. HupA and HupB were baseline separated on a C18 column by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (Preparative HPLC), the optimal gradient mobile phase system contained methanol increasing from 15% (v/v) to 35% (v/v) and 0.1% (v/v) TFA within the water. The purity of HupA and HupB obtained was 99.1% and 98.6%, respectively, and the total recovery for them was 83.0% and 81.8%, respectively.

  9. Caspase mediated synergistic effect of Boswellia serrata extract in combination with doxorubicin against human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Ahmed; Singh, Mhaveer; Khan, Masood Shah; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the growth-inhibiting and apoptosis mediating effects of B. serrata extract as monotherapy and combination therapy with DOX against hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Boswellic acid rich fraction of B. serrata extract was prepared. MTT assay on HepG2 and Hep3B cells was carried out using B. serrata alone and in combination with DOX. Further, caspase-3 activity, TNF-α level, and IL-6 level were estimated. Isobolographic analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of combination therapy. Additionally, protective effect of B. serrata extract on DOX induced hepatic toxicity was also evaluated in Wistar rats. B. serrata extract inhibited growth of HepG2 (IC50 value of 21.21 ± 0.92 μg/mL) as well as HepG2 (IC50 value of 18.65 ± 0.71 μg/mL). DOX inhibited growth in HepG2 and Hep3B cells with an IC50 of 1.06 ± 0.04 μg/mL and 1.92 ± 0.09 μg/mL. Isobolographic analysis showed combination index (CI) of DOX and B. serrata extract of 0.53 ± 0.03 to 0.79 ± 0.02 suggesting synergistic behavior against the two cell lines. B. serrata extract also caused dose dependent increase in caspase-3 activity, TNF-α level, and IL-6 level which was higher (P < 0.001) with DOX (1 μM) and B. serrata extract (20 μg/mL) combination. B. serrata extract also protected Wistar rats against DOX induced hepatic toxicity.

  10. Caspase Mediated Synergistic Effect of Boswellia serrata Extract in Combination with Doxorubicin against Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Ahmed; Singh, Mhaveer; Khan, Masood Shah; Najmi, Abul Kalam

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the growth-inhibiting and apoptosis mediating effects of B. serrata extract as monotherapy and combination therapy with DOX against hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Boswellic acid rich fraction of B. serrata extract was prepared. MTT assay on HepG2 and Hep3B cells was carried out using B. serrata alone and in combination with DOX. Further, caspase-3 activity, TNF-α level, and IL-6 level were estimated. Isobolographic analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of combination therapy. Additionally, protective effect of B. serrata extract on DOX induced hepatic toxicity was also evaluated in Wistar rats. B. serrata extract inhibited growth of HepG2 (IC50 value of 21.21 ± 0.92 μg/mL) as well as HepG2 (IC50 value of 18.65 ± 0.71 μg/mL). DOX inhibited growth in HepG2 and Hep3B cells with an IC50 of 1.06 ± 0.04 μg/mL and 1.92 ± 0.09 μg/mL. Isobolographic analysis showed combination index (CI) of DOX and B. serrata extract of 0.53 ± 0.03 to 0.79 ± 0.02 suggesting synergistic behavior against the two cell lines. B. serrata extract also caused dose dependent increase in caspase-3 activity, TNF-α level, and IL-6 level which was higher (P < 0.001) with DOX (1 μM) and B. serrata extract (20 μg/mL) combination. B. serrata extract also protected Wistar rats against DOX induced hepatic toxicity. PMID:25177685

  11. Long-term efficacy of Boswellia serrata in four patients with chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Lampl, Christian; Haider, Bernhard; Schweiger, Christine

    2012-07-01

    Cluster headache is an extremely severe and debilitating trigemino-autonomic pain syndrome. About 10% of patients with cluster headache manifest a chronic form (CCH).The present case series study aims to evaluate the long-term efficacy of Boswellia serrata (Sallaki H15) on headaches and disturbed sleep in patients with CCH. In an open-label study, four patients with CCH and disturbed sleep received oral B. serrata. The results provide Class IV evidence that oral B. serrata reduces the intensity and frequency of headaches in patients with CCH.

  12. Single-Molecule Sequencing of the Drosophila serrata Genome

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Scott L.; Delaney, Emily K.; Kopp, Artyom; Chenoweth, Stephen F.

    2017-01-01

    Long-read sequencing technology promises to greatly enhance de novo assembly of genomes for nonmodel species. Although the error rates of long reads have been a stumbling block, sequencing at high coverage permits the self-correction of many errors. Here, we sequence and de novo assemble the genome of Drosophila serrata, a species from the montium subgroup that has been well-studied for latitudinal clines, sexual selection, and gene expression, but which lacks a reference genome. Using 11 PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT cells), we generated 12 Gbp of raw sequence data comprising ∼65 × whole-genome coverage. Read lengths averaged 8940 bp (NRead50 12,200) with the longest read at 53 kbp. We self-corrected reads using the PBDagCon algorithm and assembled the genome using the MHAP algorithm within the PBcR assembler. Total genome length was 198 Mbp with an N50 just under 1 Mbp. Contigs displayed a high degree of chromosome arm-level conservation with the D. melanogaster genome and many could be sensibly placed on the D. serrata physical map. We also provide an initial annotation for this genome using in silico gene predictions that were supported by RNA-seq data. PMID:28143951

  13. Iowa's oldest oaks. [Quercus alba

    SciTech Connect

    Duvick, D.N.; Blasing, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Tree-ring analysis revealed 33 living white oaks (Quercus alba) in Iowa that began growing before 1700. Core of wood 4 mm in diameter, each extracted from a radius of a tree trunk were analyzed. The oldest white oak, found in northeastern Warren County, began growing about 1570 and is thus over 410 years old. A chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) was also found which was more than 300 years old. Ring widths from the white oaks are well correlated with total precipitation for the twelve months preceding completion of ring formation in July. Reconstructions of annual (August-July) precipitation for 1680-1979, based on the tree rings, indicate that the driest annual period in Iowa was August 1799-July 1800, and that the driest decade began about 1816. Climatic information of this kind, pre-dating written weather records, can be used to augment those records and provide a longer baseline of information for use by climatologists and hydrologic planners.

  14. Determining seed moisture in Quercus

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner

    1974-01-01

    The air-oven method with drying times 7 to 8 hours shorter than those now prescribed in the ISTA rules proved adequate for determining moisture contents in acorns of several North American oaks. Schedules of 8 hours at 105°C for Quercus muehlenbergii and 9 hours at 105°C for Q.shumardii and Q.nigra gave moisture contents within three percentage points of those obtained...

  15. [Content of rare earth elements in wild Hypericum japonicum Thunb].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen-Lin; Rui, Yu-Kui; Tian, Zhi-Huan

    2009-06-01

    Rare earth elements are important nutritional elements for human health, and today more and more attention has been paid to the effective components in Chinese traditional medicine, especially to rare earth elements. Fifteen rare earth elements in wild hypericum japonicum Thunb were analyzed by the methods of ICP-MS. The results showed that the concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Tm, Lu and Y ranged from 6 ng x g(-1) x DW to 14 522 ng x g(-1) x DW, and among them the concentrations of La, Ce and Nd were higher than 2 000 ng x g(-1) x DW. Compared with the concentration of rare earth elements in rice, corn, wheat and barley, the total concentration of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb was much higher, which could be the mechanism of curative effect of hypericum japonicum Thunb on liverish diseases. The character of elements and the content of rare earth elements in soil should be responsible for the difference, but the distributive mechanism of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb should be further studied.

  16. Effects of seasonal change and experimental warming on the temperature dependence of photosynthesis in the canopy leaves of Quercus serrata.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke P; Nakaji, Tatsuro; Hiura, Tsutom; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2016-10-01

    The effects of warming on the temperature response of leaf photosynthesis have become an area of major concern in recent decades. Although growth temperature (GT) and day length (DL) affect leaf gas exchange characteristics, the way in which these factors influence the temperature dependence of photosynthesis remains uncertain. We established open-top canopy chambers at the canopy top of a deciduous forest, in which average daytime leaf temperature was increased by 1.0 °C. We conducted gas exchange measurements for the canopy leaves of deciduous trees exposed to artificial warming during different seasons. The carbon dioxide assimilation rate at 20 °C (A20) was not affected by warming, whereas that at 25 °C (A25) tended to be higher in leaves exposed to warming. Warming increased the optimal temperature of photosynthesis by increasing the activation energy for the maximum rate of carboxylation. Regression analysis indicated that both GT and DL strongly influenced gas exchange characteristics. Sensitivity analysis revealed that DL affected A without obvious effects on the temperature dependence of A, whereas GT almost maintained constant A20 and strongly influenced the temperature dependence. These results indicate that GT and DL have different influences on photosynthesis; GT and DL affect the 'slope' and intercept' of the temperature dependence of photosynthesis, respectively. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Leishmania mexicana cell death achieved by Cleoserrata serrata (Jacq.) Iltis: Learning from Maya healers.

    PubMed

    Alamilla-Fonseca, Lorena Noemi; Delgado-Domínguez, José; Zamora-Chimal, Jaime; Cervantes-Sarabia, Rocely Buenaventura; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Rivero-Cruz, José Fausto; Becker, Ingeborg

    2017-09-28

    Aerial parts of Cleoserrata serrata (Jacq.) Iltis are widely used in South-Central Mexico to treat wounds and bacterial skin infections and in Panama by Kuna, Ngöbe-Buglé, and Teribe Indians for tropical warm baths and by Kunas in the form of "Ina kuamakalet" for snakebites. To evaluate the effect of Cleoserrata serrata extract on growth and viability of L. mexicana amastigotes and promastigotes in vitro, as well as on bacteria that usually co-infect skin ulcers. Cleoserrata serrata was collected in La Chontalpa, Tabasco, Mexico. The antiproliferative effect of the extract was tested on growth of Leishmania mexicana amastigotes and promastigotes in vitro, as well as on bacteria that usually co-infect skin ulcers. Our data show that Cleoserrata serrata significantly inhibits parasite growth (which was more important in infective amastigotes) and additionally inhibits growth of the co-infective bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Confocal microscopy showed a leishmanicidal effect. We conclude that Cleoserrata serrata extract is potentially an optimal treatment alternative for patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis infected with Leishmania mexicana, since it controls both the parasite as well as bacterial co-infections. Furthermore, it can be applied topically. The precise metabolites responsible for the anti-Leishmania and anti-bacterial effects remain to be established. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Selective apoptotic effect of Zelkova serrata twig extract on mouth epidermoid carcinoma through p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoe-Jin; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-06-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death plays an essential role in chemotherapy-induced tumor cell killing, and inducers of apoptosis are commonly used in cancer therapy. Treatment with Zelkova serrata extracts was performed in human gingival fibroblast (HGF), mouth epidermoid carcinoma cell (KB), lower gingival squamous cancer cell (YD38) and tongue mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (YD15). We observed that extract prepared from Zelkova serrata twig selectively inhibited proliferation of various oral cancer cells, but not normal gingival fibroblasts, in a dose-dependent manner. Caspase-8-mediated apoptosis was induced by treatment with the extract only in mouth epidermoid carcinoma and not in other types of cancer cells, including lower gingival squamous cell carcinoma. The selective apoptotic effect of Zelkova serrata twig extract in mouth epidermoid carcinoma was dependent on normal p53 status. Apoptosis was not remarkably induced by treatment with the extract in either lower gingival squamous or tongue mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells, both of which contain abnormalities of p53. Upon treatment with Zelkova serrata twig extract, mouth epidermoid carcinoma cells accumulated in S phase by activation of p21. These data indicate that Zelkova serrata twig extract exerted a cancer type-specific, p53-dependent apoptotic effect and disturbed the cell cycle, which suggests that herbal medicine could be a treatment for specific types of cancers.

  19. [Determination of alpha-pinene and octyl acetate contents in Boswellia serrata].

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiqian; Xia, Lei; Wei, Zheng; Cao, Yuna; Zhang, Linlin; Liu, Zhenli

    2012-05-01

    To establish method for determining the contents of alpha-pinene and octyl acetate in Boswellia serrata, in order to provide preference for making quality standards for B. serrata and processed B. serrata. Application of orthogonal design was employed to optimize the solvent, solvent quantity and extraction time. The GC-MS analysis was performed on a Rxi-5ms silica capillary column, running in the electron impact (EI) mode, with ion trap and injector temperature of 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C, respectively. The column oven was initially 50 degrees C and was held for 1 min after injection, followed by temperature ramping at 5 degrees C x min(-1) up to 130 degrees C, holding for 1 min. 1 microL of samples solution were injected in the split mode (1:60). Helium was the carrier gas. The mass spectrometer was set to scan m/z 45450 with an ionizing voltage at 70 eV. Sample solutions were prepared for 50-fold dose by ultrasonic extraction with hexane for 30 min. The content of alpha-pinene and octyl acetate in 10 batches of B. serrata were 0.021 3-0.149 5, 2.519 6-9.098 0 mg x g(-1), respectively. And, those of alpha-pinene and octyl acetate in processed B. serrata were 0.015 9-0.065 9, 0.801 0-12.812 2 mg x g(-1). The method is a stable and reliable for determining the contents of alpha-pinene and octyl acetate in B. serrata.

  20. A-90 Day Gavage Safety Assessment of Boswellia serrata in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pooja; Chacko, K. Mathai; Aggarwal, M. L.; Bhat, Binu; Khandal, R. K.; Sultana, Sarwat; Kuruvilla, Binu T.

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with the evaluation and assessment of the safety/toxic potential of Boswellia serrata, a well known Ayurvedic herb used to treat disorders of digestive system, respiratory ailments and bone related diseases. A repeated dose oral (90 days) toxicity study of Boswellia serrata was carried out. For this, 10 rats of each sex were treated with the Boswellia serrata at three different doses i.e. 100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg B. wt. /day. As a control, 10 rats of each sex were treated with corn oil only which was the vehicle. Two groups consisting of five male and five female rats were kept as control recovery and high dose recovery group which were treated with the vehicle (corn oil) and the Boswellia serrata at the dose of 1000 mg/kg B. wt. Animals of control recovery and high dose recovery groups were further observed for 28 days without any treatment. From this study, it was found that the rats treated with high dose of the Boswellia serrata gained their body weight with much less rate than that of the control group. However, during the recovery period, the loss in body weight gain as observed during the study period exhibits a reversible effect on the metabolic activity and recovered. The results also indicate that Boswellia serrata is relatively safe in rat up to the dose of 500 mg/kg B.wt. as no adverse impact on health factors was observed. Thus, the No observed adverse effect level is 500 mg/kg B. wt. PMID:23293466

  1. Microsatellite markers derived from Quercus mongolica var. crispula (Fagaceae) inner bark expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Saneyoshi; Taguchi, Yuriko; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2008-04-01

    In reforestation programs the genetic composition and diversity of populations that could be used as sources of planting material needs to be carefully considered to maximize the chances of successful establishment. For such purposes genetic analyses that include the identification of functional genes are required. In this study, we constructed a cDNA library from inner bark of Quercus mongolica (which is widely distributed in Japan) and collected 3385 ESTs. After constructing 2140 unigenes, 274 microsatellites were found within them. The most frequent microsatellite had AG motif (48%) and the next most common was AAG motif (12%). There were no CG repeats in the unigenes. In total, 20 EST-SSR markers were developed, polymorphisms of which were described by using eight individuals from eight populations over the species' distributional range. The number of alleles per locus (Na) and observed heterozygosity (H(o)) ranged from 2 to 12, and from 0.25 to 1.00, respectively. Cross-species amplification was successful for 19 loci in eight individuals of Q. serrata and for 20 loci in eight individuals of Q. dentata, with values of Na and H(o) comparable to those of Q. mongolica. The EST-SSR markers characterized in this study should facilitate the analysis of genetic diversity in future studies.

  2. Influence of weather at time of pollenation on acorn production of Quercus alba and Quercus velutina

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Cecich; Neal H. Sullivan

    1999-01-01

    Pistillate flower development and acorn production were observed in small populations of white oak (Quercus alba L.) and black oak (Quercus velurina Lam.) in central Missouri from 1990 to 1997. There were significant year-year differences in the size of flower crops for both species and significant tree-tree differences in black...

  3. Community composition of root-associated fungi in a Quercus-dominated temperate forest: “codominance” of mycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Toju, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Gilbert, Gregory S; Kadowaki, Kohmei

    2013-01-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant roots are colonized by various clades of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. Focused on the root systems of an oak-dominated temperate forest in Japan, we used 454 pyrosequencing to explore how phylogenetically diverse fungi constitute an ecological community of multiple ecotypes. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi were found from 159 terminal-root samples from 12 plant species occurring in the forest. Due to the dominance of an oak species (Quercus serrata), diverse ectomycorrhizal clades such as Russula, Lactarius, Cortinarius, Tomentella, Amanita, Boletus, and Cenococcum were observed. Unexpectedly, the root-associated fungal community was dominated by root-endophytic ascomycetes in Helotiales, Chaetothyriales, and Rhytismatales. Overall, 55.3% of root samples were colonized by both the commonly observed ascomycetes and ectomycorrhizal fungi; 75.0% of the root samples of the dominant Q. serrata were so cocolonized. Overall, this study revealed that root-associated fungal communities of oak-dominated temperate forests were dominated not only by ectomycorrhizal fungi but also by diverse root endophytes and that potential ecological interactions between the two ecotypes may be important to understand the complex assembly processes of belowground fungal communities. PMID:23762515

  4. Community composition of root-associated fungi in a Quercus-dominated temperate forest: "codominance" of mycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Toju, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Gilbert, Gregory S; Kadowaki, Kohmei

    2013-05-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant roots are colonized by various clades of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. Focused on the root systems of an oak-dominated temperate forest in Japan, we used 454 pyrosequencing to explore how phylogenetically diverse fungi constitute an ecological community of multiple ecotypes. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi were found from 159 terminal-root samples from 12 plant species occurring in the forest. Due to the dominance of an oak species (Quercus serrata), diverse ectomycorrhizal clades such as Russula, Lactarius, Cortinarius, Tomentella, Amanita, Boletus, and Cenococcum were observed. Unexpectedly, the root-associated fungal community was dominated by root-endophytic ascomycetes in Helotiales, Chaetothyriales, and Rhytismatales. Overall, 55.3% of root samples were colonized by both the commonly observed ascomycetes and ectomycorrhizal fungi; 75.0% of the root samples of the dominant Q. serrata were so cocolonized. Overall, this study revealed that root-associated fungal communities of oak-dominated temperate forests were dominated not only by ectomycorrhizal fungi but also by diverse root endophytes and that potential ecological interactions between the two ecotypes may be important to understand the complex assembly processes of belowground fungal communities.

  5. Zehntneriana serrata n. sp., a new species of pilumnid crab from southern Taiwan (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L; Lin, Chia-Wei

    2015-02-03

    A new species of rhizopine crab, Zehntneriana serrata (Pilumnidae) is described from a coral reef in southern Taiwan. The new species differs from congeners by its smooth and glabrous carapace, prominently serrated anterolateral margins, elongated ambulatory legs with a serrated anterior margin of the merus, and the diagnostic morphology of the male first gonopod. 

  6. Boswellia serrata has beneficial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in a model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; Fillmann, Henrique Sarubbi; Martins, Maria Isabel Morgan; Meurer, Luise; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2014-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease that involves only the colon and rectum, being characterized by leukocyte infiltrate and superficial ulcers in the intestinal mucosa. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of extract from the Boswellia serrata plant in an experimental rat model of acute ulcerative colitis induced by the administration of acetic acid (AA). An extract of B. serrata (34.2 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage for 2 days before and after the induction of colitis with 4 mL of 4% AA. The anal sphincter pressure in the colitis group showed a significant decrease compared to that of the control groups (p < 0.001). The analysis of the values of lipid peroxidation (LPO) obtained by substances that react with thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) showed a significantly increased LPO in the colitis group compared to the control groups (p < 0.001). The nitric oxide levels and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) showed a significant increase in the colitis group compared to control groups (p < 0.01). Both pretreatment and treatment with B. serrata exhibited significantly reduced lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide and iNOS and showed improvements in tissue injury and anal sphincter pressure in animals with ulcerative colitis. The B. serrata extract has protective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that inhibit inflammatory mediators in acute experimental colitis.

  7. Ocular linguatuliasis in Ecuador: case report and morphometric study of the larva of Linguatula serrata.

    PubMed

    Lazo, R F; Hidalgo, E; Lazo, J E; Bermeo, A; Llaguno, M; Murillo, J; Teixeira, V P

    1999-03-01

    Linguatula serrata is a pentastomid, a cosmopolitan parasite belonging to the Phylum Pentastomida. Humans may act as an intermediate or accidental definitive host of this parasite, manifesting the nasopharyngeal or visceral form, with the latter having been described more frequently. The occurrence of ocular linguatuliasis is extremely rare, but it has been reported in the United States and Israel. The objective of the present paper was to report the first case of ocular linguatuliasis in Ecuador and to extend the morphologic study of L. serrata by morphometric analysis. The patient studied was a 34-year old woman from Guayaquil, Ecuador who complained of ocular pain with conjunctivitis and visual difficulties of two-months duration. Biomicroscopic examination revealed a mobile body in the anterior chamber of the eye. The mobile body was surgically removed. The specimen was fixed in alcohol, cleared using the technique of Loos, stained with acetic carmine, and mounted on balsam between a slide and a coverslip. It was observed with stereoscopic and common light microscopes in combination with an automatic system for image analysis and processing. The morphologic and morphometric characteristics corresponded to the third-instar larval form of L. serrata. To our knowledge, ocular linguatuliasis has not been previously described in South America, with this being the first report for Ecuador and South America. The present study shows that computer morphometry can adequately contribute both to the morphologic study and to the systematic classification of Pentastomids, and L. serrata in particular.

  8. Stock structure and demographic history of the Indo-West Pacific mud crab Scylla serrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Sara; Ragionieri, Lapo; Cannicci, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The increasing exploitation of mangrove forests, without any sustainable planning, has been seriously compromising the survival of this ecosystem and of its exclusive resources. Scylla serrata is one of the most commercially exploited crabs inhabiting mangroves and estuaries of the Indo-Pacific region. This species is extensively harvested, mainly for selling to the tourist market, and, as a consequence, its populations are in constant decline. The aim of the present study was to assess the level of genetic exchange of S. serrata within the Western Indian Ocean (WIO), using a population genetic structure approach. To achieve this goal, we reconstructed the intra-specific geographic pattern of genetic variation by partial sequencing the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I, in samples from seven mangrove sites of the WIO. Our data set then encompassed all the sequences for the same genetic marker deposited in Genbank and corresponding to samples from South East Asia, Australia and some Pacific Islands: this allowed us to estimate the level of connectivity among S. serrata populations within its distribution area. Our results show that an unique Scylla serrata metapopulation exists within the WIO; while throughout the entire Indo-Pacific region at least three distinct genetic stocks occur, corresponding to well-defined geographic regions (WIO, Eastern Australia and Pacific Ocean, North-Western Australia). South East China appears as the depositary of the most ancient haplotype and at the present time shares a haplotype with the Red Sea. The WIO populations show the signature of recent population bottlenecks, as expected for populations deeply exploited in a recent past. On the basis of our results, we can conclude that both the S. serrata populations and their habitats, i.e. mangrove forests and estuaries, of the WIO require future management and conservation regulations to avoiding overexploitation of this important key predator and marketable resource.

  9. [EST-SSR identification of Lonicera japonica Thunb].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Gui-Ming; Huang, Lu-Qi; Wang, Xu-Min; Yu, Jun; Chen, Min

    2012-06-01

    Simple and effective methods are needed for the identification of Chinese medicinal material species and their variety. Lonicera japonica Thunb. is one of Chinese herbal medicines widely demanded. A total of 3 705 EST-SSRs of L. japonica and 2 818 EST-SSRs of L. japonica var. chinensis Thunb. were identified from EST database in our lab. In average, there was one EST-SSR per 4.05 kb in L. japonica ESTs and per 7.49 kb in L. japonica var. chinensis ESTs, separately. The identified SSRs in L. japonica were consisted of 51.98% dinucleotide and 34.61% trinucleotide repeats, while SSRs in L. japonica var. chinensis had 57.45% dinucleotide and 30.09% trinucleotide. The results reviewed that the classes AG/TC and GAG/TCT were predominant in the dinucleotide motifs and the trinucleotide motifs, respectively. Total 87 EST-SSRs were identified of significant difference between L. japonica and L. japonica var. chinensis. PCR products were obtained from 52 L. japonica samples in 13 out of 15 SSR markers tested. The polymorphism in L. japonica, L. japonica var. chinensis and other honeysuckles could be distinguished by three markers (jp.ssr4, jp.ssr64 and jp.ssr65) tested.

  10. Acquisition of Ophiostoma quercus and Ceratocystis fagacearum by nitidulids from O. quercus-colonized oak wilt mats

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Juzwik; Kory R. Cease; Jason M. Meyer

    1998-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to determine whether the frequency of Ceratocystis fagacearum and Ophiostoma quercus propagule acquisition by nitidulids visiting oak wilt fungal mats is affected by the presence of O. quercus on the mats. Augmentation sprays with O. quercus were used to achieve...

  11. An effective method for extracting total RNA from Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Liao, C M; Li, J; Liu, X H; Zhang, Y S

    2014-01-21

    Dioscorea opposita Thunb., included in the genus Dioscorea of the family Dioscoreaceae, is an important herb with great edible and medicinal value. In this study, the total RNA from leaves of Lichuan Dioscorea opposita Thunb. was isolated by an improved Trizol method. The results showed that the RNA extracted by the improved Trizol method had good integrity, and the RNA could be used for down-stream molecular biology operations including reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

  12. Dimeric and trimeric hydrolyzable tannins from Quercus coccifera and Quercus suber.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Khennouf, Seddik; Gharzouli, Kamel; Yoshida, Takashi

    2002-03-01

    Three new hydrolyzable tannins, cocciferins D(1) (1), D(2) (2), and T(1) (4), were isolated from the leaves of Quercus coccifera. Cocciferin D(2) (2) and two additional new tannins, cocciferins D(3) (3) and T(2) (5), were also obtained from the leaves of Quercus suber. Their oligomeric structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods and chemical evidence. Compounds 2, 3, and 5 were rare oligomers possessing glucose cores with both open-chain and pyranose forms.

  13. Growth of Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana)

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Gould; Constance A. Harrington; Warren D. Devine

    2011-01-01

    Many land managers are interested in maintaining or restoring plant communities that contain Oregon white oak (OWO, Quercus garryana), yet there is relatively little information available about the species' growth rates and survival to guide management decisions. We used two studies to characterize growth (over multi-year periods and within...

  14. Seed Biology and Technology of Quercus

    Treesearch

    F.T. Bonner; John A. Vozzo

    1987-01-01

    The genus Quercus,known as oak, includes worldwide some 500 species with 58 of these species in the United States, making it this country's largest genus of native trees (Little 1979). Oak is therefore an important group of temperate-zone forest trees. In addition, oaks are significant components of many of the major forest types of the South (Burns 1983)and are...

  15. Quercus kelloggii Newb., California black oak

    Treesearch

    P.M. McDonald

    1990-01-01

    California black oak (Quercus kelloggii) exceeds all other California oaks in volume, distribution, and altitudinal range. Yet this deciduous hardwood has had little sustained commercial use and almost no management, even though its wood closely resembles that of its valuable, managed, and heavily used counterpart-northern red oak (...

  16. [Bioinformatics analysis of DNA demethylase genes in Lonicera japonica Thunb].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Yuan, Yuan; Wu, Chong; Huang, Lu-qi; Chen, Ping

    2015-03-01

    The DNA demethylase genes are widespread in plants. Four DNA demethylase genes (LJDME1, LJDME2, LJDME3 and LJDME4) were obtained from transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica Thunb by using bioinformatics methods and the proteins' physicochemical properties they encoded were predicted. The phylogenetic tree showed that the four DNA demethylase genes and Arabidopsis thaliana DME had a close relationship. The result of gene expression model showed that four DNA demethylase genes were different between species. The expression levels of LJDME1 and LJDME2 were even more higher in Lonicera japonica var. chinensis than those in L. japonica. LJDME] and LJDME2 maybe regulate the active compounds of L. japonica. This study aims to lay a foundation for further understanding of the function of DNA demethylase genes in L. japonica.

  17. Global transcriptome analysis of Huperzia serrata and identification of critical genes involved in the biosynthesis of huperzine A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengquan; You, Wenjing; Wu, Shiwen; Fan, Zhen; Xu, Baofu; Zhu, Mulan; Li, Xuan; Xiao, Youli

    2017-03-22

    Huperzia serrata (H. serrata) is an economically important traditional Chinese herb with the notably medicinal value. As a representative member of the Lycopodiaceae family, the H. serrata produces various types of effectively bioactive lycopodium alkaloids, especially the huperzine A (HupA) which is a promising drug for Alzheimer's disease. Despite their medicinal importance, the public genomic and transcriptomic resources are very limited and the biosynthesis of HupA is largely unknown. Previous studies on comparison of 454-ESTs from H. serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus predicted putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, such as lysine decarboxylase like (LDC-like) protein and some CYP450s. However, these gene annotations were not carried out with further biochemical characterizations. To understand the biosynthesis of HupA and its regulation in H. serrata, a global transcriptome analysis on H. Serrata tissues was performed. In this study, we used the Illumina Highseq4000 platform to generate a substantial RNA sequencing dataset of H. serrata. A total of 40.1 Gb clean data was generated from four different tissues: root, stem, leaf, and sporangia and assembled into 181,141 unigenes. The total length, average length, N50 and GC content of unigenes were 219,520,611 bp, 1,211 bp, 2,488 bp and 42.51%, respectively. Among them, 105,516 unigenes (58.25%) were annotated by seven public databases (NR, NT, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, Interpro, GO), and 54 GO terms and 3,391 transcription factors (TFs) were functionally classified, respectively. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that 72,230 unigenes were classified into 21 functional pathways. Three types of candidate enzymes, LDC, CAO and PKS, responsible for the biosynthesis of precursors of HupA were all identified in the transcripts. Four hundred and fifty-seven CYP450 genes in H. serrata were also analyzed and compared with tissue-specific gene expression. Moreover, two key classes of CYP450 genes BBE

  18. Scylla serrata reovirus p35 protein expressed in Escherichia coli cells alters membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Yuan, Yangyang; Fan, Dongyang; Yang, Jifang; Mao, Zhijuan; Yan, Yan; Chen, Jigang

    2015-08-01

    To promote viral entry, replication, release, and spread to neighboring cells, many cytolytic animal viruses encode proteins responsible for modification of host cell membrane permeability and for formation of ion channels in host cell membranes. Scylla serrata reovirus (SsRV) is a major pathogen that can severely damage mud crab (S. serrata) aquaculture. Protein p35, which is encoded by segment 10 of SsRV, contains two transmembrane domains. In this study, we found that SsRV p35 can induce membrane permeability changes when expressed in Escherichia coli. SsRV p35 expressed in bacterial cells existed as monomers under reducing conditions but formed homodimers and homotrimers under non-reducing conditions. These findings demonstrate that p35 may act as a viroporin; further studies are needed to elucidate the detailed structure-function relationships of this protein.

  19. Prevalence and morphological characterizations of Linguatula serrata nymphs in camels in Isfahan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Farid; Tavassoli, Mousa; Javdani, Moosa

    2012-01-01

    Linguatula serrata, well known as tongue worm; is an aberrant cosmopolitan parasite, which inhabits the canine respiratory system (final host). The discharged eggs infect many plant feeder animals including human causing visceral and nasopharyngeal linguatulosis which is known as “Marrara syndrome”. In current study, the prevalence of infection with L. serrata nymphs in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of slaughtered camels was investigated in Isfahan Province, Iran. The MLNs of 232 slaughtered camels, including 115 females and 117 males, were examined for L. serrata nymphs. Camels were categorized into four age groups, namely under six months, six months to two years, two to four years and greater than four years. Also, the morphometrics of the nymphs were measured using the classic parasitology methods. Results showed that 21.12% of examined camels were infected with L. serrata. Age and sex had no significant effect on the prevalence of this parasite in camels. The size of the different parts of nymphs’ body were recorded and evaluated. The infection rate to the nymphs of parasite in hemorrhagic and black-colored lymph nodes were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher than the infection rate in normal-colored nodes. Also, results showed that in soft lymph nodes, the infection rate was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) more than those of normal and hard nodes. A high prevalence of infection in camels suggests possibility of similar high rate of infection in other animals, and people in the investigated area. This, in turn, emphasizes the need for more preventive measures to reduce the risk of zoonotic outbreaks. PMID:25653748

  20. Pharmacological evidences for cytotoxic and antitumor properties of Boswellic acids from Boswellia serrata.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Ahmed; Ali, Ruhi; Parveen, Rabea; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2016-09-15

    Increasing research on traditional herbal medicines and their phytoconstituents has recognized their usefulness in complementary as adjuvant to chemotherapy in various types of cancers. The oleo-gum resin of Boswellia serrata tree is one such folk medicine, which has been traditionally used for religious, cosmetic as well as medical purposes since ages. The oleo-gum resin of the plant has been used in traditional medicine to treat variety of conditions including inflammatory diseases like arthritis, asthma, chronic pain, bowel conditions and many other diseases. This review presents an overview of scientific studies on cytotoxic and antitumor properties of B. serrata and its constituents. Literature search was carried out for activities of B. serrata and various isolated boswellic acids such as β-boswellic acid, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid and acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid reported in various cancer types in vitro as well as in vivo. The triterpenoidal fraction of B. serrata (containing boswellic acids) is responsible for the cytotoxic and antitumor properties. Among the screened compounds, 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid has been found to be most promising cytotoxic molecule. The cytotoxic and antitumor effects are mainly due to induction of apoptosis through caspase activation, increased Bax expression, NF-κB down regulation and induction of poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Boswellic acids appear to be promising candidates for anticancer drug development in future. However, further in vivo studies are needed. Studies in combination with clinically used anticancer drugs and QSAR studies on individual boswellic acid also need to be carried out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Polyandry and paternity skew in natural and experimental populations of Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Francesca D; Chenoweth, Stephen F

    2008-03-01

    Many species engage in polyandry, resulting in the potential for sexual selection to continue post-copulation through sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice. The relative importance of pre- vs. post-copulatory processes remains unknown for most species despite this information being fundamental for understanding the evolutionary consequences of sexual selection. The Australian fruit fly Drosophila serrata has become a prominent model system for studying precopulatory sexual selection, such as mating preferences and their influence on the evolution of sexually selected traits. Here, we investigated polyandry and the potential for post-copulatory sexual selection in this species using indirect paternity analysis. We genotyped 21 wild-caught and 19 laboratory-reared mothers and their offspring (a total of 787 flies) at six microsatellite loci and found extensive polyandry, with all broods surveyed having at least two sires. Female remating rates were higher than in other Drosophila surveyed to date and no significant differences were found between laboratory and field populations. Additionally, we found evidence for biased sperm usage in several broods of D. serrata. Paternity skew occurred more frequently in broods from the field population than the laboratory one, suggesting differences between the two environments in the level of post-copulatory sexual selection. Our data suggest that D. serrata represents a promising system for studying the interaction between pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection in driving the evolution of sexually selected phenotypes.

  2. Effect of Boswellia serrata on intestinal motility in rodents: inhibition of diarrhoea without constipation

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Francesco; Capasso, Raffaele; Ascione, Valeria; Aviello, Gabriella; Longo, Rocco; Izzo, Angelo A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the Ayurvedic plant Boswellia serrata may be effective in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) on intestinal motility and diarrhoea in rodents. BSE depressed electrically-, acetylcholine-, and barium chloride-induced contractions in the isolated guinea-pig ileum, being more potent in inhibiting the contractions induced by acetylcholine and barium chloride. The inhibitory effect of BSE on acetylcholine-induced contractions was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine, but not by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid, by the phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor rolipram or by the lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid, one of the main active ingredients of B. serrata, inhibited acetylcholine-induced contractions. BSE inhibited upper gastrointestinal transit in croton oil-treated mice as well as castor oil-induced diarrhoea. However, BSE did not affect intestinal motility in control mice, both in the small and in the large intestine. It is concluded that BSE directly inhibits intestinal motility with a mechanism involving L-type Ca2+ channels. BSE prevents diarrhoea and normalizes intestinal motility in pathophysiological states without slowing the rate of transit in control animals. These results could explain, at least in part, the clinical efficacy of this Ayurvedic remedy in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16633355

  3. Spatial segregation and aggregation of ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi in the seedlings of two Quercus species.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Hidaka, Amane; Kadowaki, Kohmei; Toju, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Diverse clades of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi are potentially involved in competitive or facilitative interactions within host-plant roots. We investigated the potential consequences of these ecological interactions on the assembly process of root-associated fungi by examining the co-occurrence of pairs of fungi in host-plant individuals. Based on massively-parallel pyrosequencing, we analyzed the root-associated fungal community composition for each of the 249 Quercus serrata and 188 Quercus glauca seedlings sampled in a warm-temperate secondary forest in Japan. Pairs of fungi that co-occurred more or less often than expected by chance were identified based on randomization tests. The pyrosequencing analysis revealed that not only ectomycorrhizal fungi but also endophytic fungi were common in the root-associated fungal community. Intriguingly, specific pairs of these ectomycorrhizal and endophytic fungi showed spatially aggregated patterns, suggesting the existence of facilitative interactions between fungi in different functional groups. Due to the large number of fungal pairs examined, many of the observed aggregated/segregated patterns with very low P values (e.g., < 0.005) turned non-significant after the application of a multiple comparison method. However, our overall results imply that the community structures of ectomycorrhizal and endophytic fungi could influence each other through interspecific competitive/facilitative interactions in root. To test the potential of host-plants' control of fungus-fungus ecological interactions in roots, we further examined whether the aggregated/segregated patterns could vary depending on the identity of host plant species. Potentially due to the physiological properties shared between the congeneric host plant species, the sign of hosts' control was not detected in the present study. The pyrosequencing-based randomization analyses shown in this study provide a platform of the high-throughput investigation of fungus

  4. Spatial Segregation and Aggregation of Ectomycorrhizal and Root-Endophytic Fungi in the Seedlings of Two Quercus Species

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S.; Hidaka, Amane; Kadowaki, Kohmei; Toju, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Diverse clades of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi are potentially involved in competitive or facilitative interactions within host-plant roots. We investigated the potential consequences of these ecological interactions on the assembly process of root-associated fungi by examining the co-occurrence of pairs of fungi in host-plant individuals. Based on massively-parallel pyrosequencing, we analyzed the root-associated fungal community composition for each of the 249 Quercus serrata and 188 Quercus glauca seedlings sampled in a warm-temperate secondary forest in Japan. Pairs of fungi that co-occurred more or less often than expected by chance were identified based on randomization tests. The pyrosequencing analysis revealed that not only ectomycorrhizal fungi but also endophytic fungi were common in the root-associated fungal community. Intriguingly, specific pairs of these ectomycorrhizal and endophytic fungi showed spatially aggregated patterns, suggesting the existence of facilitative interactions between fungi in different functional groups. Due to the large number of fungal pairs examined, many of the observed aggregated/segregated patterns with very low P values (e.g., < 0.005) turned non-significant after the application of a multiple comparison method. However, our overall results imply that the community structures of ectomycorrhizal and endophytic fungi could influence each other through interspecific competitive/facilitative interactions in root. To test the potential of host-plants' control of fungus–fungus ecological interactions in roots, we further examined whether the aggregated/segregated patterns could vary depending on the identity of host plant species. Potentially due to the physiological properties shared between the congeneric host plant species, the sign of hosts' control was not detected in the present study. The pyrosequencing-based randomization analyses shown in this study provide a platform of the high-throughput investigation of

  5. Quercus stellata growth and stand characteristics in the Quercus stellata-Quercus marilandica forest type in the Cross Timbers region of Central Oklahoma

    Treesearch

    James F. Rosson

    1994-01-01

    The author reports a baseline forest survey of Central and West Oklahoma to obtain tree and stand growth rates for harvest sustainability, standing volume estimates for biomass assessments, and stand structure to provide other pertinent data for exploring management options. This report focused on the Quercus stellata-Quercus marilandica forest type in the Cross...

  6. Phytochemical Analysis and Anti-cancer Investigation of Boswellia serrata Bioactive Constituents In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanaa H; Abd-Rabou, Ahmed A; Hassan, Amal Z; Kotob, Soheir E

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a major health obstacle around the world, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) as major causes of morbidity and mortality. Nowadays, there isgrowing interest in the therapeutic use of natural products for HCC and CRC, owing to the anticancer activity of their bioactive constituents. Boswellia serrata oleo gum resin has long been used in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine to alleviate a variety of health problems such as inflammatory and arthritic diseases. The current study aimed to identify and explore the in vitro anticancer effect of B. Serrata bioactive constituents on HepG2 and HCT 116 cell lines. Phytochemical analysis of volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin was carried out using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Oleo-gum-resin of B. Serrata was then successively extracted with petroleum ether (extract 1) and methanol (extract 2). Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) analysis of the lipoidal matter was also performed. In addition, a methanol extract of B. Serrata oleo gum resin was phytochemically studied using column chromatography (CC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC) to obtain four fractions (I, II, III and IV). Sephadex columns were used to isolate β-boswellic acid and identification of the pure compound was done using UV, mass spectra, 1H NMR and 13C NMR analysis. Total extracts, fractions and volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo-gum resin were subsequently applied to HCC cells (HepG2 cell line) and CRC cells (HCT 116 cell line) to assess their cytotoxic effects. GLC analysis of the lipoidal matter resulted in identification of tricosane (75.32%) as a major compound with the presence of cholesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol. Twenty two fatty acids were identified of which saturated fatty acids represented 25.6% and unsaturated fatty acids 74.4% of the total saponifiable fraction. GC/MS analysis of three chromatographic fractions (I,II and III) of B. Serrata oleo gum resin revealed the

  7. [Determination of fatty acids and organic acids in Ranunculus ternatus Thunb using GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Cheng; Xia, Li-Ming; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2006-08-01

    The determination of fatty acids and organic acids in Chinese medicinal plant Ranunculus ternatus Thunb using GC-MS was studied. The Ranunculus ternatus Thunb from Henan province was cut into less than 20 mesh pieces, then extracted by petroleum ether or ether in refluxing and esteried, and finally was determined using GC-MS. The results show that there are 23 kinds of organic compounds in the Chinese medicinal plant Ranunculus ternatus Thunb from Henan, among which 15 kinds of fatty acids were identified, including myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linolenic acid, eicosanoic acid, docosanoic acid etc. The unsaturated fatty acids and oleic acid account for 58.19% and 35.68% of the total organic compounds respectively. The kinds of fatty acid in petroleum ether extract and ether extract are the same.

  8. Effect of Calea serrata Less. n-hexane extract on acetylcholinesterase of larvae ticks and brain Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vera Lucia Sardá; Vanzella, Cláudia; Moysés, Felipe dos Santos; Santos, Jaqueline Campiol Dos; Martins, João Ricardo Souza; von Poser, Gilsane Lino; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2012-10-26

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that hydrolyses acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses, is a target for pesticides and its inhibition by organophosphates leads to paralysis and death of arthropods. It has been demonstrated that the n-hexane extract of Calea serrata had acaricidal activity against larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The aim of the present study was to understand the mechanism of the acaricidal action of C. serrata n-hexane extract are specifically to investigate the in vitro anticholinesterase activity on larvae of R. microplus and in brain structures of male Wistar rats. The n-hexane extract significantly inhibited in vitro acetylcholinesterase activity in R. microplus larvae and rat brain structures. The results confirm that inhibition of acetylcholinesterase is a possible mechanism of action of hexane extract at C. serrata.

  9. Phytic Acid Metabolism in Lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) Pollen 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jih-Jing; Dickinson, David B.; Ho, Tuan-Hua David

    1987-01-01

    The accumulation of phytic acid during development of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) pollen and its degradation during germination have been studied. A substantial amount of phytic acid accumulates in lily pollen by 5 days before anthesis, and little change occurs during subsequent maturation. Mature lily pollen contains 7 to 8 micrograms phytic acid per milligram pollen. Considerable degradation of phytic acid occurs by 15 minutes of incubation in glucose culture medium, and very little is left by 3 hours. No partially phosphorylated myo-inositol accumulates during germination. The breakdown of phytic acid proceeds at a constant rate during this time period. The rate is calculated to be 0.037 microgram phytic acid/milligram pollen/minute. Two phytases are detected in germinated lily pollen extract using high performance liquid chromatography with an anion exchange column (diethylaminoethyl-5PW). The results suggest that one of the phytases is already present in mature ungerminated lily pollen and the other one is newly synthesized during germination from a long-lived, pre-existing mRNA. PMID:16665258

  10. Rheological properties of polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Nanhua; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Gaixiu; Kannan, Balan; Liu, Xiuhua; Bell, Alan E

    2017-07-15

    This study investigated the chemical components and rheological properties of polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb. Graded alcohol precipitation was used to extract Dioscorea opposita polysaccharide samples (S1, S2, S3 and S4). The monosaccharides, amino acid content and molecular weight of each sample were measured and compared. The rheological properties of the polysaccharide samples at different concentrations, temperatures and pH values were studied. The rheological properties of S1, S2 and S3 exhibited pseudoplastic properties and "gel-like" behaviour. The viscosity of S1 was improved with rising temperatures, especially temperatures higher than 80°C, which may be caused by the starch gelatinisation. The acidic and basic environments may break the structures of S3 and S4. However, the extreme conditions improved the viscosity of S1. This work was a basic investigation of the Dioscorea opposita polysaccharides, contributing to the function of yam products and applications of natural thickeners in the food industry. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Emulsification properties of polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Zhang, Yun; Wen, Yurong; Yao, Yanna; Zhu, Jinhua; Liu, Xiuhua; Bell, Alan; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated the emulsification properties of polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb. Graded alcohol precipitation was used to extract Dioscorea opposita polysaccharides fractions (4 samples) in different ranges of molecular weight. Sample 3 contained more glucose and protein (80.13% and 0.34%, respectively), and molecular weight was approximately 34,790Da, distributing narrowly. The droplet sizes and stabilities of emulsions made of gum arabic (GA) and polysaccharide samples at different concentrations and ratios were measured, specifically the emulsions of GA and medium-chain-triglycerides (MCT); polysaccharides and MCT; and polysaccharides, GA and MCT (1:1:1). The results indicated that sample 2 and 3 had emulsifying properties, and the emulsions made with sample 2, GA and MCT (1:1:1) presented the best emulsification properties. Therefore, polysaccharides of Dioscorea opposita could be utilised as a natural emulsifier that can be improved synergistically with other emulsifiers, such as gum arabic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antioxidant compounds from the leaves of Peucedanum japonicum thunb.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Masashi; Kikuzaki, Hiroe; Ohigashi, Hajime; Nakatani, Nobuji

    2003-08-27

    Seventeen compounds were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of the leaves of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. On the basis of MS and various NMR spectroscopic techniques, the structures of the isolated compounds were determined as isoquercitrin (1), rutin (2), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3), 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5), cnidioside A (6), praeroside II (7), praeroside III (8), apterin (9), esculin (10), (R)-peucedanol (11), (R)-peucedanol 7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (12), l-tryptophan (13), uracil (14), guanosine (15), uridine (16), and thymidine (17). All compounds except 11 and 12 were isolated for the first time from P. japonicum. Several isolated compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. In addition, all isolated compounds were examined for radical scavenging on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and for inhibition of oxidation of liposome induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride. Compounds 2-5 were found to be the major potent constituents, which contribute to the antioxidant activity of P. japonicum leaves.

  13. In vitro propagation of persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Giordani, Edgardo; Naval, Mar; Benelli, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) is a temperate fruit tree species diffused in all continents. The traditional propagation method adopted by the nursery industry is based on budding/grafting scion cultivars on seedlings from D. kaki, Diospyros lotus, and Diospyros virginiana, the most important species used as rootstock, reproduced by seeds since they are not easy to root. Furthermore, most of nonastringent cultivars of persimmon are not compatible with D. lotus, a rootstock largely utilized because of its hardiness and frost resistance. The main in vitro tissue culture techniques, developed for persimmon, deal with direct regeneration (from dormant buds and root tips), and indirect regeneration through callus from dormant buds, apexes, and leaves. The bottlenecks of micropropagation are (1) the recalcitrance of many cultivars to in vitro establishment, (2) the low multiplication ratio of D. kaki compared to other fruit tree species, (3) the very low rooting ability of ex novo microcuttings both from direct and indirect regeneration, (4) the high sensitivity to transplant from in vitro to in vivo conditions. The development of reliable in vitro regeneration procedures is likely to play a key role for production of both clonal rootstocks and self-rooted cultivars. The general protocol for micropropagation of persimmon reported here is based on the establishment of winter dormant buds in vitro, shoot development, multiplication and elongation, and shoot rooting, using cytokinins (BA or zeatin) in a MS media along with an auxinic pretreatment for rooting induction.

  14. Antioxidant and Antiglycating Constituents from Leaves of Ziziphus oxyphylla and Cedrela serrata

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Ahmad, Niyaz; Naqvi, Atta Abbas; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Upadhyay, Atul; Tuenter, Emmy; Foubert, Kenn; Apers, Sandra; Hermans, Nina; Pieters, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ziziphus oxyphylla and Cedrela Serrata plants have a folkloric use in Pakistan for treatments of different ailments, i.e., Jaundice, Hepatitis, Diabetes, and antimicrobial. Until now, none of the research studies have reported any phytochemical work on leaves of these two plants. This study aimed to isolate and perform phytochemical analysis in order to search for the constituent having the active role in treatment of the aforementioned ailments. A bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation procedure was used to isolate the concerned phytochemicals present in leaf extracts of Z. oxyphylla and C. serrata. The process involved the hyphenated techniques, i.e., Flash Chromatography, Semi-Preparative HPLC/DAD, UPLC/MS, and NMR in order to isolate and elucidate the structure of the phytochemicals. Seven compounds (1–7) were isolated and identified as flavonoids, more in particular glycosides of quercetin and kaempferol. They showed DPPH scavenging activity, compound 3 (isoquercitrin) being the most active one with an IC50 of 10.8 µg/mL (positive control quercetin; IC50 3.6 µg/mL). The superoxide-radical scavenging and total antioxidant (ABTS) assays indicated IC50 values ranging from 200 to 910 µg/mL and 170 to 320 µg/mL, respectively (positive control quercetin: 374 and 180 µg/mL, respectively). Furthermore, these compounds had low IC50 values for inhibition of protein glycation (AGEs inhibition), ranging from 530 to 818 µg/mL, comparable to aminoguanidine (510 µg/mL) used as a positive control. This study resulted in the identification of seven flavonoid glycosides for the first time from the leaves of Z. oxyphylla and C. serrata with antioxidative and antiglycating activities. PMID:26999227

  15. Annual dormancy cycles in buried seeds of shrub species: germination ecology of Sideritis serrata (Labiatae).

    PubMed

    Copete, M A; Herranz, J M; Ferrandis, P; Copete, E

    2015-07-01

    The germination ecology of Sideritis serrata was investigated in order to improve ex-situ propagation techniques and management of their habitat. Specifically, we analysed: (i) influence of temperature, light conditions and seed age on germination patterns; (ii) phenology of germination; (iii) germinative response of buried seeds to seasonal temperature changes; (iv) temperature requirements for induction and breaking of secondary dormancy; (v) ability to form persistent soil seed banks; and (vi) seed bank dynamics. Freshly matured seeds showed conditional physiological dormancy, germinating at low and cool temperatures but not at high ones (28/14 and 32/18 °C). Germination ability increased with time of dry storage, suggesting the existence of non-deep physiological dormancy. Under unheated shade-house conditions, germination was concentrated in the first autumn. S. serrata seeds buried and exposed to natural seasonal temperature variations in the shade-house, exhibited an annual conditional dormancy/non-dormancy cycle, coming out of conditional dormancy in summer and re-entering it in winter. Non-dormant seeds were clearly induced into dormancy when stratified at 5 or 15/4 °C for 8 weeks. Dormant seeds, stratified at 28/14 or 32/18 °C for 16 weeks, became non-dormant if they were subsequently incubated over a temperature range from 15/4 to 32/18 °C. S. serrata is able to form small persistent soil seed banks. The maximum seed life span in the soil was 4 years, decreasing with burial depth. This is the second report of an annual conditional dormancy/non-dormancy cycle in seeds of shrub species.

  16. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  17. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effect of Aflapin: a novel Boswellia serrata extract.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Krishanu; Kolla, Jayaprakash N; Krishnaraju, Alluri V; Yalamanchili, Nandini; Rao, Chirravuri V; Golakoti, Trimurtulu; Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2011-08-01

    There is significant number of evidences suggesting the anti-inflammatory properties of gum resin extracts of Boswellia serrata containing 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) and their promising potential as therapeutic interventions against inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA). Unfortunately, the poor bioavailability of AKBA following oral administration might limit the anti-inflammatory efficacy of standardized Boswellia extract(s). To address this issue, we describe a novel composition called Aflapin, which contains B. serrata extract enriched in AKBA and non-volatile oil portion of B. serrata gum resin. Our observations show that the availability of AKBA in systemic circulation of experimental animals is increased by 51.78% in Aflapin-supplemented animals, in comparison with that of 30% AKBA standardized extract or BE-30 (5-Loxin(®)). Consistently, Aflapin confers better anti-inflammatory efficacy in Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA)-induced inflammation model of Sprague-Dawley rats. Interestingly, in comparison with BE-30, Aflapin(®) also provides significantly better protection from IL-1β-induced death of human primary chondrocytes and improves glycosaminoglycans production in human chondrocytes. In Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced human synovial cells, the inhibitory potential of Aflapin (IC(50) 44.736 ng/ml) on matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) production is 14.83% better than that of BE-30 (IC(50) 52.528 ng/ml). In summary, our observations collectively suggest that both the Boswellia products, BE-30 (5-Loxin(®)) and Aflapin, exhibit powerful anti-inflammatory efficacy and anti-arthritic potential. In particular, in comparison with BE-30, Aflapin provides more potential benefits in recovering articular cartilage damage or protection from proteolytic degradation due to inflammatory insult in arthritis such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall’Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  19. Phylogeny, biogeography, and processes of molecular differentiation in Quercus subgenus Quercus (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Manos, P S; Doyle, J J; Nixon, K C

    1999-08-01

    Quercus is one of the most abundant and economically important genera of woody plants in the Northern Hemisphere. To infer phylogenetic relationships within Quercus subgenus Quercus, chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) restriction sites and nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and the 5.8S coding region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat were obtained for 44 individuals, including 25 species, intraspecific samples, and three outgroups. Separate parsimony analyses of each data set showed that individual gene trees were congruent and often complementary in supporting clades that generally corresponded to previously recognized taxonomic groups. Only one instance of strongly supported gene tree incongruence was detected and this anomalous pattern was explained best by ancient introgression of cpDNA across sectional boundaries. Simultaneous parsimony analysis of the pruned data sets supported the recognition of the strictly Eurasian section Cerris and resolved a novel hypothesis for the major infrageneric groups (Cerris- (Lobatae- (Protobalanus + Quercus sensu stricto))). The biogeographic hypothesis that all major oak lineages evolved locally at middle latitudes within the general distribution of their fossil ancestors was fully supported. This set of relationships also suggested a New World origin for the widespread white oaks of the Northern Hemisphere (section Quercus s. s.). For both data sets, inter- and intraspecific sampling within section Protobalanus showed little correspondence to morphological species. Greater cladistic structure among the samples was obtained by cpDNA restriction sites and two well-delimited plastomes types comprising a total of 15 distinct haplotypes were resolved. Haplotypes of 2 of the peripheral species in this species complex occupy terminal portions of one of the plastome clades, suggesting a more recent origin relative to those of more widespread species. The phylogeography of the two divergent plastome types suggested

  20. The oak (Quercus) biodiversity of California and adjacent regions

    Treesearch

    Kevin C. Nixon

    2002-01-01

    Twenty species of oak (Quercus) are known from California. The white oak group is the most diverse, and includes a complex of scrub oak species that are often encountered in chaparral, mixed forest and desert margin habitats. The Protobalanus group (e.g., Quercus chrysolepis) is a unique and distinctive clade of western North...

  1. Cork Oak Trees (Quercus suber L.).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Rubén; Toribio, Mariano; Cortizo, Millán; Ordás Fernández, Ricardo-Javier

    2006-01-01

    A transformation system for selected mature Quercus suber L. trees using Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been established. Embryos obtained from recurrent proliferating embryogenic masses are inoculated with AGL1 strain harbouring the plasmid pBINUbiGUSint, which carries the nptII and uidA genes. Evidence of stable transgene integration is obtained by polymerase chain reaction for nptII and uidA genes, Southern blotting and expression of the uidA gene. The transgenic embryos are germinated and successfully transferred to soil.

  2. Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. ethanol extract suppresses RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Mi; Erkhembaatar, Munkhsoyol; Lee, Guem-San; Lee, Jin-Hyun; Noh, Eun-Mi; Lee, Minok; Song, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Choong Hun; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kim, Min Seuk; Lee, Young-Rae

    2017-01-01

    The constituents of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. (PJ) exhibit biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-obesity, anti-oxidant and anti-allergic activities. The aim of the present study was to examine in vitro effects of PJ in RANKL-induced signaling pathways, which determine osteoclast differentiation. PJ ethanol extract (PEE) exhibited anti-osteoporotic activity by disrupting the phospholipase C (PLC)-Ca2+-c-Fos/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway during osteoclastogenesis. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured and used to determine the effects of PJ in the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis. The effects of PEE in the RANKL-mediated signaling cascade were evaluated using a standard in vitro osteoclastogenesis system. PEE treatment of BMMs significantly reduced the number of RANKL-mediated tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells (P<0.05 for 5 and 10 µg/ml PEE, P<0.01 for 25 and 50 µg/ml PEE), without cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, the expression of differentiation-related marker genes, including TRAP, Oscar, Cathepsin K, dendrocyte expressed seven transmembrane protein, ATPase H+ Transporting V0 Subunit D2 and NFATc1, were markedly suppressed. PEE induced a transient increase in free cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) mobilization via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and PLC-sensitive pathways. Transient [Ca2+]i increase consequently resulted in the suppression of c-Fos, CREB and NFATc1 activities. These findings highlight the potential use of PJ in treating bone disorders caused by osteoclast overgrowth. PMID:28672947

  3. Radial and vertical distributions of radiocesium in tree stems of Pinus densiflora and Quercus serrata 1.5 y after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Shinta; Okada, Naoki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Nakai, Wataru; Takano, Shigeyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The radial and vertical distributions of radiocesium in tree stems were investigated to understand radiocesium transfer to trees at an early stage of massive contamination from the Fukushima nuclear disaster. A conifer species (Japanese red pine) and a broad-leaved species (Japanese konara oak) were selected to determine whether the radiocesium contamination pattern differs between species. Stem disks were collected at several heights and separated into outer bark, inner bark, and wood. The radiocesium concentration was the highest in the outer bark, followed by that in the inner bark and wood. The vertical distribution of the radiocesium concentration at each stem part differed between the species. The difference between species in radiocesium concentration of the outer bark could be explained by presence or absence of leaves at the time of the disaster. However, the reasons for the differences between species in the radiocesium concentration of the inner bark and wood are unclear. The radial distribution in the wood of the studied species showed a common pattern across stem disk heights and species. However, the radiocesium concentration ratio between sapwood and inner bark was significantly different between species. Although the radial contamination pattern in the wood was similar in the studied species during the early stage of contamination, the radiocesium transport pathway and allocation would be different between the species, and the contamination pattern will likely be different between the species at later stages. Continued investigations are important for understanding the radiocesium cycle and the accumulation of radiocesium in the tree stems of each species.

  4. Relationship of European Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) Cultivars to Asian Cultivars, Characterized Using AFLPs.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sixty one persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) selections, including 17 Italian, 11 Spanish, 13 Japanese, six Korean, five Chinese, one Israeli, and eight of unknown origin, were evaluated for genetic differences by AFLP analysis. Relationships among cultivars were evaluated by UPGMA clustering, Neigh...

  5. The nature and extent of mutational pleiotropy in gene expression of male Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Collet, Julie M; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Ye, Yixin H; Allen, Scott L; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Blows, Mark W

    2014-03-01

    The nature and extent of mutational pleiotropy remain largely unknown, despite the central role that pleiotropy plays in many areas of biology, including human disease, agricultural production, and evolution. Here, we investigate the variation in 11,604 gene expression traits among 41 mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Drosophila serrata. We first confirmed that these expression phenotypes were heritable, detecting genetic variation in 96% of them in an outbred, natural population of D. serrata. Among the MA lines, 3385 (29%) of expression traits were variable, with a mean mutational heritability of 0.0005. In most traits, variation was generated by mutations of relatively small phenotypic effect; putative mutations with effects of greater than one phenotypic standard deviation were observed for only 8% of traits. With most (71%) traits unaffected by any mutation, our data provide no support for universal pleiotropy. We further characterized mutational pleiotropy in the 3385 variable traits, using sets of 5, randomly assigned, traits. Covariance among traits chosen at random with respect to their biological function is expected only if pleiotropy is extensive. Taking an analytical approach in which the variance unique to each trait in the random 5-trait sets was partitioned from variance shared among traits, we detected significant (at 5% false discovery rate) mutational covariance in 21% of sets. This frequency of statistically supported covariance implied that at least some mutations must pleiotropically affect a substantial number of traits (>70; 0.6% of all measured traits).

  6. Antioxidant and Ex Vivo Immune System Regulatory Properties of Boswellia serrata Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Roncada, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Boswellia serrata (BS) is an important traditional medicinal plant that currently represents an interesting topic for pharmaceutical research since it possesses several pharmacological properties (e.g., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitumour). The safety and versatility of this dietary supplement should allow for its use in numerous pathological conditions; however the quality of the extracts needs to be standardized to increase the clinical success rate resulting from its use. In the present study, different commercially available B. serrata extracts were employed to compare their AKBA content and in vitro antioxidant power. Furthermore, their ability to modulate the immune system regulatory properties was investigated. Our results showed that the AKBA content varied from 3.83 ± 0.10 to 0.03 ± 0.004%, with one sample in which it was not detectable. The highest antioxidant power and phenolic content were shown by the same extract, which also exhibited the highest AKBA concentration. Finally, the BS extracts showed the ability to influence the regulatory and effector T-cell compartments. Our results suggest that frankincense should be further investigated for its promising potentiality to modulate not only inflammation/oxidative stress but also immune dysregulation, but attention should be paid to the composition of the commercial extracts. PMID:28386311

  7. Diuretic activity of Boswellia serrata Roxb. oleo gum extract in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Asif, Muhammad; Jabeen, Qaiser; Abdul-Majid, Amin Malik-Shah; Atif, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of crude aqueous extract of Boswellia serrata Roxb. oleo gum on urinary electrolytes, pH and diuretic activity in normal albino rats. Moreover, acute toxicity of the gum extract was assessed using mice. Albino rats were divided into five groups. Control group received normal saline (10 mg/kg), reference group received furosemide (10 mg/kg) and test groups were given different doses of crude extract (10, 30 and 50 mg/kg) by intra-peritoneal route, respectively. The Graph Pad Prism was used for the statistical analysis and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Significant diuretic, kaliuretic and natriuretic effects were observed in the treated groups in a dose dependent manner. Diuretic index showed good diuretic activity of the crude extract. Lipschitz values indicated that the crude extract, at the dose of 50 mg/kg, showed 44 % diuretic activity compared to the reference drug. No lethal effects were observed among albino mice even at the higher dose of 3000 mg/kg. It is concluded that aqueous extract of Boswellia serrata oleo gum, at the dose of 50 mg/kg showed significant effects on urinary volume and concentration of urinary electrolytes with no signs of toxicity.

  8. Antioxidant and Ex Vivo Immune System Regulatory Properties of Boswellia serrata Extracts.

    PubMed

    Beghelli, Daniela; Isani, Gloria; Roncada, Paola; Andreani, Giulia; Bistoni, Onelia; Bertocchi, Martina; Lupidi, Giulio; Alunno, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Boswellia serrata (BS) is an important traditional medicinal plant that currently represents an interesting topic for pharmaceutical research since it possesses several pharmacological properties (e.g., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitumour). The safety and versatility of this dietary supplement should allow for its use in numerous pathological conditions; however the quality of the extracts needs to be standardized to increase the clinical success rate resulting from its use. In the present study, different commercially available B. serrata extracts were employed to compare their AKBA content and in vitro antioxidant power. Furthermore, their ability to modulate the immune system regulatory properties was investigated. Our results showed that the AKBA content varied from 3.83 ± 0.10 to 0.03 ± 0.004%, with one sample in which it was not detectable. The highest antioxidant power and phenolic content were shown by the same extract, which also exhibited the highest AKBA concentration. Finally, the BS extracts showed the ability to influence the regulatory and effector T-cell compartments. Our results suggest that frankincense should be further investigated for its promising potentiality to modulate not only inflammation/oxidative stress but also immune dysregulation, but attention should be paid to the composition of the commercial extracts.

  9. Combined Administration of Melissa officinalis and Boswellia serrata Extracts in an Animal Model of Memory

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza; Takht Firozeh, Sayyed Mehdi; Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Tamtaji, Omid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Boswellia serrata and Melissa officinalis is traditionally used for its memory enhancing effects. Objectives In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of combined form of these extracts on memory improvement of scopolamine treated rats by the Morris water maze method. Materials and Methods Two groups (group 1 and 2) of animals were pretreated with combined extracts of B. serrata and M. officinalis (200, 400 mg/Kg body weight) for four weeks and then, 30 minutes before starting the experiment scopolamine was injected (0.1 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally to pretreated animals. The control group was the animals that were injected by scopolamine and pre treated with distilled water (group 3). The normal group was treated with distilled water alone (group 4). Results For time spent and distance, there was no substantial difference between groups 1, 2 and 4, while they had statistical difference with group 3 (P = 0.001). The spatial memory evaluation showed no significant difference between treated groups and normal group. Conclusions Therefore, the combination of the two extracts had the ability to improve memory as its traditional use. PMID:27822272

  10. Effect of Boswellia serrata on antioxidant status in an experimental model of colitis rats induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; Morgan Martins, Maria Isabel; Tieppo, Juliana; Fillmann, Henrique Sarubbi; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant effect of an extract of the plant Boswellia serrata in an experimental model of acute ulcerative colitis induced by administration of acetic acid (AA) in rats. The extract of B. serrata (34.2 mg/kg/day) was administered orally by gavage for 2 days before and after induction of colitis with AA diluted to 4 % and in a volume of 4 ml. The anal sphincter pressure in the groups treated with B. serrata showed a significant increase compared to the colitis group (P < 0.001). Histological analysis of treated animals showed less edema with preservation of mucosal crypts. Lipid peroxidation showed a significant decrease in the treated groups compared to the colitis group (P < 0.001). The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity showed a significant reduction in the treated groups compared to the colitis group (P < 0.001), the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) significantly increased in the treated groups compared to colitis group (P < 0.05), and the same was the result for enzyme activity glutathione (GSH; P < 0.05). The extract of B. serrata has active antioxidant substances that exert protective effects in acute experimental colitis.

  11. Aqueous and Ethanolic Extracts of Boswellia serrata Protect Against Focal Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan, Alireza; Sadeghnia, Hamid R

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress and cell apoptosis play major roles in neuronal injury after ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury. Boswellia serrata is a medicinal plant with antioxidant properties. Acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is an active triterpenoid compound from B. serrate. In the current study, the neuroprotective effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of B. serrata (named ABS and EBS, respectively) and AKBA were investigated against middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral I-R injury in rats. ABS and EBS with doses of 125, 250 and 500 and AKBA with a dose of 50 mg/kg were administered (intraperitoneally) just after middle cerebral artery occlusion induction for 30 min and reperfusion for 24 h. HPLC analysis suggested that ABS and EBS had AKBA of 8.8% and 9.5% (w/w), respectively. B. serrata and AKBA significantly improved neurological deficit and reduced brain infarction, neuronal cell loss and apoptosis and also attenuated lipid peroxidation while increasing glutathione content and superoxide dismutase activity in the cerebral cortex following a stroke. Apoptosis suppression was found to be mediated through regulating caspase-3 and bax/bcl-2 expressions. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that B. serrata and AKBA attenuate oxidative damage and inhibit cell apoptosis, subsequently protecting cerebral I-R injury in rats. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Complete chloroplast genome of a valuable medicinal plant, Huperzia serrata (Lycopodiaceae), and comparison with its congener1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhi-You; Zhang, Hong-Rui; Shrestha, Nawal; Zhang, Xian-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Here we report the complete chloroplast genome of the important medicinal species Huperzia serrata (Lycopodiaceae) and compare it to the chloroplast genome of the congeneric species H. lucidula. Methods and Results: The whole chloroplast genome of H. serrata was sequenced using an Illumina platform and assembled with Geneious version R9.0.5. The genome size of H. serrata was 154,176 bp, with 36.3% GC content. The complete chloroplast genome contained 120 unique genes, including 86 coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes. Comparison with the chloroplast genome of H. lucidula revealed three highly variable regions (rps16-chlB, ycf12-trnR, and ycf1) between these two species and 252 mutation events including 27 insertion/deletion polymorphisms and 225 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ninety-two SNPs were identified in the gene-coding regions. In addition, 18 microsatellite sites were found, which can potentially be used in phylogeographic studies. Conclusions: The complete chloroplast genome of H. serrata is reported here, and will be a valuable genome resource for further phylogenetic, evolutionary, and medical studies of medicinal plants in the genus Huperzia. PMID:27843724

  13. The AMPK pathway mediates an anti-adipogenic effect of fruits of Hovenia dulcis Thunb.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Lin; Sim, Jung-Eun; Choi, Hyun-Myung; Choi, In-Young; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Jinbong; Jung, Yunu; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Cho, Jung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Hwang, Min-Woo; Jin, Jong-Sik; Hong, Seung-Heon; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Um, Jae-Young

    2014-11-01

    Hovenia dulcis Thunb. is well known as a treatment for liver disease. Several studies have demonstrated that extracts of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. or its purified compounds can serve as detoxifying agents for alcohol poisoning. However, its anti-obesity effect has not been reported thus far. In this study, the anti-obesity effect of water extracts from the fruits or stems of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. was examined in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The cellular lipid contents in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were assessed by Oil Red O staining. Fruits of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. (FHD) significantly inhibit lipid accumulation during adipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, but not stems of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. FHD (100 μg ml(-1)) significantly down-regulates the expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2, adiponectin, and resistin, and the inhibition rates were 29.33%, 54.36%, 34.5%, 55.69%, and 60.39%, respectively. In addition, FHD (100 μg ml(-1)) also up-regulates the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α, liver kinase B1 as a major AMPK kinase, and the downstream substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and the inhibition rates were 43.52%, 38.25%, and 20.39%, respectively. These results indicate that FHD has a significant anti-obesity effect through the modulation of the AMPK pathway, suggesting that FHD has a potential benefit in preventing obesity.

  14. Callicarpa japonica Thunb. attenuates cigarette smoke-induced neutrophil inflammation and mucus secretion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Shin, Na-Rae; Park, Ji-Won; Park, So-Yeon; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Lee, Han-Sol; Hee Kim, Jung; Lee, Hee Jae; Lee, Joongku; Zhang, Zhi-yun; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2015-12-04

    Callicarpa japonica Thunb. (CJT) is traditionally used as an herbal remedy for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in Korea, China, and Japan. In this study, we evaluated the effects of C. japonica Thunb. (CJT) on the development of COPD using a Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced murine model and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC)-stimulated H292 cells, human pulmonary mucoepidermoid cell line. C. japonica Thunb. was isolated from the leaves and stem of C. japonica. The methanol extract profile was obtained by UPLC Q-TOF-MS analysis. In in vivo experiment, the mice received 1h of cigarette smoke for 10 days. C. japonica Thunb. was administered to mice by oral gavage 1h before cigarette smoke exposure for 10 days. In in vitro experiment, we evaluated the effect of C. japonica Thunb. on the expression of MUC5AC and proinflammatory cytokines in H292 cells stimulated with CSC. CJT treatment effectively suppressed the infiltration of neutrophils, and decreased the production of ROS and the activity of neutrophil elastase in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) induced by CS. CJT also significantly attenuated production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α in the BALF, and reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the production of mucus in lung tissue induced by CS. In in vitro experiments, CJT decreased the expression of MUC5AC and proinflammatory cytokines in CSC-stimulated H292 cells. Furthermore, CJT attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK induced by CSC in H292 cells. Taken together, CJT effectively reduced the neutrophil airway inflammation and mucus secretion induced by CS in murine model, and inhibited the expression of MUC5AC in CSC-stimulated H292 human lung cell line. These findings suggest that CJT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Osmotic stress responses of individual white oak (Quercus section, Quercus subgenus) genotypes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Zita; Kanalas, Péter; Máthé, Csaba; Cseke, Klára; Szőllősi, Erzsébet; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jámbrik, Katalin; Kiss, Zoltán; Mészáros, Ilona

    2014-01-15

    White oaks (Quercus section, Quercus subgenus) are widely distributed in Europe. Quercus petraea (sessile oak), an economically important species is predicted to be affected by climate change. Q. pubescens (pubescent oak) and Q. virgiliana (Italian pubescent oak) are economically less important, drought tolerant species. Frequent hybridization of white oaks was observed and currently the introgression of Q. pubescens and Q. virgiliana in non-mediterranean regions of Europe has been reported. Our goal was to use tissue cultures established from individual trees of the above taxa and their putative hybrids, all present in the forest stand of Síkfőkút LTER Research Area (NE Hungary) as simple experimental model systems for studying drought/osmotic stress tolerance. Tissue cultures are more suitable models for such studies, than seedlings, because they are genetically identical to the parent plants. Polyethylene glycol (PEG6000) treatments were used for this purpose. The identification of taxa was based on leaf morphological traits and microsatellite analysis and showed that Q. petraea is genetically distinct to all other taxa examined. We established six callus lines of Quercus. As expected, in Q. petraea cultures PEG6000 induced severe loss of fresh weight and the ability to recover after removal of the osmoticum, which was not characteristic for Q. pubescens and Q. virgiliana. Putative hybrids exhibited an intermediate response to osmotic stress. Activity gels showed the increase of single-strand preferring (SSP) nuclease and no significant change of guaiacol-peroxidase activities in drought-sensitive genotypes/cultures and no significant increase of SSP nuclease activities accompanied with increases of guaiacol-peroxidase activities in drought-tolerant ones. This indicates that drought/osmotic stress tolerance is associated to increased capacity of scavenging reactive oxygen species and hence less susceptibility to DNA damage. Our results confirm that tissue

  16. Use of multiple chemical tracers to define habitat use of Indo-Pacific mangrove crab, Scylla serrata (Decapoda: Portunidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, A.W.J.; Cormier, N.; Ewel, K.C.; Fry, B.

    2008-01-01

    The mangrove or mud crab, Scylla serrata, is an important component of mangrove fisheries throughout the Indo-Pacific. Understanding crab diets and habitat use should assist in managing these fisheries and could provide additional justification for conservation of the mangrove ecosystem itself. We used multiple chemical tracers to test whether crab movements were restricted to local mangrove forests, or extended to include adjacent seagrass beds and reef flats. We sampled three mangrove forests on the island of Kosrae in the Federated States of Micronesia at Lelu Harbor, Okat River, and Utwe tidal channel. Samples of S. serrata and likely food sources were analyzed for stable carbon (??13C), nitrogen (??15N), and sulfur (??34S) isotopes. Scylla serrata tissues also were analyzed for phosphorus (P), cations (K, Ca, Mg, Na), and trace elements (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and B). Discriminant analysis indicated that at least 87% of the crabs remain in each site as distinct populations. Crab stable isotope values indicated potential differences in habitat use within estuaries. Values for ??13C and ??34S in crabs from Okat and Utwe were low and similar to values expected from animals feeding within mangrove forests, e.g., feeding on infauna that had average ??13C values near -26.5???. In contrast, crabs from Lelu had higher ?? 13C and ??34S values, with average values of -21.8 and 7.8???, respectively. These higher isotope values are consistent with increased crab foraging on reef flats and seagrasses. Given that S. serrata have been observed feeding on adjacent reef and seagrass environments on Kosrae, it is likely that they move in and out of the mangroves for feeding. Isotope mixing model results support these conclusions, with the greatest mangrove ecosystem contribution to S. serrata diet occurring in the largest mangrove forests. Conserving larger island mangrove forests (> 1 km deep) appears to support crab foraging activities. ?? 2007 Coastal and Estuarine Research

  17. Comparative mapping in watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. et Nakai].

    PubMed

    Sandlin, Katherine; Prothro, Jason; Heesacker, Adam; Khalilian, Nelly; Okashah, Rebecca; Xiang, Wenwen; Bachlava, Eleni; Caldwell, David G; Taylor, Chris A; Seymour, Danelle K; White, Victoria; Chan, Eva; Tolla, Greg; White, Cathy; Safran, Dolores; Graham, Elaine; Knapp, Steven; McGregor, Cecilia

    2012-12-01

    The first single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps for watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. et Nakai] were constructed and compared. Three populations were developed from crosses between two elite cultivars, Klondike Black Seeded × New Hampshire Midget (KBS × NHM), an elite cultivar and wild egusi accession, Strain II × PI 560023 (SII × Egusi) and an elite cultivar and a wild citron accession, ZWRM50 × PI 244019 (ZWRM × Citroides). The SII × Egusi and ZWRM × Citroides F(2) populations consisted of 187 and 182 individuals respectively while the KBS × NHM recombinant inbred line (RIL) population consisted of 164 lines. The length of the genetic maps were 1,438, 1,514 and 1,144 cM with average marker distances of 3.8, 4.2, and 3.4 cM for the KBS × NHM, SII × Egusi and ZWRM × Citroides populations, respectively. Shared markers were used to align the three maps so that the linkage groups (LGs) represented the 11 chromosomes of the species. Marker segregation distortion were observed in all three populations, but was highest (12.7 %) in the ZWRM × Citroides population, where Citroides alleles were favored. The three maps were used to construct a consensus map containing 378 SNP markers with an average distance of 5.1 cM between markers. Phenotypic data was collected for fruit weight (FWT), fruit length (FL), fruit width (FWD), fruit shape index (FSI), rind thickness (RTH) and Brix (BRX) and analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with these traits. A total of 40 QTL were identified in the three populations, including major QTL for fruit size and shape that were stable across genetic backgrounds and environments. The present study reports the first SNP maps for Citrullus and the first map constructed using two elite parents. We also report the first stable QTL associated with fruit size and shape in Citrullus lanatus. These maps, QTL and SNPs should be useful for the watermelon community and represent a significant step towards the

  18. Hepatoprotective Activity of Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) Bulb Extracts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenping; Munafo, John P; Palatini, Kimberly; Esposito, Debora; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Gianfagna, Thomas J

    2015-11-11

    The hepatoprotective activities of two different extracts, a hydroethanolic crude bulb extract (CB) and a steroidal glycoside-rich 1-butanol extract (BuOH), prepared from the bulbs of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.), were evaluated in a 24 week study in the female KK.Cg-A(y)/J Type 2 diabetic mouse model. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 16): control mice received Easter lily bulb extract-free drinking water together with a low- or high-fat diet (diabetic control); drinking water for the remaining groups was supplemented with CB extract (1%), BuOH extract (0.1 or 0.2%), and reference drug Metformin (0.001%), together with a high-fat diet. Both CB and BuOH extract treatment groups exhibited significantly improved liver function based on comparisons of triglycerides [diabetic 219 ± 34 mg/dL, CB 131 ± 27 mg/dL, BuOH(0.2%) 114 ± 35 mg/dL], CB total cholesterol (TC) (diabetic 196 ± 12 mg/dL, CB 159 ± 5 mg/dL), average liver mass [diabetic 2.96 ± 0.13 g, CB 2.58 ± 0.08 g, BuOH(0.1%) 2.48 ± 0.13 g], alanine transferase [diabetic 74 ± 5 units/L, CB 25 ± 1 units/L, BuOH(0.1%) 45 ± 1 units/L], and histological examinations. Glucose metabolism was improved only in CB, which was confirmed by oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice exposed to CB extract. These data suggest that steroidal glycosides 1-5 might play a role in the hepatoprotective activity of the BuOH extracts, while the results of the TC measurements and OGTT study indicate that other constituents present in the CB extract are responsible for its hypocholesterolemic and hypoglycemic activity.

  19. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

  20. Boswellia serrata: an overall assessment of in vitro, preclinical, pharmacokinetic and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Tawab, Mona; Werz, Oliver; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred

    2011-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) intake is associated with high prevalence of gastrointestinal or cardiovascular adverse effects. All efforts to develop NSAIDs that spare the gastrointestinal tract and the cardiovasculature are still far from achieving a breakthrough. In the last two decades, preparations of the gum resin of Boswellia serrata (a traditional ayurvedic medicine) and of other Boswellia species have experienced increasing popularity in Western countries. Animal studies and pilot clinical trials support the potential of B. serrata gum resin extract (BSE) for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and asthma. Moreover, in 2002 the European Medicines Agency classified BSE as an 'orphan drug' for the treatment of peritumoral brain oedema. Compared to NSAIDs, it is expected that the administration of BSE is associated with better tolerability, which needs to be confirmed in further clinical trials. Until recently, the pharmacological effects of BSE were mainly attributed to suppression of leukotriene formation via inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) by two boswellic acids, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (KBA) and acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA). These two boswellic acids have also been chosen in the monograph of Indian frankincense in European Pharmacopoiea 6.0 as markers to ensure the quality of the air-dried gum resin exudate of B. serrata. Furthermore, several dietary supplements advertise the enriched content of KBA and AKBA. However, boswellic acids failed to inhibit leukotriene formation in human whole blood, and pharmacokinetic data revealed very low concentrations of AKBA and KBA in plasma, being far below the effective concentrations for bioactivity in vitro. Moreover, permeability studies suggest poor absorption of AKBA following oral administration. In view of these results, the previously assumed mode of action - that is, 5-LO inhibition - is

  1. Morella serrata (Lam.) Killick stabilizes biomembrane and rejuvenates sexual competence in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sabiu, S; Ashafa, A O T

    2017-06-09

    Morella serrata L. is an indigenous medicinal plant to South and southern Africa with folkloric applications as aphrodisiac, laxative, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-hypertensive, antitussive and antidiabetic agent. This study evaluated the membrane stabilization and aphrodisiac potentials of its aqueous root extract in male Wistar rats. While the membrane stabilization of the extract was investigated against bovine erythrocytes (BE), the male rats for the aphrodisiac study were randomized into five groups with animals in group 1 given sterile placebo and served as control. The rats in group 2 were treated with 7.14mg/kg body weight of PowMaxM, while animals in groups 3, 4 and 5 were administered with the extract (100, 200 and 400mg/kg, respectively). All treatments (1mL) were done once daily for 4 weeks via oral gavaging and their mating behavioural, testicular, spermatogenetic and antioxidant parameters were evaluated. With the exception of the mount, intromission and post ejaculatory latencies that were dose-dependently reduced by the extract, other mating parameters were significantly improved when compared with the control. Similar patterns of significant improvement were also observed on the testes-body weight ratio, quality and viability of sperm cells as well as testicular concentrations of proteins, cholesterol, glycogen, testosterone, follicle stimulating hormone, leuitenizing hormone and glutathione (reduced) subsequent to treatment with the extract. Although, administration of M. serrata had no significant (p>0.05) effect on the testicular activity of gamma glutamyl transferase, those of lactate dehydrogenase, phosphatases (alkaline and acid), superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly (p<0.05) induced in the treated animals. The extract also conferred respective significant (p<0.05) membrane stabilization potential of 66.02% and 60.87% on the BE against hypotonic solution and heat-induced hemolysis relative to 62.14% and 40

  2. The utilization of crude fish oil (CFO) to increase mudcrab (Scylla serrata) feed quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamid, Mirni; Agustono

    2017-02-01

    Crude fish oil is one of essential fatty acid sources, which is found in Sardinella lemuru. This research aims to study the quality improvement of mudcrab(Scylla serrata) feed. Four feed formulations were designed by using completely randomized design, including P0 = trash fish + 1% tapioca starch; P1=trash fish + 2.0% crude fish oil + 1% tapioca starch;, P2= trash fish +4.0% crude fish oil + 1% tapioca starch; P3=trash fish + 6.0% crude fish oil + 1% tapioca starch; P4=trash fish +8.0% crude fish oil + 1% tapioca starch, respectively, which were carried out in quadruplicate. This study showed that feed formulation significantly affected crude protein, crude fiber, crude lipid, ash, organic matter and nitrogen free extract and energy of mudcrab. The P2 feed was the best formulation but had a slight different from P3 formulation.

  3. In vitro study of neuroendocrine regulation over the testicular development in mud crabs Scylla serrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haihui; Huang, Huiyang; Li, Shaojing; Wang, Guizhong; Li, Qifu

    2006-06-01

    The reproductive endocrine activities of neuroendocrine organs and androgenic glands (AG) in male Scylla serrata were investigated with co-incubation technology. In vitro studies show that: (1) the AG in Stage III can significantly accelerate the development of seminiferous tubules and spermic maturation; (2) the brain, thoracic ganglia and optic ganglia have no direct influence over the testicular development; (3) the brain and thoracic ganglia can significantly promote the growth of the AG cells and highly significantly boost the ratio of Type B cells, while the optic ganglia have no such effects. It is the first time for in vitro investigations to confirm that the brain and thoracic ganglia can regulate, testicular development through AG in male crustaceans.

  4. Nasal infestation by Linguatula serrata in a dog in the UK: a case report.

    PubMed

    Villedieu, E; Sanchez, R F; Jepson, R E; Ter Haar, G

    2017-03-01

    A two-year-old, female neutered, cross-breed dog imported from Romania was diagnosed with nasal infestation of Linguatula serrata after she sneezed out an adult female. The dog was presented with mucopurulent/sanguinous nasal discharge, marked left-sided exophthalmia, conjunctival hyperaemia and chemosis. Computed tomography and left frontal sinusotomy revealed no further evidence of adult parasites. In addition, there was no evidence of egg shedding in the nasal secretions or faeces. Clinical signs resolved within 48 hours of sinusotomy, and with systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Recommendations are given in this report regarding the management and follow-up of this important zoonotic disease.

  5. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system.

  6. Head structures of Priacma serrata Leconte (Coleptera, Archostemata) inferred from X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Hörnschemeyer, Thomas; Beutel, Rolf G; Pasop, Freek

    2002-06-01

    Internal and external features of the head of Priacma serrata were studied with X-ray microtomography and with histological methods. The comparison of both techniques shows that X-ray tomography is a promising new technique for the investigation of insect anatomy. The still somewhat coarse resolution of the X-ray data is compensated for by advantages like the nondestructive and artifact-free data acquisition. The head of P. serrata and other adults of Archostemata is characterized by many derived features. Muscular features of Priacma, especially muscles of the labium and pharynx, differ strongly from what is found in other groups of Coleoptera. Several character states are considered as autapomorphies of Archostemata: scale-like surface structures, constricted neck, strongly reduced tentorium, and the plate-like, enlarged prementum. The scales provide a protecting surface pattern and may have evolved with a more exposed lifestyle. The enlarged prementum forms a lid, which closes the mouth and covers the ligula when it is pulled back by contraction of the unusually strong submento-premental muscle. The presence of four cone-shaped protuberances on the dorsal side of the head is considered an autapomorphy of Cupedidae. The galea with a narrow stalk and a round and pubescent distal galeomere is another autapomorphy of this family. It has probably evolved as an adaptation to pollen-feeding. The shape of the mandible of Cupedidae is plesiomorphic compared to what is found in adults of Ommatidae. The vertical arrangement of apical teeth is an autapomorphy of the latter family. The lateral insertion of the antenna in Priacma is a groundplan feature of Cupedidae. The dorsal shift is a synapomorphy of all other cupedid genera. A cladistic analysis of characters of the head and additional data resulted in the following branching pattern: ((Crowsoniella + (Omma + Tetraphalerus)) + (Micromalthus + (Priacma + (Paracupes + (Cupes + Tenomerga + Prolixocupes + Rhipsideigma

  7. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression and characterization of lysine decarboxylase gene from Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Di, Ci; Li, Jing; Tang, Yuntao; Peng, Qingzhong

    2014-08-01

    Huperzine A is a promising drug to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, its biosynthetic pathway is still unknown. Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) has been proposed to catalyze the first-step of the biosynthesis of huperzine A. To identify and characterize LDCs from Huperzia serrata, we isolated two LDC fragments (LDC1 and LDC2) from leaves of H. serrata by RT-PCR and then cloned them into pMD 19-T vector. Sequence analysis showed that LDC1 and LDC2 genes shared 95.3% identity and encoded the protein of 212 and 202 amino acid residues respectively. Thus, we ligated LDC genes into pET-32a(+) to obtain recombinant expressing vectors pET-32a(+)/LDC1 and pET-32a(+)/LDC2 respectively. We further introduced two expression vectors into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and cultured positive colonies of E. coli in liquid LB medium. After inducing for 4 hours with 260 μg/mL IPTG at 30 degrees C, soluble recombinant Trx-LDC1 and Trx-LDC2 were obtained and isolated for purification using a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. We incubated purified recombinant proteins with L-lysine in the enzyme reaction buffer at 37 degrees C and then derived the reaction products using dansyl chloride. It was found that both Trx-LDC1 and Trx-LDC2 had decarboxylase activity, could convert L-lysine into cadaverine by way of thin layer chromatography assay. Further, bioinformatics analysis indicated that deduced LDC1 and LDC2 had different physicochemical properties, but similar secondary and three-dimensional structures.

  8. Polygonumnolides C1-C4; minor dianthrone glycosides from the roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Bo; Li, Li; Dai, Zhong; Wu, Yu; Geng, Xing-Chao; Li, Bo; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Wang, Ai-Guo; Su, Ya-Lun

    2016-09-01

    Four new dianthrone glycosides, named polygonumnolides C1-C4 (1-4), were isolated from the dried roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, together with two known emodin dianthrones (5-6). Their hepatotoxicities were evaluated against L-02 cell lines. Compounds 1-4 showed weak hepatotoxicity against L-02 cell lines with IC50 values of 313.05, 205.20, 294.20, and 207.35 μM, respectively.

  9. Cryopreservation of in vitro grown shoot tips of Diospyros kaki thunb. using different methods.

    PubMed

    Niu, Y L; Luo, Z R; Zhang, Y F; Zhang, Q L

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the potential of different cryopreservation strategies for in vitro shoot tips of Diospyros kaki Thunb. The treatments consisted of three different cryopreservation methods: vitrification, droplet-vitrification and modified droplet-vitrification. The following variables were assessed: cold acclimation, sucrose concentration in the preculture medium and PVS2 treatment time. A higher average survival level was obtained using the modified droplet-vitrification method compared to the other two methods.

  10. Physical and Linkage Maps for Drosophila serrata, a Model Species for Studies of Clinal Adaptation and Sexual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Ann J.; Rusuwa, Bosco B.; Blacket, Mark J.; Frentiu, Francesca D.; Sullivan, Mitchell; Foley, Bradley R.; Beatson, Scott; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Chenoweth, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila serrata is a member of the montium group, which contains more than 98 species and until recently was considered a subgroup within the melanogaster group. This Drosophila species is an emerging model system for evolutionary quantitative genetics and has been used in studies of species borders, clinal variation and sexual selection. Despite the importance of D. serrata as a model for evolutionary research, our poor understanding of its genome remains a significant limitation. Here, we provide a first-generation gene-based linkage map and a physical map for this species. Consistent with previous studies of other drosophilids we observed strong conservation of genes within chromosome arms homologous with D. melanogaster but major differences in within-arm synteny. These resources will be a useful complement to ongoing genome sequencing efforts and QTL mapping studies in this species. PMID:22384407

  11. [Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of FatB genes in Lonicera japonica Thunb and its substitutes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhou-yong; Jiang, Chao; Chen, Min; Chen, Ping; Yuan, Yuan; Lin, Shu-fang; Wu, Zhi-gang

    2012-10-01

    A FatB unigene was obtained from the transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Full-length FatB cDNA was cloned from buds of Lonicera japonica Thunb., Lonicera japonica Thunb. var. chinensis (Wats.) Bak., Lonicera hypoglauca Miq. and Lonicera dasystyla Rehd. using RT-PCR technology, and named as LJFatB, LHFatB, LJCFatB and LDFatB. The results of bioinformatic analysis showed that LJFatB, LJCFatB, LHFatB and LDFatB and Arabidopsis thaliana AtFatB had a closely relationship. Nucleotide sequences and protein secondary structure of LJFatB, LJCFatB, LHFatB and LDFatB are different and their proteins had conserved FatB substrate binding sites and catalytic activity sites. Transcriptive level of LJFatB, LJCFatB, LHFatB and LDFatB in bud was not significantly different. Therefore, LJFatB, LJCFatB, LHFatB and LDFatB could have the same biological function as AtFatB.

  12. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED EXTRACTION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM POLYGONUM MULTIFLORUM THUNB. ROOTS.

    PubMed

    Quoc, Le Pham Tan; Muoi, Nguyen Van

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best extraction conditions for total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (AC) of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. root using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The raw material used was Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. root powder. Five factors such as solvent type, solvent concentrations, solvent/material ratio, extraction time and microwave power were studied; TPC and AC values were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method and DPPH free radical scavenging activity measurement, respectively. In addition, studies involved assaying the HPLC test of extracts and SEM of samples. Optimal results pointed to acetone as the solvent, acetone concentration of 60%, solvent/material ratio of 40/1 (v/w), extraction time of 5 mins and microwave power of 127 W. TPC and AC obtained were approximates 44.3 ±0.13 mg GAE/g DW and 341.26 ±1.54 μmol TE/g DW, respectively. The effect of microwaving on the cell destruction of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. root was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Some phenolic compounds were determined by the HPLC method, for instance, gallic acid, catechin and resveratrol. These factors significantly affected TPC and AC. We can use acetone as a solvent with microwave-assisted extraction to achieve the best result.

  13. Effect of Boswellia serrata supplementation on blood lipid, hepatic enzymes and fructosamine levels in type2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is an endocrine disorder that affects a large percentage of patients. High blood glucose causes fatty deposits in the liver which is likely to increase in SGOT and SGPT activities. Significant increase in SGOT/SGPT and low HDL levels is observed in patients with diabetes. Serum fructosamine concentration reflects the degree of blood glucose control in diabetic patients. This study was aimed to investigate the antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of supplementation of Boswellia serrata in type2 diabetic patients. Methods 60 type 2 diabetic patients from both sexes (30 males and 30 females) were dedicated to the control and intervention groups (30 subjects per group). Boswellia serrata gum resin in amount of 900 mg daily for 6 weeks were orally administered (as three 300 mg doses) in intervention group and the control group did not receive anything. Blood samples were taken at the beginning of the study and after 6 weeks. Blood levels of fructosamine, lipid profiles as well as hepatic enzyme in type 2 diabetic patients were measured. Results Treatment of diabetic patient with Boswellia serrata was caused to significant increase in blood HDL levels as well as a remarkable decrease in cholesterol, LDL, fructosamine (p < 0.05) SGPT and SGOT levels after 6 weeks (p < 0.01). In spite of reduction of serum triglyceride, VLDL levels in intervention group, we did not detect a significant difference after 6 weeks. Conclusion This study showed that Boswellia serrata supplementation can be beneficial in controlling blood parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, its use can be useful in patients with medicines. PMID:24495344

  14. Isolation, diversity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi harboured in Huperzia serrata from Jinggang Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Lai, Zheng; Li, Xi-Xi; Yan, Ri-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Hui-Lin; Zhu, Du

    2016-02-01

    Huperzia serrata has many important medicinal properties with proven pharmacological potential. Some of these properties may be mediated by its endophytic fungi. To test this hypothesis, in the present study, we provided a first insights into evaluating the species composition and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi of H. serrata from the regional at Jinggang Mountain in southeastern China. A total number of 885 fungal isolates distributed across 44 genera and 118 putative species were obtained from 1422 fragments of fine H. serrata roots, stems and leaves base on ITS-rDNA sequences BLAST analysis. The endophytic fungi were phylogenetically diverse and species-rich, with high rate of colonization and isolation. The assemble of endophytic fungi consisted mainly of Ascomycota (97.15%), followed by Basidiomycota (1.92%) and unknown fungal species (0.90%). Colletotrichum (64.29%), Phyllosticta (3.39%), Hypoxylon (2.81%), Xylaria (2.25%) and Nigrospora (2.04%) were the most abundant genera, whereas the remaining genera were infrequent groups. Although, roots yielded low abundance strains, the diverse and species-rich were both higher than that of stems and leaves. In addition, out of the 247 endophytic fungi strains determinated, 221 fungal extracts showed AChE inhibition activities in vitro. Among them, 22 endophytic fungi strains achieved high inhibitory activity (≥50%) on AChE which belongs to 13 genera and five incertae sedis strains. Four endophytic fungi designated as JS4 (Colletotrichum spp.), FL14 (Ascomycota spp.), FL9 (Sarcosomataceae spp.) and FL7 (Dothideomycetes spp.) were displayed highly active (≥80%) against AChE, which the inhibition effects were even more intense than the positive control. Our findings highlight that H. serrata grown in Jinggang Mountain harbors a rich and fascinating endophytic fungus community with potential AChE inhibitory activity, which could further broaden the natural

  15. Characterisation of microsatellite loci in two species of lice, Polyplax serrata (Phthiraptera: Anoplura: Polyplacidae) and Myrsidea nesomimi (Phthiraptera: Amblycera: Menoponidae).

    PubMed

    Martinu, Jana; Roubova, Veronika; Novakova, Milena; Smith, Vincent S; Hypsa, Vaclav; Stefka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite loci were characterised for two louse species, the anopluran Polyplax serrata Burmeister, 1839, parasitising Eurasian field mice of the genus Apodemus Kaup, and the amblyceran Myrsidea nesomimi Palma et Price, 2010, found on mocking birds endemic to the Galápagos Islands. Evolutionary histories of the two parasites show complex patterns influenced both by their geographic distribution and through coevolution with their respective hosts, which renders them prospective evolutionary models. In P. serrata, 16 polymorphic loci were characterised and screened across 72 individuals from four European populations that belong to two sympatric mitochondrial lineages differing in their breadth of host-specificity. In M. nesomimi, 66 individuals from three island populations and two host species were genotyped for 15 polymorphic loci. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.05 to 0.9 in P. serrata and from 0.0 to 0.96 in M. nesomimi. Deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were frequently observed in the populations of both parasites. Fst distances between tested populations correspond with previous phylogenetic data, suggesting the microsatellite loci are an informative resource for ecological and evolutionary studies of the two parasites.

  16. Effects of Mesh Size and Escape Gaps on Discarding in an Australian Giant Mud Crab (Scylla serrata) Trap Fishery

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, Matt K.; Butcher, Paul A.; Cullis, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    In response to concerns over excessive discarding from Australian recreational round traps (with four funnel entrances) used to target giant mud crabs, Scylla serrata, an experiment was done to assess the independent and cumulative utility of paired, bottom-located horizontal escape gaps (46×120 mm) and increasing mesh size (from 51 to 101 mm). Compared to conventional traps comprising 51-mm mesh throughout, those with the same mesh size and escape gaps caught significantly fewer (by 95%) undersize (<85 mm carapace length – CL) crabs while maintaining legal catches. Traps made from 101-mm mesh (but with the same funnel entrances as conventional designs) and with and without escape gaps similarly retained fewer undersize crabs and also yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis (the key bycatch species) by up to 94%, but there were concomitant reductions in fishing power for legal sizes of S. serrata. Although there were no immediate mortalities among any discarded crabs, there was a greater bias towards wounding among post molts than late inter-molts and less damage to individuals in the 101-mm conventional than 51-mm conventional traps (without escape gaps). The results support retrospectively fitting escape gaps in conventional S. serrata traps as a means for reducing discarding, but additional work is required to determine appropriate mesh sizes/configurations that maximize species and size selectivity. PMID:25180770

  17. Comparative 28-day repeated oral toxicity of Longdan Xieganwan, Akebia trifoliate (Thunb.) koidz., Akebia quinata (Thunb.) Decne. and Caulis aristolochiae manshuriensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiang; Xiao, Ying; Gong, Likun; Guan, Shuhong; Liu, Yongzhen; Lu, Henglei; Qi, Xinming; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Yan; Wu, Xiongfei; Ren, Jin

    2008-09-02

    Longdan Xieganwan, which contains Aristolochia species, is a traditional Chinese prescription. It has been used for thousands of years to "enhance liver". However, many cases of Longdan Xieganwan induced nephropathy were reported recently. This study was designed to compare the possible toxic effects of Longdan Xieganwan and three different Aristolochia species, i.e. Akebia trifoliate (Thunb.) koid (Akebia trifoliate), Akebia quinata (Thunb.) Decne. (Akebia quinata) and Caulis aristolochiae manshuriensis (Aristolochia manshuriensis). Mice were orally administered these drugs for 28 days. Clinical signs, body weights, serum biochemistry, organ weights and histopathology were examined. Significantly decreased body weights and obvious nephropathy were noticed in the Aristolochia manshuriensis groups at doses higher than 0.24 g/kg/d. A few endothelial cell degenerations in renal glomerulus were observed in the Akebia trifoliate group at a high-dose of 2.00 g/kg/d. No significant changes were observed in the other groups. The no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) for Aristolochia manshuriensis, Akebia trifoliate, Akebia quinata and Longdan Xieganwan in this study for mice were 0.06 g/kg/d, 0.40 g/kg/d, higher than 3.00 g/kg/d and higher than 10.00 g/kg/d, which were equivalent to 0.25 times, 5 times, 25 times and 10 times of normal human dose in clinical prescription, respectively.

  18. The diversification of terpene emissions in Mediterranean oaks: lessons from a study of Quercus suber, Quercus canariensis and its hybrid Quercus afares.

    PubMed

    Welter, Saskia; Bracho-Nuñez, Araceli; Mir, Céline; Zimmer, Ina; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Lumaret, Roselyne; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Staudt, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Interspecific gene flow is common in oaks. In the Mediterranean, this process produced geographical differentiations and new species, which may have contributed to the diversification of the production of volatile terpenes in the oak species of this region. The endemic North African deciduous oak Quercus afares (Pomel) is considered to be a stabilized hybrid between the evergreen Quercus suber (L.) and the deciduous Quercus canariensis (Willd.), presumably being monoterpene and isoprene emitters, respectively. In a common garden experiment, we examined the terpene emission capacities, terpene synthase (TPS) activities and nuclear genetic markers in 52 trees of these three oak species. All but one of the Q. suber and Q. canariensis trees were found to be genetically pure, whereas most Q. afares trees possessed a mixed genotype with a predominance of Q. suber alleles. Analysis of the foliar terpene emissions and TPS activities revealed that all the Q. canariensis trees strongly produced isoprene while all the Q. suber trees were strong monoterpene producers. Quercus afares trees produced monoterpenes as well but at more variable and significantly lower rates, and with a monoterpene pattern different than that observed in Q. suber. Among 17 individuals tested, one Q. afares tree emitted only an insignificant amount of terpenes. No mixed isoprene/monoterpene emitter was detected. Our results suggest that the capacity and pattern of volatile terpene production in Algerian Q. afares populations have strongly diverged from those of its parental species and became quantitatively and qualitatively reduced, including the complete suppression of isoprene production.

  19. Lilium lancifolium Thunb. extract attenuates pulmonary inflammation and air space enlargement in a cigarette smoke-exposed mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Euijeong; Yun, Nayoung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Jinju

    2013-08-26

    Lilium lancifolium Thunb. (Liliaceae) has long been used as a traditional medicine in Korea and China to treat bronchitis, pneumonia, and other pulmonary ailments. Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major risk factor for the development of pulmonary inflammatory response; it also triggers pulmonary alveoli enlargement. In the present study, we investigate the effects of Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract on pulmonary inflammatory responses in a CS-exposed mouse model. Water extract of Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root was fed to C57BL/6 mice prior CS exposure every day for 3 weeks. The numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. The relative inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12) were measured by real-time PCR, ELISA, or Western blot analysis. The average alveoli size was determined by lung histology. Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract was found to significantly inhibit the numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in BALF due to CS exposure. Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract also reduced the protein secretion levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and MCP-1 in BALF and the RNA expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, MCP-1, and MMP-12 in lung tissue compared with mice only exposed to CS. Moreover, MMP-12 in serum was down regulated in Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract treated mice compared with CS-exposed mice. Finally, a morphometric analysis of the lungs of Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract treated mice demonstrated a significant reduction in airspace size compared to mice only exposed to CS. Our results show that Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract reduces lung inflammation and airspace enlargement in a CS-exposed mouse model. These data indicate that Lilium lancifolium Thunb. root extract is a therapeutic candidate for pulmonary inflammation and emphysema

  20. Assessment of Quercus flowering trends in NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Jato, V; Rodríguez-Rajo, F J; Fernandez-González, M; Aira, M J

    2015-05-01

    This paper sought to chart airborne Quercus pollen counts over the last 20 years in the region of Galicia (NW Spain) with a view to detecting the possible influence of climate change on the Quercus airborne pollen season (APS). Pollen data from Ourense, Santiago de Compostela, Vigo and Lugo were used. The Quercus airborne pollen season was characterized in terms of the following parameters: pollen season start and end dates, peak pollen count, pollen season length and pollen index. Several methods, dates and threshold temperatures for determining the chill and heat requirements needed to trigger flowering were applied. A diverse APS onset timing sequence was observed for the four cities as Quercus flowers few days in advance in Vigo. The variations observed could be related to differences in the meteorological conditions or the thermal requirements needed for flowering. Thermal requirements differed depending on local climate conditions in the study cities: the lowest values for chilling accumulation were recorded in Vigo and the highest in Lugo, whereas the lowest heat accumulation was achieved in Vigo. Differences in APS trends between cities may reflect variations in weather-related trends. A significant trend towards rising Quercus pollen indices and higher maximum daily mean pollen counts was observed in Ourense, linked to the more marked temperature increase across southern Galicia. A non-uniform trend towards increased temperatures was noted over the study period, particularly in late summer and early autumn in all four study cities. Additionally, an increase in spring temperatures was observed in south-western Galicia.

  1. Gymnomyces xerophilus sp. nov. (sequestrate Russulaceae), an ectomycorrhizal associate of Quercus in California.

    Treesearch

    Matthew E. Smith; James M. Trappe; David M. Rizzo; Steven L. Miller

    2006-01-01

    Gymnomyces xerophilus sp. nov., a sequestrate species in the Russulaceae, is characterized and described morphologically as a new species from Quercus-dominated woodlands in California. ITS sequences recovered from healthy, ectomycorrhizal roots of Quercus douglasii and Q....

  2. Gum resin of Boswellia serrata inhibited human monocytic (THP-1) cell activation and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kokkiripati, Praveen K; Bhakshu, Lepakshi Md; Marri, Swathi; Padmasree, K; Row, Anupama T; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Tetali, Sarada D

    2011-09-01

    Stem bark gum resin extract of Boswellia serrata is traditionally used in India for its hemostatic, antiinflammatory and cardiovascular health effects and it is named as Śallakī in Ayurvedic medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative and antithrombotic properties of stem bark gum resin extracts of Boswellia serrata (BS). The inhibitory activity of the BSWE and BSAE on FeCl(3) induced lipid peroxidation (in vitro) in rat liver and heart homogenates was measured spectrophotometrically. Their effect on H(2)O(2) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in human monocytic (THP-1) cells was investigated by tracking intensity of a cell permeable fluorescent dye, H(2)DCFDA and subjecting the cell samples to confocal microscopy. Further, the effect of BSAE and BSWE on ADP-induced platelet aggregation was assessed using a multimode detection plate reader, plasma coagulation times using an automated blood coagulation analyzer and on human blood clotting factors Xa and XIa using chromogenic substrate. Phytomarker analysis of the water (BSWE) and hydroalcoholic (BSAE) extracts of BS-gum resin was done through HPLC using a standard compound AKβBA. BSAE and BSWE inhibited, to varied extents, the lipid peroxidation in liver (80%) and heart (50%) tissue homogenates of male Wistar rats. Further, BSAE (30 μg dwt/mL) and BSWE (300 μg dwt/mL) attenuated ≥ 60% of H(2)O(2) mediated ROS generation in THP-1 cells. In case of standard compounds, ascorbate (20 μg dwt/mL) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) (10 μg dwt/mL) completely scavenged ROS in the cells. BSAE and BSWE at 3 mg dwt/mL completely inhibited ADP induced platelet aggregation and activities were comparable to 20 μg/mL of heparin. The extracts also showed very high activity in prolonging coagulation time periods. Both types of extracts extended prothrombin time (PT) from ∼13 to >60s and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) from ∼32s to >90s. BSAE inhibited clotting factors Xa

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the black mud crab, Scylla serrata (Crustacea: Brachyura: Portunidae) and its phylogenetic position among (pan)crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Jondeung, Amnuay; Karinthanyakit, Wirangrong; Kaewkhumsan, Jitlada

    2012-12-01

    The black mud crab, Scylla serrata (Forskål 1775), is the most economically important edible crab in South-East Asia. In the present study, the complete mitochondrial genome of black mud crab, S. serrata, was determined with the sequential polymerase chain reaction and primer walking sequencing. The complete mitochondrial genome was 15,721 bp in length with an A+T content of 69.2 % and contained 37 mitochondrial genes (13 protein coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes) and a control region (CR). The analysis of the CR sequence shows that it contains a multitude of repetitive fragments which can fold into hairpin-like or secondary structures and conserved elements as in other arthropods. The gene order of S. serrata mainly retains as the pancrustacean ground pattern, except for a single translocation of trnH. The gene arrangement of S. serrata appears to be a typical feature of portunid crabs. Phylogenetic analyses with concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 PCGs establishes that S. serrata in a well-supported monophyletic Portunidae and is consistent with previous morphological classification. Moreover, the phylogenomic results strongly support monophyletic Pancrustacea (Hexapoda plus "Crustaceans"). Within Pancrustacea, this study identifies Malacostraca + Entomostraca and Branchiopoda as the sister group to Hexapoda, which confirms that "Crustacea" is not monophyletic. Cirripedia + Remipedia appear to be a basal lineage of Pancrustacea. The present study also provides considerable data for the application of both population and phylogenetic studies of other crab species.

  4. Cryopreservation of Quercus suber and Quercus ilex embryonic axes: in vitro culture, desiccation and cooling factors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Benito, M Elena; Prieto, Roberto-Moreno; Herradon, Esther; Martin, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    This study examines different factors included in the cryopreservation protocols for Quercus ilex and Q. suber embryonic axes. In vitro incubation temperature played an important role in the appropriate development of Q. ilex axes, as 15 degrees C was superior to 25 degrees C. Q. suber axes proved to be more sensitive to desiccation and cooling. Poor survival (35%) was observed when axes were included into cryovials and then in liquid nitrogen, and none when immersed in sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (-210 degrees C). Q. ilex axes showed poorly organised development in vitro (c. 50% of non-cooled axes showed shoot development). However, c. 80% survival was observed after cryopreservation (either in liquid nitrogen or sub-cooled liquid nitrogen at 0.34 g water / g dry weight), of which c. 15% showed shoot development.

  5. Comparison of Three Different DNA Extraction Methods for Linguatula serrata as a Food Born Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    ESLAMI, Gilda; KHALATBARI-LIMAKI, Sepideh; EHRAMPOUSH, Mohammad Hasan; GHOLAMREZAEI, Mostafa; HAJIMOHAMMADI, Bahador; ORYAN, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the most important items in molecular characterization of food-borne pathogens is high quality genomic DNA. In this study, we investigated three protocols and compared their simplicity, duration and costs for extracting genomic DNA from Linguatula serrata. Methods: The larvae were collected from the sheep’s visceral organs from the Yazd Slaughterhouse during May 2013. DNA extraction was done in three different methods, including commercial DNA extraction kit, Phenol Chloroform Isoamylalcohol (PCI), and salting out. Extracted DNA in each method was assessed for quantity and quality using spectrophotometery and agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. Results: The less duration was regarding to commercial DNA extraction kit and then salting out protocol. The cost benefit one was salting out and then PCI method. The best quantity was regarding to PCI with 72.20±29.20 ng/μl, and purity of OD260/OD280 in 1.76±0.947. Agarose gel electrophoresis for assessing the quality found all the same. Conclusion: Salting out is introduced as the best method for DNA extraction from L. seratta as a food-borne pathogen with the least costand appropriate purity. Although, the best purity was regarding to PCI but PCI is not safe as salting out. In addition, the duration of salting out was less than PCI. The least duration was seen in commercial DNA extraction kit, but it is expensive and therefore is not recommended for developing countries where consumption of offal is common. PMID:28761484

  6. Dominance genetic variance for traits under directional selection in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Sztepanacz, Jacqueline L; Blows, Mark W

    2015-05-01

    In contrast to our growing understanding of patterns of additive genetic variance in single- and multi-trait combinations, the relative contribution of nonadditive genetic variance, particularly dominance variance, to multivariate phenotypes is largely unknown. While mechanisms for the evolution of dominance genetic variance have been, and to some degree remain, subject to debate, the pervasiveness of dominance is widely recognized and may play a key role in several evolutionary processes. Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the contribution of dominance variance to phenotypic variance may increase with the correlation between a trait and fitness; however, direct tests of this hypothesis are few. Using a multigenerational breeding design in an unmanipulated population of Drosophila serrata, we estimated additive and dominance genetic covariance matrices for multivariate wing-shape phenotypes, together with a comprehensive measure of fitness, to determine whether there is an association between directional selection and dominance variance. Fitness, a trait unequivocally under directional selection, had no detectable additive genetic variance, but significant dominance genetic variance contributing 32% of the phenotypic variance. For single and multivariate morphological traits, however, no relationship was observed between trait-fitness correlations and dominance variance. A similar proportion of additive and dominance variance was found to contribute to phenotypic variance for single traits, and double the amount of additive compared to dominance variance was found for the multivariate trait combination under directional selection. These data suggest that for many fitness components a positive association between directional selection and dominance genetic variance may not be expected.

  7. Comparing complex fitness surfaces: among-population variation in mutual sexual selection in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Howard D; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Blows, Mark W

    2008-04-01

    Despite a dramatic increase in empirical estimates of phenotypic selection over the past two decades, we remain remarkably ignorant about variation in the multivariate fitness surfaces that shape the adaptive landscape. We develop a novel approach for quantifying patterns of spatial and/or temporal variation in multivariate selection that directly compares vectors of linear selection gradients (beta) and matrices of nonlinear selection gradients (gamma) that describe the multivariate fitness surface in each population. We apply this approach to estimates of sexual selection on a suite of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) in males and females from nine geographic populations of Drosophila serrata. In males, variation in linear sexual selection was associated with the presence of the related species Drosophila birchii, suggesting that female mate preferences for male CHCs differ between sympatry and allopatry. This is consistent with previous experimental results suggesting that reproductive character displacement of male CHCs has resulted from selection caused by the presence of D. birchii. No significant associations were found for nonlinear sexual selection in males. In females, large-scale variation in both linear and nonlinear sexual selection was negatively associated with assumed-neutral population genetic structure, suggesting a key role for chance events in male mate preference divergence.

  8. Functional role of anthocyanins in the leaves of Quintinia serrata A. Cunn.

    PubMed

    Gould, K S; Markham, K R; Smith, R H; Goris, J J

    2000-06-01

    The protective functions that have been ascribed to anthocyanins in leaves can be performed as effectively by a number of other compounds. The possibility that anthocyanins accumulate most abundantly in leaves deficient in other phytoprotective pigments has been tested. Pigment concentrations and their histological distribution were surveyed for a sample of 1000 leaves from a forest population of Quintinia serrata, which displays natural polymorphism in leaf colour. Eight leaf phenotypes were recognized according to their patterns of red coloration. Anthocyanins were observed in almost all combinations of every leaf tissue, but were most commonly located in the vacuoles of photosynthetic cells. Red leaves contained two anthocyanins (Cy-3-glc and Cy-3-gal), epicuticular flavones, epidermal flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids, chlorophylls, and carotenoids. Green leaves lacked anthocyanins, but had otherwise similar pigment profiles. Foliar anthocyanin levels varied significantly between branches and among trees, but were not correlated to concentrations of other pigments. Anthocyanins were most abundant in older leaves on trees under canopies with south-facing gaps. These data indicate that anthocyanins are associated with photosynthesis, but do not serve an auxiliary phytoprotective role. They may serve to protect shade-adapted chloroplasts from brief exposure to high intensity sunflecks.

  9. Comparing the intersex genetic correlation for fitness across novel environments in the fruit fly, Drosophila serrata

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, D; Delcourt, M; Rundle, H D

    2014-01-01

    Sexually antagonistic genetic variation can pose limits to the independent evolution and adaptation of the sexes. The extent of sexually antagonistic variation is reflected in the intersex genetic correlation for fitness (rwFM). Previous estimates of this correlation have been mostly limited to populations in environments to which they are already well adapted, making it difficult to gauge the importance of sexually antagonistic genetic variance during the early stages of adaptation, such as that occurring following abrupt environmental change or upon the colonization of new habitat. Here we assayed male and female lifetime fitness in a population of Drosophila serrata in four novel laboratory environments. We found that rwFM varied significantly across environments, with point estimates ranging from positive to negative values of considerable magnitude. We also found that the variability among estimates was because, at least in part, of significant differences among environments in the genetic variances of both male and female fitness, with no evidence of any significant changes in the intersex covariance itself, although standard errors of these estimates were large. Our results illustrate the unpredictable nature of rwFM in novel environments and suggest that, although sexually antagonistic genetic variance can be pronounced in some novel environments, it may have little effect in constraining the early stages of adaptation in others. PMID:24045292

  10. Mangrove crab ( Scylla serrata) populations may sometimes be best managed locally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewel, Katherine C.

    2008-02-01

    Mangrove crabs ( Scylla serrata) were trapped in summer and fall 2004 at four sites, each in a separate municipality on the Pacific island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia. Carapace width (CW) of the 219 crabs averaged 15.1 ± 0.13 cm (SE), slightly larger than the mean size of 221 crabs trapped from the same sites 4 y earlier. Mean CW of the 56 crabs in the upper quartile was 17.5 ± 0.17 cm (SE). In the current study, both sizes of crabs as well as degree and direction of change in size from summer to winter varied among the municipalities. The average CW of crabs from one municipality was significantly larger than from any of the other municipalities. Average CW of crabs from another municipality decreased from summer to fall. These results suggest that although the island-wide crab population appears to be stable, some municipalities may wish to enact site-specific management policies to obtain a harvest regimen that will meet local needs.

  11. Plasticity versus environmental canalization: population differences in thermal responses along a latitudinal gradient in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Liefting, Maartje; Hoffmann, Ary A; Ellers, Jacintha

    2009-08-01

    The phenotypic plasticity of traits, defined as the ability of a genotype to express different phenotypic values of the trait across a range of environments, can vary between habitats depending on levels of temporal and spatial heterogeneity. Other traits can be insensitive to environmental perturbations and show environmental canalization. We tested levels of phenotypic plasticity in diverse Drosophila serrata populations along a latitudinal cline ranging from a temperate, variable climate to a tropical, stable climate by measuring developmental rate and size-related traits at three temperatures (16 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 28 degrees C). We then compared the slopes of the thermal reaction norms among populations. The 16-22 degrees C part of the reaction norms for developmental rate was flatter (more canalized) for the temperate populations than for the tropical populations. However, slopes for the reaction norms of the two morphological traits (wing size, wing:thorax ratio), were steeper (more plastic) in the temperate versus the tropical populations over the entire thermal range. The different latitudinal patterns in plasticity for developmental rate and the morphological traits may reflect contrasting selection pressures along the tropical-temperate thermal gradient.

  12. Time flies: Time of day and social environment affect cuticular hydrocarbon sexual displays in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Susan N; Toumishey, Ethan; Rundle, Howard D

    2014-10-07

    Recent work on Drosophila cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) challenges a historical assumption that CHCs in flies are largely invariant. Here, we examine the effect of time of day and social environment on a suite of sexually selected CHCs in Drosophila serrata. We demonstrate that males become more attractive to females during the time of day that flies are most active and when most matings occur, but females become less attractive to males during the same time of day. These opposing temporal changes may reflect differences in selection among the sexes. To evaluate the effect of social environment on male CHC attractiveness, we manipulated male opportunity for mating: male flies were housed either alone, with five females, with five males or with five males and five females. We found that males had the most attractive CHCs when with females, and less attractive CHCs when with competitor males. Social environment mediated how male CHC attractiveness cycled: males housed with females and/or other males showed temporal changes in CHC attractiveness, whereas males housed alone did not. In total, our results demonstrate temporal patterning of male CHCs that is dependent on social environment, and suggest that such changes may be beneficial to males.

  13. Enhanced anticancer potential of encapsulated solid lipid nanoparticles of TPD: a novel triterpenediol from Boswellia serrata.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Shashi; Kakkar, Vandita; Pal, Harish Chandra; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Mondhe, D M; Sharma, P R; Taneja, Subhash Chandra; Kaur, Indu Pal; Singh, Jaswant; Saxena, A K

    2013-01-07

    A pentacyclic triterpenediol (TPD) from Boswellia serrata has significant cytotoxic and apoptotic potential in a large number of human cancer cell lines. To enhance its anticancer potential, it was successfully formulated into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) by the microemulsion method with 75% drug entrapment efficiency. SEM and TEM studies indicated that TPD-SLNs were regular, solid, and spherical particles in the range of 100-200 nm, and the system indicated that they were more or less stable upon storing up to six months. TPD loaded SLNs showed significantly higher cytotoxic/antitumor potential than the parent drug. TPD-SLNs have 40-60% higher cytotoxic and apoptotic potential than the parent drug in terms of IC(50), extent of apoptosis, DNA damage, and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins like TNF-R1, cytochrome-c, and PARP cleavage in HL-60 cells. Moreover, blank SLNs did not have any cytotoxic effect on the cancer as well as in normal mouse peritoneal macrophages. The in vivo antitumor potential of TPD-SLNs was significantly higher than that of TPD alone in Sarcoma-180 solid tumor bearing mice. Therefore, SLNs of TPD successfully increased the apoptotic and anticancer potential of TPD at comparable doses (both in vitro and in vivo). This work provides new insight into improvising the therapeutic efficacy of TPD by adopting novel delivery strategies such as solid lipid nanoparticles.

  14. Curcumin and Boswellia serrata gum resin extract inhibit chikungunya and vesicular stomatitis virus infections in vitro.

    PubMed

    von Rhein, Christine; Weidner, Tatjana; Henß, Lisa; Martin, Judith; Weber, Christopher; Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever and has infected millions of people mainly in developing countries. The associated disease is characterized by rash, high fever, and severe arthritis that can persist for years. CHIKV has adapted to Aedes albopictus, which also inhabits temperate regions including Europe and the United States of America. CHIKV has recently caused large outbreaks in Latin America. No treatment or licensed CHIKV vaccine exists. Traditional medicines are known to have anti-viral effects; therefore, we examined whether curcumin or Boswellia serrata gum resin extract have antiviral activity against CHIKV. Both compounds blocked entry of CHIKV Env-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors and inhibited CHIKV infection in vitro. In addition, vesicular stomatitis virus vector particles and viral infections were also inhibited to the same extent, indicating a broad antiviral activity. Although the bioavailability of these compounds is rather poor, they might be used as a lead structure to develop more effective antiviral drugs or might be used topically to prevent CHIKV spread in the skin after mosquito bites.

  15. Heritable Micro-environmental Variance Covaries with Fitness in an Outbred Population of Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Sztepanacz, Jacqueline L; McGuigan, Katrina; Blows, Mark W

    2017-08-01

    The genetic basis of stochastic variation within a defined environment, and the consequences of such micro-environmental variance for fitness are poorly understood . Using a multigenerational breeding design in Drosophila serrata, we demonstrated that the micro-environmental variance in a set of morphological wing traits in a randomly mating population had significant additive genetic variance in most single wing traits. Although heritability was generally low (<1%), coefficients of additive genetic variance were of a magnitude typical of other morphological traits, indicating that the micro-environmental variance is an evolvable trait. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that the micro-environmental variance in wings was genetically correlated among single traits, indicating that common mechanisms of environmental buffering exist for this functionally related set of traits. In addition, through the dominance genetic covariance between the major axes of micro-environmental variance and fitness, we demonstrated that micro-environmental variance shares a genetic basis with fitness, and that the pattern of selection is suggestive of variance-reducing selection acting on micro-environmental variance. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. The effect of Boswellia Serrata on neurorecovery following diffuse axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Moein, Payam; Abbasi Fard, Salman; Asnaashari, Ali; Baratian, Hajar; Barekatain, Majid; Tavakoli, Naser; Moein, Houshang

    2013-01-01

    This pilot trial was conducted to establish whether Boswellia Serrata (BS), a traditional herbal medicine, could improve the outcome of patients who have diffuse axonal injury (DAI). In total, 38 patients with pure DAI were enrolled in this 12-week, double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (group A, n = 20) or BS capsules (group B, n = 18) for 6 weeks and then switched to the other intervention for another 6 weeks. The disability rating scale (DRS) was used to assess the outcome at 2-, 6- and 12-weeks post-trauma. A non-significant trend for improvement of DRS total scores was observed after the use of BS. Regarding the DRS sub-scores, however, there was significant improvement in 'cognitive ability to self-care' during the second 6 weeks in group A on BS compared to an insignificant spontaneous recovery in group B during the same period on placebo. Moreover, both groups experienced a close-to-significant increase in the cognitive function-related items of the DRS during the periods they were on BS. The reported adverse events were all of mild quality and had similar frequency between the groups. These results suggest that BS resin does not significantly affect general outcome, but may enhance the cognitive outcome of patients with DAI.

  17. The contribution of spontaneous mutations to thermal sensitivity curve variation in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Camille A L; McGuigan, Katrina; Wilson, Robbie S; Blows, Mark W; Chenoweth, Stephen F

    2014-06-01

    Many traits studied in ecology and evolutionary biology change their expression in response to a continuously varying environmental factor. One well-studied example are thermal performance curves (TPCs); continuous reaction norms that describe the relationship between organismal performance and temperature and are useful for understanding the trade-offs involved in thermal adaptation. We characterized curves describing the thermal sensitivity of voluntary locomotor activity in a set of 66 spontaneous mutation accumulation lines in the fly Drosophila serrata. Factor-analytic modeling of the mutational variance-covariance matrix, M, revealed support for three axes of mutational variation in males and two in females. These independent axes of mutational variance corresponded well to the major axes of TPC variation required for different types of thermal adaptation; "faster-slower" representing changes in performance largely independent of temperature, and the "hotter-colder" and "generalist-specialist" axes, representing trade-offs. In contrast to its near-absence from standing variance in this species, a "faster-slower" axis, accounted for most mutational variance (75% in males and 66% in females) suggesting selection may easily fix or remove these types of mutations in outbred populations. Axes resembling the "hotter-colder" and "generalist-specialist" modes of variation contributed less mutational variance but nonetheless point to an appreciable input of new mutations that may contribute to thermal adaptation.

  18. Comparison of Three Different DNA Extraction Methods for Linguatula serrata as a Food Born Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Gilda; Khalatbari-Limaki, Sepideh; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hasan; Gholamrezaei, Mostafa; Hajimohammadi, Bahador; Oryan, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important items in molecular characterization of food-borne pathogens is high quality genomic DNA. In this study, we investigated three protocols and compared their simplicity, duration and costs for extracting genomic DNA from Linguatula serrata. The larvae were collected from the sheep's visceral organs from the Yazd Slaughterhouse during May 2013. DNA extraction was done in three different methods, including commercial DNA extraction kit, Phenol Chloroform Isoamylalcohol (PCI), and salting out. Extracted DNA in each method was assessed for quantity and quality using spectrophotometery and agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. The less duration was regarding to commercial DNA extraction kit and then salting out protocol. The cost benefit one was salting out and then PCI method. The best quantity was regarding to PCI with 72.20±29.20 ng/μl, and purity of OD260/OD280 in 1.76±0.947. Agarose gel electrophoresis for assessing the quality found all the same. Salting out is introduced as the best method for DNA extraction from L. seratta as a food-borne pathogen with the least costand appropriate purity. Although, the best purity was regarding to PCI but PCI is not safe as salting out. In addition, the duration of salting out was less than PCI. The least duration was seen in commercial DNA extraction kit, but it is expensive and therefore is not recommended for developing countries where consumption of offal is common.

  19. Dominance Genetic Variance for Traits Under Directional Selection in Drosophila serrata

    PubMed Central

    Sztepanacz, Jacqueline L.; Blows, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to our growing understanding of patterns of additive genetic variance in single- and multi-trait combinations, the relative contribution of nonadditive genetic variance, particularly dominance variance, to multivariate phenotypes is largely unknown. While mechanisms for the evolution of dominance genetic variance have been, and to some degree remain, subject to debate, the pervasiveness of dominance is widely recognized and may play a key role in several evolutionary processes. Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the contribution of dominance variance to phenotypic variance may increase with the correlation between a trait and fitness; however, direct tests of this hypothesis are few. Using a multigenerational breeding design in an unmanipulated population of Drosophila serrata, we estimated additive and dominance genetic covariance matrices for multivariate wing-shape phenotypes, together with a comprehensive measure of fitness, to determine whether there is an association between directional selection and dominance variance. Fitness, a trait unequivocally under directional selection, had no detectable additive genetic variance, but significant dominance genetic variance contributing 32% of the phenotypic variance. For single and multivariate morphological traits, however, no relationship was observed between trait–fitness correlations and dominance variance. A similar proportion of additive and dominance variance was found to contribute to phenotypic variance for single traits, and double the amount of additive compared to dominance variance was found for the multivariate trait combination under directional selection. These data suggest that for many fitness components a positive association between directional selection and dominance genetic variance may not be expected. PMID:25783700

  20. Ixeris dentata (Thunb. Ex Thunb.) Nakai Extract Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Akt/NF-κB Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seong-Ah; Lee, Hae-Nim; Choo, Gang-Sik; Kim, Hyeong-Jin; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Jung, Ji-Youn

    2017-01-01

    Ixeris dentata (Thunb. Ex Thunb.) Nakai (ID) exhibits various physiological activities, and its related plant derived-products are expected to represent promising cancer therapeutic agents. However, the anticancer effects of ID extract on breast cancer cells classified as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects and analyzed the molecular mechanism of ID extract in T47D, MCF-7 (ER-, PR-positive, HER2-negative), SK-BR-3(ER-, PR-negative, HER2-positive), and MDA-MB-231 (Triple-negative) through in vitro studies. Additionally, we examined its anti-tumor effects through in vivo studies. Our findings indicated that ID extract-induced apoptosis was mediated via various survival pathways on four breast cancer cells by identifying the factors including Bcl-2 family, phospho-Akt and phospho-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Based on in vitro findings that induced apoptosis via Akt-NF-κB signaling, we investigated the effects of ID extract on mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cells. The results showed that ID extract significantly decreased MDA-MB-231 tumor volume and weight via inducing apoptosis by suppressing phospho-Akt. Overall, these results indicate that ID extract induces apoptosis through the Akt-NF-κB signaling pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and tumors, and it may serve as a therapeutic agent for triple-negative human breast cancer. PMID:28134814

  1. Vicissitudes of oxidative stress biomarkers in the estuarine crab Scylla serrata with reference to dry and wet weather conditions in Ennore estuary, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Ragunathan, M G

    2017-03-15

    The primary objective of this study was to understand the impact of monsoon and summer seasons on the Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB's) and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds (PHC's) load in Ennore estuary and how the physiological response of estuarine Scylla serrata inhabiting in this estuary changed with reference to antioxidant defense. Seasonal levels of PCB's and PHC's were assessed in the water along with their bioaccumulation in gills, hemolymph, hepatopancreas and ovary of S. serrata. Concentration of PCB's and PHC's in water and their bioaccumulation was found to be higher in summer season when compared to monsoon season. Enzymic antioxidant assays [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST)]; non-enzymic antioxidant assays [glutathione (GSH), vitamin C, vitamin E] and macromolecular alterations [membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO), and DNA Damage (strand breaks)] were assessed in the gills, hemolymph and hepatopancreas of S. serrata. There was a significant (p<0.05) upregulation in lipid peroxidation activity and DNA damage activity collected during the summer season when compared to the pre- and post-monsoon seasons. On the contrary, the enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants exhibited significant (p<0.05) down regulation in the gills, hemolymph, hepatopancreas and ovary of S. serrata. Oxidative stress biomarkers represented a significant (p<0.05) maximum in gills when compared to hemolymph and hepatopancreas of S. serrata. Present study provided scientific evidences of how the antioxidant defense status of S. serrata responded to PCB's and PAH's stress with reference to seasonal vicissitudes, which indirectly represented the environmental health conditions of the estuary.

  2. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over study to evaluate the analgesic activity of Boswellia serrata in healthy volunteers using mechanical pain model.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathi, K; Chandra, U Shobha Jagdish; Soanker, Radhika; Rani, P Usha

    2014-01-01

    Experimental pain models in human healthy volunteers are advantageous for early evaluation of analgesics. All efforts to develop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which are devoid of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system effects are still far from achieving a breakthrough. Hence we evaluated the analgesic activity of an ayurvedic drug, Boswellia serrata by using validated human pain models which has shown its analgesic activity both in-vitro and preclinical studies to evaluate the analgesic activity of single oral dose (125 mg, 2 capsules) of Boswellia serrata compared to placebo using mechanical pain model in healthy human subjects. After taking written informed consent, twelve healthy subjects were randomized (1:1) to receive single oral dose of Boswellia serrata (Shallaki (®)) 125 mg, 2 capsules or identical placebo in a crossover design. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesymeter (by Randall Selitto test) at baseline and at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs after test drug administration. Pain Threshold force and time and Pain Tolerance force and time were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done by paired t-test. Twelve healthy volunteers have completed the study. Mean percentage change from baseline in Pain Threshold force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly increased [Force: 9.7 ± 11.0 vs 2.9 ± 3.4 (P = 0.05) and time: 9.7 ± 10.7 vs 2.8 ± 3.4 (P = 0.04)] at third hr. Mean Percentage change from baseline in Pain Tolerance force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs. In the present study, Boswellia serrata significantly increased the Pain Threshold and Pain Tolerance force and time compared to placebo. Both study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug.

  3. Mycorrhizas on nursery and field seedlings of Quercus garryana

    Treesearch

    Dariene Southworth; Elizabeth M. Carrington; Jonathan L. Frank; Peter Gould; Connie A. Harrington; Warren D. Devine

    2009-01-01

    Oak woodland regeneration and restoration requires that seedlings develop mycorrhizas, yet the need for this mutualistic association is often overlooked. In this study, we asked whether Quercus garryana seedlings in nursery beds acquire mycorrhizas without artificial inoculation or access to a mycorrhizal network of other ectomycorrhizal hosts. We...

  4. Quercus garryana communities in the Puget Trough, Washington.

    Treesearch

    D.R. Thysell; A.B. Carey

    2001-01-01

    Among the legacies of the Vashon Glaciation are Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana), prairie, wetland, and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) communities arrayed in a mosaic in the Puget Sound Area (PSA). Much of this mosaic has been destroyed. The largest remaining portion is on Fort Lewis Military Reservation. We examined...

  5. The physiological diversity and similarity of ten Quercus species

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; M.N. Angelov; R.R. Doong; W.R. Harms; Paul P. Kormanik; C.C. Black

    1994-01-01

    Based on anatomical, photosynthetic, and biochemical data, the range of physiological differences and similarities was defined for ten Quercus species. There were no correlations between species' site adaptability, leaf anatomy and photosynthetic rate (A). It is concluded from these data that each oak species must be treated individually when incorporated into...

  6. Effects of prescribed burning on leaves and flowering Quercus garryana

    Treesearch

    David H. Peter; James K. Agee; Douglas G. Sprugel

    2011-01-01

    Many woodland understories are managed with prescribed fire. While prescribed burns intended to manipulate understory vegetation and fuels usually do not cause excessive tree mortality, sublethal canopy damage may occur and can affect tree vigor and reproductive output. We monitored Quercus garryana trees in western Washington, USA with multiple...

  7. In vitro propagation of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.)

    Treesearch

    G. Vengadesan; Paula M. Pijut

    2009-01-01

    In vitro propagation of northern red oak (Quercus rubra) shoots was successful from cotyledonary node explants excised from 8-wk-old in vitro grown seedlings. Initially, four shoots per explant were obtained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 4.4 µM 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), 0.45 ...

  8. [Determination of constant and trace elements in Ranunculus ternatus thunb by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Cheng; Ouyang, Ping-kai

    2005-04-01

    The determination of twenty one kinds of constant and trace elements in Chinese herb Ranunculus ternatus thunb was performed by ICP-AES. The results show that K, Fe, Ca, Cr, Mg, Mn, Zn, Co, Cu, Ni, Se and Sr are relatively rich in Ranunculus ternatus and the content of Pb, Cd and As are very low. The ratio of the content of Zn to that of Cu is about 3, which is consistent with the relative content level of Zn and Cu contained in many anticancer Chinese traditional plants.

  9. Pharmacological activity of compounds extracted from persimmon peel (Diospyros kaki THUNB.).

    PubMed

    Fukai, Satomi; Tanimoto, Shinichi; Maeda, Aki; Fukuda, Hitomi; Okada, Yoshiharu; Nomura, Masato

    2009-01-01

    Persimmon peels (Diospyros kaki THUNB.) are discarded during the production of dried fruit. The 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (8) which is component of persimmon peel had high antioxidant activity on the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging assay and SOD (superoxide dismutase) assay. And (8) had higher tyrosinase inhibiting activity than that of arbutin using both L-tyrosine and L-DOPA as substrates. In addition, tyrosinase inhibiting activity of synthesized 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol glycoside (8a) was studied. (8a) had tyrosinase inhibiting activity, suggesting that (8a) has possibilities for ingredient of cosmetics that are possessed of whitening effect.

  10. Interspecific variation in functional traits of oak seedlings (Quercus ilex, Quercus trojana, Quercus virgiliana) grown under artificial drought and fire conditions.

    PubMed

    Chiatante, D; Tognetti, R; Scippa, G S; Congiu, T; Baesso, B; Terzaghi, M; Montagnoli, A

    2015-07-01

    To face summer drought and wildfire in Mediterranean-type ecosystems, plants adopt different strategies that involve considerable rearrangements of biomass allocation and physiological activity. This paper analyses morphological and physiological traits in seedlings of three oak species (Quercus ilex, Quercus trojana and Quercus virgiliana) co-occurring under natural conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate species-specific characteristics and the response of these oak seedlings to drought stress and fire treatment. Seedlings were kept in a growth chamber that mimicked natural environmental conditions. All three species showed a good degree of tolerance to drought and fire treatments. Differences in specific biomass allocation patterns and physiological traits resulted in phenotypic differences between species. In Q. ilex, drought tolerance depended upon adjustment of the allocation pattern. Q. trojana seedlings undergoing mild to severe drought presented a higher photosystem II (PSII) efficiency than control seedlings. Moreover, Q. trojana showed a very large root system, which corresponded to higher soil area exploitation, and bigger leaf midrib vascular bundles than the other two species. Morphological and physiological performances indicated Q. trojana as the most tolerant to drought and fire. These characteristics contribute to a high recruitment potential of Q. trojana seedlings, which might be the reason for the dominance of this species under natural conditions. Drought increase as a result of climate change is expected to favour Q. trojana, leading to an increase in its spatial distribution.

  11. Plastome data reveal multiple geographic origins of Quercus Group Ilex

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Guido W.; Papini, Alessio; Vessella, Federico; Cardoni, Simone; Tordoni, Enrico; Piredda, Roberta; Franc, Alain; Denk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from the plastome are currently the main source for assessing taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships in flowering plants and their historical biogeography at all hierarchical levels. One major exception is the large and economically important genus Quercus (oaks). Whereas differentiation patterns of the nuclear genome are in agreement with morphology and the fossil record, diversity patterns in the plastome are at odds with established taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships. However, the extent and evolutionary implications of this incongruence has yet to be fully uncovered. The DNA sequence divergence of four Euro-Mediterranean Group Ilex oak species (Quercus ilex L., Q. coccifera L., Q. aucheri Jaub. & Spach., Q. alnifolia Poech.) was explored at three chloroplast markers (rbcL, trnK/matK, trnH-psbA). Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed including worldwide members of additional 55 species representing all Quercus subgeneric groups. Family and order sequence data were harvested from gene banks to better frame the observed divergence in larger taxonomic contexts. We found a strong geographic sorting in the focal group and the genus in general that is entirely decoupled from species boundaries. High plastid divergence in members of Quercus Group Ilex, including haplotypes shared with related, but long isolated oak lineages, point towards multiple geographic origins of this group of oaks. The results suggest that incomplete lineage sorting and repeated phases of asymmetrical introgression among ancestral lineages of Group Ilex and two other main Groups of Eurasian oaks (Cyclobalanopsis and Cerris) caused this complex pattern. Comparison with the current phylogenetic synthesis also suggests an initial high- versus mid-latitude biogeographic split within Quercus. High plastome plasticity of Group Ilex reflects geographic area disruptions, possibly linked with high tectonic activity of past and modern distribution ranges, that did not

  12. Plastome data reveal multiple geographic origins of Quercus Group Ilex.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Grimm, Guido W; Papini, Alessio; Vessella, Federico; Cardoni, Simone; Tordoni, Enrico; Piredda, Roberta; Franc, Alain; Denk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from the plastome are currently the main source for assessing taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships in flowering plants and their historical biogeography at all hierarchical levels. One major exception is the large and economically important genus Quercus (oaks). Whereas differentiation patterns of the nuclear genome are in agreement with morphology and the fossil record, diversity patterns in the plastome are at odds with established taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships. However, the extent and evolutionary implications of this incongruence has yet to be fully uncovered. The DNA sequence divergence of four Euro-Mediterranean Group Ilex oak species (Quercus ilex L., Q. coccifera L., Q. aucheri Jaub. & Spach., Q. alnifolia Poech.) was explored at three chloroplast markers (rbcL, trnK/matK, trnH-psbA). Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed including worldwide members of additional 55 species representing all Quercus subgeneric groups. Family and order sequence data were harvested from gene banks to better frame the observed divergence in larger taxonomic contexts. We found a strong geographic sorting in the focal group and the genus in general that is entirely decoupled from species boundaries. High plastid divergence in members of Quercus Group Ilex, including haplotypes shared with related, but long isolated oak lineages, point towards multiple geographic origins of this group of oaks. The results suggest that incomplete lineage sorting and repeated phases of asymmetrical introgression among ancestral lineages of Group Ilex and two other main Groups of Eurasian oaks (Cyclobalanopsis and Cerris) caused this complex pattern. Comparison with the current phylogenetic synthesis also suggests an initial high- versus mid-latitude biogeographic split within Quercus. High plastome plasticity of Group Ilex reflects geographic area disruptions, possibly linked with high tectonic activity of past and modern distribution ranges, that did not

  13. Rapid temperature acclimation of leaf respiration rates in Quercus alba and Quercus rubra.

    PubMed

    Bostad, Paul V; Reich, Peter; Lee, Tali

    2003-10-01

    We conducted controlled (chamber) and natural (field) environment experiments on the acclimation of respiration in Quercus alba L. and Quercus rubra L. Three-year-old Louisiana, Indiana and Wisconsin populations of Q. alba were placed in growth chambers and exposed to alternating 5-week periods of cool (20 degrees C mean) and warm (26 degrees C mean) temperatures. We measured respiration rates on fully expanded leaves immediately before and approximately every 2 days after a switch in mean temperature. In a second chamber experiment, 3-year-old potted Q. alba seedlings were exposed to alternating warm (26 degrees C mean) and cool (16 degrees C mean) temperatures at 4-day intervals. Leaf dark respiration rates were measured on days 2, 3 and 4 after each change in temperature. In a third, field-based study, we measured leaf respiration rates in the same three sources of Q. alba and in Arkansas, Indiana and Minnesota sources of Q. rubra before and after a natural 16 degrees C change in mean daily ambient temperature. We observed rapid, significant and similar acclimation of leaf respiration rates in all populations of Q. alba and Q. rubra. Cold-origin populations were no more plastic in their acclimation responses than populations from warmer sites. All geographic sources showed lower respiration rates when measured at 24 degrees C after exposure to higher mean temperatures. Respiration rates decreased 13% with a 6 degrees C increase in mean temperature in the first chamber study, and almost 40% with a 10 degrees C increase in temperature in the second chamber study. Acclimation was rapid in all three studies, occurring after 2 days of exposure to changed temperature regimes. Acclimation was reversible when changes in ambient temperature occurred at 4-day intervals. Respiration response functions, ln(R) = ln(beta0) + beta1T, were statistically different among treatments (cool versus warm, first chamber study) and among sources in a pooled comparison. Pair

  14. Clinical evaluation of a formulation containing Curcuma longa and Boswellia serrata extracts in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kizhakkedath, Reji

    2013-11-01

    A formulation containing Curcuma longa and Boswellia serrata extracts (CB formulation) was evaluated for safety and efficacy in osteoarthritic patients and directly compared with the selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib. In total, 54 subjects were screened, 30 subjects were enrolled and 28 completed the study. The treatment was well tolerated and did not produce any adverse effect in patients, as judged by the vital signs, hemogram, liver and renal function tests. The CB formulation at 500 mg administered twice a day, was more successful than administering celecoxib 100 mg twice a day for symptom scoring and clinical examination. The formulation was found to be safe and no dose-related toxicity was found.

  15. Effects of stomatal development on stomatal conductance and on stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in Syringa oblata and Euonymus japonicus Thunb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing-Jie; Chow, Wah Soon; Liu, Yu-Jun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuang-Dao

    2014-12-01

    During leaf development, the increase in stomatal conductance cannot meet photosynthetic demand for CO2, thus leading to stomatal limitation of photosynthesis (Ls). Considering the crucial influences of stomatal development on stomatal conductance, we speculated whether stomatal development limits photosynthesis to some extent. To test this hypothesis, stomatal development, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis were carefully studied in both Syringa oblata (normal greening species) and Euonymus japonicus Thunb (delayed greening species). Our results show that the size of stomata increased gradually with leaf expansion, resulting in increased stomatal conductance up to the time of full leaf expansion. During this process, photosynthesis also increased steadily. Compared to that in S. oblata, the development of chloroplasts in E. japonicus Thunb was obviously delayed, leading to a delay in the improvement of photosynthetic capacity. Further analysis revealed that before full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation increased rapidly in both S. oblata and E. japonicus Thunb; after full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation continually increased in E. japonicus Thunb. Accordingly, we suggested that the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity is the main factor leading to stomatal limitation during leaf development but that stomatal development can alleviate stomatal limitation with the increase of photosynthesis by controlling gas exchange.

  16. Antisweet natural products. VIII. Structures of hodulosides VI--X from Hovenia dulcis Thunb. var. tomentella Makino.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, K; Nagai, Y; Yoshida, M; Arihara, S

    1993-10-01

    From the Fresh leaves of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. var. tomentella Makino, five five new dammarane glycosides named hodulosides VI-X (1-5) were isolated. Their structures were determined on the basis of chemical and spectral evidence. Hodulosides VII-X showed antisweet activities.

  17. Characterization of Volatile and Polar Compounds of Jiaogulan Tea [Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino] by Hyphenated Analytical Techniques

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Jiaogulan [Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino] is a Chinese medical plant from southern Asia that has rapidly gained popularity and interest for its health-promotive and therapeutic properties. The volatile composition of jiaogulan tea was analyzed by using headspace-solid phase microextraction...

  18. Simultaneous Estimation of Additive and Mutational Genetic Variance in an Outbred Population of Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Aguirre, J David; Blows, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    How new mutations contribute to genetic variation is a key question in biology. Although the evolutionary fate of an allele is largely determined by its heterozygous effect, most estimates of mutational variance and mutational effects derive from highly inbred lines, where new mutations are present in homozygous form. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, middle-class neighborhood (MCN) experiments have been used to assess the fitness effect of new mutations in heterozygous form. However, because MCN populations harbor substantial standing genetic variance, estimates of mutational variance have not typically been available from such experiments. Here we employ a modification of the animal model to analyze data from 22 generations of Drosophila serrata bred in an MCN design. Mutational heritability, measured for eight cuticular hydrocarbons, 10 wing-shape traits, and wing size in this outbred genetic background, ranged from 0.0006 to 0.006 (with one exception), a similar range to that reported from studies employing inbred lines. Simultaneously partitioning the additive and mutational variance in the same outbred population allowed us to quantitatively test the ability of mutation-selection balance models to explain the observed levels of additive and mutational genetic variance. The Gaussian allelic approximation and house-of-cards models, which assume real stabilizing selection on single traits, both overestimated the genetic variance maintained at equilibrium, but the house-of-cards model was a closer fit to the data. This analytical approach has the potential to be broadly applied, expanding our understanding of the dynamics of genetic variance in natural populations.

  19. Simultaneous Estimation of Additive and Mutational Genetic Variance in an Outbred Population of Drosophila serrata

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Katrina; Aguirre, J. David; Blows, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    How new mutations contribute to genetic variation is a key question in biology. Although the evolutionary fate of an allele is largely determined by its heterozygous effect, most estimates of mutational variance and mutational effects derive from highly inbred lines, where new mutations are present in homozygous form. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, middle-class neighborhood (MCN) experiments have been used to assess the fitness effect of new mutations in heterozygous form. However, because MCN populations harbor substantial standing genetic variance, estimates of mutational variance have not typically been available from such experiments. Here we employ a modification of the animal model to analyze data from 22 generations of Drosophila serrata bred in an MCN design. Mutational heritability, measured for eight cuticular hydrocarbons, 10 wing-shape traits, and wing size in this outbred genetic background, ranged from 0.0006 to 0.006 (with one exception), a similar range to that reported from studies employing inbred lines. Simultaneously partitioning the additive and mutational variance in the same outbred population allowed us to quantitatively test the ability of mutation-selection balance models to explain the observed levels of additive and mutational genetic variance. The Gaussian allelic approximation and house-of-cards models, which assume real stabilizing selection on single traits, both overestimated the genetic variance maintained at equilibrium, but the house-of-cards model was a closer fit to the data. This analytical approach has the potential to be broadly applied, expanding our understanding of the dynamics of genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:26384357

  20. Boswellia serrata resin extract alleviates azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ya-Chun; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Wang, Yu; Pahwa, Manoj; Badmaev, Vladimir; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2017-09-01

    Boswellia serrata (BS) resin is a popular dietary supplement for joint nourishment. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive effects of dietary BS extract and its impact of gut microbiota on azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS)-induced colitis-associated colon cancer in mice. Male ICR mice were injected with AOM and 2% DSS via drinking water. The mice were fed with 0.25 or 0.5% BS extract, and colonic tissue were collected at 15 weeks. The main effective components of BS supercritical CO2 extraction were analyzed by LC-MS/MS are boswellic acids. We found that treatment with BS extract significantly reduce the colonic tumor formation. Western blot and histological analysis revealed that dietary BS extract could markedly reduce the inflammation associated protein levels expression. Furthermore, BS extract reduced cell proliferation via inhibiting phosphorylation level of protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), and downregulation of cyclin D1. In addition, BS extract also altered the composition of gut microbiota by enhancing the proportion of Clostridiales and reducing the percentage of Bacteroidales. In summary, BS extract decreased the protein levels of inflammative enzymes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in colonic mucosa. It also mediated Akt/GSK3β/cyclin D1 signaling pathway and altered the composition of gut microbiota to alleviate tumor growth. Taken together, this study suggests that BS extract has great potential to suppress colon tumorigenesis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of Boswellia serrata in mouse models of chemically induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Kiela, Pawel R; Midura, Anna J; Kuscuoglu, Nesrin; Jolad, Shivanand D; Sólyom, Anikó M; Besselsen, David G; Timmermann, Barbara N; Ghishan, Fayez K

    2005-04-01

    Extracts from Boswellia serrata have been reported to have anti-inflammatory activity, primarily via boswellic acid-mediated inhibition of leukotriene synthesis. In three small clinical trials, boswellia was shown to improve symptoms of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and because of its alleged safety, boswellia was considered superior over mesalazine in terms of a benefit-risk evaluation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of boswellia extracts in controlled settings of dextran sulfate- or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in mice. Our results suggest that boswellia is ineffective in ameliorating colitis in these models. Moreover, individual boswellic acids were demonstrated to increase the basal and IL-1beta-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro as well as reverse proliferative effects of IL-1beta. We also observed hepatotoxic effect of boswellia with pronounced hepatomegaly and steatosis. Hepatotoxity and increased lipid accumulation in response to boswellia were further confirmed in vitro in HepG2 cells with fluorescent Nile red binding/resazurin reduction assay and by confocal microscopy. Microarray analyses of hepatic gene expression demonstrated dysregulation of a number of genes, including a large group of lipid metabolism-related genes, and detoxifying enzymes, a response consistent with that to hepatotoxic xenobiotics. In summary, boswellia does not ameliorate symptoms of colitis in chemically induced murine models and, in higher doses, may become hepatotoxic. Potential implications of prolonged and uncontrolled intake of boswellia as an herbal supplement in inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions should be considered in future clinical trials with this botanical.

  2. Airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain: Identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential source areas.

    PubMed

    Maya-Manzano, José María; Fernández-Rodríguez, Santiago; Smith, Matt; Tormo-Molina, Rafael; Reynolds, Andrew M; Silva-Palacios, Inmaculada; Gonzalo-Garijo, Ángela; Sadyś, Magdalena

    2016-11-15

    The pollen grains of Quercus spp. (oak trees) are allergenic. This study investigates airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain with the aim identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential sources areas. Two types of Quercus distribution maps were produced. Airborne Quercus pollen concentrations were measured at three sites located in the Extremadura region (SW Spain) for 3 consecutive years. The seasonal occurrence of Quercus pollen in the air was investigated, as well as days with pollen concentrations ≥80Pm(-3). The distance that Quercus pollen can be transported in appreciable numbers was calculated using clusters of back trajectories representing the air mass movement above the source areas (oak woodlands), and by using a state-of-the-art dispersion model. The two main potential sources of Quercus airborne pollen captured in SW Spain are Q. ilex subsp. ballota and Q. suber. The minimum distances between aerobiological stations and Quercus woodlands have been estimated as: 40km (Plasencia), 66km (Don Benito), 62km (Zafra) from the context of this study. Daily mean Quercus pollen concentration can exceed 1,700Pm(-3), levels reached not less than 24 days in a single year. High Quercus pollen concentration were mostly associated with moderate wind speed events (6-10ms(-1)), whereas that a high wind speed (16-20ms(-1)) seems to be associated with low concentrations.

  3. Effects of desiccation on temperate recalcitrant seeds: differential scanning calorimetry, gas chromatography, electron microscopy, and moisture studies on Quercus nigra and Quercus alba

    Treesearch

    K.F. Connor; F.T. Bonner; J.A Vozzo

    1996-01-01

    Investigations into the nature of desiccation-sensitive, or recalcitrant, seed behavior have as yet failed to identify exact causes of this phenomenon. Experiments with Quercus nigra L. and Quercus alba L. were conducted to examine physiological and biochemical changes brought about by seed desiccation and to determine if there...

  4. Analysis of the Functional Morphology of Mouthparts of the Beetle Priacma serrata, and a Discussion of Possible Food Sources

    PubMed Central

    Hörnschemeyer, Thomas; Bond, Jake; Young, Philippe G.

    2013-01-01

    With the help of scanning electron microscopy, high resolution X-ray tomography (µCT), and finite element analysis, the mechanical and functional properties of the mandibles and associated muscles of the beetle Priacma serrata (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Archostemata) were studied. The combination of these techniques allowed for studying mechanical properties of the headmandible- system without using living animals. The µCT analysis delivered precise volumetric data of the geometry of the system to be studied. Dimensions of the cuticle of the parts involved could be readily deduced from the µCT-data. Thus, an exact representation of the specimen without significant artifacts like deformations and misalignments, usually resulting from histological sectioning, could be reconstructed. A virtual 3D model built from these data allowed for investigating different stress scenarios with finite element analysis. Combining these methods showed that P. serrata most likely uses its robustly-built mandibles for cutting hard material. In combination with available information on its habitat, possible food sources are discussed. PMID:24786670

  5. Phytochemical screening and anti-oxidant activity of the two plants Ziziphus oxyphylla Edgew and Cedrela serrata Royle.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Ahmad, Mansoor; Mehjabeen; Jahan, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Phytochemical studies of medicinal plants are a basic and helping tool for the isolation of active secondary metabolites. The isolation of active compounds is made easy by the help of preliminary phytochemical studies, which shows the presence of a specific class or group of compounds present in these medicinal plants. Ziziphus oxyphylla and Cedrela serrata are medicinal plants with valuable local uses. The present study is for the first Phytochemical investigation of these two medicinal plants which consists of, Quantitative tests showing very good results except Ziziphus oxyphylla plants which does not showed the results for Ester value and Peroxide value. Color reactions are studied for all the crude extracts showing the presence of a number of chemical groups belonging to the class of Alkaloids, Phenol compounds, Phenothiazines, Aromatic compounds, Amino acids, Sulfur compounds etc. Brine shrimp activity was performed which showed a LD50 value of 45.74 and 53.36 in the case of Ziziphus oxyphylla roots and Cedrela serrata bark respectively, which is comparable to the standard drug Cyclophosphamide results of 16.09. Insecticidal activity did not show any promising result indicating the absence of any insect killing potency. Antioxidant activity was very positive for all the extract particularly, the Ziziphus oxyphylla roots, which showed even better results than the standard drug Ascorbic acid used in various dilutions.

  6. Antiarthritic activity of a standardized, multiherbal, Ayurvedic formulation containing Boswellia serrata: in vitro studies on knee cartilage from osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Sumantran, V N; Joshi, A K; Boddul, S; Koppikar, S J; Warude, D; Patwardhan, B; Chopra, A; Chandwaskar, R; Wagh, U V

    2011-09-01

    A validated in vitro model of cartilage damage and published data were used showing that this model measures the chondroprotective and antiinflammatory effects of different antiarthritic drugs. In this report, this model was used to evaluate the effects of a new antiarthritic Ayurvedic formulation containing Zingiber officinale root, Tinospora cordifolia stem, Phyllanthus emblica fruit and oleoresin of Boswellia serrata. Glucosamine sulphate was used as a positive control in the study. Aqueous extracts of each drug were tested on explant cultures of knee cartilage obtained from osteoarthritis patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. The new formulation caused a sustained and statistically significant inhibition in the release of glycosaminoglycans and aggrecan by cartilage explants from these patients. This formulation also induced a transient antiinflammatory effect as measured by a reduction in the levels of nitric oxide released by explants. Furthermore, the data strongly suggest that oleoresin of B. serrata plays a crucial role in the chondroprotective and antiinflammatory activity of this formulation. In summary, this report provides the first, direct, in vitro biochemical evidence of anti-arthritic activity a new Ayurvedic formulation. This formulation significantly reduced damage of articular knee cartilage from chronic osteoarthritis patients.

  7. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Boswellia serrata Roxb. ex Colebr. (Burseraceae) essential oil with various azoles against pathogens associated with skin, scalp and nail infections.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Palanivel, S; Ghosh, S

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobials from natural sources have gained immense importance in recent times to combat the global challenge of antibiotic resistance. Essential oils are implicated in antimicrobial action against several species. Here, we have screened nine commercially available essential oils for their antimicrobial activity against organisms associated with skin, scalp and nail infections mainly Propionibacterium acnes, Malassezia spp., Candida albicans and Trichophyton spp. Among nine essential oils, Boswellia serrata essential oil demonstrated superior antimicrobial activity against all the micro-organisms and surprisingly it showed maximum activity against Trichophyton spp. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of B. serrata oil indicates a major composition of α thujene, ρ cymene and sabinene. Additionally, B. serrata oil was found to inhibit Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm, and its combination with azoles has shown synergistic activity against azole-resistant strain of C. albicans. These broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities of B. serrata oil will make it an ideal candidate for topical use.

  8. SSR markers for Quercus suber tree identification and embryo analysis.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Pintos, B; Aguiriano, E; Manzanera, J A; Bueno, M A

    2001-01-01

    Three Quercus simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from nuclear DNA extracts of trees and in vitro-induced haploid embryos from anther cultures of Quercus suber L. These markers were sufficiently polymorphic to identify 10 of 12 trees located in two Spanish natural areas. The same loci have been analyzed in anther-derived haploid embryos showing the parental tree allele segregation. All the alleles were present in the haploid progeny. The presence of diverse alleles in embryos derived from the same anther demonstrated that they were induced on multiple microspores or pollen grains and they were not clonally propagated. Also, diploid cultures and mixtures of haploid-diploid tissues were obtained. The origin of such cultures, either somatic or gametic, was elucidated by SSR markers. All the embryos showed only one allele, corroborating a haploid origin. Allelic composition of the haploid progeny permitted parental identification among all analyzed trees.

  9. Comparison of 454-ESTs from Huperzia serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus reveals putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis and developmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongmei; Li, Ying; Sun, Chao; Wu, Qiong; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Yongzhen; Steinmetz, André; Chen, Shilin

    2010-09-21

    Plants of the Huperziaceae family, which comprise the two genera Huperzia and Phlegmariurus, produce various types of lycopodium alkaloids that are used to treat a number of human ailments, such as contusions, swellings and strains. Huperzine A, which belongs to the lycodine type of lycopodium alkaloids, has been used as an anti-Alzheimer's disease drug candidate. Despite their medical importance, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for the members of this family. We used massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset for Huperzia serrata (H. serrata) and Phlegmariurus carinatus (P. carinatus) as representative members of the Huperzia and Phlegmariurus genera, respectively. H. serrata and P. carinatus are important plants for research on the biosynthesis of lycopodium alkaloids. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of bioactive compound biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation as well as genetic marker detection in these species. For H. serrata, 36,763 unique putative transcripts were generated from 140,930 reads totaling over 57,028,559 base pairs; for P. carinatus, 31,812 unique putative transcripts were generated from 79,920 reads totaling over 30,498,684 base pairs. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 16,274 (44.3%) unique putative transcripts from H. serrata and 14,070 (44.2%) from P. carinatus were assigned to at least one protein. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology annotations revealed that the functions of the unique putative transcripts from these two species cover a similarly broad set of molecular functions, biological processes and biochemical pathways.In particular, a total of 20 H. serrata candidate cytochrome P450 genes, which are more abundant in leaves than in roots and might be involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, were found based on the comparison of H. serrata and P. carinatus 454-ESTs and real

  10. Comparison of 454-ESTs from Huperzia serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus reveals putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis and developmental regulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants of the Huperziaceae family, which comprise the two genera Huperzia and Phlegmariurus, produce various types of lycopodium alkaloids that are used to treat a number of human ailments, such as contusions, swellings and strains. Huperzine A, which belongs to the lycodine type of lycopodium alkaloids, has been used as an anti-Alzheimer's disease drug candidate. Despite their medical importance, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for the members of this family. We used massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset for Huperzia serrata (H. serrata) and Phlegmariurus carinatus (P. carinatus) as representative members of the Huperzia and Phlegmariurus genera, respectively. H. serrata and P. carinatus are important plants for research on the biosynthesis of lycopodium alkaloids. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of bioactive compound biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation as well as genetic marker detection in these species. Results For H. serrata, 36,763 unique putative transcripts were generated from 140,930 reads totaling over 57,028,559 base pairs; for P. carinatus, 31,812 unique putative transcripts were generated from 79,920 reads totaling over 30,498,684 base pairs. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 16,274 (44.3%) unique putative transcripts from H. serrata and 14,070 (44.2%) from P. carinatus were assigned to at least one protein. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology annotations revealed that the functions of the unique putative transcripts from these two species cover a similarly broad set of molecular functions, biological processes and biochemical pathways. In particular, a total of 20 H. serrata candidate cytochrome P450 genes, which are more abundant in leaves than in roots and might be involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, were found based on the comparison of H. serrata and P. carinatus

  11. Anaphylactic reaction to ingestion of Quercus ilex acorn nut.

    PubMed

    Vega, A; Domínguez, C; Cosmes, P; Martínez, A; Bartolomé, B; Martínez, J; Palacios, R

    1998-06-01

    A patient experienced an anaphylactic reaction after eating acorn nuts, fruit of the holm oak (Quercus ilex), one of the most abundant trees in Spain. Several urticaria episodes upon ingestion of peanuts were also referred. To assess the hypersensitivity reaction to acorn and to characterize the allergenic proteins involved. Cutaneous tests were performed using the skin-prick technique, using a large variety of grass, tree and weed pollens as well as fresh nuts and nut extracts. Specific IgE determination was assessed by RAST. IgE binding bands were determined by SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. Skin-prick tests were strongly positive with acorn and peanut. Olea europaea, Quercus alba, Quercus ilex and grass pollens also elicited a weal higher than negative control. Patient serum had measurable levels of IgE antibodies especially to acorn, peanut and grass pollens. Only one protein band, of 17.9 kDa molecular mass, showed IgE-binding properties in the acorn extract. The possible homology of this strong allergenic protein with the group 1 tree pollen allergens was evidenced by the partial inhibition of the western blot with Bet v 1. We present a case of anaphylaxis to acorn ingestion as demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro results. A 17.9 kDa IgE-binding band, showing some homology to group 1 pollen tree allergens, was recognized by patient serum.

  12. Morphological Response of Eight Quercus Species to Simulated Wind Load

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Geoff G.; Yu, Mukui

    2016-01-01

    Leaf shape, including leaf size, leaf dissection index (LDI), and venation distribution, strongly impacts leaf physiology and the forces of momentum exerted on leaves or the canopy under windy conditions. Yet, little has been known about how leaf shape affects the morphological response of trees to wind load. We studied eight Quercus species, with different leaf shapes, to determine the morphological response to simulated wind load. Quercus trees with long elliptical leaves, were significantly affected by wind load (P< 0.05), as indicted by smaller specific leaf area (SLA), stem base diameter and stem height under windy conditions when compared to the control. The Quercus trees with leaves characterized by lanceolate or sinuous edges, showed positive morphological responses to wind load, such as bigger leaf thickness, larger stem diameter, allocation to root biomass, and smaller stem height (P< 0.05). These morphological responses to wind can reduce drag and increase the mechanical strength of the tree. Leaf dissection index (LDI), an important index of leaf shape, was correlated with morphological response to wind load (P< 0.05), including differences in SLA, in stem base diameter and in allocation to root biomass. These results suggest that trees with higher LDI, such as those with more and/or deeper lobes, are better adapted to wind load. PMID:27662594

  13. Morphological Response of Eight Quercus Species to Simulated Wind Load.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tonggui; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Geoff G; Yu, Mukui

    Leaf shape, including leaf size, leaf dissection index (LDI), and venation distribution, strongly impacts leaf physiology and the forces of momentum exerted on leaves or the canopy under windy conditions. Yet, little has been known about how leaf shape affects the morphological response of trees to wind load. We studied eight Quercus species, with different leaf shapes, to determine the morphological response to simulated wind load. Quercus trees with long elliptical leaves, were significantly affected by wind load (P< 0.05), as indicted by smaller specific leaf area (SLA), stem base diameter and stem height under windy conditions when compared to the control. The Quercus trees with leaves characterized by lanceolate or sinuous edges, showed positive morphological responses to wind load, such as bigger leaf thickness, larger stem diameter, allocation to root biomass, and smaller stem height (P< 0.05). These morphological responses to wind can reduce drag and increase the mechanical strength of the tree. Leaf dissection index (LDI), an important index of leaf shape, was correlated with morphological response to wind load (P< 0.05), including differences in SLA, in stem base diameter and in allocation to root biomass. These results suggest that trees with higher LDI, such as those with more and/or deeper lobes, are better adapted to wind load.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of triterpenoic acids by high performance liquid chromatography method in the extracts of gum resin of Boswellia serrata obtained by different extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neha; Bhardwaj, Vikram; Singh, Samar; Ali, Sheikh Abid; Gupta, D K; Paul, Satya; Satti, Naresh K; Chandra, Suresh; Verma, Mahendra K

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia serrata, also known as Indian frankincense is a commercially important medicinal plant which has been used for hundreds of years as an Ayurvedic medicine for the attempted treatment of arthritis. It contains naturally occurring triterpenoic acids, called as boswellic acids (BA's). A highly reproducible High performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet diode array detection (HPLC-UV-DAD) method was developed for the simultaneous determination and quantitative analysis of eight major triterpenoic acids in Boswellia serrata gum resin obtained by different extraction techniques. All the calibration curves exhibited good linear regression (R(2) > 0.997) within the test ranges. The established method showed good precision and overall recoveries of the boswellic acids. The eight triterpenoic acids coded as BS-1 (11-keto-beta-boswellic acid), BS-2 (3-O-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid), BS-3 (3-keto tirucallic acid), BS-4 (3-O-acetyl-alpha-tirucallic acid), BS-5 (3-O-acetyl-beta-tirucallic acid), BS-6 (alpha-boswellic acid), BS-7 (beta-boswellic acid) and BS-8 (3-O-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid) were isolated from the processed gum resin of Boswellia serrata by column chromatography. The proposed HPLC method is simple, reliable and has been very useful for the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of boswellic acids in the gum resin of Boswellia serrata. The proposed method allows to quantify boswellic acids in appreciable amounts by HPLC-UV (DAD) method in the extracts and the available marketed formulations.Graphical abstractIsolation & separation of eight Triterpenoic acids from Boswellia serrata.

  15. Effect of tannins from Quercus suber and Quercus coccifera leaves on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Khennouf, Seddik; Benabdallah, Hassiba; Gharzouli, Kamel; Amira, Smain; Ito, Hideyuki; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoshida, Takashi; Gharzouli, Akila

    2003-02-26

    The gastroprotective effects of 70% acetone extracts of Quercus suber and Quercus coccifera leaves and of tannins (pedunculagin, castalagin, phillyraeoidin A, and acutissimin B) purified from these extracts were examined in the mouse using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model. Both extracts (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg), given orally, prevented the formation of ethanol-induced lesions in the stomach. The percent protection varied between 68 and 91%. Purified tannins (50 mg/kg) were also effective in protecting the stomach against ethanol, and the percent protection varied from 66 to 83%. Castalagin was the most potent. Both extracts and all of the tannins tested (10, 25, and 50 microg/mL) strongly inhibited (55-65%) the lipid peroxidation of rabbit brain homogenate. These results suggest that the gastroprotective effects of extracts of Q. suber and Q. coccifera leaves and the purified tannins in this experimental model are related to their anti-lipoperoxidant properties.

  16. Modulation of the immune system by Boswellia serrata extracts and boswellic acids.

    PubMed

    Ammon, H P T

    2010-09-01

    Extracts from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata and some of is constituents including boswellic acids affect the immune system in different ways. Among the various boswellic acids 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (KBA) and acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid have been observed to be active. However, also other boswellic acids may exhibit actions in the immune system. In the humoral defence system a mixture of boswellic acis at higher doses reduced primary antibody titres; on the other hand lower doses enhanced secondary antibody titres following treatment with sheep erythrocytes. In the cellular defence boswellic acides appear to increase lymphocyte proliferation whereas higher concentrations are even inhibitory. Moreover, BAs increase phagocytosis of macrophages. BAs affect the cellular defence system by interaction with production/release of cytokines. Thus, BAs inhibit activation of NFkappaB which is a product of neutrophile granulocytes. Consequently a down regulation of TNF-alpha and decrease of IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-gamma, which are proinflammatory cytokines by BEs and BAs has been reported. Suppressions of the classic way of the complement system was found to be due to inhibition of the conversion of C3 into C3a and C3b. However, which of these pharmacological actions contribute to the therapeutic effects and which is finally the best dosage of a standardized extract needs further examination. And it is also a question whether or not a single BA will have the same therapeutic effect as a standardized extract. Among the mediators of inflammatory reaction, mast cell stabilisation has been described by a BE. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis appears to play only a minor role as far as the anti-inflammatory effect is concerned. On the other hand the inhibitory action of BAs on 5-LO leading to a decreased production of leukotrienes has received high attention by the scientific community since a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases is associatied with

  17. Mycorrhization of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. seedlings with Tuber macrosporum Vittad.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Gógán Csorbai, Andrea; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Bencivenga, Mattia; Di Massimo, Gabriella; Donnini, Domizia

    2012-11-01

    Tuber macrosporum Vittad. is not a common truffle species, but with remarkable organoleptic qualities and much economic interest. After the addition of truffle spore slurry, 30 seedlings of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. were grown inside a greenhouse for 11 months before evaluation of the mycorrhizal level. Two different potting mixes were used: a natural soil-based potting mix for Q. robur, Q. cerris and C. avellana and a peat-based potting mix for Q. robur. Quercus robur planted in soil potting mix was the most receptive towards the truffle spore inoculum, with a level of formation of T. macrosporum ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) of approximately 14 %, ranging from a minimum of ∼4 % to a maximum of ∼44 % in different seedlings. No T. macrosporum ECMs developed on Q. cerris (soil potting mix) or on Q. robur (peat potting mix), whereas a low percentage of ECMs was detected on only three C. avellana (soil potting mix) seedlings. The fungus Sphaerosporella brunnea (Alb. & Schwein.) Svrček & Kubička was also detected as a contaminant on almost half the truffle-inoculated seedlings. A new detailed description of the morphological and anatomical characteristics of T. macrosporum ECMs and their DNA-based verification with species-specific markers were also reported.

  18. BVOC emission pattern from Quercus robur under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorska, O.; Dewulf, J.; Joó; Šimpraga, M.; Steppe, K.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Muller, J. J.; van Langenhove, H.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past decades biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) have been widely studied not only for better understanding their functions, biosynthesis and regulation, but also because they have great impact on regional and global air quality [1]. Since all BVOCs react with hydroxyl radicals (OH●) and may also react with nitrate radicals (NO3●) and ozone (O3), they contribute to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols. In this study we focus on Quercus robur which is a widely spread tree species in Europe and known as a strong isoprene emitter. We aimed to investigate seasonal patterns of BVOC emissions from Quercus robur under field conditions and to explore the intra-species variations within Quercus robur trees as both are of great importance for accurate modeling and regional inventories. Measurements were performed during a period from May till October 2009 at the campus of Ghent University (Belgium) using a dynamic branch enclosure system. Experiments were conducted on four potted Quercus robur trees with a varying 1-1.5 m height. Samples were collected on Tenax TA-Carbotrap adsorbent tubes and analyzed by TD-GC-MS. Isoprene was the predominant compound released by Quercus robur (QR1) with a pronounced seasonal emission. The normalized emission rates for isoprene calculated according to Guenther’s algorithm (standard conditions of temperature 30°C and PAR 1000 µmol m-2 s-1) varied from 29.89 µg h-1 g(DW)-1 in Spring (May) to 28.62 µg h-1 g(DW)-1 in Fall (October) reaching peak of 105.51 µg h-1 g(DW)-1 in August. Apart from isoprene, through the whole measurement period trans-β-ocimene and β-caryophyllene were the only BVOC emitted in detectable range (sum of the emissions varied between 0.15 µg h-1 g(DW)-1 in July and 0.24 µg h-1 g(DW)-1 in October). No clear seasonal pattern was observed for those compounds. In May when acorns where developing on enclosed branch, emissions of limonene and β-farnesene were also observed. The

  19. Triterpenoid Saponins with Potential Cytotoxic Activities from the Root Bark of Ilex rotunda Thunb.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Jie; Peng, Yu-Yuan; Chen, Hao; Liu, Xian-Fang; Liang, Jing-Yu; Sun, Jian-Bo

    2017-02-01

    A new 19-oxo-18,19-seco-ursane-type triterpeonoid saponin, laevigin E (8), together with 17 known compounds (1 - 7 and 9 - 18) were isolated from the root bark of Ilex rotunda Thunb. Their structures were determined by various spectroscopic analysis. Among them, compounds 6, 9, 11, and 18 were isolated from this species for the first time, while compounds 10 and 12 were firstly isolated from the family Aquifoliaceae. Biological activity assay showed that all triterpenoids exhibit moderate cytotoxic activities against MCF7, A549, HeLa and LN229 cell lines. The four triterpenoid saponins (3, 4, 6, and 8) exhibit slightly better activities compared to the four triterpenoid sapogenins (1, 2, 5, and 7). Compound 8 showed the best cytotoxicity against A549, HeLa and LN229 cell lines with IC50 of 17.83, 22.58 and 30.98 μm, respectively.

  20. Review of clinical studies of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. and its isolated bioactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bounda, Guy-Armel; Feng, YU

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (PMT), officially listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, is one of the most popular perennial Chinese traditional medicines known as He shou wu in China and East Asia, and as Fo-ti in North America. Mounting pharmacological studies have stressed out its key benefice for the treatment of various diseases and medical conditions such as liver injury, cancer, diabetes, alopecia, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases as well. International databases such as PubMed/Medline, Science citation Index and Google Scholar were searched for clinical studies recently published on P. multiflorum. Various clinical studies published articles were retrieved, providing information relevant to pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis, sleep disorders, dyslipidemia treatment, and neurodegenerative diseases. This review is an effort to update the clinical picture of investigations ever carried on PMT and/or its isolated bio-compounds and to enlighten its therapeutic assessment. PMID:26130933

  1. Constituents of essential oil from the dried fruits and stems of Akebia quinata (THUNB.) DECNE.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Jyunichi; Kameda, Munekazu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    The compositions of the essential oil from AKEBIAE FRUCTUS and AKEBIAE CAULIS, the dried fruits and stems of Akebia quinata (THUNB.) DECNE. (Lardizabalaceae), have been investigated by GC and GC/MS. As a result, the fruits oil was revealed the presence of 86 components, representing 98.4% of the total oil. The major compounds of the fruits oil were limonene, eugenol, octanal and p-cymene. The monoterpenoids and saturated short-chain aldehyde (C6 approximately C10) were main volatile fractions of the oil. Ninety components accounting for 90.5% of constituents of stems oil were identified, and the main compounds of the oil were hexanoic acid, palmitic acid, (2E, 4E)-decadienal and hexanol. The oil had high content of saturated fatty acids (C6 approximately C16), and unsaturated short-chain aldehyde (C6 approximately C10).

  2. Two new triterpenoid estersaponins and biological activities of Pittosporum tobira 'Variegata' (Thunb.) W. T. Aiton leaves.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Rabab A; Eskander, Jacqueline; Mohamed, Mona A; Mohammed, Nermine M

    2015-10-01

    Two new triterpenoid estersaponins (1, 2) were isolated from the leaves of Pittosporum tobira 'Variegata' (Thunb.) W. T. Aiton, along with one known saponin (3) and one known flavonoid glycoside (4). Their structures were established by different spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR, UV, as well as ESI-MS analysis. The investigated 80% aqueous methanol extract showed significant dose dependent inhibition of acetic acid induced abdominal writhing in mice. The n-butanol fraction exerted moderate antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In addition, it showed in vitro antioxidant activity with IC50 value (7.3 μg/ml) lower than that of the positive control ascorbic acid (11.2 μg/ml), using DPPH free radical scavenging activity method. Evaluation of its in vitro cytotoxicity showed strong activity against breast carcinoma (MCF-7), hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), and colon carcinoma (HCT) cell lines.

  3. Antibacterial activity of flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina caffra thunb.

    PubMed

    Chukwujekwu, J C; Van Heerden, F R; Van Staden, J

    2011-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of the stem bark of Erythrina caffra Thunb. was investigated against different bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity was determined by a micro broth dilution assay. Antibacterial compounds were isolated and identified using a Bruker Avance III LPO NMR spectrometer. Four known flavonoids, abyssione-V 4'-O-methyl ether, 6,8-diprenylgenistein, alpinumisoflavone and burttinone, were isolated. All the compounds were active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration values obtained (MIC) ranged from 3.9 μg/mL to 125 μg/mL. This is the first report of antibacterial activity of burttinone and the isolation of these compounds from E. caffra. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Acute and subacute toxicity study of the ethanol extract from Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Thanabhorn, S; Jaijoy, K; Thamaree, S; Ingkaninan, K; Panthong, A

    2006-10-11

    The ethanol extract from the leaves of Lonicera japonica Thunb. was evaluated for acute and subacute toxicity. The single oral dose of the ethanol extract at 5,000 mg/kg did not produce mortality or significant changes in the general behaviour and gross appearance of the internal organs of rats. In subacute toxicity study, the ethanol extract was administered orally at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg/day for a period of 14 days. The satellite group was treated with the ethanol extract at the same dose and the same period and kept for another 14 days after treatment. There were no significant differences in the body and organ weights between the control and the treated group of both sexes. Hematological analysis and clinical blood chemistry revealed no toxicity effects of the extract. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed.

  5. Antioxidant potential in non-extractable fractions of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoko; Ito, Toshihiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Kita, Eiji; Mikasa, Keiichi; Okada, Masatoshi; Furutani, Azusa; Murono, Yuka; Shibata, Mitsuru; Nishii, Yasue; Kayano, Shin-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    Dried fruits of persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) are a traditional food in Japan and contain large quantities of tannins. In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potentials of non-extractable fractions from dried persimmons. Hydrolysed non-extractable fractions showed the highest antioxidant activities in vitro. In subsequent experiments, the plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values in rats supplemented with a 5% non-extractable fraction were approximately 1.5times higher than those in control rats after 1week in vivo. Furthermore, using an in vitro model of the gastrointestinal tract, the ORAC values of the non-extractable fraction were significantly increased with colonic fermentation in the large bowel stage. These data indicate that non-extractable fractions may possess significant antioxidant potential in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antifungal potential of essential oil and ethanol extracts of Lonicera japonica Thunb. against dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Atiqur; Al-Reza, Sharif M.; Siddiqui, Shah Alam; Chang, Taehyun; Kang, Sun Chul

    2014-01-01

    The antifungal potential of essential oil and ethanolic leaf extracts of Lonicera japonica Thunb. was evaluated for controlling the growth of dermatophytes. The oil (1,000 ppm) and extracts (1,500 ppm) of L. japonica revealed 55.1–70.3 % and 40.1–65.5 % antidermatophytic effect against Microsporum canis KCTC 6348, 6349, 6591, Trichophyton rubrum KCTC 6345, 6352, 6375, Trichophyton mentagrophytes KCTC 6077 and 6085, respectively, along with their respective minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 62.5-500 and 125-1,000 µg/ml. Also, the oil had strong detrimental effect on spore germination of all the tested dermatophytes as well as concentration and time-dependent kinetic inhibition of M. canis KCTC 6348. The results demonstrated that L. japonica oil and extracts could be potential sources of natural fungicides to protect human and animals from fungal infections. PMID:26417269

  7. Ascorbic acid in cultured tissue of briar rose, Rosa rugosa Thunb.

    PubMed

    Wegg, S M; Townsley, P M

    1983-04-01

    Ascorbic acid synthesis was studied using suspension cultured cells from the fleshy portion of the fruit of the rose, Rosa rugosa Thunb. Cells cultured in the dark contained ascorbic acid at a level of 13 mg/100 g wet wt. This value increased several fold when the cells were grown under light. Ascorbic acid does not accumulate in the growth medium possibly due to its rapid oxidation. L-galactono-1,4-lactone was readily converted to ascorbic acid whereas L-gulono-1,4-lactone was used to a much lesser degree. D-glucose, D-fructose, D-galactose. D-glucurono-1,4-lactone and myoinositol did not stimulate increased ascorbic acid synthesis. Reducing the sucrose content of the medium reduced the ascorbic acid content of the cells without altering cell yield.

  8. Relationships between light, leaf nitrogen and nitrogen remobilization in the crowns of mature evergreen Quercus glauca trees.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Arata Antonio; Sone, Kosei; Terashima, Ichiro

    2004-10-01

    We estimated the amount of nitrogen (N) remobilized from 1-year-old leaves at various positions in the crowns of mature Quercus glauca Thunb. ex Murray trees and related this to the production of new shoots. Leaf N concentration on an area basis (Na) and total N (Nt= Na x lamina area of all leaves on a shoot) were related to photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on the leaves of current-year and 1-year-old shoots. When new shoots (S02 shoots; flushed in 2002) flushed, only a portion of the leaves on the previous year's shoots (S01 shoots; flushed in 2001) were shed. After the S02 shoots flushed, S01 shoots were defined as 1-year-old shoots (S01* shoots). Both Na and Nt were positively correlated with PPF for S01 shoots, but not for S01* shoots. The fraction of remobilized N (% of the maximum Na in S01 leaves) from remaining leaves was 5-35%, with the fraction size being positively correlated with the number of S02 shoots on an S01* shoot (new shoot number). However, the mean fraction of remobilized N from fallen leaves was 45% and was unrelated to new shoot number. The total amount of N remobilized from both fallen and remaining leaves was 1-20 mg per S01* shoot. Total remobilized N was positively correlated with new shoot number. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between the light-saturated net photosynthetic rate on a leaf area basis (Amax) and Na for both S01* and S02 leaves. However, when we compared leaves with similar Na, Amax of S01* leaves was only half that of S02 leaves, indicating that 1-year-old leaves had lower instantaneous N-use efficiency (Amax per unit Na) than current-year leaves. Ratios of chlorophyll a:b and Rubisco:chlorophyll were lower in S01* leaves than in S02 leaves, indicating that 1-year-old leaves were acclimatized to lower light environments. Thus, in Q. glauca, the N allocation theory (i.e., that N is distributed according to local PPF) applied only to the current-year shoots. Although the amount of foliar N in 1

  9. [Effects of simulating acid rain on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of Quercus glauca Quercus glauca].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Yi, Li-Ta; Yu, Shu-Quan; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jing-Jing

    2014-08-01

    At three levels of simulated acid rainfall intensities with pH values of 2.5 (severe), 40 (medium) and 5.6 (light) respectively, the responses of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters of Quercus glauca seedlings were studied in three acid rainfall treatments, i. e. only the aboveground of seedlings exposed to acid rain (T1), both of the seedlings and soil exposed to acid rain (T2), only the soil exposed to acid rain (T3) compared with blank control (CK). Under the severe acid rainfall, T1 significantly inhibited chlorophyll synthesis, and thus reduced the primary photochemical efficiency of PS II ( F(v)/F(m)), potential activity of PS II (F(v)/F(o)) , apparent quantum (Y), net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), and transpiration rate (T(r)), but increased the light compensation point (LCP) and dark respiration rate (R(d)) of Q. glauca seedlings. T2 inhibited, but T3 played a little enhancement on the aforementioned parameters of Q. glauca seedlings. Under the conditions of medium and light acid rainfall intensities, the above parameters in the three treatments were higher than that of CK, except with lower R(d). The chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters showed a similar tendency in the three treatments, i. e. T2>T3 >T1. It indicated that T1 had the strongest inhibition on seedlings in condition of the severe acid rainfall, while T2 had the most dramatic facilitating effect on seedlings under the medium and light acid rainfall. Intensity of acid rainfall had significant influences on SPAD, F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F(o), Y, P(n), T(r), and maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)), whereas treatments of acid rainfall affected SPAD, F(v)/F(m), Y, P(n), T(r), A(max) and light saturation point (LSP). The interaction of acid rainfall intensities and treatments played significant effects on SPAD, F(v)/F(m), Y, P(n) and A(max).

  10. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over study to evaluate the analgesic activity of Boswellia serrata in healthy volunteers using mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Prabhavathi, K.; Chandra, U. Shobha Jagdish; Soanker, Radhika; Rani, P. Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Experimental pain models in human healthy volunteers are advantageous for early evaluation of analgesics. All efforts to develop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which are devoid of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system effects are still far from achieving a breakthrough. Hence we evaluated the analgesic activity of an ayurvedic drug, Boswellia serrata by using validated human pain models which has shown its analgesic activity both in-vitro and preclinical studies to evaluate the analgesic activity of single oral dose (125 mg, 2 capsules) of Boswellia serrata compared to placebo using mechanical pain model in healthy human subjects. Materials and Methods: After taking written informed consent, twelve healthy subjects were randomized (1:1) to receive single oral dose of Boswellia serrata (Shallaki®) 125 mg, 2 capsules or identical placebo in a crossover design. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesymeter (by Randall Selitto test) at baseline and at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs after test drug administration. Pain Threshold force and time and Pain Tolerance force and time were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done by paired t-test. Results: Twelve healthy volunteers have completed the study. Mean percentage change from baseline in Pain Threshold force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly increased [Force: 9.7 ± 11.0 vs 2.9 ± 3.4 (P = 0.05) and time: 9.7 ± 10.7 vs 2.8 ± 3.4 (P = 0.04)] at third hr. Mean Percentage change from baseline in Pain Tolerance force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs. Conclusion: In the present study, Boswellia serrata significantly increased the Pain Threshold and Pain Tolerance force and time compared to placebo. Both study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug. PMID:25298573

  11. Does interspecific hybridization influence evolutionary rates? An experimental study of laboratory adaptation in hybrids between Drosophila serrata and Drosophila birchii.

    PubMed Central

    Hercus, M J; Hoffmann, A A

    1999-01-01

    The low initial fitness of progeny from interspecific crosses in animals and the rarity of interspecific hybridization in natural environments have led to a debate about the evolutionary importance of this phenomenon. Here we directly assess the effects of hybridization between Drosophila serrata and Drosophila birchii on evolutionary rates. We looked at the effects on laboratory adaptation over 30 generations in two laboratory environments, one of which involved nutrition and temperature stress. Laboratory adaptation occurred over time in both environments as reflected by a marked change in viability. However, whilst hybrid lines at no stage performed poorly relative to parental lines, their rate of adaptation never exceeded that of the parentals. Thus, there was no evidence that hybridization increased evolutionary rates. Instead, hybrid lines converged phenotypically with one of the parental species. PMID:10649634

  12. Avertoxins A-D, Prenyl Asteltoxin Derivatives from Aspergillus versicolor Y10, an Endophytic Fungus of Huperzia serrata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingzi; Sun, Mingwei; Hao, Huilin; Lu, Chunhua

    2015-12-24

    Aspergillus versicolor Y10 is an endophytic fungus isolated from Huperzia serrata, which showed inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase. An investigation of the chemical constituents of Y10 led to the isolation of four new prenylated asteltoxin derivatives, named avertoxins A-D (2-5), together with the known mycotoxin asteltoxin (1). In the present study, we report structure elucidation for 2-5 and the revised NMR assignments for asteltoxin and demonstrated that avertoxin B (3) is an active inhibitor against human acetylcholinesterase with the IC50 value of 14.9 μM (huperzine A as the positive control had an IC50 of 0.6 μM). In addition, the cytotoxicity of asteltoxin (1) and avertoxins A-D (2-5) against MDA-MB-231, HCT116, and HeLa cell lines was evaluated.

  13. Fluctuations of biochemical constituents and marker enzymes as a consequence of naphthalene toxicity in the edible estuarine crab Scylla serrata.

    PubMed

    Vijayavel, K; Balasubramanian, M P

    2006-01-01

    The sublethal effects of naphthalene on protein, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), carbohydrates, lipids, and certain marker enzymes such as phosphatases, transaminases, and lactate dehydrogenase were studied in hepatopancreas, hemolymph, and ovary in the edible crab Scylla serrata. The results revealed that there was overall decrease in total protein, total DNA, total RNA, free sugar, glycogen, protein-bound sugars, neutral lipid, glycolipid, and phospholipid in the test samples compared to control. Similarly all the marker enzymes (acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactate dehydrogenase) were decreased in hepatopancreas and ovary. On the other hand, in hemolymph, the activities of marker enzymes were increased. The results were tested statistically and interpreted accordingly.

  14. The genomic distribution of sex-biased genes in drosophila serrata: X chromosome demasculinization, feminization, and hyperexpression in both sexes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Scott L; Bonduriansky, Russell; Chenoweth, Stephen F

    2013-01-01

    The chromosomal distribution of genes with sex-biased expression is often nonrandom, and in species with XY sex chromosome systems, it is common to observe a deficit of X-linked male-biased genes and an excess of X-linked female-biased genes. One explanation for this pattern is that sex-specific selection has shaped the gene content of the X. Alternatively, the deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased genes could be an artifact of differences between the sexes in the global expression level of their X chromosome(s), perhaps brought about by a lack of dosage compensation in males and hyperexpression in females. In the montium fruit fly, Drosophila serrata, both these explanations can account for a deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased X-linked genes. Using genome-wide expression data from multiple male and female tissues (n = 176 hybridizations), we found that testis- and accessory gland-specific genes are underrepresented whereas female ovary-specific genes are overrepresented on the X chromosome, suggesting that X-linkage is disfavored for male function genes but favored for female function genes. However, genes with such sex-specific functions did not fully account for the deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased X-linked genes. We did, however, observe sex differences in the global expression level of the X chromosome and autosomes. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other species where a lack of dosage compensation in males is responsible, we found that hyperexpression of X-linked genes in both sexes leads to this imbalance in D. serrata. Our results highlight how common genomic distributions of sex-biased genes, even among closely related species, may arise via quite different evolutionary processes.

  15. The Genomic Distribution of Sex-Biased Genes in Drosophila serrata: X Chromosome Demasculinization, Feminization, and Hyperexpression in Both Sexes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Scott L.; Bonduriansky, Russell; Chenoweth, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The chromosomal distribution of genes with sex-biased expression is often nonrandom, and in species with XY sex chromosome systems, it is common to observe a deficit of X-linked male-biased genes and an excess of X-linked female-biased genes. One explanation for this pattern is that sex-specific selection has shaped the gene content of the X. Alternatively, the deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased genes could be an artifact of differences between the sexes in the global expression level of their X chromosome(s), perhaps brought about by a lack of dosage compensation in males and hyperexpression in females. In the montium fruit fly, Drosophila serrata, both these explanations can account for a deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased X-linked genes. Using genome-wide expression data from multiple male and female tissues (n = 176 hybridizations), we found that testis- and accessory gland-specific genes are underrepresented whereas female ovary-specific genes are overrepresented on the X chromosome, suggesting that X-linkage is disfavored for male function genes but favored for female function genes. However, genes with such sex-specific functions did not fully account for the deficit of male-biased and excess of female-biased X-linked genes. We did, however, observe sex differences in the global expression level of the X chromosome and autosomes. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other species where a lack of dosage compensation in males is responsible, we found that hyperexpression of X-linked genes in both sexes leads to this imbalance in D. serrata. Our results highlight how common genomic distributions of sex-biased genes, even among closely related species, may arise via quite different evolutionary processes. PMID:24084777

  16. Effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on the morphology of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in aged rat.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-sharifabad, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that administration of Boswellia resin, known as olibanum or Frankincense, increases memory power. It is reported that beta boswellic acid, the major component of Boswellia serrata gum resin, could enhance neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. We therefore studied whether Boswellia treatment produces morphological changes in the superior region of cornu ammonis (CA1) in aged rats. Sixteen male Wistar rats, 24 months of age, were randomly divided in experimental and control groups. The experimental group was orally administered Boswellia serrata gum resin (100 mg/kg per day for 8 weeks) and the control group received a similar volume of water. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volumes of CA1 hippocampal field, and a quantitative Golgi study was used to analysis of dendritic arborizations of CA1 pyramidal cells. Comparisons revealed that Boswellia-treated aged rats had greater volumes than control animals in stratum pyramidale and stratum radiatum lacunosum-moleculare. The neurons of CA1 in experimental rats had more dendritic segments (40.25 ± 4.20) than controls (30.9 ± 4.55), P = 0.001. The total dendritic length of CA1 neurons was approximately 20 % larger in the experimental group compared to control. Results also indicated that the aged rats treated with Boswellia resin had more numerical branching density in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The results of the present study show that long-term administration of Boswellia resin can attenuate age-related dendritic regression in CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampus.

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-06-21

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri.

  18. Improved genetic transformation of cork oak (Quercus suber L.).

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Fernández, Rubén; Ordás, Ricardo-Javier

    2012-01-01

    An Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for selected mature Quercus suber L. trees has been established. Leaf-derived somatic embryos in an early stage of development are inoculated with an AGL1 strain harboring a kanamycin-selectable plasmid carrying the gene of interest. The transformed embryos are induced to germinate and the plantlets transferred to soil. This protocol, from adult cork oak to transformed plantlet, can be completed in about one and a half years. Transformation efficiencies (i.e., percentage of inoculated explants that yield independent transgenic embryogenic lines) vary depending on the cork oak genotype, reaching up to 43%.

  19. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of Linguatula serrata (Pentastomida: Linguatulidae) based on the nuclear 18S rDNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene

    PubMed Central

    MOHANTA, Uday Kumar; ITAGAKI, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Linguatula serrata, a cosmopolitan parasite, is commonly known as tongue worm belonging to the subclass Pentastomida.We collected the nymphal stage of the worm from mesenteric lymph nodes of cattle and identified these as L. serrata based on morphology and morphometry. The 18S rDNA sequences showed no intraspecific variation, although cox1 sequences showed 99.7–99.9% homology. In the phylogenies inferred from both gene loci, members of the genus Linguatula (order Porocephalida) were closer to those of the order Cephalobaenida than to those of Porocephalida, reflecting a mismatch with the corresponding morphology-based taxonomy. Accordingly, analyses of additional gene loci using a larger number of taxa across the Pentastomida should be undertaken to determine an accurate phylogenetic position within the Arthropoda. PMID:27941305

  20. The influence of the La Niña-El Niño cycle on giant mud crab (Scylla serrata) catches in Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynecke, Jan-Olaf; Grubert, Mark; Arthur, James Michael; Boston, Ray; Lee, Shing Yip

    2012-03-01

    Mud crabs (Scylla spp.) are a high value commodity harvested in the Indo-West Pacific. Scylla species support important artisanal fisheries in south-east Asia and intensive commercial fisheries in Australia where the market demand and catch has increased markedly over the last decade. Over-fishing of Scylla spp. has been observed at varying levels throughout its distribution. Fluctuations in catch rates and abundance are thought to be driven by climate parameters. Here we analyse monthly, seasonal and annual patterns in catch and effort data (from 1990 to 2008) for the commercial giant mud crab (Scylla serrata) fishery in the Northern Territory, Australia, with corresponding climatic data (rainfall, freshwater runoff, sea surface temperature) and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) as an indicator of La Niña/El Niño events. Between 30 and 40% of the variation in catch per unit effort can be explained by rainfall and SOI alone. This result was supported by linear mixed models which identified SOI as the main contributor to the model. Spectral analyses showed that catch peaks coincided with a four year La Niña cycle. One- and two-year time lags (consistent with S. Serrata's life cycle) were also significantly correlated to SOI values and rainfall. These outcomes may assist fishery managers in planning fishing exposure period and duration. Furthermore, findings of this study provide information on the vulnerability of S. serrata to fluctuations in environmental conditions and can help to apply protective measures when and where necessary.

  1. Investigation of the mud crab (Scylla serrata) as a potential bio-monitoring species for tropical coastal marine environments of Australia.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, Jake; Codi King, Susan; Negri, Andrew; Humphrey, Craig; Mondon, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Mud crabs, Scylla serrata, were sampled from four estuaries (the Normanby, Herbert, Burdekin and Fitzroy Rivers) along the coast of northern Queensland, Australia, representing a pollution gradient from low to high contamination based upon previous chemical monitoring. Four biomarkers; glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and the urinary metabolite concentrations of naphthalene (NPH) and benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) were evaluated in S. serrata hepatopancreas, haemolymph and urine. Site-specific evidence of elevated GST activity and BaP metabolite concentrations and significant ChE inhibition was detected. Biomarker responses from this field study provide evidence of contaminant exposure of S. serrata from river estuaries along the coast of northern Queensland and indicate that further investigation is warranted. Based on the current results, and with further work on characterising the dose-response and seasonal variation in this species, mud crabs have great potential as indicator species for water quality and ecosystem monitoring programs across tropical coastal regions of Australia.

  2. Limited hybridization between Quercus lobata and Quercus douglasii (Fagaceae) in a mixed stand in central coastal California.

    PubMed

    Craft, Kathleen J; Ashley, Mary V; Koenig, Walter D

    2002-11-01

    Many oak species are interfertile, and morphological and genetic evidence for hybridization is widespread. Here we use DNA microsatellite markers to characterize hybridization between two closely related oak species in a mixed stand in central coastal California, Quercus lobata (valley oak) and Q. douglasii (blue oak) (Fagaceae). Genotypes from four microsatellite loci indicate that many alleles are shared between the two species. However, each species harbors unique alleles, and allele frequencies differ significantly. A Bayesian analysis of genetic structure in the stand identified two highly differentiated genetic clusters, essentially corresponding to species assignment based on morphology. Data from the four loci were sufficient to assign all 135 trees to one of the two species. In addition, five putative hybrid individuals having intermediate morphologies could be assigned genetically to one or the other species, and all but one had low probability of hybrid ancestry. Overally, only six (4.6%) trees showed >0.05 probability of hybrid ancestry, in all cases their probabilities for nonhybrid ancestry were substantially higher. We conclude that adult hybrids of Q. douglasii × Q. lobata are rare at this site and plasticity in morphological characters may lead to overestimates of hybridization among Quercus species.

  3. Natural hybridization and hybrid zones between Quercus crassifolia and Quercus crassipes (Fagaceae) in Mexico: morphological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Sánchez, Efraín; Oyama, Ken

    2004-09-01

    Hybrid zones provide interesting systems to study genetic and ecological interaction between different species. The correct identification of hybrids is necessary to understand the evolutionary process involved in hybridization. An oak species complex occurring in Mexico formed by two parental species, Quercus crassifolia H. & B. and Q. crassipes H. & B., and their putative hybrid species, Q. dysophylla, was analyzed with molecular markers (random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPDs]) and morphological tools in seven hybrid zones (10 trees per taxa in each hybrid zone) and two pure sites for each parental species (20 trees per site). We tested whether geographic proximity of hybrid plants to the allopatric site of a parental species increases its morphological and genetic similarity with its parent. Seventeen morphological traits were measured in 8700 leaves from 290 trees. Total DNA of 250 individuals was analyzed with six diagnostic RAPD primers. Quercus crassifolia differed significantly from Q. crassipes in all the examined characters. Molecular markers and morphological characters were highly coincident and support the hypothesis of hybridization in this complex, although both species remain distinct in mixed stands. Clusters and a hybrid index (for molecular and morphological data) showed that individuals from the same parental species were more similar among themselves than to putative hybrids, indicating occasional hybridization with segregation in hybrid types or backcrossing to parents. Evidence does not indicate a unidirectional pattern of gene flow.

  4. Characterization, antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities of polysaccharides from Ilex latifolia Thunb.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jialong; Wu, Zhongwei; Zhao, Tianhu; Sun, Yi; Ye, Hong; Xu, Renjie; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2014-01-30

    Crude polysaccharides from the leaves of Ilex latifolia Thunb (ILPS) was fractionated by DEAE cellulose-52 chromatography, affording four fractions of ILPS-1, ILPS-2, ILPS-3 and ILPS-4 in the recovery rates of 32.3, 20.6, 18.4 and 10.8%, respectively, based on the amount of crude ILPS used. The four fractions were mainly composed of arabinose and galactose in monosaccharide composition. Compared with ILPS-1 and ILPS-2, ILPS-3 and ILPS-4 had relative higher contents of sulfuric radical and uronic acid. The antioxidant activities in vitro of ILPS decreased in the order of crude ILPS>ILPS-4>ILPS-3>EPS-2>ILPS-1. Furthermore, the administration of crude ILPS significantly prevented the increase of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, reduced the formation of malondialdehyde and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury mice. The results suggested that ILPS should be a potent natural polymer with antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities.

  5. Efficacy evaluation of a Chinese bitter tea (Ilex latifolia Thunb.) via analyses of its main components.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; He, Xiao-Wei; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Xu, Xi-Lin

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the health effects of Ilex latifolia Thunb., a Chinese bitter tea widely consumed as a health beverage, flavonoids, saponins, polysaccharides and alkaloids were extracted from its leaves and their in vitro antioxidant activity, anticomplement system activity, antiproliferative effects against human cervical carcinoma Hela cells, and anti-inflammatory effects against mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were analyzed. Results showed that the polysaccharides exhibited a considerable inhibition of the complement system, the hemolysis inhibition rate reached 98% at a concentration of 0.8 mg mL(-1), which was clearly higher than that of the positive control (heparin sodium). The total flavonoids displayed significant DPPH scavenging activity and an inhibition effect on the generation of NO in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, the total saponins showed a better antiproliferative effect against Hela cells, and the total alkaloids exhibited a high reducing power. It is obvious that I. latifolia has a variety of nutritional and health functions which are attributed to its different components. The analysis method presented in this research can suggest lessons for analysis of other plant foods.

  6. A New Strategy for Quality Evaluation and Identification of Representative Chemical Components in Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiao-hong; Liu, Mei-chen

    2017-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (HSW) is widely used as herb medicine and health food additive. Recently, a series of HSW-induced hepatotoxicities have been reported and many studies have been carried out to investigate it. But contradictory conclusions were drawn that might be caused by the inconsistent quality of market decoction pieces. Therefore, the HSW decoction pieces quality was evaluated with a developed novel method in the paper. 25 batches of raw HSW (RHSW) and 21 batches of processed HSW (PHSW) samples were purchased from different provinces of China. HPLC determination was performed to identify and detect the contents of 16 chemical compounds in herbal material. Fingerprint similarity was analyzed using chromatography information and the results showed that most herbs were in good similarity. Then, a comprehensive evaluation strategy based on principal component analysis with representative quality control indicators was developed to evaluate the quality of HSW samples. And the rationality of the developed method was verified by HCA analysis. The results showed that the herb from Dabashan, Sichuan Province, no matter RHSW or PHSW had the best quality. Different representative components were selected for RHSW or PHSW decoction pieces which might be caused by the chemical reaction during processing. And most PHSW were unqualified according to the requirement of Chinese Pharmacopeia which might take the responsibility for the toxicity of HSW. PMID:28243311

  7. A current update on the phytopharmacological aspects of Houttuynia cordata Thunb

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Prasad, Satyendra K.; Hemalatha, S.

    2014-01-01

    The present review is an attempt to put an insight into a medicinal plant Houttuynia cordata Thunb, which is indigenous to North-East India and China. It is an aromatic medicinal herb belonging to family Saururaceae and is restricted to specialized moist habitats. The review provides detailed information regarding the morphology, distribution, phytochemistry, ethnopharmacological uses and also describes various pharmacological activities reported on the plant H. cordata. The review describes therapeutic efficacy of the whole plant and its extracts, fractions and isolated compounds in different diseased condition. Among the important pharmacological activities reported includes, anti-mutagenic, anti-cancer, adjuvanticity, anti-obesity, hepatoprotective, anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, free radical scavenging, anti-microbial, anti-allergic, anti-leukemic, chronic sinusitis and nasal polyps activities. Thus, the present review will act as a source of referential information to researchers to perform clinical studies on isolated compounds that may serve the society and will help in improving human health care system. PMID:24600193

  8. Proteomics analysis of UV-irradiated Lonicera japonica Thunb. with bioactive metabolites enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Zheng, Wen; Fu, Zhirong; Li, Wenting; Ma, Luyu; Li, Ke; Sun, Lianli; Tian, Jingkui

    2013-12-01

    A previous study showed that the contents of caffeoylquinic acids and iridoids, the major bioactive components in the postharvest Lonicera japonica Thunb., were induced by enhanced ultraviolet (UV)-A or UV-B irradiation. To clarify the UV-responsive key enzymes in the bioactive metabolites biosynthetic pathway and the related plant defense mechanism in L. japonica, 2DE in combination with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS was employed. Seventy-five out of 196 differential proteins were positively identified. Based on the functions, these proteins were grouped into nine categories, covering a wide range of molecular processes including the secondary metabolites (caffeoylquinic acids and iridoids) biosynthetic-related proteins, photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, stress, DNA, transport-related proteins, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, cell wall. Of note is the increasing expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase and 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-phosphate synthase, which was crucial to supply more precursor for the secondary metabolites including caffeoylquinic acids and iridoids. Thus, this study provides both the clues at the protein level for the increase of the two bioactive components upon UV irradiation and the profile of UV-responsive proteins in L. japonica.

  9. Hormesis phenomena under Cd stress in a hyperaccumulator--Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lian; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhouli; Huang, Yanqing; Yu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate possible hormetic response induced by cadmium (Cd) in a potential hyperaccumulator-Lonicera japonica Thunb. The results showed that Cd at low concentrations induced a significant increase in plant growth, leaf water content and content of photosynthetic pigments in L. japonica, but decreased them at high concentrations, displayed inverted U-shaped dose response curves, confirming a typical biphasic hormetic response. The U-shaped dose response curves were displayed in malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage in leaves at low doses of Cd, indicating reduce oxidative stress and toxic effect. The increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was observed along with the increased Cd concentration, indicative of increase in anti-oxidative capacity that ensures redox homeostasis is maintained. After 28 days exposure to 10 mg L(-1) Cd, stem and leaf Cd concentrations reached 502.96 ± 28.90 and 103.22 ± 5.62 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively and the plant had high bioaccumulation coefficient (BC) and translocation factor (TF'). Moreover, the maximum TF value was found at 2.5 mg L(-1) Cd treatment, implying that low Cd treatment improved the ability to transfer Cd from medium via roots to aerial structures. Taking together, L. japonica could be considered as a new plant to investigate the underlying mechanisms of hormesis and Cd tolerance. Our results suggest that hormetic effects should be taken into consideration in phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil.

  10. Enhanced antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles-Lonicera Japonica Thunb combo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Qu, Feng; Xu, Hong; Xu, Hengyi; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Silver metals have long been known to possess antimicrobial properties. Recently, even the nanoparticle version of silver (AgNPs) has also been established as antimicrobials. In this study AgNPs were combined with extracts of the medicinal plant Chinese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica Thunb. The antimicrobial activity of the AgNPs-herb was tested against pathogenic Escherichia coli CMCC44113. Using different AgNPs or herb (honeysuckle water extract or HWE) ratios in the presence of a fixed concentration of E. coli CMCC44113, potencies were found to be proportional with concentrations. The antimicrobial activities of AgNPs-HWE combo were significant enhanced, when compared with solely AgNPs or HWE. Thus, atomic force microscopic and propidium monoazide-PCR were used to probe the damages caused by AgNPs-HWE combo on the cell morphology and cell membrane integrity of E. coli. The mechanism of AgNPs-HWE combo against E. coli may attribute to AgNPs leads to cell wall lysis and damages cell membrane integrity, and thus increases the penetration of HWE into the bacterium, which results in more serious damage to bacterial cells. These findings indicated that AgNPs-herb was more potent than the AgNPs alone and holds promise for the development of nanoparticle enhanced herbal pharmaceuticals.

  11. Effects of Lonicera japonica Thunb. on Type 2 Diabetes via PPAR-γ Activation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Min; Kim, Mi Hye; Choi, You Yeon; Lee, Haesu; Hong, Jongki; Yang, Woong Mo

    2015-10-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae) is a traditional herbal medicine and has been used to treat diabetic symptoms. Notwithstanding its use, the scientific basis on anti-diabetic properties of L. japonica is not yet established. This study is designed to investigate anti-diabetic effects of L. japonica in type 2 diabetic rats. L. japonica was orally administered at the dose of 100 mg/kg in high-fat diet-fed and low-dose streptozotocin-induced rats. After the treatment of 4 weeks, L. japonica reduced high blood glucose level and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance in diabetic rats. In addition, body weight and food intake were restored by the L. japonica treatment. In the histopathologic examination, the amelioration of damaged β-islet in pancreas was observed in L. japonica-treated diabetic rats. The administration of L. japonica elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and insulin receptor subunit-1 protein expressions. The results demonstrated that L. japonica had anti-diabetic effects in type 2 diabetic rats via the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulatory action of L. japonica as a potential mechanism.

  12. A glucan isolated from flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb. inhibits aggregation and neurotoxicity of Aβ42.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peipei; Liao, Wenfeng; Fang, Jianping; Liu, Qin; Yao, Jian; Hu, Minghua; Ding, Kan

    2014-09-22

    Inhibition of Aβ aggregation and attenuation of its cytotoxicity are considered to valuable therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, a glucan named as LJW0F2 was purified from flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Using monosaccharides composition analysis, methylation analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, this polysaccharide was elucidated to be an α-D-(1→4)-glucan with an α-(1→4) linked branch attached to the C-6 position. Its inhibitory effect on Aβ42 aggregation was measured by fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavine T (ThT) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We showed that polysaccharide LJW0F2 could inhibit Aβ42 aggregation in a dose-dependent-manner. Besides, LJW0F2 could attenuate the cytotoxicity induced by Aβ42 aggregation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report that the exogenous plant-derived polysaccharide might block Aβ42 aggregation directly and reduce its toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells.

  13. Effects of cadmium hyperaccumulation on the concentrations of four trace elements in Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhouli; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Hyperaccumulators are important in the phytoremediation of cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soil. In this study, Cd accumulation and the interactions between Cd and four other trace elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) in Lonicera japonica Thunb. were investigated. As a result of exposure to soil containing 50 mg kg(-1) Cd, stem and shoot Cd concentrations reached 344.49 ± 0.71 and 286.12 ± 9.38 μg g(-1) DW respectively, without showing symptoms of visible damage to the plants. This suggests that L. japonica has a strong tolerance to Cd. It is proposed that trace metal elements are involved in the Cd-detoxification mechanisms shown by hyperaccumulators. There is a synergistic interaction in accumulation and translocation between Cd and Fe and a significantly negative correlation between Cd and Cu or Zn concentrations in L. japonica plant tissues. The imbalanced trace element concentrations influences detoxification processes to Cd, therefore, L. japonica could be considered as a new Cd-hyperaccumulator model to investigate the metal tolerance strategies of plants.

  14. Triterpenoid saponins from the roots of Rosa rugosa Thunb. as rat intestinal sucrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Jo, Sung Hoo; Hung, Tran Manh; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Kwon, Young In; Minh, Chau Van; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-10-01

    Medicinal plants constitute an important source of potential therapeutic agents for diabetes. The purpose of present study is to investigate the effect of root extract of Rosa rugosa Thunb. on inhibition of sucrase related to diabetes mellitus (DM). Bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol extract led to the identification of 13 triterpenoid saponins (1-13). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D, 2D NMR, and MS. The n-butanol fraction showed potent rat intestinal sucrase inhibitory activity with value of 87.62 ± 5.84 % inhibition compared to the positive control acarbose (50.96 ± 2.97 % inhibition at 0.02 mM). Subsequently, compounds 11-13 (1.0 mM) exhibited significant sucrase inhibitory activity, with inhibition percentage values of 41.17 ± 3.52, 46.80 ± 4.00, and 39.39 ± 4.19 %, respectively. Whereas, compounds 2-6, 8, and 10 showed moderate sucrase inhibitory activity (ranging from 13.26 ± 7.00 to 32.08 ± 6.04 % inhibition) at a same concentration. The data provide a starting point for creating new sucrase inhibitors, which may be useful for the development of effective therapies for the treatment of DM.

  15. Variations of metabolites and proteome in Lonicera japonica Thunb. buds and flowers under UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zheng, Wen; Hu, Xingjiang; Xu, Xiaobao; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2017-04-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb., also known as Jin Yin Hua and Japanese honeysuckle, is used as a herbal medicine in Asian countries. Its flowers have been used in folk medicine in the clinic and in making food or healthy beverages for over 1500years in China. To investigate the molecular processes involved in L. japonica development from buds to flowers exposed to UV radiation, a comparative proteomics analysis was performed. Fifty-four proteins were identified as differentially expressed, including 42 that had increased expression and 12 that had decreased expression. The levels of the proteins related to glycolysis, TCA/organic acid transformation, major carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate, stress, secondary metabolism, hormone, and mitochondrial electron transport were increased during flower opening process after exposure to UV radiation. Six metabolites in L. japonica buds and flowers were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. The antioxidant activity was performed using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, which revealed that L. japonica buds had more activity than the UV irradiated flowers. This suggests that UV-B radiation induces production of endogenous ethylene in L. japonica buds, thus facilitating blossoming of the buds and activating the antioxidant system. Additionally, the higher metabolite contents and antioxidant properties of L. japonica buds indicate that the L. japonica bud stage may be a more optimal time to harvest than the flower stage when using for medicinal properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal, emulsifying and rheological properties of polysaccharides sequentially extracted from Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Xin; Shi, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Li, Ling; Jiang, Li; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Plant polysaccharides are widely used in food industry as thickening and gelling agents and these attributes largely depend on their thermal, emulsifying and rheological properties. As known, the extraction methods always bring about the diversification of property and functions of polysaccharides. Thus, the Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb leaves polysaccharides (VBTLP) were sequentially extracted using hot buffer (HBSS), chelating agent (CHSS), dilute alkaline (DASS) and concentrated alkaline (CASS). The thermal, emulsifying and rheological properties of VBTLP were investigated in the present study. Within the range of 20-225°C, CHSS showed the highest peak temperature, whereas HBSS displayed the highest endothermic enthalpy and highest emulsifying activity, while, CASS showed the longest emulsifying stability. The VBTLP solutions exhibited non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior within the concentrations of 0.6-2.5%. The apparent viscosity of VBTLP solution decreased under following conditions: acidic pH (4.0), alkaline pH (10.0), in the presence of Ca(2+) and at high temperature, while it increased in the presence of Na(+) and at freezing conditions. The modulus G' and G″ of VBTLP solutions were increased with increasing oscillation frequency, and the crossover frequency shifted to lower values when the polysaccharide content increased. The above results of thermal, emulsifying and rheological properties of VBTLPs supplied the basis for V. bracteatum leaves in potential industrial applications of foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Protective Effects of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. on Gentamicin-induced Oxidative Stress and Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changgeun; Lee, Hyungkyoung; Hah, Do-Yun; Heo, Jung Ho; Kim, Chung Hui; Kim, Euikyung; Kim, Jong Shu

    2013-03-01

    Development of a therapy providing protection from, or reversing gentamicin-sulfate (GS)-induced oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity would be of great clinical significance. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HC) against gentamicin sulfate-induced renal damage in rats. Twenty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 equal groups as follows: group 1, control; group 2, GS 100 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection; group 3, GS 100 mg/kg/d, i.p. + HC 500 mg/kg/d, oral; and group 4, GS 100 mg/kg/d i.p. + HC 1000 mg/kg/d, oral administration). Treatments were administered once daily for 12 d. After 12 d, biochemical and histopathological analyses were conducted to evaluate oxidative stress and renal nephrotoxicity. Serum levels of creatinine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), together with renal levels of MDA, glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were quantified to evaluate antioxidant activity. Animals treated with GS alone showed a significant increase in serum levels of creatinine, BUN, and MDA, with decreased renal levels of GSH, SOD, and CAT. Treatment of rats with HC showed significant improvement in renal function, presumably as a result of decreased biochemical indices and oxidative stress parameters associated with GS-induced nephrotoxicity. Histopathological examination of the rat kidneys confirmed these observations. Therefore, the novel natural antioxidant HC may protect against GSinduced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

  18. Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Aspalathus abietina Thunb.

    PubMed

    Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G; Le Roux, Johannes J

    2014-06-01

    During a study to investigate the diversity of rhizobia associated with native legumes in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region, a Gram-negative bacterium designated VG1C(T) was isolated from the root nodules of Aspalathus abietina Thunb. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA genes, VG1C(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to the type strain of Burkholderia sediminicola (98.5% and 98%, respectively). The DNA G+C content of strain VG1C(T) was 60.1 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness values to the type strain of closely related species were found to be substantially lower than 70%. As evidenced by results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic tests provided here, we conclude that isolate VG1C(T) represents a novel rhizosphere-associated species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain VG1C(T) ( = DSM 27239(T) = LMG 27731(T)).

  19. Houttuynia cordata Thunb extract induces cytotoxicity in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells: Raman spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiwei; Li, Zuanfang; Yu, Yun; Lin, Duo; Huang, Hao; Shi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity induced by Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells was investigated by Raman spectroscopy (RS). The average Raman spectra of cell groups treated with HCT (0, 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 μg ml-1) for 24 h were measured separately. Compared to the control group, the intensities of the selected bands (1002, 1338, and 1448 cm-1) related to protein, DNA, and lipid in the treatment groups decreased obviously as the concentration of HCT increased. Both cell groups treated with 250 and 500 μg ml-1 of HCT could be differentiated from the control group by principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA) with a diagnostic accuracy of 100%, suggesting that cytotoxicity occurred and that 250 μg ml-1 was the proper dose for treatment. Simultaneously, the Raman spectra of cells treated with different treatment times with 250 μg ml-1 of HCT were obtained. We can get that treatment with HCT decreased cell viability in a dose and time-dependent fashion. The results indicated that the RS combined with PCA-LDA can be used for pharmacokinetics studies of HCT in NPC cells, which could also provide useful data for clinical dosage optimization for HCT.

  20. Bioactivity-guided isolation of neuritogenic triterpenoids from the leaves of Ilex latifolia Thunb.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueli; Liu, Yu; Li, Jing; Xiang, Lan; Osada, Hiroyuki; Qi, Jianhua

    2017-09-22

    Ilex latifolia Thunb is a traditional Chinese tea and herbal medicine. In this study, one new triterpene saponin (1) and six known triterpenoids (2-7) were isolated from the methanol extract of I. latifolia using a PC12 cell bioassay system. The structures and stereochemistry of these compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic methods and chemical derivatization. This new triterpene saponin (1) was characterized as an ursolic type acid with a 19α-hydroxyl and a trisaccharide moiety at C-3. Compound 1 significantly promoted the neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by 52% at 10 μM, whereas compounds 2-7 showed less neuritogenic activity. Structure activity relationship studies indicated that introducing a trisaccharide moiety at C-3 is important for the neuritogenic activity, but the sugar group at C-28 decreased this activity. In addition, compound 1 increased the neurite outgrowth length in primary cortical neuron cells of mice and also exhibited a neuronal protection effect on H2O2-damaged PC12 cells at optimum concentrations.

  1. Characterization and Antihyperglycemic Activity of a Polysaccharide from Dioscorea opposita Thunb Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yijun; He, Qinyi; Luo, Aoshuang; Wang, Miaoyu; Luo, Aoxue

    2015-01-01

    A polysaccharide DOTP-80 from Dioscorea opposita Thunb was obtained by using the method of acid water-extraction and ethanol-precipitation. After being purified by chromatography, the structure characteristics of DOTP-80 were established. Based on the calibration curve obtained with standard dextrans, the molecular weight of the polysaccharide fraction DOTP-80 was calculated to be 123 kDa. The results of Infrared spectrum (FT-IR) indicated that the polysaccharide contained the α-configuration of sugar units. GC-MS analysis revealed that DOTP-80 was mainly composed of mannose and glucose. Alloxan-induced diabetic rats and mice models were developed to evaluate the in vivo hypoglycemic activity of the polysaccharide. The results indicated that a high dose DOTP-80 (400 mg/kg) had strong hypoglycemic activity. Moreover, DOTP-80 could increase the level of antioxidant enzymes (SOD) activity in alloxan-induced diabetic mice and stimulate an increase in glucose disposal in diabetic rats. Therefore, the polysaccharide DOTP-80 should be evaluated as a candidate for future studies on diabetes mellitus. PMID:25809611

  2. Lonicera japonica Thunb.: ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology of an important traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaofei; Pan, Hu; Li, Maoxing; Miao, Xiaolou; Ding, Hong

    2011-10-31

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae), a widely used traditional Chinese medicine, was known as Jin Yin Hua (Chinese: ), Ren Dong and Japanese honeysuckle. It was taken to treat the exopathogenic wind-heat, epidemic febrile diseases, sores, carbuncles and some infectious diseases. At the same time, Lonicera japonica could be used as healthy food, cosmetics, ornamental groundcover, and so on. The present paper reviewed the ethnopharmacology, the biological activities, toxicology and phytochemistry of Lonicera japonica. Information on Lonicera japonica was gathered via the Internet (using Google Scholar, Baidu Scholar, Elsevier, ACS, Medline Plus, CNKI and Web of Science) and libraries. Additionally, information also was obtained from some local books and brilliant scholars on ethnopharmacology. More than 140 chemical compounds have been isolated, and the main compositions are essential oils, organic acids and flavones, etc. Lonicera japonica and its active principles possess wide pharmacological actions, such as anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities. As an important traditional Chinese medicine, further studies on Lonicera japonica can lead to the development of new drugs and therapeutics for various diseases, and how to utilize it better should be paid more attentions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptome changes in Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. roots induced by methyl jasmonate* #

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-chang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Jun-wen; Zhao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome profiling has been widely used to analyze transcriptomic variation in plants subjected to abiotic or biotic stresses. Although gene expression changes induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) have been profiled in several plant species, no information is available on the MeJA-triggered transcriptome response of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., a species with highly valuable medicinal properties. In this study, we used transcriptome profiling to investigate transcriptome changes in roots of P. multiflorum seedlings subjected to a 0.25 mmol/L-MeJA root irrigation treatment. A total of 18 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were induced by MeJA treatment, of which 4535 were up-regulated and 14 142 were down-regulated compared with controls. These DEGs were associated with 125 metabolic pathways. In addition to various common primary and secondary metabolic pathways, several secondary metabolic pathways related to components with significant pharmacological effects were enriched by MeJA, including arachidonic acid metabolism, linoleic acid metabolism, and stilbenoid biosynthesis. The MeJA-induced transcriptome changes uncovered in this study provide a solid foundation for future study of functional genes controlling effective components in secondary metabolic pathways of P. multiflorum. PMID:26642186

  4. Peucedanum japonicum Thunb inhibits high-fat diet induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takafumi; Toda, Takayoshi; Nukitrangsan, Natthanan; Inafuku, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hironori; Oku, Hirosuke

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the antiobese activity of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb (PJT) in mice. In the first experiment, 4-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed seven different diets containing 15% corn oil and 0-20% PJT powder for 4 weeks. Feeding the 10% and 20% PJT diet suppressed the body weight gain and the accumulation of abdominal and subcutaneous fats. PJT reduced serum and liver levels of triglyceride and serum levels of leptin in a dose-dependent manner. PJT intake decreased the proportion of saturated fatty acids and increased polyunsaturated and n-3 fatty acids in the liver. To obtain more insight into the antiobese activity of PJT, its effect on lipid absorption and enzyme activities related to lipid metabolism was studied in the second experiment. There was an increased faecal excretion of triglyceride in mice fed 5% and 10% PJT diets. Fatty acid synthase activity was decreased while carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was increased by 10% PJT intake. These findings pointed to the usefulness of PJT for the development of a safe natural agent to reduce obesity or body weight for the first time. The rationale for the lipid lowering mechanism of PJT and the candidate compound responsible for the observations have also been discussed.

  5. Constituents of the leaves of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb. and their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Masashi; Kikuzaki, Hiroe; Nakatani, Nobuji

    2004-02-11

    In the course of our study on the isolation and structure determination of constituents in tropical plants, we focused on Peucedanum japonicum Thunb., belonging to the family Umbelliferae. In this study, a new C(13) norisoprenoid glucoside, (3S)-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-6-[3-oxo-(2S)-butenylidenyl]-1,1,5-trimethylcyclohexan-(5R)-ol (1), and two new phenylpropanoid glucosides, 3-(2-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid (3) and methyl 3-(2-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoate (4), were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of this plant's leaves, together with five known compounds. The structures of these compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. In addition, all isolated compounds were examined for scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and inhibitory activity against mushroom tyrosinase. These results suggested that 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propane-1,3-diol (7) and 3-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propanol (8) showed an appreciable activity in both assay systems.

  6. Complete plastid genome of Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl and comparative analysis in Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liqun; Guan, Qijie; Amin, Awais; Zhu, Wei; Li, Mengzhu; Li, Ximin; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-01-01

    Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl (loquat) is an evergreen Rosaceae fruit tree widely distributed in subtropical regions. Its leaves are considered as traditional Chinese medicine and are of high medical value especially for cough and emesis. Thus, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of E. japonica to better utilize this important species. The complete plastid genome of E. japonica is 159,137 bp in length, which contains a typical quadripartite structure with a pair of inverted repeats (IR, 26,326 bp) separated by large (LSC, 89,202 bp) and small (SSC, 19,283 bp) single-copy regions. The E. japonica plastid genome encodes 112 unique genes which consist of 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Gene structure and content of E. japonica plastid genome are quite conserved and show similarity among Rosaceous species. Five large indels are unique to E. japonica in comparison with Pyrus pyrifolia and Prunus persica, which could be utilized as molecular markers. A total of 72 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected and most of them are mononucleotide repeats composed of A or T, indicating a strong A or T bias for base composition. The Ka and Ks ratios of most genes are lower than 1, which suggests that most genes are under purifying selection. The phylogenetic analysis described the evolutionary relationship within Rosaceae and fully supported a close relationship between E. japonica and P. pyrifolia.

  7. Transferability of retrotransposon primers derived from Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) across other plant species.

    PubMed

    Du, X Y; Hu, Q N; Zhang, Q L; Wang, Y B; Luo, Z R

    2013-06-06

    Retrotransposon-based molecular markers are powerful molecular tools. However, these markers are not readily available due to the difficulty in obtaining species-specific retrotransposon primers. Although recent techniques enabling the rapid isolation of retrotransposon sequences have facilitated primer development, this process nonetheless remains time-consuming and costly. Therefore, research into the transferability of retrotransposon primers developed from one plant species onto others would be of great value. The present study investigated the transferability of retrotransposon primers derived from 'Luotian-tianshi' persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) across other fruit crops, as well as within the genus using inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism molecular marker. Fourteen of the 26 retrotransposon primers tested (53.85%) produced robust and reproducible amplification products across all fruit crops tested, indicating their applicability across plant species. Four of the 13 fruit crops showed the best transferability performances: persimmon, grape, citrus, and peach. Furthermore, similarity coefficients and UPGMA clustering indicated that these primers could further offer a potential tool for germplasm differentiation, parentage identification, genetic diversity assessment, classification, and phylogenetic studies across a variety of plant species. Transferability was further confirmed by examining published primers derived from Rosaceae, Gramineae, and Solanaceae. This study is one of the few currently available studies concerning the transferability of retrotransposon primers across plant species in general, and is the first successful study of the transferability of retrotransposon primers derived from persimmon. The primers presented here will help reduce costs for future retrotransposon primer development and therefore contribute to the popularization of retrotransposon molecular markers.

  8. Aqueous extract of dioscorea opposita thunb. normalizes the hypertension in 2K1C hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dioscorea opposita Thunb. (Huai Shan Yao, DOT), a common staple food in China, has been used for more than 2000 years in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat different systemic diseases including hypertension. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible antihypertensive effects of the aqueous extract of (DOT) in renovascular hypertensive rats as well as the mechanism in reducing blood pressure. Methods The two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) Goldblatt model of renovascular hypertension was used in Wistar rats. Rats with captopril, low-dose DOT and high-dose DOT treated 2K1C groups for 6 weeks. The blood pressure, cardiac mass index (heart weight/body weight), plasma level of angiotensin-II (Ang-II), endothelin-1(ET-1), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated. Results DOT significantly reduced mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure after treatment. DOT also significantly increased plasma SOD activity but decreased plasma MDA concentration. Renal function was improved with captopril and DOT. DOT reduced plasma Ang-II activity and plasma ET concentration. They couldalso significantly reduce the left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac mass index. Conclusions Our results suggest that DOT may have an antihypertensive effect on hypertension by inhibit ET-converting enzyme and antioxidant activity, which warrant further exploration. PMID:24447776

  9. GC-MS analyses of the volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhan-Nan; Luo, Shi-Qiong; Ma, Jing; Wu, Dan; Hong, Liang; Yu, Zheng-Wen

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS is the basis of analysis of plant volatiles. Several protocols employed for the assay have resulted in inconsistent results in the literature. We developed a GC-MS method, which were applied to analyze 25 volatiles (α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene, 2-methyl-2-pentenal, myrcene, (+)-limonene, eucalyptol, trans-2-hexenal, γ-terpinene, cis-3-hexeneyl-acetate, 1-hexanol, α-pinene oxide, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, trans-2-hexen-1-ol, decanal, linalool, acetyl-borneol, β-caryophyllene, 2-undecanone, 4-terpineol, borneol, decanol, eugenol, isophytol and phytol) of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. Linear behaviors for all analytes were observed with a linear regression relationship (r2>0.9991) at the concentrations tested. Recoveries of the 25 analytes were 98.56-103.77% with RSDs <3.0%. Solution extraction (SE), which involved addition of an internal standard, could avoid errors for factors in sample preparation by steam distillation (SD) and solidphase micro extraction (SPME). Less sample material (≍0.05g fresh leaves of H. cordata) could be used to determine the contents of 25 analytes by our proposed method and, after collection, did not affect the normal physiological activity or growth of H. cordata. This method can be used to monitor the metabolic accumulation of H. cordata volatiles.

  10. Microsatellite primer development for post oak, Quercus stellata (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Chatwin, Warren B; Carpenter, Kyrie K; Jimenez, Felix R; Elzinga, Dave B; Johnson, Leigh A; Maughan, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    The American Cross Timbers forest ecosystem runs from southeastern Kansas to Central Texas and is primarily composed of post oak (Quercus stellata). This old-growth forest currently occupies only about 2% of its ancestral range. To facilitate genetic research on this species, we developed microsatellite primers specific to post oak from reduced genomic libraries. • Two Q. stellata individuals, sampled from the northern and southern range of the post oak forest, were subject to genomic reduction and 454 pyrosequencing. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative microsatellites from which 12 polymorphic primer sets were screened on three populations. The number of alleles observed ranged from five to 20 across all populations, while observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.05 to 0.833 and 0.236 to 0.893, respectively, within individual populations. • We report the development of microsatellite markers, specific to post oak, to aid the study of genetic diversity and population structure of extant forest remnants.

  11. Antimutagenicity of a suberin extract from Quercus suber cork.

    PubMed

    Krizková, L; Lopes, M H; Polónyi, J; Belicová, A; Dobias, J; Ebringer, L

    1999-12-13

    The possible protective effect of a suberin extract from Quercus suber cork on acridine orange (AO)-, ofloxacin- and UV radiation-induced mutagenicity (bleaching activity) in Euglena gracilis was examined. To our knowledge, the present results are the first attempt to analyse suberin in relation to mutagenicity of some chemicals. Suberin exhibits a significant dose-dependent protective effect against AO-induced mutagenicity and the concentration of 500 micrograms/ml completely eliminates the Euglena-bleaching activity of AO. The mutagenicity of ofloxacin is also significantly reduced in the presence of suberin (125, 250 and 500 micrograms/ml). However, the moderate protective effect of suberin on UV radiation-induced mutagenicity was observed only at concentrations 500 and 1000 micrograms/ml. Our data shows that suberin extract from Q. suber cork possess antimutagenic properties and can be included in the group of natural antimutagens acting in a desmutagenic manner.

  12. Ecological significance of seed desiccation sensitivity in Quercus ilex

    PubMed Central

    Joët, Thierry; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Dussert, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Several widespread tree species of temperate forests, such as species of the genus Quercus, produce recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds. However, the ecological significance of seed desiccation sensitivity in temperate regions is largely unknown. Do seeds of such species suffer from drying during the period when they remain on the soil, between shedding in autumn and the return of conditions required for germination in spring? Methods To test this hypothesis, the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex) forest was used as a model system. The relationships between the climate in winter, the characteristics of microhabitats, acorn morphological traits, and the water status and viability of seeds after winter were then investigated in 42 woodlands sampled over the entire French distribution of the species. Key Results The percentages of germination and normal seedling development were tightly linked to the water content of seeds after the winter period, revealing that in situ desiccation is a major cause of mortality. The homogeneity of seed response to drying suggests that neither intraspecific genetic variation nor environmental conditions had a significant impact on the level of desiccation sensitivity of seeds. In contrast, the water and viability status of seeds at the time of collection were dramatically influenced by cumulative rainfall and maximum temperatures during winter. A significant effect of shade and of the type of soil cover was also evidenced. Conclusions The findings establish that seed desiccation sensitivity is a key functional trait which may influence the success of recruitment in temperate recalcitrant seed species. Considering that most models of climate change predict changes in rainfall and temperature in the Mediterranean basin, the present work could help foresee changes in the distribution of Q. ilex and other oak species, and hence plant community alterations. PMID:23388882

  13. Photosynthetic characteristics in canopies of Quercus rubra, Quercus prinus and Acer rubrum differ in response to soil water availability.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Matthew H; Whitehead, David; Tissue, David T; Schuster, William S; Brown, Kim J; Engel, Victor C; Griffin, Kevin L

    2002-02-01

    Photosynthesis and related leaf characteristics were measured in canopies of co-occurring Quercus rubra L. (red oak), Quercus prinus L. (chestnut oak) and Acer rubrum L. (red maple) trees. Mature (20+ m tall) trees were investigated at sites of differing soil water availability within a catchment (a drier upper site and a wetter lower site). Leaf photosynthetic characteristics differed significantly between species and in response to site and position in the canopy. Photosynthetic capacity (A max) was significantly greater at the wetter site in all canopy strata in A. rubrum but not in Q. rubra or Q. prinus. Our findings for A. rubrum are generally consistent with those predicting that species with higher specific leaf area (SLA) will have higher A max per unit leaf nitrogen (N) and that species with leaves with lower SLA (e.g. Q. rubra and Q. prinus) will have shallower slopes of the A max-N relationship. Importantly, the relationships between A max and N area (and by implication photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency, PNUE) differed in A. rubrum between the sites, with PNUE significantly lower at the drier site. The lower photosynthetic capacity and PNUE must substantially reduce carbon acquisition capacity in A. rubrum under these field conditions. Maximum stomatal conductance (g smax) differed significantly between species, with g smax greatest in Q. rubra and Q. prinus. In Q. rubra and Q. prinus, g smax was significantly lower at the upper site than the lower site. There was no significant response of g smax to site in A. rubrum. These stomatal responses were consistent with the C i/C a ratio, which was significantly lower in leaves of Q. rubra and Q. prinus at the upper site, but did not differ between sites in A. rubrum. Leaf δ(13)C was significantly lower in A. rubrum than in either Q. rubra or Q. prinus at both sites. These findings indicate differences in stomatal behaviour in A. rubrum which are likely to contribute to lower water use efficiency at

  14. Neurotrophic activity of DA-9801, a mixture extract of Dioscorea japonica Thunb. and Dioscorea nipponica Makino, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namho; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Yu-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Nam, Min-Kyung; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Sun-Yeou; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2011-09-01

    Dioscorea japonica Thunb. has been traditionally used to treat polyuria and diabetes in Korea. We previously report the effects of Dioscorea japonica Thunb. extract on glucose control, NGF induction, and neuroprotection in a rodent diabetic model. Since the most potent fraction, DA-9801, was identified from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica Thunb. (DJ) and Dioscorea nipponica Makino (DN) following bioactivity-guided fractionation, here, we investigated the potential mechanism of the extract activity against diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). A 1:3 mixture of DJ and DN was extracted with ethanol (DA-9801) and further fractionated into an ethylacetate-soluble fraction (DA-9801E). Effects of these extracts on neurite outgrowth were measured in PC-12 cells and DRG neurons. Effects on cell viability and TrkA phosphorylation were evaluated in PC-12 cells. NGF induction effect was determined in primary Schwann cells as well as IMS32 cells (immortalized Schwann cells). No cytotoxicity was observed in PC-12 cells at the concentration below 500 μg/ml of either DA-9801 or DA-9801E. DA-9801 and DA-9801E at 100 μg/ml and 10 μg/ml, respectively, showed a significant effect on neurite outgrowth in PC-12 cells and DRG neurons in the presence of or absence a low concentration of NGF (2 ng/ml). The Trk-A phosphorylation effect of DA9801 was confirmed in PC-12 cells. An NGF induction effect of these extracts was not detected in either IMS-32 cells, or primary Schwann cells. The NGF agonistic activity of DA-9801 and DA-9801E was demonstrated, which may contribute to their neuroprotective effect against DPN. Studies of the detailed mechanism of these extracts as well as identification of the active components are warranted for the development of an anti-DPN drug from DJ and DN. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypoglycemic effect of the polyphenols rich extract from Rose rugosa Thunb on high fat diet and STZ induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liu; Tang, Dan; Zhao, Haiqing; Xin, Xuelei; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2017-03-22

    Rosa rugosa Thunb is a traditional Uygur medicine that has been used in the treatment of diabetes in Uygur ancient recipe for hundreds of years. However, the mechanism of Rosa rugosa Thunb activity is still unclear. This study was designed to address this issue by studying the polyphenols enriched extract (RPE) of Rosa rugosa Thunb in diabetic rats. RPE were tested in the inhibition of α-glucosidase and oxidative stress in vitro. RPE was administrated at dosages of 37.5, 75 and 150mg/kg body weight in the type 2 diabetic rats, which were made by high fat diet feeding plus a low dose of STZ injection (30mg/kg). The therapeutic effect was evaluated four weeks later. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT) and insulin signal pathway (PI3K/AKT) were examined to determine insulin sensitivity. Blood glucose levels and body weight were measured weekly in the study. In vitro, RPE exhibited an activity in the inhibition of α-glucosidase and had an excellent antioxidant activity in the liver of diabetic rats. RPE significantly decreased the fasting blood glucose, improved insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR), OGTT, ITT and blood lipid profile. The glycogen synthesis and hexokinase activity were increased together with the improved signaling activity of insulin as indicated by p-IRS, p-IR, p-AKT, and p-GSK-3β. The results suggest that RPE reduced blood glucose in type 2 diabetic rats by improvement of insulin sensitivity. The effect is likely achieved by inhibition of oxidative stress and α-glucosidase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of Hovenia dulcis THUNB. on experimental liver injuries induced by carbon tetrachloride or D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hase, K; Ohsugi, M; Xiong, Q; Basnet, P; Kadota, S; Namba, T

    1997-04-01

    The hepatoprotective effects of the fruits of Hovenia dulcis THUNB. on chemically or immunologically induced experimental liver injury models were examined. The methanol extract showed significant hepatoprotective activity against CCl4-toxicity in rats and D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice. The methanol extract also significantly protected against CCl4-toxicity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Hepatoprotective activity-guided fractionation and chemical analysis led to the isolation of an active constituent, (+)-ampelopsin (1) from the methanol extract.

  17. [Study on supercritical CO2 extraction of fatty oils from the seed of Akebia trifoliata (Thunb) Koidz].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-xia; Ge, Fa-huan

    2007-03-01

    The extraction of fatty oils from the seed of Akebia trifoliata (Thunb) Koidz with supercritical CO2 was studied. The effects of extraction pressure, extraction temperature on the yields were discussed. The optimal condition of this method was as follow: extraction pressure 30 MPa, extraction temerature 45 degrees C, separator I pressure 11 MPa, separator I temperature 50 degrees C, separator II pressure 6MPa, separator II temperature 45 degrees C, extraction period 2 hours. Compared with the traditional solvent extraction, with a GC-MS analysis, it revealed that the component extracted with supercritical CO2 was basically consistent with that extracted with petroleum ether, and it was rich unsaturated fatty acid.

  18. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Solution by Eriobotrya Japonica Thunb. Leaf Extract: Electrochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjing; Wang, Qihui; Xu, Ke; Yin, Yanjun; Bao, Hebin; Li, Xueming; Niu, Lidan; Chen, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    The biodegradable inhibitors, which could effectively reduce the rate of corrosion of carbon steel, were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The mixed-type inhibitors extracted from Eriobotrya japonica Thunb. leaf exhibited excellent inhibition performance, and the inhibition efficiency for carbon steel reached 90.0% at 298 K in hydrochloric acid. Moreover, the adsorption mechanism of the inhibitors on a carbon steel surface is described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Simultaneously, the corrosion morphology of the carbon steel and the inhibitor structure were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. PMID:28812993

  19. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of Oak wood ( Quercus robur and Quercus canariensis): optimization of the processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Rim; Azzouz, Soufien; Remond, Romain; Ouertani, Sahbi; Elaieb, Mohamed Taher; El Cafci, Mohamed Afif

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the moisture desorption isotherms and essentials thermodynamic properties of two Oak wood varieties. Desorption isotherms were measured using a static gravimetric method at 50, 60, 70 and 80 °C within the range of 5-90 % relative humidity. The equilibrium moisture content decreased with increasing temperature and decreased with decreasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. The `Thermodynamic' sorption equation was found to be the best for describing the experimental moisture sorption isotherms of woods within the range of temperature and water activity investigated. The Fiber saturation point, deduced from the `Thermodynamic' model parameters, depends on the temperature and varying from 22.6 to 54.4 (% kg water/kg dry matter). Isosteric heat of desorption and differential entropy were calculated by applying Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the desorption data fitted by the `Thermodynamic' model. The isosteric heat of desorption and the differential entropy decreased with increasing moisture content according to an exponential law equation and varying from 2.03 to 31.14 kJ/mol and from 73.98 to 4.34 J/(mol K), respectively. The linear relationship between differential enthalpy and entropy satisfied the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. The sign of Gibbs free energy was found to be positive (+283 J/mol) and (+97 J/mol) for Quercus robur and Quercus canariensis, respectively. The isokinetic temperature was found to be greater than the harmonic temperature. Based on the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory, it could be concluded that the moisture desorption isotherm of Oak wood is a non-spontaneous and enthalpy-controlled process.

  20. Regeneration patterns of European oak species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in dependence of environment and neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings.

  1. Drought-induced photosynthetic inhibition and autumn recovery in two Mediterranean oak species (Quercus ilex and Quercus suber).

    PubMed

    Vaz, M; Pereira, J S; Gazarini, L C; David, T S; David, J S; Rodrigues, A; Maroco, J; Chaves, M M

    2010-08-01

    Responses of leaf water relations and photosynthesis to summer drought and autumn rewetting were studied in two evergreen Mediterranean oak species, Quercus ilex spp. rotundifolia and Quercus suber. The predawn leaf water potential (Ψ(lPD)), stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthetic rate (A) at ambient conditions were measured seasonally over a 3-year period. We also measured the photosynthetic response to light and to intercellular CO₂ (A/PPFD and A/C(i) response curves) under water stress (summer) and after recovery due to autumn rainfall. Photosynthetic parameters, Vc(max), J(max) and triose phosphate utilization (TPU) rate, were estimated using the Farquhar model. RuBisCo activity, leaf chlorophyll, leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf carbohydrate concentration were also measured. All measurements were performed in the spring leaves of the current year. In both species, the predawn leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate peaked in spring, progressively declined throughout the summer and recovered upon autumn rainfall. During the drought period, Q. ilex maintained a higher predawn leaf water potential and stomatal conductance than Q. suber. During this period, we found that photosynthesis was not only limited by stomatal closure, but was also downregulated as a consequence of a decrease in the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc(max)) and the light-saturated rate of photosynthetic electron transport (J(max)) in both species. The Vc(max) and J(max) increased after the first autumnal rains and this increase was related to RuBisCo activity, leaf nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll concentration. In addition, an increase in the TPU rate and in soluble leaf sugar concentration was observed in this period. The results obtained indicate a high resilience of the photosynthetic apparatus to summer drought as well as good recovery in the following autumn rains of these evergreen oak species.

  2. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of Oak wood (Quercus robur and Quercus canariensis): optimization of the processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Rim; Azzouz, Soufien; Remond, Romain; Ouertani, Sahbi; Elaieb, Mohamed Taher; El Cafci, Mohamed Afif

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the moisture desorption isotherms and essentials thermodynamic properties of two Oak wood varieties. Desorption isotherms were measured using a static gravimetric method at 50, 60, 70 and 80 °C within the range of 5-90 % relative humidity. The equilibrium moisture content decreased with increasing temperature and decreased with decreasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. The `Thermodynamic' sorption equation was found to be the best for describing the experimental moisture sorption isotherms of woods within the range of temperature and water activity investigated. The Fiber saturation point, deduced from the `Thermodynamic' model parameters, depends on the temperature and varying from 22.6 to 54.4 (% kg water/kg dry matter). Isosteric heat of desorption and differential entropy were calculated by applying Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the desorption data fitted by the `Thermodynamic' model. The isosteric heat of desorption and the differential entropy decreased with increasing moisture content according to an exponential law equation and varying from 2.03 to 31.14 kJ/mol and from 73.98 to 4.34 J/(mol K), respectively. The linear relationship between differential enthalpy and entropy satisfied the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. The sign of Gibbs free energy was found to be positive (+283 J/mol) and (+97 J/mol) for Quercus robur and Quercus canariensis, respectively. The isokinetic temperature was found to be greater than the harmonic temperature. Based on the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory, it could be concluded that the moisture desorption isotherm of Oak wood is a non-spontaneous and enthalpy-controlled process.

  3. Regeneration Patterns of European Oak Species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in Dependence of Environment and Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings

  4. Curcumin and Boswellia serrata Modulate the Glyco-Oxidative Status and Lipo-Oxidation in Master Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Chilelli, Nino Cristiano; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Valentini, Romina; Cosma, Chiara; Ferraresso, Stefania; Lapolla, Annunziata; Sartore, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic intensive exercise is associated with a greater induction of oxidative stress and with an excess of endogenous advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Curcumin can reduce the accumulation of AGEs in vitro and in animal models. We examined whether supplementation with curcumin and Boswellia serrata (BSE) gum resin for 3 months could affect plasma levels of markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and glycation in healthy master cyclists. Methods. Forty-seven healthy male athletes were randomly assigned to Group 1, consisting of 22 subjects given a Mediterranean diet (MD) alone (MD group), and Group 2 consisted of 25 subjects given a MD plus curcumin and BSE (curcumin/BSE group). Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), total AGE, soluble receptor for AGE (sRAGE), malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma phospholipid fatty acid (PPFA) composition, and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were tested at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: sRAGE, NEFA, and MDA decreased significantly in both groups, while only the curcumin/BSE group showed a significant decline in total AGE. Only the changes in total AGE and MDA differed significantly between the curcumin/BSE and MD groups. Conclusions. Our data suggest a positive effect of supplementation with curcumin and BSE on glycoxidation and lipid peroxidation in chronically exercising master athletes. PMID:27879642

  5. Size at Maturity, Mating and Spawning in the Portunid Crab Scylla serrata (Forskål) in Natal, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, W. D.; Kruger, A.

    1994-08-01

    Size at sexual maturity, and mating and spawning periods, were investigated in the portunid crab Scylla serrata in northern Natal, South Africa. Ninety-five percent of females which had undergone the pubertal moult had sperm in their spermathecae, indicating that they had mated. Post-pubertal moult females were therefore considered mature. Size at 50% maturity for females was estimated to be 123 mm carapace width (CW) which is considerably smaller than previously recorded in South Africa. Some females underwent a moult after the pubertal moult. Fifty percent of male crabs were producing sperm at a size of 92 mm CW, but males smaller than 115 mm CW did not mate. Mating occurred in all months of the year. Spawning appeared to occur throughout the year with peak activity from late spring to early autumn. The present minimum size limit of 114-115 mm CW in South Africa may not be adequate to protect stocks should they be subjected to heavy fishing pressure.

  6. The Efficacy of Boswellia Serrata Gum Resin for Control of Lipid Profile and Blood Glucose in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Tavakolifar, Bahreh; Huseini, Hasan Fallah; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regarding preclinical evidence for antidiabetic effects of Boswellia serrata, we evaluated anti-hyperglycemic and lipid-lowering effects of Boswellia serrate gum resin in type 2 diabetic patients in a double-blind randomized placebo-control trial. Methods: Fifty-six diabetic patients were randomly allocated to two groups to receive 250 mg of the Boswellia serrate gum resin or placebo twice daily for 8 weeks, in addition to their routine antidiabetic treatments. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin level, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride of serum were measured before and after the intervention. Results: Although there was a considerable reduction after the intervention in FBS (P=0.04), HbA1c (P=0.02) and triglyceride (P=0.01) in the Boswellia serrate gum resin group, no significant difference was observed in all outcome measures between the two groups at the end of the study (FBS P=0.09, HbA1c P=0.20, total cholesterol P=0.31, LDL P=0.49, HDL P=0.10, triglyceride P=0.78 and insulin level P=0.86). Conclusion: The current study showed the 8 weeks complementary use of Boswellia serrate gum resin with a daily dose of 500 mg had no better glucose and lipid lowering effect than placebo in diabetic patients. PMID:27840532

  7. Boswellia serrata Protects Against Glutamate-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in PC12 and N2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Rajabian, Arezoo; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher; Hayatdavoudi, Parichehr; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza

    2016-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the extract from Boswellia serrata oleo-gum resin (BSE) can protect against glutamate-induced oxidative damage and cytotoxicity in PC12 and N2a cell lines. Using a simple and reliable reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the amount of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) in the BSE was found to be 18.5% w/w. The results confirmed that BSE and AKBA, at concentrations as high as 100 μg/mL or 10 μM, respectively, caused no significant cytotoxicity or apoptotic cell death. Co- and pretreatment with BSE (25-100 μg/mL) or AKBA (5 μM) restored the viability of PC12 and N2a cells under glutamate toxicity (8 mM). Treatment with BSE and AKBA also attenuated the toxic effects of glutamate on intracellular reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase activity, and oxidative DNA damage compared with the untreated glutamate-injured cells. Furthermore, BSE and AKBA decreased the apoptotic cell population in the sub-G1 region and the rate of both early and late-stage apoptosis induced by glutamate in the cells. Our data suggest that the protective effects of Boswellia extract and AKBA against glutamate toxicity in PC12 and N2a cells may be mediated through the amelioration of the oxidative stress and the resultant apoptosis.

  8. Proteoglycans from Boswellia serrata Roxb. and B. carteri Birdw. and identification of a proteolytic plant basic secretory protein.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Andreas; König, Simone; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Sehlbach, Maria; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Peter-Katalinic, Jasna; Hensel, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Water-soluble high molecular weight compounds were isolated in yields of 21-22% from the oleogum of Boswellia serrata and B. carteri. Using anion exchange chromatography and gel permeation chromatography, different proteoglycans were purified and characterized, leading to four principally different groups: (i) Hyp-/Ser-rich extensins with O-glycosidic attached arabinan side chains; (ii) Modified extensins, with arabinogalactosylated side chains containing GlA and 4-O-Me-GlcA; (iii) Glycoproteins with N-glycosidic side chains containing higher amounts of Fuc, Man and GluNH(2,) featuring a 200 kD metalloproteinase that has been de novo sequenced and is described for the first time; (iv) Type II arabinogalactans-proteins. Significant differences between the gums from the two species were observed in the protein content (6% vs 22%), offering the possibility of a quick differentiation of gums from both species for analytical quality control. The data also offer an insight into the plant response towards wound-closing by the formation of extensin and AGP-containing gum.

  9. Complete structural assignment of serratol, a cembrane-type diterpene from Boswellia serrata, and evaluation of its antiprotozoal activity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas J; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto

    2011-05-01

    From the dichloromethane extract obtained from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata Roxb. (Burseraceae), a well-known medicinal plant resin ("Indian Olibanum"), the cembrane-type diterpene serratol was isolated in high yield. Its structure, previously reported without clear specification of double-bond geometry and without specification of stereochemistry, was reanalysed by means of spectroscopic measurements and unambiguously assigned as S(-)-cembra-3E,7E,11E‑triene-1-ol. Full assignment of all NMR data is reported for the first time. The compound was found to be identical with a cembrenol previously isolated from B. carteri. Serratolwas tested for in vitro activity against four protozoan human pathogens, namely, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (East African Human Trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness), T. cruzi (Chagas' disease), Leishmania donovani (Kala-Azar), and Plasmodium falciparum (Tropical Malaria). It was found active against T. brucei and P. falciparum. These activities were 10- to 15-fold higher than its cytotoxicity against rat skeletalmyoblasts. While some reports exist on potential anti-inflammatory activity of Boswellia diterpenes, this is the first report on antiprotozoal activity of such a compound.

  10. The Efficacy of Boswellia Serrata Gum Resin for Control of Lipid Profile and Blood Glucose in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Tavakolifar, Bahreh; Huseini, Hasan Fallah; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regarding preclinical evidence for antidiabetic effects of Boswellia serrata, we evaluated anti-hyperglycemic and lipid-lowering effects of Boswellia serrate gum resin in type 2 diabetic patients in a double-blind randomized placebo-control trial. Methods: Fifty-six diabetic patients were randomly allocated to two groups to receive 250 mg of the Boswellia serrate gum resin or placebo twice daily for 8 weeks, in addition to their routine antidiabetic treatments. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin level, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride of serum were measured before and after the intervention. Results: Although there was a considerable reduction after the intervention in FBS (P=0.04), HbA1c (P=0.02) and triglyceride (P=0.01) in the Boswellia serrate gum resin group, no significant difference was observed in all outcome measures between the two groups at the end of the study (FBS P=0.09, HbA1c P=0.20, total cholesterol P=0.31, LDL P=0.49, HDL P=0.10, triglyceride P=0.78 and insulin level P=0.86). Conclusion: The current study showed the 8 weeks complementary use of Boswellia serrate gum resin with a daily dose of 500 mg had no better glucose and lipid lowering effect than placebo in diabetic patients. PMID:27516696

  11. Boswellia serrata gum resin aqueous extract upregulatesBDNF but not CREB expression in adult male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Farzaneh; Hosseinpourfeizi, Mohammad Ali; Shaikhzadeh-Hesari, Farzam; Nakhlband, Aylar; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad

    2016-11-17

    Boswellia from the family Burseraceae has been proposed for prevention of amnesia; however, the molecular mechanism by which it affects memory is not clear. To reveal the potential molecular mechanism, the effects of boswellia on the expression of two memory related genes, CREB and BDNF, were investigated. Twenty-one male rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 7): the control group received distilled water and the treatment groups received two doses of aqueous extract of Boswellia serrata gum resin (boswellia) (50 and 100 mg/kg) every day for 4 weeks. The animals were tested by the Morris water maze (MWM) and their hippocampus was isolated. Expression of CREB and BDNF genes was analyzed by Q-RT-PCR. The MWM test showed improvement in spatial learning and memory in both treatment groups. Gene expression analysis revealed a significant increase in BDNF but not CREB expression in rats treated with both 50 and 100 mg/kg doses in comparison with the control group. Although boswellia exerts its effects on memory formation at least partly by affecting the expression of BDNF, the results imply that boswellia probably affects memory via another BDNF-related pathway than the BDNF-CREB-BDNF cycle.

  12. The Efficacy of Boswellia Serrata Gum Resin for Control of Lipid Profile and Blood Glucose in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Tavakolifar, Bahreh; Huseini, Hasan Fallah; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2016-05-01

    Regarding preclinical evidence for antidiabetic effects of Boswellia serrata, we evaluated anti-hyperglycemic and lipid-lowering effects of Boswellia serrate gum resin in type 2 diabetic patients in a double-blind randomized placebo-control trial. Fifty-six diabetic patients were randomly allocated to two groups to receive 250 mg of the Boswellia serrate gum resin or placebo twice daily for 8 weeks, in addition to their routine antidiabetic treatments. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin level, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride of serum were measured before and after the intervention. Although there was a considerable reduction after the intervention in FBS (P=0.04), HbA1c (P=0.02) and triglyceride (P=0.01) in the Boswellia serrate gum resin group, no significant difference was observed in all outcome measures between the two groups at the end of the study (FBS P=0.09, HbA1c P=0.20, total cholesterol P=0.31, LDL P=0.49, HDL P=0.10, triglyceride P=0.78 and insulin level P=0.86). The current study showed the 8 weeks complementary use of Boswellia serrate gum resin with a daily dose of 500 mg had no better glucose and lipid lowering effect than placebo in diabetic patients.

  13. Curcumin and Boswellia serrata Modulate the Glyco-Oxidative Status and Lipo-Oxidation in Master Athletes.

    PubMed

    Chilelli, Nino Cristiano; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Valentini, Romina; Cosma, Chiara; Ferraresso, Stefania; Lapolla, Annunziata; Sartore, Giovanni

    2016-11-21

    Chronic intensive exercise is associated with a greater induction of oxidative stress and with an excess of endogenous advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Curcumin can reduce the accumulation of AGEs in vitro and in animal models. We examined whether supplementation with curcumin and Boswellia serrata (BSE) gum resin for 3 months could affect plasma levels of markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and glycation in healthy master cyclists. Forty-seven healthy male athletes were randomly assigned to Group 1, consisting of 22 subjects given a Mediterranean diet (MD) alone (MD group), and Group 2 consisted of 25 subjects given a MD plus curcumin and BSE (curcumin/BSE group). Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), total AGE, soluble receptor for AGE (sRAGE), malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma phospholipid fatty acid (PPFA) composition, and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were tested at baseline and after 12 weeks. sRAGE, NEFA, and MDA decreased significantly in both groups, while only the curcumin/BSE group showed a significant decline in total AGE. Only the changes in total AGE and MDA differed significantly between the curcumin/BSE and MD groups. Our data suggest a positive effect of supplementation with curcumin and BSE on glycoxidation and lipid peroxidation in chronically exercising master athletes.

  14. Immune evasion or avoidance: fungal skin infection linked to reduced defence peptides in Australian green-eyed treefrogs, Litoria serrata.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Bell, Sara C; Kenyon, Nicole; Alford, Ross A; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2012-12-01

    Many parasites and pathogens suppress host immunity to maintain infection or initiate disease. On the skin of many amphibians, defensive peptides are active against the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causative agent of the emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis. We tested the hypothesis that infection with the fungus may be linked to lower levels of defensive peptides. We sampled both ambient (or constitutive) skin peptides on the ventral surface immediately upon capture, and stored skin peptides induced from granular glands by norepinephrine administration of Australian green-eyed treefrogs, Litoria serrata. Upon capture, uninfected frogs expressed an array of antimicrobial peptides on their ventral surface, whereas infected frogs had reduced skin peptide expression. Expression of ambient skin peptides differed with infection status, and antimicrobial peptides maculatin 1.1 and 2.1 were on average three times lower on infected frogs. However, the repertoire of skin peptides stored in granular glands did not differ with infection status; on average equal quantities were recovered from infected and from uninfected frogs. Our results could have at least two causes: (1) frogs with reduced peptide expression are more likely to become infected; (2) Bd infection interferes with defence peptides by inhibiting release or causing selective degradation of peptides on the skin surface. Immune evasion therefore may contribute to the pathogenesis of chytridiomycosis and a mechanistic understanding of this fungal strategy may lead to improved methods of disease control. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, quality control and future research of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyi; Xia, Qing; Liu, Xin; Liu, Wenxue; Huang, Wanzhen; Mei, Xue; Luo, Jun; Shan, Mingxu; Ma, Zhiqiang; Lin, Ruichao

    2017-09-05

    Forsythiae Fructus (called Lianqiao in Chinese), the fruit of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl, is utilized as a common traditional medicine in China, Japan and Korea. It is traditionally used to treat pyrexia, inflammation, gonorrhea, carbuncle and erysipelas. Depending on the different harvest time, Forsythiae Fructus can be classified into two forms, namely Qingqiao and Laoqiao. The greenish fruits that start to ripen are collected as Qingqiao, while the yellow fruits that are fully ripe are collected as Laoqiao. Both are applied to medical use. This review aims to provide a systematic summary of F. suspensa (Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl) and to reveal the correlation between the traditional uses and pharmacological activities so as to offer inspiration for future research. All corresponding information about F. suspensa was searched by Scifinder and obtained from scientific databases including Springer, Science Direct, Wiley, Pubmed and China Knowledge Resource Integrated (CNKI). Local dissertations and books were searched as well. According to classical Chinese herbal texts and Chinese Pharmacopoeia, Forsythiae Fructus dominantly displays heat-clearing and detoxifying effects in TCM prescriptions. In modern research, more than 230 compounds were separated and identified from F. suspensa. 211 Of them were isolated from fruits. Lignans and phenylethanoid glycosides are considered as the characteristic and active constituents of this herb, such as forsythiaside, phillyrin, rutin and phillygenin. They exhibited anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-virus, anti-cancer and anti-allergy effects, etc. Currently, there is no report on the toxicity of Forsythiae Fructus, despite slight toxicity of forsythiaside reported in local publications. Compared to Laoqiao, Qingqiao contains higher levels of forsythiaside, forsythoside C, cornoside, rutin, phillyrin, gallic acid and chlorogenic acid and lower levels of rengyol, β-glucose and S

  16. Inhibition effects of the classical pathway complement of isolated compounds from Quercus glauca.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-09-01

    Species of the Quercus species is an evergreen broadleaf tree found not only in Korea but also in China, Taiwan, and Japan. Quercus species is the most commonly occurring plant among the 50 native species of the family Fagaceae in Korea, China, and Taiwan. Quercus species have been used for diarrhea, dysentery, dermatitis, and hemorrhagia in Korean folk medicine. The present study evaluated the anticomplement effect of constituents from Quercus species (Fagaceae) in classical pathway complement system. We have evaluated leaves of five species of the Quercus genus with regard to its anticomplement activity and have identified its active principles following activity-guided isolation. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the 80% methanol extracts of the stem barks of Quercus glauca Thunberg has led to the isolation of galloyl derivatives, displaying high anticomplement activity. Four galloyl derivatives isolated from the leaves of Q. glauca, namely 6'-O-galloyl salidroside (1), methyl gallate (2), 1,2,3,6-tetragalloylglucose (3), and 1,2,6-trigalloylglucose (4). 1, 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibitory activity against complement system with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) values of 224 μM, 362.4 μM, 32.3 μM, and 138.3 μM. Among the compounds tested, 3 showed the most potent anticomplement activity (IC(50), 32.3 μM). This is the first report of the isolation and anticomplement activity from Q. glauca.

  17. Quantitative Determination of 3-O-Acetyl-11-Keto-βBoswellic Acid (AKBA) and Other Boswellic Acids in Boswellia sacra Flueck (syn. B. carteri Birdw) and Boswellia serrata Roxb.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Giuseppe; Occhipinti, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E

    2016-10-06

    Boswellia serrata and Boswellia sacra (syn. B. carteri) are important medicinal plants widely used for their content of bioactive lipophilic triterpenes. The qualitative and quantitative determination of boswellic acids (BAs) is important for their use in dietary supplements aimed to provide a support for osteoarthritic and inflammatory diseases. We used High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-Diode Array Detector (DAD) coupled to ElectroSpray Ionization and tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) for the qualitative and quantitative determination of BAs extracted from the gum resins of B. sacra and B. serrata. Limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and Matrix Effect were assessed in order to validate quantitative data. Here we show that the BAs quantitative determination was 491.20 g·kg-1 d. wt (49%) in B. sacra and 295.25 g·kg-1 d. wt (30%) in B. serrata. Lower percentages of BAs content were obtained when BAs were expressed on the gum resin weight (29% and 16% for B. sacra and B. serrata, respectively). The content of Acetyl-11-Keto-β-Boswellic Acid (AKBA) was higher in B. sacra (70.81 g·kg-1 d. wt; 7%) than in B. serrata (7.35 g·kg-1 d. wt; 0.7%). Our results show that any claim of BAs content in either B. sacra or B. serrata gum resins equal to or higher than 70% or AKBA contents of 30% are simply unrealistic or based on a wrong quantitative determination.

  18. Effect of Dioscorea opposita Thunb. (yam) supplementation on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Lee, S Y; Palanivel, G; Kwak, H S

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted to examine the physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties of yogurt made by supplementing powdered yam Dioscorea opposita Thunb. (YPT) at different concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8%, wt/vol) into milk, which was pasteurized and then fermented at 43°C for 6 h and stored for 16 d. The pH values of all samples decreased, whereas viscosity values and mean microbial counts increased during storage. The L* and a* color values (indicators of lightness and redness, respectively) of yogurt samples were not remarkably influenced by adding YPT, whereas the b* values (indicating yellowness) significantly increased with the addition of YPT at all concentrations at 0 d of storage, probably due to the original yellow color of yam powder. In functional component analyses, when the concentration of YPT increased, the amount of allantoin and diosgenin proportionally increased. The content of allantoin was 3.22 and diosgenin 4.69 μg/mL when 0.2% (wt/vol) YPT was supplemented and did not change quantitatively during the storage period (16 d). The sensory test revealed that the overall acceptability scores of YPT-supplemented yogurt samples (0.2 to 0.6%, wt/vol) were quite similar to those of the control throughout the storage period of 16 d. Based on the data obtained from the present study, it was concluded that the concentrations (0.2 to 0.6%, wt/vol) of YPT could be used to produce YPT-supplemented yogurt without significant adverse effects on physicochemical, microbial, and sensory properties, and enhance functional components from the supplementation.

  19. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of a Nonpolar Fraction from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yantao; Huang, Jiajun; Lin, Wanjun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Feng, Senling; Xie, Ying; Ma, Wenzhe

    2016-01-01

    Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino (GpM) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. Most previous studies have focused primarily on polar fractions of GpM for anticancer activities. In this study, a nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM showed potent growth inhibitory activities against four cancer cell lines with IC50 ranging from 31.62 μg/mL to 38.02 μg/mL. Furthermore, EA1.3A also inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell MDA-MB-453 time-dependently, as well as its colony formation ability. EA1.3A induced apoptosis on MDA-MB-453 cells both dose-dependently and time-dependently as analyzed by flow cytometry and verified by western blotting analysis of apoptosis marker cleaved nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (cPARP). Additionally, EA1.3A induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Chemical components analysis of EA1.3A by GC-MS revealed that this nonpolar fraction from GpM contains 10 compounds including four alkaloids, three organic esters, two terpenes, and one catechol substance, and all these compounds have not been reported in GpM. In summary, the nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and regulation of cell cycle progression. Our study shed light on new chemical bases for the anticancer activities of GpM and feasibilities to develop new anticancer agents from this widely used medicinal plant. PMID:27034692

  20. Bud sprouting and floral induction and expression of FT in loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.].

    PubMed

    Reig, Carmina; Gil-Muñoz, Francisco; Vera-Sirera, Francisco; García-Lorca, Ana; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Mesejo, Carlos; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Agustí, Manuel

    2017-07-14

    EjFT1 and EjFT2 genes were isolated and sequenced from leaves of loquat. EjFT1 is involved in bud sprouting and leaf development, and EjFT2 in floral bud induction. Loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.] is an evergreen species belonging to the family Rosaceae, such as apple and pear, whose reproductive development, in contrast with these species, is a continuous process that is not interrupted by winter dormancy. Thus, the study of the mechanism of flowering in loquat has the potential to uncover the environmental and genetic networks that trigger flowering more accurately, contributing for a better understanding of the Rosaceae floral process. As a first step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling flowering, extensive defoliation and defruiting assays, together with molecular studies of the key FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene, were carried out. FT exhibited two peaks of expression in leaves, the first one in early to mid-May, the second one in mid-June. Two FT genes, EjFT1 and EjFT2, were isolated and sequenced and studied their expression. Expression of EjFT1 and EjFT2 peaks in mid-May, at bud sprouting. EjFT2 expression peaks again in mid-June, coinciding with the floral bud inductive period. Thus, when all leaves of the tree were continuously removed from early to late May vegetative apex differentiated into panicle, but when defoliation was performed from early to late June apex did not differentiate. On the other hand, fruit removal advanced EjFT1 expression in old leaves and the sooner the fruit detached, the sooner the bud sprouted. Accordingly, results strongly suggest that EjFT1 might be related to bud sprouting and leaf development, while EjFT2 might be involved in floral bud induction. An integrative model for FT functions in loquat is discussed.

  1. A report on the hybridization between two species of threatenedAsian box turtles (Testudines: Cuora) in the wild on Hainan Island(China) with comments on the origin of 'Serrata'-like turtles.

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, H.; Parham, James F.; Simison, W. Brian; Wang, J.; Gong, S.; Fu, B.

    2004-03-01

    Ten new turtle taxa were described from pet trade specimens from China since the 1980s (see Fritz and Obst, 1998; Fritz and Obst, 1999; Parham et al., 2001 for a review). Specimens similar to one of these taxa, Cuora serrata Iverson and McCord, 1992 (originally Cuora galbinifrons serrata, elevated by Fritz and Obst, 1997), were shown to be hybrids of male Cuora mouhotii (Gray, 1862; formerly Pyxidea, but see Stuart and Parham, 2004) and females of Cuora galbinifrons Bourret, 1939 or Cuora bourreti Obst and Reimann, 1994 (Parham et al., 2001; and Stuart and Parham, 2004).

  2. Anatomical and developmental study of petrified Quercus (Fagaceae) fruits from the Middle Miocene, Yakima Canyon, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Borgardt, S J; Pigg, K B

    1999-03-01

    The first reported petrified acorns to show internal anatomical structure are here described from Middle Miocene (∼15.6 million years old) chert of the Columbia River Basalt Group in Yakima Canyon, Washington. Quercus hiholensis Borgardt et Pigg sp. nov. is described from anatomical and morphological fruit features, as well as a little recognized anatomical feature, the umbilical complex. Acorns, each comprising a nut and its cupule, are up to 15.3 mm long and 18.8 mm wide with helically arranged, imbricate, tuberculate cupule scales. They show basal aborted ovules, short styles, broad stigmas, and lack grooves in their cotyledons. These characters and the developmental pattern seen in these fossil acorns demonstrate that Q. hiholensis conforms to genus Quercus (Fagaceae), subgenus Quercus, section Quercus (the white oaks). The correspondence of Q. hiholensis to the modern section Quercus reveals that the derived floral and fruit characters that distinguish section Quercus within the genus had evolved by the Middle Miocene.

  3. Efficient purification of high-purity compounds from the stem of Lonicera japonica Thunb using two-dimensional preparative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongli; Liu, Yanfang; Feng, Jiatao; Guo, Zhimou; Wang, Chaoran; Zhong, Zhengsheng; Peng, Xiaojun; Dang, Jun; Tao, Yanduo; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-08-01

    Purification of high-purity compounds from traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) plays an important role in investigating their bioactivity. Nevertheless, it is often quite difficult to isolate compounds with high purity because of the complexity of TCMs in chemical composition. In this work, a two-dimensional preparation method was successfully developed for the preparation of high-purity compounds from the stem of Lonicera japonica Thunb, based on two novel polar copolymerized RP stationary phases, XAqua C3 and XAqua C18. An XAqua C3 prep column was used to separate the sample in the first-dimensional preparation, and 14 g of sample was fractionated into eight fractions with a recovery of 82%. An XAqua C18 prep column was selected to prepare high-purity compounds in the second-dimensional preparation for its good orthogonality with the XAqua C3 stationary phase. As a result, major compounds in the sample were isolated with more than 99% purity. This method is a potent method to realize the efficient purification of compounds with high purity from the stem of L. japonica Thunb and it shows great potential in the separation of high-purity compounds from complex samples.

  4. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice modulates oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray in mice.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Zakaria, Ainul Mardhiyah; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P < 0.05). Mice supplemented with 50% watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure.

  5. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) Juice Modulates Oxidative Damage Induced by Low Dose X-Ray in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md.

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P < 0.05). Mice supplemented with 50% watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure. PMID:24877107

  6. [Simultaneous determination of four alkaloids in Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Han, Chao; Liu, Cuiping; Zhou, Yongfang; Xia, Biqi; Zhu, Zhenou; Liu, Aili

    2011-02-01

    A method for the analysis of 4 alkaloids in Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. was developed by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The sample was extracted in methanol by ultrasonic, filtered and diluted with methanol for further analysis. The analysis was performed on a C18 column (150 mm x 2.1 mm, 3.5 microm) using a gradient elution program with the mobile phase of 0.2% acetic acid solution and acetonitrile. The analyte was determined by an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were based on the retention times and characteristic ion pairs consisting of one parent ion and two fragment ions of the analyte. The limits of detection (LODs) for 4 alkaloids were in the range of 0.02 - 0.2 microg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.07 - 0.66 microg/L. The average recoveries were in the range of 93.6% - 103.5% for 4 alkaloids with the relative standard deviations below 3.8%. This method is reliable, sensitive and reproducible, and it can be used for the quality control of Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. sample.

  7. Isolation and quantitation of amygdalin in Apricot-kernel and Prunus Tomentosa Thunb. by HPLC with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei-Feng; Ding, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Rui

    2005-08-01

    Apricot-kernel and Prunus Tomentosa Thunb. are traditional Chinese herb medicines that contain amygdalin as their major effective ingredient. In this report, three methods for the extraction of amygdalin from the medicinal materials are compared: ultrasonic extraction by methanol, Soxhlet extraction by methanol, and reflux extraction by water. The results show that reflux extraction water containing 0.1% citric acid is the best option. The optimal reflux is 2.5 h and water bath temperature is 60 degrees C. The solid-phase extraction method using C18 and multiwalled carbon nanotube as adsorbents is established the pretreatment of reflux extract, and the result shows that the two adsorbents have greater adsorptive capacity for amygdalin and good separation effect. In order to quantitate amygdalin in Apricot-kernel and Prunus Tomentosa Thunb., a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method using methanol-water (15:85, for 30 min and pure methanol after 30 min) as mobile phase is developed and a good result is obtained.

  8. Silicon reduces impact of plant nitrogen in promoting stalk borer (Eldana saccharina) but not sugarcane thrips (Fulmekiola serrata) infestations in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Keeping, Malcolm G.; Miles, Neil; Sewpersad, Chandini

    2014-01-01

    The stalk borer Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a major limiting factor in South African sugarcane production, while yield is also reduced by sugarcane thrips Fulmekiola serrata Kobus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Borer management options include appropriate nitrogen (N) and enhanced silicon (Si) nutrition; the effect of N on sugarcane thrips is unknown. We tested the effects of these nutrients, in combination with resistant (N33) and susceptible (N27) sugarcane cultivars, on E. saccharina and F. serrata infestation. Two pot trials with three levels of N (60, 120, and 180 kg ha-1) and two levels each of calcium silicate and dolomitic lime (5 and 10 t ha-1) were naturally infested with thrips, then artificially water stressed and infested with borer. Higher N levels increased borer survival and stalk damage, while Si reduced these compared with controls. Silicon significantly reduced stalk damage in N27 but not in N33; hence, Si provided relatively greater protection for susceptible cultivars than for resistant ones. High N treatments were associated with greater thrips numbers, while Si treatments did not significantly influence thrips infestation. The reduction in borer survival and stalk damage by Si application at all N rates indicates that under field conditions, the opportunity exists for optimizing sugarcane yields through maintaining adequate N nutrition, while reducing populations of E. saccharina using integrated pest management (IPM) tactics that include improved Si nutrition of the crop and reduced plant water stress. Improved management of N nutrition may also provide an option for thrips IPM. The contrasting effects of Si on stalk borer and thrips indicate that Si-mediated resistance to insect herbivores in sugarcane has mechanical and biochemical components that are well developed in the stalk tissues targeted by E. saccharina but poorly developed in the young leaf spindles where F. serrata occurs. PMID:24999349

  9. Effects of temperature on complexes I and II mediated respiration, ROS generation and oxidative stress status in isolated gill mitochondria of the mud crab Scylla serrata.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Chainy, G B N

    2014-04-01

    Effects of fluctuations in habitat temperature (18-30°) on mitochondrial respiratory behavior and oxidative metabolic responses in the euryhaline ectotherm Scylla serrata are not fully understood. In the present study, effects of different temperatures ranging from 12 to 40°C on glutamate and succinate mediated mitochondrial respiration, respiratory control ratio (RCR), ATP generation rate, ratio for the utilization of phosphate molecules per atomic oxygen consumption (P/O), levels of lipid peroxidation and H2O2 in isolated gill mitochondria of S. serrata are reported. The pattern of variation in the studied parameters was similar for the two substrates at different temperatures. The values recorded for RCR (≥3) and P/O ratio (1.4-2.7) at the temperature range of 15-25°C were within the normal range reported for other animals (3-10 for RCR and 1.5-3 for P/O). Values for P/O ratio, ATP generation rate and RCR were highest at 18°C when compared to the other assay temperatures. However, at low and high extreme temperatures, i.e. at 12 and 40°C, states III and IV respiration rates were not clearly distinguishable from each other indicating that mitochondria were completely uncoupled. Positive correlations were noticed between temperature and the levels of both lipid peroxidation and H2O2. It is inferred that fluctuations on either side of ambient habitat temperature may adversely influence mitochondrial respiration and oxidative metabolism in S. serrata. The results provide baseline data to understand the impacts of acute changes in temperature on ectotherms inhabiting estuarine or marine environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Influence of Pleistocene Climatic Changes and Ocean Currents on the Phylogeography of the Southern African Barnacle, Tetraclita serrata (Thoracica; Cirripedia)

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Terry V.; Matthee, Conrad A.; von der Heyden, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary effects of glacial periods are poorly understood for Southern Hemisphere marine intertidal species, particularly obligatory sessile organisms. We examined this by assessing the phylogeographic patterns of the southern African volcano barnacle, Tetraclita serrata, a dominant species on rocky intertidal shores. Restricted gene flow in some geographical areas was hypothesized based on oceanic circulation patterns and known biogeographic regions. Barnacle population genetic structure was investigated using the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) region for 410 individuals sampled from 20 localities spanning the South African coast. The mtDNA data were augmented by generating nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences from a subset of samples. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA data reveal two distinct clades with mostly sympatric distributions, whereas nuclear analyses reveal only a single lineage. Shallow, but significant structure (0.0041–0.0065, P<0.01) was detected for the mtDNA data set, with the south-west African region identified as harbouring the highest levels of genetic diversity. Gene flow analyses on the mtDNA data show that individuals sampled in south-western localities experience gene flow primarily in the direction of the Benguela Current, while south and eastern localities experience bi-directional gene flow, suggesting an influence of both the inshore currents and the offshore Agulhas Current in the larval distribution of T. serrata. The mtDNA haplotype network, Bayesian Skyline Plots, mismatch distributions and time since expansion indicate that T. serrata population numbers were not severely affected by the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), unlike other southern African marine species. The processes resulting in the two morphologically cryptic mtDNA lineages may be the result of a recent historical allopatric event followed by secondary contact or could reflect selective pressures

  11. The influence of Pleistocene climatic changes and ocean currents on the phylogeography of the southern African barnacle, Tetraclita serrata (Thoracica; Cirripedia).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terry V; Matthee, Conrad A; von der Heyden, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary effects of glacial periods are poorly understood for Southern Hemisphere marine intertidal species, particularly obligatory sessile organisms. We examined this by assessing the phylogeographic patterns of the southern African volcano barnacle, Tetraclita serrata, a dominant species on rocky intertidal shores. Restricted gene flow in some geographical areas was hypothesized based on oceanic circulation patterns and known biogeographic regions. Barnacle population genetic structure was investigated using the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) region for 410 individuals sampled from 20 localities spanning the South African coast. The mtDNA data were augmented by generating nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences from a subset of samples. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA data reveal two distinct clades with mostly sympatric distributions, whereas nuclear analyses reveal only a single lineage. Shallow, but significant structure (0.0041-0.0065, P<0.01) was detected for the mtDNA data set, with the south-west African region identified as harbouring the highest levels of genetic diversity. Gene flow analyses on the mtDNA data show that individuals sampled in south-western localities experience gene flow primarily in the direction of the Benguela Current, while south and eastern localities experience bi-directional gene flow, suggesting an influence of both the inshore currents and the offshore Agulhas Current in the larval distribution of T. serrata. The mtDNA haplotype network, Bayesian Skyline Plots, mismatch distributions and time since expansion indicate that T. serrata population numbers were not severely affected by the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), unlike other southern African marine species. The processes resulting in the two morphologically cryptic mtDNA lineages may be the result of a recent historical allopatric event followed by secondary contact or could reflect selective pressures

  12. A thin-layer chromatography method for the identification of three different olibanum resins (Boswellia serrata, Boswellia papyrifera and Boswellia carterii, respectively, Boswellia sacra).

    PubMed

    Paul, Michael; Brüning, Gerit; Bergmann, Jochen; Jauch, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Resins of the genus Boswellia are currently an interesting topic for pharmaceutical research since several pharmacological activities (e.g. anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-tumour) are reported for extracts and compounds isolated from them. Unambiguous identification of these resins, by simple and convenient analytical methods, has so far not clearly been verified. For differentiation and identification of three important Boswellia species (Boswellia serrata Roxb., Boswellia papyrifera Hochst. and Boswellia carterii Birdw., respectively Boswellia sacra Flueck.), possible even for minimally equipped laboratories, a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) method was developed, allowing unambiguous identification of the three species. Crude resin samples (commercial samples and a voucher specimen) were extracted with methanol or diethyl ether and subjected to TLC analysis (normal phase). A pentane and diethyl ether (2:1) with 1% acetic acid eluent was used. Chromatograms were analysed by UV detection (254 nm) and dyeing with anisaldehyde dyeing reagent. Significant spots were isolated and structures were assigned (mass spectrometry; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Incensole and incensole acetate are specific biomarkers for Boswellia papyrifera. Boswellia carterii/Boswellia sacra reveal ß-caryophyllene oxide as a significant marker compound. Boswellia serrata shows neither incensole acetate nor ß-caryophyllene oxide spots, but can be identified by a strong serratol and a sharp 3-oxo-8,24-dien-tirucallic acid spot. The TLC method developed allows unambiguous identification of three different olibanum samples (Boswellia papyrifera, Boswellia serrata, Boswellia carterii/Boswellia sacra). Evidence on the specific biosynthesis routes of these Boswellia species is reported. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Description and morphometric variability of Paranoplocephala serrata n. sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx spp., Arvicolinae) from Arctic Siberia and North America.

    PubMed

    Haukisalmi, V; Henttonen, H

    2000-03-01

    We describe Paranoplocephala serrata n. sp. (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae) from collared lemmings Dicrostonyx torquatus and D. groenlandicus (Arvicolinae, Rodentia) in Arctic Siberia and North America. The new species was recorded from the Yamal Peninsula (type-locality), Yana Delta, Kolyma Delta, Wrangel Island, Alaska and Victoria Island/Kent Peninsula (Northwest Territories). P. serrata n. sp. is characterised by a long, ribbon-like strobila, distinctly serrated segments, a small scolex, unilateral or infrequently alternating genital pores and testes confined to the antiporal part of the segment. It differs from the related species (Andrya bairdi, Parandrya feodorovi and Paranoplocephala manseri) by several morphological features, including the distribution of testes (several testes antiporal to ventral longitudinal osmoregulatory canal), structure of the cirrus-sac and vagina, and large eggs (0.053-0.068 mm in the type-material). The material of P. serrata n. sp. from North America differs from the Siberian material by the shorter cirrus-sac, smaller dimensions of the female reproductive organs, larger seminal receptacle and larger eggs. However, the statistical differences in the dimensions of reproductive organs mainly reflect the larger size of mature segments in Siberian specimens compared with North American specimens. The main diagnostic features, i.e. the size and form of scolex and suckers, number and distribution of testes, position of female glands, vagina/cirrus-sac ratio and morphology of reproductive organs, do not differ markedly between the Palaearctic and Nearctic specimens. According to the structure of the early-stage uterus, A. bairdi Schad, 1954 belongs to the genus Paranoplocephala. Parandrya Gulyaev & Chechulin, 1996 is probably a synonym of Paranoplocephala. A redescription is provided for Paranoplocephala bairdi n. comb.

  14. Microsatellite primer development for post oak, Quercus stellata (Fagaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Chatwin, Warren B.; Carpenter, Kyrie K.; Jimenez, Felix R.; Elzinga, Dave B.; Johnson, Leigh A.; Maughan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: The American Cross Timbers forest ecosystem runs from southeastern Kansas to Central Texas and is primarily composed of post oak (Quercus stellata). This old-growth forest currently occupies only about 2% of its ancestral range. To facilitate genetic research on this species, we developed microsatellite primers specific to post oak from reduced genomic libraries. • Methods and Results: Two Q. stellata individuals, sampled from the northern and southern range of the post oak forest, were subject to genomic reduction and 454 pyrosequencing. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative microsatellites from which 12 polymorphic primer sets were screened on three populations. The number of alleles observed ranged from five to 20 across all populations, while observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.05 to 0.833 and 0.236 to 0.893, respectively, within individual populations. • Conclusions: We report the development of microsatellite markers, specific to post oak, to aid the study of genetic diversity and population structure of extant forest remnants. PMID:25309841

  15. Pharmacognostic studies of insect gall of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Fagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Savitri; Kaushik, Vasuki Srinivas; Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Ramanna, Latha Muuaiah; Lakkappa, Dhananjaya Bhadrapura

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the detailed pharmacognostic profile of galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Q. infectoria olivier) (Fagaceae), an important medicinal plant used in the Indian system of medicine. Methods Samples of galls of Q. infectoria were studied by macroscopical, microscopical, physiochemical, phytochemical, fluorescence analysis and othjer methods for standardization as recommended by WHO. Results Macroscopically, the crude drug is globose with horny appearances on external surface (1.4-2.3 cm in length and 1-1.5 cm in diameter), with greyish-brown to brownish-black in colour externally and dark brown buff colored. Surface is smooth with numerous horny protuberances giving rough touch, and with unpleasant odour. Microscopically, a wide zone of radially elongated parenchyma cells between upper and lower epidermis were found. The vascular strands were present at all places and radially elongated sclerides touched the lower epidermis. In physico-chemical studies, the moisture, total ash, acid insoluble ash, alcohol soluble, water soluble, petroleum ether, chloroform extractive value and tannin content were found to be 2.790, 5.020, 0.110, 38.780, 41.210, 0.402, 1.590 and 49.200 percentage respectively. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed the presence of phenols, flavonoids, steroids, triterpenes, tannins, saponins and alkaloids. Conclusions The results of the present study serve as a valuable source of information and provide suitable standards for identification of this medicinally important plant drug material for future investigations and applications. PMID:24144128

  16. Landscape-level spatial genetic structure in Quercus acutissima (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Yoon; Nason, John; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong; Park, Chong-Wook; Sun, Byung-Yun; Pak, Jae-Hong

    2002-08-01

    Quercus acutissima (Fagaceae), a deciduous broad-leaved tree, is an important forest element in hillsides of South Korea. We used allozyme loci, Wright's F statistics, and multilocus spatial autocorrelation statistics to examine the distribution of genetic diversity within and among three local populations and the spatial genetic structure at a landscape scale (15 ha, 250 × 600 m) on Oenaro Island, South Korea. Levels of genetic diversity in Q. acutissima populations were comparable to mean values for other oak species. A moderate but significant deficit of heterozygotes (mean F(IS) = 0.069) was detected within local populations and low but significant differentiation was observed among populations (F(ST) = 0.010). Spatial autocorrelation analyses revealed little evidence of significant genetic structure at spatial scales of 100-120 m. The failure to detect genetic structure within populations may be due to intraspecific competition or random mortality among saplings, resulting in extensive thinning within maternal half-sib groups. Alternatively, low genetic differentiation at the landscape scale indicates substantial gene flow among local populations. Although wind-borne pollen may be the primary source of gene flow in Q. acutissima, these results suggest that acorn movement by animals may be more extensive than previously anticipated. Comparison of these genetic data for Oenaro Island with a disturbed isolated inland population suggests that population-to-population differences in internal genetic structure may be influenced by local variation in regeneration environment (e.g., disturbance).

  17. Competitive suppression of Quercus douglasii (Fagaceae) seedling emergence and growth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D R; Rice, K J

    2000-07-01

    Reduced recruitment of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) seedlings in California grasslands and woodlands may result from shifts in seasonal soil water availability coincident with replacement of the native perennial herbaceous community by Mediterranean annuals. We used a combination of container and field experiments to examine the interrelationships between soil water potential, herbaceous neighborhood composition, and blue oak seedling shoot emergence and growth. Neighborhoods of exotic annuals depleted soil moisture more rapidly than neighborhoods of a perennial grass or "no-neighbor" controls. Although effects of neighborhood composition on oak seedling root elongation were not statistically significant, seedling shoot emergence was significantly inhibited in the annual neighborhoods where soil water was rapidly depleted. Seedling water status directly reflected soil water potential, which also determined the extent and duration of oak seedling growth during the first year. End-of-season seedling height significantly influenced survival and growth in subsequent years. While growth and survival of blue oak seedlings may be initially constrained by competition with herbaceous species, subsequent competition with adult blue oak trees may further contribute to reduced sapling recruitment.

  18. Phylogeographical variation of chloroplast DNA in cork oak (Quercus suber).

    PubMed

    Lumaret, Roselyne; Tryphon-Dionnet, Mathieu; Michaud, Henri; Sanuy, Aurélie; Ipotesi, Emilie; Born, Céline; Mir, Céline

    2005-10-01

    In the last decades, the geographical location of the centre of origin of Quercus suber (cork oak), a strictly western Mediterranean oak species, has been the subject of controversy. RFLP variation over the whole chloroplast DNA molecule and PCR-RFLPs over seven specific cpDNA fragments were analysed phylogeographically to reconstruct the evolutionary history of cork oak. Nine chlorotypes of the 'suber' cpDNA lineage were identified throughout the species range. Using closely related Mediterranean oak species as outgroup, the chlorotypes showed a clear phylogeographical pattern of three groups corresponding to potential glacial refuges in Italy, North Africa and Iberia. The most ancestral and recent groups were observed in populations located in the eastern and western parts of the species range, respectively. Several unrelated chlorotypes of the 'ilex' cpDNA lineage were also identified in specific western areas. The results support a Middle-Eastern or a central Mediterranean origin for cork oak with subsequent westward colonization during the Tertiary Period, and suggest that the 'ilex' chlorotype variation does not reflect entirely cytoplasmic introgression by Q. ilex but originated partly in Q. suber.

  19. Temperature stress effects in Quercus suber leaf metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Inês; Passarinho, José António P; Capitão, Cláudio; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Fevereiro, Pedro; Ricardo, Cândido P P

    2011-10-15

    Based on projections that climate changes are will intensify in the near future, it is important to understand how plants respond to climate. Consequently, we have been studying the effect of contrasting temperatures on leaf metabolism of Quercus suber, an important Mediterranean oak. Potted plants were grown under controlled conditions for 53 days at 28°C or 10°C. The accumulation of major soluble metabolites was analyzed by NMR. The relative levels of transcripts of genes encoding key enzymes of the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathway (CS, PAL, CAD and ChS) were examined by means of quantitative, real-time RT-PCR. At 10°C, in the pre-existing leaves, the concentrations of sucrose, quercitol and catechin were higher, as were PAL and ChS transcripts. At 28°C, however, it was the concentration of quinic acid that was higher, as were the concentrations of CS and CAD transcripts. We conclude that contrasting temperatures greatly influence Q. suber metabolism and that a deeper analysis of the effects of more extreme temperatures is needed to understand the possible effects of temperature changes on Q. suber metabolism and physiology.

  20. Presence of env-like sequences in Quercus suber retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M; Ribeiro, T; Viegas, W; Morais-Cecilio, L; Rocheta, M

    2010-01-01

    The main difference between LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses is the presence of the envelope (env) gene in the latter, downstream of the pol gene. The env gene is involved in their infectious capacity. Here we report the presence of env-like sequences in the genome of Quercus suber (cork oak), one of the most economically important Portuguese species. These gene sequences were isolated through DNA amplification between RNaseH conserved motifs and 3' LTR, based on the structure of copia retrotransposons. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that almost all the clones isolated are clustered with Cyclops-2, a Ty3-gypsy element identified in Pisum sativum, except one clustered with gypsy and copia retroelements found in different species. This suggests the existence of a potential ancestral sequence of the env gene, prior to the separation of Ty3-gypsy and Ty1-copia retrotransposons. Additionally, the isolated env-like sequences showed 26-39% of homology with env-like sequences characterized in viruses. The origin of env-like sequences in retrotransposons from host plant taxa is discussed.

  1. Mycorrhizas on nursery and field seedlings of Quercus garryana.

    PubMed

    Southworth, Darlene; Carrington, Elizabeth M; Frank, Jonathan L; Gould, Peter; Harrington, Connie A; Devine, Warren D

    2009-03-01

    Oak woodland regeneration and restoration requires that seedlings develop mycorrhizas, yet the need for this mutualistic association is often overlooked. In this study, we asked whether Quercus garryana seedlings in nursery beds acquire mycorrhizas without artificial inoculation or access to a mycorrhizal network of other ectomycorrhizal hosts. We also assessed the relationship between mycorrhizal infection and seedling growth in a nursery. Further, we compared the mycorrhizal assemblage of oak nursery seedlings to that of conifer seedlings in the nursery and to that of oak seedlings in nearby oak woodlands. Seedlings were excavated and the roots washed and examined microscopically. Mycorrhizas were identified by DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region and by morphotype. On oak nursery seedlings, predominant mycorrhizas were species of Laccaria and Tuber with single occurrences of Entoloma and Peziza. In adjacent beds, seedlings of Pseudotsuga menziesii were mycorrhizal with Hysterangium and a different species of Laccaria; seedlings of Pinus monticola were mycorrhizal with Geneabea, Tarzetta, and Thelephora. Height of Q. garryana seedlings correlated with root biomass and mycorrhizal abundance. Total mycorrhizal abundance and abundance of Laccaria mycorrhizas significantly predicted seedling height in the nursery. Native oak seedlings from nearby Q. garryana woodlands were mycorrhizal with 13 fungal symbionts, none of which occurred on the nursery seedlings. These results demonstrate the value of mycorrhizas to the growth of oak seedlings. Although seedlings in nursery beds developed mycorrhizas without intentional inoculation, their mycorrhizas differed from and were less species rich than those on native seedlings.

  2. Identification and expression of nine oak aquaporin genes in the primary root axis of two oak species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur.

    PubMed

    Rasheed-Depardieu, Claire; Parent, Claire; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Parelle, Julien; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne; Le Provost, Grégoire; Capelli, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) belong to the Major Intrinsic Protein family that conducts water and other small solutes across biological membranes. This study aimed to identify and characterize AQP genes in the primary root axis of two oak species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. Nine putative AQP genes were cloned, and their expression was profiled in different developmental root zones by real-time PCR. A detailed examination of the predicted amino acid sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolated AQPs could be divided into two subfamilies, which included six plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and three tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs). We characterized the anatomical features of the roots and defined three developmental root zones: the immature, transition and mature zones. Expression analysis of the AQPs was performed according to these root developmental stages. Our results showed that the expression of PIP2;3 and TIP1 was significantly higher in Quercus petraea compared with Quercus robur in the three root zones. However, PIP2;1 and TIP2;1 were found to be differentially expressed in the mature zone of the two oak species. Of the nine AQP genes identified and analyzed, we highlighted four genes that might facilitate a deeper understanding of how these two closely related tree species adapted to different environments.

  3. Identification and Expression of Nine Oak Aquaporin Genes in the Primary Root Axis of Two Oak Species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed-Depardieu, Claire; Parent, Claire; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Parelle, Julien; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne; Le Provost, Grégoire; Capelli, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) belong to the Major Intrinsic Protein family that conducts water and other small solutes across biological membranes. This study aimed to identify and characterize AQP genes in the primary root axis of two oak species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. Nine putative AQP genes were cloned, and their expression was profiled in different developmental root zones by real-time PCR. A detailed examination of the predicted amino acid sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolated AQPs could be divided into two subfamilies, which included six plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and three tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs). We characterized the anatomical features of the roots and defined three developmental root zones: the immature, transition and mature zones. Expression analysis of the AQPs was performed according to these root developmental stages. Our results showed that the expression of PIP2;3 and TIP1 was significantly higher in Quercus petraea compared with Quercus robur in the three root zones. However, PIP2;1 and TIP2;1 were found to be differentially expressed in the mature zone of the two oak species. Of the nine AQP genes identified and analyzed, we highlighted four genes that might facilitate a deeper understanding of how these two closely related tree species adapted to different environments. PMID:23284785

  4. Effect of hybridization of the Quercus crassifolia x Quercus crassipes complex on the community structure of endophagous insects.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Sánchez, Efraín; Oyama, Ken

    2006-04-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the geographic proximity of hybrid plants to the allopatric areas of parental species increases their morphological and genetic similarity with them. In the present work, we explored whether the endophagous fauna of hybrid plants show the same pattern. We studied the canopy species richness, diversity and composition of leaf-mining moths (Lepidoptera: Tischeridae, Citheraniidae) and gall-forming wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) associated with two species of red oaks (Quercus crassifolia and Quercus crassipes) and their interspecific hybrid (Quercusxdysophylla Benth pro sp.) in seven hybrid zones in central Mexico, during four seasons in 2 years. The study was conducted on 194 oak trees with known genetic status [identified by leaf morphology and molecular markers (random amplified polymorphic DNAs)], and the results indicate a bidirectional pattern of gene flow. Hybrid plants supported intermediate levels of infestation of gall-forming and leaf-mining insects compared to their putative parental species. The infestation level of leaf-mining insects varied significantly following the pattern: Q. crassifolia>hybrids>Q. crassipes, whereas the gall-forming insects showed an inverse pattern. A negative and significant relationship was found between these two types of insect guilds in each host taxa, when the infestation percentage was evaluated. It was found that 31.5% (n=11) of the endophagous insects were specific to Q. crassipes, 22.9% (n=8) to Q. crassifolia, and 8.6% (n=3) to hybrid individuals. The hybrid bridge hypothesis was supported in the case of 25.7% (n=9) of insects, which suggests that the presence of a hybrid intermediary plant may favor a host herbivore shift from one plant species to another. Greater genetic diversity in a hybrid zone is associated with greater diversity in the endophagous community. The geographic proximity of hybrid plants to the allopatric site of a parental species increases their similarity in

  5. Development of Chloroplast and Nuclear DNA Markers for Chinese Oaks (Quercus Subgenus Quercus) and Assessment of Their Utility as DNA Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia; Vázquez, Lucía; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Zhanlin; Zhao, Guifang

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) is frequently used for species demography, evolution, and species discrimination of plants. However, the lack of efficient and universal markers often brings particular challenges for genetic studies across different plant groups. In this study, chloroplast genomes from two closely related species (Quercus rubra and Castanea mollissima) in Fagaceae were compared to explore universal cpDNA markers for the Chinese oak species in Quercus subgenus Quercus, a diverse species group without sufficient molecular differentiation. With the comparison, nine and 14 plastid markers were selected as barcoding and phylogeographic candidates for the Chinese oaks. Five (psbA-trnH, matK-trnK, ycf3-trnS, matK, and ycf1) of the nine plastid candidate barcodes, with the addition of newly designed ITS and a single-copy nuclear gene (SAP), were then tested on 35 Chinese oak species employing four different barcoding approaches (genetic distance-, BLAST-, character-, and tree-based methods). The four methods showed different species identification powers with character-based method performing the best. Of the seven barcodes tested, a barcoding gap was absent in all of them across the Chinese oaks, while ITS and psbA-trnH provided the highest species resolution (30.30%) with the character- and BLAST-based methods, respectively. The six-marker combination (psbA-trnH + matK-trnK + matK + ycf1 + ITS + SAP) showed the best species resolution (84.85%) using the character-based method for barcoding the Chinese oaks. The barcoding results provided additional implications for taxonomy of the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus, basically identifying three major infrageneric clades of the Chinese oaks (corresponding to Groups Quercus, Cerris, and Ilex) referenced to previous phylogenetic classification of Quercus. While the morphology-based allocations proposed for the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus were challenged. A low variation rate of the chloroplast genome, and complex

  6. Development of Chloroplast and Nuclear DNA Markers for Chinese Oaks (Quercus Subgenus Quercus) and Assessment of Their Utility as DNA Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia; Vázquez, Lucía; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Zhanlin; Zhao, Guifang

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) is frequently used for species demography, evolution, and species discrimination of plants. However, the lack of efficient and universal markers often brings particular challenges for genetic studies across different plant groups. In this study, chloroplast genomes from two closely related species (Quercus rubra and Castanea mollissima) in Fagaceae were compared to explore universal cpDNA markers for the Chinese oak species in Quercus subgenus Quercus, a diverse species group without sufficient molecular differentiation. With the comparison, nine and 14 plastid markers were selected as barcoding and phylogeographic candidates for the Chinese oaks. Five (psbA-trnH, matK-trnK, ycf3-trnS, matK, and ycf1) of the nine plastid candidate barcodes, with the addition of newly designed ITS and a single-copy nuclear gene (SAP), were then tested on 35 Chinese oak species employing four different barcoding approaches (genetic distance-, BLAST-, character-, and tree-based methods). The four methods showed different species identification powers with character-based method performing the best. Of the seven barcodes tested, a barcoding gap was absent in all of them across the Chinese oaks, while ITS and psbA-trnH provided the highest species resolution (30.30%) with the character- and BLAST-based methods, respectively. The six-marker combination (psbA-trnH + matK-trnK + matK + ycf1 + ITS + SAP) showed the best species resolution (84.85%) using the character-based method for barcoding the Chinese oaks. The barcoding results provided additional implications for taxonomy of the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus, basically identifying three major infrageneric clades of the Chinese oaks (corresponding to Groups Quercus, Cerris, and Ilex) referenced to previous phylogenetic classification of Quercus. While the morphology-based allocations proposed for the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus were challenged. A low variation rate of the chloroplast genome, and complex

  7. Immunological adjuvant effect of Boswellia serrata (BOS 2000) on specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Khajuria, A; Singh, J; Singh, S; Suri, K A; Qazi, G N

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata was evaluated for its potential ability as adjuvants on the immune responses to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Balb/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA 100 μg alone or with OVA 100 μg dissolved in saline containing alum (200 μg) or BOS 2000 (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg) on Days 1 and 15. Two weeks later, OVA specific antibodies in serum; concanavalin A (Con A), OVA stimulated splenocyte proliferation, CD4/CD8/CD80/CD86 analysis in spleen cells and its estimation of cytokines (IL-2 and IFN gamma) from cell culture supernatant were measured. OVA specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody levels in serum were significantly enhanced by BOS 2000 (80 μg) compared with OVA control group. Moreover, the adjuvant effect of BOS 2000 (80 μg) on the OVA-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a antibody responses to OVA in mice were more significant than those of alum. BOS 2000 significantly enhanced the Con A and OVA induced splenocyte proliferation in the OVA immunized mice especially at a dose of 80 μg (p<0.001). However, no significant differences were observed among the OVA group and OVA/alum group. At a dose of 80 μg (p<0.001), there was a significant increase in the CD4/CD8 and CD80/CD86 analysis in spleen cells and cytokine (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) profile in the spleen cell culture supernatant was observed. In conclusion, BOS 2000 seems to be a promising balanced Th1 and Th2 directing immunological adjuvants which can enhance the immunogenicity of vaccine.

  8. In vitro metabolism, permeation, and brain availability of six major boswellic acids from Boswellia serrata gum resins.

    PubMed

    Gerbeth, Kathleen; Hüsch, Jan; Fricker, Gert; Werz, Oliver; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Abdel-Tawab, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Boswellia serrata gum resin extracts (BSE) revealed potent anti-inflammatory actions in preclinical and clinical studies. In 2002 BSE was assigned an orphan drug status by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of peritumoral edema. In the past pharmacological effects of BSE were mainly attributed to 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (KBA) and 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA). Therefore pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies focused mainly on these two boswellic acids (BAs). However, other BAs, like β-boswellic acid (βBA), might also contribute to the anti-inflammatory actions of BSE. Here, we determined the metabolic stability, permeability and brain availability of six major BAs, that is, KBA, AKBA, βBA, 3-acetyl-β-boswellic acid (AβBA), α-boswellic acid (αBA), and 3-acetyl-α-boswellic acid (AαBA). For permeability studies, the Caco-2 model was adapted to physiological conditions by the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the basolateral side and the use of modified fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) on the apical side. Under these conditions the four BAs lacking the 11-keto moiety revealed moderate permeability. Furthermore the permeability of AKBA and KBA was improved compared to earlier studies. In contrast to Aα- and AβBA, βBA and αBA were intensively metabolized after incubation with human and rat liver microsomes. Finally, the availability of all six major BAs could be confirmed in rat brain 8h after oral administration of 240mg/kg BSE to rats showing mean concentrations of 11.6ng/g for KBA, 37.5ng/g for AKBA, 485.1ng/g for αBA, 1066.6ng/g for βBA, 43.0ng/g for AαBA and 163.7ng/g for AβBA.

  9. Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, a constituent of a herbal medicine from Boswellia serrata resin, attenuates experimental ileitis.

    PubMed

    Krieglstein, C F; Anthoni, C; Rijcken, E J; Laukötter, M; Spiegel, H U; Boden, S E; Schweizer, S; Safayhi, H; Senninger, N; Schürmann, G

    2001-04-01

    The gum resin extract from Boswellia serrata (H15), an herbal product, was recently shown to have positive therapeutic effects in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the mechanisms and constituents responsible for these effects are poorly understood. This study examined the effect of the Boswellia extract and its single constituent acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in an experimental model of IBD. Ileitis was induced by two subcutaneous injections of indomethacin (7.5 mg/kg) in Sprague-Dawley rats 24 h apart. Rats also received oral treatment with the Boswellia extract (H15) or AKBA at two different doses (low and high) equivalent to recommendations in human disease over 2 days. Controls received only the carriers NaHCO3 (subcutaneously) and tylose (orally). Effects of treatment were assessed by intravital microscopy in ileal submucosal venules for changes in the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes and by macroscopic and histological scoring. Increased leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions and severe tissue injury accompanied indomethacin-induced ileitis. Treatment with the Boswellia extract or AKBA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in rolling (up to 90%) and adherent (up to 98%) leukocytes. High-dose Boswellia extract as well as both low- and high-dose AKBA significantly attenuated tissue injury scores. Oral therapy with the Boswellia extract or AKBA significantly reduces macroscopic and microcirculatory inflammatory features normally associated with indomethacin administration, indicating that the anti-inflammatory actions of the Boswellia extract in IBD may be due in part to boswellic acids such as AKBA.

  10. Traditional usages, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longfei; Ni, Boran; Lin, Hongmei; Zhang, Miao; Li, Xuechun; Yin, Xingbin; Qu, Changhai; Ni, Jian

    2015-01-15

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., which is known as Heshouwu ( in Chinese) in China. It is traditionally valued and reported for hair-blacking, liver and kidney-tonifying and anti-aging effects as well as low toxicity. The aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological research and toxicology of Polygonum multiflorum, based on the scientific literature. Moreover, trends and perspectives for future investigation of this plant are discussed. It will build up a new foundation for further study on Polygonum multiflorum. A systematic review of the literature on Polygonum multiflorum was performed using several resources, including classic books on Chinese herbal medicine and various scientific databases, such as PubMed, SciFinder, the Web of Science, Science Direct, China Knowledge Resource Integrated (CNKI). Polygonum multiflorum is widely distributed throughout the world and has been used as a traditional medicine for centuries in China. The ethnomedical uses of Polygonum multiflorum have been recorded in many provinces of China and Japan for nine species of adulterants in six families. More than 100 chemical compounds have been isolated from this plant, and the major components have been determined to be stilbenes, quinones, flavonoids and others. Crude extracts and pure compounds of this plant are used as effective agents in pre-clinical and clinical practice due to their anti-aging, anti-hyperlipidaemia, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects and to promote immunomodulation, neuroprotection, and the curing of other diseases. However, these extracts can also lead to hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity and embryonic toxicity. Pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that the main components of Polygonum multiflorum, such as 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucopyranoside and emodin are distributed among many organs and tissues. Therapeutic potential of Polygonum multiflorum has been

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Phenylpropanoid Glycerol Glucosides in Different Organs of Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Munafo, John P; Gianfagna, Thomas J

    2015-05-20

    The Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) is esteemed worldwide as an attractive ornamental plant, and the flower buds and bulbs are used for both culinary and medicinal purposes in many parts of the world. L. longiflorum contains significant amounts of phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides, a group of compounds that may contribute to plant pathogen defense, ultraviolet/high-intensity visible light (UV/high light) protection, and the purported medicinal uses of lilies. To define the natural distribution of these compounds within the plant, a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method performed in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode was employed for the quantitative analysis of five phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides, namely, (2S)-1-O-caffeoyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, 1; (2R)-1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2-O-p-coumaroylglycerol, 2; (2S)-1-O-p-coumaroyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, 3; (2S)-1-O-caffeoyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-acetylglycerol, 4; and (2S)-1-O-p-coumaroyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-acetylglycerol, 5, in the different organs of L. longiflorum. The p-coumaroyl-based 3 and its acetylated derivative 5 were determined to be the most abundant of the phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides found in Easter lily bulbs, at 776.3 ± 8.4 and 650.7 ± 32.6 μg/g dry weight, respectively. The acetylated p-coumaroyl- and caffeoyl-based derivatives, 5 and 4, accumulated to the highest concentration in the closed flower buds, at 4925.2 ± 512.8 and 3216.8 ± 406.4 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Compound 4, followed by 5 and 1, proved to be the most abundant in the mature flowers, occurring at 6006.2 ± 625.8, 2160.3 ± 556.5, and 1535.8 ± 174.1 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Total concentrations of the phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides were 10-100-fold higher in the above-ground plant organs as compared to the bulbs and fleshy roots. Two of the five compounds, 1 and 2, were identified in L. longiflorum for the first time. The quantitative

  12. Production of anthraquinones, phenolic compounds and biological activities from hairy root cultures of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Praveen, Nagella; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-05-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. is a highly important medicinal plant producing anthraquinones (emodin and physcion) and phenolic compounds which has pharmaceutical use. In vitro seedling explants such as roots, internodals, nodals and leaves were inoculated with A. rhizogenes strain KCTC 2703. Transformed roots were induced from internodals and leaf explants. Six transgenic clones of hairy roots were established and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using rolC specific primers. Hairy roots cultured using MS liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose showed highest accumulation of biomass (99.05 g/l FW [fresh weight] and 10.95 g/l DW [dry weight]) and highest production of anthraquinones content (emodin 211.32 μg/g DW and physcion 353.23 μg/g DW) were observed at 20 days. Nearly 9.5-fold increment of biomass was evident in suspension cultures at 20 days of culture and hairy root biomass produced in suspension cultures possessed 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher content of emodin and physcion, respectively, when compared with the untransformed control roots. MS basal liquid medium was superior for the growth of hairy roots and production of anthraquinones compared with other culture media evaluated (SH, B5 and N6), with MS-basal liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose was optimal for secondary metabolite production. A total of 23 polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified from P. multiflorum untransformed and hairy roots, which includes hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and other groups of phenolic compounds. The ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis of the phenolic compounds profile revealed that pyrogallol, hesperidin, naringenin and formononetin were higher in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. The total phenolics, flavonoids content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity was high in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. This is the first

  13. Salinity Stress Is Beneficial to the Accumulation of Chlorogenic Acids in Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Yan, Kun; Cui, Mingxing; Zhao, Shijie; Chen, Xiaobing; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is a traditional medicinal plant in China that is particularly rich in chlorogenic acids, which are phenolic compounds with various medicinal properties. This study aimed to examine the effects of salinity stress on accumulation of chlorogenic acids in honeysuckle, through hydroponic experiments and field trials, and to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects. NaCl stress stimulated the transcription of genes encoding key enzymes in the synthesis of chlorogenic acids in leaves; accordingly, the concentrations of chlorogenic acids in leaves were significantly increased under NaCl stress, as was antioxidant activity. Specifically, the total concentration of leaf chlorogenic acids was increased by 145.74 and 50.34% after 30 days of 150 and 300 mM NaCl stress, respectively. Similarly, the concentrations of chlorogenic acids were higher in the leaves of plants in saline, compared with non-saline, plots, with increases in total concentrations of chlorogenic acids of 56.05 and 105.29% in October 2014 and 2015, respectively. Despite leaf biomass reduction, absolute amounts of chlorogenic acids per plant and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity were significantly increased by soil salinity, confirming that the accumulation of chlorogenic acids in leaves was a result of stimulation of their synthesis under salinity stress. Soil salinity also led to elevated chlorogenic acid concentrations in honeysuckle flower buds, with significant increases in total chlorogenic acids concentration of 22.42 and 25.14% in May 2014 and 2015, respectively. Consistent with biomass reduction, the absolute amounts of chlorogenic acid per plant declined in flower buds of plants exposed to elevated soil salinity, with no significant change in PAL activity. Thus, salinity-induced chlorogenic acid accumulation in flower buds depended on an amplification effect of growth reduction. In conclusion, salinity stress improved the medicinal quality of

  14. Salinity Stress Is Beneficial to the Accumulation of Chlorogenic Acids in Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Cui, Mingxing; Zhao, Shijie; Chen, Xiaobing; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is a traditional medicinal plant in China that is particularly rich in chlorogenic acids, which are phenolic compounds with various medicinal properties. This study aimed to examine the effects of salinity stress on accumulation of chlorogenic acids in honeysuckle, through hydroponic experiments and field trials, and to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects. NaCl stress stimulated the transcription of genes encoding key enzymes in the synthesis of chlorogenic acids in leaves; accordingly, the concentrations of chlorogenic acids in leaves were significantly increased under NaCl stress, as was antioxidant activity. Specifically, the total concentration of leaf chlorogenic acids was increased by 145.74 and 50.34% after 30 days of 150 and 300 mM NaCl stress, respectively. Similarly, the concentrations of chlorogenic acids were higher in the leaves of plants in saline, compared with non-saline, plots, with increases in total concentrations of chlorogenic acids of 56.05 and 105.29% in October 2014 and 2015, respectively. Despite leaf biomass reduction, absolute amounts of chlorogenic acids per plant and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity were significantly increased by soil salinity, confirming that the accumulation of chlorogenic acids in leaves was a result of stimulation of their synthesis under salinity stress. Soil salinity also led to elevated chlorogenic acid concentrations in honeysuckle flower buds, with significant increases in total chlorogenic acids concentration of 22.42 and 25.14% in May 2014 and 2015, respectively. Consistent with biomass reduction, the absolute amounts of chlorogenic acid per plant declined in flower buds of plants exposed to elevated soil salinity, with no significant change in PAL activity. Thus, salinity-induced chlorogenic acid accumulation in flower buds depended on an amplification effect of growth reduction. In conclusion, salinity stress improved the medicinal quality of

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genomes of Five Quercus Species

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanci; Zhou, Tao; Duan, Dong; Yang, Jia; Feng, Li; Zhao, Guifang

    2016-01-01

    Quercus is considered economically and ecologically one of the most important genera in the Northern Hemisphere. Oaks are taxonomically perplexing because of shared interspecific morphological traits and intraspecific morphological variation, which are mainly attributed to hybridization. Universal plastid markers cannot provide a sufficient number of variable sites to explore the phylogeny of this genus, and chloroplast genome-scale data have proven to be useful in resolving intractable phylogenetic relationships. In this study, the complete chloroplast genomes of four Quercus species were sequenced, and one published chloroplast genome of Quercus baronii was retrieved for comparative analyses. The five chloroplast genomes ranged from 161,072 bp (Q. baronii) to 161,237 bp (Q. dolicholepis) in length, and their gene organization and order, and GC content, were similar to those of other Fagaceae species. We analyzed nucleotide substitutions, indels, and repeats in the chloroplast genomes, and found 19 relatively highly variable regions that will potentially provide plastid markers for further taxonomic and phylogenetic studies within Quercus. We observed that four genes (ndhA, ndhK, petA, and ycf1) were subject to positive selection. The phylogenetic relationships of the Quercus species inferred from the chloroplast genomes obtained moderate-to-high support, indicating that chloroplast genome data may be useful in resolving relationships in this genus. PMID:27446185

  16. Identification and characterization of L-lysine decarboxylase from Huperzia serrata and its role in the metabolic pathway of lycopodium alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baofu; Lei, Lei; Zhu, Xiaocen; Zhou, Yiqing; Xiao, Youli

    2017-04-01

    Lysine decarboxylation is the first biosynthetic step of Huperzine A (HupA). Six cDNAs encoding lysine decarboxylases (LDCs) were cloned from Huperzia serrata by degenerate PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). One HsLDC isoform was functionally characterized as lysine decarboxylase. The HsLDC exhibited greatest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km, 2.11 s(-1) mM(-1)) toward L-lysine in vitro among all reported plant-LDCs. Moreover, transient expression of the HsLDC in tobacco leaves specifically increased cadaverine content from zero to 0.75 mg per gram of dry mass. Additionally, a convenient and reliable method used to detect the two catalytic products was developed. With the novel method, the enzymatic products of HsLDC and HsCAO, namely cadaverine and 5-aminopentanal, respectively, were detected simultaneously both in assay with purified enzymes and in transgenic tobacco leaves. This work not only provides direct evidence of the first two-step in biosynthetic pathway of HupA in Huperzia serrata and paves the way for further elucidation of the pathway, but also enables engineering heterologous production of HupA.

  17. Female mate choice predicts paternity success in the absence of additive genetic variance for other female paternity bias mechanisms in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Collet, J M; Blows, M W

    2014-11-01

    After choosing a first mate, polyandrous females have access to a range of opportunities to bias paternity, such as repeating matings with the preferred male, facilitating fertilization from the best sperm or differentially investing in offspring according to their sire. Female ability to bias paternity after a first mating has been demonstrated in a few species, but unambiguous evidence remains limited by the access to complex behaviours, sperm storage organs and fertilization processes within females. Even when found at the phenotypic level, the potential evolution of any mechanism allowing females to bias paternity other than mate choice remains little explored. Using a large population of pedigreed females, we developed a simple test to determine whether there is additive genetic variation in female ability to bias paternity after a first, chosen, mating. We applied this method in the highly polyandrous Drosophila serrata, giving females the opportunity to successively mate with two males ad libitum. We found that despite high levels of polyandry (females mated more than once per day), the first mate choice was a significant predictor of male total reproductive success. Importantly, there was no detectable genetic variance in female ability to bias paternity beyond mate choice. Therefore, whether or not females can bias paternity before or after copulation, their role on the evolution of sexual male traits is likely to be limited to their first mate choice in D. serrata.

  18. Bioaccumulation and public health implications of trace metals in edible tissues of the crustaceans Scylla serrata and Penaeus monodon from the Tanzanian coast.

    PubMed

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Leermakers, Martine; Mdegela, Robinson H; Kochzius, Marc; Elskens, Marc

    2017-09-30

    The coastal population in East Africa is growing rapidly but sewage treatment and recycling facilities in major cities and towns are poorly developed. Since estuarine mangroves are the main hotspots for pollutants, there is a potential for contaminants to accumulate in edible fauna and threaten public health. This study analysed trace metals in muscle tissues of the giant mud crabs (Scylla serrata) and the giant tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon) from the Tanzanian coast, in order to determine the extent of bioaccumulation and public health risks. A total of 180 samples of muscle tissues of S. serrata and 80 of P. monodon were collected from nine sites along the coast. Both species showed high levels of trace metals in the wet season and significant bioaccumulation of As, Cu and Zn. Due to their burrowing and feeding habits, mud crabs were more contaminated compared to tiger prawns sampled from the same sites. Apart from that, the measured levels of Cd, Cr and Pb did not exceed maximum limits for human consumption. Based on the current trend of fish consumption in Tanzania (7.7 kg/person/year), the measured elements (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are not likely to present health risks to shellfish consumers. Nevertheless, potential risks of As and Cu cannot be ruled out if the average per capita consumption is exceeded. This calls for strengthened waste management systems and pollution control measures.

  19. Effect of phospholipid-based formulations of Boswellia serrata extract on the solubility, permeability, and absorption of the individual boswellic acid constituents present.

    PubMed

    Hüsch, Jan; Gerbeth, Kathleen; Fricker, Gert; Setzer, Constanze; Zirkel, Jürgen; Rebmann, Herbert; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Abdel-Tawab, Mona

    2012-10-26

    Boswellia serrata gum resin extracts are used widely for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, very low concentrations in the plasma and brain were observed for the boswellic acids (1-6, the active constituents of B. serrata). The present study investigated the effect of phospholipids alone and in combination with common co-surfactants (e.g., Tween 80, vitamin E-TPGS, pluronic f127) on the solubility of 1-6 in physiologically relevant media and on the permeability in the Caco-2 cell model. Because of the high lipophilicity of 1-6, the permeability experiments were adapted to physiological conditions using modified fasted state simulated intestinal fluid as apical (donor) medium and 4% bovine serum albumin in the basolateral (receiver) compartment. A formulation composed of extract/phospholipid/pluronic f127 (1:1:1 w/w/w) increased the solubility of 1-6 up to 54 times compared with the nonformulated extract and exhibited the highest mass net flux in the permeability tests. The oral administration of this formulation to rats (240 mg/kg) resulted in 26 and 14 times higher plasma levels for 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (1) and acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (2), respectively. In the brain, five times higher levels for 2 compared to the nonformulated extract were determined 8 h after oral administration.

  20. Copper toxicity in the crab, Scylla serrata, copper levels in tissues and regulation after exposure to a copper-rich medium

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, M.; Ravindranath, M.H.

    1987-10-01

    In the decapod crustaceans copper is distributed in various tissues. In these animals the tissue copper generally exists in four forms; ionic, bound to proteins, lipids and membrane. In the estuarine crab Scylla serrata, the haemolymph copper exists only in association with proteins, whereas in the hepatopancreas it exists in all the four forms and in gills it exists in all the forms except in combination with lipids. Although food is the major source of copper in decapod crustaceans evidence indicate that copper may be directly obtained from the environment. It was postulated earlier that in Scylla serrata the haemolymph and hepatopancreas may be involved in copper regulation. In the present work the authors have studied the nature and levels of copper in different tissues after exposing the crabs to copper-rich medium. The results indicate the relative importance of various tissues in accumulation an the possible mechanisms of regulation of the environmental copper. Besides, as a pre-requisite for studies of this kind, the toxic levels for different forms of copper were estimated since the form of toxicant is known to influence the toxicity to the decapod crustaceans.

  1. Efficacy of Boswellia serrata L. and Cyperus scariosus L. plus pelvic floor muscle training in stress incontinence in women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Arkalgud Rangaswamy, Padmaja; Sultana, Arshiya; Rahman, Khaleequr; Nagapattinam, Sumana

    2014-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of combining of Boswellia serrata L. resin and the root of Cyperus scariosus L. plus PFMT in reproductive age women with stress urinary incontinence. A prospective, single-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted. The patients were randomized to receive orally either combination of equal quantity of B. serrata and C. scariosus (2g) (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) respectively twice daily for 8 weeks in addition to pelvic floor muscle training in both groups. The outcome was one hour pad test. The results were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric test. The improvement in the test and control group was 60% and 37% respectively. Between the group comparison was statistically significant (P = 0.035). The intra group comparison of one hour pad test was statistically significant in both groups (P < 0.001). No adverse effects were noted. The test group was more effective than control group in women with SUI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quercus ilex L. carbon sequestration capability related to shrub size.

    PubMed

    Gratani, Loretta; Catoni, Rosangela; Varone, Laura

    2011-07-01

    CO(2) sequestration capacity of Quercus ilex L., an evergreen species developing in shrub and forest communities widely distributed in the Mediterranean Basin, was analysed. Experiments were carried out in the period of January to December 2009 on 20 shrubs of different size, growing at the Botanical Garden of Rome. At shrub level, the largest differences concern total photosynthetic leaf surface area per shrub and shrub volume. Shrubs structure significantly contribute to reduce total irradiance and air temperature below the canopy. Leaf mass per area is higher in sun leaves than in shade ones (20 ± 1 and 12 ± 2 mg cm( -2), respectively). Sun leaves are also characterised by the highest leaf thickness (78% higher in sun than in shade leaves), the spongy parenchyma thickness (71% higher in sun than in shade leaves) and the highest adaxial cuticle thickness (7.2 ± 1.2 and 4.7 ± 0.5 μm, respectively). Net photosynthetic rates (P (N)) of sun and shade leaves are the highest in spring, and shade leaves contribute 6% to the whole shrub P (N). Q. ilex CO(2) sequestration depends on shrub size. In particular, the CO(2) sequestration per shrub was 0.20 ± 0.02 Kg CO(2) year( -1) in small shrubs, and it was 75% and 98% lower than in medium and large ones. The highest CO(2) sequestration is measured in spring, decreasing 77% during drought. Q. ilex may play a significant role in mitigating carbon dioxide concentration and lowering air and soil temperature in areas around the Mediterranean Basin.

  3. [Aboveground architecture and biomass distribution of Quercus variabilis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bi-yun; Zhang, Wen-hui; Hu, Xiao-jing; Shen, Jia-peng; Zhen, Xue-yuan; Yang, Xiao-zhou

    2015-08-01

    The aboveground architecture, biomass and its allocation, and the relationship between architecture and biomass of Quercus variabilis of different diameter classes in Shangluo, south slope of Qinling Mountains were researched. The results showed that differences existed in the aboveground architecture and biomass allocation of Q. variabilis of different diameter classes. With the increase of diameter class, tree height, DBH, and crown width increased gradually. The average decline rate of each diameter class increased firstly then decreased. Q. variabilis overall bifurcation ratio and stepwise bifurcation ratio increased then declined. The specific leaf areas of Q. variabilis of all different diameter classes at vertical direction were 0.02-0.03, and the larger values of leaf mass ratio, LAI and leaf area ratio at vertical direction in diameter level I , II, III appeared in the middle and upper trunk, while in diameter level IV, V, VI, they appeared in the central trunk, with the increase of diameter class, there appeared two peaks in vertical direction, which located in the lower and upper trunk. The trunk biomass accounted for 71.8%-88.4% of Q. variabilis aboveground biomass, while the branch biomass accounted for 5.8%-19.6%, and the leaf biomass accounted for 4.2%-8.6%. With the increase of diameter class, stem biomass proportion of Q. variabilis decreased firstly then increased, while the branch and leaf biomass proportion showed a trend that increased at first then decreased, and then increased again. The aboveground biomass of Q. variabilis was significantly positively correlated to tree height, DBH, crown width and stepwise bifurcation ratio (R2:1), and positively related to the overall bifurcation ratio and stepwise bifurcation ratio (R3:2), but there was no significant correlation. Trunk biomass and total biomass aboveground were negatively related to the trunk decline rate, while branch biomass and leaf biomass were positively related to trunk decline

  4. Factors affecting stress tolerance in recalcitrant embryonic axes from four Quercus (Fagaceae) species native to the US or China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recalcitrant-seeded Quercus species are often considered “keystone” components of the ecosystems. However, their populations are declining and there is a considerable urgency to develop ex situ conservation strategies. The storage physiology of seeds within Quercus was explored in order to determine...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1179 - Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plant extract derived from Opuntia... Tolerances § 180.1179 Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and... derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle is exempted from...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1179 - Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plant extract derived from Opuntia... Tolerances § 180.1179 Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and... derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle is exempted from...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1179 - Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plant extract derived from Opuntia... Tolerances § 180.1179 Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and... derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle is exempted...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1179 - Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plant extract derived from Opuntia... Tolerances § 180.1179 Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and... derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle is exempted...

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, a fungus associated with oak mortality in South Korea

    Treesearch

    M. -S. Kim; P. A. Hohenlohe; K. -H. Kim; S. -T. Seo; Ned Klopfenstein

    2016-01-01

    Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae is a fungus associated with oak wilt and deemed to cause extensive oak mortality in South Korea. Since the discovery of this fungus on a dead Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) in 2004, the mortality continued to spread southwards in South Korea. Despite continued expansion of the disease and associated significant impacts on forest...

  10. Survival and growth of Pinus echinata and Quercus seedlings in response to simulated summer and winter prescribed burns

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Cain; Michael G. Shelton

    2000-01-01

    First-year seedlings of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.), southern red oak (Quercus falcata Michx.), and white oak (Quercus alba L.) were subjected to simulated prescribed burns during August (growing season) or January (dormant season) on an Upper Coastal Plain site in southeastern Arkansas, U.S.A. Survival...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1179 - Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plant extract derived from Opuntia... Tolerances § 180.1179 Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and... derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle is exempted...

  12. Data in support of antioxidant activities of the non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoko; Ito, Toshihiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Kita, Eiji; Mikasa, Keiichi; Okada, Masatoshi; Furutani, Azusa; Murono, Yuka; Shibata, Mitsuru; Nishii, Yasue; Kayano, Shin-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled, "Antioxidant potential in non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.)" (Matsumura et al., 2016) [1]. We investigated antioxidant activities of the non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon fruits in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated both extracted fraction and non-extractable fraction, and reported that non-extractable fraction may possess significantly antioxidant potential in vivo on the basis of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). We showed our experimental raw data about antioxidant capacity of dried persimmon, plasma triglycerides (TG) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and this data article might contribute to evaluate real antioxidant capacity of other fruits and vegetables.

  13. Optimization of deep eutectic solvent-based ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijin; Wang, Maoshan

    2017-02-01

    In this study, deep eutectic solvents were proposed for the ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb. Several deep eutectic solvents were prepared for the extraction of polysaccharides, among which the deep eutectic solvent composed of choline chloride and 1,4-butanediol was proved to be suitable for the extraction. Based on the screening of single-factor experiment design and orthogonal experiment design, three experimental factors were optimized for the Box-Behnken experimental design combined with response surface methodology, which gave the optimal extraction conditions: water content of 32.89%(v/v), extraction temperature of 94.00°C, and the extraction time of 44.74min. The optimal extraction conditions could supply higher extraction yield than those of hot water extraction and water-based ultrasound-assisted extraction. Therefore, deep eutectic solvents were an excellent extraction solvent alternative to the extraction of polysaccharides from sample matrices.

  14. The role of prescribed burning in regenerating Quercus macrocarpa and associated woody plants in stringer woodlands in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Henry A. Wright

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the range of Quercus macrocarpa, fire historically played an important role in maintaining Quercus stands. However, little is known about the role of fire in maintaining stringer Quercus stands on the western edge of its distribution. This research suggests that prescribed burning could be used to rejuvenate woody plants...

  15. Draft genome sequence of the fungus associated with oak-wilt mortality in South Korea, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae KACC44405

    Treesearch

    Jongbum Jeon; Ki-Tae Kim; Hyeunjeong Song; Gir-Won Lee; Kyeongchae Cheong; Hyunbin Kim; Gobong Choi; Yong-Hwan Lee; Jane E. Stewart; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim

    2017-01-01

    The fungus Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae is the causal agent of Korean oak wilt, a disease associated with mass mortality of oak trees (e.g., Quercus spp.). The fungus is vectored and dispersed by the ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis. Here, we present the 27.0-Mb draft genome sequence of R. quercus-mongolicae strain KACC44405.

  16. Antileishmanial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities of Quercus infectoria Olivier extract.

    PubMed

    Kheirandish, Farnaz; Delfan, Bahram; Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Moradi, Nasim; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad; Rashidipour, Marzieh

    2016-08-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine available, and chemotherapy is the main approach for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). During recent decades, studies have demonstrated that a number of plant-derived compounds may act as new therapeutic tools against leishmaniasis. This study was evaluated the antileishmanial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities of Quercus infectoria Olivier (oak) extract. The total amount of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was measured in oak extract. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was also performed to determine the amount of quercetin and gallic acid in this plant. This extract (0-80g/mL) was evaluated in vitro against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER) using MTT assay and in a macro-phage model, respectively. Then oak extract was tested on CL in infected male BALB/c mice with L. major in order to evaluate the antileishmanial activity topically. Moreover, cytotoxicity effects of oak in murine macrophage cells were tested by MTT assay. Antioxidative activity of oak was also determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1,1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging test. The amount of phenolic and flavonoid compounds in the oak extract was 57.50 and 1.86%, respectively. The amount of quercetin and gallic acid in the oak extract was 0.0064 and 0.22%, respectively. The findings revealed that oak significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the growth rate of promastigote of (IC50 12.65μg/mL) and amastigotes (IC50 10.31μg/mL) as a dose-dependent response. In the in vivo assay, after 4 weeks of treatment, 91.6, 66.66, and 50% recovery was observed in the infected mice treated with 20, 10, and 5mg/kg of oak extract, respectively. After treatment of the infected mice with the concentration of 10 and 20mg/kg of oak, the mean diameter of lesions, parasite load and mean number of parasites was significantly (P<0.05) reduced. Selectivity index of greater than 10 for oak revealed that oak extract had

  17. Anti-adipogenic and anti-diabetic effects of cis-3',4'-diisovalerylkhellactone isolated from Peucedanum japonicum Thunb leaves in vitro.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ra-Yeong; Nam, Sang-Jip; Ham, Ju Ri; Lee, Hae-In; Yee, Sung-Tae; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Seo, Kwon-Il; Lee, Ju-Hye; Kim, Myung-Joo; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2016-10-01

    Peucedanum japonicum Thunb is a medicinal plant belonging to the family Umbelliferae. This study evaluated the anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of cis-3',4'-diisovalerylkhellactone (cDIVK) isolated from Peucedanum japonicum Thunb leaves. cDIVK (30 and 50μM) effectively inhibited adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation, whereas it stimulated glucose uptake compared with the control in 3T3-L1 cells. cDIVK significantly increased AMPK activation and suppressed protein and mRNA expression of major adipogenic transcriptional factors such as C/EBPα, PPARγ and SREBP-1c in 3T3-L1 cells. In addition, cDIVK had potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. These results indicated that cDIVK may act as a natural dual therapeutic agent for diabetes and obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strength, diversity and plasticity of postmating reproductive barriers between two hybridizing oak species (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt) Liebl.).

    PubMed

    Abadie, P; Roussel, G; Dencausse, B; Bonnet, C; Bertocchi, E; Louvet, J-M; Kremer, A; Garnier-Géré, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about the nature and strength of reproductive isolation (RI) in Quercus species, despite extensive research on the estimation and evolutionary significance of hybridization rates. We characterized postmating pre- and postzygotic RI between two hybridizing oak species, Quercus robur and Quercus petraea, using a large set of controlled crosses between different genotypes. Various traits potentially associated with reproductive barriers were quantified at several life history stages, from pollen-pistil interactions to seed set and progeny fitness-related traits. Results indicate strong intrinsic postmating prezygotic barriers, with significant barriers also at the postzygotic level, but relatively weaker extrinsic barriers on early hybrid fitness measures assessed in controlled conditions. Using general linear modelling of common garden data with clonal replicates, we showed that most traits exhibited important genotypic differences, as well as different levels of sensitivity to micro-environmental heterogeneity. These new findings suggest a large potential genetic diversity and plasticity of reproductive barriers and are confronted with hybridization evidence in these oak species.

  19. Report of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) from Scylla serrata: Ontogeny, molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis following ligand stimulation, and upon bacterial and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Vidya, R; Makesh, M; Purushothaman, C S; Chaudhari, A; Gireesh-Babu, P; Rajendran, K V

    2016-09-15

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are present in all living organisms, and their participation in signal transduction and defense mechanisms has been elucidated in humans and mosquitoes. LRRs possibly involve in protein-protein interactions also and show differential expression pattern upon challenge with pathogens. In the present study, a new LRR gene was identified in mud crab, Scylla serrata. LRR gene mRNA levels in different developmental stages and various tissues of S. serrata were analysed. Further, the response of the gene against different ligands, Gram-negative bacterium, and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Full-length cDNA sequence of S. serrata LRR (SsLRR) was found to be 2290 nucleotide long with an open reading frame of 1893bp. SsLRR encodes for a protein containing 630 deduced amino acids with 17 conserved LRR domains and exhibits significant similarity with crustacean LRRs so that these could be clustered into a branch in the phylogenetic tree. SsLRR mRNA transcripts were detected in all the developmental stages (egg, Zoea1-5, megalopa and crab instar), haemocytes and various tissues such as, stomach, gill, muscle, hepatopancreas, hematopoietic organ, heart, epithelial layer and testis by reverse-transcriptase PCR. SsLRR transcripts in cultured haemocytes showed a 2-fold increase in expression at 1.5 and 12h upon Poly I:C induction. WSSV challenge resulted in significant early up-regulation at 3h in-vitro and late up-regulation at 72h in-vivo. Peptidoglycan (PGN)-induction resulted in marginal up-regulation of SsLRR at timepoints, 6, 12 and 24h (fold change below 1.5) and no significant change in the expression at early timepoints. LPS-stimulation, on the other hand, showed either down-regulation or normal level of expression at all timepoints. However, a delayed 5-fold up-regulation was observed in vivo against Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection at 72hpi. The constitutive expression of the LRR gene in all the

  20. A bibliography for Quercus garryana and other geographically associated and botanically related oaks.

    Treesearch

    Constance A. Harrington; Melanie A. Kallas

    2002-01-01

    Interest in Quercus garryana Dougl. ex Hook., commonly known as Oregon white oak or Garry oak, has increased in recent years as scientists, resource managers, and the general public focus attention on a forest type in decline. To aid those interested in learning what has previously been reported on this species, we have compiled a comprehensive bibliography for Q....

  1. Performance of nuttall oak (Quercus Texana Buckl.) provenances in the Western Gulf Region

    Treesearch

    D.P. Gwaze; T.D. Byram; E.M. Raley

    2003-01-01

    Three series of three tests each of Nuttall oak (Quercus texana Buckl. formally Q. nuttallii Palmer) were established by the Western Gulf Forest Tree Improvement Program at three locations: Desha and Lonoke Counties in Arkansas and Sharkey County in Mississippi. The three series included 28-42 different half-sib families from...

  2. Prediction of leaf area in individual leaves of cherrybark oak seedlings (Quercus pagoda Raf.)

    Treesearch

    Yanfei Guo; Brian Lockhart; John Hodges

    1995-01-01

    The prediction of leaf area for cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings is important for studying the physiology of the species. Linear and polynomial models involving leaf length, width, fresh weight, dry weight, and internodal length were tested independently and collectively to predict leaf area. Twenty-nine cherrybark oak seedlings were...

  3. Additivity in tree biomass components of Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.)

    Treesearch

    Joao P. Carvalho; Bernard R. Parresol

    2003-01-01

    In tree biomass estimations, it is important to consider the property of additivity, i.e., the total tree biomass should equal the sum of the components. This work presents functions that allow estimation of the stem and crown dry weight components of Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) trees. A procedure that considers additivity of tree biomass...

  4. Effects of moisture and nitrogen stress on gas exchange and nutrient resorption in Quercus rubra seedlings

    Treesearch

    K. Francis Salifu; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2008-01-01

    The effects of simulated soil fertility at three levels (poor, medium, and rich soils) and moisture stress at two levels (well watered versus moisture stressed) on gas exchange and foliar nutrient resorption in 1+0 bareroot northern red oak (Quercus rubra) seedlings were evaluated. Current nitrogen (N) uptake was labeled with the stable isotope

  5. [Temporal dynamics of allelic diversity in isolated population of pedunculate oak Quercus robur L. (Fagaceae)].

    PubMed

    Buschbom, J; Ianbaev, Iu A; Degen, B; Gabitova, A A

    2012-01-01

    Using nine microsatellite loci, genetic diversity of small geographically isolated population of pedunculate oak Quercus robur L. (Fragaceae) was examined. The population was located outside of the species range in Bashkir Transuralia. Considerable temporal dynamics of allelic diversity, explained in terms of different effectiveness of gene flow in different years, was demonstrated.

  6. Predicting the height growth of oak species (Quercus) reproduction over a 23-year period following clearcutting

    Treesearch

    J. Travis Swaim; Daniel C. Dey; Michael R. Saunders; Dale R. Weigel; Christopher D. Thornton; John M. Kabrick; Michael A. Jenkins

    2016-01-01

    We resampled plots from a repeated measures study implemented on the Hoosier National Forest (HNF) in southern Indiana in 1988 to investigate the influence of site and seedling physical attributes on height growth and establishment success of oak species (Quercus spp.) reproduction in stands regenerated by the clearcut method. Before harvest, an...

  7. Consequences of salinity and freezing stress for two populations of Quercus virginiana Mill

    Treesearch

    Cassandra M. Kurtz; Jessica A. Savage; I-Yu Huang; Jeannine. Cavender-Bares

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is of increasing concern in coastal forests where rising sea levels could lead to dramatic shifts in ecosystem composition. To investigate how inundation may impact coastal ecosystems, we examined the sensitivity of Quercus virginiana Mill., a dominant tree in the southeastern U.S., to increased soil salinity and examined whether high...

  8. An analysis of phenotypic selection in natural stands of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.)

    Treesearch

    Jeffery W. Stringer; David B. Wagner; Scott E. Schlarbaum; Daniel B. Houston

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of growth and stem quality parameters of 19-year-old progeny from superior and comparison trees indicates that rigorous phenotypic selection of trees in natural stands may not be an efficient method of parent tree selection for Quercus rubra L. Total tree height, dbh, number of branches in the butt log, fork height, and number of mainstem...

  9. Underplanting cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings on a bottomland site in the southern United States

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; Jimmie L. Yeiser

    2006-01-01

    We initiated a study on a bottomland site in the southern United States to examine the effects of Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunberg) control and seedlings of two root classes on survival and growth of underplanted cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings. Three honeysuckle control treatments were assigned to...

  10. Utility of ITS sequence data for phylogenetic reconstruction of Italian Quercus spp.

    PubMed

    Bellarosa, Rosanna; Simeone, Marco C; Papini, Alessio; Schirone, Bartolomeo

    2005-02-01

    Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences encoding the 5.8S RNA and the flanking internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) were used to test the phylogenetic relationships within 12 Italian Quercus taxa (Fagaceae). Hypotheses of sequence orthology are tested by detailed inspection of some basic features of oak ITS sequences (i.e., general patterns of conserved domains, thermodynamic stability and predicted conformation of the secondary structure of transcripts) that also allowed more accurate sequence alignment. Analysis of ITS variation supported three monophyletic groups, corresponding to subg. Cerris, Schlerophyllodrys (=Ilex group sensu Nixon) and Quercus, as proposed by Schwarz [Feddes Rep., Sonderbeih. D, 1-200]. A derivation of the "Cerris group" from the "Ilex group" is suggested, with Q. cerris sister to the rest of the "Cerris group." Quercus pubescens was found to be sister to the rest of the "Quercus group." The status of hybrispecies of Q. crenata (Q. cerrisxQ. suber) and Q. morisii (Q. ilexxQ. suber) was evaluated and discussed. Finally, the phylogenetic position of the Italian species in a broader context of the genus is presented. The utility of the ITS marker to assess the molecular systematics of oaks is therefore confirmed. The importance of Italy as a region with a high degree of diversity at the population and genetic level is discussed.

  11. Throughfall chemistry beneath Quercus rubra: atmospheric, foliar, and soil chemistry considerations

    Treesearch

    Theodor D. Leininger; W.E. Winner

    1988-01-01

    Concentrations of inorganic ions were measured in bulk rainfall and bulk throughfall collected beneath northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) trees growing in fertile, limestone-derived soil and less fertile sandstone/shale-derived soil. Rainfall passing through the crowns at both sites was enriched with SO2-4...

  12. Growth and biomass distribution of cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings as influenced by light availability

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; John D. Hodges

    1998-01-01

    Cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings were established and raised in the field under four light levels (100 percent. 53 percent, 27 percent or 8 percent of full sunlight) to study the effects of light availability on their shoot growth, biomass accumulation. and biomass distribution. After two growing seasons, greatest stem growth was observed on seedlings...

  13. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  14. Maternal influences on seed mass effect and initial seedling growth in four Quercus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rodríguez, Victoria; Villar, Rafael; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M.

    2011-01-01

    Seed mass represents the reserves available for growth in the first stages of plant establishment. Variation in seed mass is an important trait which may have consequences for growth and survival of seedlings. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain how seed mass influences seedling development: the reserve use effect, the metabolic effect and the seedling-size effect. Few studies have evaluated at the same time the three hypotheses within species and none have evaluated the effect of the mother trees. We studied four Quercus species by selecting five mother trees per species. Seeds were sown in a glasshouse and the use of seed reserves, seedling growth and morphology were measured. Considering all mothers of the same species together, we did not find the reserve effect for any species, the metabolic effect was observed in all species except for Quercus suber, and the seedling-size effect was matched for all the species. Within species, maternal origin modified the studied relationships and thus the studied mechanisms as we did not observe seed mass effects on all mothers from each species. Moreover, the metabolic effect was not found in any mother of Quercus ilex and Quercus faginea. We concluded that a maternal effect can change seed mass relationships with traits related to seedling establishment. The conservation of this high intra-specific variability must be considered to guarantee species performance in heterogeneous environments and in particular in the current context of climate change.

  15. A suggested approach for design of oak (Quercus L.) regeneration research considering regional differences

    Treesearch

    Daniel C. Dey; Martin A. Spetich; Dale R. Wiegel; Paul S. Johnson; David L. Graney; John M. Kabrick

    2009-01-01

    Research on oak (Quercus L.) regeneration has generally consisted of smallscale studies of treatments designed to favor oak, including consideration of site quality and topographic effects on oak regeneration. However, these experiments have not consistently factored in broader-scale ecological differences found in the eastern United States. Oak...

  16. A site model for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica) stands using a dynamic algebraic difference equation

    Treesearch

    Joao P. Carvalho; Bernard R. Parresol

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a growth model for dominant-height and site-quality estimations for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) stands. The Bertalanffy–Richards function is used with the generalized algebraic difference approach to derive a dynamic site equation. This allows dominant-height and site-index estimations in a compatible way, using any...

  17. Influence of gap-scale disturbance on developmental and successional pathways in Quercus-Pinus stands

    Treesearch

    T.A. Weber; J.L. Hart; C. Schweitzer; D.C. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Quercus-Pinus forests of the eastern USA cover millions of hectares and span a variety of ecoregions. Understanding the influence of natural disturbance on developmental and successional pathways is important for managers that wish to sustain Pinus spp. in these mixtures. Quantifying developmental and successional patterns in this...

  18. Size Class Distribution of Quercus engelmannii (Engelmann Oak) on the Santa Rosa Plateau, Riverside County, California

    Treesearch

    Earl W. Lathrop; Chris Osborne; Anna Rochester; Kevin Yeung; Samuel Soret; Rochelle Hopper

    1991-01-01

    Size class distribution of Quercus engelmannii (Engelmann oak) on the Santa Rosa Plateau was studied to understand whether current recruitment of young oaks is sufficient to maintain the population in spite of high natural mortality and impacts of development in some portions of the plateau woodland. Sapling-size oaks (1-10 cm dbh) made up 5.56 pct...

  19. Factors Limiting the Establishment of a Chaparral Oak, Quercus durata Jeps., in Grassland

    Treesearch

    Kimberlyn Williams; Stephen D. Davis; Barbara L. Gartner; Staffan Karlsson

    1991-01-01

    We studied factors that restrict colonization of grassland by Quercus durata Jeps., an oak commonly found in chaparral on serpentine soils. The study site contained a chaparral/ grassland border that had been stable for at least 50 years. Monitoring of acorns planted in the chaparral understory and grassland revealed that, although initial seedling...

  20. Growth and Seed Production of Sawtooth Oak (Quercus acutissima) 22 Years After Direct Seeding

    Treesearch

    J.C.G. Goelz; D.W. Carlson

    1997-01-01

    Sawtooth oak (Quercus acutissima Carruth.) was direct seeded at two locations, one with a poorly drained clay soil and the other with a well-drained silty clay loam. For comparison, Nuttall oak (Q. nuttallii Palmer) was direct seeded on the poorly drained clay soil. On the well-drained silty clay loam, sawtooth oak was 18 ft...

  1. Quercus kelloggii (Newb.) sprout response to fire severity in northern California

    Treesearch

    Justin S. Crotteau; Martin W. Ritchie; J. Morgan Varner; John-Pascal Berrill

    2015-01-01

    We counted seedlings and assessed crown characteristics and abundance of fire-induced stump sprout regeneration in California black oak (Quercus kelloggii) 11 to 12 years after wildfire. Regeneration was examined across three levels of burn severity (low, moderate, and high) according to the Composite Burn Index. Fire severity affected crown width...

  2. Acute renal failure in 2 adult llamas after exposure to Oak trees (Quercus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Manuel F.; Passler, Thomas; Joiner, Kellye; Poppenga, Robert H.; Bayne, Jenna; Walz, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Two adult llamas (Lama glama) previously exposed to oak trees (Quercus spp.) were presented with a history of depression and anorexia. Clinicopathological abnormalities included severe gastroenteritis, acute renal failure, and increased liver enzymes. This is believed to be the first report of oak toxicosis in South American camelids. PMID:23814303

  3. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.)

    Treesearch

    G. Vengadesan; Paula M. Pijut

    2009-01-01

    A somatic embryogenesis protocol for plant regeneration of northern red oak (Quercus rubra) was established from immature cotyledon explants. Embryogenic callus cultures were induced on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) containing 3% sucrose, 0.24% Phytagel™, and various concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) after 4 weeks of...

  4. Ex-situ conservation of Quercus oglethorpensis in living collections of arboreta and botanical gardens.

    Treesearch

    Matthew S. Lobdell; Patrick G. Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Quercus oglethorpensis (Oglethorpe oak) is an endangered species native to the southeastern United States. It is threatened by land use changes, competition, and chestnut blight disease caused by Cryphonectria parasitica. The species is distributed sparsely over a linear distance of ca. 950 km. Its range includes several...

  5. The phenolic extractives in southern red oak (Quercus falcata Michx. var. falcata)

    Treesearch

    Seiji Ohara; Richard W. Hemingway

    1989-01-01

    The bark of southern red oak (Quercus falcala Michx. var. falcala) is a rich source of quercitrin (quercetin-3-rhamnoside). It contains only low concentrations of (+)-catechin and no significant amounts of epicatechin or gallocatechin. The three major dimeric proanthocyanidins present are epicatechin-(4β→8)-...

  6. Invasive perennial grasses in Quercus garryana meadows of southwestern British Columbia: prospects for restoration

    Treesearch

    Andrew MacDougall

    2002-01-01

    Garry oak (Quercus garryana) meadows of the Pacific Northwest are heavily invaded but the dynamics surrounding this ecosystem transformation are poorly understood. Of particular uncertainty is the role of the invasive species in structuring the community, and the potential stability of this invasive-dominated system when disturbed. Clarifying such...

  7. Biodiversity of mycorrhizas on Garry oak (Quercus garryana) in a southern Oregon savanna

    Treesearch

    Lori L. Valentine; Tina L. Fiedler; Stephen R. Haney; Harold K. Berninghausen; Darlene Southworth

    2002-01-01

    Garry oak or Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) is the dominant vegetation on the Whetstone Savanna in Jackson County, Oregon. The site is located on the western edge of the Agate Desert, an alluvial fan capped with shallow clay loam over a cemented hardpan. The landform exhibits patterned ground with mounds and vernal pools. The oaks are associated...

  8. Xylem dysfunction in Quercus: vessel sizes, tyloses, cavitation and seasonal changes in embolism.

    PubMed

    Cochard, H; Tyree, M T

    1990-12-01

    The seasonal progression of xylem dysfunction from tyloses and embolism induced both by cavitation and frost was studied in Quercus rubra L. and Quercus alba L. branches. Vessel lengths and diameters were measured in current-year rings of branches of various ages. Vessels in current-year shoots are about the same size as those in many diffuse porous trees, but vessels in older branches are two to six times larger in diameter and typically more than 10 times longer. Large Quercus vessels were more vulnerable to cavitation than small vessels. The small vessels in current-year shoots were more vulnerable to cavitation than vessels of comparable size in diffuse porous species. Earlywood vessels are completely blocked by tyloses within a year of their formation. Tylose growth starts in winter, but the vessels are not fully blocked until the next summer. Many latewood vessels, by contrast, remain free of complete blockage for several years. In Q. rubra, loss of hydraulic conductivity in current-year shoots due to cavitation reaches 20% by August and > 90% after the first hard frost. Both laboratory and field observations confirm that the role of frost in causing loss of hydraulic conduction by embolism is much more dramatic in Quercus than in conifers and diffuse porous hardwoods.

  9. Riparian valley oak (Quercus lobata) forest restoration on the middle Sacramento River, California

    Treesearch

    F. Thomas Griggs; Gregory H. Golet

    2002-01-01

    In 1989 The Nature Conservancy initiated a riparian horticultural restoration program on the floodplain of the middle Sacramento River, California. At nearly all restoration sites Valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) comprised a major component of the planting design. Valley oaks are a keystone tree species of lowland floodplain habitats in California...

  10. Underplanting to sustain future stocking of oak (Quercus) in temperate deciduous forests

    Treesearch

    Daniel C. Dey; Emile S. Gardiner; Callie J. Schweitzer; John M. Kabrick; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus spp.) are one of the most important tree taxa in the northern hemisphere. Although they are dominant in mixed species forests and widely distributed, there are frequent reports of regeneration failures. An adequate population of large oak advance reproduction is a critical prerequisite to successful oak regeneration, and hence...

  11. Heritability of first-order lateral root number in Quercus: implication for artificial regeneration of stands

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; Taryn L. Kormanik; Stanley L. Zarnoch; Scott Schlarbaum

    2000-01-01

    Natural regeneration of oak (Quercus) species in the USA has been easy to obtain on the lower quality xeric sites (site index less than or equal to 20 m at age 50) by developing advanced oak reproduction before stands are harvested. This approach has not been successful with Q. rubra, Q. pagoda, or Q. alba...

  12. Regeneration of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) using shelterwood systems: Ecophysiology, silviculture and management recommendations

    Treesearch

    Daniel C. Dey; William C. parker

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing relaible methods for regenerating red oak (Quercus rubra) in Ontario. Traditional silviculture methods have not been successful in maintaining the curent levels of oak growing stock. In this paper, we review the ecology, physiology and reproductive biology of red oak. This discussion stresses the...

  13. Agrilus auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) seasonal development within Quercus agrifolia (Fagales: Fagaceae) in southern California

    Treesearch

    L.J. Haavik; T.W. Coleman; M.L. Flint; R.C. Venette; S.J. Seybold

    2013-01-01

    We investigated seasonal development of the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and physical conditions of the phloem within a preferred host species, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née. We sampled infested trees on a monthly basis at two sites in southern California throughout...

  14. The allelopathic influence of post oak (Quercus stellata) on plant species in southern U.S

    Treesearch

    Nicollette A. Baldwin; Michael K. Crosby

    2016-01-01

    Post oak (Quercus stellata) is a commonly occurring tree in the southeastern United States, offering forage and shelter for a variety of wildlife as well as having commercial uses. This species is often planted in parks and urban green-spaces for the shade it offers. Previous studies have found that parts of the plant can be toxic to livestock and...

  15. Effects of desiccation on the physiology and biochemistry of Quercus alba acorns

    Treesearch

    Kristina F. Connor; Sharon Sowa

    2003-01-01

    Seeds that lose viability when dried to a water content of less than 12% are said to be recalcitrant. We subjected acorns of Quercus alba L., a species with recalcitrant seeds, to desiccation to determine the effects of drying on lipids, proteins and carbohydrates of the embryonic axis and cotyledon tissues. Samples of fresh seed and seed dried for...

  16. The effect of seed size variation in Quercus pacifica on seedling establishment and growth

    Treesearch

    Mario B. Pesendorfer

    2015-01-01

    Quercus pacifica, the island scrub-oak, is the dominant species in oak chaparral on the three largest California Channel Islands. While the population on Santa Cruz Island has experienced a strong recovery, the populations on Santa Rosa and Santa Catalina islands are of conservation concern, and managers are actively restoring oak habitat by...

  17. Concentric Ring Method for generating pollen maps. Quercus as case study.

    PubMed

    Oteros, Jose; Valencia, Rosa Mª; Del Río, Sara; Vega, Ana Mª; García-Mozo, Herminia; Galán, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Pablo; Mandrioli, Paolo; Fernández-González, Delia

    2017-01-15

    Mapping pollen concentrations is of great interest to study the health impact and ecological implications or for forestry or agronomical purposes. A deep knowledge about factors affecting airborne pollen is essential for predicting and understanding its dynamics. The present work sought to predict annual Quercus pollen over the Castilla and León region (Central and Northern Spain). Also to understand the relationship between airborne pollen and landscape. Records of Quercus and Quercus pyrenaica pollen types were collected at 13 monitoring sites over a period of 8years. They were analyzed together with land use data applying the Concentric Ring Method (CRM), a technique that we developed to study the relationship between airborne particle concentrations and emission sources in the region. The maximum correlation between the Quercus pollen and forms of vegetation was determined by shrubland and "dehesa" areas. For the specific Qi pyrenaica model (Q. pyrenaica pollen and Q. pyrenaica forest distribution), the maximum influence of emission sources on airborne pollen was observed at 14km from the pollen trap location with some positive correlations up to a distance of 43km. Apart from meteorological behavior, the local features of the region can explain pollen dispersion patterns. The method that we develop here proved to be a powerful tool for multi-source pollen mapping based on land use.

  18. Viability of litter-stored Quercus falcata Michx. acorns after simulated prescribed winter burns

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Cain; Michael G. Shelton

    1998-01-01

    Partially stratified (11 days) southern red oak (Quercus falcata Michx.) acorns were placed at three depths in a reconstructed forest floor and subjected to simulated prescribed winter burns. Within the forest floor, acorns were placed within the L layer, at the upper-F/ lower-F interface, and at the lower-F/mineral-soil interface. Winds for a...

  19. Whole-transcriptome response to water stress in a California endemic oak, Quercus lobata

    Treesearch

    Paul F. Gugger; Juan Manuel Peñaloza-Ramírez; Jessica W. Wright; Victoria L. Sork; Jörg-Peter Schnitzler

    2016-01-01

    Reduced water availability during drought can create major stress for many plant species. Within a species, populations with a history of seasonal drought may have evolved the ability to tolerate drought more than those in areas of high precipitation and low seasonality. In this study, we assessed response to water stress in a California oak species, Quercus lobata Née...

  20. Involvement of Phythophthora species in white oak (Quercus alba) decline in southern Ohio

    Treesearch

    Y. Balci; R.P. Long; M. Mansfield; D. Balser; W.L. MacDonald

    2010-01-01

    This study was initiated to investigate the possible role of Phytophthora species in white oak decline (Quercus alba) in southern Ohio at Scioto Trail State Forest. Surveys demonstrated the presence of four species of Phytophthora including one novel species. By far, the most common species was P....

  1. Intraspecific Phenotypic Variation and Ecological Genetics of Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii Hook. & Am.)

    Treesearch

    Kevin J. Rice; Doria R. Gordon; Jeanine L. Hardison; Jeffrey M. Welker

    1991-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to examine the effects of soil water availability on blue oak (Quercus douglasii) seedling establishment. Acorns were planted either into cleared plots of 0, 10, 20, or 40 cm diameter. The cleared plots were located in two grazed and one ungrazed site. Half of the plots received drip irrigation in a split plot design...

  2. Photosynthetic light response of flooded cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda) seedlings grown in two light regimes

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; Ken W. Krauss

    2001-01-01

    Two-year-old cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings raised in full or partial (27 percent) sunlight were flooded for 30 days to study the effects of light availability and root inundation on photosynthetic light response. Compared with seedlings receiving full sunlight, seedlings receiving partial sunlight developed leaves...

  3. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  4. Age structure and growth of California black oak (Quercus kelloggii) in the central Sierra Nevada, California

    Treesearch

    Barrett A. Garrison; Christopher D. otahal; Matthew L. Triggs

    2002-01-01

    Age structure and growth of California black oak (Quercus kelloggii) was determined from tagged trees at four 26.1-acre study stands in Placer County, California. Stands were dominated by large diameter (>20 inch dbh) California black oak and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). Randomly selected trees were tagged in June-August...

  5. Influence of Soil Type and Drainage on Growth of Swamp Chestnut Oak (Quercus Michauxii Nutt.) Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Donald D. Hook

    1969-01-01

    Swamp chestnut oak (Quercus michauxii Nutt.) seedlings were grown for 2 years in five soil types in drained and undrained pots. First-year height growth was related to soil type and pot drainage, but second-year height growth was related only to soil type. Results suggest that swamp chestnut oak is site-sensitive. But slow growth, a maximum of 2...

  6. Competitive capacity of Quercus rubra L. planted in Arkansas' Boston Mountains

    Treesearch

    Martin A. Spetich; Daniel C. Dey; Paul S. Johnson; David L. Graney

    2002-01-01

    Results of an 11 yr study of the growth and survival of planted northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings (2-0 bare-root) are presented. More than 4,000 seedlings were planted under shelterwood overstories that were harvested 3 yr after planting. Results are expressed as planted-tree dominance probabilities. Dominance probability is the...

  7. Competitive Capacity of Quercus rubra L. Planted in Arkansas' Boston Mountains

    Treesearch

    Martin A. Spetich; Daniel C. Dey; Paul S. Johnson; David L. Graney

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. Results of an 11 yr study of the growth and survival of planted northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings (2-0 bare-root) are presented. More than 4,000 seedlings were planted under shelterwood overstories that were harvested 3 yr after planting. Results are expressed as planted-tree dominance probabilities. Dominance...

  8. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa supsp. multiplex strain Griffin-1 from Quercus rubra in Georgia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex Strain Griffin-1 isolated from a red oak tree (Quercus rubra) in Georgia, U.S.A. is reported. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,387,314 bp with 51.7% G+C content and comprises 2,903 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 50 RNA g...

  9. Trunk and root sprouting on residual trees after thinning a Quercus chrysolepis stand

    Treesearch

    Timothy E. Paysen; Marcia G. Narog; Robert G. Tissell; Melody A. Lardner

    1991-01-01

    Canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis Liebm.) showed sprouting patterns on root and trunk zones foUowing forest thinning. Root sprouting was heaviest on north and east (downhill) sides of residual trees; bole sprouts were concentrated on the south and west (uphill). Root and bole sprouting appeared to be responding to different stimuli, or...

  10. Tree mortality 6 years after burning a thinned Quercus chrysolepis stand

    Treesearch

    T.E. Paysen; M.G. Narog

    1993-01-01

    Managers do not currently use prescribed fire in stands of canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis Liebm.) because it is highly susceptible to fire injury. A preliminary study investigating the effects of  prescribed burning on this species was initiated on the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California. The purpose was to assess the...

  11. Effects of soil and stem base heating on survival, resprouting and gas exchange of Acer and Quercus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Huddle, J A; Pallardy, S G

    1996-06-01

    Acer rubrum L., A. saccharum Marsh., Quercus alba L. and Q. rubra L. seedlings subjected to soil and stem base heat treatments showed rapid declines in rates of transpiration and photosynthesis. Reductions in photosynthetic rate were partly attributable to mesophyll inhibition. Quercus seedlings were less able to maintain transpiration and photosynthesis after heat treatment than Acer seedlings. Declines in rates of transpiration and photosynthesis of Quercus seedlings were observed 1 h after heat treatment and became more pronounced over time. In contrast, rates of transpiration and photosynthesis of Acer seedlings initially declined in response to heat treatment, partially recovered after one or two days, but then declined again six to eight days after the heat treatment. Observed changes in leaf water potential after heating were small, suggesting that hydraulic factors were not the primary signal eliciting the gas exchange response to soil and stem heating. Ultimately, the heat treatments caused stem die-back of most seedlings. For all species, seedlings that resprouted had a greater chance of surviving heat stress than seedlings that did not resprout. Despite the rapid loss of photosynthetic capacity in response to heat treatment in Quercus seedlings, survival was higher in Quercus seedlings than in Acer seedlings, and was associated with a greater capacity for resprouting. We suggest that the reduced allocation of resources toward recovery of photosynthesis in existing Quercus stems after heat stress is a physiological mechanism that facilitates resprouting and hence survival of Quercus seedlings after fire.

  12. Studies on the chemical modification of the essential groups of N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase from viscera of green crab (Scylla Serrata).

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhu-Xing; Zhang, Ji-Ping; Yan, Ya-Wen; Wang, Qin

    2008-05-01

    The chemical modification of N-acetyl-beta-D: -glucosaminidase (EC3.2.1.30) from viscera of green crab (Scylla serrata) has been first studied. The modification of indole groups of tryptophan of the enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide can lead to complete inactivation, accompanying the absorption decreasing at 275 nm and the fluorescence intensity quenching at 338 nm, indicating that tryptophan is essential residue to the enzyme. The modification of histidine residue, the carboxyl groups, and lysine residue inactivates the enzyme completely or incompletely. The results show that imidazole groups of histidine residue or sulfhydryl residues, the carboxyl groups of acidic amino acid, amino groups of lysine residue, and indole groups of tryptophan were essential for the catalytic activity of enzyme, while the results demonstrate that the disulfide bonds and the carbamidine groups of arginine residues are not essential to the enzyme's function.

  13. Host specificity and genealogy of the louse Polyplax serrata on field mice, Apodemus species: a case of parasite duplication or colonisation?

    PubMed

    Stefka, Jan; Hypsa, Václav

    2008-05-01

    The genealogy, population structure and population dynamics of the sucking louse Polyplax serrata were analysed across four host species of the genus Apodemus. An analysis of 126 sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I using phylogenetic approaches and haplotype networking revealed a clear structure of European samples, forming three distinct and genetically distant clades with different host specificities. Although a clear connection was detected between the host and parasite genealogies/phylogenies, a uniform pattern of co-speciation was not found. For example, a dramatic shift in the degree of host specificity was demonstrated for two related louse lineages living in sympatry and sharing one of their host species. While one of the louse lineages frequently parasitised two different host taxa (Apodemus sylvaticus and Apodemus flavicollis), the other louse lineage was strictly specific to A. flavicollis. The estimate of divergence time between the two louse lineages indicates that they may have arisen due to parasite duplication on A. flavicollis.

  14. The application of histo-cytopathological biomarkers in the mud crab Scylla serrata (Forskal) to assess heavy metal toxicity in Pulicat Lake, Chennai.

    PubMed

    Arockia Vasanthi, Lourduraj; Muruganandam, Azhagu; Revathi, Peranandam; Baskar, Balakrishnan; Jayapriyan, Kodhilmozhian; Baburajendran, Ramaswamy; Munuswamy, Natesan

    2014-04-15

    The concentrations of heavy metals and their associated structural deformities in the gills, muscles and hepatopancreas of Scylla serrata from Pulicat Lake were determined and compared with crabs live along Kovalam coast. The concentrations of metals were high in the hepatopancreas and gills of crab from Pulicat Lake, whereas, low in crab from the Kovalam coast. Data were visualized using a principal component analysis (PCA). Significant differences were found for all variables at the plot scale; however, the overall variation was relatively low for muscle tissues in both stations. The structural deformities observed in the gills, hepatopancreas and muscle was due to metal toxicity, and the degree of damage was correlated with the elevated metal concentration. The results showed significant metal accumulation and histo-cytological lesions in the crabs from Pulicat Lake. The results suggest that these biomarkers are useful for assessing the impact of metal pollution in the coastal environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibacterial and Anti-Quorum Sensing Molecular Composition Derived from Quercus cortex (Oak bark) Extract.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, Dmitry G; Tolmacheva, Anna A

    2015-09-17

    Quercus cortex (Oak bark) has been used in European folk medicine since medieval times for treatment of diarrhea, stomatitis, pharyngitis and skin inflammations. Its antimicrobial activity is a well-known therapeutic property of oak bark, and its novel anti-quorum sensing (QS) ability has also been described recently. In this study, we examined the bioactive compounds of Quercus cortex extract and compared their direct antibacterial and regulatory anti-QS effects against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 in a biotest. Evaluation of the original Quercus cortex extract showed weak antibacterial and prominent anti-QS activities that were retained and completely restored when the samples were dried and re-hydrated. The one-step liquid chromatography result indicated that the anti-QS activity might be determined by hydrophobic compounds; however, the subsequent reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography led to dissipation and loss of the activity. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gave excellent resolution between a majority of the compounds. Based on this result, 10 of the 35 identified small molecules were selected for further screening. The subsequent investigation indicated several compounds determined both the antibacterial and anti-QS activities of the Quercus cortex extract. Direct antibacterial activity was shown for 1,2,3-benzenetriol and 4-propyl-1,3-benzenediol, while sub-inhibitory concentrations of these compounds led to anti-QS effects. Five compounds: 4-(3-hydroxy-1-propenyl)-2-methoxy-phenol; 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenol; 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde; 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one and 2H-1-benzopyran-2-one were characterized as QS inhibitors independent of any effect on bacterial growth. Biologically relevant concentrations of each single component showed weak activity only while reconstruction of the small molecule composition derived from the Quercus cortex extract provided comparable complementary activity against C. violaceum

  16. Mitochondrial genome of the intertidal acorn barnacle Tetraclita serrata Darwin, 1854 (Crustacea: Sessilia): Gene order comparison and phylogenetic consideration within Sessilia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Tsang, Ling Ming; Chu, Ka Hou; Achituv, Yair; Chan, Benny Kwok Kan

    2015-08-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the intertidal barnacle Tetraclita serrata Darwin, 1854 (Crustacea: Maxillopoda: Sessilia) is presented. The genome is a circular molecule of 15,200 bp, which encodes 13 PCGs, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. All non-coding regions are 591 bp in length, with the longest one speculated as the control region (389 bp), which is located between srRNA and trnK. The overall A+T content of the mitochondrial genome of T. serrata is 65.4%, which is lowest among all the eight mitochondrial genomes reported from sessile barnacles. There are variations of initiation and stop codons in the reported sessile barnacle mitochondrial genomes. Large-scale gene rearrangements are found in these genomes as compared to the pancrustacean ground pattern. ML and Bayesian analyses of all 15 complete mitochondrial genomes available from Maxillopoda lead to identical phylogenies. The phylogenetic tree based on mitochondrial PCGs shows that Argulus americanus (Branchiura) cluster with Armillifer armillatus (Pentastomida), distinct from all ten species from Cirripedia. Within the order Sessilia, Amphibalanus amphitrite (Balanidae) clusters with Striatobalanus amaryllis (Archaeobalanidae), and Nobia grandis (Pyrgomatidae). However, the two Megabalanus (Balanidae) are separated from the above grouping, resulting in non-monophyly of the family Balanidae. Moreover, the two Megabalanus have large-scale rearrangements as compared to the gene order shared by former three species. Therefore, both phylogenetic analysis using PCG sequences and gene order comparison suggest that Balanidae is not a monophyletic group. Given the limited taxa and moderate support values of the internal branches, the non-monophyly of the family Balanidae requires further verification.

  17. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of Boswellia serrata in maintaining remission of Crohn's disease: good safety profile but lack of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Zeuzem, Stefan; Preiss, Jan; Kruis, Wolfgang; Böhm, Stephan; Maaser, Christian; Raedler, Andreas; Schmidt, Carsten; Schnitker, Jörg; Schwarz, Joachim; Zeitz, Martin; Caspary, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    Complementary therapies are frequently used by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term therapy with a new Boswellia serrata extract (Boswelan, PS0201Bo) in maintaining remission in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). In 22 German centers a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel study was performed. In all, 108 outpatients with CD in clinical remission were included. Patients were randomized to Boswelan (3×2 capsules/day; 400 mg each) or placebo for 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients in whom remission was maintained throughout the 52 weeks. Secondary endpoints were time to relapse, changes of Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), and IBD Questionnaire (IBDQ) scores. The trial was prematurely terminated due to insufficient discrimination of drug and placebo with regard to the primary efficacy endpoint. A total of 82 patients were randomized to Boswelan (n=42) or placebo (n=40). Sixty-six patients could be analyzed for efficacy. 59.9% of the actively treated patients and 55.3% of the placebo group stayed in remission (P=0.85). The mean time to diagnosis of relapse was 171 days for the active group and 185 days for the placebo group (P=0.69). With respect to CDAI, IBDQ, and laboratory measurements of inflammation, no advantages in favor of active treatment were detected. Regarding safety concerns, no disadvantages of taking the drug compared to placebo were observed. The trial confirmed good tolerability of a new Boswellia serrata extract, Boswelan, in long-term treatment of CD. However, superiority versus placebo in maintenance therapy of remission could not be demonstrated.

  18. Occurrence of an Inhibitor of Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Seeds and in Vitro Cultures of Erythrina caffra Thunb.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H J; van Staden, J

    1991-08-01

    The level of an inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) increased slowly during the early developmental stage of seeds of Erythrina caffra Thunb. Thereafter, the inhibitor increased exponentially until the seeds reached maturity. At maturity, the t-PA inhibitor levels in the cotyledons were 38 times higher than the levels at the onset of seed development. The t-PA inhibitor accumulated at a faster rate than the storage proteins, which reached a concentration 15 times higher than the protein concentration at the onset of seed development. During the imbibition and germination process, the t-PA inhibitor decreased gradually. The inhibitor kept on decreasing during the growth of the seedlings until the 10th day after imbibition, when it leveled off at 4.1% of that of the initial inhibitor concentration. The inhibitor remained at this level until the cotyledons were shed at day 22. The total protein in the cotyledons decreased at a slower rate than the inhibitor and reached a minimum concentration at day 20 of 3.6% of the initial protein concentration in the cotyledons. Callus cultures of root, shoot, leaf, and cotyledonary tissue was established and maintained on Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with 3% sucrose, 10 micromolar benzyladenine, and 5 micromolar 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. A shoot cell suspension culture was established on Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with 3% sucrose, 1 micromolar benzyladenine, and 0.5 micromolar 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (pH 5.7) and shaken at 60 revolutions per minute. The level of t-PA inhibitor in root, shoot, leaf, and cotyledonary callus was substantially lower than in the corresponding intact tissue. The t-PA inhibitor levels in the linear growth phase was higher than in the lag or stationary growth phases of the cell suspension culture. A hydrolysate of the cell walls of tomato and E. caffra Thunb, as well as polyamines and organic acids, did not increase the concentration of t-PA inhibitor in

  19. Phylogenetic position of Linguatula arctica and Linguatula serrata (Pentastomida) as inferred from the nuclear 18S rRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2013-10-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from a Linguatula serrata female expelled from a dog imported to Norway from Romania and from four Linguatula arctica females collected from semi-domesticated reindeer from northern Norway and subjected to PCR amplification of the complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene and a 1,045-bp portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1). The two species differed at two of 1,830 nucleotide positions (99.9% identity) of the complete 18S rRNA gene sequences and at 102 of 1,045 nucleotide positions (90.2% identity) of the partial cox1 sequences. The four isolates of L. arctica showed no genetic variation in either gene. The new cox1 primers may facilitate the diagnosis of various developmental stages of L. arctica and L. serrata in their hosts. In separate phylogenetic analyses using the maximum likelihood method on sequence data from either gene, L. arctica and L. serrata clustered with members of the order Cephalobaenida rather than with members of the order Porocephalida, in which the genus Linguatula is currently placed based on morphological characters. The phylogenetic relationship of L. arctica, L. serrata and other pentastomids to other metazoan groups could not be clearly resolved, but the pentastomids did not seem to have a sister relationship to crustaceans of the subclass Branchiura as found in other studies. A more extensive taxon sampling, including molecular characterisation of more pentastomid taxa across different genera, seems to be necessary in order to estimate the true relationship of the Pentastomida to other metazoan groups.

  20. Leaf morphological and physiological adaptations of a deciduous oak (Quercus faginea Lam.) to the Mediterranean climate: a comparison with a closely related temperate species (Quercus robur L.)

    PubMed Central

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sisó, Sergio; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Díaz-Espejo, Antonio; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-01-01

    ‘White oaks’—one of the main groups of the genus Quercus L.—are represented in western Eurasia by the ‘roburoid oaks’, a deciduous and closely related genetic group that should have an Arcto-Tertiary origin under temperate-nemoral climates. Nowadays, roburoid oak species such as Quercus robur L. are still present in these temperate climates in Europe, but others are also present in southern Europe under Mediterranean-type climates, such as Quercus faginea Lam. We hypothesize the existence of a coordinated functional response at the whole-shoot scale in Q. faginea under Mediterranean conditions to adapt to more xeric habitats. The results reveal a clear morphological and physiological segregation between Q. robur and Q. faginea, which constitute two very contrasting functional types in response to climate dryness. The most outstanding divergence between the two species is the reduction in transpiring area in Q. faginea, which is the main trait imposed by the water deficit in Mediterranean-type climates. The reduction in leaf area ratio in Q. faginea should have a negative effect on carbon gain that is partially counteracted by a higher inherent photosynthetic ability of Q. faginea when compared with Q. robur, as a consequence of higher mesophyll conductance, higher maximum velocity of carboxylation and much higher stomatal conductance (gs). The extremely high gs of Q. faginea counteracts the expected reduction in gs imposed by the stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit, allowing this species to diminish water losses maintaining high net CO2 assimilation values along the vegetative period under nonlimiting soil water potential values. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Q. faginea can be regarded as an example of adaptation of a deciduous oak to Mediterranean-type climates. PMID:26496958

  1. Leaf morphological and physiological adaptations of a deciduous oak (Quercus faginea Lam.) to the Mediterranean climate: a comparison with a closely related temperate species (Quercus robur L.).

    PubMed

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sisó, Sergio; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Díaz-Espejo, Antonio; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-03-01

    'White oaks'--one of the main groups of the genus Quercus L.--are represented in western Eurasia by the 'roburoid oaks', a deciduous and closely related genetic group that should have an Arcto-Tertiary origin under temperate-nemoral climates. Nowadays, roburoid oak species such as Quercus robur L. are still present in these temperate climates in Europe, but others are also present in southern Europe under Mediterranean-type climates, such as Quercus faginea Lam. We hypothesize the existence of a coordinated functional response at the whole-shoot scale in Q. faginea under Mediterranean conditions to adapt to more xeric habitats. The results reveal a clear morphological and physiological segregation between Q. robur and Q. faginea, which constitute two very contrasting functional types in response to climate dryness. The most outstanding divergence between the two species is the reduction in transpiring area in Q. faginea, which is the main trait imposed by the water deficit in Mediterranean-type climates. The reduction in leaf area ratio in Q. faginea should have a negative effect on carbon gain that is partially counteracted by a higher inherent photosynthetic ability of Q. faginea when compared with Q. robur, as a consequence of higher mesophyll conductance, higher maximum velocity of carboxylation and much higher stomatal conductance (gs). The extremely high gs of Q. faginea counteracts the expected reduction in gs imposed by the stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit, allowing this species to diminish water losses maintaining high net CO2 assimilation values along the vegetative period under nonlimiting soil water potential values. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Q. faginea can be regarded as an example of adaptation of a deciduous oak to Mediterranean-type climates.

  2. Effect of habitat and age on variations in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.; Owen, S.; Duckham, S. C.; Boissard, C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    A dynamic branch enclosure was used to measure emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under field conditions from two common native Mediterranean species, Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea. In addition to α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, limonene and cineole, a suite of lesser known compounds were tentatively identified including cis- and trans-ocimene, cis- and trans-linalool oxide and sabinaketone. Emissions of isoprene from Quercus ilex were insignificant in comparison to those of the monoterpenes and were not detected from Pinus pinea. Variability in emission rates between two habitats, the forest and the dunes, were assessed for Quercus ilex. Temperature sensitivities of emissions and total summed emission rates from Quercus ilex were clearly related to environmental conditions. Emission rates from Pinus pinea showed great variability, but differences between normalised mean emission rates from mature forest and young plantation trees may be significant. Existing emission rate models were found to inadequately describe the observed data.

  3. Anti-steatotic and anti-inflammatory effects of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. extracts in chronic alcohol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ra-Yeong; Woo, Moon-Jae; Ham, Ju Ri; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2017-04-02

    The anti-steatotic and anti-inflammatory effects of fruit water extract (FW) and seed ethanol extract (SE) of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. in chronic alcohol-fed rats were investigated. Rats were fed a liquid diet containing 36% calories from alcohol and orally administered FW or SE (300 and 500mg/kg/day). Both FW and SE reduced hepatic lipid contents and droplets, serum lipid concentration and inflammatory markers (hs-CRP, TNF-α and IL-6) levels compared with the alcohol control group. Alcohol led to significant decreases in the hepatic fatty acid oxidative gene (Ppargc1a, Cpt1a and Acsl1) levels, while it significantly increased the Myd88 and Tnfa gene levels. However, FW or SE supplementation significantly up-regulated gene expression of Ppargc1a, Ppara, Cpt1a and Acsl1, and down-regulated gene expression of Myd88, Tnfa and Crp compared with the alcohol control group. FW or SE supplementation also significantly decreased hepatic activities of fatty acid synthase and phosphatidate phosphohydrolase in chronic alcohol-fed rats. Plasma alcohol and acetaldehyde levels, hepatic enzyme activity and protein expression of CYP2E1 were lowered by FW or SE supplementation. These results indicate that both FW and SE play an important role in improvement of alcoholic hepatic steatosis and inflammation via regulation of lipid and inflammation metabolism.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Immature Flower Buds Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries and Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Xiaobao; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-04

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. flower is a well-known medicinal plant that has been widely used for the treatment of human disease. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and removal of high-abundance proteins, respectively. A total of 177, 614, and 529 proteins were identified in crude protein extraction, CPLL fractions, and PEG fractions, respectively. Among the identified proteins, 283 and 239 proteins were specifically identified by the CPLL and PEG methods, respectively. In particular, proteins related to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, signaling, hormone metabolism, and transport were highly enriched by CPLL and PEG fractionation compared to crude protein extraction. A total of 28 secondary metabolism-related proteins and 25 metabolites were identified in L. japonica immature flower buds. To determine the specificity of the identified proteins and metabolites for L. japonica immature flower buds, Cerasus flower buds were used, which resulted in the abundance of hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase in L. japonica immature flower buds being 10-fold higher than that in Cerasus flower buds. These results suggest that proteins related to secondary metabolism might be responsible for the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds.

  5. The effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing activity of Hypericum japonicum Thunb. extract in murine liver cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HONG-BO; LU, PING; CAO, WEN-BO; ZHANG, ZHEN-HUA; MENG, XIANG-LEI

    2013-01-01

    Chinese herbs are potential sources of antitumor drugs with immunoregulatory activity and few adverse effects. In the present study, we investigated whether the Hypericum japonicum Thunb. (HJT) extract enhanced the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment in murine liver tumor xenografts and reduced toxicity of chemotherapy in hepatoma H22-bearing mice. Tumor weight and inhibition rate, thymus and spleen indices, as well as white blood cell (WBC) count were calculated. The phagocytic function of macrophages was assessed by observing peritoneal macrophages phagocytized chicken red blood cells (RBC). Body weight and toxic reactions of the chemotherapeutic and life prolongation rate were investigated in the mice. Results demonstrated that the HJT extract significantly enhanced the tumor inhibition rate of 5-FU, improved the immune function, reduced the toxic effects and prolonged the survival time in the tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results indicated that the HJT extract has a synergistic tumor-inhibiting effect with 5-FU, is able to reduce the toxic side effects and is likely to be safe and efficacious for use in antitumor therapy. PMID:24649182

  6. The effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing activity of Hypericum japonicum Thunb. extract in murine liver cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Lu, Ping; Cao, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Meng, Xiang-Lei

    2013-03-01

    Chinese herbs are potential sources of antitumor drugs with immunoregulatory activity and few adverse effects. In the present study, we investigated whether the Hypericum japonicum Thunb. (HJT) extract enhanced the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment in murine liver tumor xenografts and reduced toxicity of chemotherapy in hepatoma H22-bearing mice. Tumor weight and inhibition rate, thymus and spleen indices, as well as white blood cell (WBC) count were calculated. The phagocytic function of macrophages was assessed by observing peritoneal macrophages phagocytized chicken red blood cells (RBC). Body weight and toxic reactions of the chemotherapeutic and life prolongation rate were investigated in the mice. Results demonstrated that the HJT extract significantly enhanced the tumor inhibition rate of 5-FU, improved the immune function, reduced the toxic effects and prolonged the survival time in the tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results indicated that the HJT extract has a synergistic tumor-inhibiting effect with 5-FU, is able to reduce the toxic side effects and is likely to be safe and efficacious for use in antitumor therapy.

  7. Quality evaluation of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection (HPLC-DAD).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhan-nan; Sun, Yi-ming; Luo, Shi-qiong; Chen, Jin-wu; Chen, Jin-wu; Yu, Zheng-wen; Sun, Min

    2014-03-01

    A new, validated method, developed for the simultaneous determination of 16 phenolics (chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, vitexin, rutin, afzelin, isoquercitrin, narirutin, kaempferitrin, quercitrin, quercetin, kaempferol, chrysosplenol D, vitexicarpin, 5-hydroxy-3,3',4',7-tetramethoxy flavonoids, 5-hydroxy-3,4',6,7-tetramethoxy flavonoids and kaempferol-3,7,4'-trimethyl ether) in Houttuynia cordata Thunb. was successfully applied to 35 batches of samples collected from different regions or at different times and their total antioxidant activities (TAAs) were investigated. The aim was to develop a quality control method to simultaneously determine the major active components in H. cordata. The HPLC-DAD method was performed using a reverse-phase C18 column with a gradient elution system (acetonitrile-methanol-water) and simultaneous detection at 345 nm. Linear behaviors of method for all the analytes were observed with linear regression relationship (r(2)>0.999) at the concentration ranges investigated. The recoveries of the 16 phenolics ranged from 98.93% to 101.26%. The samples analyzed were differentiated and classified based on the contents of the 16 characteristic compounds and the TAA using hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The results analyzed showed that similar chemical profiles and TAAs were divided into the same group. There was some evidence that active compounds, although they varied significantly, may possess uniform anti-oxidant activities and have potentially synergistic effects.

  8. Unilateral compatibility and genotypic difference in crossability in interspecific hybridization between Dianthus caryophyllus L. and Dianthus japonicus Thunb.

    PubMed

    Nimura, M; Kato, J; Mii, M; Morioka, K

    2003-05-01

    Reciprocal interspecific crosses were carried out between six lines of Dianthus caryophyllus L. and one line of Dianthus japonicus Thunb. Although no seed was set when D. japonicus was used as the seed parent, six seedlings were successfully obtained from 2,380 immature ovules by applying the embryo-rescue technique. However, they showed seed parent-like morphology and no evidence for the hybridity by flow cytometry and RAPD analyses. When six lines of D. caryophyllus were used as seed parents, a total of 192 seedlings were successfully obtained without using the embryo-rescue technique. Among these seedlings, 12 out of 25 progenies obtained from the carnation line '98sp1651' were confirmed to be the hybrids. The remaining 13 progenies of this line, and the total 167 progenies obtained from the other carnation lines, had carnation-like morphology without any evidence of hybridity by flow cytometry and RAPD analyses. The progenies confirmed as hybrids had intermediate characters of the parents with respect to leaf width and flower size, but they had a uniform flower color, reddish purple, which was different from that of either parent. Since the hybrids obtained in the present study have some profitable characters such as vigorous growth in summer time, upright robust stem, broad leaves and early flowering, they are expected to be used for the breeding of carnation which is suitable for growing under the Japanese climate.

  9. Akebia trifoliate (Thunb.) Koidz Seed Extract Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines via Inducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen-Li; Ren, Hong-Yan; Liang, Cao; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Ji; Pan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Fang, Zhao-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Akebia Fructus has long been used for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in China, while the molecular mechanism remains obscure. Our recent work found that Akebia trifoliate (Thunb.) Koidz seed extract (ATSE) suppressed proliferation and induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMMC-7721. The present study aimed to throw more light on the mechanism. ER stress occurred after ATSE treatment in HepG2, HuH7, and SMMC-7721 cells, manifested as ER expansion, and SMMC-7721 was the most sensitive kind in terms of morphology. Cell viability assay showed that ATSE significantly inhibited cells proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that ATSE leads to an upward tendency of G0/G1 phase and a reduced trend of the continuous peak after G2/M phase in HepG2; ATSE promoted apoptosis in HuH7 and a notable reduction in G0/G1 phase; ATSE does not quite influence cell cycles of SMMC-7721. Western blot analysis showed an increased trend of the chosen ER stress-related proteins after different treatments but nonsignificantly; only HYOU1 and GRP78 were decreased notably by ATSE in HuH7. Affymetrix array indicated that lots of ER stress-related genes' expressions were significantly altered, and downward is the main trend. These results suggest that ATSE have anticancer potency in HCC cells via partly inducing ER stress. PMID:25389441

  10. Effect of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf pigment on the thermal, pasting, and textural properties and microstructure characterization of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Fan, Mingcong; Zhou, Sumei; Wang, Li; Qian, Haifeng; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Xiguang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the thermal, pasting and gel textural properties of japonica rice starch (JRS) and glutinous rice starch (GRS) fortified with Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf pigment (VBTLP) were investigated. The results showed that VBTLP facilitated the gelatinization of JRS and GRS with earlier onsets of onset temperature (To), peak temperature (Tp), conclusion temperature (Tc), and lower values of gelatinization enthalpy (ΔHg), and retrogradation enthalpy (ΔHr), as the VBTLP level increased. For JRS, VBTLP increased the peak viscosity and breakdown, reduced the final viscosity and setback, but for GRS it increased the peak viscosity, final viscosity, breakdown and setback. VBTLP also reduced the hardness and adhesiveness of the JRS gel. The values of lightness (L(∗)) for JRS and GRS with VBTLP decreased by 47.60 and 49.56%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that VBTLP caused looser matrices in dried JRS and GRS gels which had lower crystallinities compared with the control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro thrombolytic activity of Dhamasa (Fagonia arabica Linn.), Kushta (Saussurea lappa Decne.), and Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia Thunb.)

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shweta; Godatwar, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Reetu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic disorders are among the major fatal conditions affecting the society. Treatment modalities used for such disorders are either surgical interventions or use of drugs such as urokinase, streptokinase (SK), or tissue plasminogen activators to dissolve the blood clots. These modalities have their own limitations and side effects apart from being expensive. There is a need for safer and cost effective antithrombolytic agents. Aim: To evaluate in vitro thrombolytic property of Dhamasa (Fagonia arabica Linn.), Kushta (Saussurea lappa Decne.), and Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia Thunb.) plant extract. Materials and Methods: Venous blood drawn from 20 healthy volunteers was allowed to form clots which was weighed and treated with the extract of test plant materials to disrupt the clots. Weight of clot after and before treatment provided a percentage of clot lysis. SK was used as a positive and water as a negative control. Statistical Analysis Used: The significance between % clot lysis of five groups by means of weight difference was tested by the one-way ANOVA. Results: Clot lysis observed were 68.06%, 14.85%, 25.01%, 92.54%, and 3.00% for Dhamasa, Kushta, Guduchi, SK, and distilled water, respectively. Conclusion: Herbal extracts possess thrombolytic properties and lyse blood clots in vitro. PMID:27833372

  12. A Novel Biosurfactant Produced by Aureobasidium pullulans L3-GPY from a Tiger Lily Wild Flower, Lilium lancifolium Thunb.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Shik; Lee, In Kyoung; Yun, Bong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Yeast biosurfactants are important biotechnological products in the food industry, and they have medical and cosmeceutical applications owing to their specific modes of action, low toxicity, and applicability. Thus, we have isolated and examined biosurfactant-producing yeast for various industrial and medical applications. A rapid and simple method was developed to screen biosurfactant-producing yeasts for high production of eco-friendly biosurfactants. Using this method, several potential niches of biosurfactant-producing yeasts, such as wild flowers, were investigated. We successfully selected a yeast strain, L3-GPY, with potent surfactant activity from a tiger lily, Lilium lancifolium Thunb. Here, we report the first identification of strain L3-GPY as the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans. In addition, we isolated a new low-surface-tension chemical, designated glycerol-liamocin, from the culture supernatant of strain L3-GPY through consecutive chromatography steps, involving an ODS column, solvent partition, silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, and an ODS Sep-Pak cartridge column. The chemical structure of glycerol-liamocin, determined by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, indicates that it is a novel compound with the molecular formula C33H62O12. Furthermore, glycerol-liamocin exhibited potent biosurfactant activity (31 mN/m). These results suggest that glycerol-liamocin is a potential novel biosurfactantfor use in various industrial applications. PMID:25849549

  13. Stilbene glucoside from Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.: a novel natural inhibitor of advanced glycation end product formation by trapping of methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lishuang; Shao, Xi; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Derong; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2010-02-24

    Methylglyoxal (MGO), the reactive dicarbonyl intermediate generated during the nonenzymatic glycation between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins, lipids, and DNA, is the precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Many studies have shown that AGEs play a major pathogenic role in diabetes and its complications. This study found that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene 2-O-beta-D-glucoside (THSG), the major bioactive compound from Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., can efficiently inhibit the formation of AGEs in a dose-dependent manner by trapping reactive MGO under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). More than 60% MGO was trapped by THSG within 24 h, which was much more effective than resveratrol and its methylated derivative, pterostilbene, the two major bioactive dietary stilbenes. The major mono- and di-MGO adducts of THSG were successfully purified and found to be mixtures of tautomers. LC-MS and NMR data showed that positions 4 and 6 of the A ring were the major active sites for trapping MGO. It was also found that THSG could significantly inhibit the formation of AGEs in the human serum albumin (HSA)-MGO assay and both mono- and di-MGO adducts of THSG were detected in this assay using LC-MS. The results suggest that the ability of THSG to trap reactive dicarbonyl species makes it a potential natural inhibitor of AGEs.

  14. Inhibitory effects of viburnum dilatatum Thunb. (gamazumi) on oxidation and hyperglycemia in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kunihisa; Onodera, Akio; Matsue, Hajime

    2004-02-25

    The fruit of Viburnum dilatatum Thunb. (gamazumi) was found in a previous study to have strong radical scavenging activity. The present study investigated the antioxidative functions of gamazumi crude extract (GCE) in rats having diabetes induced by the administration of streptozotocin. In rats given water (H(2)O group), plasma levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and lipid peroxide (TBARS) and erythrocyte levels of TBARS increased with time over the experimental period of 10 weeks. These increases were inhibited in rats given GCE (GCE group). After 10 weeks, hepatic, renal, and pancreatic TBARS in the GCE group were significantly lower than those in the H(2)O group. GCE contains a high concentration of polyphenols, and it is expected that they are the active components. These results demonstrate that GCE has an inhibitory effect on the oxidative stress induced by diabetes and suggest that GCE may be useful for the prevention of diabetic complications. Furthermore, as the increase of plasma glucose and total cholesterol was inhibited in the GCE group, GCE may also have anti-hyperglycemic activity in diabetes.

  15. Anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. and its compounds: A perspective on its potential role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHAO, FUTAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to take a look at the anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HCT) that have been illustrated in the literature and to explore new fields in which HCT could be used in the future. The use of HCT has been described in broad inflammatory domains, where it has exhibited a variety of activities, including antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and immunostimulant activity, with high efficiency, mild features and definite therapeutic effects. The numerous anti-inflammatory functions of HCT have demonstrated that HCT has wide application prospects. New uses of HCT and the full extent of its utilization await further investigation. The basic pathological change of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is synovial proliferation which leads to joint destruction in the long-term. There are types of drugs that have been used clinically for patients with RA, however, due to their side-effects or high prices their broad usage is limited. A safe and low-cost drug is urgently required to be developed for the clinical usage of patients with RA. Thus, HCT has the potential to be a good candidate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26170903

  16. Rapid and quantitative determination of 10 major active components in Lonicera japonica Thunb. by ultrahigh pressure extraction-HPLC/DAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Lin, Changhu; Duan, Wenjuan; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Jianhua; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    An ultrahigh pressure extraction (UPE)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/diode array detector (DAD) method was established to evaluate the quality of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Ten active components, including neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, luteoloside, isochlorogenic acid B, isochlorogenic acid A, isochlorogenic acid C, and quercetin, were qualitatively evaluated and quantitatively determined. Scanning electron microscope images elucidated the bud surface microstructure and extraction mechanism. The optimal extraction conditions of the UPE were 60% methanol solution, 400 MPa of extraction pressure, 3 min of extraction time, and 1:30 (g/mL) solid:liquid ratio. Under the optimized conditions, the total extraction yield of 10 active components was 57.62 mg/g. All the components showed good linearity (r2 ≥ 0.9994) and recoveries. This method was successfully applied to quantify 10 components in 22 batches of L. japonica samples from different areas. Compared with heat reflux extraction and ultrasonic-assisted extraction, UPE can be considered as an alternative extraction technique for fast extraction of active ingredient from L. japonica.

  17. Houttuynia cordata Thunb fraction induces human leukemic Molt-4 cell apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Prommaban, Adchara; Kodchakorn, Kanchanok; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Banjerdpongchai, Ratana

    2012-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) is a native herb found in Southeast Asia which features various pharmacological activities against allergy, inflammation, viral and bacterial infection, and cancer. The aims of this study were to determine the cytotoxic effect of 6 fractions obtained from silica gel column chromatography of alcoholic HCT extract on human leukemic Molt-4 cells and demonstrate mechanisms of cell death. Six HCT fractions were cytotoxic to human lymphoblastic leukemic Molt-4 cells in a dose-dependent manner by MTT assay, fraction 4 exerting the greatest effects. Treatment with IC50 of HCT fraction 4 significantly induced Molt-4 apoptosis detected by annexinV-FITC/propidium iodide for externalization of phosphatidylserine to the outer layer of cell membrane. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential was reduced in HCT fraction 4-treated Molt-4 cells. Moreover, decreased expression of Bcl-xl and increased levels of Smac/Diablo, Bax and GRP78 proteins were noted on immunoblotting. In conclusion, HCT fraction 4 induces Molt-4 apoptosis cell through an endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  18. Identification of DNA-microsatellite markers for the characterization of somatic embryos in Quercus suber.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Garay, Arancha; Bueno, Angeles; Pintos, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear DNA-microsatellite markers led the possibility to characterize individually both Quercus suber trees and somatic embryos. The genotype inferred by SSR markers opens the possibility to obtain a fingerprint for clonal lines identification. Furthermore, allow to infer the origin of somatic embryos from haploid cells (microspores) or from diploid tissues. Using few SSR markers from other Quercus species and an automatic system based in fluorescence, it is possible to obtain a high discrimination power between genotypes. This method is sufficient to assign tissues to an individual tree with high statistical certainty. Nevertheless, it is necessary to take care to select the adequate DNA extraction method to avoid PCR inhibitors present in diverse Q. suber tissues.

  19. Rapid detection of Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in stained wood by PCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Uzunovic, A; Breuil, C

    1999-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple method was developed to detect the sapstain fungi Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in stained wood. By using microwave heating for DNA extraction and PCR with internal transcribed spacer-derived-specific primers, detection was feasible within 4 h, even with DNA obtained from a single synnema. This method can easily be extended for the detection of other wood-inhabiting fungi.

  20. [Fine spatial structure of allozyme genotypes in isolated population of pedunculate oak Quercus robur L. (Fagaceae)].

    PubMed

    Red'kina, N N; Mullagulov, R Iu; Ianbaev, Iu A; Degen, B

    2008-08-01

    The extent and spatial pattern of genetic variation at polymorphic allozyme loci in a population of pedunculate oak Quercus robur from the Bashkir Transural region was investigated using autocorrelation analysis. In the plantation examined, statistically significant local concentration of most of the alleles in two-dimensional space was identified. The measures for protection of this small population located outside of the western border of the species range, in the mountain--steppe habitat, and characterized by specific gene pool, are suggested.

  1. Terpenoid emissions from Quercus robur. A case study of Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Débora; Peñuelas, Josep; López-Mahía, Purificación; Llusià, Joan

    2009-06-01

    Isoprene and monoterpenes emission fluxes emitted by Quercus robur seedlings were measured at a leaf scale in the field. Isoprene emissions were always predominant over the monoterpene ones, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and camphene being the most abundant emitted monoterpenes. Emission fluxes were normalised at standard conditions of temperature and photosynthetically active radiation, PAR, (30 degrees C and 1000 micromol m(-2) s(-1) respectively) using temperature and light dependent algorithms. The standardised emission fluxes ranged from 43 to 73 microg g(DM)(-1) h(-1) for isoprene and from 0.04 to 2.95 microg g(DM)(-1) h(-1) for the monoterpenes. The values reported in the literature are within our experimental intervals. These standardised fluxes were used to estimate the Quercus robur emissions in Galicia (NW Spain). This region is characterised by its abundant forest extensions where Quercus robur occupies the second place in species abundance with a total of 195029 ha of Quercus robur pure stands. To estimate the region emission fluxes, both the extension and distribution of the forest areas and the regional climatic conditions over five years (2002-2006) were taken into account. The averaged annual fluxes regarding the forest extension were 0.04 t ha(-1) yr(-1) for isoprene and 0.52 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) for monoterpenes. This means averaged annual fluxes of 9730 t yr(-1) and 114 t yr(-1) for isoprene and monoterpenes, respectively. These values place Galicia as an important isoprene emitter power in Spain as a consequence of the extension of its forests more than of the climatic conditions.

  2. A Neighborhood Analysis of the Consequences of Quercus suber Decline for Regeneration Dynamics in Mediterranean Forests

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Beatriz; Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena; Stoll, Peter; Ávila, José M.; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M.; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-01-01

    In forests, the vulnerable seedling stage is largely influenced by the canopy, which modifies the surrounding environment. Consequently, any alteration in the characteristics of the canopy, such as those promoted by forest dieback, might impact regeneration dynamics. Our work analyzes the interaction between canopy neighbors and seedlings in Mediterranean forests affected by the decline of their dominant species (Quercus suber). Our objective was to understand how the impacts of neighbor trees and shrubs on recruitment could affect future dynamics of these declining forests. Seeds of the three dominant tree species (Quercus suber, Olea europaea and Quercus canariensis) were sown in six sites during two consecutive years. Using a spatially-explicit, neighborhood approach we developed models that explained the observed spatial variation in seedling emergence, survival, growth and photochemical efficiency as a function of the size, identity, health, abundance and distribution of adult trees and shrubs in the neighborhood. We found strong neighborhood effects for all the performance estimators, particularly seedling emergence and survival. Tree neighbors positively affected emergence, independently of species identity or health. Alternatively, seedling survival was much lower in neighborhoods dominated by defoliated and dead Q. suber trees than in neighborhoods dominated by healthy trees. For the two oak species, these negative effects were consistent over the three years of the experimental seedlings. These results indicate that ongoing changes in species’ relative abundance and canopy trees’ health might alter the successional trajectories of Mediterranean oak-forests through neighbor-specific impacts on seedlings. The recruitment failure of dominant late-successional oaks in the gaps opened after Q. suber death would indirectly favor the establishment of other coexisting woody species, such as drought-tolerant shrubs. This could lead current forests to shift

  3. A neighborhood analysis of the consequences of Quercus suber decline for regeneration dynamics in Mediterranean forests.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Beatriz; Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena; Stoll, Peter; Ávila, José M; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-01-01

    In forests, the vulnerable seedling stage is largely influenced by the canopy, which modifies the surrounding environment. Consequently, any alteration in the characteristics of the canopy, such as those promoted by forest dieback, might impact regeneration dynamics. Our work analyzes the interaction between canopy neighbors and seedlings in Mediterranean forests affected by the decline of their dominant species (Quercus suber). Our objective was to understand how the impacts of neighbor trees and shrubs on recruitment could affect future dynamics of these declining forests. Seeds of the three dominant tree species (Quercus suber, Olea europaea and Quercus canariensis) were sown in six sites during two consecutive years. Using a spatially-explicit, neighborhood approach we developed models that explained the observed spatial variation in seedling emergence, survival, growth and photochemical efficiency as a function of the size, identity, health, abundance and distribution of adult trees and shrubs in the neighborhood. We found strong neighborhood effects for all the performance estimators, particularly seedling emergence and survival. Tree neighbors positively affected emergence, independently of species identity or health. Alternatively, seedling survival was much lower in neighborhoods dominated by defoliated and dead Q. suber trees than in neighborhoods dominated by healthy trees. For the two oak species, these negative effects were consistent over the three years of the experimental seedlings. These results indicate that ongoing changes in species' relative abundance and canopy trees' health might alter the successional trajectories of Mediterranean oak-forests through neighbor-specific impacts on seedlings. The recruitment failure of dominant late-successional oaks in the gaps opened after Q. suber death would indirectly favor the establishment of other coexisting woody species, such as drought-tolerant shrubs. This could lead current forests to shift into

  4. Antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis (L), Quercus infectoria (Oliver) and Canthium parviflorum (Lam)

    PubMed Central

    Priya, P. Sathiya; Sasikumar, J.M.; Gowsigan, G.

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis, L., (Rutaceae), Quercus infectoria Oliver., (Fagaceae) and Canthium parviflorum Lam., (Rubiaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytocoa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. The experiment was carried out using disc diffusion method. The results revealed that the methanol extract of aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis (L) presented the highest zone of inhibition against tested pathogens. Other plants showed significant zone of inhibition. PMID:22557348

  5. Short-term response to waterlogging in Quercus petraea and Quercus robur: A study of the root hydraulic responses and the transcriptional pattern of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Rasheed-Depardieu, Claire; Parelle, Julien; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne; Parent, Claire; Capelli, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the short-term response to waterlogging in Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. and Quercus robur L. as the initial response towards their known long-term differences in tolerance to waterlogging. One-month old seedlings were subjected to hypoxic stress and leaf gas exchange, shoot water potential (Ψs) and root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) were measured. In parallel, the expression of nine aquaporins (AQPs) along the primary root was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed a similar reduction in net assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs) for the two species. Notably, the response of Lpr differed temporally between the two species. Q. robur seedlings exhibited a significant early decline of Lpr within the first 5 h that returned to control levels after 48 h, whereas Q. petraea seedlings showed a delayed response with a significant decrease of Lpr exhibited only after 48 h. Transcriptional profiling revealed that three genes (PIP1;3, TIP2;1 and TIP2;2) were differentially regulated under stress conditions in the two oak species. Taken together, these results suggested species-specific responses to short-term waterlogging in terms of root water transport.

  6. Apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading in Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior

    PubMed Central

    Lohaus, Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    Whereas most of the research on phloem loading is performed on herbaceous plants, less is known about phloem loading strategies in trees. In this study, the phloem loading mechanisms of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior were analysed. The following features were examined: the minor vein structure, the sugar concentrations in phloem sap by the laser–aphid–stylet technique, the distribution of photoassimilates in the mesophyll cells by non-aqueous fractionation, gradients of sugar concentrations and osmotic pressure, and the expression of sucrose transporters. The minor vein configurations of Q. robur and F. excelsior belong to the open type. Quercus robur contained companion cells in the minor veins whereas F. excelsior showed intermediary cells in addition to ordinary companion cells. The main carbon transport form in Q. robur was sucrose (~1M). In F. excelsior high amounts of raffinose and stachyose were also transported. However, in both tree species, the osmolality of phloem sap was higher than the osmolality of the mesophyll cells. The concentration gradients between phloem sap and the cytoplasm of mesophyll cells for sucrose were 16-fold and 14-fold for Q. robur and F. excelsior, respectively. Independent of the type of translocated sugars, sucrose transporter cDNAs were cloned from both species. The results indicate that phloem loading of sucrose and other metabolites must involve active loading steps in both tree species. Quercus robur seems to be an apoplastic phloem loader while F. excelsior shows indications of being a symplastic or mixed symplastic–apoplastic phloem loader. PMID:24591056

  7. Apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading in Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior.

    PubMed

    Oner-Sieben, Soner; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2014-04-01

    Whereas most of the research on phloem loading is performed on herbaceous plants, less is known about phloem loading strategies in trees. In this study, the phloem loading mechanisms of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior were analysed. The following features were examined: the minor vein structure, the sugar concentrations in phloem sap by the laser-aphid-stylet technique, the distribution of photoassimilates in the mesophyll cells by non-aqueous fractionation, gradients of sugar concentrations and osmotic pressure, and the expression of sucrose transporters. The minor vein configurations of Q. robur and F. excelsior belong to the open type. Quercus robur contained companion cells in the minor veins whereas F. excelsior showed intermediary cells in addition to ordinary companion cells. The main carbon transport form in Q. robur was sucrose (~1M). In F. excelsior high amounts of raffinose and stachyose were also transported. However, in both tree species, the osmolality of phloem sap was higher than the osmolality of the mesophyll cells. The concentration gradients between phloem sap and the cytoplasm of mesophyll cells for sucrose were 16-fold and 14-fold for Q. robur and F. excelsior, respectively. Independent of the type of translocated sugars, sucrose transporter cDNAs were cloned from both species. The results indicate that phloem loading of sucrose and other metabolites must involve active loading steps in both tree species. Quercus robur seems to be an apoplastic phloem loader while F. excelsior shows indications of being a symplastic or mixed symplastic-apoplastic phloem loader.

  8. Landscape genetics and population structure in Valley Oak (Quercus lobata Née).

    PubMed

    Ashley, Mary V; Abraham, Saji T; Backs, Janet R; Koenig, Walter D

    2015-12-01

    Although long-distance pollen movement is common in wind-pollinated trees, barriers to gene flow may occur in species that have discontinuous ranges or are confined to certain habitat types. We investigated the genetic structure of Quercus lobata Née populations throughout much of their range in California. We assessed the connectivity of populations and determined if barriers to gene flow occurred, and if so, if they corresponded to landscape features. We collected leaf samples from 270 trees from 12 stands of Quercus lobata and genotyped these trees using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Genetic structure and clustering was evaluated using genetic distance methods, Bayesian clustering approaches, and network analysis of spatial genetic structure. The southernmost population of Quercus lobata sampled from the Santa Monica area comprised a separate genetic cluster from the rest of the species, suggesting that Transverse Ranges such as the San Gabriel Mountains limit gene flow. Population differentiation among the other sites was small but significant. Network analysis reflected higher connectivity among populations along the Central Coast range, with few connections spanning the dry, low Central Valley. While long distance pollen movement has been shown to be common in oaks, on larger spatial scales, topographic features such as mountain ranges and the large, flat Central Valley of California limit gene flow. Such landscape features explain gene flow patterns much better than geographic distance alone. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  9. Absolute stereostructures of hovenidulciosides A1 and A2, bioactive novel triterpene glycosides from hoveniae semen seu fructus, the seeds and fruit of Hovenia dulcis Thunb.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Ueda, T; Muraoka, O; Aoyama, H; Matsuda, H; Shimoda, H; Yamahara, J; Murakami, N

    1995-03-01

    Two bioactive novel triterpene glycosides named hovenidulciosides A1 and A2 have been isolated from a Chinese natural medicine, Hoveniae Semen Seu Fructus, the seeds and fruit of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. (Rhamnaceae). The absolute stereostructures of hovenidulciosides A1 and A2 with a migrated 16,17-seco-dammarane skeleton have been determined on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence which included the X-ray crystallographic analysis of the p-bromobenzoate of their common aglycone, hovenidulcigenin A. Hovenidulciosides A1 and A2 exhibited inhibitory activity on the histamine release from rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 or calcium ionophore A-23187.

  10. Prevention of multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) diabetes in mice by an extract from gum resin of Boswellia serrata (BE).

    PubMed

    Shehata, Ahmed M; Quintanilla-Fend, L; Bettio, Sabrina; Singh, C B; Ammon, H P T

    2011-09-15

    Type 1-diabetes is an autoimmune disease, where a chronic inflammatory process finally causes β-cell death and insulin deficiency. Extracts from gum resin of Boswellia serrata (BE) have been shown to posses anti-inflammatory properties especially by targeting factors/mediators related to autoimmune diseases. Multiple low dose-streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatment is a method to induce diabetes in animals similar to Type 1 diabetes in humans. It was aimed to study whether or not a BE could prevent hyperglycemia, inflammation of pancreatic islets and increase of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood in MLD-STZ treated mice. In BK+/+ wild type mice, 5 days of daily treatment with 40 mg/kg STZ i.p. produced permanent increase of blood glucose, infiltration of lymphocytes into pancreatic islets (CD3-stain), apoptosis of periinsular cells (staining for activated caspase 3) after 10 days as well as shrinking of islet tissue after 35 days (H&E staining). This was associated with an increase of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1A, IL-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α) in the blood. Whereas BE alone did not affect blood glucose in non diabetic mice, in STZ treated mice simultaneous i.p. injection of 150 mg/kg of BE over 10 days prevented animals from increase of blood glucose levels. Histochemical studies showed, that i.p. injection of 150 mg/kg BE for 10 days starting with STZ treatment, avoided lymphocyte infiltration into islets, apoptosis of periinsular cells and shrinking of islet size 35 days after STZ. As far as the cytokines tested are concerned, there was a significant inhibition of the increase of G-CSF and GM-CSF. BE also significantly prevented the increase of IL-1A, IL-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α. It is concluded that extracts from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata prevent islet destruction and consequent hyperglycemia in an animal model of type 1

  11. Myricetin derived from Hovenia dulcis Thunb. ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in high choline-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianjun; Meng, Yonghong; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Ren, Daoyuan; Yang, Xingbin

    2015-05-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the protective effects of myricetin (MYR) purified from Hovenia dulcis Thunb. against vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice fed with 3% dietary choline water. MYR was shown to possess strong scavenging activities against DPPH˙, HO˙, and O2˙(-) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power in vitro. Mice fed 3% dietary choline water for 8 weeks significantly displayed vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver oxidative stress (p < 0.01). Furthermore, continuous administration of MYR at 400 and 800 mg per kg bw in choline-fed mice could significantly decrease the high choline diet-induced elevation of serum total cholesterol (TC), total triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), endothelin 1 (ET-1) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) levels as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, while the choline-induced decline of serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), endothelin nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) levels could be markedly elevated in mice (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, MYR at 400 and 800 mg per kg bw also increased hepatic total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and decreased hepatic malonaldehyde (MDA) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels in mice, relative to choline-treated mice (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). These results together with conventional haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Oil Red O staining observation of the liver and vascular tissues suggested that MYR exerted a significant protective role against high choline diet-induced endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice. This is the first report showing that high intake of dietary choline can induce liver damage and that MYR can ameliorate choline-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury.

  12. Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Activity by Inhibiting NF-κB Activation in BV-2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Ma, Shi-Xun; Ko, Yong-Hyun; Seo, Jee-Yeon; Lee, Bo-Ram; Lee, Taek Hwan; Kim, Sun Yeou; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. methanol extract (VBME) on microglial activation and to identify the underlying mechanisms of action of these effects. The anti-inflammatory properties of VBME were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells. We measured the production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as inflammatory parameters. We also examined the effect of VBME on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65). VBME significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of NO and PGE2 and LPS-mediated upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner; importantly, VBME was not cytotoxic. VBME also significantly reduced the generation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. In addition, VBME significantly dampened intracellular ROS production and suppressed NF-κB p65 translocation by blocking IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. Our findings indicate that VBME inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators in BV-2 microglial cells by suppressing NF-κB signaling. Thus, VBME may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases due to its ability to inhibit inflammatory mediator production in activated BV-2 microglial cells. PMID:27169820

  13. Effect of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb extract on high-fat diet-induced obesity and gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Nukitrangsan, Natthanan; Okabe, Takafumi; Toda, Takayoshi; Inafuku, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hironori; Oku, Hirosuke

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of the diet with Peucedanum japonicum Thunb (PJT) powder inhibits high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Either the fiber component or other bioactive components in the PJT powder may inhibit obesity. This study, therefore, was an attempt to identify the components, fiber or other phytochemicals of PJT that were responsible for the anti-obesity activity, and also studied the modulation of obesity-related gene expression in C57BL/6 mice. Animals were fed a modified-AIN76 diet supplemented with PJT powder or extracts of PJT in water, 50 % ethanol, or ethanol. Body weight gain, tissue weight, serum biochemical parameters, liver lipid concentrations, and gene expression in tissues were compared between the control and treatment groups. Of the extracts, the ethanol extract of PJT decreased fat accumulation and adipocyte size, reduced serum and liver triglyceride concentrations, and inhibited obesity. This finding clearly demonstrates the presence of anti-obesity phytochemicals in PJT. Ethanol extract of PJT inhibited lipase activity in vitro. Modulation of gene expression by PJT ethanol extract was largely similar to that by PJT powder in the hepatic and adipose tissues: RORC and PBEF1 were upregulated and DUSP1, INSIG2, and SERPINA12 were downregulated in the liver; FXRα and PPARγ were upregulated and PEG1/MEST, the size-marker of adipocytes, was downregulated in the adipose tissue. Furthermore, PJT ethanol extract increased the expression of the UCP3 gene in muscle. These results suggest that the anti-obesity phytochemicals in PJT lower lipid levels by inhibiting fat absorption and by modulating obesity-related gene expression in the liver, adipose tissue, and muscle.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a laccase gene potentially involved in proanthocyanidin polymerization in Oriental persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) fruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qianni; Luo, Chun; Zhang, Qinglin; Luo, Zhengrong

    2013-04-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs, condensed tannins) are important health-promoting phytochemicals that are abundant in many plants. Oriental persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) is an excellent source of PAs because of its unique ability to accumulate large quantities of these compounds in its young fruit. There are two different spontaneous mutant phenotypes of oriental persimmons which lose their astringent taste naturally on the tree; while plants without these mutations remain rich in soluble PAs until the fruit fully ripened. The mutations are referred to as pollination-constant non-astringent genotypes named J-PCNA and C-PCNA, and are from Japan and China respectively. In this work we speculated that the loss of astringency in C-PCNA fruit is due to the soluble PAs transferred into insoluble upon polymerization, which was quite different from that of the J-PCNA. A DkLAC1 gene was isolated by the homology-based clone method. The predicted protein product of this gene showed that the DkLAC1 is a plant laccase which is phylogenetically related to the known enzyme AtLAC15 involved in the polymerization of PAs. Expression patterns of PAs biosynthetic genes associated with soluble PAs contents in three types of Oriental persimmons. Expression levels of DkLAC1 in C-PCNA type plants were linked with the reduction of soluble PAs in the flesh of the fruit. In addition the cis-elements in the DkLAC1 promoter regions indicated that the gene might also be regulated by the DkMYB4 as is seen with other well-known structural genes in Oriental persimmon. We conclude that DkLAC1 is potentially involved in PA polymerization in C-PCNA during normal ripening in C-PCNA persimmon.

  15. Deep sequencing reveals transcriptome re-programming of Polygonum multiflorum thunb. roots to the elicitation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongchang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Junwen; Zhao, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    The phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been successfully used as an effective elicitor to enhance production of stilbenoid which is induced in plants as a secondary metabolite possibly in defense against herbivores and pathogens. However, the mechanism of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis remains unclear. Genomic information for Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (P. multiflorum) is currently unavailable. To obtain insight into the global regulation mechanism of MeJA in the steady state of stilbene glucoside production (26 h after MeJA elicitation), especially on stilbene glucoside biosynthesis, we sequenced the transcriptomes of MeJA-treated and untreated P. multiflorum roots and obtained more than 51 million clean reads, from which 79,565 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly. 56,972 unigenes were annotated against databases including Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG and COG. 18,677 genes expressed differentially between untreated and treated roots. Expression level analysis indicated that a large number of genes were associated with plant-pathogen interaction, plant hormone signal transduction, stilbenoid backbone biosynthesis, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. 15 known genes involved in the biosynthesis of stilbenoid backbone were found with 7 genes showing increased transcript abundance following elicitation of MeJA. The significantly up (down)-regulated changes of 70 genes in stilbenoid biosynthesis were validated by qRT-PCR assays and PCR product sequencing. According to the expression changes and the previously proposed enzyme functions, multiple candidates for the unknown steps in stilbene glucoside biosynthesis were identified. We also found some genes putatively involved in the transcription factors. This comprehensive description of gene expression information could greatly facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis in P. multiflorum roots. Our results shed new light on the global regulation

  16. Effect of different plant growth regulators on micro-tuber induction and plant regeneration of Pinellia ternate (Thunb) Briet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junli; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jue; Lu, Yuan; Xiao, Xuan; Gong, Weizhen; Liu, Jikai

    2009-10-01

    An efficient micropropagation system for Pinellia ternate (Thunb) Briet, a traditional Chinese medicinal plant, has been developed. Petiole and lamina of P. ternate were used as explants and cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing different concentrations of different plant growth regulators. The results indicated that low concentration of 2,4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) were suitable for micro-tuber induction, but callus induction rate increased with increasing concentrations of growth regulators. Tubers induction rates of petiole and leaf were (81.8 %-100 %) and (89.4 %-96.0 %) respectively, when 0.2 mg l(-1) 2, 4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid, indole-3-acetic acid or α-naphthalene acetic acid were present in the medium. Tubers induction rates of petiole and leaf cultured on MS medium supplemented with 0.2-0.5 mg l(-1) 6-benzyl amino purine (6-BAP) were (94.1 %-100 %) and (96.0 %-100 %) respectively. When the concentration of 2,4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid, α-naphthalene acetic acid and 6-benzyl amino purine was increased to 2.0 mg l(-1), callus induction rates of petiole and leaf were 100 % and 98.2 %, 91.0 % and 36.0 %, 62.3 % and 70.0 %, respectively. Different concentration of kinetin (KT) and zeatin (ZT) had no significant effect on micro-tuber induction of petiole. Most petioles showed polarity during the cultivation of explants, when supplemented with different concentrations of auxin or cytokinin in the MS medium.

  17. Saline stress enhanced accumulation of leaf phenolics in honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) without induction of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kun; Zhao, Shijie; Bian, Lanxing; Chen, Xiaobing

    2017-03-01

    Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is a traditional medicinal plant in Chinese, and chlorogenic acid and luteolosid are its specific bioactive phenolic compounds. This study was to investigate leaf antioxidant responses in honeysuckle to saline stress with emphasis on phenolics through hydroponic experiments and field trials. NaCl stress did not stimulate antioxidant system including superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate, and had no significant effect on lipid peroxidation in the leaves. Consistently, no inhibition on photochemical capacity of photosystems suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) was maintained at a normal level under NaCl stress. However, leaf phenolic synthesis was activated by NaCl stress, indicated by elevated genes transcription and activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and increased phenolics concentration. Specifically, leaf chlorogenic acid concentration was increased by 67.43% and 48.86% after 15 days of 150 and 300 mM NaCl stress, and the increase of luteolosid concentration was 54.26% and 39.74%. The accumulated phenolics hardly helped detoxify ROS in vivo in absence of oxidative stress, but the elevated phenolic synthesis might restrict ROS generation by consuming reduction equivalents. As with NaCl stress, soil salinity also increased concentrations of leaf phenolics including chlorogenic acid and luteolosid without exacerbated lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, leaf phenolics accumulation is a mechanism for the acclimation to saline stress probably by preventing oxidative stress in honeysuckle; leaf medicinal quality of honeysuckle can be improved by saline stress due to the accumulation of bioactive phenolic compounds.

  18. Managing ulcerative colitis in remission phase: usefulness of Casperome®, an innovative lecithin-based delivery system of Boswellia serrata extract.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, L; Milano, E; Franceschi, F; Belcaro, G; Gizzi, G; Feragalli, B; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Togni, S; Eggenhoffner, R; Giacomelli, L

    2016-06-01

    Boswellia serrata extracts (BSE) have been traditionally used for the treatment of several inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel delivery form of BSE (Casperome®) in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) during minimally symptomatic remission phase. In this open-label, observational, registry study, informed participants with UC in remission phase (n = 43) freely decided to receive the oral daily Casperome® supplementation (n = 22) or no supplementation (n = 21) for 4 weeks. Several parameters associated with minimally symptomatic UC in remission were evaluated at the inclusion and the end of the study. A significant beneficial effect of Casperome® was observed for all the parameters evaluated, namely: diffuse intestinal pain, evident and occult blood in stools, bowel movements and cramps, watery stools, malaise, anemia, rectal involvement, number of white blood cells as well as need for concomitant drugs and medical attention. Faecal concentration of calprotectin, a marker of bowel inflammation, resulted ameliorated in Casperome® supplemented patients. Our study showed that Casperome® supplementation attenuates symptoms associated with mild UC in remission, reducing the use of drugs and medical consultations. Therefore, our study suggests that Casperome® supplementation could represent a promising alternative approach to manage minimally symptomatic UC and maintain the remission phase.

  19. Differentiation of leaf and whole-plant samples of di- and tetraploid Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino using flow-injection mass spectrometric(FIMS) fingerprinting method combined with chemometric approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the present study, the feasibility and advantages of employing a flow-injection mass spectrometry (FIMS) fingerprinting method combined with chemometric analyses for assessment of di- and tetraploid leaf and whole-plant Gynostemma. pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino samples were investigated for the fi...

  20. Differentiation of leaf and whole-plant samples of di- and tetraploid Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino using flow-injection mass spectrometric(FIMS) fingerprinting method combined with chemometric approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the present study, the feasibility and advantages of employing a flow-injection mass spectrometry (FIMS) fingerprinting method combined with chemometric analyses for quality assessment of di- and tetraploid leaf and whole-plant Gynostemma. pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino samples were investigated fo...

  1. [Analysis of flavonoids and components of stems & leaves of Ranunculus ternatus Thunb. using ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole tandem time of flight mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chi, Yumei; Li, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qinxia; Cui, Xiaobing

    2013-09-01

    In order to explore the applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technology in the rapid identification of components of Chinese herbal medicines and natural products, reference flavones were used as precursors, and the stems and leaves of medicinal plant Ranunculus ternatus Thunb. were used as the objects. Ultra performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector-electrospray ionization quadrupole tandem time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/DAD-ESI/Q-TOF MS) was also used to analyse the characteristics of flavonoid homologues and flavonoid isomers. The results showed that ultraviolet (UV) absorption and MS/MS spectra of C-glycosyl were distinct from O-glycosyl. There was also a correlation between glycosidation positions and the retention times, MS/MS fragments and their relative abundances. When applied it to analyse the alcohol extract of stems and leaves of Ranunculus ternatus Thunb. and their acid hydrolysis solution, 22 flavonol glycosides and 3 flavonoid aglycones were identified. The method is simple, convenient and exercisable.

  2. Rapid quantification of four major bioactive alkaloids in Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. by pressurised liquid extraction combined with liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Han, Chao; Jiang, Yongxiang; Zhou, Xiujin; Zhu, Zhenou; Lei, Xinxiang

    2011-05-30

    A new method based on pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) followed by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-QTrap-MS) analysis has been developed for the identification and quantification of four major alkaloids in extracts of Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. PLE extractions were performed using 90% ethanol; temperature was set at 100°C and pressure at 1500 psi. HPLC analysis was performed on a Waters XBridge™ C(18) column (150 mm × 2.1mm i.d., 3.5 μm) eluted by a mobile phase of acetonitrile and 0.2% acetic acid. Data acquisition was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring transitions (MRMs) mode, monitoring two MRM transitions to ensure an accurate identification of target compounds in the samples. Additional identification and confirmation of target compounds were performed using the enhanced product ion modus (EPI) of the linear ion trap. The novel LC-QTrap-MS platform offers the best sensitivity and specificity for characterization and quantitative determination of the four alkaloids in C. decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. and fulfils the quality criteria for routine laboratory application.

  3. Tree ring-based reconstruction of annual precipitation in the South-Central United State from 1750 to 1980. [Quercus stellata; Quercus alba

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Stahle, D.W.; Duvick, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    A 231-year reconstruction of annual precipitation, from 1750 through 1980 A.D., was developed from 10 tree ring chronologies (9 post oak, Quercus stellata, and 1 white oak, Q. alba, series) in the south-central United States. Straight line regression was used to calibrate regionally averaged precipitation with ring width data, and the derived reconstruction was verified with independent climatic data and historical evidence. A variance trend in the tree ring data, which may have resulted from nonclimatic factors, was removed. The reconstructed precipitation series indicates that (1) a drought which appears to have been more severe than any in the instrumental record occurred about 1860 and (2) severe and prolonged droughts comparable to twentieth century events have occurred at roughly 15- to 25-years intervals throughout the past 231 years. It follows that serious droughts in the south-central United States could be expected to recur even in the absence of projected CO/sub 2/-induced warming.

  4. Interactive effects of shade and irrigation on the performance of seedlings of three Mediterranean Quercus species.

    PubMed

    Castro-Díez, Pilar; Navarro, Javier; Pintado, Ana; Sancho, Leopoldo G; Maestro, Melchor

    2006-03-01

    Shade and irrigation are frequently used to increase the success of Mediterranean Quercus spp. plantations. However, there is controversy about the combined effects of these treatments on plant performance. We assessed the effects of two irradiances (full sunlight and moderate shade) and two summer watering regimes (high (daily) and low (alternate days)) on leaf and whole-plant traits of 1-year-old seedlings of Quercus coccifera, Q. ilex subsp. ballota and Q. faginea grown outdoors for 8.5 months. Leaf traits included measures of morphology, nitrogen concentration, gas exchange and photochemical efficiency, and measures of whole-plant traits included biomass allocation patterns, growth phenology, across-summer leaf area change and relative growth rate (RGR). Moderate shade reduced leaf mass per area, increased photochemical efficiency, maximum carbon assimilation rate (Amax) and allocation to leaves, and prolonged the growing period in one or more of the species. Daily watering in summer increased Amax of Q. ilex and prolonged the growing period of Q. ilex and Q. faginea. Both treatments tended to increase RGR. The effect of shade was greater in the low-watering regime than in the high-watering regime for two of the 15 studied traits, with treatment effects being independent for the remaining 13 traits. Leaf nitrogen and the ability to maintain leaf area after the arid period, rather than biomass allocation traits, explained the variation in seedling RGR. Trait responsiveness to the treatments was low and similar among species and between study scales, being unexpectedly low in Q. faginea leaves. This may be because selective pressures on leaf plasticity act differently in deciduous and evergreen species. We conclude that moderate shade and daily summer watering enhance the performance of Mediterranean Quercus seedlings through species-specific mechanisms.

  5. Insect-oak interactions with coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) and Engelmann oak (Q. engelmannii) at the acorn and seedling stage

    Treesearch

    Connell E. Dunning; Timothy D. Paine; Richard A. Redak

    2002-01-01

    We determined the impact of insects on both acorns and seedlings of coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia Nee) and Engelmann oak (Quercus engelmannii E. Greene). Our goals were to (1) identify insects feeding on acorns and levels of insect damage, and (2) measure performance and preference of a generalist leaf-feeding insect herbivore...

  6. Molecular differentiation and diversity among the California red oaks (Fagaceae; Quercus section Lobatae).

    PubMed

    Dodd, Richard S; Kashani, Nasser

    2003-09-01

    A recent epidemic of Phytopthora (Sudden Oak Death) in coastal woodlands of California is causing severe mortality in some oak species belonging to the red oak (Lobatae) group. To predict the risks of spread of this disease, an understanding of the relationships among California's red oak species and of their population genetic structure is needed. We focus here on relationships among the four species of red oak. Whereas morphological distinction of Quercus wislizeni and Quercus parvula can pose problems, Quercus kelloggii and Quercus agrifolia in pure forms are easily distinguishable from one another and from Q. wislizeni and Q. parvula in the field. However, hybrids among all species combinations are known to occur in nature and these can confound data from ecological studies. Our results revealed greatest differentiation of the deciduous Q. kelloggii, with only weak AFLP fragment differentiation of the three remaining evergreen species. The molecular data suggest a closer affinity of Q. agrifolia with Q. wislizeni and Q. parvula contrary to earlier suggestions that its origins are likely to have been with northern deciduous oaks probably through a common ancestor with Q. kelloggii. Interior and coastal populations of Q. wislizeni separated in dendrograms based on phenetic and genetic distances suggesting probable isolation in different glacial refugia. The position of Q. parvula remains ambiguous, having a closer affinity with interior populations of Q. wislizeni and with Q. agrifolia, than with coastal populations of Q. wislizeni. Mean population differentiation in Q. wislizeni was 0.18, which is somewhat higher than the average for other oak species, suggesting that range fragmentation has occurred in the past, resulting in a metapopulation structure. Our results provide evidence that introgression among these species may be causing reticulation, further confounding species separation. Whereas Phytopthora has been reported on Q. agrifolia, Q. parvula and Q

  7. Genetic transformation of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) for herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Rubén; Alvarez, José M; Humara, Jaime M; Revilla, Angeles; Ordás, Ricardo J

    2009-09-01

    The bar gene was introduced into the cork oak genome. Cork oak embryogenic masses were transformed using the Agrobacterium strain AGL1 which carried the plasmid pBINUbiBar. This vector harbours the genes, nptII and bar, the latter under control of the maize ubiquitin promoter. The transgenic embryogenic lines were cryopreserved. Varying activities of phosphinothricin acetyl transferase were detected among the lines, which carried 1-4 copies of the insert. Molecular and biochemical assays confirmed the stability and expression of the transgenes 3 months after thawing the cultures. These results demonstrate genetic engineering of herbicide tolerance in Quercus spp.

  8. A new cycloartane nortriterpenoid from stem and leaf of Quercus variabilis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ling-Yun; Wang, Jing; Lv, Chong-Ning; Xu, Tan-Ye; Jia, Ben-Zhi; Lu, Jin-Cai

    2013-09-01

    A new compound 3-acetyloxy-epicycloeucalenol-24-one (1), with 11 known compounds 3α-acetyloxy-4α,14α-dimethyl-9β,19-cycloergost-24-oic acid (2), 3-epicycloeucalenol (3), 3-epicycloeucalenyl-24-one (4), 3-epicycloeucalenyl acetate (5), 4β,14α-dimethyl-5α-ergosta-9β,19-cyclo-24(31)-en-3β-hydroxy-4α-carboxylic acid (6), cycloeucalenone (7), friedelin (8), epifriedelanol (9), lup-20 (29)-en-3β,30-diol (10), betulin (11), lupeol (12), was isolated from the stems and leaves of Quercus variabilis Blume. Seven compounds (1-7) showed anti-inflammatory activity.

  9. Phellinus caribaeo-quercicolus sp. nov., parasitic on Quercus cubana: taxonomy and preliminary phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Decock, Cony; Herrera Figueroa, Sara; Robledo, Gerardo; Castillo, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Phellinus caribaeo-quercicolus sp. nov. is described from several collections made in western Cuba, so far exclusively on Quercus cubana. The species is characterized by a perennial, resupinate basidiomes, cushion-shaped to nodulose and multi-layered when old, apically hooked to hamate hymenial setae, and ellipsoid to broadly ellipsoid, thin- to thick-walled, hyaline to faintly yellowish basidiospores, 4.5-5.5 x 3.5-4.5 microm. The species is compared to other Phellinus species with hooked setae, especially Phellinus undulatus, also recorded in Cuba. The preliminary phylogenetic relationships of Ph. caribaeo-quercicolus within the poroid Hymenochaetales complex of genera is presented and discussed here.

  10. Assessment of sensitization to holm oak (Quercus ilex) pollen in the Mérida area (Spain).

    PubMed

    Prados, M; Aragon, R; Carranco, M I; Martinez, A; Martinez, J

    1995-05-01

    Sensitization to Quercus ilex (holm oak) was studied in 760 patients with clinically suspected sensitization to aeroallergens. Prick tests with commercial extracts of Q. ilex proved positive in 27 patients; none were monosensitive. Nasal and conjunctival provocation tests and specific IgE (RAST) performed with Q. ilex extracts in these patients were negative in all but one patient, who exhibited specific IgE titer (by RAST) of 7 PRU/ml (class 3). We conclude that Q. ilex pollen, though obtained in considerable quantities by our collector, does not cause allergies in our area.

  11. Ectomycorrhizal association of three Lactarius species with Carpinus and Quercus trees in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Lamus, Valentina; Montoya, Leticia; Aguilar, Carlos J; Bandala, Victor M; Ramos, David

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are being monitored in the Santuario del Bosque de Niebla in the central region of Veracruz (eastern Mexico). Based on the comparison of DNA sequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips, we discovered the EM symbiosis of Lactarius indigo, L. areolatus and L. strigosipes with Carpinus caroliniana, Quercus xalapensis and Quercus spp. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). Descriptions coupled with photographs of ectomycorrhizas and basidiomes are presented.

  12. Insights into the molecular mechanisms of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb-induced liver injury: a computational systems toxicology approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Yin; Li, Jie; Wu, Zeng-Rui; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Qin; Cai, Ying-Chun; Liu, Gui-Xia; Li, Wei-Hua; Tang, Yun

    2017-02-27

    An increasing number of cases of herb-induced liver injury (HILI) have been reported, presenting new clinical challenges. In this study, taking Polygonum multiflorum Thunb (PmT) as an example, we proposed a computational systems toxicology approach to explore the molecular mechanisms of HILI. First, the chemical components of PmT were extracted from 3 main TCM databases as well as the literature related to natural products. Then, the known targets were collected through data integration, and the potential compound-target interactions (CTIs) were predicted using our substructure-drug-target network-based inference (SDTNBI) method. After screening for hepatotoxicity-related genes by assessing the symptoms of HILI, a compound-target interaction network was constructed. A scoring function, namely, Ascore, was developed to estimate the toxicity of chemicals in the liver. We conducted network analysis to determine the possible mechanisms of the biphasic effects using the analysis tools, including BiNGO, pathway enrichment, organ distribution analysis and predictions of interactions with CYP450 enzymes. Among the chemical components of PmT, 54 components with good intestinal absorption were used for analysis, and 2939 CTIs were obtained. After analyzing the mRNA expression data in the BioGPS database, 1599 CTIs and 125 targets related to liver diseases were identified. In the top 15 compounds, seven with Ascore values >3000 (emodin, quercetin, apigenin, resveratrol, gallic acid, kaempferol and luteolin) were obviously associated with hepatotoxicity. The results from the pathway enrichment analysis suggest that multiple interactions between apoptosis and metabolism may underlie PmT-induced liver injury. Many of the pathways have been verified in specific compounds, such as glutathione metabolism, cytochrome P450 metabolism, and the p53 pathway, among others. Hepatitis symptoms, the perturbation of nine bile acids and yellow or tawny urine also had corresponding pathways

  13. In Vitro Antibacterial and Time-Kill Evaluation of the Erythrina caffra Thunb. Extract against Bacteria Associated with Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso Olusola; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of stem bark ethanolic extract of Erythrina caffra Thunb. against bacteria in diarrhoea was determined in vitro by the agar diffusion and dilution, macrobroth dilution, and time-kill assay methods. The result showed that the extract produced inhibition zones ranging between 15 ± 1.0 mm and 23 ± 1.0 mm, and the bacteria were susceptible at concentrations ranging between ≤100 and ≤1000 μg/mL. While the MICs of the extract ranged between 39.1 and 625 μg/mL, and the MBCs ranged between 78.1 and 625 μg/mL, the MICs of Micrococcus luteus, Proteus vulgaris CSIR 0030, Enterococcus faecalis KZN, and Staphylococcus aureus OK3 were less than 100 μg/mL, and the mechanisms of antibiosis indicated that the crude ethanolic extract was highly bactericidal against the entire test bacteria isolates. In the time-kill assay, the average log reduction of the viable cell count ranged between 0.916log 10 and 1.851log 10 cfu/mL on incubating the bacteria for 4 h at the MICs, while the reduction ranged between 0.183log 10 and 1.105log 10 cfu/mL after 8 h of incubation. Incubating the bacteria for 4 h at 2 × MICs resulted in the reduction of the viable cell count to between −0.264log 10 and 0.961log 10 cfu/mL, while the average log reduction ranged between −3.968log 10 and −0.425log 10 cfu/mL after 8 h of incubation with Micrococcus luteus, Proteus vulgaris CSIR 0030, and Staphylococcus aureus OK3 being the most highly affected bacteria. The result showed that the extract exhibited broader-spectrum antibacterial activity and justifies the use of Erythrina caffra in the folkloric medicine for treating gastrointestinal infections in South Africa. PMID:23213297

  14. Clonal population structure and genetic variation in sand-shinnery oak,Quercus havardii (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Mayes, S G; McGinley, M A; Werth, C R

    1998-11-01

    We investigated clonal population structure and genetic variation in Quercus havardii (sand-shinnery oak), a deciduous rhizomatous shrub that dominates vegetation by forming uninterrupted expanses of ground cover over sandy deposits on the plains of western Texas, western Oklahoma, and eastern New Mexico. Isozyme electrophoresis (15 loci coding 11 enzymes) was used to recognize and map clones arrayed in a 2000-m transect (50-m sample intervals) and a 200 × 190 m grid (10-m sample intervals). Ninety-four clones were discovered, 38 in the transect and 56 in the grid, resulting in an estimated density of ∼15 clones per hectare. Clones varied greatly in size (∼100-7000 m), shape, and degree of fragmentation. The larger clones possessed massive interiors free of intergrowth by other clones, while the smaller clones varied in degree of intergrowth. The population maintained substantial levels of genetic variation (P = 60%, A = 2.5, H(exp) = 0.289) comparable to values obtained for other Quercus spp. and for other long-lived perennials. The population was outcrossing as evidenced by conformance of most loci to Hardy-Weinberg expected genotype proportions, although exceptions indicated a limited degree of population substructuring. These data indicate that despite apparent reproduction primarily through vegetative means, Q. havardii possesses conventional attributes of a sexual population.

  15. Polyphenol deposition in leaf hairs of Olea europaea (Oleaceae) and Quercus ilex (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Karabourniotis, G; Kofidis, G; Fasseas, C; Liakoura, V; Drossopoulos, I

    1998-07-01

    The subcellular localization (cytoplasm, vacuoles, cell walls) of polyphenol compounds during the development of the multicellular nonglandular leaf hairs of Olea europaea (scales) and Quercus ilex (stellates), was investigated. Hairs of all developmental stages were treated with specific inducers of polyphenol fluorescence, and the bright yellow-green fluorescence of individual hairs was monitored with epifluorescence microscopy. During the early ontogenetic stages, bright fluorescence was emitted from the cytoplasm of the cells composing the multicellular shield of the scales of O. europaea. Transmission electron micrographs of the same stages showed that these cells possessed poor vacuolation and thin cell walls. The nucleus of these cells may be protected against ultraviolet-B radiation damage. The progressive vacuolation that occurred during maturation was followed by a shifting of the bright green-yellow fluorescence from the perinuclear region and the cytoplasm to the cell walls. The same trends were observed during the development of the nonglandular stellate hairs of Quercus ilex, in which maturation was also accompanied by a considerable secondary thickening of the cell walls. Despite the differences in morphology, high concentrations of polyphenol compounds are initially located mainly in the cytoplasm of the developing nonglandular hairs, and their deposition on the cell walls takes place during the secondary cell wall thickening. These structural changes during the development of the leaf hairs make them a very effective barrier against abiotic (uv-B radiation) and probably biotic (pathogenic) stresses.

  16. Isolation of antibacterial compounds from Quercus dilatata L. through bioassay guided fractionation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Four medicinal plants (Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreng, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., Ephedra gerardiana Wall. ex Stapf, and Quercus dilatata L.) used by indigenous healers to treat various infectious diseases were selected for the present study. The major objective of the present study was isolation and characterization of antimicrobial components from the crude plant extracts using bioassay guided fractionation. Methods Seven methanolic extracts of the four plants were screened to identify any antimicrobial agents present in them. The active crude plant extract was fractionated first by solvent partitioning and then by HPLC. Characterization of the active fractions was done by using spectrophotometer. Results All the seven methanolic extracts showed low antifungal activity, however, when these extracts were tested for antibacterial activity, significant activity was exhibited by two extracts. The extract of aerial parts of Q. dilatata was most active and therefore, was selected for further analysis. Initially fractionation was done by solvent-solvent partitioning and out of six partitioned fractions, ethanol fraction was selected on the basis of results of antibacterial activity and phytochemical analysis. Further, fractionation was carried out by RP- HPLC and purified active subfractions were characterized by comparing their absorption spectra with that of the known natural products isolated from the plants of Quercus genus. Discussion and conclusion The results suggest that this is the first report of the isolated antibacterial compounds from this genus. PMID:22554280

  17. Comparative of Quercus spp. and Salix spp. for phytoremediation of Pb/Zn mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang; Wang, Shufeng; Sun, Haijing; Chen, Yitai; Wang, Dongxue; Pan, Hongwei; Zou, Yazhu; Liu, Jianfeng; Zheng, Linyu; Zhao, Xiulian; Jiang, Zeping

    2017-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using tree seedlings for the phytoremediation of lead/zinc (Pb/Zn) mine tailings. Seedlings of three Quercus spp. (Q. shumardii, Q. phellos, and Q. virginiana) and rooted cuttings of two Salix spp. (S. matsudana and S. integra) were transplanted into pots containing 50 and 100 % Pb/Zn mine tailings to evaluate their tolerance of heavy metals. The five species showed different tolerance levels to the Pb/Zn tailings treatments. Q. virginiana was highly tolerant to heavy metals and grew normally in the Pb/Zn tailings. The root systems showed marked differences between the Quercus spp. and Salix spp., indicating that different mechanisms operated to confer tolerance of heavy metals. The maximum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry value of the five species showed no differences among the treatments, except for Q. shumardii. All species showed low metal translocation factors (TFs). However, S. integra had significantly higher TF values for Zn (1.42-2.18) and cadmium (1.03-1.45) than did the other species. In this respect, Q. virginiana showed the highest tolerance and a low TF, implying that it is a candidate for phytostabilization of mine tailings in southern China. S. integra may be useful for phytoextraction of tailings in temperate regions.

  18. Quercus ilex L.: How season, Plant Organ and Extraction Procedure Can Influence Chemistry and Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Lila; Babou, Louiza; Zaidi, Farid; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Grosso, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Quercus species have a plethora of applications, either in wine and wood industries, in human and animal nutrition or in human health. In order to improve the knowledge on this genus, the aim of the present study was to correlate, for the first time, the phenolic composition of different Quercus ilex L. plant tissues (leaves in two maturation stages, acorns, teguments and cotyledons) and different extraction procedures with scavenging and anticholinesterase activities. The hydromethanolic and aqueous extracts obtained showed strong radical scavenging activity against DPPH, superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide radical, leaves exhibiting higher total phenolic content and revealing the best antioxidant properties, followed by tegument and acorns. Concerning the phenolic profile, fifteen compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-DAD, ranging from 1568.43 to 45,803.16 mg/kg dried extract. The results indicate that Q. ilex can be a source of strong antioxidant phenolic compounds with possible interest for food and pharmaceutical industries.

  19. Particulate Matter deposition on Quercus ilex leaves in an industrial city of central Italy.

    PubMed

    Sgrigna, G; Sæbø, A; Gawronski, S; Popek, R; Calfapietra, C

    2015-02-01

    A number of studies have focused on urban trees to understand their mitigation capacity of air pollution. In this study particulate matter (PM) deposition on Quercus ilex leaves was quantitatively analyzed in four districts of the City of Terni (Italy) for three periods of the year. Fine (between 0.2 and 2.5 μm) and Large (between 2.5 and 10 μm) PM fractions were analyzed. Mean PM deposition value on Quercus ilex leaves was 20.6 μg cm(-2). Variations in PM deposition correlated with distance to main roads and downwind position relatively to industrial area. Epicuticular waxes were measured and related to accumulated PM. For Fine PM deposited in waxes we observed a higher value (40% of total Fine PM) than Large PM (4% of total Large PM). Results from this study allow to increase our understanding about air pollution interactions with urban vegetation and could be hopefully taken into account when guidelines for local urban green management are realized.

  20. Photosynthesis of Quercus suber is affected by atmospheric NH3 generated by multifunctional agrosystems.

    PubMed

    Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Da Silva, Anabela Bernardes; Flexas, Jaume; Dias, Teresa; Zarrouk, Olfa; Martins-Loução, Maria Amélia; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Cruz, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Montados are evergreen oak woodlands dominated by Quercus species, which are considered to be key to biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services. This ecosystem is often used for cattle breeding in most regions of the Iberian Peninsula, which causes plants to receive extra nitrogen as ammonia (NH(3)) through the atmosphere. The effect of this atmospheric NH(3) (NH(3atm)) on ecosystems is still under discussion. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an NH(3atm) concentration gradient downwind of a cattle barn in a Montado area. Leaves from the selected Quercus suber L. trees along the gradient showed a clear influence of the NH(3) on δ(13)C, as a consequence of a strong limitation on the photosynthetic machinery by a reduction of both stomatal and mesophyll conductance. A detailed study of the impact of NH(3atm) on the photosynthetic performance of Q. suber trees is presented, and new mechanisms by which NH(3) affects photosynthesis at the leaf level are suggested.

  1. Effect of magnetite nanoparticles on the germination and early growth of Quercus macdougallii.

    PubMed

    Pariona, Nicolaza; Martínez, Arturo I; Hernandez-Flores, Homero; Clark-Tapia, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    The present study measures the effect of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) on the germination and early growth of Quercus macdougallii (oak). Two types of Fe3O4-NPs were synthetized and characterized, being denominated NP1 and NP2. The synthesis was performed by the co-precipitation method and partial reduction of iron(II), respectively. It was found that the NP1 has a quasi-spherical morphology, with sizes of 6-10nm, while the NP2 has sizes between 65 and 160nm. It was demonstrated that the Fe3O4-NPs exhibit peroxidase-like catalytic activity. Experiments of germination and growth of Quercus macdougallii were performed using the synthesized Fe3O4-NPs treatments and a deionized water control. The experiments were performed in intact and peeled acorns. The application of the NPs increased the germination up to 33% in relation to the control. Additionally, the Fe3O4-NPs treatments increased the growth, dry biomass, and chlorophyll concentration. The data obtained in this study suggest that Fe3O4-NPs treatments could be potentially used to improve conservation and reforestation of threatened forestry species.

  2. [Effects of soil water regimes on the growth of Quercus mongolica seedlings in Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Li, Qiurong; Hao, Zhanqing; Dong, Baili

    2004-10-01

    This paper studied the response of the seedlings of Quercus mongolica, one of the dominant tree species in Changbai Mountains, to the artificially controlled three soil water gradients, including their morphology, biomass and photosynthetic characteristics. The results indicated that various water regimes significantly affected the biomass and its distribution pattern in the leaves, branches and roots, as well as the leaf gas exchange. Under soil water stress, the crown structure changed, and the tree height, groundline diameter, single leaf area, and aboveground and belowground biomass were inhibited. As soil water content decreased, the ratio of belowground and aboveground biomass dry weight significantly increased. Water stress had a negative effect on net photosynthetic rate, CO2 use efficiency and carbon use efficiency. The responses of stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and water use efficiency to water stress were complicated. Only at low soil water content, the stomatal conductance and transpiration rate significantly decreased, while water use efficiency increased. It was demonstrated that Quercus mongolica was the tree species with variable resistance to drought, and the resistance could be improved by long-term soil water stress.

  3. [Niche characteristics of plant populations in Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata stands in Qinling Mountains].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonghua; Lei, Ruide; He, Xingyuan; Jia, Xia

    2004-06-01

    Based on the data collected from 31 plots and using Levins, Hurlbert and Pianka formulas, this paper calculated and analyzed the niche breadths and overlaps of 24 tree and 29 shrub populations in Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata stands in Mt. Qinling, Shaanxi. The results showed that the Levins and Hurlbert's niche breadths of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata , Pinus armandi, Toxicodendron vernicifluum, Populus davidiana and Pinus tabulaeformis in arbor layer were 3.695, 1.695, 1.325, 0.840, 0.702 and 0.036, 0.299, 0.568, 1.721, 2.701 respectively, and those of Corrylus heterophylla, Lespedeza formosa and Smilax vaginata in shrub layer were 1.833, 1.466, 0.984 and 0.111, 0.300, 0.594, respectively. In general, the niche overlaps between the species with bigger niche breadth and other species were higher, and those of the species having similar environmental requirements were also higher.

  4. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Mohammad; Kamali-Ardakani, Razieh; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG), shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs) gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old) were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks) and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Results: Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. Conclusion: This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs. PMID:27222832

  5. Toll-like receptor of mud crab, Scylla serrata: molecular characterisation, ontogeny and functional expression analysis following ligand exposure, and bacterial and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Vidya, R; Paria, Anutosh; Deepika, A; Sreedharan, K; Makesh, M; Purushothaman, C S; Chaudhari, Aparna; Gireesh Babu, P; Rajendran, K V

    2014-10-01

    Toll-like receptors are sentinels of innate immune system, which recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and subsequently activate production of antimicrobial peptides to contain the infection. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a Toll gene from Scylla serrata (SsToll) encoding 1005 amino acids with typical Toll-like receptor domain topology. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that it belongs to insect-type invertebrate Toll family showing 100 % identity with Scylla paramamosain (SpToll). The expression pattern of mRNA in different tissues indicated that SsToll is constitutively expressed in all the tissues examined, with varying expression levels. The expression was also detected in all the life-stages (egg, zoea stages 1-5, megalopa and crab instar) with the highest level observed in zoea 2. In-vitro studies using crab haemocyte culture demonstrated that SsToll transcripts are distinctly modulated in response to ligands such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide at all time-points. A significant change in SsToll expression was also noticed in haemocytes exposed to poly I:C (3-9 h). On the contrary, the transcription level of SsToll in response to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge was noticeably different. The change in expression in vitro was not significant at early time-points until 3 h; the transcripts showed a significant up-regulation commencing from 6 h, but not beyond 12 h. However, in vivo expression was unaffected at early time-points of WSSV challenge (until 12 h) and a gradual up-regulation was detected at 24 h. In-vivo challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus resulted in delayed up-regulation of the gene. The results obtained in the present study suggest that SsToll might be involved in the innate immunity of mud crab.

  6. Co-analgesic therapy for arthroscopic supraspinatus tendon repair pain using a dietary supplement containing Boswellia serrata and Curcuma longa: a prospective randomized placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Merolla, G; Dellabiancia, F; Ingardia, A; Paladini, P; Porcellini, G

    2015-09-01

    The cuff tendon that is most prone to full-thickness rotator cuff tears is the supraspinatus (SSP). Arthroscopic SSP repair ensures good to satisfactory mid- to long-term clinical outcomes. However, the intense postoperative pain reduces rehabilitation compliance and is cause of patient dissatisfaction. Many natural compounds act by inhibiting inflammatory pathways in a similar way to anti-inflammatory drugs This was a prospective randomized trial designed to assess the analgesic effect of a dietary supplement (DS) containing Boswellia serrata and Curcuma longa in a population of subjects with full-thickness SSP tendon tear treated by arthroscopy. Three weeks before surgery, patients were randomized to receive Tendisulfur(®) (group T) or a placebo (group P) for 2 months. The primary outcome measure was subjective VAS pain. Secondary outcomes measures were Constant-Murley score simple shoulder test, and patient global assessment (PGA) scores. Patients were assessed immediately at baseline and subsequently at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. Stratification of pain scores and subscores demonstrated significantly lower overall pain scores in group T versus group P at 1 week (p = 0.0477), and lower but not significantly different scores on week 2 (p = 0.0988); at subsequent time points, differences were not significant (p > 0.05). PGA scores were good in all subjects. In conclusion, this study provides objective data on the effect of a DS containing natural substances, added to standard analgesics, on postoperative RC pain. DS alleviated short and partially mid-term pain, while long-term pain was unchanged. This limitation can probably be addressed by a dosage increase over the first 4 weeks and by extending treatment by 1 or 2 months.

  7. Movardol® (N-acetylglucosamine, Boswellia serrata, ginger) supplementation in the management of knee osteoarthritis: preliminary results from a 6-month registry study.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, G; Belcaro, G; Feragalli, B; Cornelli, U; Cotellese, R; Hu, S; Dugall, M

    2016-12-01

    Knee Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic disease caused by the deterioration of cartilage in joints, which results in activation of the inflammatory response, pain, and impaired movement. Complementary therapies, particularly supplementation, in the management of moderate/severe knee OA have been gaining attention. This registry study aimed at evaluating the synergistic effect of Movardol®, a supplementation containing active ingredients with recognized anti-inflammatory activities on symptoms and levels of circulating biomarkers of knee OA. 54 subjects with symptomatic, moderate knee OA freely decided to follow either a standard management (SM) (n = 26) or SM plus oral supplementation with Movardol® (n = 28). Movardol® supplementation containing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, ginger, and Boswellia Serrata extract was taken at the following dosage: 3 tablets/day for one week and then 2 tablets/day. Several parameters were assessed at inclusion and after 1, 3 and 6 months: functional impairment by the Karnofsky Performance Scale Index; pain, stiffness, physical, social and emotional functions by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC); total and pain-free walking distance; circulating biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Significant improvements in the functional outcomes and pain-free walking distance were observed after 1, 3 and 6 months in OA patients supplemented with Movardol®. Moreover, all the signs/symptoms of disease assessed by the WOMAC tended to regress over a 6-month period in patients following SM+supplementation. Inflammatory markers and plasmatic content of reactive oxygen species decreased over 6 months, in supplemented patients. Movardol® supplementation resulted to be safe and well tolerated, also showing the beneficial effect in term of a decrease in pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments and, consequently, reduction in management costs. These preliminary results indicate the efficacy and

  8. Boswellia serrata acts on cerebral edema in patients irradiated for brain tumors: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kirste, Simon; Treier, Markus; Wehrle, Sabine Jolie; Becker, Gerhild; Abdel-Tawab, Mona; Gerbeth, Kathleen; Hug, Martin Johannes; Lubrich, Beate; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Momm, Felix

    2011-08-15

    Patients irradiated for brain tumors often suffer from cerebral edema and are usually treated with dexamethasone, which has various side effects. To investigate the activity of Boswellia serrata (BS) in radiotherapy-related edema, we conducted a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot trial. Forty-four patients with primary or secondary malignant cerebral tumors were randomly assigned to radiotherapy plus either BS 4200 mg/day or placebo. The volume of cerebral edema in the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence was analyzed as a primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were toxicity, cognitive function, quality of life, and the need for antiedematous (dexamethasone) medication. Blood samples were taken to analyze the serum concentration of boswellic acids (AKBA and KBA). Compared with baseline and if measured immediately after the end of radiotherapy and BS/placebo treatment, a reduction of cerebral edema of >75% was found in 60% of patients receiving BS and in 26% of patients receiving placebo (P = .023). These findings may be based on an additional antitumor effect. There were no severe adverse events in either group. In the BS group, 6 patients reported minor gastrointestinal discomfort. BS did not have a significant impact on quality of life or cognitive function. The dexamethasone dose during radiotherapy in both groups was not statistically different. Boswellic acids could be detected in patients' serum. BS significantly reduced cerebral edema measured by MRI in the study population. BS could potentially be steroid-sparing for patients receiving brain irradiation. Our findings will need to be further validated in larger studies. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  9. The large-leaved Kudingcha (Ilex latifolia Thunb and Ilex kudingcha C.J. Tseng): a traditional Chinese tea with plentiful secondary metabolites and potential biological activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xu, Li J; Ma, Gui Z; Dong, Yin M; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Pei G

    2013-07-01

    In China, Kudingcha has been used for almost 2,000 years as a tea to quench thirst, remove phlegm, refresh the mind, and improve eyesight. The group of large-leaved Kudingcha is coveted for its potential effects on lipid metabolism, which are attributed to the presence of characteristic ingredients. This contribution reviews studies from the past few decades regarding the plant characteristics, ethnobotanical usages, chemical constituents, and related biological activities of the large-leaved Kudingcha (Ilex latifolia Thunb and Ilex kudingcha C.J. Tseng). Triterpenoids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, and essential oils are the main metabolites in the large-leaved Kudingcha, and these ingredients protect the vascular system, regulate lipid metabolism, and have antioxidant, hypoglycemic, and anti-tumor effects. Moreover, large-leaved Kudingcha shares several properties with the popular green tea and the Yerba maté from South America.

  10. Preparative isolation and purification of celastrol from Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. by a new counter-current chromatography method with an upright coil planet centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shihua; Sun, Cuirong; Wang, Kuiwu; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2004-02-27

    A new counter-current chromatography (CCC) method with an upright coil planet centrifuge, which holds four identical multilayer coil columns in the symmetrical positions around the centrifuge axis, was applied to the isolation and purification of celastrol from the roots of Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. The crude celastrol was obtained by elution with light petroleum from ethanol extracts using 15 cm x 5 cm i.d. silica gel flash chromatography. Preparative CCC with a two-phase system composed of light petroleum (bp 60-90 degrees C)-ethyl acetate-tetrachloromethane-methanol-water (1:1:8:6:1, v/v) was successfully performed, yielding 798 mg celastrol at 99.5% purity from 1020 mg of the crude sample in one step separation.

  11. To prune or not to prune: responses of coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia to canopy retention during transplanting

    Treesearch

    Rosi Dagit; A. James Downer

    2002-01-01

    A total of 62 coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia) were monitored since they were initially boxed for transplantation in 1993. At that time, only branches injured during the moving process and deadwood were removed, leaving the entire canopy intact. This was a departure from the usual transplanting methodology that traditionally removes up to 70...

  12. Recalcitrant Behavior of Cherrybark Oak Seed: An FT-IR Study of Desiccation Sensitivity in Quercus pagoda Raf. Acorns

    Treesearch

    Sharon Sowa; Kristina F. Connor

    2003-01-01

    The recalcitrant behavior of cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) acorns was examined in terms of effects of moisture content on seed storage longevity and (short term) seed germination. Seed samples collected over two consecutive years were fully hydrated, then subjected to drying under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity on the...

  13. Composition, structure, and dendroecology of an old-growth Quercus forest on the tablelands of the Cumberland Plateau, USA.

    Treesearch

    Justin L. Hart; Stacy L. Clark; Scott J. Torreano; Megan L. Buchanan

    2011-01-01

    Forest reconstructions provide information on the processes that influence forest development and successional patterns. In this study, we quantified woody species composition, stand structure, and radial growth patterns of individual Quercus trees to document the processes that shaped a forest on the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee over the past three centuries. The...

  14. High-light acclimation in Quercus robur L.seedlings upon over-topped a shaded environment

    Treesearch

    Anna M. Jensen; Emile S. Gardiner; Kevin C. Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    High developmental plasticity at the seedling-level during acclimation to the light environment may be an important determinant of seedling establishment and growth in temperate broadleaf forests, especially in dense understories where spatial light availability can vary greatly. Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) seedlings were raised beneath a...

  15. Photosynthesis and xanthophyll cycle-mediated photoprotection in leaves of Quercus rubra and Q. alba seedlings of different light environments

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; Dianpeng Xu; Paul P. Kormanik; Clanton C. Black

    1997-01-01

    Two and three years after the outplanting of 1-0 northern red oak (Quercus rubra, NRO) and white oak (Q. alba, WO) nursery stocks, the highest net photosynthetic rates (Amax) were observed from seedlings growing on a clearcut site, followed by those under a pine stand. Both NRO and WO...

  16. Potential effects of sudden oak death on small mammals and herpetofauna in coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia woodlands

    Treesearch

    Douglas J. Tempel; William D. Tietje

    2006-01-01

    Within San Luis Obispo County, California, coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) woodlands provide important habitat for many wildlife species (see Tietje and others, this volume). Unfortunately, many of these woodlands are at high risk of sudden oak death (SOD) infection should the pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) become established...

  17. The effects of silvicultural thinning and Lymantria dispar L. defoliation on wood volume growth of Quercus spp.

    Treesearch

    Mary Ann Fajvan; Kurt W. Gottschalk

    2012-01-01

    Pre- and post-defoliation radial growth rates were used to examine the effects of silvicultural thinning and two consecutive years of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) defoliation on Quercus spp. wood volume production. In the first phase of the study, tree rings from 65 dissected stems, were used to develop polynomial models to...

  18. Does habitat matter in an urbanized landscape? The birds of the Garry oak (Quercus garryana) ecosystem of southeastern Vancouver Island

    Treesearch

    Richard E. Feldman; Pamela G. Krannitz

    2002-01-01

    Garry oak (Quercus garryana) was once a dominant habitat type on southeastern Vancouver Island, British Columbia but urbanization has severely fragmented and reduced its occurrence. This study tests whether bird abundance in remnant patches of Garry oak and adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is related to Garry oak volume...

  19. The influence of cultural treatments of the long-term survival and growth of planted Quercus rubra

    Treesearch

    James J. Zaczek; Kim C. Steiner

    2011-01-01

    A northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) plantation testing 20 nursery stock and planting methods was used to evaluate treatments 3, 6, 10, and 17 years after planting. Survival over all treatments was 92 percent at age 3 and declined to 74 percent, 56 percent, and 39 percent at ages 6, 10, and 17, respectively. At age 17, survival was highest for...

  20. Comparative gas-exchange in leaves of intact and clipped, natural and planted cherybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Lockhart; John D. Hodges

    1994-01-01

    Gas-exchange measurements, including CO2-exchange rate (net photosynthesis), stomatal conductance, and transpiration, were conducted on intact and clipped cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings growing inthe field and in a nursery bed. Seedlings inthe field, released frommidstory and understory woody competition, showed...

  1. Comparative gas-exchange in leaves of intact and clipped, natural and planted cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Lockhart; John D. Hodges

    2005-01-01

    Gas-exchange measurements, including C022-exchange rate (net photosynthesis), stomatal conductance, and transpiration, were conducted on intact and clipped cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings growing in the field and in a nursery bed. Seedlings in the field, released from midstory and understory woody competition,...

  2. Effects of above- and below-ground competition from shrubs on photosynthesis, transpiration and growth in Quercus robur L

    Treesearch

    Anna M. Jensen; Magnus Lof; Emile S. Gardiner

    2011-01-01

    For a tree seedling to successfully establish in dense shrubbery, it must maintain function under heterogeneous resource availability. We evaluated leaf-level acclimation in photosynthetic capacity, seedling-level transpiration, and seedling morphology and growth to gain an understanding of the effects of above- and below-ground competition on Quercus robur seedlings....

  3. Historical jigsaw puzzles: piecing together the understory of Garry Oak (Quercus garryana) ecosystems and the implications for restoration

    Treesearch

    Carrina Maslovat

    2002-01-01

    Ecosystem restoration requires a set of reference vegetation conditions which are difficult to find for Garry oak (Quercus garryana) ecosystems in Canada because contemporary sites have been drastically altered. A survey of historical information provides only limited clues about the original understory vegetation. Although there is considerable...

  4. Distribution of Quercus agrifolia mycorrhizae deep within weathered bedrock: a potential mechanism for transport of stored water

    Treesearch

    M. Bornyasz; R. Graham; M. Allen

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern California, Quercus agrifolia distribution closely matches regions of granitic regolith. High annual evapotranspiration demand and inherent shallow soil conditions lead to a dependence on a deep rooting system and an ability to access water from deep within the regolith. Most of the plant available water in weathered granitic rock is...

  5. Interactive effects of O3 exposure on California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.) seedlings with and without N amendment

    Treesearch

    T. Handley; Nancy Grulke

    2008-01-01

    We examined the short-term separate and combined effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition (fertilization) and ozone (O3) exposure on California black oak seedlings (Quercus kelloggii Newb.), an ecologically important tree of the San Bernardino Mountains downwind of Los Angeles. Realistic concentrations of O3...

  6. Gas chromatograph analysis on closed air and nitrogen oxide storage atmospheres of recalcitrant seeds of Quercus Alba

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Storage of recalcitrant seeds remains an unsolved problem. This study investigated the quantitative gas analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O) and air atmospheres on the recalcitrant seeds of Quercus alba by using gas chromatograph. Ten seeds were placed in each sealed atmospheric system of air and 98/2% N...

  7. Evaluation of antioxidative, protective effect against H2O2 induced cytotoxicity, and cytotoxic activities of three different Quercus species.

    PubMed

    Söhretoğlu, Didem; Sabuncuoğlu, Suna; Harput, U Şebnem

    2012-02-01

    Quercus species are used as antidiarrheic, for the treatment of hemorrhoid, oral and anal mucosa inflammation. These tree species have been of interest to researchers because of their usage in folk medicine, consumption as food, beverage and especially usage of oak woods for construction in wine barrels. The DPPH, SO and NO radical scavenging activities, protective effect against H2O2 induced cytotoxicity as well as their cytotoxic activity against Hep-2 human larynx epidermoid carcinoma cell line of the MeOH and water extracts of the barks of Quercus cerris var. cerris, Quercusmacranthera subsp. syspirensis and Quercus aucheri were investigated for the first time. Total phenolic content of the extracts was also evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu method. Results demonstrated that the extracts showed strong radical scavenging activity comparable to those of standard compounds. Extracts also showed good protective effect against H2O2 induced cytotoxicity on human erythrocytes comparing to ascorbic acid. On the other hand, while each extract showed dose dependent cytotoxic activity, MeOH extract of Q.macranthera subsp. syspirensis showed the strongest cytotoxicity against the tested cell line. Taken together, the results showed that Quercus species may be a promising alternative to synthetic substances as natural compound with high antioxidant and antiproliferative activities.

  8. Winter variation in physiological status of cold stored and freshly lifted semi-evergreen quercus nigra seedlings

    Treesearch

    Rosa C. Goodman; Douglass F. Jacobs; Kent G. Apostol; Barrett C. Wilson; Emile S. Gardiner

    2009-01-01

    Water oak (Quercus nigra L.) is a tardily deciduous species commonly planted in afforestation projects in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA. Field performance is often marked by low survival rates and top dieback, which may be associated with poor physiological quality of planting stock.

  9. Previously unrecorded damage to oak, Quercus spp., in southern California by the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Tom W. Coleman; Steven Seybold

    2008-01-01

    A new and potentially devastating pest of oaks, Quercus spp., has been discovered in southern California. The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), colonizes the sapwood surface and phloem of the main stem and larger branches of at least three species of...

  10. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  11. Progress report on the evaluation of the susceptibility of the holm oak (Quercus ilex) forest ecosystem to Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Eduardo Moralejo; Enrique Descals

    2006-01-01

    In preliminary studies on the susceptibility of plant members of the holm oak (Quercus ilex) forest, detached leaves of several woody species were highly susceptible when inoculated with zoospore suspensions of local isolates of Phytophthora ramorum (Moralejo and Hernández 2002). Since then, there have been reports of natural...

  12. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  13. Shade, leaf growth, and crown development of Quercus rubra, Q. velutina, Prunus serotina, and Acer rubrum seedlings

    Treesearch

    Kurt W. Gottschalk

    1994-01-01

    The study was conducted in an open field to detennine the optimum irradiance for establishment and growth of two oak species and two major associated woody species. Half-sib seedlings of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and black oak (Q. velutina Lam.) were grown for two years under shade-clotht...

  14. Early results from a newly-established provenance test in Valley Oak (Quercus lobata) show significant population differentiation

    Treesearch

    Jessica W. Wright; Victoria L. Sork

    2017-01-01

    Valley oak (Quercus lobata) is a majestic, endemic California native oak, found throughout California's foothills, valleys and flood plains. It is threatened because: Contracted range due to housing and agriculture.Low recruitment in existing stands as a function of land use and...

  15. Midstory shelterwood to promote natural Quercus reproduction on the Mid-Cumberland Plateau, Alabama: Status four years after final harvest

    Treesearch

    Callie J. Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey

    2017-01-01

    In 2001, we initiated a study in Jackson County, AL, to examine shelterwood prescriptions in mixed mesophytic upland hardwood forests located on the escarpment of the mid-Cumberland Plateau. We were particularly interested in testing a shelterwood method that was successfully applied in other upland hardwood systems to recruit Quercus into...

  16. Agrilus auroguttatus exit hole distributions on Quercus agrifolia boles and a sampling method to estimate their density on individual trees

    Treesearch

    Laurel J. Haavik; Tom W. Coleman; Mary Louise Flint; Robert C. Venette; Steven J. Seybold

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, invasive phloem and wood borers have become important pests in North America. To aid tree sampling and survey efforts for the newly introduced goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), we examined spatial patterns of exit holes on the boles (trunks) of 58 coast live oak, Quercus...

  17. Post-fire monitoring of coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia) burned in the 1993 Old Topanga Fire

    Treesearch

    Rosi Dagit

    2002-01-01

    The intensity of the 1993 Old Topanga Fire raised many concerns about the recovery and response of the coast live oak trees (Quercus agrifolia) and their understory vegetation. Preliminary information on the status of the trees 6 months post-fire has been previously reported. This report provides follow up assessment of the condition of the 90 trees...

  18. Coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, susceptibility and response to goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus, injury in southern California

    Treesearch

    Tom W. Coleman; Nancy E. Grulke; Miles Daly; Cesar Godinez; Susan L. Schilling; Philip J. Riggan; Steven J. Seybold

    2011-01-01

    Oak mortality is often associated with a complex of decline factors. We describe the morphological and physiological responses of coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née, in California to an invasive insect, the goldspotted oak borer (GSOB), Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and evaluate drought as a...

  19. Historical Mortality of Valley Oak (Quercus lobata, Nee) in the Santa Ynez Valley, Santa Barbara County, 1938-1989

    Treesearch

    Rodney W. Brown; Frank W. Davis

    1991-01-01

    The range and abundance of valley oak (Quercus lobata, Nee) have steadily decreased in the last 100 years due to low rates of regeneration during this period. Documented low rates of sapling recruitment must be compared to adult mortality rates in order to evaluate the severity of this decline. The purpose of this research is to measure and analyze...

  20. Heritability of first-order-lateral roots in five Quercus species: effect on 1-0 seedling quality evaluation

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; Taryn L. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Scott Schlarbaum

    1997-01-01

    Heritability estimates (h2) were calculated for first-order lateral root (FOLR) numbers on a family plot mean basis for 5 Quercus species: Q. alba, Q. falcata, Q, michauxii, Q. pagoda, and Q. rubra. All species were grown with the...

  1. Effect of simulated insect damage on growth and survival of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings

    Treesearch

    Susan L. Wright; Richard W. Hall; John W. Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Effects of simulated insect damage—artificial defoliation and root damage in combination with two levels of watering—were studied to determine the potential effect on northern red oak seedlings (Quercus rubra L.). Treatments and treatment combinations caused significant differences in stem diameter, percentage of stem dieback, and mortality....

  2. Establishing a range-wide provenance test in valley oak (Quercus lobata Née) at two California sites

    Treesearch

    Annette Delfino-Mix; Jessica W. Wright; Paul F. Gugger; Christina Liang; Victoria L. Sork

    2015-01-01

    We present the methods used to establish a provenance test in valley oak, Quercus lobata. Nearly 11,000 acorns were planted and 88 percent of those germinated. The resulting seedlings were measured after 1 and 2 years of growth, and were outplanted in the field in the winter of 2014-2015. This test represents a long-term resource for both research...

  3. Root desiccation and drought stress responses of bareroot Quercus rubra seedlings treated with a hydrophilic polymer root dip

    Treesearch

    Kent G. Apostol; Douglass F. Jacobs; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2009-01-01

    Root hydrogel, a hydrophilic polymer, has been used to improve transplanting success of bareroot conifer seedlings through effects on water holding capacity. We examined mechanisms by which Terra-sorb Fine Hydrogel reduces damage that occurs when roots of 1-year old, dormant northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) were subjected to shortterm (1, 3, and 5...

  4. Photosynthesis and water relations of the mistletoe, Phoradendron villosum, and its host, the California valley oak, Quercus lobata

    Treesearch

    David Y. Hollinger

    1983-01-01

    Water vapor and CO2 exchange characteristics were studied in Phoradendron villosum, a hemiparasitic mistletoe and its host, Quercus lobata. The hemiparasite had stomatal conductances equal to or higher than the host but a much lower capacity to fix carbon. Respiration was high in the mistletoe relative to...

  5. Rooting stem cuttings of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) utilizing hedged stump sprouts formed on recently felled trees

    Treesearch

    Matthew H. Gocke; Daniel J. Robinson

    2010-01-01

    The ability to root stem cuttings collected from hedged stump sprouts formed on recently felled trees was evaluated for 26 codominant northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) trees growing in Durham County, NC. Sprouting occurred, the same year as felling, on 23 of the 26 tree stumps and sprout number was significantly and positively correlated with stump diameter. The...

  6. Genetic differentiation of two California red oak species, Quercus parvula var. shreveii and Q. wislizeni, based on AFLP genetic markers

    Treesearch

    Nasser Kashani; Richard S. Dodd

    2002-01-01

    Oaks are renowned for posing problems in defining species boundaries. One example is the case of the interior live oak complex that is usually taken to include two varieties of Quercus wislizeni from the Coast Ranges of California and the Sierra Nevada, and Q. parvula var. shreveii from the central coast of...

  7. Influence of winter-spring livestock grazing on survival and growth of Quercus lobata and Q. agrifolia seedlings

    Treesearch

    Claudia M. Tyler; Bruce E. Mahall; Frank W. Davis

    2008-01-01

    The relative importance of livestock grazing in limiting or enhancing oak recruitment remains unclear because results from previous studies have been contradictory. In Santa Barbara County, we have replicated large-scale planting experiments from 1997 to 2001 to determine the effects of cattle and other factors on seedling establishment of valley oak (Quercus...

  8. Field performance of Quercus bicolor established as repeatedly air-root-pruned container and bareroot planting stock

    Treesearch

    J.W." Jerry" Van Sambeek; Larry D. Godsey; William D. Walter; Harold E. Garrett; John P. Dwyer

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of repeated air-root-pruning of seedlings when stepping up to progressively larger containers include excellent lateral root distribution immediately below the root collar and an exceptionally fibrous root ball. To evaluate long-term field performance of repeatedly air-root-pruned container stock, three plantings of swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor...

  9. Pyrosequencing of the northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) chloroplast genome reveals high quality polymorphisms for population management

    Treesearch

    Lisa W. Alexander; Keith E. Woeste

    2014-01-01

    Given the low intraspecific chloroplast diversity detected in northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), more powerful genetic tools are necessary to accurately characterize Q. rubra chloroplast diversity and structure. We report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of the chloroplast genome of northern red oak via pyrosequencing and...

  10. Artificial regeneration of major oak (Quercus) species in the eastern United States - a review of the literature

    Treesearch

    Daniel C. Dey; Douglass Jacobs; Ken McNabb; Gary W. Miller; V. Baldwin; G. Foster

    2008-01-01

    Although natural regeneration is often the best method for establishing new oak (Quercus spp.) stands, there are increasingly more situations in which high potential for oak regeneration failure dictates the use of artificial regeneration including direct seeding and planting seedlings. Additionally, afforestation planting programs frequently...

  11. Comparative pharmacokinetic study of two boswellic acids in normal and arthritic rat plasma after oral administration of Boswellia serrata extract or Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Chenning; Wu, Yun; Ai, Yu; Lee, David Y-W; Dai, Ronghua

    2014-10-01

    Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), a Chinese herbal formula composed of 11 different herbs, has been used traditionally for the treatment of arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the pharmacokinetic profile of its anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds has not been elucidated. Boswellic acids are the bioactive compounds with potent anti-inflammatory activity isolated from Boswellia serrate which is one of the 11 herbs of HLXLD. The objective of the study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of the two bioactive bowsellic acids: 11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic following oral administration of HLXLD or Boswellia serrata extract alone in normal and arthritic rats. An LC-MS method was developed and validated for the determination of 11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic in the comparative pharmacokinetic study. The results showed that there were significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between normal and arthritic groups. Interestingly, the absorptions of two boswellic acids were significantly higher in HLXLD than Boswellia serrata extract alone, indicating the synergistic effect of other herbal ingredients in HLXLD. This comparative pharmacokinetic study provided direct evidence supporting the notion that the efficacy of a complex mixture such as HLXLD is better than that of single components in treating human diseases.

  12. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in Ranunculus ternatus Thunb by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic one-step extraction-derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hanying; Liu, Ruilin; Wang, Dejin; Yuan, Jing; Xu, Shengjie; Zhang, Zhiqi

    2013-03-01

    A rapid and simple microwave-ultrasonic synergistic one-step extraction-derivatization (MUED) method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was established for the determination of low content fatty acids (FAs) profile in Ranunculus ternatus Thunb. The critical experimental parameters for MUED method were optimized with response surface methodology by taking the chromatographic peak areas of total FAs as a major response index. The best technological parameters were determined as 5.0 g of Ranunculus ternatus Thunb. powder, 50.0 mL of n-hexane, 500 W of microwave power, 50 degree C of reaction temperature, 0.30 g of catalyst (KOH), 4.0 mL of derivatization reagent (methanol) and the time of extraction-derivatization of 8 min. The contents of individual FAs were quantified by internal standard method. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of the total FAs and the total unsaturated FAs contents obtained with MUED were (3.327 +/- 0.023) x 10(7) (n = 3) and (13.59 +/- 0.30) mg/g (n = 3) respectively. They were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method which were (2.410 +/- 0.036) x 10(7) (n = 3) and (12.05 +/- 0.34) mg/g (n = 3) respectively. The MUED method simplified the complicated sample handling steps, shortened the sample preparation time, reduced the cost of analysis, and improved the extraction and derivatization efficiency of the lipids, especially weakened the oxidization and decomposition of the unsaturated FAs. The simplicity, speed and practicability suggest the proposed method has significant potential for the determination of lowcontent FAs in herbal medicines.

  13. [Evapotranspiration of natural Quercus litaotungensis and Tilia paucicostata secondary stands in Liupan Mountains of Ningxia].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wang, Yanhui; Yu, Pengtao; Zhong, Shi; Zhenxi, Shen; Guo, Mingchun

    2005-09-01

    With heat dissipation probe technique and combined with microlysimeter and hydrological methods, this paper studied the evapotranspiration of secondary Quercus liaotungensis and Tilia paucicostata stands, and its relationship to forest structure from August to September 2004. The results indicated that the stem sap flux density (SFD) of Quercus liaotungensis and Tilia paucicostata changed regularly from day to night in later growth season. In relatively still period (nighttime), the SFD kept low values continuously, usually below 0.05 microl x cm(-2). min(-1), while in active period (daytime), it increased quickly, usually below 0.25 microl x cm(-2) x min(-1). The daily transpiration of whole-tree was estimated based on the calculation of daily cumulative SFD, which showed that there existed a significant difference between two tree species. The daily transpiration of Quercus liaotungensis reached 5.31 and 2.48 L x d(-1) in sunny- and cloudy-days, 2.35 and 3.75 folds as that of Tilia paucicostata, respectively. There was no significant difference in daily leaf transpiration rate between these two shrub species. During measurement periods, the average daily stand evapotranspiration was 1.45 mm x d(-1), including transpiration (0.72 mm x d(-1)), soil evaporation (0.19 mm x d(-1)), and canopy interception (0.54 mm x d(-1)), which accounted for 49.6%, 13.3% and 37.1% of the total evapotranspiration, respectively. The results showed that the difference of whole-tree transpiration between tree species contributed significantly to the difference of tree canopy transpiration, while the difference of shrub canopy transpiration was on account of the leaf amount in the canopy. The effects of vertical layers in the stand on total stand evapotranspiration also differed, with a percentage of 65.8%, 20.9% and 13.3% for tree canopy, shrub canopy and floor, respectively, which meant that the transpiration and interception of tree canopy contributed most to the total

  14. Quantitative analysis of steroidal glycosides in different organs of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Munafo, John P; Gianfagna, Thomas J

    2011-02-09

    The bulbs of the Easter lily ( Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) are regularly consumed in Asia as both food and medicine, and the beautiful white flowers are appreciated worldwide as an attractive ornamental. The Easter lily is a rich source of steroidal glycosides, a group of compounds that may be responsible for some of the traditional medicinal uses of lilies. Since the appearance of recent reports on the role steroidal glycosides in animal and human health, there is increasing interest in the concentration of these natural products in plant-derived foods. A LC-MS/MS method performed in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for the quantitative analysis of two steroidal glycoalkaloids and three furostanol saponins, in the different organs of L. longiflorum. The highest concentrations of the total five steroidal glycosides were 12.02 ± 0.36, 10.09 ± 0.23, and 9.36 ± 0.27 mg/g dry weight in flower buds, lower stems, and leaves, respectively. The highest concentrations of the two steroidal glycoalkaloids were 8.49 ± 0.3, 6.91 ± 0.22, and 5.83 ± 0.15 mg/g dry weight in flower buds, leaves, and bulbs, respectively. In contrast, the highest concentrations of the three furostanol saponins were 4.87 ± 0.13, 4.37 ± 0.07, and 3.53 ± 0.06 mg/g dry weight in lower stems, fleshy roots, and flower buds, respectively. The steroidal glycoalkaloids were detected in higher concentrations as compared to the furostanol saponins in all of the plant organs except the roots. The ratio of the steroidal glycoalkaloids to furostanol saponins was higher in the plant organs exposed to light and decreased in proportion from the aboveground organs to the underground organs. Additionally, histological staining of bulb scales revealed differential furostanol accumulation in the basal plate, bulb scale epidermal cells, and vascular bundles, with little or no staining in the mesophyll of the bulb scale. An understanding of the distribution of steroidal glycosides in the different

  15. Larvicidal activity of oak Quercus infectoria Oliv. (Fagaceae) gall extracts against Anopheles stephensi Liston.

    PubMed

    Aivazi, Ali-Ashraf; Vijayan, V A

    2009-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of botanical insecticides to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides in order to avoid environmental side effects. Anopheles stephensi is the primary vector of urban malaria, an endemic disease in India. So, an effort to assay An. stephensi larvae with gall extracts of Quercus infectoria was made under laboratory conditions at Mysore. Ethyl-acetate extract was found to be the most effective of all the five extracts tested for larvicidal activity against the fourth instar larvae, with LC(50) of 116.92 ppm followed by gallotannin, n-butanol, acetone, and methanol with LC(50) values of 124.62, 174.76, 299.26, and 364.61 ppm, respectively. The efficacy in killing mosquito larvae may make this plant promising for the development of new botanical larvicide.

  16. Analysis and antimicrobial activity of volatile constituents from Quercus leucotrichophora (Fagaceae) bark.

    PubMed

    Sati, Sushil Chandra; Sati, Nitin; Sati, O P; Biswas, D; Chauhan, B S

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition of the volatile extract (yield ≈ 0.13%, v/w) from the bark of Quercus leucotrichophora (Fagaceae) was analysed for the first time by GC-MS. Twenty-three constituents, amounting to 93.0% of the total detected contents of the volatile extract, were identified. The volatile extract contained approximately 86.36% monoterpenoids, 6.53% sesquiterpenoids and 0.11% aliphatic aldehydes. 1,8-Cineol (40.359%) followed by γ-terpinene (16.369%) were the major monoterpene constituents of the volatile extract. The residue of volatile extract (0.00025-250 µg  mL(-1)) exhibited a potent antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615. This study concludes that residues of the volatile extract of Q. leucotrichophora could serve as an important bioresource for the extraction and isolation of monoterpenoids exhibiting antimicrobial activity, and thus has good potential for use in the pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Winter season corticular photosynthesis in Cornus florida, Acer rubrum, Quercus alba, and Liriodendron tulipifera

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, J.M.; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1980-12-01

    Winter season corticular photosynthesis was studied in four species of deciduous trees: dogwood (Cornus florida), red maple (Acer rubrum), white oak (Quercus alba), and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera). Techniques included measuring CO/sub 2/ uptake at varying light intensities, relating the apparent photosynthetic capacities to seasonal changes in chlorophyll content of twigs and determining the fate of assimilated carbon over time. Dogwood was the most photosynthetically active of the four species studied; however, gross photosynthesis did not exceed respiration in any of the four species. Photosynthetic activity of dogwood twigs was estimated at 10% of that of dogwood leaves on a weight basis and 85% on a surface area basis. Photosynthetic activity was generally related to shade tolerance ranking and was on the order of dogwood much greater than red maple much greater than white oak approx. = yellow-poplar. Little change in chlorophyll content occurred over the January-April 1979 study interval.

  18. Proteotyping of Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota) provenances through proteomic analysis of acorn flour.

    PubMed

    Galván, José Valero; Fernández, Raquel González; Valledor, Luis; Cerrillo, Rafael Ma Navarro; Jorrin-Novo, Jesus V

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has become a powerful tool to characterize biodiversity and natural variability in plant species, as well as to catalogue and establish phylogenetic relationships and distances among populations, provenances or ecotypes. In this chapter, we describe the standard proteomics workflow that we currently use in cataloguing Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.) populations. Proteins are extracted from acorn flour or pollen by TCA/acetone or TCA/acetone-phenol methods, resolved by one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and gel images are captured and analyzed by appropriate software and statistical packages. Quantitative or qualitative variable bands or spots are subjected to MS analysis in order to identify them and correlate differences in the protein profile with the phenotypes or environmental conditions.

  19. Epigenetic marks in the mature pollen of Quercus suber L. (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Teresa; Viegas, Wanda; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2009-03-01

    We have analysed the distribution of epigenetic marks for histone modifications at lysine residues H3 and H4, and DNA methylation, in the nuclei of mature pollen cells of the Angiosperm tree Quercus suber; a monoecious wind pollinated species with a protandrous system, and a long post-pollination period. The ultrasonic treatment developed for the isolation of pollen nuclei proved to be a fast and reliable method, preventing the interference of cell wall autofluorescence in the in situ immunolabelling assays. In contrast with previous studies on herbaceous species with short progamic phases, our results are consistent with a high level of silent (5-mC and H3K9me2) epigenetic marks on chromatin of the generative nucleus, and the prevalence of active marks (H3K9me3 and H4Kac) in the vegetative nucleus. The findings are discussed in terms of the pollination/fertilization timing strategy adopted by this plant species.

  20. Genetic transformation of selected mature cork oak (Quercus suber L.) trees.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Alonso, P; Cortizo, M; Celestino, C; Hernández, I; Toribio, M; Ordás, R J

    2004-10-01

    A transformation system for selected mature cork oak (Quercus suber L.) trees using Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been established. Embryos obtained from recurrent proliferating embryogenic masses were inoculated with A. tumefaciens strains EHA105, LBA4404 or AGL1 harbouring the plasmid pBINUbiGUSint [carrying the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) and beta-glucuronidase (uidA) genes]. The highest transformation efficiency (4%) was obtained when freshly isolated explants were inoculated with A. tumefaciens strain AGL1. Evidence of stable transgene integration was obtained by PCR for the nptII and uidA genes, Southern blotting and expression of the uidA gene. The transgenic embryos were germinated and successfully transferred to soil.