Science.gov

Sample records for questionnaire hospital anxiety

  1. Shortened questionnaires to assess anxiety and depression during in-hospital rehabilitation: clinical validation and cutoff scores

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Giorgio; Moroni, Loretta; Burro, Roberto; Spanevello, Antonio; Pedretti, Roberto FE; Giorgetti, Giandomenico

    2016-01-01

    Background A postacute phase needs reliable routine screening instruments in order to identify the patients to be referred for a clinical interview with a psychologist. The aim of this study was to estimate the clinical cutoff scores of the anxiety and depression questionnaires and their clinical validity using a gold standard. Methods The study involved 177 patients with pulmonary, cardiac, or neurological disease undergoing in-hospital rehabilitation. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the best concordance between questionnaire’s scores and the gold standards. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.001) between clinically anxious and depressed patients and nonclinical subjects. The receiver operating characteristic curve for anxiety indicated that the best area under the curve for State Anxiety Inventory is obtained with a cutoff point of 21 for males and 25 for females; for depression scores, the highest area under the curve for Depression Questionnaire-Reduced Form is obtained with a cutoff point of six for males and eight for females. Conclusion Using appropriate cutoff values, the State Anxiety Inventory and Depression Questionnaire-Reduced Form allow psychologists to optimize early clinical intervention strategies selecting patients with significant needs. PMID:27789951

  2. Psychometric properties of the Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire in stroke patients with aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Alicia; Morris, Reg; Kneebone, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of an observational, carer-completed anxiety screen for aphasic stroke patients. Design: Phase 1: A cross-sectional questionnaire design to establish psychometric properties. Phase 2: A randomized longitudinal design with treatment and control to evaluate sensitivity to change and repeatability/reliability. Subjects: Phase 1: 111 patient-carer dyads were recruited through stroke charities: patient mean age 69.7(10. 7), 6.2(5. 2) years since stroke, 76 male; carer mean age 64.7(12. 2), 27 male. Phase 2. A subsample of 50 dyads (29 completed). Measures: All patients completed the Tension Rating Circles and the Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test. Carers completed the Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire, observational versions of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A) and the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7, and a feedback questionnaire. Intervention: Phase 2: 25 dyads were offered relaxation training and 25 acted as controls. Results: The Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire correlated .77 with the HADS-A and Cronbach’s Alpha was .82 demonstrating validity and internal consistency. Using HADS-A cut-off > 7 as criterion the area under the curve was 0.90 and at cut-off of > 16 sensitivity (0.85) and specificity (0.85) were both good. Scores declined significantly more in a group given anxiety training (n = 12) than in a control group (n = 17), demonstrating sensitivity to change and construct validity. Two-week repeatability/reliability was .92. Feedback suggested the scale was acceptable. Conclusions: The Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire shows promise as an anxiety screen for stroke patients with aphasia and is sensitive to change. Further analysis of dimensionality and discriminant validity is needed. PMID:27121863

  3. Utilizing a medical questionnaire to predict anxiety and depression in outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Hideki; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Akiko; Hanazawa, Nao; Masuyama, Takako; Yamashita, Tomoko; Kondo, Takeshi; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety and depressive symptoms are seen in patients with anxiety and mood disorders but are also common in those with organic disorders. However, since physical symptoms are predominant complaints from patients who visit nonpsychiatric outpatient clinics, anxiety and depressive symptoms are often unrecognized. It is important for physicians to be aware of these issues concurrent with the physical symptoms. We therefore examined whether a self-administered medical questionnaire could identify anxiety and depressive symptoms. Patients and methods A total of 453 patients on their first visit to the Department of General Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan, participated in this study. They were asked to complete a medical questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaire before examination. Data on age, sex, number of complaints, symptom duration, and number of previous physicians were extracted from the medical questionnaire. These data were used as independent variables in logistic regression analysis to develop a predictive model for the presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Results Data from 358 (79.0%) patients were included in the analyses. Logistic regression analysis identified the following predictors: “three or more complaints” (odds ratio [OR] 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48–3.88) and “four or more previous physicians” (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.10–2.69). In the predictive model for the presence of symptoms of anxiety and depression, the likelihood ratio was 2.40 (95% CI 1.33–4.34) in patients reporting both conditions and 1.35 (95% CI 1.04–1.77) in those reporting either condition. Conclusion The presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms can be predicted from the items of a medical questionnaire in outpatients visiting a general medicine department of a university hospital. When patients report three or more complaints or four or more previous physicians on a medical questionnaire

  4. Validation of Iranian Version of Pregnancy Related Anxiety Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Askarizadeh, Ghasem; Karamoozian, Mahsa; Darekordi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy is an acute period in the lifetime of women, during which numerous excitatory physical and social changes occur. The purpose of this study is confirmatory factor analysis of Pregnancy Related Anxiety Questionnaire (PRAQ) that is designed in Iranian pregnant women population. Methods: A total of 170 pregnant women in health centers of Kerman city were chosen through random sampling method and completed PRAQ questionnaire and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). In this study, confirmatory factor analysis and concurrent validity are used to evaluate the validity of models; and to test-retest and Cronbach alpha were used for evaluating external and internal reliability in SPSS-19 and the AMOS software to evaluate reliability of models. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis gave an acceptable value for the latent PRAQ in the question scale and 5 micro-scale level. Furthermore, significant correlation between the components and the overall scale of the PRAQ questionnaire with the BAI confirmed concurrent validity of questionnaire. The reliability of questionnaire is confirmed based on Cronbach's alpha coefficient value of 0.78 that calculated 0.69–0.76 for the five-factors. A month later, reliability coefficient amplitude of test-retest on forty pregnant women was between 0.65 and 0.72 which shows the reliability of PRAQ over time. Conclusions: The short form of anxiety during pregnancy questionnaire has the essential psychometric properties. In this study, five-factors extracted in the PRAQ were adapted with the factors extracted from the original version. This study introduces an instrument that can be benefit in measuring anxiety and concerns of women during pregnancy. PMID:28382193

  5. Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Anxiety Control Questionnaire among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerolimatos, Lindsay A.; Gould, Christine E.; Edelstein, Barry A.

    2012-01-01

    Among young adults and clinical populations, perceived inability to control internal and external events is associated with anxiety. At present, it is unclear what role perceived anxiety control plays in anxiety among older adults. The Anxiety Control Questionnaire (ACQ) was developed to assess one's perceived ability to cope with anxiety-related…

  6. Brazilian Portuguese Validated Version of the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, Aline; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; de Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Eifert, Georg H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac Anxiety (CA) is the fear of cardiac sensations, characterized by recurrent anxiety symptoms, in patients with or without cardiovascular disease. The Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) is a tool to assess CA, already adapted but not validated to Portuguese. Objective This paper presents the three phases of the validation studies of the Brazilian CAQ. Methods To extract the factor structure and assess the reliability of the CAQ (phase 1), 98 patients with coronary artery disease were recruited. The aim of phase 2 was to explore the convergent and divergent validity. Fifty-six patients completed the CAQ, along with the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ) and the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN). To determine the discriminative validity (phase 3), we compared the CAQ scores of two subgroups formed with patients from phase 1 (n = 98), according to the diagnoses of panic disorder and agoraphobia, obtained with the MINI - Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results A 2-factor solution was the most interpretable (46.4% of the variance). Subscales were named "Fear and Hypervigilance" (n = 9; alpha = 0.88), and "Avoidance", (n = 5; alpha = 0.82). Significant correlation was found between factor 1 and the BSQ total score (p < 0.01), but not with factor 2. SPIN factors showed significant correlations with CAQ subscales (p < 0.01). In phase 3, "Cardiac with panic" patients scored significantly higher in CAQ factor 1 (t = -3.42; p < 0.01, CI = -1.02 to -0.27), and higher, but not significantly different, in factor 2 (t = -1.98; p = 0.51, CI = -0.87 to 0.00). Conclusions These results provide a definite Brazilian validated version of the CAQ, adequate to clinical and research settings. PMID:24145391

  7. The mediating and moderating effects of sleep hygiene practice on anxiety and insomnia in hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tsui-Lan; Chang, Lu-I; Chung, Min-Huey

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to test the mediating and moderating effects of sleep hygiene practice on the relationship between anxiety and insomnia severity in hospital nurses. A cross-sectional survey was employed, and a convenience sample was recruited from one regional hospital in Taiwan. Participants completed the following self-report questionnaires over a 3-month period in 2009: the Insomnia Severity Index, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Sleep Hygiene Awareness and Practice Scale. The results indicated that nurses with more anxiety tended to have higher insomnia severity. Further, nurses with poor sleep hygiene practice had more insomnia. Sleep hygiene practice partially mediated the effects of anxiety on insomnia severity. Also, sleep hygiene practice was a moderator in the relationship between anxiety and insomnia severity with age and work units as covariates. Sleep hygiene practice mediated and moderated the relationship between anxiety and insomnia severity after controlling the variables of age and work units. Continuing to learn and train sleep hygiene practice might promote nurses' sleep hygiene, and thereby ameliorate anxiety and reduce the risk of insomnia.

  8. Using Symptom and Interference Questionnaires to Identify Recovery Among Children With Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rachel; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2016-08-15

    Questionnaires are widely used in routine clinical practice to assess treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. This study was conducted to determine whether 2 widely used child and parent report questionnaires of child anxiety symptoms and interference (Spence Child Anxiety Scale [SCAS-C/P] and Child Anxiety Impact Scale [CAIS-C/P]) accurately identify recovery from common child anxiety disorder diagnoses as measured by a 'gold-standard' diagnostic interview. Three hundred thirty-seven children (7-12 years, 51% female) and their parents completed the ADIS-IV-C/P diagnostic interview and questionnaire measures (SCAS-C/P and CAIS-C/P) before (Time 1) and after (Time 2) treatment or wait-list. Time 2 parent reported interference (CAIS-P) was found to be a good predictor of absence of any diagnoses (area under the curve [AUC] = .81). In terms of specific diagnoses, Time 2 SCAS-C/P separation anxiety subscale (SCAS-C/P-SA) identified recovery from separation anxiety disorder well (SCAS-C-SA, AUC = .80; SCAS-P-SA, AUC = .82) as did the CAIS-P (AUC = .79). The CAIS-P also successfully identified recovery from social phobia (AUC = .78) and generalized anxiety disorder (AUC = .76). These AUC values were supported by moderate to good sensitivity (.70-.78) and specificity (.70-.73) at the best identified cut-off scores. None of the measures successfully identified recovery from specific phobia. The results suggest that questionnaire measures, particularly the CAIS-P, can be used to identify whether children have recovered from common anxiety disorders, with the exception of specific phobias. Cut-off scores have been identified that can guide the use of routine outcome measures in clinical practice. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Factor analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale from a large cancer population.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam B; Selby, Peter J; Velikova, Galina; Stark, Dan; Wright, E Penny; Gould, Ann; Cull, Ann

    2002-06-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used as a tool for assessing psychological distress in patients and non-clinical groups. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results regarding the factor structure of the questionnaire for different groups of patients, and the general population. This study investigated the factor structure of the HADS in a large heterogeneous cancer population of 1474 patients. It also sought to investigate emerging evidence that the HADS conforms to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression (Clark & Watson, 1993), and to test the proposal that detection rates for clinical cases of anxiety and depression could be enhanced by partialling out the effects of higher order factors from the HADS (Dunbar et al., 2000). The results demonstrated a two-factor structure corresponding to the Anxiety and Depression subscales of the questionnaire. The factor structure remained stable for different subgroups of the sample, for males and females, as well as for different age groups, and a subgroup of metastatic cancer patients. The two factors were highly correlated (r =.52) and subsequent secondary factor analyses demonstrated a single higher order factor corresponding to psychological distress or negative affectivity. We concluded that the HADS comprises two factors corresponding to anhedonia and autonomic anxiety, which share a common variance with a primary factor namely psychological distress, and that the subscales of the HADS, rather than the residual scores (e.g. Dunbar et al., 2000) were more effective at detecting clinical cases of anxiety and depression.

  10. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi F.; Galea, Sandro; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To document the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders, and their associations with mortality among hospitalized breast cancer patients. Methods We examined the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and the diagnoses of anxiety or depression among 4,164 hospitalized breast cancer cases matched with 4,164 non-breast cancer controls using 2006-2009 inpatient data obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Conditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and diagnoses of anxiety or depression. We also used binary logistic regression models to examine the association between diagnoses of depression or anxiety, and in-hospital mortality among breast cancer patients. Results We observed that breast cancer cases were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.77), and less likely to have a diagnosis of anxiety (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90) compared with controls. This association remained after controlling for race/ethnicity, residential income, insurance and residential region. Breast cancer patients with a depression diagnosis also had lower mortality (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.52-0.89) compared with those without a depression diagnosis, but there was no significant difference in mortality among those with and without anxiety diagnoses. Conclusion Diagnoses of depression and anxiety in breast cancer patients were less prevalent than expected based on our analysis of hospitalized breast cancer patients and matched non-breast cancer controls identified in the NIS dataset using ICD-9 diagnostic codes. Results suggest that under-diagnosis of mental health problems may be common among hospitalized women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work may fruitfully explore reasons for, and consequences of, inappropriate identification of the mental health needs of breast cancer patients. PMID

  11. The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27): a short version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90.

    PubMed

    Osman, Augustine; Freedenthal, Stacey; Gutierrez, Peter M; Wong, Jane L; Emmerich, Ashley; Lozano, Gregorio

    2011-06-01

    The authors conducted three studies to construct and examine the psychometric properties of a 27-item version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90 (MASQ-90; Watson & Clark, 1991a). The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27) contains three empirically derived scales: Positive Affect, Somatic Anxiety, and General Distress, which are relevant dimensions of the tripartite model of affect. Each scale is composed of nine items, and the estimate of scale reliability for each scale score was ≥ .80 across the three studies. Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses provided adequate support for a 3-factor model. Additional estimates of concurrent validity documented the ADDI-27 scales' convergent and discriminant validity. We also identified three construct relevant correlates for each scale score. Overall, the ADDI-27 appears to be a content valid, reliable, and multidimensional measure of the tripartite model of affect.

  12. The Factor Structure and Dimensional Scoring of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for "DSM-IV"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Holaway, Robert M.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Despite favorable psychometric properties, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.) (GAD-Q-IV) does not have a known factor structure, which calls into question use of its original weighted scoring system (usually referred to as the dimensional score).…

  13. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caballo, Vicente E.; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C.; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a non-clinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled: 1) Interactions with strangers, 2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, 3) Interactions with the opposite sex, 4) Criticism and embarrassment, and 5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a ROC analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score. PMID:25774643

  14. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Vicente E; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a nonclinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled as follows: (1) Interactions with strangers, (2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, (3) Interactions with the opposite sex, (4) Criticism and embarrassment, and (5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust, or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score.

  15. Development and Initial Test of the Safety Behaviors in Test Anxiety Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Ross W; Valentiner, David P; Holzman, Jacob B

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the current studies is to identify safety behavior dimensions relevant to test anxiety, to develop a questionnaire to assess those dimensions, and to examine the validity of that questionnaire. Items were generated from interviews with college students ( N = 24). Another sample ( N = 301) completed an initial 33-item measure. Another sample ( N = 151) completed the final 19-item version the Safety Behaviors in Test Anxiety Questionnaire and provided access to their academic records. Interviews and expert evaluations were used to select items for the initial pool. An examination of item distributions and exploratory factor analysis were used to identify dimensions and reduce the item pool. Confirmatory factor analyses were used to validate the factorial structure. Correlational analyses were used to examine criterion validity of the final measure. The Safety Behaviors in Test Anxiety Questionnaire consists of a 9-item "Superstitious Behaviors" scale and a 10-item "Reassurance Seeking." The measure shows good content validity, factorial validity, internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity. Only the Reassurance Seeking scale showed good incremental criterion validity. Overall, these findings suggest that reassurance seeking may be a neglected target for interventions that might increase performance on high stakes tests.

  16. The multidimensional nature and multicultural validity of a new measure of social anxiety: the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Vicente E; Salazar, Isabel C; Irurtia, María Jesús; Arias, Benito; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2012-06-01

    Much has been written about the situations most often feared by persons with social phobia, and several self-report measures are frequently used to assess such feared situations. However, it is not clear whether the situations feared by persons with social phobia form unidimensional or multidimensional factors. If these situations are multidimensional, reliance on a total score of feared situations would not reflect important differences between those dimensions. This research examined the multidimensional nature and multicultural validity of a newly developed instrument (the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults [SAQ-A]) in two studies with a total of 539 patients diagnosed with social phobia and 15,753 nonpatients from 20 different countries. The structure (five clear and solid factors) and psychometric properties of the final instrument (the SAQ-A30) support the multidimensional nature of social anxiety and provide a new perspective in the assessment of social phobia.

  17. Prognostic value of depression, anxiety, and anger in hospitalized cardiovascular disease patients for predicting adverse cardiac outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Kato, Koji; Yoshida, Asuka; Fukuma, Nagaharu; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hiroto; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-05-15

    Although attention has recently been focused on the role of psychosocial factors in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), the factors that have the greatest influence on prognosis have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of depression, anxiety, and anger on the prognosis of patients with CVD. Four hundred fourteen consecutive patients hospitalized with CVD were prospectively enrolled. Depression was evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire, anxiety using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, and anger using the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to examine the individual effects of depression, anxiety, and anger on a combined primary end point of cardiac death or cardiac hospitalization and on a combined secondary end point of all-cause death or hospitalization during follow-up (median 14.2 months). Multivariate analysis showed that depression was a significant risk factor for cardiovascular hospitalization or death after adjusting for cardiac risk factors and other psychosocial factors (hazard ratio 2.62, p = 0.02), whereas anxiety was not significantly associated with cardiovascular hospitalization or death after adjustment (hazard ratio 2.35, p = 0.10). Anger was associated with a low rate of cardiovascular hospitalization or death (hazard ratio 0.34, p <0.01). In conclusion, depression in hospitalized patients with CVD is a stronger independent risk factor for adverse cardiac events than either anxiety or anger. Anger may help prevent adverse outcomes. Routine screening for depression should therefore be performed in patients with CVD, and the potential effects of anger in clinical practice should be reconsidered.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Social Anxiety - Acceptance and Action Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Esmail; Bahrainian, Seyed Abdolmajid; Masjedi Arani, Abbas; Farhoudian, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder is often related to specific impairment or distress in different areas of life, including occupational, social and family settings. Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the persian version of the social anxiety-acceptance and action questionnaire (SA-AAQ) in university students. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 324 students from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences participated via the cluster sampling method during year 2015. Factor analysis by the principle component analysis method, internal consistency analysis, and convergent and divergent validity were conducted to examine the validity of the SA-AAQ. To calculate the reliability of the SA-AAQ, Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest reliability were used. Results The results from factor analysis by principle component analysis method yielded three factors that were named acceptance, action and non-judging of experience. The three-factor solution explained 51.82% of the variance. Evidence for the internal consistency of SA-AAQ was obtained via calculating correlations between SA-AAQ and its subscales. Support for convergent and discriminant validity of the SA-AAQ via its correlations with the acceptance and action questionnaire - II, social interaction anxiety scale, cognitive fusion questionnaire, believability of anxious feelings and thoughts questionnaire, valued living questionnaire and WHOQOL- BREF was obtained. The reliability of the SA-AAQ via calculating Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest coefficients yielded values of 0.84 and 0.84, respectively. Conclusions The Iranian version of the SA-AAQ has acceptable levels of psychometric properties in university students. The SA-AAQ is a valid and reliable measure to be utilized in research investigations and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27803719

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for DSM-IV Among Four Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christina M.; Klenck, Suzanne C.; Norton, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous studies have established the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV revealing excellent diagnostic specificity and sensitivity as well as good test-retest reliability and convergent and discriminant validity (Newman et al., 2002). Recent analyses with other measures of anxiety symptoms have revealed differences across racial or national groups. Given that the GAD-Q-IV was tested primarily on Caucasian (78%) participants, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV across four racial groups: African American, Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian. A student sample of 585 undergraduate psychology students completed the GAD-Q-IV as well as other measures of anxiety symptoms. A clinical replication sample was obtained from 188 clinical participants who completed the GAD-Q-IV as part of a larger psychotherapy study. Results indicated excellent and very similar factor structures in the student sample, and similar psychometric properties across both samples across the racial groups. Implications for the use of the GAD-Q-IV across racial groups are discussed. PMID:20830629

  20. A Questionnaire for Screening a Broad Range of DSM-Defined Anxiety Disorder Symptoms in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Dreessen, Laura; Bogels, Susan; Weckx, Miryam; van Melick, Marion

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reliability and validity of the 66-item Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-Revised (SCARED-R), a questionnaire for measuring a broad range of DSM-defined anxiety disorder symptoms, in a sample of clinically referred youths. Method: The SCARED-R was administered to children/adolescents and their parents…

  1. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  2. Dimensional assessment of anxiety in Puerto Rican patients: evaluating applicability of psychological questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrios, Polaris; Morales-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Merced-Morales, Kritzianel; Lampón, Anabelle; González, Rafael; Martínez, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Objective A dimensional assessment model as a supplement to the diagnosis process could overcome the current pitfalls in classifying psychopathology in ethnic minorities. The aim of the study described herein was to examine a sample of Puerto Rican patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder in order to evaluate the psychometric properties of the specific scales that assess the following 3 domains: clinical symptoms, personality/trait, and affective style. Methods 80 subjects were recruited and interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV to identify the presence of anxiety disorders. Following this, various questionnaires assessing each proposed domain were administered to the participants. Reliability and validity of these questionnaires were examined using Cronbach’s alpha and exploratory factor analysis. The effect of the individual items of the questionnaires on the overall reliability and validity was assessed using factor scores component matrix. Results Analyses revealed moderate to high reliability and validity scores within all 3 domains. The sample obtained moderate to high scores on the scales comprising clinical and personality/trait domains. Conclusion The use of self-report scales in accordance with the proposed dimensional framework may be an effective way to supplement categorical diagnoses within the Hispanic population represented by this sample. PMID:27623138

  3. Dimensionality of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in cardiac patients: comparison of Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S

    2012-09-01

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis and (b) the scale properties of the HADS. Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis suggested that three dimensions adequately capture the structure of the HADS. Of the three corresponding scales, two scales of five items each were found to be structurally sound and reliable. These scales covered the two key attributes of anxiety and (anhedonic) depression. The findings suggest that the HADS may be reduced to a 10-item questionnaire comprising two 5-item scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  4. Trait anxiety and trait anger measured by ecological momentary assessment and their correspondence with traditional trait questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Chaplin, William F.; Burg, Matthew M.; Stone, Arthur A.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological momentary assessments (EMA) of anxiety and anger/hostility were obtained every 25–30 minutes over two 24-hour periods, separated by a median of 6 months, from 165 employees at a university in the Northeast. We used a multilevel trait-state-error structural equation model to estimate: (1) the proportion of variance in EMA anxiety and anger/hostility attributable to stable trait-like individual differences; (2) the correspondence between these trait-like components of EMA anxiety and anger/hostility and traditional questionnaire measures of each construct; and (3) the test-retest correlation between two 24-hour averages obtained several months apart. After adjustment for measurement error, more than half the total variance in EMA reports of anxiety and anger/hostility is attributable to stable trait-like individual differences; however, the trait-like component of each construct is only modestly correlated with questionnaire measures of that construct. The 6-month “test-retest” correlations of latent variables representing the true 24-hour EMA average anxiety and average anger are quite high (r ≥ 0.83). This study represents the longest follow-up period over which EMA-based estimates of traits have been examined. The results suggest that although the trait component (individual differences) of EMA momentary ratings of anxiety and anger is larger than the state component, traditional self-report questionnaires of trait anxiety and anger correspond only weakly with EMA-defined traits. PMID:24198441

  5. The Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire across four ethnoracial groups in an undergraduate sample.

    PubMed

    Talkovsky, Alexander M; Norton, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Increasing awareness of cross-cultural issues in psychology has led many to question the validity and utility of instruments in nonmajority ethnic and racial groups. The Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ; Clark & Watson, 1991) is a widely used measure of anxious and depressive symptoms. However, some of the most-cited investigations into the psychometric properties of the MASQ have failed to report the demographics of their samples. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the psychometric properties of the MASQ across ethnoracial groups. Results suggest that the internal consistency and convergent and divergent validity of the MASQ are similar across ethnoracial groups. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis indicated cross-racial invariance of loadings on the General Distress and Anxious Arousal factors, although noninvariance was observed for the Anhedonic Depression. Implications for assessment and clinical research are discussed.

  6. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J.; Palfai, Tibor P.; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller & Tonigan (1996) and Maisto et al (1999). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al (1999) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller & Tonigan (1996). The first component measured Perception of Problems and was more strongly correlated with severity of alcohol related consequences, presence of alcohol dependence, and alcohol consumption levels (average number of drinks per day and total number of binge drinking days over the past 30 days)compared to the second component measuring Taking Action. Our findings support the view that the SOCRATES is comprised of two important readiness constructs in general medical patients identified by screening PMID:19395177

  7. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J; Palfai, Tibor P; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.) and Maisto et al. (Maisto, S. A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M. E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al. (Maisto, S.A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M.E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.). The first component measured

  8. Screening for Depressive Disorders Using the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire Anhedonic Depression Scale: A Receiver-Operating Characteristic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredemeier, Keith; Spielberg, Jeffery M.; Silton, Rebecca Levin; Berenbaum, Howard; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the utility of the anhedonic depression scale from the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ-AD scale) as a way to screen for depressive disorders. Using receiver-operating characteristic analysis, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of the full 22-item MASQ-AD scale, as well as the 8- and 14-item…

  9. Self-Reported Acceptance of Social Anxiety Symptoms: Development and Validation of the Social Anxiety-Acceptance and Action Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Meagan B.; Kocovski, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have been used in social anxiety treatments with initial success. Further research requires the psychometrically sound measurement of mechanisms of change associated with these treatments. This research was conducted to develop and evaluate such a measure, the Social Anxiety-Acceptance and Action…

  10. Assessing the Multi-faceted Nature of Test Anxiety Among Secondary School Students: An English Version of the German Test Anxiety Questionnaire: PAF-E.

    PubMed

    Hoferichter, Frances; Raufelder, Diana; Ringeisen, Tobias; Rohrmann, Sonja; Bukowski, William M

    2016-01-01

    The current study concerns the validation of an English version of the German Test Anxiety Inventory, namely the PAF-E. This questionnaire is a multi-faceted measure of test anxiety designed to detect normative test anxiety levels and in consequence meet the need of consultancy. Construct and criterion validity of (PAF-E) were examined with a sample of 96 secondary students (Mage = 12.8, SD = 0.67; 55% girls) from an international school in Berlin (Germany) and 399 secondary students (Mage = 13.4, SD = 0.80; 56% girls) from Montréal (Canada). Both samples completed the PAF-E and related constructs, such as school-related self-efficacy, inhibitory test anxiety, achievement motivation, and the Big Five. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the four-factor-structure (worry, emotionality, interfering thoughts, lack of confidence) of the original German Test Anxiety Inventory (PAF). Each subscale consists of five items with a total of 20 questions. Cronbach's alpha, ranging from.71 to.82 among Germans and.77 to.87 among Canadians as well as the re-test reliability (from.80 to.85 among Canadians) were sufficient. The differential patterns of correlations between other constructs and the indices of test anxiety indicate good construct validity.

  11. Associations of Preexisting Depression and Anxiety With Hospitalization in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Vickers, Kristin S.; Colligan, Robert C.; Weston, Susan A.; Rummans, Teresa A.; Roger, Véronique L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk of hospitalization and death in relation to preexisting depression and anxiety among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The cohort consisted of 799 Olmsted County, MN, residents diagnosed with CVD (myocardial infarction or heart failure) from January 1, 1979, to December 31, 2009, who completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) prior to their event. The MMPI was used to identify depression and anxiety, and participants were followed up for hospitalizations and death during an average of 6.2 years. RESULTS: Depression and anxiety were identified in 282 (35%) and 210 (26%) participants, respectively. After adjustment, depression and anxiety were independently associated with a 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8%-51%) and 26% (95% CI, 3%-53%) increased risk of being hospitalized, respectively. Depression also conferred an increased risk of all-cause mortality of similar magnitude, whereas the hazard ratio for anxiety was not statistically significant. The combined occurrence of depression and anxiety led to a 35% (95% CI, 8%-71%) increase in the risk of hospitalizations. CONCLUSION: Among patients with CVD, both preexisting depression and anxiety, occurring on average 17 years before the CVD event, independently predict hospitalizations. In addition, the 2 conditions may act synergistically on increasing health care utilization in patients with CVD. PMID:22033250

  12. Clinical utility of the mood and anxiety symptom questionnaire in a chinese sample of patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gongping; Jiang, Chun; Li, Yi-xiong

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with pancreatic carcinoma compared with nonclinical populations. The aims of this study were to evaluate the tripartite model for assessing symptoms of depression and anxiety and develop a Chinese version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire-Short Form (MASQ-SF) in patients with pancreatic cancer. The final sample consisted of 1,029 patients with pancreatic cancer. In line with our hypothesis, results of confirmatory factor analysis suggest that the three factors identified fit the hypothesized tripartite model well. The Chinese version of the MASQ-SF also exhibited high internal consistency. Reliability of the three scales was excellent with all scores greater than .79. Cronbach's alpha for the total MASQ-SF was .88. The 1-month test-retest reliability was .80. Correlation coefficients among the three subscales ranged from .36 to .75. Thus, the Chinese version of the MASQ-SF exhibited high levels of reliability and validity, indicating that the Chinese version of the MASQ-SF is appropriate for assessing symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with pancreatic cancer. The use of this instrument may help researchers to better measure depression and anxiety in patients with pancreatic cancer and consequently develop appropriate prevention and treatment interventions.

  13. [Accuracy and diagnostic utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) in a sample of obese Mexican patients].

    PubMed

    López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Velázquez, Verónica; Arcila-Martínez, Denise; Sierra-Ovando, Angel Ernesto; González-Barranco, Jorge; Salín-Pascual, Rafael J

    2002-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) have been used in Mexico in drug abusers, burned patients, older people, with renal insufficiency and high-risk pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine reproducibility and accuracy of the questionnaire in a sample of obese subjects. A group of 75 obese patients (BMI > 27) without diabetes mellitus were invited to participated in the study. Diagnosis of anxiety or depression was made by an structured interview based on the DSM-IV criteria, and they were requested to complete the HAD. All subjects were randomized for the manoeuvre sequence. Sensibility specificity, positive predictive value and negative value, and unweighted kappa coefficient (for concordance) were calculated for the two procedures. The questionnaire reproducibility was assessed buy test-retest with other 25 independent subjects. Internal validity was estimated by alpha Cronbach, Guttman and intraclass correlation coefficients. Mean age was 39.7 +/- 11.5 years and BMI 39.1 +/- 9.6. The best cut off point for anxiety was 8 points (Kappa 0.68) and for depression 7 points (Kappa 0.73). Mean age for test-retest was 39.2 +/- 14.5 years and BMI 45.3 +/- 14.6. The alpha-Cronbach was 0.84 for the first tes. and 0.86 for the second. Intraclass coefficient correlation was 0.946. The HAD is applicable for obese subjects, it is reproducible and concordant with a structured interview.

  14. Internal Structure and Clinical Utility of the Anxiety Control Questionnaire-Revised (ACQ-R) Spanish Version.

    PubMed

    Osma, Jorge; Barrada, Juan Ramón; García-Palacios, Azucena; Navarro-Haro, María; Aguilar, Alejandra

    2016-10-03

    Perceived control has shown predictive value for anxiety severity symptoms as well as cognitive-behavior therapy outcomes. The most commonly used measure of perceived control is the Anxiety Control Questionnaire (ACQ), and more recently the ACQ Revised (ACQ-R). However, both questionnaires have shown structural inconsistencies among several studies. Also, although the ACQ and ACQ-R seem to be multidimensional instruments, a single total score have been commonly used. This study examined the internal structure of the ACQ-R Spanish version using exploratory factor and exploratory bi-factor analysis in a sample of 382 college students and 52 people diagnosed of panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia). Also, in this study we assessed the preliminary diagnostic value of the ACQ-R scores. The results indicated that the ACQ-R Spanish version structure consisted of two factors: one related with perceived control of internal emotional reactions (Emotion Control) and another related with perceived control of external events (Threat and Stress Control). Both specific factors can be adequately summarized by a general factor (General Anxiety Perception of Control; CFI = .973, TLI = .954, RMSEA = .039; p = .002), which accounted for 70% of the common explained variance. The correlations between the ACQ-R scores and with variables like anxiety (r = -.66) or anxiety sensitivity (r = -.50) presented the expected pattern of results. Either the two dimensions structure or the total score have proved to be a good tool to distinguish between participants with panic disorder and non-clinical samples (area under the curve = 0.79).

  15. Anxiety and Depression during Transition from Hospital to Community in Older Adults: Concepts of a Study to Explain Late Age Onset Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Aislinn F.; Brown, Ted; Robins, Lauren; Lee, Den-Ching Angel; O’Connor, Daniel; Russell, Grant; Stolwyk, Rene; McDermott, Fiona; Johnson, Christina; Haines, Terry P.

    2015-01-01

    The transition between extended hospitalization and discharge home to community-living contexts for older adults is a critical time period. This transition can have an impact on the health outcomes of older adults such as increasing the risk for health outcomes like falls, functional decline and depression and anxiety. The aim of this work is to identify and understand why older adults experience symptoms of depression and anxiety post-discharge and what factors are associated with this. This is a mixed methods study of adults aged 65 years and over who experienced a period of hospitalization longer than two weeks and return to community-living post-discharge. Participants will complete a questionnaire at baseline and additional monthly follow-up questionnaires for six months. Anxiety and depression and their resulting behaviors are major public health concerns and are significant determinants of health and wellbeing among the ageing population. There is a critical need for research into the impact of an extended period of hospitalization on the health status of older adults post-discharge from hospital. This research will provide evidence that will inform interventions and services provided for older adults after they have been discharged home from hospital care. PMID:27417775

  16. Development and validation of a 30-item short adaptation of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ).

    PubMed

    Wardenaar, Klaas J; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J; de Beurs, Edwin; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2010-08-30

    The original Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ) is a 90-item self-report, designed to measure the dimensions of Clark and Watson's tripartite model. We developed and validated a 30-item short adaptation of the MASQ: the MASQ-D30, which is more suitable for large-scale psychopathology research and has a clearer factor structure. The MASQ-D30 was developed through a process of item reduction and grouping of the appropriate subscales in a sample of 489 psychiatric outpatients, using a validated Dutch translation, based on the original English MASQ, as a starting point. Validation was done in two other large samples of 1461 and 2471 subjects, respectively, with an anxiety, somatoform and/or depression diagnosis or no psychiatric diagnosis. Psychometric properties were investigated and compared between the MASQ-D30 and the full (adapted) MASQ. A three-dimensional model (negative affect, positive affect and somatic arousal) was found to represent the data well, indicating good construct validity. The scales of the MASQ-D30 showed good internal consistency (all alphas>0.87) in patient samples. Correlations of the subscales with other instruments indicated acceptable convergent validity. Psychometric properties were similar for the MASQ-D30 and the full questionnaire. In conclusion, the MASQ-D30 is a valid instrument to assess dimensional aspects of depression and anxiety and can easily be implemented in psychopathology studies.

  17. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogbimi, Roseline I; Adebamowo, Clement A

    2006-01-01

    Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH) in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria. PMID:16504039

  18. Measuring Positive Emotion With the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties of the Anhedonic Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Ashley D; Zinbarg, Richard E; Bobova, Lyuba; Mineka, Susan; Revelle, William; Prenoveau, Jason M; Craske, Michelle G

    2016-02-01

    Low positive emotion distinguishes depression from most types of anxiety. Formative work in this area employed the Anhedonic Depression scale from the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ-AD), and the MASQ-AD has since become a popular measure of positive emotion, often used independently of the full MASQ. However, two key assumptions about the MASQ-AD-that it should be represented by a total scale score, and that it measures time-variant experiences-have not been adequately tested. The present study factor analyzed MASQ-AD data collected annually over 3 years (n = 618, mean age = 17 years at baseline), and then decomposed its stable and unstable components. The results suggested the data were best represented by a hierarchical structure, and that less than one quarter of the variance in the general factor fluctuated over time. The implications for interpreting past findings from the MASQ-AD, and for conducting future research with the scale, are discussed.

  19. In Systemic Sclerosis, Anxiety and Depression Assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale Are Independently Associated with Disability and Psychological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, Angela; Mikhaylova, Svetlana; Baccini, Marco; Lupi, Ilaria; Matucci Cerinic, Marco; Maddali Bongi, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anxious and depressive symptoms are frequent in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Our objective is to assess their prevalence and association with district and global disability and psychological variables. Methods. 119 SSc patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Clinical depression and anxiety were defined for HADS score cutoff ≥8. Patients were assessed for psychological symptoms (RSES, COPE-NIV), hand (HAMIS, CHFDS, fist closure, and hand opening) and face disability (MHISS, mouth opening), global disability, and fatigue (HAQ, FACIT). Results. Both depression and anxiety in SSc are 36%. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher HADS-D score than patients with depression only (P = 0.001). HADS-A and -D are positively correlated with global disability, hands and mouth disability, fatigue, self-esteem and avoidance coping strategy, and, only HADS-A, also with social support (P < 0.05). By multiple regression, HADS-D is independently associated with FACIT-F (P < 0.001), RSES (P < 0.001), and MHISS total score (P = 0.016), together explaining 50% of variance. HADS-A is independently associated with RSES (P = 0.006), COPE-NIV SA (P = 0.003), COPE-NIV SS (P = 0.008), FACIT-F (P = 0.022), and MHISS mouth opening (P = 0.029), explaining 41% of variance. Conclusions. In SSc depression and anxiety correlate to local and global disabilities and psychological characteristics. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher level of depressive symptoms. PMID:23984376

  20. Validation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for use with multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Kimia; Feinstein, Anthony

    2009-12-01

    Detecting clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety in medically ill patients using self-report rating scales presents a challenge because of somatic confounders. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was developed with this in mind, but has never been validated for a multiple sclerosis population. Our objective was to validate the HADS for multiple sclerosis patients. Multiple sclerosis patients were interviewed for the presence of major depression (n = 180) and anxiety disorders (n = 140) with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken to assess which HADS cut-off scores give the best yield with respect to diagnoses of major depression and all anxiety disorders defined by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. A threshold score of 8 or greater on the HADS depression subscale provides a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 87.3% (ROC area under the curve 0.938). The same cut-off score gives a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 80.7% on the anxiety subscale (ROC area under the curve 0.913), but for generalized anxiety disorder only. The study confirms the usefulness of the HADS as a marker of major depression and generalized anxiety disorder, but not other anxiety disorders, in multiple sclerosis patients.

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety in Hospitalized Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ana Paula Ceré; Lazzari, Tássia Kirchmann

    2017-01-01

    Background Much of the attention of tuberculosis (TB) programs is focused on outcomes of microbiological cure and mortality, and health related quality of life (HRQL) is undervalued. Also, TB patients have a significantly higher risk of developing depression and anxiety compared with those in the general population. We intend to evaluate the HRQL and the prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety in hospitalized patients with TB. Methods Cross-sectional study in a tertiary care hospital in Brazil. Adult patients with pulmonary TB that were hospitalized during the study period were identified and invited to participate. HRQL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) version 2. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to record symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results Eighty-six patients were included in the analysis. The mean age of all patients was 44.6±15.4 years, 69.8% were male, and 53.5% were white. Thirty-two patients (37.2%) were human immunodeficiency virus positive. Twenty-seven patients (31.4%) met study criteria for depression (HADS depression score ≥11) and 33 (38.4%) had anxiety (HADS anxiety score ≥11). Scores on all domains of SF-36 were significantly lower than the Brazilian norm scores (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study shows that TB patients may have a poor HRQL. Additionally, we found a possible high prevalence of depression and anxiety in this population. Health care workers should be aware of these psychological disorders to enable a better management of these patients. The treatment of these comorbidities may be associated with better TB outcomes. PMID:28119749

  2. Validation of a short adaptation of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ) in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ashleigh; Yung, Alison R; Wigman, Johanna T W; Killackey, Eoin; Baksheev, Gennady; Wardenaar, Klaas J

    2014-03-30

    The Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ) was developed to measure the symptom-dimensions of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression. A 30-item short adaptation of the MASQ (MASQ-D30) was previously developed and validated in adult psychiatric outpatients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the MASQ-D30 in a sample of adolescents and young adults. Help-seeking adolescents from Australia (N=147; mean age: 17.7 years; 58.8% female) completed the original, 90-item MASQ. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the construct validity (a 3-factor structure) of the original MASQ and the MASQ-D30. Internal consistencies and correlations with other instruments were calculated and compared between versions. CFA showed that the intended 3-factor structure fit adequately to the MASQ-D30 data (CFI=0.95; RMSEA=0.08). Internal consistencies ranged from 0.85 to 0.92 across the scales and patterns of correlations with the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) indicated adequate convergent/divergent properties. Importantly, the observed psychometric characteristics were comparable with the original MASQ and alternative short-forms. Results indicated that the MASQ-D30 is a valid and reliable instrument in young people, allowing for quick assessment of the tripartite dimensions of depression and anxiety.

  3. Adaption of pregnancy anxiety questionnaire-revised for all pregnant women regardless of parity: PRAQ-R2.

    PubMed

    Huizink, A C; Delforterie, M J; Scheinin, N M; Tolvanen, M; Karlsson, L; Karlsson, H

    2016-02-01

    The 10-item Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire-Revised (PRAQ-R) is a widely used instrument to assess and identify pregnancy-specific anxiety in nulliparous women. It has good psychometric values and predictive validity for birth and childhood outcomes. Nonetheless, the PRAQ-R is not designed for use in parous women, as particularly one item of the questionnaire is not relevant for women who gave birth before. We tested the factorial and scalar invariance of a modified PRAQ-R2 across nulliparous and parous women with an adapted item to fit both groups of pregnant women. A longitudinal study among 1144 pregnant women (n = 608 nulliparous and n = 536 parous) with two repeated measures of the PRAQ-R2 was used to test for measurement invariance of the instrument. Results show metric and scalar invariance, indicating that the PRAQ-R2 measures similar constructs on the same scale for all pregnant women at two different times during pregnancy. We conclude that the PRAQ-R2 can be used, compared, or combined in a sample of nulliparous and parous women.

  4. Patient satisfaction questionnaire and quality achievement in hospital care: the case of a Greek public university hospital.

    PubMed

    Matis, Georgios K; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Chrysou, Olga I

    2009-11-01

    The scope of this research has been to investigate the satisfaction of Greek patients hospitalized in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing and organizational/administrative services. It is a cross-sectional study involving 200 patients hospitalized for at least 24 h. We administered a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Health Ministry. Four aspects of satisfaction were employed (medical, hotel facilities/organizational, nursing, global). Using principal component analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency with the aid of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non-parametric Spearman rank correlation coefficient was also used. The results reveal a relatively high degree of global satisfaction (75.125%), yet satisfaction is higher for the medical (89.721%) and nursing (86.432%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the hotel facilities and the general organization was found to be more limited (76.536%). Statistically significant differences in participant satisfaction were observed (depending on age, gender, citizenship, education, number of previous admissions and self-assessment of health status at the first and last day of patients' stay) for the medical, nursing and hotel facilities/organizational dimension, but not for global satisfaction. The present study confirms the results of previously published Greek surveys.

  5. The Effectiveness of Slow-Stroke Back Massage on Hospitalization Anxiety and Physiological Parameters in School-Age Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalalodini, Alia; Nourian, Manijeh; Saatchi, Kiarash; Kavousi, Amir; Ghaljeh, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background The outcomes of hospitalization anxiety are mental health disorders. One of the methods of anxiety reduction is massage, which can cause reduction of pain and changes in physiological parameters. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effects of slow-stroke back massage (SSBM) on hospitalization anxiety and physiological parameters in school-age children. Methods This clinical trial study included 80 school-aged children from Ali Ebne Abi Taleb hospital, located in Zahedan, who were selected using sequential sampling and randomly divided into two groups: a massage group (40) and a control group (40). Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the state-trait anxiety inventory for children (STAIC). Subjects in the massage group received SSBM, using sesame oil, for 3 days. Massage was given three times a day, and each massage session lasted for 15 - 20 minutes. Physiological parameters and hospitalization anxiety were determined from the second to fifth days. T-test and Chi-square were used for analysis data. Results There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the mean of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressures (DBP), and pulse rate (PR) in the massage group prior to intervention (97.05 ± 20.7, 60.35 ± 16.69 and 95.45 ± 13.02 respectively) and on the fifth day (88.32 ± 16.58, 55.95 ± 12.7 and 90.45 ± 15.1 respectively). However, no difference was observed in mean respiratory rate (RR) in the massage group from the second day (17.55 ± 3.6) to fifth day (17.62 ± 3.27) (P = 0.096). The mean of state of anxiety, which was 36.4 ± 5.1 before intervention, was reduced by the fifth day to 31.2 ± 5.1 in the massage group (P < 0.0001, t = 5.2). Conclusions The results suggest that massage reduced hospitalization anxiety, PR, and BP. Therefore, we propose that nurses can use massage to reduce anxiety in school-age children in hospital. This method has no side-effects and is easily applicable

  6. Psychometric comparison of the generalized anxiety disorder scale-7 and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for measuring response during treatment of generalised anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Sunderland, Matthew; McMillan, Dean; Anderson, Tracy; Lorian, Carolyn; Robinson, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a widely used measure of the worry characteristic of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) is a new brief screening tool for GAD, which is being increasingly used in research and clinical practice. The present study sought to provide comparison data on the relative psychometric properties of these two scales. The data of 195 adults who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD and who participated in two randomised treatment controlled trials were used. Factor analyses, internal consistency, correlational analyses, responsiveness to change, and agreement between the scales based on indentified clinical cutoffs were conducted. Factor analyses confirmed a one-factor structure for the GAD-7 and a three-factor structure involving two method factors for the PSWQ. Both the GAD-7 and the PSWQ demonstrated adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: .79-.91 and .86-.91, respectively), and moderate correlations (r = .51-.71) were observed between the scales across the treatment time points. The scales exhibited small correlations with the Sheehan Disability Scale at pretreatment (GAD-7 r = .38; PSWQ r = .26), but moderate correlations at posttreatment and follow-up (r = .59-.79). Agreement between the scales was limited using various clinical cutoffs identified within the literature. Both measures were sensitive to change, although the GAD-7 appeared to be more sensitive and may, therefore, confer some advantages in clinical work.

  7. [Questionnaires for pharmacies and pharmacists working in the hospitals built during the Meiji and Taisho periods in Japan].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Jun; Yamakawa, Koji

    2008-01-01

    In the previous paper, information about questionnaires for pharmacies and pharmacists in the 86 hospitals built during the Meiji and Taisho periods in Japan was reported. The histories of old pharmacies and pharmacists of the remaining 10 old hospitals were also reported in this paper.

  8. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) as a screening instrument in tinnitus evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zöger, Sigyn; Svedlund, Jan; Holgers, Kajsa-Mia

    2004-09-01

    The identification of anxiety and depressive disorders in tinnitus patients is important from a therapeutic point of view. We have addressed this question by investigating the screening performance of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) in a consecutive series of tinnitus patients (n = 82) without severe socially disabling hearing loss referred to an audiological clinic. The structured clinical interview for DSM-III criteria was used as the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the screening abilities of the HAD subscales for anxiety and depression and the total HAD Scale. The ROC analysis showed that the HAD Scale was better at detecting depression than anxiety disorders in tinnitus patients. The optimal cut-off score for the subscales was > or = 5 when we were screening for any anxiety or depressive disorder as well as for major depression. The performance of the HAD depression subscale was superior, especially when we were screening for major depression only (sensitivity 1.00; specificity 0.75). The findings of the study suggest that the HAD Scale is more useful for screening for depression than for anxiety disorders in tinnitus patients

  9. Relationship of Cognitive Functions with Daily Living Activities, Depression, Anxiety and Clinical Variables in Hospitalized Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    DEMİR AKÇA, Ayşe Semra; SARAÇLI, Özge; EMRE, Ufuk; ATASOY, Nuray; GÜDÜL, Serdar; ÖZEN BARUT, Banu; ŞENORMANCI, Ömer; BÜYÜKUYSAL, M. Çağatay; ATİK, Levent; ATASOY, H. Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment in elderly patients, which may be a sign of dementia, depression, anxiety or medical diseases, has been determined as a risk factor for functional loss. In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of cognitive impairment and to investigate the relationship of cognitive status with sociodemographic variables, daily living activities, anxiety and depression in elderly inpatients. Method The sample of this cross-sectional and descriptive study consists of 243 patients aged 65 years and older who were hospitalized in Bülent Ecevit University Hospital. A sociodemographic questionnaire,, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale, Lawton-Brody Instrumental Daily Activities Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were used for data collection. Results One hundred and six (43.6%) patients were female and 137 (56.4%) were male. The patients were divided into two groups according to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) 23/24 cut-off score. The cognitive decline was statistically significantly more frequent in patients who were older, female, less educated, low socioeconomic status, and living in rural areas. There were more problems in the basic and instrumental activities of daily living and nutrition in patients with cognitive decline. Anxiety and depression scores were higher in this group. In our study, although the frequency of cognitive decline and depression according to GDS were 56% and 48%, respectively; we found that only 10.5% of patients applied to the psychiatrist, and 9.3% of patients received psychiatric treatment. Conclusion Cognitive decline may cause deterioration in the daily living activities, nutrition and capacity for independent functioning. Older age, female, low education, low socioeconomic status and living in rural area are important risk factors for cognitive impairment. Cognitive decline in older age may be associated with depression and

  10. Application of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in Albanian hospitals: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gabrani, Adriatik; Hoxha, Adrian; Simaku, Artan; Gabrani, Jonila (Cyco)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the reliability and validity of the translated version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) by evaluating its psychometric properties and to determine possible differences among nurses and physicians regarding safety attitudes. Design A cross-sectional study utilising the Albanian version of the SAQ and a demographic questionnaire. Setting Four regional hospitals in Albania. Participants 341 healthcare providers, including 132 nurses and 209 doctors. Main outcome measure(s) The translation, construct validity and internal validity of the SAQ. The SAQ includes six scales and 30 items. Results A total of 341 valid questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of 70%. The confirmatory factor analysis and its goodness-of-fit indices (standardised root mean square residual 0.075, root mean square error of approximation 0.044 and comparative fit index 0.97) showed good model fit. The Cronbach's α values for each of the scales of the SAQ ranged from 0.64 to 0.82. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers who had a positive attitude was 60.3% for the teamwork climate, 57.2% for the safety climate, 58.4% for job satisfaction, 37.4% for stress recognition, 59.3% for the perception of management and 49.5% for working conditions. Intercorrelations showed that the subscales had moderate-to-high correlations with one another. Nurses were more hesitant to admit and report errors; only 55% of physicians and 44% of nurses endorsed this statement (χ2=4.9, p=0.02). Moreover, nurses received lower scores on team work compared with doctors (N 45.7 vs D 52.3, p=0.01). Doctors denied the effects of stress and fatigue on their performance (N 46.7 vs D 39.5, p<0.01), neglecting the workload. Conclusions The SAQ is a useful tool for evaluating safety attitudes in Albanian hospitals. In light of the health workforce's poor recognition of stress, establishing patient safety programmes should be a priority among policymakers in Albania. PMID:25877270

  11. Adaption and validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire for the Danish hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring and developing a safe culture in health care is a focus point in creating highly reliable organizations being successful in avoiding patient safety incidents where these could normally be expected. Questionnaires can be used to capture a snapshot of an employee’s perceptions of patient safety culture. A commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The purpose of this study was to adapt the SAQ for use in Danish hospitals, assess its construct validity and reliability, and present benchmark data. Materials and methods The SAQ was translated and adapted for the Danish setting (SAQ-DK). The SAQ-DK was distributed to 1,263 staff members from 31 in- and outpatient units (clinical areas) across five somatic and one psychiatric hospitals through meeting administration, hand delivery, and mailing. Construct validity and reliability were tested in a cross-sectional study. Goodness-of-fit indices from confirmatory factor analysis were reported along with inter-item correlations, Cronbach’s alpha (α), and item and subscale scores. Results Participation was 73.2% (N=925) of invited health care workers. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed: c2=1496.76, P<0.001, CFI 0.901, RMSEA (90% CI) 0.053 (0.050–0056), Probability RMSEA (p close)=0.057. Inter-scale correlations between the factors showed moderate-to-high correlations. The scale stress recognition had significant negative correlations with each of the other scales. Questionnaire reliability was high, (α=0.89), and scale reliability ranged from α=0.70 to α=0.86 for the six scales. Proportions of participants with a positive attitude to each of the six SAQ scales did not differ between the somatic and psychiatric health care staff. Substantial variability at the unit level in all six scale mean scores was found within the somatic and the psychiatric samples. Conclusion SAQ-DK showed good construct validity and

  12. Validity of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in detecting depressive and anxiety disorders among high school students.

    PubMed

    Baksheev, Gennady Nickolaevich; Robinson, Jo; Cosgrave, Elizabeth Mary; Baker, Kathryn; Yung, Alison Ruth

    2011-05-15

    Despite the common use of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) with adolescents, there is limited data supporting its validity with this population. The aims of the study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the GHQ-12 among high school students, to validate the GHQ-12 against the gold standard of a diagnostic interview, and to suggest a threshold score for detecting depressive and anxiety disorders. Six hundred and fifty-four high school students from years 10 to 12 (ages 15-18) completed the GHQ-12 (Likert scored) and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Test Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted. The mean GHQ-12 score for the total sample was 9.9 (S.D.=5.4). Results from the ROC curve indicated that the GHQ-12 performed better than chance at identifying depressive and anxiety disorders (area under the curve (AUC)=0.781). A GHQ-12 threshold score of 9/10 for males and 10/11 for females was found to be optimal. Given the significant proportion of mental illness among high school students, there may be a need to introduce screening for mental illnesses as part of the school curriculum. This can assist with the early identification and enable low stigma preventive intervention within the school environment.

  13. The effect of teacher's presence at children's bedside on the anxiety of mothers with hospitalized children: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Reyhani, Tayebeh; Aemmi, Seyedeh Zahra; Emami Zeydi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hospitalization of a child is a stressful experience for parents, especially mothers. Not having access to the teacher and not being able to continue school studies within the hospital by hospitalized children is a common reason for anxiety in them and their parents. The current study aimed to determine the effect of teacher's presence at children's bedside on the anxiety of mothers with hospitalized children. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, a total of 50 mothers with children admitted to pediatric ward of one teaching hospital in Mashhad, Iran, were randomly allocated to two equal groups. In the intervention group, the teacher was present at children's bedside for daily education and practices, but the control group received standard routine care. The mothers’ level of anxiety was evaluated using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, which was completed at both admission and prior to child's discharge. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: The results showed that before intervention, the means and standard deviations of the mothers’ trait anxiety scores in the experimental and control groups were not significantly different (P = 0.164). However, after intervention, the mothers’ mean trait anxiety scores decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (P < 0.001) and compared to the pre-intervention phase (P < 0.001). Conclusions: It seems that the presence of a teacher at children's bedside is an easy and effective strategy to reduce anxiety in mothers regarding their children hospitalization. PMID:27563330

  14. Anxiety symptoms in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Jeanne K; MacKain, Sally; Reyes, Darcel

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most frequent symptoms recognized by providers who care for persons living with HIV disease (PLWH). This evidence-based review of anxiety and HIV disease includes an overview of anxiety symptoms, their prevalence in PLWH, and co-existing mood and behavioral disorders. Harmful physiologic effects are also highlighted. Valid and reliable clinical measurement tools used for assessing anxiety include the Clinical Diagnostic Questionnaire, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Scale, the Profile of Mood States, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Evidence supports the use of cognitive behavioral therapy as a recommended intervention for the treatment of anxiety symptoms and/or anxiety disorders in PLWH. Medications for use with more severe and disabling anxiety are discussed, as well as evidence based on expert opinion for anxiety self-management.

  15. Dimensionality of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in Cardiac Patients: Comparison of Mokken Scale Analysis and Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken…

  16. Adaptation and initial validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 Questionnaire (GAD-7) in an Arabic speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Helen; Atoui, Mia; Hamadeh, Aya; Zeinoun, Pia; Nahas, Ziad

    2016-05-30

    The Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7) are short screening measures used in medical and community settings to assess depression and anxiety severity. The aim of this study is to translate the screening tools into Arabic and evaluate their psychometric properties in an Arabic-speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample. The patients completed the questionnaires, among others, prior to being evaluated by a clinical psychiatrist or psychologist. The scales' internal consistency and factor structure were measured and convergent and discriminant validity were established by comparing the scores with clinical diagnoses and the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire - MDD subset (PDSQ - MDD). Results showed that the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 are reliable screening tools for depression and anxiety and their factor structures replicated those reported in the literature. Sensitivity and specificity analyses showed that the PHQ-9 is sensitive but not specific at capturing depressive symptoms when compared to clinician diagnoses whereas the GAD-7 was neither sensitive nor specific at capturing anxiety symptoms. The implications of these findings are discussed in reference to the scales themselves and the cultural specificity of the Lebanese population.

  17. The British Sign Language Versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Scott, Paul R.; Kendal, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to translate 3 widely used clinical assessment measures into British Sign Language (BSL), to pilot the BSL versions, and to establish their validity and reliability. These were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS).…

  18. Differentiating anxious and depressive self-statements in youth: factor structure of the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire among youth referred to an anxiety disorders clinic.

    PubMed

    Lerner, J; Safren, S A; Henin, A; Warman, M; Heimberg, R G; Kendall, P C

    1999-03-01

    Conducted a factor analysis on the items from the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire (NASSQ; Ronan, Kendall, & Rowe, 1994). This analysis yielded 4 factors (Depressive Self-Statements, Anxiety/Somatic Self-Statements, Negative Affect Self-Statements, and Positive Affect Self-Statements) broadly consistent with both the content-specificity hypothesis (Beck & Clark, 1988) and L. A. Clark and Watson's (1991b) tripartite model of anxiety and depression. The association between children's self-talk and measures of trait anxiety and depression was also examined. Self-statements with content theoretically specific to depression were the best predictors of self-reported depressive symptoms, but the results were less clear for trait anxiety. Overall, these results provide evidence for the discriminability of anxious and depressive self-talk in youth and for the utility of the NASSQ as a cognitive assessment instrument.

  19. Do attachment representations predict depression and anxiety in psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Geoff; Stroh, Martha; Valdez, Adina

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-six prepubertal inpatients were videotaped completing five stories thematically related to attachment experiences and classified by their attachment representations. Children also completed the Children's Depression Inventory and Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents-Revised. Mothers completed demographic questionnaires. Percentage of secure (B) attachment was only about one tenth of the normative percentage, anxious-ambivalent (C) attachment was between two and three times the normative percentage, and disorganized (D) attachment was almost twice the normative percentage. Both D attachment and the total number of disorganized story responses were associated with negative self-esteem and clinical-range depression. Anxious-avoidant (A) attachment decreased the likelihood, while C and D attachment increased the likelihood, of separation anxiety disorder. Clinical intervention needs to focus on the meaning of parental relationships represented in the child's mind, specifically the negative self-esteem and separation anxiety associated with the lack of felt security provided by the parents.

  20. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Faheem, Muhammad; Fahim, Ammad; Innocent, Haran; Mansoor, Zainab; Rizvi, Shehrbano; Farrukh, Hizra

    2016-01-01

    Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS). Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7%) patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient's awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7%) uneducated patients, 85 (59.4%) were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients. PMID:27752508

  1. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: Factor Structure, Internal Consistency and Convergent Validity in Patients with Dizziness.

    PubMed

    Piker, Erin G; Kaylie, David M; Garrison, Douglas; Tucci, Debara L

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities, particularly anxiety-related pathologies, are often observed in dizzy patients. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a widely used self-report instrument used to screen for anxiety and depression in medical outpatient settings. The purpose of this study was to assess the factor structure, internal consistency and convergent validity of the HADS in an unselected group of patients with dizziness. The HADS and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) were administered to 205 dizzy patients. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted and indicated a 3-factor structure, inconsistent with the 2-subscale structure (i.e. anxiety and depression) of the HADS. The total scale was found to be internally consistent, and convergent validity, as assessed using the DHI, was acceptable. Overall findings suggest that the HADS should not be used as a tool for psychiatric differential diagnosis, but rather as a helpful screener for general psychiatric distress in the two domains of psychiatric illness most germane in dizzy patients.

  2. Factor Structure of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in Malaysian patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satpal; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Low, Wah Yun; Ramasamy, Ravindran; Sidhu, Jaideep Singh

    2015-05-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a common screening instrument used to determine the levels of anxiety and depression experienced by a patient and has been extensively used in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to establish the factor structure of HADS in a Malaysian sample of 189 patients with CAD. Factor analysis of HADS using principal component analysis with varimax rotation yielded 3 factors. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the use of HADS in assessing 3 distinct dimensions of psychological distress--namely, anxiety, anhedonia, and psychomotor retardation. The HADS showed good internal consistency and was found to be a valid measure of psychological distress among Malaysian patients with CAD. However, low mean scores on the original 2 factors--that is, anxiety and depression--and also on the 2 depression subscales--anhedonia and psychomotor retardation--suggests that the recommended cutoff score to screen for psychological distress among CAD patients be reevaluated. Further research to determine the generalizability and consistency for the tridimensional structure of the HADS in Malaysia is recommended.

  3. The Affect of Mobile Performance Support Devices on Anxiety and Self-Efficacy of Hospital Float Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley McKee, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Floating describes the act of staff moving from one unit to another based on the needs of the patients in a hospital. Many staff who float to different units express negative feelings, including anxiety and lack in self-efficacy. However, floating is both an economical and efficient method to use staff across the hospital, especially with current…

  4. Development of the Chinese version of the Hospital Autonomy Questionnaire: a cross-sectional study in Guangdong Province

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zifeng; Yuan, Lianxiong; Huang, Yixiang; Zhang, Lingling; Luo, Futian

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to develop a questionnaire for quantitative evaluation of the autonomy of public hospitals in China. Method An extensive literature review was conducted to select possible items for inclusion in the questionnaire, which was then reviewed by 5 experts. After a two-round Delphi method, we distributed the questionnaire to 404 secondary and tertiary hospitals in Guangdong Province, China, and 379 completed questionnaires were collected. The final questionnaire was then developed on the basis of the results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results Analysis suggested that all internal consistency reliabilities exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.70 for the α coefficient. The overall scale coefficient was 0.87, and 6 subscale coefficients were 0.92 (strategic management), 0.81 (budget and expenditure), 0.85 (financing), 0.75 (financing, medical management), 0.86 (human resources) and 0.86 (accountability). Correlation coefficients between and among items and their hypothesised subscales were higher than those with other subscales. The value of average variance extracted (AVE) was higher than 0.5, the value of construct reliability (CR) was higher than 0.7, and the square roots of the AVE of each subscale were larger than the correlation of the specific subscale with the other subscales, supporting the convergent and discriminant validity of the Chinese version of the Hospital Autonomy Questionnaire (CVHAQ). The model fit indices were all acceptable: χ2/df=1.73, Goodness of Fit Index (GFI) = 0.93, Adjusted Goodness of Fit Index (AGFI) = 0.91, Non-Normed Fit Index (NNFI) = 0.96, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.97, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.04, Standardised Root Mean Square Residual (SRMR) = 0.07. Conclusions This study demonstrated the reliability and validity of a CVHAQ and provides a quantitative method for the assessment of hospital autonomy. PMID:26911587

  5. Current state of practice for colonic diverticular bleeding in 37 hospitals in Japan: A multicenter questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Niikura, Ryota; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Doyama, Hisashi; Ota, Ryosuke; Ishii, Naoki; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hikichi, Takuto; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Nishikawa, Jun; Uraoka, Toshio; Kiyotoki, Shu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the current state of practice for colonic diverticular bleeding (CDB) in Japan. METHODS We conducted multicenter questionnaire surveys of the practice for CDB including clinical settings (8 questions), diagnoses (8 questions), treatments (7 questions), and outcomes (4 questions) in 37 hospitals across Japan. The answers were compared between hospitals with high and low number of inpatient beds to investigate which factor influenced the answers. RESULTS Endoscopists at all 37 hospitals answered the questions, and the mean number of endoscopists at these hospitals was 12.7. Of all the hospitals, computed tomography was performed before colonoscopy in 67% of the hospitals. The rate of bowel preparation was 46.0%. Early colonoscopy was performed within 24 h in 43.2% of the hospitals. Of the hospitals, 83.8% performed clipping as first-line endoscopic therapy. More than half of the hospitals experienced less than 20% rebleeding events after endoscopic hemostasis. No significant difference was observed in the annual number of patients hospitalized for CDB between high- (≥ 700 beds) and low-volume hospitals. More emergency visits (P = 0.012) and endoscopists (P = 0.015), and less frequent participation of nursing staff in early colonoscopy (P = 0.045) were observed in the high-volume hospitals. CONCLUSION Some practices unique to Japan were found, such as performing computed tomography before colonoscopy, no bowel preparation, and clipping as first-line therapy. Although, the number of staff differed, the practices for CDB were common irrespective of hospital size. PMID:28042393

  6. Anxiety and depressive disorders in an emergency department ward of a general hospital: a control study

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, C; Brusamonti, E; Borghi, C; Giannini, A; Di, R; Minneo, F; Quarantelli, C; Maggini, C

    2004-01-01

    Objective: In this study anxiety and depressive disorders were evaluated in patients admitted to an emergency department (ED) or to a medical department (MD). Methods: The General Health Questionnaire-30 (GHQ-30) was administered to screen all patients (n = 719) consecutively admitted to an ED (n = 556) and to MD (n = 163) in a 120 day period. All GHQ-30 positive (score>4) underwent the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, a structured interview to diagnose mental disorders according to DSM-IV criteria. Results: Subjects positive to GHQ-30 were 264 (47%) in ED and 88 (54%) in MD. A mental disorder was diagnosed in 233 ED patients (42%) and in 77 MD patients (47%) (p = 0.70). The most frequent disorders were anxiety disorders in ED patients (18.1%) and depressive disorders in MD patients (21%) (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Anxious patients more frequently seek attention at ED, whereas patients with depressive disorders are more often observed in medical units. The improvement of quality of care, the waste of healthcare resources through unnecessary medical care, and the well known efficacy of appropriate treatments in patients with anxiety and depressive disorders make the diagnosis of these patients particularly important. PMID:14988342

  7. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... include Panic disorder Obsessive-compulsive disorder Post-traumatic stress disorder Phobias Generalized anxiety disorder Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  8. Clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for an outpatient fibromyalgia education program.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seungree; Tin, Diane; Bain, Lorna; Thorne, J Carter; Ginsburg, Liane

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in the context of evaluating the Fibromyalgia Outpatient Education Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre (Newmarket, Canada). A pre-test/post-test design was implemented for data analysis. A total of 232 patients' data were obtained through retrospective patient chart review. Complete pre-post data were available for 70 patients and qualitative analysis was done for 12 patients. Main outcome measures included HADS and Arthritis Self-Efficacy (ASE) scores. At the end of the education program, subgroups of patients (high attendance, high exercise habit, low medication) experienced significant improvement on HADS-depression and ASE scores. Linear regression analysis found that HADS pre-program scores explain far more variance in HADS post-test scores than ASE pre-program scores explain in ASE post-program scores; more variance in ASE post-program scores was explained by other variables. In contrast to the quantitative analysis of the Anxiety subscale of HADS, patients in the focus group indicated that their anxiety level decreased through attending the education program. These findings suggest that HADS is an appropriate tool for evaluating fibromyalgia and related patient education programs. Moreover, patient education programs have positive effects on enhancing patients' psychological well-being and self-confidence in controlling fibromyalgia-related symptoms.

  9. Rasch analysis of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (hads) for use in motor neurone disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is commonly used to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression in motor neurone disease (MND). The measure has never been specifically validated for use within this population, despite questions raised about the scale's validity. This study seeks to analyse the construct validity of the HADS in MND by fitting its data to the Rasch model. Methods The scale was administered to 298 patients with MND. Scale assessment included model fit, differential item functioning (DIF), unidimensionality, local dependency and category threshold analysis. Results Rasch analyses were carried out on the HADS total score as well as depression and anxiety subscales (HADS-T, D and A respectively). After removing one item from both of the seven item scales, it was possible to produce modified HADS-A and HADS-D scales which fit the Rasch model. An 11-item higher-order HADS-T total scale was found to fit the Rasch model following the removal of one further item. Conclusion Our results suggest that a modified HADS-A and HADS-D are unidimensional, free of DIF and have good fit to the Rasch model in this population. As such they are suitable for use in MND clinics or research. The use of the modified HADS-T as a higher-order measure of psychological distress was supported by our data. Revised cut-off points are given for the modified HADS-A and HADS-D subscales. PMID:21955749

  10. Validation of the caregivers' satisfaction with Stroke Care Questionnaire: C-SASC hospital scale.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-06-01

    To date, researchers have lacked a validated instrument to measure stroke caregivers' satisfaction with hospital care. We adjusted a validated patient version of satisfaction with hospital care for stroke caregivers and tested the 11-item caregivers' satisfaction with hospital care (C-SASC hospital scale) on caregivers of stroke patients admitted to nine stroke service facilities in the Netherlands. Stroke patients were identified through the stroke service facilities; caregivers were identified through the patients. We collected admission demographic data from the caregivers and gave them the C-SASC hospital scale. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modeling and examined its validity and reliability. After the elimination of three items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting eight-item C-SASC hospital scale. Cronbach's α was high (0.85) and correlations with general satisfaction items with hospital care ranged from 0.594 to 0.594 (convergent validity). No significant relations were found with health and quality of life (divergent validity). Such results indicate strong construct validity. We conclude that the C-SASC hospital scale is a promising instrument for measuring stroke caregivers' satisfaction with hospital stroke care.

  11. Adaptation and validation of a questionnaire assessing patient satisfaction with pharmacy services in general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jumah, Khalaf Ali; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Al-Zaagi, Ibrahem

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the Armando Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire into Arabic and validate its use in the general population. Methods The translation was conducted based on the principles of the most widely used model in questionnaire translation, namely Brisling’s back-translation model. A written authorization allowing translation into Arabic was obtained from the original author. The Arabic version of the questionnaire was distributed to 480 participants to evaluate construct validity. Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17.0 for Windows was used for the statistical analysis. Results The response rate of this study was 96%; most of the respondents (52.5%) were female. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s α, which showed that this questionnaire provides a high reliability coefficient (reaching 0.9299) and a high degree of consistency and thus can be relied upon in future patient satisfaction research. PMID:24707170

  12. Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anxiety Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  13. Comparison of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms in relatives of ICU patients in an American and an Indian public hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Hrishikesh S.; Kulkarni, Karishma R.; Mallampalli, Antara; Parkar, Shubhangi R.; Karnad, Dilip R.; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: An intensive care unit (ICU) admission of a patient causes considerable stress among relatives. Whether this impact differs among populations with differing sociocultural factors is unknown. Aims: The aim was to compare the psychological impact of an ICU admission on relatives of patients in an American and Indian public hospital. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out in ICUs of two tertiary care hospitals, one each in major metropolitan cities in the USA and India. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 relatives visiting patients were verbally administered a questionnaire between 48 hours and 72 hours of ICU admission that included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R) for post-traumatic stress response. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests. Results: Relatives in the Indian ICU had more anxiety symptoms (median HADS-A score 11 [inter-quartile range 9-13] vs. 4 [1.5-6] in the American cohort; P<0.0001), more depression symptoms (BDI-II score 14 [8.5-19] vs. 6 [1.5-10.5], P<0.0001) but a comparable post-traumatic stress response (IES-R score>30). 55% of all relatives had an incongruous perception regarding “change in the patient's condition” compared to the objective change in severity of illness. “Change in worry” was incongruous compared to the perception of improvement of the patient's condition in 78% of relatives. Conclusions: Relatives of patients in the Indian ICU had greater anxiety and depression symptoms compared to those in the American cohort, and had significant differences in factors that may be associated with this psychological impact. Both groups showed substantial discordance between the perceived and objective change in severity of illness. PMID:22013306

  14. The Psychometric Properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depressions Scale Adapted for Use with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, D.; Jahoda, A.; McDowell, K.; Masson, J.; Banks, P.; Hare, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of depression in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a need to develop well-standardised self-report measures for both clinical and research purposes. This paper presents some psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) adapted for use with people with ID.…

  15. Etiological factors in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a hospital-based, retrospective, case-control, questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Shanmugaratnam, K; Tye, C Y; Goh, E H; Chia, K B

    1978-01-01

    A total of 379 Singapore Chinese patients with NPC were interviewed by use of a questionnaire covering the following items: occupation, level of education, language medium of education, personal and family history of nasal illnesses, types of medicines used, use of Chinese medicines for the nose and throat, use of soya sauce, Chinese tea, cooling drinks and alcohol, cigarette smoking (number and duration), cooking fuels and use of incense (frequency and duration) and of anti-mosquito coils. The same questionnaire was given to two groups of controls: 595 patients with diseases of the ear, nose and throat other than NPC and 1 044 patients with diseases other than cancer or otorhinolaryngeal disease. NPC patients differed significantly from both groups of controls in that they showed stronger associations with personal history of nasal illnesses, family history of nasal illnesses, use of Chinese medicines for the nose and throat and exposure to smoke from anti-mosquito coils.

  16. Behavioral Assessment: Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, C. Chrisman

    1980-01-01

    This is a general discussion of the validity, reliability, function, and format of questionnaires designed to measure problem behavior, noncompliance, anxiety, social interaction, hyperactivity, drug use, and sexual behavior. Commonly used questionnaires are cited. (CP)

  17. Retesting the validity of the Arabic version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale in primary health care.

    PubMed

    el-Rufaie, O E; Absood, G H

    1995-01-01

    The Arabic version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale was retested and cut-off points determined in a sample of 217 patients attending a primary health care centre in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.). Subjects were screened using the HAD scale and all patients were then interviewed by a single consultant psychiatrist. The scale scores were assessed against the psychiatrist's clinical evaluations. The study furnished evidence that the Arabic version of the HAD scale is a valid instrument for detecting anxiety and depressive disorders in primary health care settings. Spearman rank correlations of all items of the scale were significantly above zero. The butterflies item of the anxiety subscale had the lowest correlation coefficients. The overall Cronbach alpha measures of internal consistency were 0.7836 and 0.8760 for anxiety and depression, respectively. The cut-off points that produced a balanced combination of sensitivity and specificity appropriate for referral to a psychiatric facility by the general practitioner were 6/7 for anxiety and 3/4 for depression. Almost all other similar studies have determined a single cut-off point for both subscales of the HAD. This study also indicated that the HAD depression subscale is more consistent and more predictive than the HAD anxiety subscale. Moreover some of the problems arising from applying psychiatric research instruments across cultures are highlighted by this study.

  18. The Relationship between Quality of Life and Cognitive Functions, Anxiety and Depression among Hospitalized Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saraçlı, Özge; Akca, Ayşe Semra Demir; Atasoy, Nuray; Önder, Özde; Şenormancı, Ömer; Kaygisız, İsmet; Atik, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Objective Older people seek not only a longer life, but also a better quality of life (QOL). Our aim was to find out the relationship between QOL and socio-demographic factors, social activities, cognitive status, depression and anxiety symptoms among medically ill and hospitalized elderly people in Turkey. Methods Two hundred forty three patients age 65 years or older were examined. The Socio-demographic Data Survey, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Geriatric Depression Scale-short form (GDS-15), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD) were applied to participants. The independent samples t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze quantitative data. Pearson’s correlation and linear regression analysis were performed. Results The total score for QOL was significantly higher for those who saw their family members and relatives frequently rather than rarely (p=0.002), who were always busy with social activities rather than rarely or never (p<0.001), who had more years of education (p=0.003), and who were frequently exercising (p=0.023). According to linear regression analysis, the WHOQOL-OLD total score increased by 0.295 and −0.936 units, while MMSE and GDS-15 scale scores increased one unit respectively (β=0.295, t=1.979, p=0.04; β=−0.936, t=−4.881, p<0.001). Conclusion Cognitive disabilities, depression, and other psychiatric problems along with medical disease negatively affect the QOL of elderly patients. While performing medical assessment regarding elders, detecting and treating cognitive disabilities and depression is very valuable in improving the QOL of elderly patients. PMID:26243848

  19. Attitudes and awareness of female genital mutilation: a questionnaire-based study in a Kenyan hospital.

    PubMed

    Livermore, L; Monteiro, R; Rymer, J

    2007-11-01

    There are considerable efforts in Kenya to increase awareness of the issues and health risks associated with female genital mutilation (FGM) through educational programmes. The Kenyan government formally outlawed FGM in 2001. This questionnaire-based study aimed to explore attitudes and awareness of FGM in Kenya with particular reference to the law, health complications and educational programmes. A significant decline in the prevalence of FGM was demonstrated and awareness of health complications of FGM shown to be the main factor causing this trend. The need for further efforts to eradicate the practice and the importance of religion and culture in shaping social attitudes was evident. The outlawing of FGM was considered a positive advance but may have the detrimental effect of deterring women from seeking medical assistance for complications relating to FGM.

  20. Safety culture perceptions of pharmacists in Malaysian hospitals and health clinics: a multicentre assessment using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Samsuri, Srima Elina; Pei Lin, Lua; Fahrni, Mathumalar Loganathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety attitudes of pharmacists, provide a profile of their domains of safety attitude and correlate their attitudes with self-reported rates of medication errors. Design A cross-sectional study utilising the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Setting 3 public hospitals and 27 health clinics. Participants 117 pharmacists. Main outcome measure(s) Safety culture mean scores, variation in scores across working units and between hospitals versus health clinics, predictors of safety culture, and medication errors and their correlation. Results Response rate was 83.6% (117 valid questionnaires returned). Stress recognition (73.0±20.4) and working condition (54.8±17.4) received the highest and lowest mean scores, respectively. Pharmacists exhibited positive attitudes towards: stress recognition (58.1%), job satisfaction (46.2%), teamwork climate (38.5%), safety climate (33.3%), perception of management (29.9%) and working condition (15.4%). With the exception of stress recognition, those who worked in health clinics scored higher than those in hospitals (p<0.05) and higher scores (overall score as well as score for each domain except for stress recognition) correlated negatively with reported number of medication errors. Conversely, those working in hospital (versus health clinic) were 8.9 times more likely (p<0.01) to report a medication error (OR 8.9, CI 3.08 to 25.7). As stress recognition increased, the number of medication errors reported increased (p=0.023). Years of work experience (p=0.017) influenced the number of medication errors reported. For every additional year of work experience, pharmacists were 0.87 times less likely to report a medication error (OR 0.87, CI 0.78 to 0.98). Conclusions A minority (20.5%) of the pharmacists working in hospitals and health clinics was in agreement with the overall SAQ questions and scales. Pharmacists in outpatient and ambulatory units and those in health clinics had better perceptions of safety

  1. Childhood Peer Status and Adult Susceptibility to Anxiety and Depression. A 30-Year Hospital Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modin, Bitte; Ostberg, Viveca; Almquist, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which sixth grade peer status could predict anxiety and/or depression in 5,242 women and 5,004 men who were born in 1953 and whose hospital records were followed up from 1973-2003. The data used was the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study. While no association could be established for men, results indicated that women…

  2. Development and Evaluation of the Barriers to Nurses' Participation in Research Questionnaire at a Large Academic Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Joseph; Walden, Marlene

    2017-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to survey nurses at a large pediatric hospital to examine barriers to nursing research and to develop the Barriers to Nurses' Participation in Research Questionnaire (BNPRQ) in preparation for its use at other institutions. The BNPRQ was created and refined through iterative pilot testing. Exploratory factor analysis was applied, and composite scores were computed for the identified factors. The two latent factors "Research Resources" and "Personal Relevance of Research" were extracted. The independent item "lack of time to do research" represented the largest barrier to research. Factor and item scores differed according to subject characteristics. Findings from this study will be used to create targeted interventions to reduce barriers to research participation prevalent in specific groups of nurses. By using the BNPRQ developed in this study, researchers and administrators at other institutions can identify and address barriers to research among their nurses.

  3. Evaluation of Educational Environment for Medical Students of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Tehran, Using DREEM Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Andalib, Masoud Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Masoud Mohammad; Agharahimi, Zahra; Daryabeigi, Maede; Yaghmaei, Bahareh; Ashrafi, Mahmoud-Reza; Rabbani, Ali; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tertiary pediatric hospitals usually provide excellent clinical services, but such centers have a lot to do for educational perfection. Objectives: This study was performed to address under-graduate educational deficits and find feasible solutions. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in a target population of 77 sixth year undergraduate medical students (response rate = 78%) who spent their 3-month pediatric rotation in the Children’s Medical Center, the Pediatrics Center of Excellence in Tehran, Iran. The Dundee ready educational environment measure (DREEM) instrument was used for assessing educational environment of this subspecialized pediatric hospital. Results: Among 60 students who answered the questionnaires, 24 were male (40%). Participants’ age ranged from 23 to 24 years. The mean total score was 95.8 (48%). Comparison of scores based on students’ knowledge showed no significant difference. Problematic areas were learning, academic self-perception, and social self-perception. Conclusions: Having an accurate schedule to train general practitioner, using new teaching methods, and providing a non-stressful atmosphere were suggested solutions. PMID:26495091

  4. Attitudes, knowledge, and proficiency in relation to organ donation: a questionnaire-based analysis in donor hospitals in northern Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, L; Madsen, M

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes, and proficiency in relation to organ donation among staff members of intensive care units (ICUs) in donor hospitals, and possibly identify areas for improvement. The investigation was carried out as a collaboration between the transplant center and appointed key persons in all 17 ICUs in 15 hospitals in northern Denmark. A total of 1168 structured questionnaires were distributed to the health care professionals in the ICUs in the region; 689 were returned, giving a response rate of 59%. In general, there is a positive attitude among health care professionals toward organ donation. However, a considerable fraction of 11% declares to be against organ donation. Only 49% of the ICU health care professionals are willing to donate their own organs after death. By comparison, 74% of the general Danish population are willing to donate organs after death. Doctors are more positive toward organ donation than the nursing staff. Thus, 95% of the doctors are positive to organ donation compared to 81% of the nurses; 70% of the doctors will donate own organs after death compared to 45% of the nurses. Further, the survey demonstrates as expected a significant lack of experience in organ donation. Our data show a considerable need for more education and training, especially on how to inform and support the donor relatives and how to identify potential donors. The survey also discloses a substantial need for information regarding the results of transplantation.

  5. An Integrated Web-Based Mental Health Intervention of Assessment-Referral-Care to Reduce Stress, Anxiety, and Depression in Hospitalized Pregnant Women With Medically High-Risk Pregnancies: A Feasibility Study Protocol of Hospital-Based Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Janes-Kelley, Selikke; Tyrrell, Janie; Clark, Lorna; Hamza, Deena; Holmes, Penny; Parkes, Cheryl; Moyo, Nomagugu; McDonald, Sheila; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    Background At prevalence rates of up to 40%, rates of depression and anxiety among women with medically complex pregnancies are 3 times greater than those in community-based samples of pregnant women. However, mental health care is not a component of routine hospital-based antenatal care for medically high-risk pregnant women. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of the hospital-based implementation of a Web-based integrated mental health intervention comprising psychosocial assessment, referral, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for antenatal inpatients. Methods This study is a quasi-experimental design. Pregnant women are eligible to participate if they are (1) <37 weeks gestation, (2) admitted to the antenatal inpatient unit for >72 hours, (3) able to speak and read English or be willing to use a translation service to assist with completion of the questionnaires and intervention, (4) able to complete follow-up email questionnaires, (5) >16 years of age, and (6) not actively suicidal. Women admitted to the unit for induction (eg, <72-hour length of stay) are excluded. A minimum sample of 54 women will be recruited from the antenatal high-risk unit of a large, urban tertiary care hospital. All women will complete a Web-based psychosocial assessment and 6 Web-based CBT modules. Results of the psychosocial assessment will be used by a Web-based clinical decision support system to generate a clinical risk score and clinician prompts to provide recommendations for the best treatment and referral options. The primary outcome is self-reported prenatal depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms at 6-8 weeks postrecruitment. Secondary outcomes are postpartum depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms; self-efficacy; mastery; self-esteem; sleep; relationship quality; coping; resilience; Apgar score; gestational age; birth weight; maternal-infant attachment; infant behavior and development; parenting stress/competence at 3

  6. Is anxiety more common in school students with newly diagnosed specific learning disabilities? A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, AN; Karande, S; Bala, N; Sant, H; Gogtay, NJ; Sholapurwala, R

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: School students with specific learning disabilities (SpLDs) experience chronic academic underachievement and resultant stress. The present study aimed to determine if school students with newly diagnosed SpLD were more likely to have anxiety than their regular peers. Materials and Methods: The study cases (aged 8-15 years) were recruited from our institute's learning disability clinic. The matched controls were recruited from four schools in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. Anxiety was measured using the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS)-child self-report version questionnaire. Median SCAS scores and the proportion of students with an SCAS score in the “clinical anxiety” range were compared between the groups. Results: SCAS scores were significantly higher in 8-11-year-old learning-disabled male and female students (P < 0.0001 for both groups) and 12-15-year-old female students (P = 0.004), as compared with matched controls. A significantly higher number of learning-disabled students were found to have “clinical anxiety” [24.64% vs 4.35%, crude odds ratio (OR) = 7.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.91-17.78, P = 0.0001], as compared with the controls regardless of gender, age group, presence of comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or associated medical conditions. A significantly higher proportion of 8-11-year-old learning-disabled students, especially males, were found to have “clinical anxiety” as compared with 12-15-year-old learning-disabled students (crude OR = 4.38, 95% CI 1.94-9.92, P = 0.0004). Gender, presence of comorbid ADHD or associated medical conditions, and type of school attended or curriculum did not impact the prevalence of “clinical anxiety” in learning-disabled students. Interpretation and Conclusions: Students with newly diagnosed SpLD have greater odds of being “clinically anxious” relative to their regular peers. We recommend screening for anxiety in children with Sp

  7. Discriminant validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory to confirmed clinical diagnosis of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tina; Carter, Owen; Adams, Claire; Waterer, Grant; Chung, Li Ping; Hawkins, Maxine; Rudd, Cobie; Ziman, Mel; Strobel, Natalie

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the discriminant validity of commonly used depression and anxiety screening tools in order to determine the most suitable tool for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD patients (n = 56) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). These scores were compared to confirmed clinical diagnoses of depression and anxiety using the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview. HADS depression subscale (HADS-D) sensitivity/specificity was 78/81%; BDI-II 89/77%; HADS anxiety subscale (HADS-A) 71/81%; and BAI 89/62%. HADS-D sensitivity/specificity was improved (100/83%) with the removal of Q4 'I feel as if I am slowed down' and adjusted cut-off (≥5). Removal of BDI-II Q21 'Loss of interest in sex' with adjusted cut-off ≥12 resulted in similar improvement (100/79%). No problematic items were identified for HADS-A or BAI. Previously reported low sensitivity/specificity of the HADS for COPD patients was not replicated. Furthermore, simple modifications of the HADS-D markedly improved sensitivity/specificity for depression.BDI-II, HADS-A and BAI produced acceptable sensitivity/specificity unmodified. Pending further research for COPD patients we recommend continued use of the HADS-A with standard cut-off (≥8) and removal of Q4 of the HADS-D with lower cut-off ≥5.

  8. Structural ambiguity of the Chinese version of the hospital anxiety and depression scale in patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenru; Lopez, Violeta; Thompson, David; Martin, Colin R

    2006-01-01

    Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a widely used screening tool designed as a case detector for clinically relevant anxiety and depression. Recent studies of the HADS in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in European countries suggest it comprises three, rather than two, underlying sub-scale dimensions. The factor structure of the Chinese version of the HADS was evaluated in patients with CHD in mainland China. Methods Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted on self-report HADS forms from 154 Chinese CHD patients. Results Little difference was observed in model fit between best performing three-factor and two-factor models. Conclusion The current observations are inconsistent with recent studies highlighting a dominant underlying tri-dimensional structure to the HADS in CHD patients. The Chinese version of the HADS may perform differently to European language versions of the instrument in patients with CHD. PMID:16438711

  9. The British Sign Language versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine D; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Scott, Paul R; Kendal, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to translate 3 widely used clinical assessment measures into British Sign Language (BSL), to pilot the BSL versions, and to establish their validity and reliability. These were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). The 3 assessment measures were translated into BSL and piloted with the Deaf signing population in the United Kingdom (n = 113). Participants completed the PHQ-9, GAD-7, WSAS, and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) online. The reliability and validity of the BSL versions of PHQ-9, GAD-7, and WSAS have been examined and were found to be good. The construct validity for the PHQ-9 BSL version did not find the single-factor solution as found in the hearing population. The BSL versions of PHQ-9, GAD-7, and WSAS have been produced in BSL and can be used with the signing Deaf population in the United Kingdom. This means that now there are accessible mental health assessments available for Deaf people who are BSL users, which could assist in the early identification of mental health difficulties.

  10. Prevalence and associated factors of anxiety and depression among patients with chronic respiratory diseases in eight general hospitals in Jiangsu Province of China: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianmei; Li, Jiashu; Gu, Wei; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Yimin; Zhang, Guicai; Ding, Yuanhua; Tang, Yanfen

    2017-05-01

    Anxiety and depression are two common psychological disorders with high morbidity worldwide. Understanding of their prevalence of patients with chronic respiratory diseases is becoming more and more important for clinicians. The current study aims at investigation of the prevalence and potential risk factors of anxiety and depression among patients with chronic respiratory diseases. The psychological status, anxiety and depression, and the relevant risk factors of 1713 patients with chronic respiratory diseases from 8 general hospitals in Jiangsu Province of China were evaluated. The results showed that the patients with chronic respiratory diseases experiencing depression and anxiety accounted for 46.00% and 25.34%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lower body mass index (BMI), sleep disorders, limitation of physical activity, and negative life events were significantly associated with an increased risk of both depressive and anxiety symptoms. Poor marital status including divorce, separation and widowerhood was markedly correlated with an increased risk of depression, and chronic pain was with anxiety symptoms, respectively. Collectively, the data demonstrated that depression and anxiety were highly prevalent among the patients with chronic respiratory diseases. It is greatly significant to take specific psychological measures to lower the incidence of depression and anxiety in these patients.

  11. The influence of general anxiety and childbirth-specific anxiety on birth outcome.

    PubMed

    Reck, C; Zimmer, K; Dubber, S; Zipser, B; Schlehe, B; Gawlik, S

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we examined a German sample to determine whether anxiety symptoms during pregnancy had an impact on the duration and method of childbirth. Data of N = 88 women recruited at the Heidelberg University Hospital were used in the analyses. Prepartum anxiety symptoms were assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, general anxiety) and the Pregnancy Related Anxiety Questionnaire (PRAQ-R, pregnancy-specific anxiety). Obstetric outcome was taken from birth records and operationalized by two parameters: the total duration of birth (dilation and fetal expulsion) and the incidence of pregnancy or birth-related interventions (ventouse, planned, and unplanned Cesarean section). The data show that childbirth-specific anxiety assessed by the PRAQ-R is an important predictor of total birth duration. In contrast, general anxiety measured by the STAI had no effect. The incidence of birth intervention was explained by parity. Anxiety, however, had no predictive value. In addition to medical factors, childbirth-specific anxiety during pregnancy plays an important role in the process of childbirth. The findings of the present study point to the need of implementing psychological interventions to reduce childbirth-specific anxiety and thereby positively influencing birth outcome.

  12. Neurasthenia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and the Medicalization of Worry in a Vietnamese Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tran, Allen L

    2016-04-26

    This article examines two forms of the medicalization of worry in an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Biomedical psychiatrists understand patients' symptoms as manifestations of the excessive worry associated with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Drawing on an ethnopsychology of emotion that reflects increasingly popular models of neoliberal selfhood, these psychiatrists encourage patients to frame psychic distress in terms of private feelings to address the conditions in their lives that lead to chronic anxiety. However, most patients attribute their symptoms to neurasthenia instead of GAD. Differences between doctors' and patients' explanatory models are not just rooted in their understandings of illness but also in their respective conceptualizations of worry in terms of emotion and sentiment. Patients with neurasthenia reject doctors' attempts to psychologize distress and maintain a model of worry that supports a sense of moral selfhood based on notions of obligation and sacrifice.

  13. Buspirone treatment of psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children with symptoms of anxiety and moderately severe aggression.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, C R; Jiang, H; Domeshek, L J

    1997-01-01

    Open-label buspirone was studied in 25 prepubertal psychiatric inpatients (age 8.0 +/- 1.8 years, 76% boys) presenting with anxiety symptoms and moderately aggressive behavior. Patients with severe aggression, requiring rapid treatment with mood stabilizers or neuroleptics, were excluded. A 3-week titration (maximum 50 mg daily) preceded a 6-week maintenance phase at optimal dose. Buspirone was discontinued in 6 children (25%): 4 developed increased aggression and agitation, and 2 developed euphoric mania. For the 19 patients who completed the study, mean optimal dose was 28 mg daily. Among completers, depressive symptoms were reduced 52% by Week 6 on Children's Depression Inventory (p < or = 0.001). Decreased aggressivity was reflected in a 29% reduction on Measure of Aggression, Violence, and Rage in Children [MAVRIC] ratings (p < or = 0.02) and in 86% less time in seclusion or physical restraints (p < or = 0.02). Clinical Global Assessment scores improved (CGAS 41 vs. 54, p < or = 0.01). Only 3 children improved sufficiently to continue buspirone after the study. Residual aggressivity and global functioning remained problematic. Buspirone may pose behavioral risks in treating moderate aggressivity in 24% of children with anxiety; in the others, the therapeutic effects on aggression, anxiety, and depression were limited but significant.

  14. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool.

  15. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: “No Butterflies in the Desert”

    PubMed Central

    Maters, Gemma A.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kim, Aimee Y.; Coyne, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-structures. This article examines whether these problems could be due to the construction of the HADS that poses difficulties for translation and cross-cultural use. Methods Authors’ awareness of difficulties translating the HADS were identified by examining 20% of studies using the HADS, obtained by a systematic literature search in Pubmed and PsycINFO in May 2012. Reports of use of translations and validation studies were recorded for papers from non-English speaking countries. Narrative and systematic reviews were examined for how authors dealt with different translations. Results Of 417 papers from non-English speaking countries, only 45% indicated whether a translation was used. Studies validating translations were cited in 54%. Seventeen reviews, incorporating data from diverse translated versions, were examined. Only seven mentioned issues of language and culture, and none indicated insurmountable problems in integrating results from different translations. Conclusion Initial decisions concerning item content and response options likely leave the HADS difficult to translate, but we failed to find an acknowledgment of problems in articles involving its translation and cross-cultural use. Investigators’ lack of awareness of these issues can lead to anomalous results and difficulties in interpretation and integration of these results. Reviews tend to overlook these issues and most reviews indiscriminately integrate results from studies performed in different countries. Cross-culturally valid, but literally translated versions of the HADS may not be attainable, and specific cutpoints may not be valid across cultures and language. Claims about rates of anxiety and

  16. Validity study of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale among a group of Saudi patients.

    PubMed

    el-Rufaie, O E; Absood, G

    1987-11-01

    The Arabic version of the HAD scale was validated in a sample of 50 Saudi patients. The scale scores were assessed against the principal author's clinical evaluations. Spearman correlations of all items of the scale, except for one, were statistically significant. The non-significance of one item was probably related to the way it was translated into Arabic. The study furnished evidence that the Arabic version was a reliable instrument for detecting states of anxiety and depression in Saudi patients in a primary health care setting.

  17. Emergency medical services responders’ perceptions of the effect of stress and anxiety on patient safety in the out-of-hospital emergency care of children: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Matthew; O'Brien, Kerth; Dickinson, Caitlin; Meckler, Garth; Engle, Phil; Lambert, William; Jui, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) providers report anxiety as the second most common contributor to paediatric patient safety events. The objective of this study was to understand how EMS providers perceive the effect of stress and anxiety on paediatric out-of-hospital patient safety. Setting This was a nationwide study of EMS providers from 44 of 50 (88%) US states. Participants A total of 753 eligible EMS professionals, including emergency medical technicians, emergency department physicians and nurses (general and paediatric), and respiratory therapists who participate in out-of-hospital transports. Primary and secondary outcome measures Outcomes included responses to: (1) clinical situations where heightened stress or anxiety was likely to contribute to safety events, (2) aspects of these clinical situations that cause stress or anxiety and (3) how stress or anxiety may lead to paediatric safety events. Results EMS providers reported that the clinical situations where stress and anxiety were more likely to contribute to paediatric patient safety events were trauma, respiratory distress and cardiac issues. Key themes were: (1) provider sympathy or identification with children, (2) difficulty seeing an innocent child hurt and the inherent value of children and (3) insufficient exposure to paediatric emergencies. Conclusions Caring for paediatric emergencies creates unique stresses on providers that may affect patient safety. Many of the factors reported to cause provider stress and anxiety are inherent attributes of children and therefore not modifiable. Tools that support care during stressful conditions such as cognitive aids may help to mitigate anxiety in the prehospital care of children. Further research is needed to identify opportunities for and attributes of interventions. PMID:28246139

  18. Death anxiety as a function of aging anxiety.

    PubMed

    Benton, Jeremy P; Christopher, Andrew N; Walter, Mark I

    2007-04-01

    To assess how different facets of aging anxiety contributed to the prediction of tangible and existential death anxiety, 167 Americans of various Christian denominations completed a battery of questionnaires. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for demographic variables and previously demonstrated predictors of death anxiety, revealed that the aging anxiety dimensions of physical appearance concern and fear of losses each positively predicted tangible death anxiety. In addition, the aging anxiety dimension of fear of losses predicted existential death anxiety. Results are discussed with respect to the multifaceted nature of death anxiety and how different forms of aging anxiety contribute to anxieties about death.

  19. Psychometric Evaluation of the Chinese Version of the Existential Anxiety Questionnaire in a Sample of Chinese Adolescents Living in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    To, Siu-ming; Chan, Wallace Chi-ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: While Western academia has increasingly recognized the importance of studying existential anxiety among adolescents, psychometrically valid and reliable tools for measuring this construct remain unavailable in Chinese societies. Objective: This research investigated the empirical viability of the construct of existential anxiety in…

  20. Effect of NICU Department Orientation Program on Mother’s Anxiety: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Heydarpoor Damanabad, Zhilla; Rahkar Farshi, Mahni; Asgari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ranjbar Kochaksaraie, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neonatal intensive care unit induces the high level of anxiety for mothers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of NICU orientation program on the anxiety of mothers who had preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial (three parallel groups). Participants included 99 mothers with preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU of Al- Zahra hospital, affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Mothers were randomly assigned to one of three groups (film, booklet, and control). Mothers completed the State- Trait Anxiety Inventory before entering to the NICU, and then mothers in the experiment groups became familiar with the NICU environment through watching a film or reading booklet. After the first NICU visit, all mothers completed the STAI and Cattell's Anxiety Questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 13 software. Results: There was no significant difference between three groups regarding state- trait anxiety before the intervention. After the first NICU visit, a significant reduction in maternal state anxiety was seen in the both experiment groups. There was no statistical significant difference regarding trait anxiety. Data obtained from Cattell's anxiety questionnaire after intervention, showed significant difference in state anxiety between groups. Conclusion: Employing film and booklet orientation strategy after preterm delivery can reduce the mother’s anxiety and beneficent for the mother, baby, family and health care system. PMID:27752486

  1. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services using the theory of planned behaviour: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Yang, Fan; Mu, Dongqin; Xing, Yuan; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Main study aim was as follows: (1) to explore the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model in predicting Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services (CPSs), including auxiliary CPSs and core CPSs; (2) to identify the main factors affecting the Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide core CPSs based on TPB quantitatively. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting The study was conducted in 22 general hospitals in seven cities located in the eastern and western part of China. Participants 416 hospital pharmacists (292 (70.2%) female) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Quantitative responses with hospital pharmacists' intention, attitude, subjective norms (SNs) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) over provision of CPSs and their past behaviour (PB)-related CPSs. Results The structural equation model analysis found that attitude (p=0.0079, β=0.12), SN (p=0.038, β=0.10) and the pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs (p=0.0001, β=0.63) significantly predicted of their intention to provide core CPSs, accounting for 54.0% of its variance. Attitude (p=0.0001, β=0.35), PBC (p=0.0182, β=0.12) and PB (p=0.0009, β=0.15) are significant predictors of pharmacists' intention, accounting for 21% of the variance in pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs. Conclusions The TPB with the addition of PB is a useful framework for predicting pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs in Chinese hospital care context. Strategies to improve hospital pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs should focus on helping the individuals related medical care see the value of CPSs, altering their perception of social pressure towards core CPSs and the removal of obstacles that impede the translation of intentions into behaviour. PMID:27707835

  2. Procedures for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal diseases: a multicenter questionnaire survey of hospitals in the Kyoto Neonatal Disease Study Group, Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Kawai, Masahiko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Kato, Fumihide; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Yamakawa, Masaru; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Seiichi; Maeda, Shinji; Okumura, Mitsuyoshi; Kanaoka, Hiroo

    2007-02-01

    To explore clinical protocols for the prevention of early-onset group B Streptococcus (EOGBS) disease of the newborn in Japan, we conducted a multicenter questionnaire survey. Of 32 regional centers participating in the Kyoto Neonatal Study Group, 28 provided usable data concerning prevention practices undertaken between 2000 and 2004. Twenty-three (82%) of the 28 hospitals implemented bacteriological screening to identify maternal GBS carriage, and all 23 hospitals administered intrapartum antibiotics to all screening-positive pregnant women. There were no institutes that used risk-based strategies. In the 23 hospitals, bacteriological screening was conducted mostly by lower vaginal swab alone (n = 18). Eighteen hospitals performed screening once during pregnancy, either before 34 weeks' gestation (n = 6) or between 35 and 37 weeks' gestation (n = 12). Oral antepartum antibiotics, when carriage was identified, were administered at 12 (52%) hospitals. Twenty institutes used penicillins for intrapartum prophylaxis. However, the loading dose for chemoprophylaxis ranged from 0.5 to 2 g, and the interval between repeat administrations ranged from 4 to 12 h. Although the results indicated that more than 80% of the hospitals surveyed had introduced some screening-based prevention practices, the timing of the bacteriological screening during the pregnancy, the number of screenings, and the screening sites, as well as the antibiotics used, and their dosage, varied widely. Because of these highly variable methods, the efficacy of the implementation of preventive practices could not be determined. This study is the first to have described preventive practices for EOGBS disease in Japan in the era of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. In light of the above results, a larger study under a unifying protocol would be warranted.

  3. Knowledge and practices of obtaining informed consent for medical procedures among specialist physicians: questionnaire study in 6 Croatian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Marko; Kvolik, Slavica; Kardum, Goran; Kozina, Slavica; Tomic Juraga, Ana

    2009-12-01

    AIM. To assess physicians' knowledge and practices for obtaining patients' informed consent to medical procedures. METHODS. An anonymous and voluntary survey of knowledge and practices for obtaining informed consent was conducted among 470 physicians (63% response rate) working in 6 hospitals: 93 specialists in anesthesiology, 166 in internal medicine, and 211 in surgery. RESULTS. Only 54% physicians were acquainted with the fact that the procedure for obtaining consent was regulated by the law. Internists and surgeons were better informed than anesthesiologists (P=0.024). More than a half of respondents (66%) were familiar with the fact that a law on patient rights was passed in Croatia; there were no differences among different specialties (P=0.638). Only 38% of the physicians were fully informed about the procedure of obtaining consent. Internists and surgeons provided detailed information to the patient in 33% of the cases and anesthesiologists in 16% of the cases (P<0.050). Internists reported spending more time on informing the patient than anesthesiologists and surgeons (P<0.001). There were no differences in knowledge and practices for obtaining informed consent between physicians working in university and those working in community hospitals (P> or =0.05 for all questions). CONCLUSION. Physicians in Croatia have no formal education on informed consent and implement the informed consent process in a rather formal manner, regardless of the type of hospital or medical specialty. Systemic approach at education and training at the national level is needed to improve the informed consent process.

  4. Death anxiety in hospitalized end-of-life patients as captured from a structured electronic health record: differences by patient and nurse characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, Muhammad Kamran; Cheema, Umer Iftikhar; Stifter, Janet; Wilkie, Diana J; Keenan, Gail M; Yao, Yingwei; Ansari, Rashid; Khokhar, Ashfaq A

    2014-01-01

    The nursing outcomes of hospitalized patients whose plans of care include death anxiety, which is a diagnosis among patients at the end-of-life, are obscure. The authors of the current article applied data mining techniques to nursing plan-of-care data for patients diagnosed with death anxiety, as defined by North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International, from four different hospitals to examine nursing care outcomes and associated factors. Results indicate that <50% of patients met the expected outcome of comfortable death. Gerontology unit patients were more likely to meet the expected outcome than patients from other unit types, although results were not statistically significant. Younger patients (i.e., age <65) had a lower chance of meeting the outcome compared with older patients (i.e., age ≥65) (χ(2)(1) = 9.266, p < 0.004). Longer stays improved the chances of meeting the outcome (χ(2)(2) = 6.47, p < 0.04). Results indicate that death anxiety outcomes are suboptimal and suggest the need to better educate clinicians about diagnosing and treating death anxiety among patients who face the end-of-life transition.

  5. Statistics Anxiety, Trait Anxiety, Learning Behavior, and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between statistics anxiety, individual characteristics (e.g., trait anxiety and learning strategies), and academic performance. Students enrolled in a statistics course in psychology (N = 147) filled in a questionnaire on statistics anxiety, trait anxiety, interest in statistics, mathematical…

  6. Knowledge and Practices of Obtaining Informed Consent for Medical Procedures among Specialist Physicians: Questionnaire Study in 6 Croatian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jukić, Marko; Kvolik, Slavica; Kardum, Goran; Kozina, Slavica; Tomić, Ana; Juraga

    2009-01-01

    Aim To assess physicians’ knowledge and practices for obtaining patients’ informed consent to medical procedures. Methods An anonymous and voluntary survey of knowledge and practices for obtaining informed consent was conducted among 470 physicians (63% response rate) working in 6 hospitals: 93 specialists in anesthesiology, 166 in internal medicine, and 211 in surgery. Results Only 54% physicians were acquainted with the fact that the procedure for obtaining consent was regulated by the law. Internists and surgeons were better informed than anesthesiologists (P = 0.024). More than a half of respondents (66%) were familiar with the fact that a law on patient rights was passed in Croatia; there were no differences among different specialties (P = 0.638). Only 38% of the physicians were fully informed about the procedure of obtaining consent. Internists and surgeons provided detailed information to the patient in 33% of the cases and anesthesiologists in 16% of the cases (P < 0.050). Internists reported spending more time on informing the patient than anesthesiologists and surgeons (P < 0.001). There were no differences in knowledge and practices for obtaining informed consent between physicians working in university and those working in community hospitals (P ≥ 0.05 for all questions). Conclusion Physicians in Croatia have no formal education on informed consent and implement the informed consent process in a rather formal manner, regardless of the type of hospital or medical specialty. Systemic approach at education and training at the national level is needed to improve the informed consent process. PMID:20017225

  7. Revisiting a Common Measure of Child Postoperative Recovery: Development of the Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire for Ambulatory Surgery (PHBQ-AS)

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Brooke N.; Kain, Zeev N.; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Stevenson, Robert S.; Mayes, Linda C.; Guadarrama, Josue; Fortier, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ) was designed for assessing children’s post-hospitalization and postoperative new-onset behavioral changes. However, the psychometric properties of the scale have not been re-evaluated in the past five decades despite substantial changes in the practice of surgery. In this investigation, we examined the psychometric properties of the PHBQ to potentially increase the efficacy and relevance of the instrument in current perioperative settings. Method This study used principal components analysis, a panel of experts, Cronbach’s alpha, and correlations to examine the current subscale structure of the PHBQ and eliminate items to create the Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire for Ambulatory Surgery (PHBQ-AS). Data from previous investigations (N = 1064, Mage = 5.88) which utilized the PHBQ were combined for the purposes of this paper. Results A principal components analysis revealed that the original subscale structure of the PHBQ could not be replicated. Subsequently, a battery reduction, which utilized principal components analysis and a panel of experts, was used to eliminate the subscale structure of the scale and reduce the number of items from 27 to 11, creating the PHBQ-AS. The PHBQ-AS demonstrated good internal consistency reliability and concurrent validity with another measure of children’s psychosocial and physical functioning. Conclusion Revising the former subscale structure and reducing the number of items in the PHBQ to create the PHBQ-AS may provide a means for reducing the burden of post-operative behavioral assessment through decreasing time of administration and eliminating redundancy of items and allow for more accurate measurement of child postoperative behavioral changes. PMID:25958978

  8. Factors Associated with Types of Mathematics Anxiety in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Kenneth C.

    1995-01-01

    Factor analysis of a version of the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (MARS) and the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) given to (n=173) introductory statistics students found 6 factors: general evaluation anxiety, everyday numerical anxiety, passive observation anxiety, performance anxiety, mathematics test anxiety, and problem-solving anxiety. (39…

  9. Work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care providers and the risk of post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jacoba; Lok, Anja; Van't Verlaat, Ellen; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Bakker, Arnold B; Smit, Bert J

    2011-07-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed existing data on the impact of work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care professionals. Work-related critical incidents may induce post-traumatic stress symptoms or even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression and may negatively affect health care practitioners' behaviors toward patients. Nurses and doctors often cope by working part time or switching jobs. Hospital administrators and health care practitioners themselves may underestimate the effects of work-related critical incidents. Relevant online databases were searched for original research published from inception to 2009 and manual searches of the Journal of Traumatic Stress, reference lists, and the European Traumatic Stress Research Database were conducted. Two researchers independently decided on inclusion and study quality. Effect sizes were estimated using standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. Consistency was evaluated, using the I(2)-statistic. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Eleven studies, which included 3866 participants, evaluated the relationship between work-related critical incidents and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Six of these studies, which included 1695 participants, also reported on the relationship between work-related critical incidents and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Heterogeneity among studies was high and could not be accounted for by study quality, character of the incident, or timing of data collection. Pooled effect sizes for the impact of work-related critical incidents on post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression were small to medium. Remarkably, the effect was more pronounced in the longer than in the shorter term. In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that work-related critical incidents are positively related to post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression in hospital-based health care professionals

  10. Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for identifying depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Christoph; Sievi, Noriane A; Clarenbach, Christian F; Schwarz, Esther Irene; Schlatzer, Christian; Brack, Thomas; Brutsche, Martin; Frey, Martin; Irani, Sarosh; Leuppi, Jörg D; Rüdiger, Jochen; Thurnheer, Robert; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Psychological morbidity is common in chronic respiratory diseases. The diagnostic accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and risk factors for comorbid depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are addressed. Consecutive COPD patients (GOLD stage I-IV, 40-75 years old) were enrolled in a multicentre, cross-sectional cohort study. Diagnosis of depression was ascertained through clinical records. Lung function, HADS score, 6-minute walking test (6-MWT), MRC dyspnoea score, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-nine COPD patients (mean age 62.5 years; 32% female; mean FEV1 48% predicted) were included. Patients diagnosed with depression (29/259; 11.2%) had significantly higher HADS-D and HADS-Total scores than nondepressed patients (median (quartiles) HADS-D 6 [4; 9] versus 4 [2; 7], median HADS-Total 14 [10; 20] versus 8 [5; 14]). Receiver-operating characteristic plots showed moderate accuracy for HADS-D, AUC 0.662 (95%CI 0.601-0.719), and HADS-Total, AUC 0.681 (95%CI 0.620-0.737), with optimal cut-off scores of >5 and >9, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 62.1% and 62.6% for HADS-D compared to 75.9% and 55.2% for HADS-Total. Age, comorbidities, sex, and lower airflow limitation predicted depression. The HADS exhibits low diagnostic accuracy for depression in COPD patients. Younger men with comorbidities are at increased risk for depression.

  11. Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for Identifying Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Christoph; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Schwarz, Esther Irene; Schlatzer, Christian; Brack, Thomas; Brutsche, Martin; Frey, Martin; Irani, Sarosh; Leuppi, Jörg D.; Rüdiger, Jochen; Thurnheer, Robert; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Psychological morbidity is common in chronic respiratory diseases. The diagnostic accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and risk factors for comorbid depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are addressed. Consecutive COPD patients (GOLD stage I–IV, 40–75 years old) were enrolled in a multicentre, cross-sectional cohort study. Diagnosis of depression was ascertained through clinical records. Lung function, HADS score, 6-minute walking test (6-MWT), MRC dyspnoea score, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-nine COPD patients (mean age 62.5 years; 32% female; mean FEV1 48% predicted) were included. Patients diagnosed with depression (29/259; 11.2%) had significantly higher HADS-D and HADS-Total scores than nondepressed patients (median (quartiles) HADS-D 6 [4; 9] versus 4 [2; 7], median HADS-Total 14 [10; 20] versus 8 [5; 14]). Receiver-operating characteristic plots showed moderate accuracy for HADS-D, AUC 0.662 (95%CI 0.601–0.719), and HADS-Total, AUC 0.681 (95%CI 0.620–0.737), with optimal cut-off scores of >5 and >9, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 62.1% and 62.6% for HADS-D compared to 75.9% and 55.2% for HADS-Total. Age, comorbidities, sex, and lower airflow limitation predicted depression. The HADS exhibits low diagnostic accuracy for depression in COPD patients. Younger men with comorbidities are at increased risk for depression. PMID:25548667

  12. Cognitive and somatic anxiety.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Kearsley, N

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and forty adults (including sports players, recreational exercisers, mediators and sedentary controls) completed three inventories purporting to measure cognitive and somatic aspects of anxiety. These were the Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Questionnaire (CSAQ) devised by Schwartz, Davidson & Goleman (Psychosomatic Medicine, 40, 321-328, 1978), the Worry-Emotionality Scale (WES, Morris, Davis & Hutchens, Journal of Educational Psychology, 73, 541-555, 1981) and the Lehrer-Woolfolk (1982) Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (LWASQ). Factor analysis of the CSAQ and WES identified distinct cognitive and somatic anxiety factors in both inventories. Higher somatic than cognitive ratings were recorded on the CSAQ and WES, while the pattern was reversed on the LWASQ. The CSAQ can tentatively be recommended as a useful measure of these two anxiety components. We were unable to confirm an observation made previously in the literature that practice of meditation is associated with reduced cognitive anxiety, or that exercise is linked with lower somatic anxiety.

  13. Relationships Between Spielberger Trait Anxiety and Lykken Social and Physical Trait Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankstein, Kirk R.

    1976-01-01

    To determine the relationship between Spielberger's measure of trait anxiety and social-interpersonal vs. physical danger trait anxiety, Ss were administered the trait scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Lykken's Activity Preference Questionnaire (APQ). (Editor)

  14. Questionnaire survey about use of an online appointment booking system in one large tertiary public hospital outpatient service center in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As a part of nationwide healthcare reforms, the Chinese government launched web-based appointment systems (WAS) to provide a solution to problems around outpatient appointments and services. These have been in place in all Chinese public tertiary hospitals since 2009. Methods Questionnaires were collected from both patients and doctors in one large tertiary public hospital in Shanghai, China.Data were analyzed to measure their satisfaction and views about the WAS. Results The 1000 outpatients randomly selected for the survey were least satisfied about the waiting time to see a doctor. Even though the WAS provided a much more convenient booking method, only 17% of patients used it. Of the 197 doctors surveyed, over 90% thought it was necessary to provide alternative forms of appointment booking systems for outpatients. However, about 80% of those doctors who were not associated professors would like to provide an ‘on-the-spot’ appointment option, which would lead to longer waits for patients. Conclusions Patients were least satisfied about the waiting times. To effectively reduce appointment-waiting times is therefore an urgent issue. Despite the benefits of using the WAS, most patients still registered via the usual method of queuing, suggesting that hospitals and health service providers should promote and encourage the use of the WAS. Furthermore, Chinese health providers need to help doctors to take others’ opinions or feedback into consideration when treating patients to minimize the gap between patients’ and doctors’ opinions. These findings may provide useful information for both practitioners and regulators, and improve recognition of this efficient and useful booking system, which may have far-reaching and positive implications for China’s ongoing reforms. PMID:24912568

  15. Temporomandibular disorder and anxiety, quality of sleep, and quality of life in nursing professionals.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Larissa Kattiney; Almeida, Guilherme de Araújo; Lelis, Éverton Ribeiro; Tavares, Marcelo; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the association between temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and anxiety, quality of sleep, and quality of life in nursing professionals at the Hospital de Clínicas de Uberlândia of the Universidade Federal de Uberlandia--HCU-UFU (Medical University Hospital of the Federal University of Uberlândia), four questionnaires were given to nursing professionals. The questionnaires were completed by 160 of these professionals. The Fonseca's questionnaire was used to evaluate the presence and severity of TMD, the IDATE was used to evaluate anxiety, the SAQ was used to evaluate quality of sleep, and the SF-36 was used to evaluate quality of life. Forty-one nurses (25.6%) reported having no TMD (Fonseca's questionnaire score ≤ 15), 66 (41.3%) had mild TMD (Fonseca's questionnaire score 20-40), 39 (24.4%) had moderate TMD (Fonseca's questionnaire score 45-65), and 14 (8.8%) had severe TMD (Fonseca's questionnaire score ≥ 70). According to Fonseca's questionnaire, the presence of TMD was associated with trait anxiety, but the TMD severity was associated with state anxiety classification (mild, moderate, severe). The SAQ score differed significantly from Fonseca classification. The Fonseca's questionnaire score correlated negatively with the score of each dimension of the SF-36 (r = -0.419 to -0.183). We conclude that TMD is common among nursing professionals; its presence was associated with trait anxiety, and its severity was associated with state anxiety. Hence, the presence of TMD may reduce quality of sleep and quality of life.

  16. The latent structure of the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Robert; Bryant, Richard A; Silove, Derrick; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; McFarlane, Alexander C; Marmar, Charles R

    2009-04-01

    This paper has been retracted due to a publisher's error: the order of the authors was incorrect. The Editor and Publisher of the Journal of Traumatic Stress apologize to the authors and our readership. The Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) is a widely used measure of peritraumatic dissociation, and is presumably a unidimensional construct. Two hundred forty-seven individuals admitted to five hospitals after traumatic injury were administered the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the PDEQ. Factor analysis indicated that the PDEQ involved two factors containing four items each: one factor (altered awareness) indexes alterations in awareness and the other (derealization) reflects distortions in perceptions of the self and the world. Only the derealization factor was associated with acute stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms. Cross-validation with independent data provided only partial support for the 2-factor structure model. These data indicate that peritraumatic dissociation may involve two distinct constructs.

  17. Death Anxiety as a Function of Aging Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Jeremy P.; Christopher, Andrew N.; Walter, Mark I.

    2007-01-01

    To assess how different facets of aging anxiety contributed to the prediction of tangible and existential death anxiety, 167 Americans of various Christian denominations completed a battery of questionnaires. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for demographic variables and previously demonstrated predictors of death anxiety, revealed that…

  18. Addressing Library Anxiety (LA) in student nurses: a study in an NHS Foundation Trust Hospital library and information service.

    PubMed

    Still, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    Library anxiety is a concept which has been recognised in academic library circles since the early 1990s. It can result in students actively avoiding the library for the duration of their studies. Madeleine Still is Trust Librarian at North Tees & Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust and while studying for an MSc, recognised that some student nurses were exhibiting signs of library anxiety. She decided to make it the focus of her MSc dissertation, and this article discusses her research project as well as highlighting the measures she has taken to address the issues she uncovered. Madeleine graduated in July 2013 with an MSc in Information & Library Studies from Robert Gordon University.

  19. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: a pilot study to examine its latent structure and the link between psychological state and symptom severity in transient ischaemic attack patients.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Laura; James, Gill; Sackley, Cath

    2016-07-01

    Transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is often associated with anxiety and depression, which may precipitate secondary stroke and interfere with treatment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to assess these states and to inform the management of any associated psychological problems, but there is considerable debate about what it actually measures. The HADS scores from a range of different clinical groups have been reviewed in order to assess its psychometric properties, but so far, no research has examined either its latent structure when used with TIA patients, or the association between symptom severity and the test's validity. The aims of this study, therefore, were to investigate: (a) the underlying structure of the HADS when used with TIA patients; and (b) the impact of symptom severity on the validity of the HADS. The HADS and a functional capacity measure were administered by post to a sample of 542 confirmed TIA patients. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the HADS scores to establish its underlying structure for this clinical group, and then, sub-sample correlations were undertaken between the anxiety/depression scores for different levels of functional capacity. Two factors emerged, with 13 of the 14 HADS items loading significantly on both, suggesting there is a common affective state underlying the standard anxiety and depression scales. Further data-exploration indicated that convergence between these affective states increased as functional capacity deteriorated. The results suggest firstly that the HADS measures general subjective distress when used with TIA patients, and secondly that the higher reported symptom severity in this clinical group may be associated with reduced affective differentiation. As the ability to retain clear affective discrimination is associated with health and well-being, this could provide a focus for post-TIA rehabilitation.

  20. Anxiety and personality characteristics in children undergoing dental interventions.

    PubMed

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Sarakinova, Olivera; Markovska-Simoska, Silvana; Loleska, Sofija

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety about and fear of dental treatment have been recognized as sources of problems in the management of child dental patients. It has been suggested that some individuals who are fearful of or anxious about dental treatment have a constitutional vulnerability to anxiety disorders as is evidenced by the presence of multiple fears, generalized anxiety or panic disorders. Concerning the child population, maternal anxiety is considered to be a major factor affecting the behaviour of young children expecting dental intervention. The aim of the study was to the measure general anxiety of children undergoing dental intervention and to compare it with some personality characteristics, such as psychopathology, extroversion and neuroticism. The evaluated sample comprises 50 children (31 girls and 19 boys), randomly selected at the University Dental Hospital, Skopje. The mean age for girls was 11.4 (± 2.4) years, and for boys 10.7 (± 2.6) years. Two psychometric instruments were used: the General Anxiety Scale for Children (GASC) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). The study confirms the presence of a high anxiety level (evaluated with GASC) among all children undergoing dental intervention. It also confirmed differences in anxiety scores between girls and boys, girls having higher scores for anxiety. Personality characteristics (evaluated with EPQ) showed low psychopathological traits, moderate extroversion and neuroticism, but accentuated insincerity (evaluated with L scale). L scales are lower with increasing age, but P scores rise with age, which could be related to puberty. No correlation was found between personality traits (obtained scores for EPQ) and anxiety except for neuroticism, which is positively correlated with the level of anxiety. In the management of dental anxiety some response measures (psychological support, biofeedback, and relaxation techniques) are recommended.

  1. Anxiety and Test Anxiety: General and Test Anxiety among College Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custodero, Jeri Lyn

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the state, trait, and test anxiety scores of 145 college students with and without learning disabilities against categories such as demographics, general anxiety, test anxiety, and disability experience. This study used a questionnaire and compared answers among groups. The analysis indicated that students with learning…

  2. Relation of Depression, Anxiety, and Quality of Life with Outcome after Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Suprakash; Srivastava, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite, increasing number of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) being performed, there is a paucity of Indian studies on the psychological effects of PTCA. Aim. To study the relation of anxiety, depression, and health related quality of life with outcome after PTCA. Methods. A total of 35 patients undergoing PTCA were included in the present project with their informed consent. All patients filled a specially designed proforma, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Coronary Scale, Seattle Angina Questionnaire, and a health related quality of life measure (EQ 5D) one day before undergoing PTCA. Three days after PTCA patients were reassessed with the Hospital anxiety & depression scale, Seattle angina questionnaire and the EQ 5D. Results. Analysis showed that 46% had significant anxiety and 32.1% had significant depression before PTCA. Following successful PTCA, none of the patients had significant anxiety, and only 2 (3.6%) had significant depression. On the Seattle Angina Questionnaire, physical limitation reduced from 67.9 to 48. Disease perception improved from 21.2 to 37.1. On the EQ5D, the health status improved from 42.7 before PTCA to 78.7 after PTCA. Conclusion. Successful PTCA resulted in significant reduction in anxiety, depression, and physical limitation and improvement in disease perception and health status. PMID:24319368

  3. Sources and Experience of Anxiety in Practice Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Ken; Nicoll, Vivienne

    1981-01-01

    Questionnaires and interviews were used to study student teachers' anxiety and reactions to classroom successes and failures. From the questionnaire responses, it was clear that anxiety fell during the three-week practice session while custodial attitudes increased. (FG)

  4. Validation of Online Versions of Tinnitus Questionnaires Translated into Swedish

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Karolina; Edvall, Niklas K.; Idrizbegovic, Esma; Huhn, Robert; Cima, Rilana; Persson, Viktor; Leineweber, Constanze; Westerlund, Hugo; Langguth, Berthold; Schlee, Winfried; Canlon, Barbara; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to the lack of objective measures for assessing tinnitus, its clinical evaluation largely relies on the use of questionnaires and psychoacoustic tests. A global assessment of tinnitus burden would largely benefit from holistic approaches that not only incorporate measures of tinnitus but also take into account associated fears, emotional aspects (stress, anxiety, and depression), and quality of life. In Sweden, only a few instruments are available for assessing tinnitus, and the existing tools lack validation. Therefore, we translated a set of questionnaires into Swedish and evaluated their reliability and validity in a group of tinnitus subjects. Methods: We translated the English versions of the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI), the Fear of Tinnitus Questionnaire (FTQ), the Tinnitus Catastrophizing Scale (TCS), the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-30), and the Tinnitus Sample Case History Questionnaire (TSCHQ) into Swedish. These translations were delivered via the internet with the already existing Swedish versions of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Hyperacusis Questionnaire (HQ), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF). Psychometric properties were evaluated by means of internal consistency [Cronbach's alpha (α)] and test–retest reliability across a 9-week interval [Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), Cohen's kappa] in order to establish construct as well as clinical validity using a sample of 260 subjects from a population-based cohort. Results: Internal consistency was acceptable for all questionnaires (α > 0.7) with the exception of the “social relationships” subscale of the WHOQoL-BREF. Test–retest reliability was generally acceptable (ICC > 0.70, Cohens kappa > 0.60) for the tinnitus-related questionnaires, except for the TFI “sense of control” subscale and 15 items of the TSCHQ. Spearmen rank correlations showed that

  5. Anxiety mediates the impact of stress on psychosomatic symptoms in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janet Yuen-Ha; Fong, Daniel Yee-Tak

    2015-01-01

    The literature has stipulated that stress causes somatic symptoms; however, the pathway has not been empirically examined. This study examines the relationship between stress, anxiety, depression, and somatic symptoms by investigating the mediating roles of anxiety and depression in the relationship between stress and somatic symptoms in the general Chinese population. Data were collected from 202 Chinese participants in a household survey conducted between August and September 2013 in Hong Kong. The measurements included a Patient Health Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Sociodemographics. By using structural equation modeling, anxiety was a significant mediator of the effect of stress on somatic symptoms (Z = 4.328, p < .001, 95% CI = .061, .152), even after adjusting for sociodemographic variables. The findings imply that clinical presentation of somatic symptoms will be helpful for general practitioners in primary care in diagnosing anxiety.

  6. Death Depression and Death Anxiety in HIV-Infected Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintze, Julie; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Death Anxiety Scale, Death Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Scale, and questionnaire assessing demographic and life-situation variables to 94 human immunodeficiency virus-infected gay men. Higher death anxiety and death depression were most highly correlated with state anxiety, trait anxiety,…

  7. Living with Amputation: Anxiety and Depression Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Sukriti; Chhabra, Anurag; Uppal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trauma accounts for 16% of the total burden of disease in the world, making it a leading cause of morbidity and mortality especially in the developing nations. India represents about 10% (225million) of the total world workforce in agriculture. With the evolution of new machinery and better techniques of agriculture, there has been a substantial increase in the associated injuries. Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress are among the predictors of poor quality of life (QOL). Aim This study was aimed to assess and correlate of traumatic amputation on the patient’s mental health in the Northern Indian rural setting. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included subjects who had undergone traumatic amputations. A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was administered to each study participant after an informed verbal consent. The questionnaire had two parts. The first part gathered socio-personal and the disability related information from the patient and the second part included a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results The mean anxiety and depression scores were 9.10±5.7 and 3.44±3.42, respectively. The length of original inpatient stay, people at hand for help, number of hospitalizations, number of follow ups per year, type of family (nuclear versus joint), pain perception, optimism, rehabilitation satisfaction and lower limb amputations correlated significantly with anxiety levels in the patients. The depression levels correlated significantly only with perception of pain. Conclusion The amputees have a large number of psychosocial concerns which need to be addressed to provide a holistic care and a better QOL. It is essential to sensitize the community, the health care providers and the patient’s family to the additional psychosocial needs of the amputee. PMID:27790532

  8. Factors associated with preoperative anxiety levels of Turkish surgical patients: from a single center in Ankara

    PubMed Central

    Erkilic, Ezgi; Kesimci, Elvin; Soykut, Cem; Doger, Cihan; Gumus, Tülin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    Background Preoperative anxiety and stress are undoubtedly a difficult experience in patients undergoing elective surgery. These unpleasant sensations depend on several factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the preoperative anxiety levels in a sample of Turkish population, as well as the underlying causes using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI anxiety) scale. Methods The study was conducted according to the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the local ethical committee. All participants gave written informed consent upon having received detailed information on the study. Upon entry in the study, state and trait anxiety questionnaires were completed by 186 patients scheduled for elective surgery. The influencing factors in regard to age, sex, educational status and others were also reported. Results There was a statistically significant positive correlation between state and trait anxiety scores in this Turkish population. While the most important predictive factors that affected state-STAI scores were age, sex and duration of sleep the night before surgery; educational status and age were the best predictors for determining the variation in trait-STAI scores. Conclusion The factors affecting anxiety levels in different populations might vary among different countries. Interestingly, in this sample of Turkish population, the trait anxiety levels were found to be higher from state-anxiety levels, especially in women and less educated people. Thus, doubts about operation and anesthesia are overlooked. This could be attributed to the low to intermediate life standards of people admitted to our hospital. PMID:28280304

  9. Validation of a questionnaire measuring the regulation of autonomic function

    PubMed Central

    Kröz, M; Feder, G; von Laue, HB; Zerm, R; Reif, M; Girke, M; Matthes, H; Gutenbrunner, C; Heckmann, C

    2008-01-01

    Background To broaden the range of outcomes that we can measure for patients undergoing treatment for oncological and other chronic conditions, we aimed to validate a questionnaire measuring self-reported autonomic regulation (aR), i.e. to characterise a subject's autonomic functioning by questions on sleeping and waking, vertigo, morningness-eveningness, thermoregulation, perspiration, bowel movements and digestion. Methods We administered the questionnaire to 440 participants (♀: N = 316, ♂: N = 124): 95 patients with breast cancer, 49 with colorectal cancer, 60 with diabetes mellitus, 39 with coronary heart disease, 28 with rheumatological conditions, 32 with Hashimoto's disease, 22 with multiple morbidities and 115 healthy people. We administered the questionnaire a second time to 50.2% of the participants. External convergence criteria included the German version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), a short questionnaire on morningness-eveningness, the Herdecke Quality of Life Questionnaire (HLQ) and a short version questionnaire on self-regulation. Results A principal component analysis yielded a three dimensional 18-item inventory of aR. The subscales orthostatic-circulatory, rest/activity and digestive regulation had internal consistency (Cronbach-α: rα = 0.65 – 0.75) and test-retest reliability (rrt = 0.70 – 85). AR was negatively associated with anxiety, depression, and dysmenorrhoea but positively correlated to HLQ, self-regulation and in part to morningness (except digestive aR) (0.49 – 0.13, all p < 0.05). Conclusion An internal validation of the long-version scale of aR yielded consistent relationships with health versus illness, quality of life and personality. Further studies are required to clarify the issues of external validity, clinical and physiological relevance. PMID:18533043

  10. Preoperative anxiety and emergence delirium and postoperative maladaptive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kain, Zeev N; Caldwell-Andrews, Alison A; Maranets, Inna; McClain, Brenda; Gaal, Dorothy; Mayes, Linda C; Feng, Rui; Zhang, Heping

    2004-12-01

    Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that the clinical phenomena of preoperative anxiety, emergence delirium, and postoperative maladaptive behavioral changes were closely related. We examined this issue using data obtained by our laboratory over the past 6 years. Only children who underwent surgery and general anesthesia using sevoflurane/O(2)/N(2)O and who did not receive midazolam were recruited. Children's anxiety was assessed preoperatively with the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS), emergence delirium was assessed in the postanesthesia care unit, and behavioral changes were assessed with the Post Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ) on postoperative days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14. Regression analysis showed that the odds of having marked symptoms of emergence delirium increased by 10% for each increment of 10 points in the child's state anxiety score (mYPAS). The odds ratio of having new-onset postoperative maladaptive behavior changes was 1.43 for children with marked emergence status as compared with children with no symptoms of emergence delirium. A 10-point increase in state anxiety scores led to a 12.5% increase in the odds that the child would have a new-onset maladaptive behavioral change after the surgery. This finding is highly significant to practicing clinicians, who can now predict the development of adverse postoperative phenomena, such as emergence delirium and postoperative behavioral changes, based on levels of preoperative anxiety.

  11. Measuring Metacognition in Cancer: Validation of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 (MCQ-30)

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sharon A.; Salmon, Peter; Dunn, Graham; Fisher, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 assesses metacognitive beliefs and processes which are central to the metacognitive model of emotional disorder. As recent studies have begun to explore the utility of this model for understanding emotional distress after cancer diagnosis, it is important also to assess the validity of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 for use in cancer populations. Methods 229 patients with primary breast or prostate cancer completed the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale pre-treatment and again 12 months later. The structure and validity of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 were assessed using factor analyses and structural equation modelling. Results Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses provided evidence supporting the validity of the previously published 5-factor structure of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30. Specifically, both pre-treatment and 12 months later, this solution provided the best fit to the data and all items loaded on their expected factors. Structural equation modelling indicated that two dimensions of metacognition (positive and negative beliefs about worry) were significantly associated with anxiety and depression as predicted, providing further evidence of validity. Conclusions These findings provide initial evidence that the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 is a valid measure for use in cancer populations. PMID:25215527

  12. Personality traits, gender differences and symptoms of anhedonia: What does the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measure in nonclinical settings?

    PubMed

    Langvik, Eva; Hjemdal, Odin; Nordahl, Hans M

    2016-04-01

    In healthy populations men report more depressive symptoms than women when depression is measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). This study aims to investigate the role of neuroticism and extroversion in symptom reporting by men and women and whether anhedonia can explain these reversed gender differences in depression observed when using HADS. HADS, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO FFI) were administered twice to a sample of university students. Number of subjects at T1 was 372 and 160 at T2, measured two months apart. Men had a higher average score on depressive symptoms measured by HADS-D compared to women (p = 0.029). Women scored higher than men on HADS-A (p = 0.012), neuroticism (p < 0.001) and PANAS-negative affect (p < 0.029). No significant gender differences were observed in extroversion and positive affect. Test-retest stabilities on HADS-A and HADS-D were high. Neuroticism predicted HADS-A at Time 2. Gender, extroversion, and neuroticism predicted HADS-D at Time 2. The anhedonic content in HADS may be a plausible explanation of reversed gender differences in the HADS depression scale. HADS-D represents a specific anhedonic subtype of depression where symptom reporting reflects dispositional tendencies related specifically to extroversion.

  13. An abnormal screening mammogram causes more anxiety than a palpable lump in benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Keyzer-Dekker, C M G; van Esch, L; de Vries, J; Ernst, M F; Nieuwenhuijzen, G A P; Roukema, J A; van der Steeg, A F W

    2012-07-01

    Being recalled for further diagnostic procedures after an abnormal screening mammogram (ASM) can evoke a high state anxiety with lowered quality of life (QoL). We examined whether these adverse psychological consequences are found in all women with benign breast disease (BBD) or are particular to women referred after ASM. In addition, the influence of the anxiety as a personality characteristic (trait anxiety) was studied. Between September 2002 and February 2010 we performed a prospective longitudinal study in six Dutch hospitals. Women referred after ASM or with a palpable lump in the breast (PL), who were subsequently diagnosed with BBD, were included. Before diagnosis (at referral) and during follow-up, questionnaires were completed examining trait anxiety (at referral), state anxiety, depressive symptoms (at referral, one, three and 6 months after diagnosis), and QoL (at referral and 12 months). Women referred after ASM (N=363) were compared with women with PL (N=401). A similar state anxiety score was found in both groups, but a lower psychological QoL score at 12 months was seen in the ASM group. In women with not-high trait anxiety those in the ASM group were more anxious with more depressive symptoms at referral, and reported impaired psychological QoL at referral and at 12 months compared with the PL group. No differences were found between ASM and PL in women with high trait anxiety, but this group scored unfavorably on anxiety, depressive symptoms and QoL compared with women with not-high trait anxiety. ASM evokes more anxiety and depressive symptoms and lowered QoL compared with women referred with PL, especially in women who are not prone to anxiety. Women should be fully informed properly about the risks and benefits of breast cancer screening programs. We recommend identifying women at risk of reduced QoL using a psychometric test.

  14. Depression and anxiety among parents of phenylketonuria children

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Mehmet; Arslan, Nur; Unal, Ozlem; Cakar, Sevim; Kuyum, Pınar; Bulbul, Selda F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the existence of depression and/or anxiety with underlying risk factors among parents of children with classical phenylketonuria (PKU). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Division of Pediatric Metabolism, Ankara Children’s Hospital, Dokuz Eylul University, Kırıkkale University, and Erzurum Local Research Hospital, Turkey, between January and July 2014. Parents of 61 patients and 36 healthy controls completed the self-report questionnaires. We used Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to assess the parental depression and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory S-T (STAI S-T) to assess parental anxiety. Results: Depression and anxiety scores were significantly higher in the case group (BDI 12.3±9.1; STAI-S: 38.2±9.6; STAI-T: 43.2±6.9) than controls (BDI: 5.4±4.1 p=0.000; STAI-S: 31.8±7.6 p=0.001; STAI-T: 37.0±7.2 p=0.000). Mothers of the patients had higher scores than the other parental groups (BDI: p=0.000, STAI-S: p=0.001 and STAI-T: p=0.000). Logistic regression analysis showed that low educational level of the parent was the only independent factor for depression (OR 9.96, 95% CI: 1.89-52.35, p=0.007) and state anxiety (OR: 6.99, 95% CI: 1.22-40.48, p=0.030) in the case group. Conclusion: A subset of parents with PKU patients have an anxiety or depressive disorder. Supportive services dealing with the parents of chronically ill children such as PKU are needed in order to reduce the level of anxiety. PMID:26492114

  15. Evaluation of anxiety and depression prevalence in patients with primary severe hyperhidrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Gleide Maria Gatto; Lima, Sonia Oliveira; Pinto, Aloisio Ferreira; Marques, Lucas Menezes; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; Reis, Francisco Prado

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary hyperhidrosis (PH) can lead to mood changes due to the inconveniences it causes. OBJECTIVE This study aimed to examine the existence of anxiety and depression in patients with severe primary hyperhidrosis who sought treatment at a medical office. METHODS The questionnaire "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" was used for 197 individuals, in addition to the chi square test and Fisher exact test, p <0.05. RESULTS There was an increased prevalence of anxiety (49.6%) but not of depression (11.2%) among patients with PH, with no link to gender, age or amount of affected areas. Palmar and plantar primary hyperhidrosis were the most frequent but when associated with the presence of anxiety, the most frequent were the axillary (p = 0.02) and craniofacial (p = 0.02) forms. There was an association between patients with depression and anxiety (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS the involvement of Primary hyperhidrosis was responsible for a higher prevalence of anxiety than that described among the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. Depression had a low prevalence rate, while mild and moderate forms were the most common and frequently associated with anxiety. The degree of anxiety was higher in mild and moderate types than in the severe form. PMID:24770497

  16. Repetitive negative thinking predicts depression and anxiety symptom improvement during brief cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Kertz, Sarah J; Koran, Jennifer; Stevens, Kimberly T; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a common symptom across depression and anxiety disorders and preliminary evidence suggests that decreases in rumination and worry are related to improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms. However, despite its prevalence, relatively little is known about transdiagnostic RNT and its temporal associations with symptom improvement during treatment. The current study was designed to examine the influence of RNT on subsequent depression and anxiety symptoms during treatment. Participants (n = 131; 52% female; 93% White; M = 34.76 years) were patients presenting for treatment in a brief, cognitive behavior therapy based, partial hospitalization program. Participants completed multiple assessments of depression (Center for the Epidemiological Studies of Depression-10 scale), anxiety (the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale), and repetitive negative thinking (Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire) over the course of treatment. Results indicated statistically significant between and within person effects of RNT on depression and anxiety, even after controlling for the effect of time, previous symptom levels, referral source, and treatment length. RNT explained 22% of the unexplained variability in depression scores and 15% of the unexplained variability in anxiety scores beyond that explained by the control variables. RNT may be an important transdiagnostic treatment target for anxiety and depression.

  17. Anxiety in Patients with Chronic Cor Pulmonale and Its Effect on Exercise Capacity

    PubMed Central

    XU, Wenxin; YAO, Jiwei; CHEN, Longfei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic cor pulmonale (CCP) is a disease of increasing frequency in Chinese people and profoundly influences their health. CCP is often accompanied by anxiety and other psychological problems, and patients may show signs of motor function decline. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of CCP-related psychological problems on motor function. Methods: Patients with CCP receiving in- or outpatient treatment in the Respiratory Department of Xiangya Hospital of Central South University and the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University in Hunan Province between January and July 2015 were investigated. A total of 167 questionnaires were distributed, with 160 valid questionnaires ultimately collected from 95 male and 65 female participants of mean age (± standard deviation) of 68.2 ± 12.3 yr. Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scoring was adopted to evaluate anxiety in the participants, and heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate, 6-minute walk test and Borg index score were combined to detect the exercise capability of the participants. Results: Anxiety was present in 48.8% of patients. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, breathing rate and the Borg score of CCP patients with anxiety were higher than in CCP patients without anxiety (P < 0.05), while mean walking distance was shorter (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The rate of anxiety in patients with CCP is relatively high. Anxiety reduces motor function in CCP patients; therefore, in the process of treating patients with CCP, effort should be made to engage simultaneously patients in psychotherapy. PMID:27928526

  18. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  19. Heart-related anxieties in relation to general anxiety and severity of illness in cardiology patients.

    PubMed

    Muschalla, Beate; Glatz, Johannes; Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Absence of an adequate reason for anxiety is a criterion for pathological anxiety. However, the presence of danger or fear-provoking stimuli may even be a risk factor for anxiety and does not exclude that there is additionally pathological anxiety too. The question is, to what degree can heart-related anxiety be explained by the severity of illness or trait anxiety? Two hundred and nine patients (37.8% women) from a cardiology inpatient unit completed the Heart-Anxiety-Questionnaire, Progression-Anxiety-Questionnaire, Job-Anxiety-Scale and the State-Trait-Anxiety-Inventory. The severity of cardiac illness was rated by the treating cardiologists using the Multidimensional Severity of Morbidity Rating. Time absent from work due to sickness was assessed as an indicator for illness-related impairment. Heart anxiety was significantly related to progression anxiety and, to a lesser extent, trait anxiety and indicators of subjective symptoms of somatic illness. No association was found with medical ratings for prognosis, multimorbidity, or reduction in life expectancy. Heart-related anxiety is a symptom of an anxiety disorder. Although partially dependent on subjective suffering, it cannot be explained by the severity of medical illness. Treatment of health-related anxieties should focus on how to cope with subjective symptoms of illness.

  20. EFFECT OF PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT ON THE LEVELS OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION OF HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lilympaki, Ioanna; Makri, Andriana; Vlantousi, Kyriaki; Koutelekos, Ioannis; Babatsikou, Fotoula; Polikandrioti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: of this study was to explore the effect of social support on the levels of anxiety and depression of hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: 258 patients undergoing hemodialysis were enrolled. A questionnaire developed for the purpose of the study was used to collect data through the interview process. Apart from socio-demographic, clinical and other characteristics, the questionnaire also included the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) to assess social support from significant others, family and friends, and the questionnaire Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADs) to assess the levels of anxiety and depression of patients. Results: 53,9% of the participants were male while 34,1% of the participants were >70 years old. 32,9% and 30,2% of the participants felt high levels of anxiety and depression, respectively. Analysis of data showed a statistically significant association between anxiety/depression and social support from significant others, family and friends (p=<0,001 for all associations). In particular, patients with high levels of anxiety and depression felt less support from their significant others, family and friends. The multinomial logistic regression, showed a statistically significant effect of social support from friends in anxiety levels (p=0,004). An one point increase of the support from friends seems to reduce by 57% the probability of having high levels of anxiety. In addition, statistically significant effect of social support from significant others, family and friends was observed on the levels of depression (p=<0,001, p=0,001 & p=0,003, respectively). Specifically, an one point increase of the support from significant others, family and friends it was found to reduce by 77%, 71% and 56% respectively the probability of experiencing high levels of depression. Conclusions: Phyco-social evaluation is essential when providing holistic care to hemodialysis patients. PMID:27999485

  1. Quality of life in borderline patients comorbid with anxiety spectrum disorders – a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Grambal, Ales; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Holubova, Michaela; Sedláčková, Zuzana; Hruby, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Borderline personality disorder (BPD) significantly reduces the quality of life (QoL) in mental, social, and work domains. Patients with BPD often suffer from depressive anxiety symptoms. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to compare the QoL and demographic and clinical factors of inpatients diagnosed with BPD and comorbid anxiety spectrum disorders, and healthy controls. Methods Ninety-two hospitalized patients treated in the psychotherapeutic department and 40 healthy controls were included. Subjects were assessed by the Quality of Life Satisfaction and Enjoyment Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q), Dissociative Experiences Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Clinical Global Impression, demographic questionnaire, Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and Sheehan Anxiety Scale. Results BPD patients suffered from comorbid anxiety disorders, panic disorder (18.5%), social phobia (20.7%), generalized anxiety disorder/mixed anxiety depression disorder (17.4%), adjustment disorder (22.8%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (8.7%); 19.6% patients had two or more anxiety disorder comorbidities. Patients score in Q-LES-Q (general) was 36.24±9.21, which was significantly lower in comparison to controls (57.83±10.21) and similar in all domains (physical health, feelings, work, household, school/study, leisure, social activities). The subjective level of depression measured by BDI and SDS (social life and family subscales) negatively correlated with all Q-LES-Q domains. Conclusion Patients suffering from BPD and comorbid anxiety disorders have a lower level of QoL compared to healthy controls in all measured domains. Negative correlations of the Q-LES-Q domains with clinical scales (Dissociative Experiences Scale, BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Sheehan Anxiety Scale, Clinical Global Impression, and SDS) are noticeable. PMID:27536074

  2. Social Anxiety and Aggression in Behaviorally Disordered Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Ketty P.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-nine boys in classes for students with behavioral disturbances were given questionnaires on trait anxiety, social anxiety, empathy, depression, and self-esteem, while teachers rated their aggression. Results showed that anxiety and empathy scores were not correlated with aggression, while social anxiety was positively correlated with trait…

  3. The design and evaluation of a system for improved surveillance and prevention programmes in resource-limited settings using a hospital-based burn injury questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Michael; Falk, Henry; Meddings, David; Sugerman, David; Mehta, Sumi; Sage, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited and fragmented data collection systems exist for burn injury. A global registry may lead to better injury estimates and identify risk factors. A collaborative effort involving the WHO, the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, the CDC and the International Society for Burn Injuries was undertaken to simplify and standardise inpatient burn data collection. An expert panel of epidemiologists and burn care practitioners advised on the development of a new Global Burn Registry (GBR) form and online data entry system that can be expected to be used in resource-abundant or resource-limited settings. Methods International burn organisations, the CDC and the WHO solicited burn centre participation to pilot test the GBR system. The WHO and the CDC led a webinar tutorial for system implementation. Results During an 8-month period, 52 hospitals in 30 countries enrolled in the pilot and were provided the GBR instrument, guidance and a data visualisation tool. Evaluations were received from 29 hospitals (56%). Key findings Median time to upload completed forms was <10 min; physicians most commonly entered data (64%), followed by nurses (25%); layout, clarity, accuracy and relevance were all rated high; and a vast majority (85%) considered the GBR ‘highly valuable’ for prioritising, developing and monitoring burn prevention programmes. Conclusions The GBR was shown to be simple, flexible and acceptable to users. Enhanced regional and global understanding of burn epidemiology may help prioritise the selection, development and testing of primary prevention interventions for burns in resource-limited settings. PMID:27044496

  4. Investigation of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gerontoukou, Evangelia-Ioanna; Michaelidoy, Sofia; Rekleiti, Maria; Saridi, Maria; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    The health of an individual depends on both his/her physical and psychological condition. In recent years it has been observed that chronic patients have frequently an affected psycho-emotional state. The purpose of this study is to investigate anxiety and depression in patients with chronic diseases and the correlation of the results with daily physical activity levels and individual health levels, as well comorbidity. This study included patients with chronic diseases that were treated in a local general hospital or were visiting often outpatient clinics of the same hospital due to their condition. The sample in this particular study included 204 patients; 118 of them were women and 86 men. From the total sample that participated in our research, 118 (57.8%) were females and the majority of the participants were secondary/basic education graduates (67%), married (71%), living in urban areas (53%). Hypertension was the most frequent chronic disease in our sample, followed by hypercholesterolemia and diabetes mellitus. Comparing the occurrence of depression and anxiety symptoms in both questionnaires in relation to the expected frequency in the general population, significant levels of depression and anxiety symptoms were recorded. Taking into consideration the findings of this research, anxiety and depression symptoms can have profound effects regarding the control of chronic diseases, the patients’ quality of life and their general health. PMID:26973961

  5. The effect of need-based spiritual/religious intervention on spiritual well-being and anxiety of elderly people.

    PubMed

    Elham, Hedayati; Hazrati, Maryam; Momennasab, Marzieh; Sareh, Keshavarzi

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and spiritual distress are the most common problems among the patients admitted in intensive care units. The elderly are more vulnerable to this problem due to impairment of their adaptation mechanisms. Hence, helping to reduce anxiety is one of the most effective nursing interventions. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the effect of need-based spiritual/religious interventions on spiritual well-being (SWB) and anxiety of the elderly admitted to coronary care unit (CCU). This quasi-experimental study with pre- and posttest control group design was conducted on 66 patients admitted to CCU of Imam Reza hospital in Lar, southern Iran, in 2014. After obtaining informed consents, the data were collected using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the SWB Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. The questionnaires were completed through interviewing the patients before and after the intervention. The participants of the intervention group underwent 60- to 90-minute sessions of spiritual and religious need-based interventions for 3 consecutive days. The results showed a significant increase in the mean scores of SWB in the intervention group after the intervention (P = .001). Also, a significant decrease was found in mean scores of trait and state anxiety in the intervention group in comparing to control group (P < .001). Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between the mean scores of SWB and state and trait anxiety. Spiritual/religious interventions could enhance SWB and reduce anxiety in the elderly admitted to CCU.

  6. [Somatic symptoms in those hospitalized for dizziness or vertigo].

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutumi, Tomoko; Arai, Motohiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-09-01

    Anxiety and depression greatly affect the prognosis of and burden on subjects seen for dizziness or vertigo, who usually report multiple somatic symptoms. We studied the prevalence of these symptoms in 145 subjects hospitalized for dizziness or vertigo and taking part in 4-day group vestibular rehabilitation. Questionnaires given to determine the prevalence of somatic symptoms assessed headache, insomnia, diarrhea, constipation, stomachache, chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, general fatigue, and stress. Quantitation used aerical rating scale (NRS). Anxiety and depression were assessed using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Disability due to dizziness was assessed using the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI). We conducted correlational analysis between dizziness and somatic symptoms. The top four average NRS scores for somatic symptoms were dizziness at 3.5 +/- 2.8, general fatigue at 2.8 +/- 2.6, insomnia at 2.4 +/- 2.6, and headache at 1.8 +/- 2.3. These symptoms resembled those reported for subjects with anxiety and depression. The correlation between headache and dizziness NRS scores was R = 0.48 (P < 0.0001). The total HADS score was 13.9 +/- 8.1 points (anxiety 7.2 +/- 4.3, depression 6.7 +/- 4.3). The average DHI score was 36.3 +/- 24.1 points. These results indicate that those with dizziness reported several somatic symptoms related to anxiety and depression attributable to dizziness. This underscores the need to treat these somatic symptoms when treating subjects seen chiefly dizziness or vertigo.

  7. Early Childhood Adversity and Its Associations with Anxiety, Depression, and Distress in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Daniel C; Andreotti, Charissa; Harris, Kirk; Mandeli, John; Tiersten, Amy; Holland, Jimmie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Certain vulnerability factors have been found to place patients at risk for depression and anxiety, especially within the context of medical illness. Early childhood adversity (ECA) primes adults to become more vulnerable to depression by enhancing their reactivity to stress; this relationship is not adequately described in patients with breast cancer. Methods Breast cancer patients (Stage 0-IV) were assessed for ECA (i.e., the Risky Families Questionnaire [RFQ]-subscales include Abuse/Neglect/Chaotic Home Environment), distress (i.e., Distress Thermometer and Problem List [DT&PL]), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety [HADS-A]), depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression [HADS-D]), meeting standardized cut-off thresholds for distress (DT&PL ≥4 or ≥7)/anxiety (HADS-A ≥8)/depression (HADS-D ≥8), and demographic factors. Results One hundred twenty-five participants completed the study (78% response rate). ECA was associated with depression (p<.001), anxiety (p=.001), and distress (p=.006) and with meeting cut-off threshold criteria for distress (p=.024), anxiety (p=.048), and depression (p=.001). On Multivariate analysis, only depression (p=.04) and emotional issues (i.e, component of DT&PL)(p=.001) were associated with ECA. Neglect, but not Abuse and Chaotic Home Environment, was associated with depression (β=.442, p<.001), anxiety (β=.342, p=.002), and self-identified problems with family (β−.288, p=.022), emotion (β=.345, p=.004), and physical issues (β=.408, p<.001). Conclusion ECA and neglect are associated with multiple psychological symptoms but most specifically depression in the setting of breast cancer. ECA contributes to psychological burden as a vulnerability factor. ECA may help to explain individual patient trajectories and influence the provision of patient centered care for psychological symptoms in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26876888

  8. Association of temporomandibular disorder symptoms with anxiety and depression in Portuguese college students.

    PubMed

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Morgado, Marcos; Caro, Tatiana

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its association with anxiety and depression among 1,493 Portuguese college students (age 17-69 years) at Piaget Institute. The assessment instruments were the Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. TMD was present in 633 (42.4%) students, and anxiety or depression was present in 456 (30.5%) students. Regarding the association of TMD with anxiety and depression, 280 of the 633 students (61.4%) with TMD symptoms also had signs of anxiety or depression (P < 0.001). As compared with men, women had an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.53-2.46; P < 0.001) for TMD. As compared with students without signs of anxiety or depression, students with such signs had an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.42-3.84; P < 0.001) for TMD. College students from various fields of study and regions of Portugal had a high prevalence of TMD, which was significantly associated with anxiety and depression.

  9. Test Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... Like other anxiety reactions, test anxiety affects the body and the mind. When you're under stress, your body releases ...

  10. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... making life feel overwhelming or out of control. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). For a person with OCD , anxiety takes ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Social Phobia 5 Ways to Deal With Anxiety ...

  11. [Cultural adaptation and Argentine validation of the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire in the hospitals of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Mariana V; Rodríguez, Matias G; Clarett, Martín; Iribarne, Juan I; Martínez, Marianela; Battistotti, Romina; López de Arcaute, Ana S; Adarves, Romina; Orsini, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: realizar la adaptación cultural y validación del Cuestionario Northwick Park (NPQ) en Argentina, determinando sus propiedades psicométricas, en pacientes con dolor cervical de origen mecánico derivados al Servicio de Kinesiología del Hospital D. F. Santojanni. Materiales y Métodos: Se solicitó la autorización del autor original del NPQ, luego se realizó la adaptación lingüística y prueba piloto. Las propiedades psicométricas incluyeron: confiabilidad test-retest (coeficiente de correlación intraclase, CCI), validez (coeficiente de correlación de Pearson NPQ-Escala Análoga Visual, EVA), consistencia interna (alfa de Cronbach) y sensibilidad al cambio (prueba T para pruebas pareadas NPQ-EVA). Se incluyeron consecutivamente 60 pacientes de septiembre de 2007 a febrero de 2009 con dolor cervical mecánico. Se midieron las variables porcentaje de discapacidad (NPQ) y dolor (EVA) al día del ingreso, a las 24 horas y al alta. Resultados: Veintiséis pacientes completaron el estudio, 4 fueron eliminados y 30 no completaron la 3° medición. Se obtuvo una buena confiabilidad test-retest (ICC 0.8979) y una alta consistencia interna (alfa de Cronbach 0.86). La validez mostró una buena correlación (r= 0,678). La sensibilidad al cambio fue buena (r=0.661). Conclusión: El NPQ es un instrumento válido, confiable y sensible para evaluar la discapacidad asociada al dolor cervical de origen mecánico en pacientes atendidos en el ámbito hospitalario de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires.

  12. Anxiety and Stress Levels on Liver Transplantation Candidates.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, H R S; Marques, D M; Lopes, A R F; Ziviani, L C; Magro, J T J; Mente, Ênio D; Castro-E-Silva, O; Galvão, C M; Mendes, K D S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the anxiety and stress levels of liver transplant candidates during the preoperative period. A cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on 52 liver transplantation candidates seen at a specialized public hospital outpatient clinic in the interior of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2014 to April 2015 using a self-applicable questionnaire for the assessment of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, short version) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale), in addition to sociodemographic and clinic characterization. The mean (±SD) anxiety level detected was 23.06 ± 5.51 points, with 1.92% of the subjects showing minimum levels (0 to 12 points), 59.62% a medium level (12 to 24 points), 36.54% a moderate level (24 to 36 points), and 1.92% a severe level (36 to 48 points) of anxiety. The mean level on the stress scale was 12.10 ± 5.62 points, with 7.69% of the subjects showing high stress levels. When individuals with good and poor stress levels were compared, a significant difference was observed between them (P = .0004). The Spearman correlation test showed that the higher the stress, the higher the levels of anxiety (r = 0.4258), P < .0001. The present study contributes to the analysis of the mental health of liver transplantation candidates in view of the need for interventions for the improvement of anxiety and stress levels since the waiting period for the organ generates emotional changes that can affect the quality of life of the patient and the success of this complex therapeutic modality.

  13. Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  14. Requirements and access needs of patients with chronic disease to their hospital electronic health record: results of a cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    White, H; Gillgrass, L; Wood, A; Peckham, D G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify patient's views on the functionality required for personalised access to the secondary care electronic health record (EHR) and their priorities for development. Design Quantitative analysis of a cross-sectional self-complete survey of patient views on required EHR functionality from a secondary care EHR, including a patient ranking of functionality. Setting Secondary care patients attending a regional cystic fibrosis unit in the north of England. Participants 201 adults (106 (52.7%) males), median age 29 years (range 17–58 years), entered and completed the study. Inclusion criteria are as follows: a confirmed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, aged 16 years and over, at the time of clinical stability. Outcome measures Quantitative responses within 4 themes; (1) value placed on aspects of the EHR; (2) access requirements to functions of the EHR; (3) views on information sent to the EHR and (4) patient feedback entered into the EHR. A ranked score for 15 functions of the EHR was obtained. Results Highest ratings (% reporting item as very important/important) were reported for access to clinical measures (lung function (94%), C reactive protein (84%), sputum microbiology (81%) and blood results (80%)), medication changes (82%) and lists (83%) and sending repeat prescription (83%) and treatment requests (80%), while sending symptom diaries was less so (62%). Email contact with clinicians was the most valuable communication element of the EHR (84% very important/important). Of 15 features of the EHR (1=most desirable to 15=least desirable), patients identified ‘clinical measures’ (2.62 (CI 2.07 to 3.06)), and ‘access to medication lists’ (4.91 (CI 4.47 to 5.44)), as highest priority for development and the ability to comment on errors/omissions (11.0 (CI 10.6 to 11.5)) or experience of care (11.8 (CI 11.4 to 12.2)) as lowest. Conclusions Patients want extensive personal access to their hospital EHR, placing high importance on the

  15. Prevalence of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Related Risk Factors among Physicians in China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Dib, Hassan H.; Yang, Guoan; Zhuang, Runsen; Chen, Yuqi; Tong, Xinyue; Yin, Xiaoxv; Lu, Zuxun

    2014-01-01

    Background Physicians’ poor mental health not only hinders their professional performance and affects the quality of healthcare provided but also adversely affects patients’ health outcomes. Few studies in China have evaluated the mental health of physicians. The purposes of this study are to quantify Chinese physicians’ anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as evaluate associated risk factors. Methods In our study, 2641 physicians working in public hospitals in Shenzhen in southern China were recruited and interviewed by using a structured questionnaire along with validated scales testing anxiety and depressive symptoms. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for anxiety and depressive symptoms. Results An estimated 25.67% of physicians had anxiety symptoms, 28.13% had depressive symptoms, and 19.01% had both anxiety and depressive symptoms. More than 10% of the participants often experienced workplace violence and 63.17% sometimes encountered it. Among our study population, anxiety and depressive symptoms were associated with poor self-reported physical health, frequent workplace violence, lengthy working hours (more than 60 hours a week), frequent night shifts (twice or more per week), and lack of regular physical exercise. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that anxiety and depressive symptoms are common among physicians in China, and the doctor-patient relationship issue is particularly stressful. Interventions implemented to minimize workload, improve doctor-patient relationships, and assist physicians in developing healthier lifestyles are essential to combat anxiety and depressive symptoms among physicians, which may improve their professional performance. PMID:25050618

  16. [Creating a good relationship between hospital and clinic for the support of end-of-life home care patients-usefulness of questionnaires to indicate the capacity of home care-supporting clinics for palliative care].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Osamu; Kato, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Kazuko; Chiba, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Motoko; Iwadare, Midori

    2012-12-01

    We have been practicing palliative care for terminal cancer patients at outpatient sections, patient wards, by home care, and by visiting nursing stations for the last 4 years. After the establishment of our palliative care unit in June 2011, it became difficult for us to provide sufficient home care support by ourselves, because of the increasing number of the patients and their widespread locations. It is therefore necessary to cooperate with regional medical clinics in order to support the patients who need home care even after their condition deteriorates. To determine the extent to which the home care-supporting clinics perform palliative care, we used an original questionnaire. Twenty-five clinics agreed to the publication of their names as our cooperating clinics. The number of patients who received palliative care at home from home care clinics after visiting our hospital increased from 8% to 14%, and the rate of patients who died at home also increased from 10% to 13%. Information about cooperating with home care clinics is very important and the improvement of palliative care skills necessary for home care doctors to continue their support for End-Of-Life cancer patients. Furthermore, the hospital should offer a strict and timely backup when the condition of patients treated at home suddenly deteriorates.

  17. Subjective memory complaints among patients on sick leave are associated with symptoms of fatigue and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Aasvik, Julie K.; Woodhouse, Astrid; Jacobsen, Henrik B.; Borchgrevink, Petter C.; Stiles, Tore C.; Landrø, Nils I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify symptoms associated with subjective memory complaints (SMCs) among subjects who are currently on sick leave due to symptoms of chronic pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, subjects (n = 167) who were currently on sick leave were asked to complete an extensive survey consisting of the following: items addressing their sociodemographics, one item from the SF-8 health survey measuring pain, Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Everyday Memory Questionnaire – Revised. General linear modeling was used to analyze variables associated with SMCs. Results: Symptoms of fatigue (p-value < 0.001) and anxiety (p-value = 0.001) were uniquely and significantly associated with perceived memory failures. The associations with symptoms of pain, depression, and insomnia were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Subjective memory complaints should be recognized as part of the complex symptomatology among patients who report multiple symptoms, especially in cases of fatigue and anxiety. Self-report questionnaires measuring perceived memory failures may be a quick and easy way to incorporate and extend this knowledge into clinical practice. PMID:26441716

  18. A comparative study of death anxiety in hospice and emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Payne, S A; Dean, S J; Kalus, C

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes a preliminary cross-sectional study which aimed to compare levels of death anxiety and coping responses in palliative care and accident and emergency (A & E) nurses. Forty-three nurses (23 from palliative care and 20 from A & E) were recruited from a district general hospital and nearby hospice. Both sites had the same mean annual death rate of 150 patients. Death anxiety was measured by the Death Attitude Profile-Revised Questionnaire and coping responses were elicited by a semi-structured interview. As hypothesized, hospice nurses had lower death anxiety and they were more likely to recall both good and difficult experiences related to patient care. Unlike the hospice nurses, a subgroup (20%) of A & E nurses reported that they were unable to discuss problems with colleagues. The study has implications for the development of institutional support for staff to enable nurses to provide good quality care for dying patients and bereaved people.

  19. Mathematics anxiety in secondary students in England.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Steve

    2009-02-01

    Whatever the changes that are made to the mathematics curriculum in England, there will always remain a problem with mathematics anxiety. Maths anxiety is rarely facilitative. This study examined aspects of mathematics in secondary schools and how students rated them as sources of anxiety. Over 2000 students in independent and mainstream schools in England completed a 20-item questionnaire designed to investigate maths anxiety levels. The same questionnaire was given to over 440 dyslexic males in specialist schools within the same age range. The results showed that examinations and tests create high levels of anxiety in approximately 4% of students. The results suggest that certain aspects and topics in the maths curriculum, such as long division, cause similar levels of anxiety for students in all year groups in secondary schools.

  20. Anxiety and support resources for Israeli women before gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Peles Bortz, Anat; Bluvstein, Irit; Bergman, Liat; Barnoy, Sivia

    2017-03-01

    Gynecologic surgery is a frequent procedure for benign and malignant diseases and may evoke anxiety and a need for support. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether women with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy and those with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy had different sources of social support and the relationship between this support and their anxiety. A descriptive cross-sectional method was used at a large medical center. Data were collected between June and December 2010 from 100 hospitalized women 20-28 hours prior to gynecologic surgery: 50 with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy and 50 with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy. Social Support and Anxiety Questionnaires were distributed to the participants. The results showed that sources of support differed between the groups: women with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy reported receiving more support from their family and from the nursing staff while women with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy reported receiving more support from friends or the Internet. Both groups reported similar levels of anxiety. Because women seek support prior to gynecologic surgery, healthcare professionals should play a more active role by offering their support in addition to guiding patients to websites that aim to provide information and support.

  1. Depression and anxiety disorders in a sample of facial trauma: A study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Samieirad, Sahand; Vakil-Zadeh, Mohammad; Habib-Aghahi, Raha; Alsadat-Hashemipour, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Various studies have shown that such patients are susceptible to psychological problems and poor quality of life. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders and quality of life in a group of facial trauma. Material and Methods In the present cross-sectional study Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Oral Health Impact (OHIP-14) questionnaires were used. In this study, fifty subjects were selected from the patients with maxillofacial traumas based on the judgment of the physicians, referring to hospitals in Kerman and Rafsanjan during 2012-2013. In addition, 50 patients referring to the Dental School for tooth extraction, with no maxillofacial traumas, were included. SPSS 13.5 was used for statistical analysis with two-sample t-test, Mantel-Haenszel technique, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and chi-squared test. Results Seven patients with maxillofacial traumas were depressed based on HADS depression scale, with 5 other borderline cases. However, patients referring for surgery or tooth extraction only 2 were depressed and 1 patient was a borderline case. The results showed that patients with maxillofacial traumas had higher rates of depression and anxiety, with significant differences between this group and the other group (P=0.01). The results of the present study showed a significant prelateship between depression severity and confounding factors. The mean of OHIP-14 parameters were 35.51 ±5.2 and 22.3±2.4 in facial trauma and dental surgery groups, respectively, with statistically significant differences (P=0.01). Conclusions The results of the present study showed depression and anxiety disorders in patients with maxillofacial trauma. The results showed a higher rate of anxiety and anxiety in patients with maxillofacial traumas compared to the control group. Key words:Depression, facial trauma, HADS, OHIP-14, questionnaire. PMID:26946207

  2. Relationship between Anxiety and Burnout among Chinese Physicians: A Moderated Mediation Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Yang, Yanjie; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Qiao, Zhengxue; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wenbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The main goal of this research was to investigate the complex relationships among coping styles, personality, burnout, and anxiety using a moderated mediation analysis. Methods A random cluster sampling procedure was used to select a total of 1274 physicians from two tertiary grade A hospitals in Heilongjiang Province, which is located in northeast China. The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), Chinese version of the EPQ-revised Short Scale, and the Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) were used to gather data. Moderated mediation analysis was used in this study; it was executed using the PROCESS macro so that the mediators and moderator could function together in the same model. Results The prevalence of anxiety symptoms among the physicians was 31%, and there were no differences between the sexes. The results showed that positive and negative coping styles partially mediated the association between burnout and anxiety symptoms in physicians. The mediated effect of positive coping styles was moderated by Eysenck’s Psychoticism traits. Conclusions Personality traits moderate the strength of the relationships between burnout and anxiety mediated by positive coping styles; however, personality traits do not moderate the strength of the relationships between burnout and anxiety mediated by negative coping styles. PMID:27479002

  3. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Anxiety, and Depression Levels in Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    BAYRAM, Korhan; EROL, Almıla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The close relationship between chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and childhood traumatic experiences is well known. The aim of this study is to investigate childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, which are diseases that cause chronic pain. Method A total of 30 patients with fibromyalgia, 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 30 healthy controls, matched with patients with respect to gender, age, and education, were included in the study (90 participants in total). All participants were given a form for sociodemographic characteristics, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Patients were also asked to complete a numeric pain scale (NPS). Results Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for HAD anxiety than both healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Pain scores of patients with fibromyalgia were higher than in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Participants who had scores over the threshold on HAD anxiety and depression had significantly higher scores on CTQ sexual abuse. Conclusion Both patients with fibromyalgia and patients with rheumatoid arthritis have high levels of childhood traumatic experiences and depression. Patients with pain-related disorders should be examined for childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression for better treatment outcomes.

  4. Anxiety, depression and distress among irritable bowel syndrome and their subtypes: An epidemiological population based study

    PubMed Central

    Roohafza, Hamidreza; Bidaki, Ehsan Zare; Hasanzadeh-Keshteli, Ammar; Daghaghzade, Hamed; Afshar, Hamid; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric disorders are common in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We conducted this study to investigate the relationship of IBS and their subtypes with some of psychological factors. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed among 4763 staff of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Modified ROME III questionnaire and Talley Bowel Disease Questionnaire were used to evaluate IBS symptoms. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and 12-item General Health Questionnaire were utilized to assess anxiety, depression and psychological distress. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association of psychological states and IBS in the total subject and both genders. Results: About, 4763 participants with mean age 36/58 ± 8/09 were included the 2106 males and 2657 females. Three thousand and seven hundred and seventy-six (81.2%) and 2650 (57.2%) participants were married and graduated respectively. Subtype analysis of IBS and its relationship with anxiety, depression and distress comparing the two genders can be observed that: IBS and clinically-significant IBS have higher anxiety, depression symptoms, and distress than the subject without IBS (P < 0.001). Women with IBS, have higher scores than men (P < 0.001). Compared to other subtypes, mixed IBS subtype has a higher anxiety, depression, and distress score. Conclusion: A high prevalence of anxiety, depression symptoms and distress in our subjects emphasize the importance of the psychological evaluation of the patients with IBS, in order to better management of the patients and may also help to reduce the burden of health care costs. PMID:28028523

  5. The Association of Each Disability Based on the Three Sub-Categories of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire during Hospitalization with Itself at 1 Year Postoperatively in Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Nodoka; Ino, Masatake

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A prospective study in a hospital. Purpose To investigate whether each disability based on the three sub-categories of the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ) during hospitalization is associated with itself at 1 year postoperatively in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Overview of Literature Although the total score of the RDQ represents whole pain-related disabilities or health-related quality of life, it is a shortcoming that multi-dimensional changes in disabilities are difficult to understand when only using the RDQ. Methods Fifty-seven patients with LSS (men, 28; women, 29; 63.0±12.1 years) were included. Disabilities, pain intensity and depressive feelings were assessed at preoperation, discharge and 1 year postoperatively. Results The range of "mental and physical activities (MPA)," "functional movements on/around a bed (FM)" and "walking function (WF)" scores were 0 to 13 (median, 8), 0 to 6 (median, 6) and 0 to 4 (median, 3) at preoperation; 0 to 12 (median, 0), 0 to 6 (median, 0), and 0 to 4 (median, 0) at discharge; and 0 to 8 (median, 0), 0 to 5 (median, 0), and 0 to 4 (median, 0) at 1 year postoperatively, respectively. The following significant multiple regression equations were obtained: MPA at 1 year postoperatively=0.56 (MPA at discharge)-0.10 (depression at discharge)+0.90 (adjusted r2=0.41), FM at 1 year postoperatively=0.35 (MPA at discharge)-0.06 (depression at discharge)+0.40 (adjusted r2=0.45) and WF at 1 year postoperatively=0.59 (WF at discharge)-0.08 (depression at discharge)+0.63 (adjusted r2=0.29). Conclusions In our LSS population, each disability based on MPA and WF at discharge is associated with itself in the future. Therefore, disabilities excluding functional movements are longitudinally independent. PMID:24596598

  6. Internet Anxiety among Foreign Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Selami

    2011-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the demotivating potential of new technologies in foreign language research. Thus, this study aims to investigate Internet anxiety among foreign language learners and to determine the relationships between Internet anxiety and certain variables. A background questionnaire, an Internet information test, and an…

  7. Research Anxiety among Turkish Graduate ELT Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merç, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level and predictors of research-related anxiety among graduate ELT students in the Turkish context. 81 MA and PhD students from 14 universities offering graduate programs in ELT responded to a background questionnaire, a research anxiety scale, and a research self-efficacy survey. The analysis of…

  8. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  9. Relationship of coping ways and anxiety with Pregnancy Specific-stress

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Amiri, Fatemeh Nasiri; Rezaee, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether coping strategies and general anxiety are associated with pregnancy-specific stress (PSS) and how much of variance of PSS is explained with these variables. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at two teaching hospitals between November 2013 and December 2015. Total 190 pregnant women (60 women at 6-13-weeks of gestation, 60 at 13-26 weeks, and 70 at 27-40 weeks of gestation) completed the study. The participants completed three questionnaires including; Pregnancy experience scale (PES-41), Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ), and State-Trait anxiety inventory (SATI). Pearson coefficients and analysis of regression was done to assess the correlations between variables. Results: Pregnant women who experienced higher mean level of pregnancy specific-stress had significantly higher mean level of occult anxiety, overt anxiety, and total anxiety than women who did not experience PSS. Although there was a positive and significant relationship between intensity of hassles and uplifts and ways of coping, the correlation between PSS and ways of coping was not significant. The results of analysis regression showed that general anxiety during pregnancy predicted 25% of the variance of PSS (F=4.480, β=0.159). Also, ways of coping predicted 38% of the variance in pregnancy Hassles (F=7.033, β=0.194). Conclusion: The ways of coping predicted the variance of pregnancy hassles, but does not evaluate pregnancy specific-stress. To think about PSS in terms of general anxiety may help to clarify past findings and to guide future research and interventions. PMID:28083027

  10. Anxiety in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William; Brescia, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety in terminal cancer is linked to diminished quality of life, yet overall it is poorly understood with regard to prevalence and relationship to other aspects of psychological distress. Objectives This study examines anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients, including the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, the relationship between anxiety and depression, differences in anxiety between participants receiving inpatient palliative care and those receiving outpatient care, and characteristics that distinguish highly anxious from less anxious patients. Methods Participants were 194 patients with terminal cancer. Approximately half (n = 103) were receiving inpatient care in a palliative care facility and half (n = 91) were receiving outpatient care in a tertiary care cancer center. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, and was administered along with measures of hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and social support. Results Moderately elevated anxiety symptoms were found in 18.6% of participants (n = 36) and 12.4% (n = 24) had clinically significant anxiety symptoms. Level of anxiety did not differ between the two treatment settings. However, participants receiving palliative care reported significantly higher levels of depression and desire for hastened death. A multivariate prediction model indicated that belief in an afterlife, social support, and anxiolytic and antidepressant use were unique, significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusion Severity of anxiety symptoms did not differ between the study sites, suggesting that anxiety may differ from depression and desire for hastened death in the course that it takes over the duration of terminal cancer. PMID:21565460

  11. Anxiety Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Marilyn

    Anxiey, in general, helps one to cope. It rouses a person to action and gears one up to face a threatening situation. It makes students study harder for exams, and keeps presenters on their toes when making speeches. But an anxiety disorder can prevent one from coping and can disrupt daily life. Anxiety disorders are not just a case of…

  12. Writing Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue examine the characteristics of student writing apprehension, and teaching methods to alleviate it. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Writing Anxiety: Reasons and Reduction Techniques" (Helen R. Heaton and Pauline M. Pray); (2) "Writing Anxiety and the Gifted Student…

  13. Anxiety and depression in the acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Millward, L M; Kelly, P; King, A; Peters, T J

    2005-01-01

    A previous study of self-rated psychosocial aspects in patients with acute porphyria found that depression, and particularly anxiety, is more common in porphyria patients than in the general population or general medical outpatient attenders. Nearly half of the sample (46%) reported at least some problem with anxiety and/or depression: anxiety caseness was 26% and depression caseness was 13%. This paper extends our previous observations and investigates further the associations between porphyria and anxiety, depression and general mental health in 90 patients (58 acute intermittent porphyria, 32 variegate porphyria). The findings of this study confirm that anxiety is raised in patients with acute intermittent porphyria and with variegate porphyria, in both males and females, compared to the normative population and, using a series of questionnaires exploring the physical and psychosocial features of anxiety, that this anxiety is experienced as a 'relatively stable personality trait', rather than a 'transitory emotional state' (i.e. intrinsic rather than secondary to the porphyria).

  14. Validating the Farsi version of the Pregnancy Worries and Stress Questionnaire (PWSQ): An exploratory factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Navidpour, Fariba; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Shishehgar, Sara; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Hashemi, Seyed Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Biological, environmental, inter- and intrapersonal changes during the antenatal period can result in anxiety and stress in pregnant women. It is pivotal to identify potential stressors and prevent their foetal and maternal consequences. The present study was conducted to validate and examine the factor structure of the Farsi version of the Pregnancy Worries and Stress Questionnaire (PWSQ). Methods In 2015, 502 Iranian healthy pregnant women, referred to selected hospitals in Tehran for prenatal care at 8–39 weeks of pregnancy, were recruited through a randomized cluster sampling. The PWSQ was translated into Farsi, and its validity and reliability were examined using exploratory factor analysis by SPSS version 21. Results The content validity of items on the PWSQ was between 0.63–1. The content validity index for relevance, clarity and simplicity were 0.92, 0.98, and 0.98, respectively, with a mean of 0.94. The Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.863. Test–retest reliability showed high internal consistency (α=0.89; p<0.0001) Conclusion The psychometric evaluation and exploratory factor analysis showed that the translated questionnaire is a valid and reliable tool to identify stress in Iranian pregnant women. Application of the questionnaire can facilitate the diagnosis of stress in pregnant women and assist health care providers in providing timely support and minimizing negative outcomes of stress and anxiety in pregnant women and their infants. PMID:27957315

  15. College English Writing Affect: Self-Efficacy and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Lindy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research project into the self-efficacy and anxiety of college English students at four universities in China. A total of 738 participants completed a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy and anxiety in writing in English. This was immediately followed by a writing task. The questionnaire used a seven point Likert type…

  16. Parents' Cognitions and Expectations about Their Pre-School Children: The Contribution of Parental Anxiety and Child Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatcroft, Rebecca; Creswell, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relative associations between parent and child anxiety and parents' cognitions about their children. One hundred and four parents of children aged 3-5 years completed questionnaires regarding their own anxiety level, their child's anxiety level and their cognitions about the child, specifically parents' expectations…

  17. Type D personality parents of children with leukemia tend to experience anxiety: the mediating effects of social support and coping style.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Yang; Cai, Qing-Qing; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Jing-Feng; Chen, Wei-qing; Huang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The aims were to access anxiety and type D personality (TDP) in parents of children with leukemia, and to determine the mediating effect of social support and coping style on the relationship between TDP and anxiety. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 231 parents of children with leukemia and 261 parents of children with acute diseases in hospitals. Parents completed questionnaires on anxiety, TDP, social support, coping styles, children's clinical characteristics, and demographic characteristics. Parents of children with leukemia showed higher prevalence of anxiety (64.5% vs 40.2%, P < 0.01) and TDP (44.2% vs 24.1%, P < 0.01) compared with controls. TDP (odds ratio [OR] = 4.34, P < 0.01), lower social support (OR = 1.92, P = 0.02), and less positive coping (OR = 1.87, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anxiety. Parents with TDP showed lower social support and less positive coping, but more negative coping compared with those without. Moreover, multiple mediation analyses revealed that the significant effect of TDP on anxiety was partially mediated by social support and positive coping. In conclusion, anxiety and TDP were highly prevalent in parents of children with leukemia. The predictive factors could be used to identify those parents who are at high risk of anxiety and may also be targets for prevention and intervention.

  18. [A questionnaire survey about public's image of radiation after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Abe, Toshiaki; Kuto, Tatsuhiko

    2012-03-01

    A questionnaire survey about the public's image of radiation was performed after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. The survey was taken by general citizens (200 and 1640 in Fukushima and 52 outside of Fukushima) and doctors (63 in Fukushima and 1942 outside of Fukushima (53 in Oita, 44 in Sagamihara and 1,845 in Kitakyushu)) in and outside of Fukushima and second year medical students in the University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan. The questionnaire surveys were performed during lectures about radiation. The response rates were 86% for the general citizens in Fukushima, 91% for the general citizens outside of Fukushima, 86% for doctors in Fukushima, and 85% and 86% for doctors in Sagamihara and Oita, respectively. The questionnaire surveys were sent to clinics and hospitals in Fukushima where the general citizens answered with a response rate of 50%. When the questionnaire surveys were sent to clinics and hospitals in Kitakyushu, doctors answered, with a response rate of 17%. The percentages of anxiety about future radiation effects after the FDNPP accident were the highest among the general citizens (71.6% in Fukushima and 40.4% outside of Fukushima), in the middle among the doctors (30.2% in Fukushima and 26.2% outside of Fukushima) and the lowest among the medical students (12.2%). The doctors in Fukushima and the medical students were anxious about food and soil pollution. The general citizens and the doctors outside of Fukushima were anxious about health problems and food and soil pollution. We concluded that a high level of education about radiation decreased the anxiety about the radiation effects. It is important to spread knowledge about radiation.

  19. The Reliability and Validity of the Career Decision Difficulties Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Brian P.; Rudolph, Charles E.; Perkins, T. Scott; Patten, Thomas G.

    1999-01-01

    Scores on the Career Decision Difficulties Questionnaire for 268 college students (86 classified as undecided) showed convergence with the Career Decision Scale. The questionnaire's discriminant validity was confirmed in the areas of social desirability and anxiety. There were statistically significant differences between decided and undecided…

  20. Psychological Outcomes in Parents of Critically Ill Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Haddad, Summer; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Parshuram, Christopher

    2017-03-05

    Parents of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) are subjected to significant psychological stress. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms and decisional conflict in parents of children hospitalized in the PICU. The study employed a descriptive, cross-sectional design to investigate the psychological status of 118 parents of 91 children (74 mothers and 44 fathers) admitted to the PICU, using measures of anxiety (STAI), depression (CES-D), and decisional conflict (DCS). Using hospital data and self-administered questionnaires, information on child and parent characteristics and psychological outcomes were collected. Objective measures of parental sleep also were examined using actigraphy and sleep diaries. The research findings indicated that 24% of parents achieved scores characteristic of severe anxiety. Proportions of parents with symptoms indicative of major depression and significant decisional conflict were 51% and 26% respectively. For all psychological outcomes, higher levels of social support were protective. Inconsistency in sleep schedule and sleep location affected psychological outcomes and are possible targets for future interventions. Given evidence that parents of children admitted to the PICU are at risk for developing post-traumatic stress symptoms, future studies should examine the effects of hospitalization on long-term parental psychological outcomes. Screening for those at risk and implementing interventions to promote coping strategies and reduce decisional conflict may be beneficial. Pediatric nurses have a critical role in assessing parents' psychological distress and promoting family health during a child's hospitalization.

  1. The Survey Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  2. The use of research questionnaires with hearing impaired adults: online vs. paper-and-pencil administration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When evaluating hearing rehabilitation, it is reasonable to use self-report questionnaires as outcome measure. Questionnaires used in audiological research are developed and validated for the paper-and-pencil format. As computer and Internet use is increasing, standardized questionnaires used in the audiological context should be evaluated to determine the viability of the online administration format. The aim of this study was to compare administration of questionnaires online versus paper- and pencil of four standardised questionnaires used in hearing research and clinic. We included the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA), Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Methods A cross-over design was used by randomly letting the participants complete the questionnaires either online or on paper. After 3 weeks the participants filled out the same questionnaires again but in the other format. A total of 65 hearing-aid users were recruited from a hearing clinic to participate on a voluntary basis and of these 53 completed both versions of the questionnaires. Results A significant main effect of format was found on the HHIE (p < 0.001), with participants reporting higher scores on the online format than in the paper format. There was no interaction effect. For the other questionnaires were no significant main or interaction effects of format. Significant correlations between the two ways of presenting the measures was found for all questionnaires (p<0.05). The results from reliability tests showed Cronbachs α’s above .70 for all four questionnaires and differences in Cronbachs α between administration formats were negligible. Conclusions For three of the four included questionnaires the participants’ scores remained consistent across administrations and formats. For the fourth included questionnaire (HHIE) a

  3. Effect of Implementation of Continuous Care Model on Mothers’ Anxiety of the Children Discharged from the Pediatric Surgical Unit

    PubMed Central

    Okhovat, Forogh; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Namnabati, Mahboobeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Child's hospitalization for surgery is a source of anxiety for the child and the family that persists for a long time after discharge. Therefore, it is necessary to provide appropriate solutions in this regard. This study aimed to investigate the effect of implementation of continuous care model on anxiety in mothers of children discharged from pediatric units of educational hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2016. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 64 mothers of children hospitalized in surgical units were categorized in two groups (experimental and control). The intervention was a continuous care model including orientation, sensitization, follow up, and evaluation stages. We used Spielberg's Anxiety Questionnaire to assess mothers’ anxiety before, 1 week, and 1 month after the intervention. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, (t-test and analysis of variance) using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16. Results: The results of the study showed that the mean anxiety scores of the experimental group were 58.9, 36, and 31.4, respectively, before, 1 week, and 1 month after the intervention (P < 0.001). These scores were 57.5, 55.8, and 49.7, respectively, for the control group. t-test results showed that the mean anxiety scores of the experimental group were significantly less than that of the control group at 1 week and 1 month after the intervention. Conclusions: Based on the results, use of the continuous care model led to a decrease in mothers’ anxiety during their children's discharge from the pediatric surgery units. Therefore, we suggest the implementation of this model in pediatric units. PMID:28382056

  4. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... fearful to talk at all in certain situations. Panic attacks. These episodes of anxiety can occur for no apparent reason. During a panic attack, a child typically has sudden and intense physical ...

  5. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... making life feel overwhelming or out of control. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) . For a person with OCD, anxiety takes ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Taking Your Child to a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress ...

  6. Validation of the Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) for the assessment of acceptance in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ). Pain acceptance is the process of giving up the struggle with pain and learning to live a worthwhile life despite it. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) is the questionnaire most often used to measure pain acceptance in chronic pain populations. Methods A total of 205 Spanish patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome who attended our pain clinic were asked to complete a battery of psychometric instruments: the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (PVAS) for pain intensity, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Results Analysis of results showed that the Spanish CPAQ had good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.83) and internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α: 0.83). The Spanish CPAQ score significantly correlated with pain intensity, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophising, health status and physical and psychosocial disability. The Scree plot and a Principal Components Factor analysis confirmed the same two-factor construct as the original English CPAQ. Conclusion The Spanish CPAQ is a reliable clinical assessment tool with valid construct validity for the acceptance measurement among a sample of Spanish fibromyalgia patients. This study will make it easier to assess pain acceptance in Spanish populations with fibromyalgia. PMID:20385016

  7. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among nursing personnel and its association with occupational stress, anxiety and depression1

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Renata Perfeito; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Martins, Julia Trevisan; Ribeiro, Patrícia Helena Vivan; Robazzi, Maria Lucia do Carmo Cruz; Dalmas, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among nursing personnel, and its association with occupational stress, anxiety and depression. METHOD: a descriptive correlational study undertaken with 226 nursing personnel from a teaching hospital. Data collection was undertaken through application of the Job Stress Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire, with variables of Metabolic Syndrome. Univariate analyses and Chi-squared and Pearson tests were used for correlation between the variables, with a level of significance of 5%. RESULTS: 86 (38.1%) workers presented Metabolic Syndrome, of whom 183 (81.1%) were female, and 43 (19.9%) male, aged between 23 and 66 years old. In relation to anxiety and depression, 154 (68.1%) presented anxiety, with 48 (31.2%) also presenting Metabolic Syndrome; 185 (81.8%) presented depression, of whom 62 (33.5%) also had Metabolic Syndrome. It was ascertained that 61 (27.0%) workers presented stress and that of these, 14 (22.9%) presented Metabolic Syndrome. CONCLUSION: a correlation was observed between the variables of anxiety and Metabolic Syndrome and stress and Metabolic Syndrome, there being no correlation between the variables of depression and Metabolic Syndrome. PMID:26155007

  8. Efficacy of illness perception focused intervention on quality of life, anxiety, and depression in patients with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sararoudi, Reza Bagherian; Motmaen, Maryam; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Pishghadam, Elnaz; Kheirabadi, Gholam Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide, which can reduces quality of life in patients. Some disabilities are depression and anxiety which delay returning to work. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of illness perception focused intervention on quality of life, anxiety, and depression in MI patients. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial study of 48 recently hospitalized MI patients was conducted (24 in intervention group and 24 in control group). Intervention group was trained to understand the disease by a mental health counselor in three half-an-hour sessions for three consecutive days. Data were collected from three questionnaires: hospital anxiety and depression scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (short form), and Illness Perceptions Questionnaire Brief at admission, 1.5, and 3 months postdischarge. Data were analyzed with ANOVA repeated measure. Results: The mean duration of returning to work was 28.7 ± 8.1 days in intervention groups and 46 ± 7.6 days in control group which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Moreover, anxiety, depression, and illness perceptions score were significantly decreased in intervention groups which were 8.3 ± 3.3, 6.8 ± 3.5, and 36.5 ± 5 in intervention groups and 15.8 ± 2.1(P < 0.001), 17.1 ± 2.3 (P < 0.001), and 41.9 ± 4 (P < 0.001) in control group, respectively. Mean of quality of life subscales scores just physical health subscale showed a significant reduction after 3 months in the control group. Conclusion: Training MI patients to understand the disease in three half-an-hour sessions for 3 consecutive days can decrease the duration of returning to work, anxiety and depression, and increase illness perceptions which can make a better outcome. PMID:28331511

  9. [Practical study for seminar program certified by Japanese Society of Hospital Pharmacists for Clinical Psychiatric Pharmacists organized by Chiba Society of Hospital Pharmacists, and investigation of participants' background and issues for taking board certified psychiatric pharmacy specialists and board certified pharmacists in psychiatric pharmacy certifications using questionnaires].

    PubMed

    Tsukiji, Mariko; Furuyama, Hikaru; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Ishida, Keiko; Matsuda, Kimiko; Fukuda, Keiko; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Recently, certification systems for Board-Certified Psychiatric Pharmacy Specialists (BCPPS) and Board-Certified Pharmacists in Psychiatric Pharmacy (BCPPP) were established by the Japanese Society of Hospital Pharmacists (JSHP) in 2008, to meet the increasing needs for specialists in psychiatric pharmacy. However, there was no report on the background and opinion of pharmacists who have intention to take the BCPPS or BCPPP and/or seminar programs for BCPPS or BCPPP. The Chiba Society of Hospital Pharmacists has started to provide a seminar program certified by the JSHP to study psychiatry for pharmacists and also investigated the participants' background, demand for the program, and issues in taking the BCPPS or BCPPP using questionnaires. We found that many participants wanted lectures to obtain information on issues they face in routine work as well as for certification testing. For many participants, satisfying the requirements for applying for the BCPPS or BCPPP was one of the most important issues in receiving the qualifications. We found that over 40% of participants working at community pharmacies intended to take the BCPPS or BCPPP, although working experience at a community pharmacy does not entitle them to apply for the BCPPS or BCPPP. The intention of community pharmacists indicates that discussion of the requirements for BCPPS or BCPPP certification systems is necessary to improve psychiatric community care. We will plan a practical seminar program with feedback from this investigation.

  10. Effect of stress inoculation training on the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Fahimeh; Kashani, Parisa; Moghimian, Maryam; Shakour, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a broad group (over 270 types) of diseases. This disease, like other chronic diseases, occurs in all ages and ethnic groups, and is considered as a major health problem. Stress is one of the most important psychological factors influencing the occurrence of physical diseases, and can lead to severe anxiety, depression, and negative effects on health. It can also make individuals vulnerable to physical diseases, and in the long term, leads to death. This study was conducted to determine the effect of inoculation training on stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 as a clinical trial with convenient random sampling of patients from the chemotherapy clinic of Seyed Al-Shohada hospital of Isfahan. Forty patients with cancer who were eligible for the study were randomly assigned to either case or control group. The case and control groups had the same treatment plans, and the only difference was stress inoculation training administered in the case group, which was composed of eight 90-min sessions over 8 weeks. Data were collected using Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales 42 (DASS-42) questionnaire and demographic questionnaire, and analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and t-test in SPSS. Results: The results showed that there was a significant difference between case and control groups in terms of stress, anxiety, and depression (P < 0.001). Stress inoculation training reduced stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Conclusions: Stress inoculation training significantly reduced stress, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, teaching this skill and the strategies of coping with stress is recommended for these patients, in addition to medicational treatment. PMID:26120337

  11. Masticatory ability with depression, anxiety, and stress: Does there exist any association?

    PubMed Central

    Roohafza, Hamidreza; Afshar, Hamid; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Shirani, Mohamad Javad; Afghari, Parastu; Vali, Amrita; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Masticatory ability as a subjective response to masticatory function indicates patients’ perception of their mastication. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no study on association between masticatory ability and psychological status. This study investigated the association between self-assessed masticatory ability (SAMA) and psychological status among a large sample of Iranian adults. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were extracted from 4135 adults who had been completed information in 20 counties across Isfahan province regarding masticatory ability and psychological statuses (depression, anxiety, and stress). An SAMA questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and General Health Questionnaire were used to measure masticatory ability, depression and anxiety, and stress of study population. To analyze the data, ANOVA, χ2 test, and multinomial regression were applied at 0.05 for the significance level. Results: Masticatory ability was significantly correlated with depression (P < 0.001), anxiety (P < 0.001), and stress (P < 0.001). The participants in high masticatory ability group reported lower scores for presence of these psychological variables. Furthermore, males reported significantly higher level for masticatory ability than females (P = 0.025). In addition, there were significant association between low and moderate masticatory ability with anxiety (1.09, 1.08), depression (1.15, 1.13), and stress (1.11, 1.09), respectively. The association was still significant after adjusting for age, sex, educational level, and marital status. Conclusion: Despite study limitations, the results of this study provide evidence that participants with higher score of depression, anxiety, and stress suffer lower masticatory ability. PMID:27274340

  12. Depression, anxiety, and health related quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Aminisani, Nayyereh; Nikbakht, Hosseinali; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological distress and quality of life (QOL) dimensions in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the North of Iran. A total of 157 CRC survivors were selected from the registry database and included in this study. Psychological distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and QOL was estimated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ C-30). The association between the patients’ emotional functioning (EF) score on EORTC QLQ-C30 and their HADS scores was analysed through multiple linear regression. Results In statistical terms, there were significantly negative relationships between EF and HADS-A (anxiety), and between HADS-D (depression) and HADS-T (total score). However, compared with HADS-A, the correlation between HADS-D and other QOL dimensions was significantly higher. By the same token, depression rather than anxiety was more strongly associated with reduced QOL. Conclusions The EF dimension of the EORTC QLQ-C30 predominantly assesses anxiety; however, depression has a stronger impact on the global QOL of patients than anxiety. Therefore, the use of an additional instrument is recommended for the assessment of depression in outpatients with CRC. PMID:28280612

  13. Gender differences in cardiac patients: a longitudinal investigation of exercise, autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression.

    PubMed

    Hunt-Shanks, Tiffany; Blanchard, Christopher; Reid, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    Female cardiac patients frequently experience greater anxiety and depression and engage in less exercise when compared with their male counterparts. This study considered whether exercise had similar effects on male and female cardiac patients' autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression, and whether exercise behavior explained the gender difference in their affective functioning (e.g. autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression). Eight hundred one participants completed the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and the leisure score index (LSI) of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. Female cardiac patients had greater autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression and reduced exercise when compared with male cardiac patients at all time points. Although exercise was significantly related to affective outcomes at various time points for both men and women, gender did not moderate any of the exercise/affective relationships, and exercise did not mediate any of the gender/affective relationships. Further research is needed to clarify the complex relationships between gender, exercise, and the affective functioning of cardiac patients.

  14. Anxiety/depression and orofacial myofacial disorders as factors associated with TMD in children.

    PubMed

    Pizolato, Raquel Aparecida; Freitas-Fernandes, Frederico Silva de; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in children. TMD clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD; axis I), and subjective symptoms were evaluated using a structured questionnaire. Eighty-two children were selected, 40 with TMD (19 boys and 21 girls, mean age 9.84 ± 1.53 and 9.71 ± 1.30 years, respectively) and 42 without TMD (21 boys and 21 girls, mean age 10.27 ± 1.63 and 9.9 ± 1.37 years, respectively). Intra- and extra-oral examinations were carried out to determine the myofunctional characteristics of the masticatory system. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess anxiety and depression. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regression (α = 0.05). In bivariate analysis, the variables of open lips, anxiety, and depression had a p value < 0.15 and were entered into the multivariate logistic regression model. The most significant predictor factors were the presence of open lips (odds ratio = 5.42, p = 0.034) and anxiety (odds ratio = 18.59, p < 0.001). Thus, anxiety levels and open lips were associated with TMD in children. Owing to the cross-sectional design of the present study, the associations observed may have a bidirectional relationship.

  15. Association of Ego Defense Mechanisms with Academic Performance, Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Ahmed; Malik, Aamenah; Muhammad, Umer; Khan, Sarah; Mahmood, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ego defense mechanisms are unconscious psychological processes that help an individual to prevent anxiety when exposed to a stressful situation. These mechanisms are important in psychiatric practice to assess an individual’s personality dynamics, psychopathologies, and modes of coping with stressful situations, and hence, to design appropriate individualized treatment. Our study delineates the relationship of ego defense mechanisms with anxiety, depression, and academic performance of Pakistani medical students. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done at CMH Lahore Medical College and Fatima Memorial Hospital Medical and Dental College, both in Lahore, Pakistan, from December 1, 2014 to January 15, 2015. Convenience sampling was used and only students who agreed to take part in this study were included. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: 1) Demographics, documenting demographic data and academic scores on participants’ most recent exams; 2) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); and 3) Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40). The data were analyzed with SPSS v. 20. Mean scores and frequencies were calculated for demographic variables and ego defense mechanisms. Bivariate correlations, one-way ANOVA, and multiple linear regression were used to identify associations between academic scores, demographics, ego defense mechanisms, anxiety, and depression. Results: A total of 409 medical students participated, of whom 286 (70%) were females and 123 (30%) were males. Mean percentage score on the most recent exams was 75.6% in medical students. Bivariate correlation revealed a direct association between mature and neurotic ego defense mechanisms and academic performance, and an indirect association between immature mechanisms and academic performance. One-way ANOVA showed that moderate levels of anxiety (P < .05) and low levels of depression (P < .05) were associated with higher academic performance. Conclusion: There was a

  16. Effects of locality based community hospital care on independence in older people needing rehabilitation: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Green, John; Young, John; Forster, Anne; Mallinder, Karen; Bogle, Sue; Lowson, Karin; Small, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects on independence in older people needing rehabilitation in a locality based community hospital compared with care on a ward for elderly people in a district general hospital. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Care in a community hospital and district general hospital in Bradford, England. Participants 220 patients needing rehabilitation after an acute illness that required hospital admission. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to a locality based community hospital or to remain within a department for the care of elderly people in a district general hospital. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were Nottingham extended activities of daily living scale and general health questionnaire 28 (carer). Secondary outcomes were activities of daily living (Barthel index), Nottingham health profile, hospital anxiety and depression scale, mortality, destination after discharge, satisfaction with services, carer strain index, and carer's satisfaction with services. Results The median length of stay was 15 days for both the community hospital and the district general hospital groups (interquartile range: community hospital 9-25 days; district general hospital 9-24 days). Independence at six months was greater in the community hospital group (adjusted mean difference 5.30, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 9.96). Results for the secondary outcome measures, including care satisfaction and measures of carer burden, were similar for both groups. Conclusions Care in a locality based community hospital is associated with greater independence for older people than care in wards for elderly people in a district general hospital. PMID:15994660

  17. Examining Factor Structure and Validating the Persian Version of the Pregnancy’s Worries and Stress Questionnaire for Pregnant Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Navidpour, Fariba; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Hashemi, Seyed Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pregnant women tend to experience anxiety and stress when faced with the changes to their biology, environment and personal relationships. The identification of these factors and the prevention of their side effects are vital for both mother and fetus. The present study was conducted to validate and to examine the factor structure of the Persian version of the Pregnancy’s Worries and Stress Questionnaire. Materials and Methods: The 25-item PWSQ was first translated by specialists into Persian. The questionnaire’s validity was determined using face, content, criterion and construct validity and reliability of questionnaire was examined using Cronbach’s alpha. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed in AMOS and SPSS 21. Participants included healthy Iranian pregnant women (8-39 weeks) who refer to selected hospitals for prenatal care. Hospitals included private, social security and university hospitals and selected through the random cluster sampling method. Findings: The results of validity and reliability assessments of the questionnaire were acceptable. Cronbach’s alpha calculated showed a high internal consistency of 0.89. The confirmatory factor analysis using the χ2, CMIN/DF, IFI, CFI, NFI and NNFI indexes showed the 6-factor model to be the best fitted model for explaining the data. Conclusion: The questionnaire was translated into Persian to examine stress and worry specific to Iranian pregnant women. The psychometric results showed that the questionnaire is suitable for identifying Iranian pregnant women with pregnancy-related stress. PMID:26153186

  18. Questionnaire Construction Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    Questionnaire Results A. Overview 8. Social De ■* ability and Acquiescence Response Sets C. Other Response Sets or Errors D. Effects of General Pretest...Attitudes of Respondents E. Effects of Demographic Characteristics of Responses XIII. Evaluating Questionnaire Results A. Overview B. Scoring...34questionnaire" refers to an ordered arrangement of items (questions, in effect ) intended to elicit the evaluations, judgments, comparisons, attitudes

  19. Predictors of preoperative anxiety in children.

    PubMed

    Wollin, S R; Plummer, J L; Owen, H; Hawkins, R M F; Materazzo, F

    2003-02-01

    This study aimed to identify factors contributing to anxiety at induction of anaesthesia in children. One hundred and twenty children aged five to twelve years and scheduled for surgery requiring general anaesthesia were included. Children were interviewed and assessed prior to surgery. Parents completed anxiety measures prior to surgery and were interviewed after the induction of anaesthesia. The level of children's anxiety was determined at the time of induction of anaesthesia by the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale. Factors associated with increased levels of anxiety in the children included increased number of people in the room at induction of anaesthesia; longer waiting time between admission at the hospital and induction of anaesthesia; negative memories of previous hospital experiences; and having a mother who does not practise a religion. Suggestions for implementation of the findings and for future research are provided.

  20. Night Eating Syndrome in Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    KÜÇÜKGÖNCÜ, Suat; BEŞTEPE, Emrem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence and the clinical features of night eating syndrome (NES) in patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Method The study was conducted at Bakırköy State Hospital for Mental Health and Neurological Disorders. Three-hundred out-patients who had major depression (MD), panic disorders (PD), general anxiety disorders (GAD) and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) participated in the study. The semi-structured socio-demographic form, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), Night Eating Questionnaire, and NES Evaluation Questionnaire were implemented. Results In our sample, the prevalence of the NES was 15.7% (n=47). NES frequency was significantly higher in the patients diagnosed with major depression (MD 22%, GAD 7.8%, OCD 12.5%, PD 14%). Smoking, presence of past suicide attempts, rates of antipsychotic drugs use, and average scores of body mass index (BMI) were significantly higher in the patients who had NES. In this sample, depression, BMI, and smoking were found to be determinants of NES. Conclusion This study shows that NES may be frequently observed in patients admitted to psychiatric clinics, especially in those with major depression. Evaluation of NES in psychiatric patients may help the treatment of the primary psychopathology and prevent the adverse effects, like weight gain, which may reduce the quality of life.

  1. Anxiety and depression and cognitive coping strategies and health locus of control in patients with ovary and uterus cancer during anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ziętalewicz, Urszula; Kosowicz, Mariola; Stypuła-Ciuba, Beata; Ziółkowska, Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study The crisis associated with cancer may contribute to the development of anxiety and depressive disorders. Contemporary psycho-oncology focuses on the psychological determinants of the cancer patients functioning to find which disease-coping strategies help the healing process, facilitate the establishment of a good therapeutic relationship and the process of adapting to difficult situations. Aim of the study was assess the psychological functioning of patients with cancer of reproductive organs in the cancer-treating process. The practical aim was to develop guidelines for psychological care dedicated to this group of patients. Material and methods The study was conducted in the Reproductive Organs Cancer Clinic in Institute of Oncology in Warsaw using a questionnaire consisting of: Demographic, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Multidimentional Health Locus of Control (MHLC), Cognitive Emotions Regulations Questionaire (CERQ). Results Seventy-eight patients aged 22 to 82 (average 54) were examined. Investigation of relationships between anxiety and depression and coping strategies showed: positive correlation of anxiety with self blame and rumination, positive correlation of anxiety and depression with catastrophizing, positive correlation of depression with blaming others, negative correlation of anxiety and depression with acceptance and positive refocusing, negative correlation of depression with refocus of planning and putting into perspective. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that there may be an indirect method of diagnosing anxiety and depression disorders in cancer patients by observing the coping strategies to cope with the difficult situation. PMID:27358598

  2. Subliminal psychodynamic activation method and annihilation anxiety: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, A C

    1992-02-01

    Research with the subliminal psychodynamic activation (SPA) method has led to improvements in subjects' functioning in a variety of areas, including but not limited to weight control, school grades, and feelings of general anxiety. In 1987, Hurvich proposed that the SPA method could be used to further the understanding of annihilation anxiety. 100 nonclinical subjects completed questionnaires pertaining to annihilation anxiety, psychological differentiation, and state anxiety and were tachistoscopically exposed to the subliminal message of symbiotic-like oneness, MOMMY AND I ARE ONE, and to control messages. Analysis showed that women with low annihilation anxiety had significantly lower state anxiety than women with high annihilation anxiety, regardless of the content of the subliminal message; results did not reach significance for men. Correlations among scores on the questionnaires also were noted.

  3. Methodological Issues in Internet-Mediated Research: A Randomized Comparison of Internet Versus Mailed Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of Internet-mediated studies use measures developed as paper-and-pencil measures or face-to-face-delivered material. Previous research suggests that the equivalence between online and offline measures must be demonstrated rather than assumed. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the equivalence 4 measures completed in an online or offline setting. Methods A sample of students (n = 1969) was randomly assigned to complete 4 popular scales (the SF-12v2, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Fatigue Symptom Inventory, and a single-item fatigue measure) either online or by mail survey (pencil and paper). The response rate was 52.51% (n = 1034) and comparable between the online and offline groups. Results Significant differences were noted in fatigue levels between the online and offline group (P = .01) as measured by the Fatigue Symptom Inventory, with the online sample demonstrating higher levels of fatigue. Equivalency was noted for the SF-12v2, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the single-item fatigue measure. Internal consistency was high except for the SF-12v2. The SF-12v2 may not be an ideal measure to use for remote administration. Conclusions Equivalency of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Physical Component Score and Mental Component Score of the SF-12v2 for online and offline data were demonstrated. Equivalency was not demonstrated for the Fatigue Symptom Inventory. Explanations for the difference in fatigue score between the online and offline samples are unclear. Research that seeks to match samples and control for extraneous online and offline variables is called for, along with exploration of factors that may mediate the completion of questionnaires or alter the respondents’ relationship with the same, to enhance progress in this area. PMID:22155721

  4. Restless leg syndrome in hospitalized psychiatric patients in Lebanon: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Talih, Farid; Ajaltouni, Jean; Kobeissy, Firas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize and describe the prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in hospitalized psychiatric patients and to investigate the correlations between patient profile and RLS. Methods Demographic information, psychiatric diagnoses, psychotropic medication use, and history of substance use were collected from hospitalized psychiatric patients at the American University of Beirut Medical Center; Beirut, Lebanon. A validated questionnaire to evaluate RLS symptomatology was also administered to 126 participants who agreed to participate, as well as questionnaires for insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Statistical analysis was conducted to detect the prevalence of RLS among the participants and to examine correlations with RLS in a hospitalized psychiatric population. Results Out of the 126 participants who completed the survey, RLS was detected in 18% of the participants. Of interest, RLS was also found to be associated with higher depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation, and working night shifts. PMID:27785035

  5. The relationship between anxiety, depression and illness perception in tberculosis patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective As the rates of TB world over have increased during the past 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of depression and its role in the outcome of chronic disorders. Though depression is common in patients with TB no study as yet has examined the prevalence of depression in this group in Pakistan. We aimed to determine the presence of depression, anxiety and illness perceptions in patients suffering from Tuberculosis (TB) in Pakistan. Methods 108 consecutive outpatients with tuberculosis completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Results Out of 108 patients, 50 (46.3%) were depressed and 51 (47.2%) had anxiety. Raised depression and anxiety scores were associated with an increase in the number of symptoms reported (HADS Depression: r = 0.346, p = < 0.001), more serious perceived consequences (HADS Depression: r = 0.279, p = 0.004, HADS Anxiety: r = 0.234, p = 0.017) and less control over their illness (HADS Depression: r = 0.239, p = 0.014, HADS Anxiety: r = 0.271, p = 0.005). Conclusion We found that about a half of patients in our sample met the criteria for probable depression and anxiety based on HADS score. Negative illness perceptions were clearly related to reports of mood symptoms. As depression and lack of perceived control over illness in those suffering from tuberculosis are reported to be independent predictors of poor adherence further studies to investigate their relationship with medication adherence are required. PMID:18302758

  6. The Associations of Psychological Stress with Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms among Chinese Bladder and Renal Cancer Patients: The Mediating Role of Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyao; Wang, Lie

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms and their associated factors in bladder and renal cancer patients are not well evaluated in China. Given the growing attention to positive psychological constructs in the field of oncology, it is necessary to explore the effects of these constructs on depressive and anxiety symptoms. This study aims to explore the associations of psychological stress with depressive and anxiety symptoms among Chinese bladder and renal cancer patients and the mediating role of resilience in these relationships. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University in Liaoning province. 327 bladder cancer patients and 268 renal cancer patients completed questionnaires on demographic variables, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, Resilience Scale-14, and Perceived Stress Scale-10 during the period from July 2013 to July 2014. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of resilience. Results The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms was 78.0% and 71.3% in bladder cancer patients, and 77.6% and 68.3% in renal cancer patients. Psychological stress was positively related to depressive and anxiety symptoms, while resilience was negatively related to these symptoms. Resilience partially mediated the relations of psychological stress with depressive and anxiety symptoms. Conclusions The high prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms among Chinese bladder and renal cancer patients should receive more attention from medical institutions and government agencies. In addition to reducing depressive and anxiety symptoms, resilience development should be included in depression and anxiety prevention and treatment strategies in China. PMID:27128438

  7. Maternal phobic anxiety and child anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gail A; Layne, Ann E; Egan, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Lara P

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between maternal anxiety symptoms and child anxiety symptoms and evaluated whether a reporting bias is associated with maternal anxiety. Fifty-seven mother-child pairs participated. All children had features or diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Measures of maternal symptomatology and child anxiety were administered. Higher levels of maternal phobic anxiety on the Brief Symptom Inventory were significantly associated with higher levels of separation anxiety in children. After controlling for clinician rating of SAD severity, maternal phobic anxiety emerged as a significant predictor of maternal ratings of child separation anxiety, accounting for 19% of the variance. Phobic mothers endorsed levels of separation anxiety in their children that exceeded levels endorsed by clinicians, suggesting maternal overreporting.

  8. Bruxism. Masticatory implications and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Alves, Anne C; Alchieri, João C; Barbosa, Gustavo A S

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of bruxism, defined as the act of clenching and/or grinding the teeth, a habit that compromises the orofacial region. It is often associated with emotional aspects, such as anxiety and stress, and may result in alterations to orofacial structures, functional modifications and social repercussions. The aim of this study was to determine a possible association between bruxism and anxiety underscoring the primary complaints related to masticatory function. Eighty volunteers participated in the study. They were divided into bruxers (N = 40) and non-bruxers (N = 40) of both sexes. The diagnosis of bruxism was made by clinical examination. The Trait-State Anxiety Inventory was used to assess anxiety levels and a questionnaire with structured questions related to daily activities, focusing on masticatory function (for the bruxism group), was applied to evaluate psychosocial aspects. The results of the study show a significant difference in state anxiety. Mean and standard deviation of state anxiety in the bruxism and non-bruxism groups was 42.7 +/- 9.6 and 38.6 +/- 8.2 (p < or = 0.04), respectively, while trait anxiety had a mean and standard deviation of 44.5 +/- 11.0 and 40.7 +/- 9.5 (p < or = 0.11). The main complaints of bruxers during mastication were facial pain and headache while chewing as well as the presence of clicking sounds in the jaw joint. Findings demonstrate an association between emotional factors such as anxiety and bruxism, resulting in compromised masticatory function.

  9. Parental responsibility beliefs: associations with parental anxiety and behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Apetroaia, Adela; Hill, Claire; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Background High levels of parental anxiety are associated with poor treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Associated parental cognitions and behaviours have been implicated as impediments to successful treatment. We examined the association between parental responsibility beliefs, maternal anxiety and parenting behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders. Methods Anxious and non-anxious mothers of 7–12 year old children with a current anxiety disorder reported their parental responsibility beliefs using a questionnaire measure. Parental behaviours towards their child during a stressor task were measured. Results Parents with a current anxiety disorder reported a greater sense of responsibility for their child's actions and wellbeing than parents who scored within the normal range for anxiety. Furthermore, higher parental responsibility was associated with more intrusive and less warm behaviours in parent–child interactions and there was an indirect effect between maternal anxiety and maternal intrusive behaviours via parental responsibility beliefs. Limitations The sample was limited to a treatment-seeking, relatively high socio-economic population and only mothers were included so replication with more diverse groups is needed. The use of a range of stressor tasks may have allowed for a more comprehensive assessment of parental behaviours. Conclusions The findings suggest that parental anxiety disorder is associated with an elevated sense of parental responsibility and may promote parental behaviours likely to inhibit optimum child treatment outcomes. Parental responsibility beliefs may therefore be important to target in child anxiety treatments in the context of parental anxiety disorders. PMID:26363612

  10. Psychometric properties of the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease in patients with COPD in China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Lan; Tao, Yan-Xia; Suo, Xiu-li; Li, Yue-Chuan; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a common comorbidity in patients with COPD in China, and it can significantly decrease patients’ quality of life. Almost all anxiety measurements contain somatic items that can overlap with symptoms of COPD and side effects of medicines, which can lead to bias in measuring anxiety in patients with COPD. Therefore, a brief and disease-specific non-somatic anxiety measurement scale, the Anxiety Inventory for Respiratory Disease (AIR), which has been developed and validated in its English version, is needed for patients with COPD in China. Methods A two-center study was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Tianjin, China. A total of 181 outpatients with COPD (mean age 67.21±8.10 years, 32.6% women), who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were enrolled in the study. Test–retest reliability was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients. The internal consistency was calculated by Cronbach’s α. Content validity was examined using the Content Validity Index (CVI), scale-level CVI/universal agreement, and scale-level CVI/average agreement (S-CVI/Ave). Besides, convergent validity and construct validity were also examined. Results The AIR-C (AIR-Chinese version) scale had high test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.904) and internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=0.914); the content validity of the AIR-C scale was calculated by CVI, scale-level CVI/universal agreement, and S-CVI/Ave at values of 0.89–1, 0.90, and 0.98, respectively. Meanwhile, the AIR-C scale had good convergent validity, correlating with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (r=0.81, P<0.01), and there were significant correlations between the AIR-C and Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ; r=0.44, P<0.01) and Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS; r=0.36, P<0.01). A two-factor model of general anxiety and panic symptoms in the AIR-C scale had the best fit according to Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Conclusion The AIR

  11. Relations of the factors of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression to types of social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alicia A; Heimberg, Richard G; Coles, Meredith E; Gibb, Brandon E; Liebowitz, Michael R; Schneier, Franklin R

    2006-11-01

    Our primary goal was to examine the relations of the specific components of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression [Clark, L. A., Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336] to two types of social anxiety (social interaction anxiety and performance anxiety) in 148 individuals with social phobia. In line with previous research, overall social anxiety was more closely related to the anhedonic depression (AD) or low positive affect factor of the tripartite model than to the physiological hyerarousal factor, controlling for general distress. However, as hypothesized, performance anxiety was more closely associated with the physiological hyerarousal factor, whereas social interaction anxiety was more closely associated with the AD or low positive affect factor. We also examined the convergent and discriminant validity of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ; [Watson, D., Clark, L. A. (1991). The mood and anxiety symptom questionnaire. Unpublished manuscript, University of Iowa City]). Intercorrelations of the MASQ subscales were as expected, but correlations with measures of social anxiety, nonsocial anxiety, and depression provided only modest support for convergent and discriminant validity. Findings from this study provide a more detailed account of the specific components of the tripartite model that characterize the diversity of symptoms subsumed by social phobia.

  12. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  13. Health Anxiety, Hypochondriasis, and the Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S.; Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Deacon, Brett J.

    2007-01-01

    Although clinical observations suggest that health-related anxiety is present, to some extent, in a number of anxiety disorders, this relationship has not been examined empirically. The present study therefore utilized the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI) to elucidate the structure of such symptoms among patients with anxiety disorders and to…

  14. Evaluation of anxiety condition among type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Aliye; Bulut, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted for the purpose of determining the relationship between type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and anxiety. Method This study was conducted between August and September 2015 at Bingol State Hospital. The study included 131 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) followed up at the Internal Diseases Polyclinic of Bingol State Hospital. The questionnaire used in the study consisted of two parts. The first part of the questionnaire comprised a set of questions querying the sociodemographic characteristics and the second part comprised the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Results The incidence of Type 1 DM was found to be higher among female compared to male patients, whereas type 2 DM was found to be higher among male compared to female patients, and this difference was statistically significant. According to the results of Beck Anxiety Scale (BAS) applied to the patients to examine their psychological states, 94.2% of male and 96.8% of female patients were found to be in the severe anxiety group. Among both male and female patients, BAS scores of the type 2 DM patients were higher than those of type 1 DM patients. When the distribution of BAS scores among the patients was examined, it was found that males received 44.7±13.2 points and females received 47.0±13.0 as mean value, but no statistically significant difference was found between BAS scores by sex. Unlike female patients, the difference between duration of disease and BAS score was found to be statistically significant in male patients. Conclusion In planning the treatment of patients with diabetes, evaluating them mentally will help to provide optimal treatment and care services. PMID:27785034

  15. The effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Azmoon, Hiva; Souri, Shiva; Akbari, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Psychological problems as state anxiety (SA) in the work environment has negative effect on the employees life especially shift work nurses, i.e. negative effect on mental and physical health (sleep quality, eye fatigue and comfort thermal). The purpose of this study was determination of effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses. Methods: This cross-sectional research conducted on 82 shift-work personnel of 18 nursing workstations of Isfahan hospitals in 2012. To measure the SA, sleep quality, visual fatigue and thermal comfort, Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory, Pittsburg sleep quality index, eye fatigue questionnaire and thermal comfort questionnaire were used respectively. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, student test and correlation analysis. Results: Correlation between SA and sleep quality was −0.664(P < 0001), Pearson correlation between SA and thermal comfort was −0.276(P = 0.016) and between SA and eye fatigue was 0.57 (P < 0001). Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that improvement of thermal conditions and reduce state anxiety level can be reduce eye fatigue and increase the sleep quality in shift work nurses. PMID:25077165

  16. Comparison of the effects of doula supportive care and acupressure at the BL32 point on the mother's anxiety level and delivery outcome

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Masoudi, Zahra; Zare, Najaf; Vaziri, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural delivery is distressing and the mother's severe pain and anxiety in this condition can have negative impacts on the fetus, mother, and the delivery process. Yet, pain and anxiety can be reduced by supporting the mother by a doula. Thus, the present study aims to compare the effects of doula supportive care and acupressure at the BL32 point on the mother's anxiety level and delivery outcome. Materials and Methods: The present clinical trial was conducted on 150 pregnant women who had referred to the Shoushtari Hospital, Shiraz, Iran for delivery in 2012. The subjects were randomly divided into two intervention groups (supportive care and acupressure) and a control group (hospital routine care). The mothers’ anxiety score was assessed before and after the intervention, using the Spielberger questionnaire. The delivery outcomes were evaluated, as well. Subsequently, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (Ver. 16) and analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA), Chi-square test, correlation coefficient, and logistic regression analysis. Results: After the intervention, the highest and lowest mean scores of the state and trait anxieties were compared with the control and the supportive care groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). A significant relationship was found between the labor length and mother's anxiety score after the intervention in the supportive care (P < 0.001) and the control group (P = 0.006). However, this relationship was not significant in the acupressure group (P = 0.425). Also, a significant difference was observed among the three groups regarding the mothers’ anxiety level (P = 0.009). Conclusions: The study results showed that doula supportive care and acupressure at the BL32 point reduced the mother's anxiety as well as the labor length. Therefore, non-pharmacological methods are recommended to be used during labor for improving birth outcomes and

  17. The Comparison of Two Types of Relaxation Techniques on Postoperative State Anxiety in Candidates for The Mastectomy Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parsa Yekta, Zohreh; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Taghavi Larijani, Taraneh; Mehran, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Anxiety among patients after surgery can affect their physiological and psychological well-being. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of Benson’s relaxation and rhythmic breathing techniques on postoperative anxiety in candidates for the mastectomy surgery. Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial study was conducted with ninety patients in 2013. The patients were hospitalized for the mastectomy surgery in three surgical wards in a teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. They were randomly assigned into three groups: Benson’s relaxation including the cognitive relaxation technique type, rhythmic breathing including the somatic relaxation technique type and control groups. According to the Davidson and Schwartz multi-process theory, the Benson’s relaxation and the rhythmic breathing techniques have cognitive and somatic effects, respectively. One day before the surgery, the patients in the intervention groups were trained regarding relaxation and breathing techniques and were asked to perform the techniques under the supervision of the researcher in the night before the surgery. The cognitive somatic anxiety questionnaire was used to measure anxiety before the intervention and half an hour after recovery of consciousness after the surgery. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis via the SPSS v.21 software. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of demographic characteristics. The application of both techniques reduced the level of patients’ anxiety after the surgery. The patients in the Benson’s relaxation technique group reported only the relief of somatic anxiety. However, the breathing technique patients reported a reduction in both cognitive and somatic anxiety. Conclusion: The Benson’s relaxation and rhythmic breathing techniques can reduce postoperative anxiety in patients after the mastectomy surgery. Trial Registration

  18. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. PMID:27499583

  19. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  20. Write Your Own Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David I.

    1975-01-01

    Contends that student evaluative questionnaires should be designed by instructors themselves to help improve their classroom performance and therefore should contain only questions that students are capable of answering objectively and not, for instance, questions about the relevancy of the course. Contains a sample questionnaire. (GH)

  1. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  2. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--Parent Version in a School Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale--Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the "DSM" diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive…

  3. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent Version in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebesutani, Chad; Bernstein, Adam; Nakamura, Brad J.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Weisz, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a 47-item parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression, with scales corresponding to the DSM-IV categories of Separation Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Panic Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Major Depressive…

  4. Burnout, anxiety, depression, and social skills in medical residents.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Lima, K; Loureiro, S R

    2015-01-01

    The medical residency is recognized as a risk period for the development of burnout and mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression, which have impact on the physician and clientele alike. There is a need for studies that address conditions of risk and protection for the development of such problems. This study aimed to verify the rates of burnout, anxiety, and depression presented by resident physicians, as well as the associations of these problems with social skills, as potential protective factors. The hypothesis was defined that the problems (burnout, anxiety, and depression) would be negatively associated with social skills. A total of 305 medical residents, of both genders, of different specialties, from clinical and surgical areas of a Brazilian university hospital were evaluated using the following standardized self-report instruments: Burnout Syndrome Inventory, Social Skills Inventory, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. High rates of burnout and mental health problems were verified and social skills were negatively associated with burnout dimensions such as emotional exhaustion, emotional detachment, and dehumanization, but positively associated with personal accomplishment. Furthermore, residents with indicators of problems presented significantly lower social skills means than those of residents without indicators of burnout, anxiety, or depression. More studies are needed, which include other types of instruments in addition to self-report ones and evaluate not only social skills but also social competence in the professional practice. These should adopt intervention and longitudinal designs that allow the continuity or overcoming of the problems to be verified. Since social skills can be learned, the results of the study highlight the importance of developing the interpersonal skills of the professionals during the training of resident physicians in order to improve their practice.

  5. Examining the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorder-71 as an Assessment Tool for Anxiety in Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Deutschman, Amber A. C. G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a questionnaire developed to assess symptoms of anxiety disorders (SCARED-71) were compared between two groups of children: children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders (ASD-group; "n" = 115), and children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; "n" = 122).…

  6. The Effect of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Stress in Women with Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Elahe; Mohammmadi, Arsalan Khan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stress induced by preeclampsia in pregnancy may have a detrimental effect on both the mother and child. Risk of anxiety, depression and stress during pregnancy is, therefore, commonly associated with preeclampsia. Aim To determine the effect of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) on anxiety, depression and stress in pregnant women with preeclampsia. Materials and Methods In a clinical trial, 60 women with preeclampsia were selected by the convenience sampling method from the Imam-Ali Hospital of Amol city (North of Iran). The subjects were randomly divided into two groups; the study group (n=30) and the control (n=30). All participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and a Pregnancy Distress Questionnaire (PDQ) at the beginning and end of the study. The intervention group received 12 CBT sessions lasting for 90 minutes over 4 weeks (3 sessions in a week) and the control group received no treatment. Results A MANCOVA test showed that CBT significantly reduced the mean scores of anxiety (5.5 ± 3.2 vs. 9.7 ± 3.8) and depression (6.4±2.6 vs 9.3±4.0) in preeclamptic women (F: 19.933, p-value <0.01). In addition, ANCOVA also revealed that CBT significantly improved the mean scores of specific-stress pregnancy (15.9 ± 6.3 vs 22.2 ± 6.8) in women with preeclampsia (F: 10.214, p-value <0.01). Conclusion Psychotherapy was effective in reducing anxiety, depression and specific-stress pregnancy in pregnant women with preeclampsia. PMID:28050449

  7. Anxiety and quality of life in phobic dental patients.

    PubMed

    Crofts-Barnes, N P; Brough, E; Wilson, K E; Beddis, A J; Girdler, N M

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about the anxiety patients experience before attending for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to determine, in dentally phobic patients, the temporal relationship of pre-operative anxiety levels, and the disruption to daily life caused by this. Twenty-four phobic and 19 comparison (non-phobic) dental patients were recruited. Four validated questionnaires were used to assess anxiety and quality of life, which each patient completed for 5 days prior to, and on the day of, treatment. Those in the experimental group were found to have significantly greater levels of dental and general anxiety, and a significantly lower quality of life compared with those in the comparison group. Significant temporal relationships were found with all of the questionnaires. Dental and general anxiety scores were significantly correlated with quality-of-life measures. This study suggests that phobic dental patients are experiencing significant increased anxiety, and significant negative quality-of-life effects, in this period.

  8. Evidence of Higher Oxidative Status in Depression and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Grases, G.; Colom, M. A.; Fernandez, R. A.; Costa-Bauzá, A.; Grases, F.

    2014-01-01

    We use a simple method for evaluating antioxidative status, by measuring the redox potential of urine, and correlate the findings with measures of anxiety and depression. We include 63 individuals (28 males and 35 females aged between 20 and 65 years). The validated anxiety State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the validated BDI (Beck Depression Inventory) questionnaire were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Antioxidative status was determined by measuring the redox potential of urine collected in standard conditions. Correlation of the antioxidant capacity of urines evaluated using the ferric ion/specific dye method or through redox potential using the platinum electrode demonstrated the suitability of this last procedure. We found that normal anxiety state values corresponded to low urine redox potentials, whereas higher anxiety states were associated with high urinary redox potential. We also found that individuals with normal BDI values had significantly lower urine redox potentials than individuals with higher BDI values. PMID:24876911

  9. Zolpidem extended-release improves sleep and next-day symptoms in comorbid insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Fava, Maurizio; Asnis, Gregory M; Shrivastava, Ram; Lydiard, Bruce; Bastani, Bijan; Sheehan, David; Roth, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    A multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of zolpidem extended-release coadministered with escitalopram in patients with insomnia and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Patients (N = 383) received open-label escitalopram 10 mg/d and were randomized to either adjunct zolpidem extended-release 12.5 mg or placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 8 in subjective total sleep time. Secondary efficacy measures included subjective sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, wake time after sleep onset, sleep quality, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Sleep Impact Scale, the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, and the Sheehan Disability Scale. The last-observation-carried-forward method was used to impute missing values for most efficacy measures. Safety was monitored at each visit. At week 8 and all time points, there was a significant improvement in the zolpidem extended-release/escitalopram group compared with placebo/escitalopram for total sleep time (P < 0.0001). Most of the secondary efficacy measures also significantly favored zolpidem at most visits (P < 0.0001). The most common treatment-emergent adverse events in both groups were nausea, dizziness, headache, fatigue, and dry mouth. Concurrent zolpidem extended-release/escitalopram, compared with placebo/escitalopram, significantly improved insomnia and sleep-related next-day symptoms, but not anxiety symptoms, in patients with comorbid insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder.

  10. Pregnant Turkish women with low income: their anxiety, health-promoting lifestyles, and related factors.

    PubMed

    Kavlak, Oya; Atan, Senay Unsal; Sirin, Ahsen; Sen, Emine; Guneri, Sezer Er; Dag, Hande Yagcan

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents anxiety levels, health-promoting lifestyles and related factors among pregnant Turkish women with low income. A descriptive correlation and cross-sectional study was conducted at a state maternity hospital in Western Turkey. The paper reports on the data (n = 195) from the Spielberg State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The average HPLP score was low (mean 2.57, SD 0.42). The average STAI score was high (40.67 ± 9.48; 46.40 ± 8.09, respectively). A significant relation was detected between the trait anxiety, state anxiety, antenatal visit, perception of social support, living environment, family type and HPLP (P < 0.05). A moderately negative relation was detected between the mean STAI and HPLP scores. The findings indicate information and data should be provided for service planning and community care to support pregnant Turkish women with low income in communities.

  11. Anxiety in Medically Ill Children/Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Maryland; Bosk, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are thought to be one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses in children/adolescents. Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of an anxiety disorder and the prevalence rate of anxiety disorders among youths with chronic medical illnesses is higher compared to their healthy counterparts. Anxiety disorders may develop secondary to predisposing biological mechanisms related to a child’s specific medical illness, as a response to being ill or in the hospital, a threatening environment, as a result of other genetic and psychological factors, or as a combination of all these factors. Additionally, exposure to physical pain early in one’s life and or frequent painful medical procedures are correlated with fear and anxiety during subsequent procedures and treatments and may lead to medical nonadherence and other comorbidities. Anxiety disorders can have serious consequences in children/adolescents with chronic and or life limiting medical illnesses. Therefore, proper identification and treatment of anxiety disorders is necessary and may improve not only psychiatric symptoms but also physical symptoms. Behavioral and cognitive methods as well as psychotropic medications are used to treat anxiety disorders in pediatric patients. We will review current treatments for anxiety in children/adolescents with medical illnesses and propose future research directions. PMID:20721908

  12. Workplace phobia--a first explorative study on its relation to established anxiety disorders, sick leave, and work-directed treatment.

    PubMed

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Workplace phobia is defined as a phobic anxiety reaction with symptoms of panic occurring when thinking of or approaching the workplace. People suffering from workplace phobia regularly avoid confrontation with the workplace and are often on sick leave. The specific characteristics of workplace phobia are investigated empirically in comparison to established anxiety disorders. Two hundred thirty patients from an inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation hospital were interviewed concerning workplace phobia and established anxiety disorders. Additionally, the patients filled in self-rating questionnaires on general and workplace phobic symptom load. Subjectively perceived degree of work load, sick leave, and therapy participation were assessed. Participants with workplace phobia reached significantly higher scores in workplace phobia self-rating than did participants with established anxiety disorders. A similar significant difference was not found concerning the general psychosomatic symptom load. Workplace phobics were more often on sick leave than patients with established anxiety disorders. Workplace phobia can occur as an alonestanding anxiety disorder. It has an own clinical value due to its specific consequences for work participation. Workplace phobia requires special therapeutic attention and treatment instead of purely 'sick leave' certification.

  13. Impact of dissociation on treatment of depressive and anxiety spectrum disorders with and without personality disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prasko, Jan; Grambal, Ales; Kasalova, Petra; Kamardova, Dana; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos; Zatkova, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective The central goal of the study was to analyze the impact of dissociation on the treatment effectiveness in patients with anxiety/neurotic spectrum and depressive disorders with or without comorbid personality disorders. Methods The research sample consisted of inpatients who were hospitalized in the psychiatric department and met the ICD-10 criteria for diagnosis of depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety–depressive disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorders, dissociative/conversion disorders, somatoform disorder, or other anxiety/neurotic spectrum disorder. The participants completed these measures at the start and end of the therapeutic program – Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, a subjective version of Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Sheehan Patient-Related Anxiety Scale, and Dissociative Experience Scale. Results A total of 840 patients with anxiety or depressive spectrum disorders, who were resistant to pharmacological treatment on an outpatient basis and were referred for hospitalization for the 6-week complex therapeutic program, were enrolled in this study. Of them, 606 were statistically analyzed. Data from the remaining 234 (27.86%) patients were not used because of various reasons (103 prematurely finished the program, 131 did not fill in most of the questionnaires). The patients’ mean ratings on all measurements were significantly reduced during the treatment. Also, 67.5% reached at least minimal improvement (42.4% showed moderate and more improvement, 35.3% of the patients reached remission). The patients without comorbid personality disorder improved more significantly in the reduction of depressive symptoms than those with comorbid personality disorder. However, there were no significant differences in change in anxiety levels and severity of the mental issues between the patients with and without

  14. Social Anxiety and Close Relationships: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Kate E. J.; Cairns, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    While only a few quantitative studies have looked at social anxiety and close relationships, this study uses the qualitative approach of hermeneutic phenomenology to explore the meaning of being in a close relationship for eight individuals with social anxiety. Participants completed a written questionnaire with open-ended questions about their…

  15. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to…

  16. Death and Dying Anxiety among Elderly Arab Muslims in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azaiza, Faisal; Ron, Pnina; Shoham, Meyrav; Gigini, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Death and dying anxiety were examined among elderly Arab Muslims in Israel. A total of 145 people aged 60 and over were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Nursing home residents reported higher death anxiety than others; women and uneducated participants reported greater levels of fear of death and dying than others. There were no…

  17. Suggested Approaches to the Measurement of Computer Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toris, Carol

    Psychologists can gain insight into human behavior by examining what people feel about, know about, and do with, computers. Two extreme reactions to computers are computer phobia, or anxiety, and computer addiction, or "hacking". A four-part questionnaire was developed to measure computer anxiety. The first part is a projective technique which…

  18. Smartphone-based Music Listening to Reduce Pain and Anxiety Before Coronarography: A Focus on Sex Differences.

    PubMed

    Guétin, Stéphane; Brun, Luc; Deniaud, Maelle; Clerc, Jean-Michel; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2016-07-01

    Background • Music Care is a smartphone-based application providing a musical intervention for the management of pain and anxiety in a clinical setting. Coronarography is a medical procedure frequently associated with examination anxiety. Objectives • The study intended to perform an initial evaluation of the application for use with patients undergoing a coronarography. Design • The research team performed an uncontrolled, observational study. Setting • The study took place at Nouméa General Hospital in Nouméa, New Caledonia, France. Participants • Participants were 35 patients, 17 women and 18 men, who were undergoing a coronarography between November 2010 and April 2011 at the Nouméa General Hospital. Intervention • Participants listened to a standardized musical sequence of adjustable length by choosing a preferred style of music (eg, classic rock or folk music) from a variety of choices that the research team had chosen to include in the application. Outcome Measures • Before and after listening to the music, all participants were asked to rate their anxiety and pain on an 11-item, visual analogue scale and to complete a questionnaire on their satisfaction with use of the application. Results • The paired sample t test revealed a significant reduction in participants' anxiety (t33 = 4.12, P < .0001) after they had listened to the music. No significant reduction in self-reported pain occurred; however, only a few participants reported pain associated with the procedure. No significant sex differences existed. Women and men both showed reduced anxiety after listening to music as well as reported a high level of satisfaction in using the Music Care application. Conclusions • The smartphone-based Music Care application is an easy-to-use tool to reduce anxiety in patients undergoing coronarography. Future large-scale, controlled trials are necessary to compare its effectiveness with other interventions. Both women and men can benefit from the

  19. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety Print A ... help both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. ...

  20. [Utility of the questionnaire for quality of life EORTC-QLQ-C30 in psycho-oncological outcome research].

    PubMed

    Determann, M M; Kollenbaum, V-E; Henne-Bruns, D

    2004-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to examine the utility and validity of the questionnaire for quality of life EORTC-QLQ-C30 (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer). Data were collected within the scope of a study for evaluation of individual psycho-oncological support for inpatients with colorectal cancer undergoing surgery. The study was sponsored by the German Cancer Aid. The design was a prospective randomized controlled trial. After informed consent, patients were randomized in one of two groups: patients in the experimental group received individualized psychotherapeutic support during the hospital stay; those in the control group received a daily program of classical music. All patients were assessed one day before surgical treatment, ten days and three months after surgery. Instruments were questionnaires for quality of life and state anxiety. 106 patients met the inclusion criteria. Results show insufficient discriminative power (high significant bivariate correlations between most EORTC scales, Kendalls tau-b) and insufficient construct validity (high and significant bivariate correlations between most EORTC scales and state anxiety, Kendalls tau-b) of the EORTC scales. The scores of "cognitive functioning" and some symptom scales show an insufficient scatter. The illustration of situational influences and therefore an insufficient illustration of effects of specific interventions are connected with a high sensitivity of the scales and a tendency to extreme sores. The psycho-oncological intervention shows a significant stress reducing effect on the specific EORTC-scale "Emotional Functioning" and on State Anxiety (STAI). The testing of utility and validity of the EORTC-Questionnaire shows that they are insufficient and therefore the benefit for evaluation of specific intervention procedures is restricted.

  1. Revising and Validating Achievement Emotions Questionnaire--Teachers (AEQ-T)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Ji; Heddy, Benjamin; Ruan, Jiening; You, Sula; Kambara, Hitomi; Nie, Youyan; Monobe, Gumiko

    2016-01-01

    Achievement Emotions Questionnaire--Teachers (AEQ-T) measures teachers' anger, anxiety, and enjoyment related to instruction. The purpose of this research is to revise and validate AEQ-T to include pride and frustration. Also, this study aimed to replicate previous research on anger, anxiety, and enjoyment and validate this expanded measure in an…

  2. Is the Relationship between Competence Beliefs and Test Anxiety Influenced by Goal Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William; Daniels, Rachel Anne

    2010-01-01

    The study described here aimed to examine the relations between test anxiety, competence beliefs and achievement goals, and in particular if the relations between competence beliefs and test anxiety were moderated by achievement goals. Pupils in their first year of secondary schooling completed self-report questionnaires for test anxiety,…

  3. Attentional networks and visuospatial working memory capacity in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Jun

    2016-12-02

    Social anxiety is associated with attentional bias and working memory for emotional stimuli; however, the ways in which social anxiety affects cognitive functions involving non-emotional stimuli remains unclear. The present study focused on the role of attentional networks (i.e. alerting, orienting, and executive control networks) and visuospatial working memory capacity (WMC) for non-emotional stimuli in the context of social anxiety. One hundred and seventeen undergraduates completed questionnaires on social anxiety. They then performed an attentional network test and a change detection task to measure visuospatial WMC. Orienting network and visuospatial WMC were positively correlated with social anxiety. A multiple regression analysis showed significant positive associations of alerting, orienting, and visuospatial WMC with social anxiety. Alerting, orienting networks, and high visuospatial WMC for non-emotional stimuli may predict degree of social anxiety.

  4. Mathematics Anxiety: What Have We Learned in 60 Years?

    PubMed Central

    Dowker, Ann; Sarkar, Amar; Looi, Chung Yen

    2016-01-01

    The construct of mathematics anxiety has been an important topic of study at least since the concept of “number anxiety” was introduced by Dreger and Aiken (1957), and has received increasing attention in recent years. This paper focuses on what research has revealed about mathematics anxiety in the last 60 years, and what still remains to be learned. We discuss what mathematics anxiety is; how distinct it is from other forms of anxiety; and how it relates to attitudes to mathematics. We discuss the relationships between mathematics anxiety and mathematics performance. We describe ways in which mathematics anxiety is measured, both by questionnaires, and by physiological measures. We discuss some possible factors in mathematics anxiety, including genetics, gender, age, and culture. Finally, we describe some research on treatment. We conclude with a brief discussion of what still needs to be learned. PMID:27199789

  5. Eating-related anxiety in individuals with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Webb, C M; Thuras, P; Peterson, C B; Lampert, J; Miller, D; Crow, S J

    2011-12-01

    Although previous research has supported the importance of anxiety as an etiological and maintenance factor for eating disorders, the specific mechanisms are not well understood. The role of anxiety in the context of eating behavior is especially unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify anxiety-eliciting eating situations and anxiety management strategies patients use to mitigate anxiety experienced in the context of eating as determined by diagnostic groups and symptom patterns. Fifty-three eating disorder outpatients were administered the Eating and Anxiety Questionnaire (EAQ) and the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Ratings indicated significant anxiety in most eating situations, whereas management strategies were more limited yet regularly employed. Factor analysis of the EAQ revealed a 6-factor solution for anxiety management strategies and a 4-factor solution for anxiety-eliciting situations. These results indicate patients with eating disorders report high levels of anxiety associated with eating behaviors but utilize limited yet consistent anxiety management strategies. Effective intervention strategies for managing eating-related anxiety should be incorporated into treatment and may need to be specified for different diagnostic subgroups.

  6. [Questionnaire methods used in the psychosomatic evaluation of tinnitus].

    PubMed

    Eğilmez, Oğuz Kadir; Kalcıoğlu, M Tayyar; Kökten, Numan

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus is a common disorder in ear, nose and throat practice. Not only muscular, vascular, neuronal, odiologic and ear pathologies, also psychological parameters contribute to the formation of tinnitus. Scales which evaluate patients' perception of tinnitus and how they are affected from tinnitus psychosomatically have gained increasing importance. Questionnaire studies are very assisting in terms of showing the degree of anxiety and depression experienced by the patients, diagnosis of the disease, evaluation of treatment efficacy, and patient follow-up. In this study, we reviewed the visual analog scale which measures the level of subjective perception in tinnitus, tinnitus evaluation questionnaires, and questionnaires measuring the level of quality of life and depression.

  7. The Relationship between Teacher and Peer Support and English-Language Learners' Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shufen; Eslami, Zohreh; Hu, Rou-Jui Sophia

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to shed light on the relationship between support (from teachers and peers) and foreign-language learners' anxiety. A total of 158 adult Taiwanese English-language learners completed three questionnaires: a background questionnaire, the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale, and the Classroom Life Measure. The results showed…

  8. Social Physique Anxiety, Obligation to Exercise, and Exercise Choices among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Wen; Bushman, Barbara A.; Woodard, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined relationships among social physique anxiety, obligation to exercise, and exercise choices. Participants and Methods: College students (N = 337; 200 women, 137 men) volunteered to complete 3 questionnaires: the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS), Obligatory Exercise Questionnaire (OEQ), and Physical Activity…

  9. Anxiety in adolescent epilepsy. A clinimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Marchetti, Daniela; Laino, Daniela; Minna, Maria; Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Fulcheri, Mario; Verrotti, Alberto; Bech, Per

    2016-08-01

    Background Anxiety and depression have been considered to be neglected disorders in epilepsy. Because panic disorder is one of the most important anxiety disorders, it has been problematic to use very comprehensive anxiety questionnaires in epilepsy patients, as panic attacks and epileptic seizures, although two distinct clinical entities from a diagnostic point of view, show a significant overlap of symptoms. Aims We have focused on single items for anxiety and depression as screening candidates in adolescent epilepsy. Methods The individual panic attack item in the Screen for Children Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Scale (SCARED) and the single depression item in the Kellner Symptom Questionnaire were tested. Our samples consisted of adolescent patients with epilepsy and a matched control group with healthy participants, as well as two numerical groups acting as controls. Results The single panic attack item identified panic anxiety in 24.1% in the group of patients with epilepsy and 0.0% in the matched control group (p = 0.01). The single depression item identified 52.2% with depression in the epilepsy group and 6.2% in the matched control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion As screening instruments, single items of panic attack and depression are sufficient to screen for these affective states in adolescent epilepsy. The clinical implications are that it is important to be quite specific when screening for depression and panic attacks in adolescent patients with epilepsy.

  10. Occurrence of Anxiety and Depression among Stable COPD Patients and its Impact on Functional Capability

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Subhasis; Chakroborty, Rajarshi; Chatterjee, Somsubhra; Rath, Subrata; Das, Runa; Begum, Shabana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety and depression are important but often under-diagnosed co-morbid conditions in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) which may affect the functional capacity of the patients. Aim To find out the proportion of depression and anxiety among stable COPD patients using a validated questionnaire suitable for use in clinic and the factors affecting their reduced functional capability as assessed by six-minute walk test. Materials and Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Seventy five patients diagnosed with stable COPD in outpatient Department of Pulmonary Medicine in a tertiary care hospital, satisfying all inclusion criteria, were included in the study. They were examined clinically, categorized as per Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) severity assessment guideline and interviewed by designated interviewer using validated questionnaire for depression (Hamilton depression rating scale, HAM-D) and anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI). The functional exercise capacity of the patient was assessed by six-minute walk test. Statistical analysis was performed using Minitab software (version16.1). Results Among 75 stable COPD patients (68 male, 7 female), majority (32 out of 75) had both depression and anxiety, while only anxiety or depression was present in 9 each. The patients with depression had no significant difference in six-minute walk distance, change in heart rate and respiratory rate (p = 0.4186, 0.219 and 0.41 respectively) as compared to those without depression, but were found to be more dyspnoeic at the end of the test (p= 0.003). There was also no significant difference in walk distance in patients with high STAI score as compared to those with low STAI score (p= 0.276). Conclusion Both anxiety and depression were present in majority of the stable COPD patients. The presence of these co-morbid conditions had no significant effect on the functional status of the patients

  11. Comparison of questionnaires determining patient satisfaction with medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J G; Tugwell, P

    1987-01-01

    This study compares the results of previously developed patient satisfaction questionnaires which quantitatively assessed the personal attitudes of 59 patients toward their medical care. These patients, hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction, were admitted to the intensive care unit of a community hospital in southern Ontario, Canada. The questionnaires were completed by these patients at four and six months post-myocardial infarction. This quantitative assessment of patient satisfaction, as indicated by Hulka and Ware questionnaires, provided data to compare the relative effectiveness of these questionnaires in measuring satisfaction. Generally, these questionnaires were reliable (r = .64, r = .59) and evidence of criterion concurrent validity was noted (r = .75-.81). Both questionnaires have comparable results concerning the prevalence of dissatisfaction (0-7 percent). PMID:3692863

  12. The COPD assessment test and St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire: are they equivalent in subjects with COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Morishita-Katsu, Mariko; Nishimura, Koichi; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tomoki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Kensuke; Ogawa, Tomoya; Watanabe, Fumiko; Arizono, Shinichi; Nishiyama, Osamu; Nakayasu, Kazuhito; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT) is a short questionnaire that has facilitated health status measurements in subjects with COPD. However, it remains controversial as to whether the CAT can be used as a suitable substitute for the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This study investigated the reliability and score distributions of the CAT and SGRQ and evaluated which factors contributed to health status for each questionnaire. Methods A total of 109 consecutive subjects with stable COPD from a single center were enrolled in this study. Each subject completed pulmonary function tests, exercise tests, and the following self-administered questionnaires: the Baseline Dyspnea Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the CAT, and SGRQ. Results Internal consistencies of CAT and SGRQ total scores were both excellent (Cronbach’s α coefficients =0.890 and 0.933). Statistically significant correlations were observed between CAT and SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001). Correlations of CAT scores with parameters related to pulmonary function, dyspnea, exercise performance, and psychological factors were inferior to correlations with those parameters with SGRQ total scores. Both multiple regression analyses and principal component analyses revealed that there were slight differences between SGRQ total scores and CAT scores. Conclusion The CAT is similar to SGRQ in terms of discriminating health status. However, we demonstrated that what is assessed by the CAT may differ slightly from what is measured by SGRQ. PMID:27462150

  13. Preassessment clinic interview and patient anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Stephen; McKendrick, Douglas; French, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is widely recognized that patients have increased anxiety before elective surgery, however, previous research investigating the effect of preassessment clinics (PACs) on anxiety levels has been limited specifically to patient information literature or multimedia use, rather than the consultation process itself. The aim was to investigate the effect attendance at PAC had on patients’ anxiety levels, associated with their subsequent surgery and anesthetic. Materials and Methods: This survey consisted of a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, quantitative study investigating patients’ anxiety levels before and after attendance at the PAC. The questionnaire consisted of a series of statements concerning the surgery and anesthetic and rated using a Likert-type scale. All adult patients who attended an appointment at the PAC were eligible to participate in the study. Those unable to read and understand the questionnaire were excluded. Results: Overall 121 participants were included in the study. Participants felt less anxious about their subsequent surgery and anesthetic following consultation at the PAC (P < 0.001). This was true for both gender subgroups (P < 0.05) Concerns about intraoperative complications generated the most anxiety. Postoperatively, male participants were most anxious about pain and females about nausea and vomiting. Participants also reported high satisfaction rates for the service at the PAC. Conclusions: This study contributes to a greater understanding of preoperative anxiety and has important implications for PACs. This clinical survey has been able to demonstrate that consultation at the PAC has a statistically significant positive effect on alleviating patients’ anxieties in regards to their surgery and anesthetic. PMID:27833482

  14. Sleep bruxism and anxiety level in children.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcelo Tomás de; Bittencourt, Sandra Teixeira; Marcon, Karina; Destro, Samia; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the association of level of anxiety in children with and without sleep bruxism (SB). The study was performed with 84 six- to eigth-years-old children, divided into two groups: with bruxism (BG) and without bruxism (CG). Following the criteria purposed by American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) to determine SB, the presence of tooth wear has been verified through clinical examinations, and the parents have answered a questionnaire about their children's behavior and habits. Additionally, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) was applied to parents of the selected patients. Data analysis revealed a statistical significant difference between the groups (Student's t-test, p = 0.0136). Based on the results, anxiety assessment revealed that children with bruxism have reached higher levels in the STAIC scale than the non-bruxism group. Therefore, it indicates a direct relationship between the presence of anxiety disorder and the onset of bruxism in children.

  15. Questionnaire typography and production.

    PubMed

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first.

  16. Association of anxiety, depression, and psychological distress in people with and without functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Peyman; Keshteli, Ammar Hasanzadeh; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Pournaghshband, Nasim; Afshar, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current studies have indicated a high ratio of psychological problems in functional dyspepsia (FD) which causes disturbance in its management, so recognition these problems help the process of treatment. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with a sample size of 4763 carried out in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Modified ROME III questionnaire was used to evaluate FD symptoms. Hospital anxiety and depression scale and 12-item General Health Questionnaire-12 was used to assess the psychological issue. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association of psychological problems and FD. Results: We showed that overly 654 (13.7%), 1338 (28.1%), and 1067 (22.4%) of participants, respectively had anxiety, depression, and of psychological distress. Seven hundred and ten (15.5%) participants were diagnosed with FD. Of all participants Mean scores of anxiety (P < 0.001), depression (P < 0.001), and psychological distress (P < 0.001) in participants with FD were significantly more than those with no FD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that psychological problems, whether in the form of psychological distress odds ratio (OR): 2 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3–3) and OR: 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.7) in males and females, respectively, anxiety OR: 2.4 (95% CI: 1.5–3.9) and OR: 2.3 (95% CI: 1.7–3.2) in males and females, respectively) or depression OR: 2.2 (95% CI: 1.5–3.3) and OR: 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3–2.3) in males and females, respectively) were significantly linked to FD in both genders. Conclusions: The prevalence of FD is less in males than females, but psychological links were stronger in males. Thus, it is essential to consider and detect the psychological distress in these patients. PMID:28217633

  17. Affects of Anxiety and Depression on Health-Related Quality of Life among Patients with Benign Breast Lumps Diagnosed via Ultrasonography in China.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhe; Li, Yinyan; Yang, Yilong; Wang, Lie; Yang, Jun

    2015-08-28

    There is a high incidence of benign breast lumps among women, and these lumps may lead to physical and psychological problems. This study aims to evaluate anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients with benign breast lumps diagnosed via ultrasonography and investigate their impacts on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shenyang, China, from January to November 2013. Data were collected with self-administered questionnaires, including the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), together with demographic characteristics, from patients of the Department of Breast Surgery of the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis (HMR) was performed to explore the effects of anxiety and depression on HRQOL. The overall prevalences of anxiety (SAS score ≥ 40) and depression (CES-D scores ≥ 16) were 40.2% and 62.0%, respectively, and 37.5% of the participants had both of these psychological symptoms. The means and standard deviations of PCS and MCS were 75.42 (15.22) and 68.70 (17.71), respectively. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were significantly negatively associated with the HRQOL of patients with benign breast lumps diagnosed via ultrasonography. Women with benign breast lumps diagnosed via ultrasonography in China experienced relatively high levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Anxiety and depressive symptoms had significant negative impacts on both the mental and physical quality of life (QOL) of women with benign breast lumps. Beyond the necessary clinical treatment procedures, psychological guidance and detailed explanations of the disease should be offered to alleviate the anxiety and depressive symptoms and enhance the HRQOL of patients with benign breast lumps.

  18. Familial and Temperamental Risk Factors for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.

    2010-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common disorder that can lead to significant impairment. In this chapter, the author provides background on the disorder and reviews hypothesized familial and temperamental risk factors. In particular, it highlights the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Longitudinal Study of Children at Risk for Anxiety, now…

  19. Construction of anxiety and dimensional personality model in college students.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M

    2013-06-01

    A sample of 402 volunteer male (n = 156) and female (n = 246) Kuwaiti undergraduates responded to the Arabic versions of the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. The latter questionnaire has four subscales: Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Lie. Women obtained a higher mean score on Kuwait University Anxiety Scale and Neuroticism than did men, while men had a higher mean score on Psychoticism than did women. Factor analysis of the intercorrelations between the five variables, separately conducted for men and women, gave rise to two orthogonal factors called Anxiety-and-Neuroticism vs Extraversion, and Psychoticism vs Lie. Stepwise regression revealed that Neuroticism was the main predictor of anxiety. It was concluded that persons with high Neuroticism scores may be more vulnerable to anxiety than those with low scores.

  20. Psychosocial burden of abnormal pap smears among HIV-infected women at Chon Buri hospital, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jayathunge, Mangala P H; Bowanwatanuwong, Chureeratana; Maek-A-nantawat, Wirach; Pitisuttithum, Benjaluck Phonratland Punnee

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective case-control study assessed the psychological burden of abnormal Pap smears, and their prevalence and characteristics among HIV-infected women attending an HIV clinic. Women with positive (n = 73) and negative Pap-smear results (n = 317) were assessed for psychosocial burden using 4 questionnaires: Psycho-Social Impact of Abnormal Pap Smears (PEAPS-Q), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Work Productivity and Impairment (WPAI) and the EURO-Qol Thermometer. The prevalence of pre-cervical cancer lesions in HIV infected woman was 17.5% (ASCUS 2.9%, LSIL 3.8%, HSIL 7.4%, SCC 1.7%, and atypical glandular cells including adenocarcinoma 1.7%). HIV infected women with abnormal Pap smears showed higher anxiety levels on the HADS questionnaire (p = 0.015); this had a significant effect on regular daily activities (p = 0.009) per the WPAI questionnaire compared to HIV positive women with normal Pap smear. Ever married HIV infected woman with an abnormal Pap smear had a significantly lower psychosocial burden using the PEAPS-Q questionnaire (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age and duration since last Pap smear, the education level of the patient was a strong predictor for anxiety. Patients, with a college education had significantly lower anxiety (p = 0.001, 95% CI -5.74 to -1.37) than those with lower or higher education. Women with HSIL were more anxious (p = 0.014, 95% CI 0.49 -4.39) than those with low grade or normal lesions.

  1. The Association of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms with Cognitive Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beaudreau, Sherry A.; O’Hara, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    We examined the association of anxiety, depressive symptoms, and their co-occurrence on cognitive processes in 102 community-dwelling older adults. Participants completed anxiety and depression questionnaires, and measures of episodic and semantic memory, word fluency, processing speed/shifting attention, and inhibition. Participants with only increased anxiety had poorer processing speed/shifting attention, and inhibition, but depressive symptoms alone were not associated with any cognitive deficits. Although co-existing anxiety and depressive symptoms was associated with deficits in 3 cognitive domains, reductions in inhibition were solely attributed to anxiety. Findings suggest an excess cognitive load on inhibitory ability in normal older adults reporting mild anxiety. PMID:19485667

  2. Relationship between anxiety, depression, and morbidity in adult asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rimington, L; Davies, D; Lowe, D; Pearson, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Symptoms of disease reported by patients reflect the effects of the disease process within the individual and the person's physical and mental ability to tolerate or otherwise cope with the limitations on their functioning. This study examines the relationship between asthma symptoms, disease severity, and psychological status in patients being managed in routine primary healthcare settings.
METHODS—One hundred and fourteen subjects from four GP practices, two inner city and two suburban, were studied. Symptoms were assessed by means of the Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire (AQLQ) and a locally devised Q score, and psychological status with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. Spirometric values and details of current asthma treatment (BTS asthma guidelines treatment step) were recorded as markers of asthma severity.
RESULTS—Symptoms as measured by AQLQ correlated with peak expiratory flow (rS = 0.40) and with BTS guidelines treatment step (rS =0.25). Similarly, the Q score correlated with peak expiratory flow (rS = 0.44) and with BTS guidelines treatment step (rS =0.42). Similar levels of correlation of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) with symptoms were reported. HAD anxiety and depression scores also correlated to a similar extent with these two symptom scores, but there was hardly any correlation with lung function. Logistic regression analysis showed that HAD scores help to explain symptom scores over and above the effects of lung function and BTS guidelines treatment step. Symptoms, depression, and anxiety were higher for inner city patients while little difference was observed in objective measures of asthma.
CONCLUSIONS—Asthma guidelines suggest that changing levels of symptoms should be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. These data suggest that reported symptoms may be misleading and unreliable because they may reflect non-asthma factors that cannot be expected to respond to changes in

  3. [Distorted cognition of bodily sensations in subtypes of social anxiety].

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Shoko; Iwanaga, Makoto; Seiwa, Hidetoshi

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between subtypes of social anxiety and distorted cognition of bodily sensations. The package of questionnaires including the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) was administered to 582 undergraduate students. To identify subtypes of social anxiety, cluster analysis was conducted using scores of the SPS and SIAS. Five clusters were identified and labeled as follows: Generalized type characterized by intense anxiety in most social situations, Non-anxious type characterized by low anxiety levels in social situations, Averaged type whose anxiety levels are averaged, Interaction anxiety type who feels anxiety mainly in social interaction situations, and Performance anxiety type who feels anxiety mainly in performance situations. Results of an ANOVA indicated that individuals with interaction type fear the negative evaluation from others regarding their bodily sensations whereas individuals with performance type overestimate the visibility of their bodily sensations to others. Differences in salient aspects of cognitive distortion among social anxiety subtypes may show necessity to select intervention techniques in consideration of subtypes.

  4. Early Life Experiences and Exercise Associate with Canine Anxieties

    PubMed Central

    Tiira, Katriina; Lohi, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Personality and anxiety disorders across species are affected by genetic and environmental factors. Shyness-boldness personality continuum exists across species, including the domestic dog, with a large within- and across-breed variation. Domestic dogs are also diagnosed for several anxiety-related behavioral conditions, such as generalized anxiety disorders, phobias, and separation anxiety. Genetic and environmental factors contributing to personality and anxiety are largely unknown. We collected questionnaire data from a Finnish family dog population (N = 3264) in order to study the associating environmental factors for canine fearfulness, noise sensitivity, and separation anxiety. Early life experiences and exercise were found to associate with anxiety prevalence. We found that fearful dogs had less socialization experiences (p = 0.002) and lower quality of maternal care (p < 0.0001) during puppyhood. Surprisingly, the largest environmental factor associating with noise sensitivity (p < 0.0001) and separation anxiety (p = 0.007) was the amount of daily exercise; dogs with noise sensitivity and separation anxiety had less daily exercise. Our findings suggest that dogs share many of the same environmental factors that contribute to anxiety in other species as well, such as humans and rodents. Our study highlights the importance of early life experiences, especially the quality of maternal care and daily exercise for the welfare and management of the dogs, and reveals important confounding factors to be considered in the genetic characterization of canine anxiety. PMID:26528555

  5. Panic anxiety, under the weather?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbena, A.; Pailhez, G.; Aceña, R.; Cunillera, J.; Rius, A.; Garcia-Ribera, C.; Gutiérrez, J.; Rojo, C.

    2005-03-01

    The relationship between weather conditions and psychiatric disorders has been a continuous subject of speculation due to contradictory findings. This study attempts to further clarify this relationship by focussing on specific conditions such as panic attacks and non-panic anxiety in relation to specific meteorological variables. All psychiatric emergencies attended at a general hospital in Barcelona (Spain) during 2002 with anxiety as main complaint were classified as panic or non-panic anxiety according to strict independent and retrospective criteria. Both groups were assessed and compared with meteorological data (wind speed and direction, daily rainfall, temperature, humidity and solar radiation). Seasons and weekend days were also included as independent variables. Non-parametric statistics were used throughout since most variables do not follow a normal distribution. Logistic regression models were applied to predict days with and without the clinical condition. Episodes of panic were three times more common with the poniente wind (hot wind), twice less often with rainfall, and one and a half times more common in autumn than in other seasons. These three trends (hot wind, rainfall and autumn) were accumulative for panic episodes in a logistic regression formula. Significant reduction of episodes on weekends was found only for non-panic episodes. Panic attacks, unlike other anxiety episodes, in a psychiatric emergency department in Barcelona seem to show significant meteorotropism. Assessing specific disorders instead of overall emergencies or other variables of a more general quality could shed new light on the relationship between weather conditions and behaviour.

  6. Is test anxiety a peril for students with intellectual disabilities?

    PubMed

    Datta, Poulomee

    2013-06-01

    Test anxiety is one of the most confronting issues in modern times with the increase in the number of standardised and high-stakes testing. Research has established that there is a direct link between test anxiety and cognitive deficits. The aim of this study is to determine the test anxiety scores of the students with intellectual disabilities in South Australia. It also provided insights into the reasons for high-test anxiety in the participants under study. The Spielberger's Test Anxiety Questionnaire was administered on students with intellectual disabilities in stage 1. Interviews were conducted with participants with intellectual disabilities, parents and teachers in stage 2. Questionnaire findings revealed that the majority of the adolescent females and males and all adult females with intellectual disabilities had high test anxiety scores. However, the majority of adult males with intellectual disabilities obtained moderate test anxiety scores. In the worry and emotionality subscales, it was also found that the majority of adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities were found to score high. The high test anxiety scores have been justified by the interview responses obtained from the three groups of respondents. A number of factors have been identified to be the major predictors of test anxiety in students with intellectual disabilities.

  7. Food frequency questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required.

  8. Evaluation of a Specialized Yoga Program for Persons Admitted to a Complex Continuing Care Hospital: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuluski, Kerry; Bechsgaard, Gitte; Ridgway, Jennifer; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a specialized yoga intervention for inpatients in a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Design. Single-cohort repeated measures design. Methods. Participants (N = 10) admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital were recruited to participate in a 50–60 min Hatha Yoga class (modified for wheelchair users/seated position) once a week for eight weeks, with assigned homework practice. Questionnaires on pain (pain, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing), psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experiences with injustice), mindfulness, self-compassion, and spiritual well-being were collected at three intervals: pre-, mid-, and post-intervention. Results. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time indicating improvements over the course of the yoga program on the (1) anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, F(2,18) = 4.74, p < .05, and ηp2 = .35, (2) Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, F(2,18) = 3.71, p < .05, and ηp2 = .29, and (3) Magnification subscale of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, F(2,18) = 3. 66, p < .05, and ηp2 = .29. Discussion. The results suggest that an 8-week Hatha Yoga program improves pain-related factors and psychological experiences in individuals admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. PMID:28115969

  9. Evaluation of a Specialized Yoga Program for Persons Admitted to a Complex Continuing Care Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kathryn; Kuluski, Kerry; Bechsgaard, Gitte; Ridgway, Jennifer; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a specialized yoga intervention for inpatients in a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Design. Single-cohort repeated measures design. Methods. Participants (N = 10) admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital were recruited to participate in a 50-60 min Hatha Yoga class (modified for wheelchair users/seated position) once a week for eight weeks, with assigned homework practice. Questionnaires on pain (pain, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing), psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experiences with injustice), mindfulness, self-compassion, and spiritual well-being were collected at three intervals: pre-, mid-, and post-intervention. Results. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time indicating improvements over the course of the yoga program on the (1) anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, F(2,18) = 4.74, p < .05, and ηp(2) = .35, (2) Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, F(2,18) = 3.71, p < .05, and ηp(2) = .29, and (3) Magnification subscale of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, F(2,18) = 3. 66, p < .05, and ηp(2) = .29. Discussion. The results suggest that an 8-week Hatha Yoga program improves pain-related factors and psychological experiences in individuals admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital.

  10. Utility of brief questionnaires of health-related quality of life (Airways Questionnaire 20 and Clinical COPD Questionnaire) to predict exacerbations in patients with asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is some evidence that quality of life measured by long disease-specific questionnaires may predict exacerbations in asthma and COPD, however brief quality of life tools, such as the Airways Questionnaire 20 (AQ20) or the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), have not yet been evaluated as predictors of hospital exacerbations. Objectives To determine the ability of brief specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires (AQ20 and CCQ) to predict emergency department visits (ED) and hospitalizations in patients with asthma and COPD, and to compare them to longer disease-specific questionnaires, such as the St George´s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Methods We conducted a two-year prospective cohort study of 208 adult patients (108 asthma, 100 COPD). Baseline sociodemographic, clinical, functional and psychological variables were assessed. All patients completed the AQ20 and the SGRQ. COPD patients also completed the CCQ and the CRQ, while asthmatic patients completed the AQLQ. We registered all exacerbations that required ED or hospitalizations in the follow-up period. Differences between groups (zero ED visits or hospitalizations versus ≥ 1 ED visits or hospitalizations) were tested with Pearson´s X2 or Fisher´s exact test for categorical variables, ANOVA for normally distributed continuous variables, and Mann–Whitney U test for non-normally distributed variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the predictive ability of each HRQoL questionnaire. Results In the first year of follow-up, the AQ20 scores predicted both ED visits (OR: 1.19; p = .004; AUC 0.723) and hospitalizations (OR: 1.21; p = .04; AUC 0.759) for asthma patients, and the CCQ emerged as independent predictor of ED visits in COPD patients (OR: 1.06; p = .036; AUC 0.651), after adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, and

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of the Depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) for detecting major depression: protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Brett D; Benedetti, Andrea; Kloda, Lorie A; Levis, Brooke; Azar, Marleine; Riehm, Kira E; Saadat, Nazanin; Cuijpers, Pim; Gilbody, Simon; Ioannidis, John P A; McMillan, Dean; Patten, Scott B; Shrier, Ian; Steele, Russell J; Ziegelstein, Roy C; Loiselle, Carmen G; Henry, Melissa; Ismail, Zahinoor; Mitchell, Nicholas; Tonelli, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) has been recommended for depression screening in medically ill patients. Many existing HADS-D studies have used exploratory methods to select optimal cut-offs. Often, these studies report results from a small range of cut-off thresholds; cut-offs with more favourable accuracy results are more likely to be reported than others with worse accuracy estimates. When published data are combined in meta-analyses, selective reporting may generate biased summary estimates. Individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses can address this problem by estimating accuracy with data from all studies for all relevant cut-off scores. In addition, a predictive algorithm can be generated to estimate the probability that a patient has depression based on a HADS-D score and clinical characteristics rather than dichotomous screening classification alone. The primary objectives of our IPD meta-analyses are to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the HADS-D to detect major depression among adults across all potentially relevant cut-off scores and to generate a predictive algorithm for individual patients. We are already aware of over 100 eligible studies, and more may be identified with our comprehensive search. Methods and analysis Data sources will include MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Eligible studies will have datasets where patients are assessed for major depression based on a validated structured or semistructured clinical interview and complete the HADS-D within 2 weeks (before or after). Risk of bias will be assessed with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. Bivariate random-effects meta-analysis will be conducted for the full range of plausible cut-off values, and a predictive algorithm for individual patients will be generated. Ethics and dissemination The findings of this study will be of interest to

  12. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Ferrario, Silvia; Giorgi, Ines; Baiardi, Paola; Giuntoli, Laura; Balestroni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Paola; Manera, Marina; Gabanelli, Paola; Solara, Valentina; Fornara, Roberta; Luisetti, Michela; Omarini, Pierangela; Omarini, Giovanna; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ) assessing patients’ and caregivers’ denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. Patients and methods After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false) was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers) together with the Anxiety–Depression Questionnaire – Reduced form (AD-R), in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α and McDonald’s ω), and test–retest analysis were performed. Results CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α: 0.87–0.96) indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and avoidance positively associated with anxiety and depression. The IDQ also showed a good stability (r from 0.71 to 0.87). Conclusion The IDQ demonstrated good psychometric properties. Denial of negative emotions and resistance to change seem to contribute to a real expression of denial, and conscious avoidance seems to constitute a further step in the process of cognitive–affective elaboration of the illness. PMID:28356745

  13. Elementary School Career Awareness: A Visit to a Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Andrew V.

    2000-01-01

    Offers suggestions for preparing an elementary school field trip to a hospital, the tour itself, and follow-up activities. Suggestions are designed to maximize the trip's value for career awareness as well as to reduce anxiety about hospitals. (JOW)

  14. Effect of depression and anxiety on the success of pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z A; Whittal, C; Mansol, S; Osborne, Lisa A; Reed, P; Emery, S

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the psychiatric symptoms of anxiety and depression, as assessed by validated questionnaires on the success of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). A prospective observational study was carried out by the Uro-gynaecological Physiotherapy Department at the Singleton Hospital, Swansea. A total of 108 consecutive women with pelvic floor dysfunction were referred for physiotherapy and admitted to the 6-month physiotherapy programme. They underwent subjective and objective assessments of their pelvic floor and psychological health at the beginning and end of the programme. A strong correlation was noted between the severity of anxiety and depression symptoms and the severity of their pelvic floor dysfunction. Following physiotherapy, apart from sexual function, all domains of pelvic floor dysfunction showed significant improvement. Based on the severity of their anxiety/depression symptoms, the patients were stratified into three groups. The group of patients that benefitted most had either no or only mild anxiety/depression. This study raises the question of whether a targeted approach should be undertaken for managing patients who, in addition to their pelvic floor dysfunction, demonstrate psychiatric symptoms.

  15. Evaluating the Korean version of the Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin-Seok; Park, Mi-Jeong; Yoon, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Yong-Wook; Park, In-Hyae; Park, Kyeong-Soo

    2006-05-01

    Although the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire are useful tools for assessing and monitoring patients with rheumatic diseases, they have a "floor effect" and do not fully reflect the psychological status of patients. Recently, the Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MDHAQ) was developed to overcome these shortcomings. We translated the MDHAQ into the Korean language and evaluated its reliability and validity for use with Korean-speaking patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The questionnaire was translated into the Korean language by three translators, who were aware of its objectives, and it was translated back into the English language by three different translators. One question was modified to reflect Korean culture, and imperial measures were changed to metric measures because most Koreans use the metric system. The Korean MDHAQ was administered to 136 patients with RA who were attending the outpatient rheumatology clinic at the Chonnam National University Hospital (Gwangju, South Korea). Test-retest reliability was assessed in 101 patients after 1 week. To assess criterion validity, we compared MDHAQ scores with HAQ scores and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) functional class. To test construct validity, the MDHAQ was compared to ACR core criteria (tender and swollen joint count, pain, patient's global assessment, physician's global assessment, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The test-retest reliability was analyzed by computing kappa statistics, which ranged from 0.60 to 0.76. Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranged from 0.892 to 0.938. The MDHAQ was significantly correlated with the HAQ and ACR functional class (all p<0.001). The correlations between the MDHAQ scores and the ACR core set, BDI, and STAI were all high and statistically significant. The Korean version of the

  16. Social Anxiety Disorder: More Than Just a Little Shyness.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, James W.

    2001-02-01

    Social anxiety is defined as a "marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations" and includes such symptoms as sweating, palpitations, shaking, and respiratory distress. Social anxiety is fairly common, occurring in as much as 13% of the population, and can be extremely disabling. It can be either specific (confined to 1 or 2 performance situations) or generalized, and can be diagnosed with a scale-based questionnaire. Social anxiety may coexist with other disorders, such as depression and dysthymia. The differential diagnosis for social anxiety includes panic disorder, agoraphobia, atypical depression, and body dysmorphic disorder. Treatment for social anxiety can be quite effective and consists of psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy (including such medications as beta-blockers, anxiolytics, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants), or a combination. This article details the prevalence, onset, disease impact, and etiology of social anxiety. Specific treatments, including both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, are presented in detail, along with other treatment considerations, such as comorbidity.

  17. Social support and performance anxiety of college music students.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Erin; Chesky, Kris

    2011-09-01

    This study characterized perceived social support and performance anxiety of college music students, compared characteristics to those of non-music majors, and explored the relationships between social support and performance anxiety. Subjects (n = 609) completed a questionnaire that included demographics, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and visual analog scale measures of performance anxiety. Results showed that music majors perceived significantly lower levels of social support from significant others when compared to non-music majors. Perceived social support was significantly correlated with measures of performance anxiety. Students with greater perceived social support reported less frequent anxiety and lower levels of impact of anxiety on ability to perform. These findings may have practical implications for schools of music and conservatories.

  18. Defense Mechanisms in "Pure" Anxiety and "Pure" Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Colovic, Olga; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica; Perunicic Mladenovic, Ivana; Milosavljevic, Maja; Munjiza, Ana

    2016-10-01

    Our study was intended to test whether there are any differences in the way defense mechanisms are used by patients suffering from pure anxiety and those with pure depressive disorders. The sample size was as follows: depressive disorders without psychotic symptoms 30, anxiety disorders 30, and the healthy control group 30. The assessment of defense mechanisms was made using the DSQ-40 questionnaire. Our findings show that "pure" anxiety disorders differ from "pure" depressive disorders only in the use of immature defense mechanisms. The group with depressive disorders was significantly more prone to use immature defense mechanisms than the group with anxiety disorders (p = 0.005), primarily projection (p = 0.001) and devaluation (p = 0.003). These defense mechanisms may therefore be used both to differentiate between anxiety and depressive disorders and also to determine which symptoms (anxiety or depressive disorders) are dominant at any given stage of treatment.

  19. Treating late-life generalized anxiety disorder in primary care: an effectiveness pilot study.

    PubMed

    Calleo, Jessica S; Bush, Amber L; Cully, Jeffrey A; Wilson, Nancy L; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane M; Masozera, Nicholas; Williams, Susan; Horsfield, Matthew; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2013-05-01

    To increase the sustainability of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in primary care for late-life anxiety, we incorporated nonexpert counselors, options for telephone meetings, and integration with primary care clinicians. This open trial examines the feasibility, satisfaction, and clinical outcomes of CBT delivered by experienced and nonexperienced counselors for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Clinical outcomes assessed worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale), and anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Structured Interview Guide for Hamilton Anxiety Scale). After 3 months of treatment, Cohen's d effect sizes for worry and anxiety ranged from 0.48 to 0.78. Patients treated by experienced and nonexperienced counselors had similar reductions in worry and anxiety, although treatment outcomes were more improved on the Beck Anxiety Inventory for experienced therapists. Preliminary results suggest that adapted CBT can effectively reduce worry. The piloted modifications can provide acceptable and feasible evidence-based care.

  20. [Influence of job-hunting anxiety on job-hunting: from the viewpoint of coping].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yuko; Nagasaku, Minoru; Arai, Kunijiro

    2010-02-01

    The present study developed a job-hunting anxiety scale and investigated the influence of job-hunting anxiety on coping, number of job-hunting applications, and satisfaction with job-hunting. Questionnaires were completed by 306 college students who had started job-hunting. Explorative factor analysis extracted five factors such as "appeal anxiety", "support anxiety", "activity persistence anxiety", "test anxiety", and "a lack of readiness anxiety". Analysis of covariance structures indicated that (a) job-hunting anxiety was negatively related to problem-focused coping, the number of job-hunting applications, and the satisfaction with job-hunting, and (b) problem-focused coping was positively related to the number of job-hunting applications and the satisfaction with job-hunting. These results suggest that reduction of job-hunting anxiety and the use of problem-focused coping facilitated job-hunting.

  1. The association between clinically relevant anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Si-Ming; Yuan, Yong-Sheng; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Qin-Rong; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Ke-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are often missed due to an overlap with other non-motor symptoms. The relationships between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in PD still remain unclear. We used the Hamilton anxiety rating scale and the Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire to measure anxiety and the complex range of non-motor symptoms in 99 PD patients. The relationships between anxiety and other PD-related non-motor symptoms were examined through regression analyses. 25 % of PD patients were diagnosed with clinically relevant anxiety. Non-motor symptoms were more prominent in patients with anxiety. Depression, urinary disorders, and sleep disruption were the factors most likely to influence anxiety in PD. Our findings have revealed a strong interplay between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms of PD and have highlighted the need for a holistic approach towards the clinical treatment of this disabling condition.

  2. The factors contributing to death anxiety in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Gokcen; Kaymak, Semra Ulusoy; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Karslioglu, Ersin Hatice; Ozalp, Elvan; Soygur, Haldun

    2012-01-01

    Suffering comes in many ways for patients confronting cancer. One of these is an unspecifiable fear about death, which is an existential issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between death anxiety and its correlates in cancer patients. Seventy cancer patients were assessed using SCID-I, Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, the Hospital Anxiety (A) and Depression (D) Scale, the Distress Thermometer, the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS), the Global Assessment of Functioning, and Glock and Stark's Dimensions of Religious Commitment scales, and these assessments were compared between cancer patients with and without death anxiety. Multiple regression analysis was conducted after correlation analysis between death anxiety and sociodemographic and clinical variables. Axis I psychiatric diagnosis, pain scores, and negative believes about what will happen after death were found to be higher in patients having death anxiety than patients not having death anxiety. Also life expectancy was perceived as shortened in patients with death anxiety. Death anxiety was associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms, and beliefs about what will happen after death. In conclusion, death anxiety could not be regarded as a natural consequence of having cancer; it is associated with the unresolved psychological and physical distress.

  3. Co-morbid anxiety and depression among pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Siddiqua; Aisha

    2010-10-01

    The need to recognize and manage psychiatric co-morbidity in tuberculosis (TB) patients in primary care settings in order to improve adherence to the treatment is now well documented. Pulmonary TB patients at the District TB Control Office and TB Centre in Haripur from December 2007 to March 2008 were evalute in order to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression and continuation of treatment. Forty seven out of 65 (72%) TB patients had severe/moderate level of anxiety and depression according to Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Fourteen (22%) TB patients with co-morbid anxiety and depression showed multi drug-resistance (MDR-TB).

  4. Using effort-reward imbalance theory to understand high rates of depression and anxiety among clergy.

    PubMed

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; Miles, Andrew; Toth, Matthew; Adams, Christopher; Smith, Bruce W; Toole, David

    2013-12-01

    The clergy occupation is unique in its combination of role strains and higher calling, putting clergy mental health at risk. We surveyed all United Methodist clergy in North Carolina, and 95% (n = 1,726) responded, with 38% responding via phone interview. We compared clergy phone interview depression rates, assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), to those of in-person interviews in a representative United States sample that also used the PHQ-9. The clergy depression prevalence was 8.7%, significantly higher than the 5.5% rate of the national sample. We used logistic regression to explain depression, and also anxiety, assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. As hypothesized by effort-reward imbalance theory, several extrinsic demands (job stress, life unpredictability) and intrinsic demands (guilt about not doing enough work, doubting one's call to ministry) significantly predicted depression and anxiety, as did rewards such as ministry satisfaction and lack of financial stress. The high rate of clergy depression signals the need for preventive policies and programs for clergy. The extrinsic and intrinsic demands and rewards suggest specific actions to improve clergy mental health.

  5. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  6. The Toronto Empathy Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Spreng, R. Nathan; McKinnon, Margaret C.; Mar, Raymond A.; Levine, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In order to formulate a parsimonious tool to assess empathy, we used factor analysis on a combination of self-report measures to examine consensus and developed a brief self-report measure of this common factor. The Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ) represents empathy as a primarily emotional process. In three studies, the TEQ demonstrated strong convergent validity, correlating positively with behavioral measures of social decoding, self-report measures of empathy, and negatively with a measure of Autism symptomatology. Moreover, it exhibited good internal consistency and high test-retest reliability. The TEQ is a brief, reliable, and valid instrument for the assessment of empathy. PMID:19085285

  7. Validation of the Arabic version of the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR_A) on Jordanian females with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Dahab, Sana; AbuRuz, Salah M; Mustafa, Khader; Sarhan, Yusef

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and validate the Arabic version of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR_A). Translation of the FIQR followed a worldwide-recognized approach to ensure the accuracy and equivalency of the translation from the English version of the FIQR. Following the translation of the FIQR, 92 women with fibromyalgia completed the FIQR_A, the Arabic Research ANd Development Short Form Health Survey (RAND SF-36), and the Arabic Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS). The FIQR_A significantly correlated with RAND SF-36 domains and HADS. The correlations ranged from fair to moderate. For selected outcomes, Bland-Altman plots were consistent with Spearman's correlations. Test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients were all significant and ranged from moderate to excellent. Internal consistency was found to be excellent. These observations suggest that the FIQR_A is a valid and reliable tool for both clinical practice and research purposes with Arabic speakers globally.

  8. Anxiety and IBS revisited: ten years later

    PubMed Central

    POPA, STEFAN-LUCIAN; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been associated with high prevalence of psychological and psychiatric disorders. However, the association between IBS and each of its subtypes (diarrhea IBS-D, constipation IBS-C, mixed IBS-M) with anxiety still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the association between anxiety and IBS on a period of ten years. Methods PubMed was searched for studies analyzing IBS and anxiety, published at 10 years interval. The study presents a comparative analysis of the articles that were published between 2003–2005 and 2013–2015, investigating the correlation between anxiety and IBS. Results The initial search identified 220 articles, from which 156 were published between 2013 and 2015, and 64 were published between 2003 and 2005. Of these articles, 15 articles were included in the review. Out of these 15 articles, 10 articles analyzed the correlation between anxiety-depression status in IBS patients using specific questionnaires, 2 articles analyzed genetic variables in IBS, 1 article analyzed serotonin and monoamine oxidase levels in IBS, 1 article analyzed serum levels of IL-1β and IL-10 in IBS, 1 article analyzed somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide levels in IBS. The result was a review of 15 studies that analyzed the association between IBS and anxiety. Conclusions IBS is a heterogeneous disorder caused by numerous psychological, immunological, infectious, endocrine and genetic factors. In recent years, the number of studies concentrating on genetic factors, cytokines and hormones has increased in comparison with the 2003–2005 period, when clinical investigation, using mainly questionnaires was the essential method. Also, the total number of papers investigating anxiety and IBS, considerably increased. The recent studies have confirmed the fact that IBS symptoms are often exacerbated during stressful events and the psychiatric treatment has a positive

  9. Measuring preoperative anxiety in patients with breast cancer using the visual analog scale.

    PubMed

    Aviado-Langer, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a prevalent concern with deleterious effects in patient recovery and is not routinely assessed in the preoperative screening process. When it is assessed, it may prompt an increase in the use of anesthetic agents, heightened postoperative pain, and prolonged hospitalization. Preoperative women with breast cancer face anxiety as it relates to anesthesia, surgery, and recovery. The preoperative anxiety visual analog scale may identify and quantify anxiety in this population, provide advocacy and support, and improve the preoperative screening process.

  10. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007687.htm Generalized anxiety disorder - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a mental disorder in which a ...

  11. Generalized anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000917.htm Generalized anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a mental disorder in which a ...

  12. Separation anxiety in children

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001542.htm Separation anxiety in children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Separation anxiety in children is a developmental stage in ...

  13. Illness anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms ...

  14. Anxious Solitude and Clinical Disorder in Middle Childhood: Bridging Developmental and Clinical Approaches to Childhood Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazelle, Heidi; Workman, Jamie Olson; Allan, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesized that children identified by their peers at school as anxious solitary would report more symptoms of social anxiety disorder on a self report questionnaire and, on the basis of child and parent clinical interviews, receive more diagnoses of social anxiety disorder and additional anxiety and mood disorders. Participants were 192…

  15. Soundoff: My Anxieties about Math Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Math anxiety affects both sexes, and is not the cause of imbalance in mathematical professions. Attempts to broaden perceptions of mathematics deal only with the symptoms of math anxiety. The principal cause is the methodology used to teach mathematics. Problem-solving processes must be employed. (MNS)

  16. Dental Anxiety among Medical and Paramedical Undergraduate Students of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Parkar, Sujal

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To assess the dental anxiety level among dental, medical, and pharmacy students of MAHSA University, Malaysia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 1500 undergraduate students of MAHSA University. The Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) was used to measure dental anxiety among the study population. The responses were assessed by 5-point likert scale ranging from 1 to 5. The level of anxiety was categorized into lowly anxious (5–11), moderately anxious (12–18), and severely anxious ≥19. Out of 1500 students enrolled, 1024 students (342 males and 682 females) completed and returned the questionnaire having response rate of 68.26%. Results. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) when the mean dental anxiety scores were compared among the three faculties and dental students had lowest mean score (11.95 ± 4.21). The fifth year (senior) dental students scored significantly (P = 0.02) lower mean anxiety score as compared to the first dental students (junior). The students were anxious mostly about tooth drilling and local anesthetic injection. Conclusions. Dental students have a significantly low level of dental anxiety as compared with medical and pharmacy students. Incorporation of dental health education in preuniversity and other nondental university curriculums may reduce dental anxiety among the students. PMID:28348593

  17. Burnout and death anxiety in hospice social workers.

    PubMed

    Quinn-Lee, Lisa; Olson-McBride, Leah; Unterberger, April

    2014-01-01

    Hospice work has been regarded as particularly stressful due to the complexity inherent in the provision of end-of-life care. Burnout and death anxiety are especially relevant to hospice social workers because they regularly function in a high-stress, high-loss environment. The purpose of this study was threefold: to determine the prevalence of burnout and death anxiety among hospice social workers; to examine associations between burnout and death anxiety; and to explore the factors which may contribute to the development of death anxiety and burnout. Participants completed four items: the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), the Death Anxiety Questionnaire (DAQ), a demographic questionnaire, and a set of open-ended questions. Findings indicate that mean scores on the subscales of the MBI-HSS ranged from the low to moderate range and that a strong positive correlation existed between death anxiety and the depersonalization subscale of the MBI. Three key themes emerged from the qualitative data: (a) personal interest in hospice social work developed through a variety of ways; (b) although death anxiety decreased from exposure and understanding of the death process, there was increased death anxiety surrounding working with certain patients; and (c) burnout was primarily related to workload or difficult cases.

  18. Validated Questionnaires heighten detection of Difficult Asthma Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Tay, Tunn Ren; Hore-Lacy, Fiona; Stirling, Robert; Hoy, R; Dabscheck, Eli; Hew, Mark

    2016-10-07

    Objective Multiple extra-pulmonary comorbidities contribute to difficult asthma, but their diagnosis can be challenging and time consuming. Previous data on comorbidity detection have focused on clinical assessment, which may miss certain conditions. We aimed to locate relevant validated screening questionnaires to identify extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma, and evaluate their performance during a difficult asthma evaluation. Methods MEDLINE was searched to identify key extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma. Screening questionnaires were chosen based on ease of use, presence of a cut off score, and adequate validation to help systematically identify comorbidities. In a consecutive series of 86 patients referred for systematic evaluation of difficult asthma, questionnaires were administered prior to clinical consultation. Results Six difficult asthma comorbidities and corresponding screening questionnaires were found: sinonasal disease (allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis), vocal cord dysfunction, dysfunctional breathing, obstructive sleep apnea, anxiety and depression, and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. When the questionnaires were added to the referring clinician's impression, the detection of all six comorbidities was significantly enhanced. The average time for questionnaire administration was approximately 40 minutes. Conclusions The use of validated screening questionnaires heightens detection of comorbidities in difficult asthma. The availability of data from a battery of questionnaires prior to consultation can save time and allow clinicians to systematically assess difficult asthma patients and to focus on areas of particular concern. Such an approach would ensure that all contributing comorbidities have been addressed before significant treatment escalation is considered.

  19. Questionnaire Translation and Questionnaire Validation: Are They the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffee, Dale T.

    The purpose of this paper is to give evidence for the thesis that if teachers using a questionnaire as a data collection instrument have the questionnaire items translated from one language into another, they cannot assume that the translated items are valid simply because they were translated. Even if the original questionnaire items were…

  20. Foreign Language Reading Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Yoshiko; Horwitz, Elaine K.; Garza, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of anxiety in response to foreign- or second-language reading. Introduces the construct of foreign-language reading anxiety, offers a scale for its measurement, and reports on a preliminary study of reading anxiety in 30 intact first-semester classes of Spanish, Russian, and Japanese. (VWL)

  1. Deconstructing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William

    2008-01-01

    Recent changes to educational policy which have focused attention on the use of high stakes testing as performance and accountability measures have renewed interest in test anxiety both in the UK and the USA. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical examination of the test anxiety construct, and explore the ways in which test anxiety is…

  2. Anxiety Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suinn, Richard M.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    Provides detailed information on anxiety management training, a relaxation-based, self-control therapy for the treatment of generalized anxiety, phobias, anger, and other stress-related disorders. Describes in detail the specific procedures of anxiety management training, summarizes research findings, and outlines means for deciding on proper use…

  3. Test and Performance Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most basic human emotions and occurs in every person at some time, most often when someone is apprehensive about uncertain outcomes of an event or set of circumstances. Anxiety can serve an adaptive function, however, and is also a marker for typical development. In the school setting, anxiety is experienced often by students…

  4. Validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire among caregivers of patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    González, Nerea; Bilbao, Amaia; Padierna, Angel; Martín, Josune; Orive, Miren; Quintana, José M

    2012-12-30

    The Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ) was developed to evaluate burden among caregivers of patients with schizophrenia. We aimed to examine its psychometric properties among caregivers of patients with eating disorders (ED). A prospective study was carried out, recruiting caregivers of patients with an ED attending two outpatient clinics in Bizkaia, Spain. Caregivers provided sociodemographic information and completed the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) and the Anorectic Behaviour Observation Scale (ABOS). The same information was requested one year later. The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) provided satisfactory fit indexes. Almost all of the factor loadings were above 0.40. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were mostly superior to 0.70. The correlation coefficients between the IEQ domains and the other questionnaires were lower than the Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Known-groups validity was supported by significant differences in the IEQ mean scores according to certain variables, as contact hours, living with the patient, type of caregiver and gender. The indexes employed for the evaluation of responsiveness were between 0.13 and 0.99. The IEQ has good psychometric properties and can be used to evaluate burden among caregivers of patients with ED.

  5. Peer Victimization and Social Anxiety: An Exploration of Coping Strategies as Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kelly M.; Shellman, Alison B.; Osmer, Sarah C.; Day, Susan X.; Dempsey, Allison G.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between recalled peer victimization, coping styles, and current social anxiety. College students (N = 298, 87.9% female) completed a demographic questionnaire, the Recalled Victimization Questionnaire- Revised (RVQ-R), the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation (BFNE), and the Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ).…

  6. Questionnaire Surveys in Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psacharopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses some critical issues related to the use of questionnaire surveys in educational planning. Ten brief sections discuss survey objectives, coverage, questionnaire design, administration, validity, nonresponse, cost considerations, coding, statistical analysis, and interpretation. Five illustrative questionnaire…

  7. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Cancer.gov

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  8. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  9. Generalized anxiety disorder is under-recognized in clinical practice in patients with alcohol dependence in France.

    PubMed

    Charriau, Violaine; Elyakoubi, M'hammed; Millet, Bruno; Drapier, Dominique; Robin, Didier; Moirand, Romain

    2013-02-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a frequent disabling disorder that often occurs with alcohol dependence. However comorbidity between substance use disorders and psychiatric disorders is often under-diagnosed. This study tried to evaluate an under-recognition of GAD by clinicians in alcoholic inpatients. Two groups of alcohol-dependent inpatients, hospitalized in the same non-academic psychiatric hospital in France, were included. The first group (Group 1) (n = 205) was included retrospectively within all patients hospitalized for alcohol dependence from may to November 2007. A record review was performed to determine the number of GAD (and other psychiatric disorders) diagnosis which was reported on these files by the clinicians. The second group (Group 2) (n = 199) was included prospectively from May to November 2008. GAD diagnosis was screened with the Worry and Anxiety Questionnaire and then confirmed with the Mini International Neurodiagnostic Interview. The two groups were similar in terms of social and demographic variables. GAD prevalence rate was significantly higher in Group 2 (30.7% with Confidence Interval [0.242; 0.371]) than in Group 1 (2.4% with Confidence Interval [0.003; 0.045]). This study confirms our hypothesis of an under-recognition of GAD by clinicians in alcohol dependant inpatients. It also confirms the high prevalence rate of comorbidity between alcohol dependence and GAD.

  10. Anxiety symptoms in clinically diagnosed bruxers.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, D; Landi, N; Fantoni, F; Segù, M; Bosco, M

    2005-08-01

    The present work was an attempt to investigate for the existence of an association between anxiety psychopathology and bruxism. The presence of bruxism was investigated according to validated clinical criteria in 98 subjects, who also filled out a self-report questionnaire (PAS-SR) for the assessment of panic-agoraphobic spectrum. 34.7% (n = 34) of participants were diagnosed as bruxers. The prevalence of anxiety psychopathology was similar between bruxers and non-bruxers, but Mann-Whitney U-test revealed significant differences in total PAS-SR (P = 0.026) score, indicating that subclinical symptoms of the anxiety spectrum might differentiate bruxers from controls. In particular, significant differences emerged in scores of domains evaluating panic (P = 0.039), stress sensitivity (P = 0.006) and reassurance sensitivity symptoms (P = 0.005) of panic-agoraphobic spectrum. Support to the existence of an association between bruxism and certain psychopathological symptoms has been provided.

  11. The Drug-Abuse Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The drug-abuse questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the alcoholism questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about drug abuse and drug abusers, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  12. Validation of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires for Arabic-speaking Populations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Manal A; Denic, Srdjan; El Taji, Hakam

    2008-09-01

    Information about quality of life in patients with cancer in Arab populations in 21 countries is inadequate. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) general quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and of the breast cancer-specific questionnaire (QLQ-BR23) in Arab breast cancer patients. The questionnaires were administered to 87 breast cancer patients 3 months after surgery. The mean age of patients was 48.6 years (SD: 9.9), 76% were married, all had staged disease (I, 9%; II, 46%; III, 44%; IV, 1%). The percentage of patients who underwent mastectomy and lumpectomy were 49% and 51%, respectively. Questionnaire reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, in which the values were all >0.7, with the exception of cognitive function and pain in the QLQ-C30 (Cronbach's alpha 0.67 and 0.51, respectively) and breast symptoms in the QLQ-BR23 (Cronbach's alpha 0.50). The questionnaires' validity was confirmed using "known group comparisons," which showed that the QLQ-C30 discriminated between mastectomy and lumpectomy patients on the emotional and cognitive function scales (P < 0.001) and QLQ-BR23 discriminated as well on the function scales and for systemic side effects (P < 0.001). For the most part, QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 distinguished clearly between subgroups of patients differing in their Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. In summary, the Arabic versions of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 are reliable and valid tools for assessment of quality of life in Arab patients with cancer.

  13. [A questionnaire on Satisfaction from psychiatric Training].

    PubMed

    Giaglis, G; Angelidis, G

    2008-01-01

    In the context of the psychiatric reform, as well as of the lifelong education, a Questionnaire for the evaluation of "Satisfaction from Psychiatric Training" has been constructed. It consists of 4 subscales (Satisfaction from Materials, Trainers, Program Organization, and General Satisfaction) and a total of 19 closed-ended items, evaluated in 5-point Likert scales, and an open-ended question for general remarks. One hundred and seventy six subjects, who participated in 8 consecutive training programs in psychiatry, organized by the Vocational Training Center of the Psychiatric Hospital of Petra Olympus, Greece, completed the questionnaire anonymously. The sample was divided into two groups: group A (N=112, from the first 5 programs), for the evaluation of the questionnaire's properties, and group B (N=65, from the next 3 programs) for the validation of the results. Principal component analysis in group A showed the existence of 4 factors corresponding to the 4 subscales and accounted for 67.4% of the questionnaire's variability, which were also confirmed in group B. Internal consistency was high in both groups for the overall questionnaire (Cronbach α>0.92) and for each subscale. Test-retest reliability of every subscale was also high (Pearson's r>0.90). The answers in the open-ended remark question were graded by two independent judges in a 5-point Likert scale, in relation to the satisfaction they revealed, which was highly correlated with all questionnaire subscales but one. For the total sample, the questionnaire subscales showed moderately high correlation with one another (r from 0.629 to 0.706) and even higher with the overall score (from 0.820 to 0.892). The questionnaire's sensitivity was demonstrated by the statistically significant differences observed in the satisfaction experienced from the various programs. None of the subscales was significantly correlated with age (r<0.134), with years in work (r<0.059) or was differentiated by gender. In general

  14. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Engel, Kirsten; Bandelow, Borwin; Gruber, Oliver; Wedekind, Dirk

    2009-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have gained increasing importance in validating neurobiological network hypotheses for anxiety disorders. Functional imaging procedures and radioligand binding studies in healthy subjects and in patients with anxiety disorders provide growing evidence of the existence of a complex anxiety network, including limbic, brainstem, temporal, and prefrontal cortical regions. Obviously, "normal anxiety" does not equal "pathological anxiety" although many phenomena are evident in healthy subjects, however to a lower extent. Differential effects of distinct brain regions and lateralization phenomena in different anxiety disorders are mentioned. An overview of neuroimaging investigations in anxiety disorders is given after a brief summary of results from healthy volunteers. Concluding implications for future research are made by the authors.

  15. Anxiety: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Melissa; Brilot, Ben; Nettle, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, with huge attendant suffering. Current treatments are not universally effective, suggesting that a deeper understanding of the causes of anxiety is needed. To understand anxiety disorders better, it is first necessary to understand the normal anxiety response. This entails considering its evolutionary function as well as the mechanisms underlying it. We argue that the function of the human anxiety response, and homologues in other species, is to prepare the individual to detect and deal with threats. We use a signal detection framework to show that the threshold for expressing the anxiety response ought to vary with the probability of threats occurring, and the individual's vulnerability to them if they do occur. These predictions are consistent with major patterns in the epidemiology of anxiety. Implications for research and treatment are discussed.

  16. The Effects of Relaxation Training with Cognitive or Nondirective Therapy and the Role of Relaxation-Induced Anxiety in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkovec, T. D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provided 30 volunteers with generalized anxiety disorder with training in progressive muscle relaxation. Clients were also given cognitive or nondirective therapy. All showed substantial reductions in anxiety measured by psychiatric assessor ratings, questionnaires, and daily self-monitoring. Relaxation plus cognitive therapy produced…

  17. Exploration of health anxiety among individuals with diabetes: prevalence and implications.

    PubMed

    Janzen Claude, Jennifer A; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Friesen, Lindsay

    2014-02-01

    Health anxiety has been infrequently examined in individuals with diabetes. In this study, individuals with Type 1 or 2 diabetes (n = 414) completed questionnaires assessing health anxiety and related constructs. Elevated health anxiety was reported by 24.1 percent of the sample and was greater among younger individuals, females, unmarried participants, and those recently diagnosed with diabetes. The construct was related to trait anxiety, fear of diabetes complications, poorer adherence to dietary and exercise self-care activities as well as lower physical quality of life. The research improves our understanding of health anxiety among individuals with diabetes.

  18. Maternal daily diary report in the assessment of childhood separation anxiety.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer L; Blatter-Meunier, Judith; Ursprung, Antonia; Schneider, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The current study evaluated the feasibility and validity of a parent-report measure of separation anxiety, the Separation Anxiety Daily Diary (SADD). Mother and child participants consisted of three groups: 96 children (aged 4-15 years) with separation anxiety disorder, 49 children with "other" anxiety disorders, and 43 healthy controls. The SADD assesses the frequency of anxiety-provoking and non-anxiety-provoking separations, along with associated parental anxiety, thoughts, child behaviors, and corresponding parental reactions. The SADD demonstrated acceptable compliance and convergent validity with hypothesized measures. Substantial improvement in the prediction of diagnostic group membership was shown when SADD items assessing child symptoms were added to information gathered from a separation anxiety symptom questionnaire.

  19. Sources of listening anxiety in learning English as a foreign language.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anna Ching-Shyang

    2008-02-01

    In this study of college students' listening anxiety in learning English in a classroom context, participants were 160 students (47 men and 113 women) ages 18 to 19 years. To address their listening anxiety, participants were chosen from students enrolling in a required listening course. A listening questionnaire was used to assess learners' anxiety about spoken English, its intensity, and the main sources of listening anxiety. Overall, participants showed moderately high intensity of anxiety in listening to spoken English, but were more anxious in testing than in general situations. In contrast to previous research on the nature of spoken English as the main source of listening anxiety, this study found that low confidence in comprehending spoken English, taking English listening courses as a requirement, and worrying about test difficulty were the three main factors contributing to participants' listening anxiety in a classroom context. Participants' learning profiles both in the classroom and outside the class yielded data which provides suggestions for reducing anxiety.

  20. Characterizing associations and dissociations between anxiety, social, and cognitive phenotypes of Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rowena; Järvinen, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic disorder known for its “hypersocial” phenotype and a complex profile of anxieties. The anxieties are poorly understood specifically in relation to the social-emotional and cognitive profiles. To address this gap, we employed a Wechsler intelligence test, the Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Salk Institute Sociability Questionnaire, to (1) examine how anxiety symptoms distinguish individuals with WS from typically developing (TD) individuals; and (2) assess the associations between three key phenotypic features of WS: intellectual impairment, social-emotional functioning, and anxiety. The results highlighted intensified neurophysiological symptoms and subjective experiences of anxiety in WS. Moreover, whereas higher cognitive ability was positively associated with anxiety in WS, the opposite pattern characterized the TD individuals. This study provides novel insight into how the three core phenotypic features associate/dissociate in WS, specifically in terms of the contribution of cognitive and emotional functioning to anxiety symptoms. PMID:24973548

  1. The chronology of distress, anxiety, and depression in older prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian J.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Balk, Eliana; Holland, Jimmie; Breitbart, William; Roth, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Current research suggests that older cancer patients report less distress compared to younger cancer patients. However, this research has generally not teased apart the differences between general distress, anxiety, and depression. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of merged datasets using cross-sectional data on 736 men with prostate cancer (Mean Age 68±10 years of age, range 50 to 93). Approximately half the participants were recruited from doctors’ offices throughout the United States and the other half from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (New York, NY). Participants were asked to complete the Distress Thermometer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the FACT-P Quality of Life questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire. Results Aging was related to reduced distress (r=−0.14), less anxiety (r=−0.22), and increased emotional quality of life (r= 0.16). In contrast, aging was associated with greater depressive symptoms in these cancer patients (r= 0.18). The mean depression scores of 5-year cohorts consistently trended upward. The significant association between age and depression remained after controlling for stage of disease, hormone therapy use, time since diagnosis, and social, physical and functional well-being. Conclusions Despite theoretical and empirical evidence that older cancer patients may cope more effectively than younger cancer patients, depressive symptoms remain an important concern for aging cancer patients and greater attention to this area is warranted. The increase in depression is in contrast to some findings in the general aging literature, raising the possibility that this trend is unique to older cancer patients. PMID:19738000

  2. Correlation between depression, anxiety, and polymorphonuclear cells’ resilience in ulcerative colitis: the mediating role of heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate whether anxiety and depression levels are associated with Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) induction in the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods The design was cross-sectional. Clinical activity was assessed by the Rachmilewitz Index (CAI). Three psychometric questionnaires were used: Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS), Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Colon biopsies were obtained from each affected anatomical site. Severity of inflammation was assessed by eosin/hematoxylin. Constitutive (HSP70c) and inducible (HSP70i) HSP70 expression were immunohistochemically studied. Results 29 UC patients were enrolled (69% men). Mean age was 46.5 years (SD: 19.5). Inflammation severity was moderate in 17 patients, severe in 6, and mild in 6. The mean number of years since diagnosis was 7.9 (SD: 6.5). The mean CAI was 6.4 (SD: 3.1). In active UC, there was downregulation of HSP70c in inflamed epithelium, without significant HSP70 induction. In 22/29 cases of active cryptitis, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) clearly expressed HSP70i, with weak, focal positivity in the other 7 cases. Except for the hospital anxiety scale, scores in all psychometric tools were higher in patients with strong HSP70i immunoreactivity in the PMN. Logistic regression showed a strong positive relationship between HSP70i immunoreactivity in the PMN cells and scores in the trait anxiety, ZDRS, and hospital depression scales, (Odds ratios 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5; P = 0.018, 0.023, and 0.038; Wald test, 5.6, 5.2, and 4.3 respectively) and a weaker but significant positive correlation with the CAI (Odds ratio 1.654; P = 0.049; Wald test 3.858). Conclusion HSP70 is induced in PMN cells of UC patients and its induction correlates with depression and anxiety levels. PMID:24742079

  3. Elevated Plasma C-Terminal Endothelin-1 Precursor Fragment Concentrations Are Associated with Less Anxiety in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors. Results from the Observational DIAST-CHF Study

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas; Chavanon, Mira-Lynn; Herrrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Roggenthien, Maren; Nolte, Kathleen; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the neurobiology of anxiety is unknown, therefore, we assessed in the observational multicenter DIAST-CHF study whether the C-terminal ET-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1) is linked to anxiety. Methods Plasma concentrations of CT-proET-1 were measured in a total of 1,410 patients presenting with cardiovascular risk factors (mean age 66.91±8.2 years, 49.3% males, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 60.0±8.2%) who had completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire. Results Among the total study cohort (n = 1,410), there were 118 subjects (8.4%) with an HADS anxiety score above the cut-off level of 11 suggestive of clinically relevant anxiety. Plasma CT-proET-1 levels were significantly lower in the group of anxious patients as compared to non-anxious patients (p = 0.013). In regression models adjusted for sex, age, systolic blood pressure, and diameters of left atrium and ventricle, plasma CT-proET-1 was again linked to anxiety (Exp(β) = 0.247, 95%-confidence interval [95%-CI] = 0.067–0.914, p = 0.036). Given the high prevalence of depressive disorders in anxious patients, we additionally included the HADS depression score as an independent variable in the models and found that CT-proET-1 remained a significant predictor of anxiety, independent of comorbid depression (Exp(β) = 0.114, 95%-CI = 0.023–0.566, p = 0.008). Conclusions Our data from a population-based study in outpatients with cardiovascular risk factors revealed that circulating CT-proET-1 levels are negatively associated with anxiety. Further investigations are required to clarify the putative anxiolytic effect of ET-1 or its precursor molecules in humans and to decipher its mechanistic pathways. PMID:26322793

  4. Motion and emotion: anxiety-axial connections in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Šumec, Rastislav; Rektorová, Irena; Jech, Robert; Menšíková, Kateřina; Roth, Jan; Růžička, Evžen; Sochorová, Dana; Dušek, Ladislav; Kaňovský, Petr; Rektor, Ivan; Pavlík, Tomáš; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety is a serious and frequent complication in Parkinson's disease (PD) that significantly affects the quality of life of patients. Multiple neuroanatomical, experimental, and clinical studies suggest its close association with axial disturbances. However, whether this relation applies for PD patients (commonly suffering from axial difficulties, such as balance and gait disturbance) has not been properly tested yet. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PD patients suffering from axial symptoms have higher levels of anxiety than others and to identify other factors associated with anxiety-axial connections. In this questionnaire study, 212 patients with PD were assessed by standardized scales, such as Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, examining their mood and cognitive status. These data were correlated to dominant motor symptoms of these patients, such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and axial symptoms. Unlike other motor symptoms, only axial symptoms showed to be significantly related to higher levels of anxiety. The patients suffering from anxiety and axial problems have also shown significantly higher depression levels. Axial disturbances are related to higher anxiety levels in PD patients. It is crucial to pay high attention to symptoms of anxiety in patients having postural instability or gait disorder. Further clinical studies are desirable to investigate new, practical implications of anxiety-axial connection to provide complex management options of these serious symptoms.

  5. Association of dietary diversity score with anxiety in women.

    PubMed

    Poorrezaeian, Mina; Siassi, Fereydoun; Qorbani, Mostafa; Karimi, Javad; Koohdani, Fariba; Asayesh, Hamid; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2015-12-15

    Evidence suggests that diet plays an important role in the development of mental disorders, especially anxiety. Dietary diversity score is an indicator for assessing diet quality. However, its association with anxiety has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the association of dietary diversity score with anxiety. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 360 women attending health centers in the south of Tehran in 2014. General information among others were collected. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Dietary intake and anxiety score were assessed using a 24-h dietary recall and Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS) questionnaires, respectively. Dietary diversity score was computed according to the guidelines of FAO. About 35% of the participants were found to exhibit anxiety. The dietary diversity score in 12.5% of the subjects were between 1 and 3 (low dietary diversity score) but 87.5% scored between 4 and 7 (high dietary diversity score). The adjusted mean of anxiety score in subjects with high dietary diversity score was significantly lower than those with low dietary diversity score. Dietary diversity score was found to be inversely associated with anxiety. However, the causality between anxiety and dietary diversity could not be determined.

  6. Parenting practices, interpretive biases, and anxiety in Latino children.

    PubMed

    Varela, R Enrique; Niditch, Laura A; Hensley-Maloney, Lauren; Moore, Kathryn W; Creveling, C Christiane

    2013-03-01

    A number of factors are believed to confer risk for anxiety development in children; however, cultural variation of purported risk factors remains unclear. We examined relations between controlling and rejecting parenting styles, parental modeling of anxious behaviors, child interpretive biases, and child anxiety in a mixed clinically anxious (n=27) and non-clinical (n=20) sample of Latino children and at least one of their parents. Families completed discussion-based tasks and questionnaires in a lab setting. Results indicated that child anxiety was: linked with parental control and child interpretative biases, associated with parental modeling of anxious behaviors at a trend level, and not associated with low parental acceptance. Findings that controlling parenting and child interpretive biases were associated with anxiety extend current theories of anxiety development to the Latino population. We speculate that strong family ties may buffer Latino children from detrimental effects of perceived low parental acceptance.

  7. Psychological adaptation to ICDs and the influence of anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Jim; Edelman, Sarah

    2007-03-01

    Forty-nine patients scheduled for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation completed self-report psychological questionnaires prior to surgery and at 2, 4 and 6 months after surgery. The most common psychological problem identified was anxiety, with clinically significant cases based on the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) ranging between 26% and 34%. Clinically significant depression ranged between 8% and 20%. Anxiety sensitivity was associated with high levels of anxiety, depression and stress at baseline, but not at follow-up assessments. It is possible that within this population anxiety sensitivity is associated with distress during high-threat situations, but the relationship diminishes once the threat has passed. In addition, the reassurance provided by the ICD may reduce negative perceptions of symptoms, promoting psychological adaptation.

  8. Death and dying anxiety among elderly Arab Muslims in Israel.

    PubMed

    Azaiza, Faisal; Ron, Pnina; Shoham, Meyrav; Gigini, Ibrahim

    2010-04-01

    Death and dying anxiety were examined among elderly Arab Muslims in Israel. A total of 145 people aged 60 and over were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Nursing home residents reported higher death anxiety than others; women and uneducated participants reported greater levels of fear of death and dying than others. There were no differences based on religiosity. Death anxiety was related to gender and education for elderly living in the community, but social support and self-esteem were additional correlates for those living in nursing homes. The results of this study indicate that fostering a sense that one has a supportive social and familial network is important in decreasing death and dying anxiety among elderly Arab people. It would also be beneficial to provide information and knowledge that might relieve some of the anxiety they experience.

  9. Over-reaching beyond disease activity: the influence of anxiety and medical economic burden on health-related quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xia-peng; Mao, Ren; Chen, Bai-li; Qiu, Yun; Zhang, Sheng-hong; He, Yao; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Zhi-rong; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Chen, Min-hu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The influence of psychological and economic factors on HRQOL has not been fully elucidated in IBD. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors of HRQOL in an IBD cohort. Patients and methods This was a cross-sectional cohort study of patients presenting to our tertiary IBD center. HRQOL was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Perceived stress and perceived social support were also assessed by standardized scales. Demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data were obtained from a prespecified questionnaire and patients’ medical records. Univariate analyses and multiple regression analysis were performed to identify predictors of HRQOL. Results A total of 242 IBD patients were recruited, and the questionnaire return rate was 90.5% (219/242). The prevalence rates of anxiety and depression were 24.7% and 17.4%, respectively. In all, 30.6% of the patients spent over half of their income to cover medical costs. Multivariate analysis revealed that anxiety symptoms (P<0.001), active disease (P<0.001) and higher medical expenditures (P=0.001) were strong and independent predictors of reduced HRQOL. Conclusion Psychological factors and costs of medical care strongly impair HRQOL in IBD, independent of the disease activity. Psychological counseling and socioeconomic support programs should be considered for integration into the management of IBD patients. PMID:28053510

  10. Prospective impact of panic disorder and panic-anxiety on asthma control, health service use, and quality of life in adult patients with asthma over a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Helene; Bacon, Simon L; Labrecque, Manon; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-02-01

    Background Panic disorder (PD) is a common anxiety disorder among asthmatic patients with overlapping symptoms (e.g., hyperventilation). However, the longitudinal impact of PD on asthma control remains poorly understood. This study assessed the impact of PD and panic-anxiety on asthma control over a 4.3-year follow-up in 643 adult asthmatic patients. Methods Consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary asthma clinic underwent a sociodemographic, medical history, and psychiatric (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders) interview and completed questionnaires including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) to assess panic-anxiety. At follow-up, patients completed the Asthma Control (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life (AQLQ) questionnaires and reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations during the follow-up. Results Baseline frequency of PD was 10% (n = 65). In fully adjusted models, analyses revealed that PD and ASI scores predicted worse follow-up ACQ total scores (β = 0.292, p = .037; β = 0.012, p = .003) but not AQLQ total scores. ASI scores also predicted greater nocturnal and waking symptoms, activity limitations, and bronchodilator use on the ACQ (β = 0.012-0.018, p < .05) as well as lower symptom (β = -0.012, p = .006) and emotional distress (β = -0.014, p = .002) subscale scores on the AQLQ. Neither PD nor ASI scores were associated with hospitalizations, although ASI scores (but not PD) were associated with an increased risk of emergency department visits (relative risk = 1.023, 95% confidence interval = 1.001-1.044). Conclusions PD and anxiety sensitivity are prospectively associated with poorer asthma control and may be important targets for treatment.

  11. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  12. Anxiety and Death Anxiety in Egyptian and Spanish Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.; Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin

    2005-01-01

    Two samples of female nursing undergraduates from Egypt (n=132) and Spain (n=126) responded to the Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety, the Spanish Death Anxiety Inventory, the Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Subscale. Each sample answered the scales in their native…

  13. Impact of a mindfulness stress management program on stress, anxiety, depression and quality of life in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stefanaki, Charikleia; Bacopoulou, Flora; Livadas, Sarantis; Kandaraki, Anna; Karachalios, Athanasios; Chrousos, George P; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder with a significant psychological burden throughout the life course of affected women. Thus, use of mindful awareness may be beneficial as an adjunct to conventional medical management of women with PCOS. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted at the Evgenideion Hospital of the Athens University Medical School to explore the impact of an 8-week mindfulness stress management program on measures of depression, anxiety and stress as well as on the quality of life in reproductive age women with PCOS. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. Twenty-three and 15 women with PCOS were randomly allocated to the intervention or control group, respectively. All participants were administered DASS21, PSS-14, PCOSQ, Daily Life and General Life Satisfaction Questionnaires and provided three-timed daily samples of salivary cortisol, before and after the intervention. Intervention group participants were provided with the Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire at the day of enrolment, to check for possible placebo effect on the outcome. Post-intervention, between-group results revealed statistically significant reductions in stress, depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as in salivary cortisol concentrations, along with an increase in Life Satisfaction and Quality of Life scores in the intervention group only. There was no significant "placebo" effect on the outcome measures. Mindfulness techniques seem promising in ameliorating stress, anxiety, depression and the quality of life in women with PCOS and could be used as an adjunct method to the conventional management of these women.

  14. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  15. Personality traits predict job stress, depression and anxiety among junior physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High levels of stress and deteriorating mental health among medical students are commonly reported. In Bergen, Norway, we explored the impact of personality traits measured early in their curriculum on stress reactions and levels of depression and anxiety symptoms as junior physicians following graduation. Methods Medical students (n = 201) from two classes participated in a study on personality traits and mental health early in the curriculum. A questionnaire measuring personality traits (Basic Character Inventory (BCI)) was used during their third undergraduate year. BCI assesses four personality traits: neuroticism, extroversion, conscientiousness and reality weakness. Questionnaires measuring mental health (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Symptom Checklist 25 (SCL-25)), and stress (Perceived Medical School Stress (PMSS)) were used during their third and sixth undergraduate year. During postgraduate internship, Cooper’s Job Stress Questionnaire (CJSQ) was used to measure perceived job stress, while mental health and stress reactions were reassessed using HADS and SCL-25. Results Extroversion had the highest mean value (5.11) among the total group of participants, while reality weakness had the lowest (1.51). Neuroticism and reality weakness were related to high levels of perceived job stress (neuroticism r = .19, reality weakness r = .17) as well as higher levels of anxiety symptoms (neuroticism r = .23, reality weakness r = .33) and symptoms of depression (neuroticism r = .21, reality weakness r = .36) during internship. Neuroticism indirectly predicted stress reactions and levels of depression and anxiety symptoms. These relations were mediated by perceived job stress, while reality weakness predicted these mental health measures directly. Extroversion, on the other hand, protected against symptoms of depression (r = −.20). Furthermore, females reported higher levels of job stress than males

  16. Brief Report: Effects of Sensory Sensitivity and Intolerance of Uncertainty on Anxiety in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uljarevic, Mirko; Carrington, Sarah; Leekam, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relations between anxiety and individual characteristics of sensory sensitivity (SS) and intolerance of uncertainty (IU) in mothers of children with ASD. The mothers of 50 children completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Highly Sensitive Person Scale and the IU Scale. Anxiety was associated with both SS and…

  17. [Effect of speech estimation on social anxiety].

    PubMed

    Shirotsuki, Kentaro; Sasagawa, Satoko; Nomura, Shinobu

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of speech estimation on social anxiety to further understanding of this characteristic of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). In the first study, we developed the Speech Estimation Scale (SES) to assess negative estimation before giving a speech which has been reported to be the most fearful social situation in SAD. Undergraduate students (n = 306) completed a set of questionnaires, which consisted of the Short Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (SFNE), the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS), the Social Phobia Scale (SPS), and the SES. Exploratory factor analysis showed an adequate one-factor structure with eight items. Further analysis indicated that the SES had good reliability and validity. In the second study, undergraduate students (n = 315) completed the SFNE, SIAS, SPS, SES, and the Self-reported Depression Scale (SDS). The results of path analysis showed that fear of negative evaluation from others (FNE) predicted social anxiety, and speech estimation mediated the relationship between FNE and social anxiety. These results suggest that speech estimation might maintain SAD symptoms, and could be used as a specific target for cognitive intervention in SAD.

  18. Effect of happiness educational program on the level of stress, anxiety and depression of the cancer patients’ nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Mardany, Zahra; Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nurses face a great amount of stress that can threaten their health and reduce their motivation. Nurses’ present working conditions lead to an increase in emotional pressures and depression. Conducting a study on this seems to be necessary, with regard to nurses’ stressful working conditions, in order to take steps toward achieving different and non-meditational treatments to treat their stress, anxiety, and depression and, consequently, promote nurses’ and patients’ health. Materials and Methods: This is a randomized clinical trial conducted on 52 nurses working in cancer patients wards, who were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Happiness educational program was administered for six sessions once a week in the study group and a communication training sessions with the patients in the control group, and DASS-42 questionnaire was completed before, immediately after, and 1 month after intervention by the subjects in both study and control groups. Data were analyzed by Chi-square, independent t-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS 18. Results: Mean scores of stress, anxiety, and depression showed no significant difference before and after intervention. Meanwhile, independent t-test showed that mean scores of stress, anxiety, and depression were significantly lower in the study group compared to the control group immediately after and 1 month after intervention (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Educational planning of happiness can reduce nurses’ depression, anxiety, and stress in the cancer patients’ wards. Psychiatric nurses can reduce depression, anxiety, and stress of nurses working in other hospitals also through application of this program. PMID:27904640

  19. Assessment of Anxiety and Depression in Oral Mucositis Patients Undergoing Cancer Chemoradiotherapy: A Randomized Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaitanya, Nallan CSK; Garlapati, Komali; Priyanka, Danam Reshma; Soma, Sravani; Suskandla, Ujwala; Boinepally, Niharika Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oral mucositis is an unavoidable complication occurring during the treatment of cancer by radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), or chemotherapy. This is a painful sequelae, significantly affecting the nutritional intake and quality of life. Materials and Methods: A multicentric cross-sectional study was done at four cancer centers in Hyderabad. About 455 subjects of both genders between 20 and 80 years undergoing cancer treatment such as chemotherapy (Group I), CCRT (Group II), radiotherapy within 14 days of initiation (Group III), and radiotherapy after 14 days of initiation of therapy (Group IV) who had oral mucositis were included in the study. A self-addressed Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaire was used to assess the anxiety/depression in cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis patients. Results: Group III had established anxiety (58.82%) followed by Group IV (47.5%) of patients showing severe oral mucositis. In Group I, 47.17% and in Group II, 40% patients with borderline anxiety had mild mucositis, which was statistically significant (P = 0.01). Group III had established depression in 56.36%, followed by Group IV with 39.62% patients showed severe oral mucositis. Group I and II had mild to moderate mucositis, which was associated with established depression at statistically significant result (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Group IV had maximum participants with anxiety and depression, closely followed by Group II, Group III, and least in Group I. Thus appropriate intervention in the form of nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment is warranted. PMID:27803567

  20. A report on the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with frozen shoulder and their relations to disease status.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huairong; Tang, Yanming; Xue, Yuan; Yang, Zhong; Li, Zhiyang; He, Dong; Zhao, Ying; Zong, Yaqi

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases often have concomitant psychological disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Frozen shoulder (FS) is a musculoskeletal disease, and causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder. The relationship between FS and psychological disorders has rarely been investigated. This cross-sectional study was to evaluate the risk of depression and anxiety in patients with primary FS, and to explore the relationship between psychological disorders and disease status. In this study, anxiety and depression were evaluated in 124 patients (78 women and 46 men) with primary FS, compared with 130 (72 women and 58 men) age-, sex- and education matched healthy controls between March 2009 and June 2012. Simple shoulder test (SST); shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI); the range of motion (ROM); visual analog scales (VAS) for pain and sleep disturbances; hospital anxiety and depression scale for depression (HADS-D) and for anxiety (HADS-A); and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) were used to assess clinical and psychological status. In FS patients, the prevalence of depression and anxiety was 28.2 and 24.2%, respectively. Compared with the healthy controls, higher HADS-D (6.41 ± 3.69, 5. 23 ± 2.87 p = 0.006) and HADS-A (6.16 ± 3.62, 4.90 ± 3.05 p = 0.003) were detected. The FS patients with depression or anxiety had significantly lower SST and HAQ scores, significantly higher VAS and SPADI scores and significantly higher prevalence of sleep disturbances compared with the FS patients with normal psychological status. The correlations of SST, SPADI, VAS and sleep disturbances but not ROM with HADS-A and HADS-D were significant ( p < 0.05). This finding indicates that anxiety and depression may coexist with FS; patients with psychological disorders have more severe self-reported shoulder pain and functional restriction.

  1. A test of the cognitive content specificity hypothesis in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lamberton, Anna; Oei, Tian P S

    2008-03-01

    The present study tested the cognitive content specificity hypothesis (CCSH) to assess whether anxiety and depression can be differentiated on the basis of cognitive disturbance. One hundred and thirty five depressed participants were administered the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ) and the anxious self-statements questionnaire (ASSQ). It was hypothesised that depressive cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, depressive (but not anxiety) symptoms in a depressed sample. Conversely, it was predicted that anxiety cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, anxiety (but not depressive) symptoms in a depressed sample. Results revealed that the ATQ was the sole predictor of the BDI and similarly, the ASSQ was the sole predictor of the BAI. These findings support the CCSH in depression and provide an integrative framework for a greater understanding of the relationship between anxiety and depression.

  2. Fear and anxiety as separable emotions: an investigation of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Adam M; Kemp, Samantha E; Corr, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    The Gray and McNaughton (2000) theory draws on a wide range of animal data to hypothesize that the emotions of fear and anxiety are separable. The authors tested their hypothesis in two studies. The first study examined associations between scores on questionnaire measures of fear, anxiety, and neuroticism; correlational analysis revealed that fear and anxiety are not interchangeable constructs. The second study examined associations between scores on questionnaire measures of fear/anxiety and performance in a military training setting; regression analysis revealed that fear captured significant variance in performance that was not shared with anxiety. These results imply that hypotheses derived from nonhuman animal data may hold important implications for understanding human emotion and motivation, especially in relation to fear and anxiety.

  3. Westside Test Anxiety Scale Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Westside Test Anxiety Scale is a brief, ten item instrument designed to identify students with anxiety impairments who could benefit from an anxiety-reduction intervention. The scale items cover self-assessed anxiety impairment and cognitions which can impair performance. Correlations between anxiety-reduction as measured by the scale and…

  4. Report on Maternal Anxiety 16 Months After the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: Anxiety Over Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Hatsumi; Saito, Hidemitsu; Kikuchi, Saya; Ueno, Takashi; Sato, Kineko

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. The tsunami caused extensive damage to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in a level 7 nuclear accident. Among those affected by this combined disaster were many pregnant and parturient women. Sixteen months after the earthquake, we conducted a questionnaire survey on anxiety among 259 women who gave birth around the time of the earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture, one of the affected areas. Participants reported 12 categories of anxiety, including anxiety over radioactivity. This study aimed to determine anxiety over radioactivity among this specific population and to record measures for future study. Anxiety over radiation was classified into seven subcategories: food safety, outdoor safety, effects on the fetuses of pregnant women, effects on children, radiation exposure, economic problems, and distrust of information disclosed. This study confirmed that concrete types of anxiety over radiation were keenly felt by mothers who had experienced the disaster who were currently raising children. The findings suggest the need to provide accurate information to these mothers, who are otherwise inundated with miscellaneous confusing information. PMID:25363115

  5. Report on maternal anxiety 16 months after the great East Japan earthquake disaster: anxiety over radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Hatsumi; Saito, Hidemitsu; Kikuchi, Saya; Ueno, Takashi; Sato, Kineko

    2014-06-25

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. The tsunami caused extensive damage to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in a level 7 nuclear accident. Among those affected by this combined disaster were many pregnant and parturient women. Sixteen months after the earthquake, we conducted a questionnaire survey on anxiety among 259 women who gave birth around the time of the earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture, one of the affected areas. Participants reported 12 categories of anxiety, including anxiety over radioactivity. This study aimed to determine anxiety over radioactivity among this specific population and to record measures for future study. Anxiety over radiation was classified into seven subcategories: food safety, outdoor safety, effects on the fetuses of pregnant women, effects on children, radiation exposure, economic problems, and distrust of information disclosed. This study confirmed that concrete types of anxiety over radiation were keenly felt by mothers who had experienced the disaster who were currently raising children. The findings suggest the need to provide accurate information to these mothers, who are otherwise inundated with miscellaneous confusing information.

  6. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress. PMID:20357926

  7. Virtual reality and anxiety in primiparous women during episiotomy repair

    PubMed Central

    Shourab, Nahid Jahani; Zagami, Samira Ebrahimzadeh; Golmakhani, Nahid; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Nahvi, Ali; Pabarja, Ferial; Talebi, Mahdi; Rizi, Sohaiela Mohamadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent studies, using virtual reality (VR) has been proposed as a nonpharmacological method for anxiety reduction, but until this time, its effects have not been assessed on anxiety during episiotomy repair. This study aimed to determine the effect of audiovisual distraction (VR) on anxiety in primiparous women during episiotomy repair. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 30 primigravida from May to July 2012 in the maternity unit of the Omolbanin Hospital, Mashhad city, Iran. The samples were divided randomly into two groups with the toss of a coin. Anxiety were evaluated by the numeric 0–10 anxiety self-report, in the first and during labor. However, after delivery, anxiety was measured with the Spilberger scale. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher tests, and repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to analyze data. Results: Anxiety scores were not significantly different between the two groups (wearing video-glass and receiving routine care), but anxiety scores were lower in the intervention group during and after repair (P = 0.000). Conclusions: VR are safe, appropriate, and nonpharmacologic to decrease and manage the anxiety-associated episiotomy. PMID:27904638

  8. Testing psychometric properties of the 30-item general health questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) given conflicting findings in the literature. A cross-sectional, nonexperimental research was used with a convenience sample of 271 American female health care professionals. Data were collected by using self-reported questionnaires. A series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs), confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs), and structural equation modeling (SEM) were performed to examine underlying dimensions of the GHQ-30. Results from EFAs and CFAs revealed the three-factor composition (positive affect, anxiety, and depressed mood). All factor loadings were statistically significant, and one pair of error variance was allowed to be correlated. All factors contained questionnaire items with acceptable face validity and demonstrated good internal consistency reliability. Results from SEM further confirmed underlying constructs of the scale. To our knowledge, this is the first study that extensively tested the psychometric properties of the GHQ-30, taking both statistical and substantive issues into consideration.

  9. Rejection sensitivity mediates the relationship between social anxiety and body dysmorphic concerns.

    PubMed

    Fang, Angela; Asnaani, Anu; Gutner, Cassidy; Cook, Courtney; Wilhelm, Sabine; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the role of rejection sensitivity in the relationship between social anxiety and body dysmorphic concerns. To test our hypothesis that rejection sensitivity mediates the link between social anxiety and body dysmorphic concerns, we administered self-report questionnaires to 209 student volunteers. Consistent with our prediction, rejection sensitivity partially mediated the relationship between social anxiety symptoms and body dysmorphic concerns. The implications of the overlap between these constructs are discussed.

  10. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  11. Analysis of the Computer Anxiety Levels of Secondary Technical Education Teachers in West Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    The computer anxiety of 116 randomly selected secondary technical education teachers from 8 area vocational-technical centers in West Virginia was the focus of a study. The mailed questionnaire consisted of two parts: Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale (COMPAS) and closed-form questions to obtain general demographic information about the teachers…

  12. Science Anxiety: An Investigation of Science Achievement, Sex and Grade Level Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene; Chiarelott, Leigh

    This study reviews literature on science anxiety related to such variables as sex, intellectual capacity, achievement, and attitudes. To measure science anxiety, a questionnaire (included in an appendix) was developed, pilot-tested on students in grades 5 and 7 in the Bowling Green (Ohio) School District, and administered in final form to 532…

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Cypriot Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Anastassiou-Hadjicharalambous, Xenia; Munoz, Luna C.

    2011-01-01

    The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) is a 38-item self-report questionnaire which measures symptoms of DSM-IV anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of SCAS in a large community sample of children and adolescents (N = 1,072), aged 12-17 years, in the…

  14. Students' Anxiety towards the Learning of Chemistry in Some Nigerian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegede, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The study was designed to find out students' anxiety towards the learning of chemistry, identify the factors that cause the anxiety, examine the disposition of sex towards the learning of chemistry and suggest ways to increase their taste towards the learning of the subject. Data for the study was obtained by administering a questionnaire to 300…

  15. Attachment, Self-Esteem and Test Anxiety in Adolescence and Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dan, Orrie; Bar Ilan, Omrit; Kurman, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how attachment dimensions (anxiety and avoidance), self-esteem, and three subscales of test anxiety--cognitive obstruction, social derogation and tenseness are related in two age groups: adolescents and college students. Participants (N?=?327) completed relevant questionnaires. Results showed that college…

  16. The Relation between Self-Esteem, Parenting Style and Social Anxiety in Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousaf, Saira

    2015-01-01

    This study is an attempt to explore the relationship between self-esteem, parenting style and social anxiety in girls. A sample of 100 female students selected from different schools. For data collection Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, Parental Authority Questionnaire and Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scales were used together with demographic sheet.…

  17. Prediction of Anxiety Symptoms in Preschool-Aged Children: Examination of Maternal and Paternal Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Susan L.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Kennedy, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about risk factors for anxiety in young children. The current study investigated the value of a set of theoretically derived risk factors to predict symptoms of anxiety in a sample of preschool-aged children. Methods: Mothers (n = 632) and fathers (n = 249) completed questionnaires twice, 12 months apart. Measures were…

  18. Hoarding in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: Incidence, Clinical Correlates, and Behavioral Treatment Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Nadeau, Joshua M.; Johnco, Carly; Timpano, Kiara; McBride, Nicole; Mutch, P. Jane; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the nature and correlates of hoarding among youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty children with ASD and a comorbid anxiety disorder were administered a battery of clinician-administered measures assessing presence of psychiatric disorders and anxiety severity. Parents completed questionnaires related to child…

  19. Test Anxiety in Mathematics among Early Undergraduate Students in a British University in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karjanto, Natanael; Yong, Su Ting

    2013-01-01

    The level of test anxiety in mathematics subjects among early undergraduate students at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus is studied in this article. The sample consists of 206 students taking several mathematics modules who completed the questionnaires on test anxiety just before they entered the venue for midterm examinations. The…

  20. The Relationship of Peer Victimization to Social Anxiety and Loneliness in Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Masia-Warner, Carrie

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of overt and relational victimization to social anxiety, loneliness, and prosocial behaviours in a sample of female adolescents. The Social Experience Questionnaire, Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents, and Asher Loneliness Scale were administered to 561 girls in the ninth, tenth, and eleventh grades of an…

  1. Anxiety and the True Beginner-False Beginner Dynamic in Beginning French and Spanish Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantzen, Diana; Magnan, Sally Sieloff

    2005-01-01

    This study considered true beginners and false beginners in first-semester university French and Spanish classes to: (a) determine whether true beginners and false beginners differ in anxiety, grades, and plans to continue language study; and (b) identify classroom factors that foster anxiety or comfort. Students completed a questionnaire that…

  2. Effects of Language Anxiety on Three Proficiency-Level Courses of Spanish as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos-Llinas, Monica; Garau, Maria Juan

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of language anxiety on course achievement in three foreign language proficiency levels of Spanish, namely, beginner, intermediate, and advanced. Participants completed the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986) and a background questionnaire. Results showed that language…

  3. The Relation between Anxiety Disorder and Experiential Avoidance in Inpatient Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venta, Amanda; Sharp, Carla; Hart, John

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the relation between experiential avoidance and anxiety disorders, as well as the usefulness of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y; Greco, Lambert, & Baer, 2008) in detecting anxiety disorder in a sample of adolescent inpatients. First, the relation between experiential avoidance and anxiety…

  4. Nocturnal Orgasm in College Women: Its Relation to Dreams and Anxiety Associated with Sexual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henton, Comradge L.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 774 female undergraduates were administered a structured questionnaire and an anxiety scale. It was found that women do experience nocturnal orgasms during sleep. Differences were found according to year at school as well as a positive correlation between level of anxiety and sexual excitement. (MS)

  5. Trait Anxiety among Japanese Massage Practitioners with Visual Impairment: What Is Required in Japanese Rehabilitation Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Munakata, Tsunetsugu

    2009-01-01

    This questionnaire-based study of Japanese massage practitioners with visual impairment (n = 155, 126 males, 29 females, mean age = 41 years) found that measures of self-repression, helplessness and "daily hassles" were positively correlated to measures of trait anxiety. Also, trait anxiety was negatively associated with measures of…

  6. Female Anxiety and Male Depression: Links between Economic Strain and Psychological Aggression in Argentinean Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconier, Mariana K.

    2010-01-01

    A dyadic model of economic strain was applied to the study of anxiety and depression as mediating mechanisms in the economic strain-psychological aggression relation. Data came from self-report questionnaires completed by 143 Argentinean clinical couples. Structural equation modeling analysis indicated that anxiety and depression increased for…

  7. Impact of a physical activity program on the anxiety, depression, occupational stress and burnout syndrome of nursing professionals1

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Anderson Rodrigues; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the effects of a workplace physical activity (WPA) program on levels of anxiety, depression, burnout, occupational stress and self-perception of health and work-related quality of life of a nursing team in a palliative care unit. Methods the WPA was conducted five days per week, lasting ten minutes, during three consecutive months. Twenty-one nursing professionals were evaluated before and after the intervention, with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Maslch Burnout Inventory, and the Job Stress Scale. The changes in self-perceived health and work-related quality of life were measured using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results the WPA did not yield significant results on the levels of anxiety, depression, burnout or occupational stress. However, after the intervention, participants reported improved perceptions of bodily pain and feeling of fatigue at work. Conclusion the WPA did not lead to beneficial effects on occupational stress and psychological variables, but it was well accepted by the nursing professionals, who reported improvement in perceptions of health and work-related quality of life. PMID:26107843

  8. Modeling the Test-Taking Motivation Construct through Investigation of Psychometric Properties of an Expectancy-Value-Based Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knekta, Eva; Eklöf, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of an expectancy-value-based questionnaire measuring five aspects of test-taking motivation (effort, expectancies, importance, interest, and test anxiety). The questionnaire was distributed to a sample of Swedish Grade 9 students taking a low-stakes (n = 1,047) or a high-stakes (n =…

  9. Depression and anxiety in patients with hematological malignancies, prevalence, and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Abuelgasim, Khadega A.; Ahmed, Gasmelseed Y.; Alqahtani, Jamilah A.; Alayed, Aseel M.; Alaskar, Ahmed S.; Malik, Mansoor A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and associated factors of depression and anxiety in hematological cancers (HC) patients. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in all HC patients at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between March 2014 and June 2015. We excluded patients with depression, or generalized anxiety disorder. We conducted a structured face to face interview using an internally developed and validated questionnaire (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 patient’s questionnaire with all participants). Results: Among 211 participants, depression was detected in 98 (46.5%) and anxiety was detected in 47 (22.3%). Thirty-eight (18.1%) had concurrent anxiety and depression. Multiple co-morbidities and tense home atmosphere were predictive for anxiety and depression. We found no association between gender, smoking, income, or being on active therapy and depression or anxiety. Conclusions: Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in HC patients in KAMC. Health care providers should screen HC cancers for depression and anxiety; as early intervention possibly improve their disease outcome and will likely enhance their psychological wellbeing. PMID:27464865

  10. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in North Chinese Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peihang; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Yihua; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Xing, Kai; Kang, Zheng; Ning, Ning; Fu, Yapeng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2017-01-19

    This research aimed to determine the prevalence of workplace violence (WPV) against healthcare workers, explore the frequency distribution of violence in different occupational groups, and determine which healthcare occupation suffers from WPV most frequently. Furthermore, the current study aimed to compare risk factors affecting different types of WPV in Chinese hospitals. A cross-sectional design was utilized. A total of 1899 healthcare workers from Heilongjiang, a province in Northeastern China, completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 83.3% reported exposure to workplace violence, and 68.9% reported non-physical violence. Gender, education, shift work, anxiety level, and occupation were significantly correlated with physical violence (p < 0.05 for all correlations). Additionally, age, professional title, and occupation were correlated with non-physical violence, which critically affected doctors. Thus, gender, age, profession, anxiety, and shift work were predictive of workplace violence toward healthcare workers. Doctors appeared to experience non-physical workplace violence with particularly higher frequency when compared to nurses and other workers in hospitals. For healthcare workers, interventions aimed at WPV reduction should be enacted according to the types of violence, profession, and other factors underlying the various types of WPV in hospitals.

  11. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in North Chinese Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peihang; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Yihua; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Xing, Kai; Kang, Zheng; Ning, Ning; Fu, Yapeng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the prevalence of workplace violence (WPV) against healthcare workers, explore the frequency distribution of violence in different occupational groups, and determine which healthcare occupation suffers from WPV most frequently. Furthermore, the current study aimed to compare risk factors affecting different types of WPV in Chinese hospitals. A cross-sectional design was utilized. A total of 1899 healthcare workers from Heilongjiang, a province in Northeastern China, completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 83.3% reported exposure to workplace violence, and 68.9% reported non-physical violence. Gender, education, shift work, anxiety level, and occupation were significantly correlated with physical violence (p < 0.05 for all correlations). Additionally, age, professional title, and occupation were correlated with non-physical violence, which critically affected doctors. Thus, gender, age, profession, anxiety, and shift work were predictive of workplace violence toward healthcare workers. Doctors appeared to experience non-physical workplace violence with particularly higher frequency when compared to nurses and other workers in hospitals. For healthcare workers, interventions aimed at WPV reduction should be enacted according to the types of violence, profession, and other factors underlying the various types of WPV in hospitals. PMID:28106851

  12. Insecure attachment is associated with math anxiety in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Guy; De Smedt, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Children's anxiety for situations requiring mathematical problem solving, a concept referred to as math anxiety, has a unique and detrimental impact on concurrent and long-term mathematics achievement and life success. Little is known about the factors that contribute to the emergence of math anxiety. The current study builds on the hypothesis that math anxiety might reflect a maladaptive affect regulation mechanism that is characteristic for insecure attachment relationships. To test this hypothesis, 87 children primary school children (M age = 10.34 years; SD age = 0.63) filled out questionnaires measuring insecure attachment and math anxiety. They all completed a timed and untimed standardized test of mathematics achievement. Our data revealed that individual differences in math anxiety were significantly related to insecure attachment, independent of age, sex, and IQ. Both tests of mathematics achievement were associated with insecure attachment and this effect was mediated by math anxiety. This study is the first to indicate that math anxiety might develop in the context of insecure parent-child attachment relationships.

  13. Relationship of children's anxiety to their potential dental health behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A

    1980-08-01

    In this study of 200 New Zealand schoolchildren aged 7-13 years, a questionnaire interview was used to gain information related to estimating dental anxiety and general illness anxiety. Information related to sociodemographic differences, belief differences, and an estimate of potential health behaviour was also collected. Oral examinations were performed and the number of dental restorations present recorded. Dental anxiety was associated with memory of pain during a dental visit. The number of restorations present, and a history of pain during a dental visit, were important predictors of illness anxiety. Neither dental anxiety nor illness anxiety operating alone provided an estimate of future dental health behaviour. Dental anxiety and illness anxiety operated through a complex interplay of variables. A stepwise multiple regression technique was used to determine the possible pathways to potential dental health behaviour. Perceived vulnerability to dental caries and perceived severity of dental disease were important in the prediction of potential denture wearing; school attended and ethnic background were useful predictors of potential extraction seeking; and school grade and level of perceived internal control were predictors of potential preventive visitation.

  14. Temperament and Anxiety: The Mediating Role of Metacognition.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Małgorzata; Dragan, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines a simple model for the relationship between temperament, anxiety and maladaptive metacognition. A clinical sample of patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders (n = 216) completed a set of self-reported questionnaires measuring temperament dimensions, state anxiety and metacognitions. Three temperament traits were included in the hypothesized model: emotional reactivity, perseveration and briskness. A structural equation modeling analysis supported a model in which the relationship between the three temperament traits and anxiety were fully mediated by metacognition. Dissimilar models were identified for the male and female subgroups, and also with reference to individual categories of maladaptive metacognition. The findings support the significance of metacognition as a factor influencing the temperament-anxiety relationship. Moreover, they confirm the roles both of emotional reactivity and of perseveration, being major traits related to anxiety which also turned out to be strongly associated with metacognition. In case of the models for the categories of metacognition, emotional reactivity was associated with negative beliefs, perseveration with negative and positive beliefs, while briskness predicted anxiety independently of metacognition. These results suggest the existence of more specific associations between temperament traits, anxiety, and various types of metacognition.

  15. Multi-Dimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire in China: Reliability, Validity and Clinical Value in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Zhu, Li-an; Wang, Su-li; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Lu, Liang-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties and clinical utility of Chinese Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MDHAQ-C) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. Methods 162 RA patients were recruited in the evaluation process. The reliability of the questionnaire was tested by internal consistency and item analysis. Convergent validity was assessed by correlations of MDHAQ-C with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Hospital anxiety and depression scales (HAD). Discriminant validity was tested in groups of patients with varied disease activities and functional classes. To evaluate the clinical values, correlations were calculated between MDHAQ-C and indices of clinical relevance and disease activity. Agreement with the Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) was estimated. Results The Cronbach's alpha was 0.944 in the Function scale (FN) and 0.768 in the scale of psychological status (PS). The item analysis indicated all the items of FN and PS are correlated at an acceptable level. MDHAQ-C correlated with the questionnaires significantly in most scales and scores of scales differed significantly in groups of different disease activity and functional status. MDHAQ-C has moderate to high correlation with most clinical indices and high correlation with a spearman coefficient of 0.701 for DAS 28 and 0.843 for CDAI. The overall agreement of categories was satisfying. Conclusion MDHAQ-C is a reliable, valid instrument for functional measurement and a feasible, informative quantitative index for busy clinical settings in Chinese RA patients. PMID:24848431

  16. The Persian Version of Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire: Translation and Evaluation of its Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, S. Elham; Hafizi, Sina; Shahi, Mohammad Hosein Pourgharib; Kordi, Ramin; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Arbabi, Mohammad; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Screening of psychosocial risk factors for chronic low back pain (LBP) is essential. The Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire (ÖMPSQ) is one of the most recognized and widely used instruments for this purpose. This study aimed to translate the ÖMPSQ into Persian, to adapt it for Iranian culture, and to investigate its psychometric properties. Methods: Using a linguistic methodology, the ÖMPSQ was translated into Persian according to the World Health Organization guideline. A total of 106 patients with LBP participated in the study. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Concurrent validity was estimated with Pearson's correlation between the ÖMPSQ and short form health survey (SF-12), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and visual analog scale (VAS). Factor analysis was used to evaluate dimensionality. Results: The content validity index was 0.80. The instrument had a good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82) and internal consistency (Cronbach's α =0.82). Factor analysis indicates that factorial structure of Persian version was similar to original questionnaire. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.252–0.639, P < 0.01) between VAS score and all the ÖMPSQ domains. Physical component summary of SF-12 was positively correlated with miscellaneous domain (r = 384, P < 0.05) and negatively correlated with psychology domain of ÖMPSQ (r = −0.364, P < 0.05). A significant correlation between total score and anxiety component of HADS and psychology domain of ÖMPSQ was found (r = 0.49, P < 0.01 and r = 0.442, P < 0.05, respectively). Correlations between the ÖMPSQ and SF-12 and HADS and VAS indicate acceptable concurrent validity. Conclusions: The Persian version of ÖMPSQ was as a valid and reliable instrument and also a good cross-cultural equivalent for original English version. PMID:28348724

  17. Dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression among adult patients with dental anxiety but with different dental-attendance patterns.

    PubMed

    Bernson, Jenny M; Elfström, Magnus L; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression in relation to regularity of dental treatment among persons with either regular dental care or phobic avoidance, whilst controlling for sociodemographic factors. Psychometric questionnaires on dental anxiety, dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression were delivered to 263 adult patients with dental phobic avoidance behavior who were seeking help from a specialized dental fear clinic and to 141 adult patients with dental anxiety who were receiving regular dental care from various public dental clinics. The results showed that the levels of dental and general anxiety and of depression were significantly higher among irregular attendees compared with regular attendees. Irregular attendees admitted fewer adaptive coping strategies. Predictive of irregular dental care were gender, dental anxiety, general anxiety, and the nonuse of the coping strategy 'optimism'. This study further confirms earlier preliminary results that the use of optimistic thinking is predictive for regular dental attendance habits and that male gender is a risk factor for irregular attendance. Moreover, this study adds that a high level of general anxiety indicates a higher risk for irregular dental care.

  18. Test and Performance Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Test and performance anxiety is not recognized easily in schools, in large part because adolescents rarely refer themselves for emotional concerns. Not wanting to risk teasing or public attention, anxious adolescents suffer in silence and under perform on school-related tasks. In school, anxiety is experienced often by students when being…

  19. Addressing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that between 25% to 40% of students experience test anxiety, with students with disabilities and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds having higher prevalence rates. Since test anxiety impacts student well-being and the validity of the important educational decisions based on testing data, this article…

  20. [Anxiety in progressive disease].

    PubMed

    Hesse, Michaela; Heydweiller, Katrin; Mücke, Martin; Cuhls, Henning; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety in terminally ill patients has a high impact on symptoms, trajectory and quality of life. There are different screening instruments for diagnosis. The holistic approach of palliative care considers the physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs and can improve the distress caused by anxiety. Early integration in palliative care decreases burden of symptoms and increases quality of life.

  1. A Meta-Analysis of the Cross-Cultural Psychometric Properties of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, William W.; Crocetti, Elisabetta; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies have demonstrated that the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), a modern youth anxiety questionnaire with scales explicitly designed to map onto specific DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorders, has good psychometric properties for children and adolescents from various countries. However, no study has…

  2. The relation between insecure attachment and child anxiety: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Colonnesi, Cristina; Draijer, Evalijn M; Jan J M Stams, Geert; Van der Bruggen, Corine O; Bögels, Susan M; Noom, Marc J

    2011-01-01

    Attachment theory suggests that children's attachment insecurity plays a key role in the development of anxiety. In the present study we evaluated the empirical evidence for the link between insecure attachment and anxiety from early childhood to adolescence. A meta-analysis of 46 studies, from 1984 to 2010, including 8,907 children, was conducted. The results show an overall effect size of r = .30, indicating that attachment is moderately related to anxiety. Moderator analyses indicated that ambivalent attachment showed the strongest association with anxiety. Further, the relation was stronger during adolescence, when attachment and anxiety were measured through questionnaires, when the informant was the child, when attachment was measured as internal working model, in cross-sectional studies, and in studies conducted in Europe. No difference was found between studies that measured anxiety as symptoms or as a disorder, and when different kinds of anxiety were considered.

  3. Effectiveness of disease-specific cognitive–behavioural therapy on depression, anxiety, quality of life and the clinical course of disease in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease: study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial (HAPPY-IBD)

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, Gertrude; Stapersma, Luuk; El Marroun, Hanan; Henrichs, Jens; Szigethy, Eva M; Utens, Elisabeth MWJ; Escher, Johanna C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) show a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety, compared to youth with other chronic diseases. The inflammation-depression hypothesis might explain this association, and implies that treating depression can decrease intestinal inflammation and improve disease course. The present multicentre randomised controlled trial aims to test the effectiveness of an IBD-specific cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) protocol in reducing symptoms of subclinical depression and anxiety, while improving quality of life and disease course in adolescents with IBD. Methods and analysis Adolescents with IBD (10–20 years) from 7 hospitals undergo screening (online questionnaires) for symptoms of depression and anxiety. Those with elevated scores of depression (Child Depression Inventory (CDI) ≥13 or Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II ≥14) and/or anxiety (Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders: boys ≥26, girls ≥30) receive a psychiatric interview. Patients meeting criteria for depressive/anxiety disorders are referred for psychotherapy outside the trial. Patients with elevated (subclinical) symptoms are randomly assigned to medical care-as-usual (CAU; n=50) or CAU plus IBD-specific CBT (n=50). Main outcomes: (1) reduction in depressive and/or anxiety symptoms after 3 months and (2) sustained remission for 12 months. Secondary outcomes: quality of life, psychosocial functioning, treatment adherence. In addition, we will assess inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and whole blood RNA expression profiles. For analysis, multilevel linear models and generalised estimating equations will be used. Ethics and dissemination The Medical Ethics Committee of the Erasmus MC approved this study. If we prove that this CBT improves emotional well-being as well as disease course, implementation is recommended. Trial registration number NCT02265588. PMID:26966551

  4. Text anxiety in adolescents: the role of self-criticism and acceptance and mindfulness skills.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Marina; Paiva, Maria Jacinta

    2012-07-01

    The current study sets out to explore test anxiety in adolescent students. The effect of sociodemographic variables on test anxiety was controlled for and the relationship between test anxiety and other psychological constructs, such as self-criticism, social anxiety, acceptance and mindfulness, was examined. In addition, the predictive effect/power of these variables was analyzed and a comparative study between high and low test anxiety adolescents was conducted. Participants in this study were 449 high school students, 211 boys and 238 girls, with a mean age of 16.28 years. These participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires composed by the Portuguese versions of Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI), Child Acceptance and Mindfulness Measure (CAMM), Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS), and the Social Anxiety and Avoidance Scale for Adolescents (SAASA). Results showed that gender, self-criticism and competencies for acceptance and mindfulness had a significant and an independent contribution on the prediction of test anxiety. The comparative study revealed that adolescents with high test anxiety score significantly higher in negative forms of self-criticism, social anxiety and lower in self-reassurance, acceptance and mindfulness, when compared to those with low test anxiety. Despite its exploratory nature, the current study adds to the existing knowledge on the influence of psychological processes, such as self-criticism and acceptance, on test anxiety. These findings might constitute a relevant contribution to psychological intervention with adolescents.

  5. An Investigation of Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in a Private Hospital and Its Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai-Tong; Yick, Sin-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nurses’ job satisfaction and job stress are important issues regarding their turnovers. While there are some recent descriptive studies on job satisfaction in public hospitals, very limited research was found on this topic in private hospital setting. It is worth to examine the job satisfaction of nurses and its correlates in such a specific hospital context in Hong Kong, by which the findings can be compared with those in public hospitals, and across countries. Aims: To investigate nurses’ job satisfaction, job stress and intention to quit of nurses in a private hospital, and the correlates of the nurses’ job satisfaction. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive survey study was conducted. Methods: By using stratified random sampling in terms of nature of wards/units and working ranks, 139 full-time nurses who were working in the 400-bed private hospital for at least 6 months and provided direct nursing care were recruited in this study. Data were collected by employing a set of self-administered structured questionnaires, consisting of the Index of Work Satisfaction (job satisfaction), Anxiety-Stress Questionnaire (job stress), Michigan Organizational Assessment Questionnaire (intention to quit), and socio-demographic data. Results: With a response rate of 74.3%, the results of the 139 respondents showed that the nurses in the private hospital had an overall moderate level of satisfaction with their work and rated the professional status as the highest satisfied domain. The nurses also reported moderate levels of job stress and intention to quit. The nurses’ job satisfaction was negatively correlated with their job stress and intention to quit; whereas, the nurses’ job stress was positively correlated with their intention to quit. The nurses with older in age and more post-registration experience and/or working experience in the private hospital indicated a higher level of job satisfaction, particularly with ‘Pay’ and

  6. [Separation anxiety. Theoretical considerations].

    PubMed

    Blandin, N; Parquet, P J; Bailly, D

    1994-01-01

    The interest in separation anxiety is nowadays increasing: this disorder appearing during childhood may predispose to the occurrence of anxiety disorders (such as panic disorder and agoraphobia) and major depression into adulthood. Psychoanalytic theories differ on the nature of separation anxiety and its place in child development. For some authors, separation anxiety must be understood as resulting from the unconscious internal conflicts inherent in the individuation process and gradual attainment of autonomy. From this point of view, the fear of loss of mother by separation is not regarded as resulting from a real danger. However, Freud considers the primary experience of separation from protecting mother as the prototype situation of anxiety and compares the situations generating fear to separation experiences. For him, anxiety originates from two factors: the physiological fact is initiated at the time of birth but the primary traumatic situation is the separation from mother. This point of view may be compared with behavioral theories. Behavioral theories suggest that separation anxiety may be conditioned or learned from innate fears. In Freud's theory, the primary situation of anxiety resulting from the separation from mother plays a role comparable to innate fears. Grappling with the problem of separation anxiety, Bowlby emphasizes then the importance of the child's attachment to one person (mother or primary caregiver) and the fact that this attachment is instinctive. This point of view, based on the watch of infants, is akin to ethological theories on behaviour of non human primates. Bowlby especially shows that the reactions of infant separated from mother evolve on three stages: the phase of protestation which may constitute the prototype of adulthood anxiety, the phase of desperation which may be the prototype of depression, and the phase of detachment. He emphasizes so the role of early separations in the development of vulnerability to depression

  7. The effectiveness of a group cognitive-behavioural breathlessness intervention on health status, mood and hospital admissions in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Howard, Claire; Dupont, Simon; Haselden, Brigitte; Lynch, Johanna; Wills, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Non-pharmacological breathlessness interventions in lung cancer have proven beneficial. Breathlessness is also a major symptom in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study measured the effectiveness of a non-exercise-based four-week cognitive-behavioural breathlessness intervention, delivered in a group setting for elderly patients with severe COPD. The results of the one-year feasibility study are presented. Patients with COPD were asked to complete the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale six weeks before the intervention, at the start and end of the intervention and at six weeks follow-up. The multidisciplinary intervention used a cognitive-behavioural format to address understanding of COPD and medication, anxiety, panic and depression, activity pacing, relaxation, breathing retraining and goal-setting. Retrospective data on accident & emergency (A&E) attendances and length of hospital stay was collected six months before and six months after the intervention and the data compared to a matched waiting list control group. The results showed significant improvements in depression and health status. There was a non-significant improvement in anxiety. There was a significant reduction in A&E attendance and a non-significant reduction in length of hospital stay in the intervention group, compared to comparative increases in the control group, highlighting the cost-effectiveness of the intervention.

  8. Haemangioma family burden: creation of a specific questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Olivia; Méni, Cecile; Léauté-Labreze, Christine; Bodemer, Christine; Voisard, Jean-Jacques; Dufresne, Hélène; Brauchoux, Sébastien; Taieb, Charles

    2015-01-01

    To develop and validate a specific questionnaire to assess burden on families of children with infantile haemangioma (IH): the Haemangioma Family Burden questionnaire (HFB). Items were generated from a literature review and a verbatim report from parents. Subsequently, a study was implemented at the Necker Hospital and the Pellegrin Children's Hospital for psychometric analysis. The HFB was refined via item reduction according to inter-question correlations, consensus among experts and exploratory factor analysis. A 20-item questionnaire, grouped into 5 dimensions, was obtained. Construct validity was demonstrated and HFB showed good internal coherence (Cronbach's α: 0.93). The HFB was significantly correlated with the mental dimension of the Short-Form-12 (r = -0.75), and the Psychological General Well-Being Index (r = -0.61). HFB scores differed significantly according to the size and localization of the IH. A validated tool for assessing the burden on families of children with IH is now available.

  9. Reliability and validity of the Symptoms of Depression Questionnaire (SDQ)

    PubMed Central

    Pedrelli, Paola; Blais, Mark A.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Shelton, Richard C.; Walker, Rosemary S. W.; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Current measures for major depressive disorder focus primarily on the assessment of depressive symptoms, while often omitting other common features. However, the presence of comorbid features in the anxiety spectrum influences outcome and may effect treatment. More comprehensive measures of depression are needed that include the assessment of symptoms in the anxiety–depression spectrum. This study examines the reliability and validity of the Symptoms of Depression Questionnaire (SDQ), which assesses irritability, anger attacks, and anxiety symptoms together with the commonly considered symptoms of depression. Analysis of the factor structure of the SDQ identified 5 subscales, including one in the anxiety–depression spectrum, with adequate internal consistency and concurrent validity. The SDQ may be a valuable new tool to better characterize depression and identify and administer more targeted interventions. PMID:25275853

  10. Patient Health Questionnaire: Greek language validation and subscale factor structure.

    PubMed

    Karekla, Maria; Pilipenko, Nataliya; Feldman, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability, validity, and factor structure of the Greek translation of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in a sample of Cypriot, Greek-speaking university students. This is the first study to examine PHQ psychometric properties in Greek and to investigate the factor structure of the PHQ subscales. A total of 520 participants (73.9% women; M(Age) = 21.57; SD, 4.94) completed the PHQ and assessment tools used for convergent validity analysis. Patient Health Questionnaire was translated and culturally adapted according to international standards. Overall, PHQ subscales in Greek language demonstrated good internal consistency (mean Cronbach α = .75, P < .001) and convergent validity with the following: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Beck Depression Inventory, Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (panic disorder, somatization, bulimia, and binge eating), and Anxiety Sensitivity Index (overall mean, r = 0.52; P < .001). The relation between the PHQ subscale diagnoses and functional impairment, as assessed by the 12-item Health Survey 12, was comparable with the original validation results for all subscales except alcohol. The depression, alcohol, and anxiety subscales exhibited single-factor structures. Subscales assessing eating disorders, panic disorder, and somatization difficulties exhibited 2-, 3-, and 4-factor structures, respectively. Overall, PHQ subscales demonstrated good psychometric properties, with the exception of the subscale examining problematic alcohol use. Overall, PHQ demonstrates good reliability, validity, and appropriate factor structure in a Greek-speaking college population. Psychometric research is needed on the Greek PHQ in primary care settings.

  11. Validation of a Spanish version of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Revised version of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) was published in 2009. The aim of this study was to prepare a Spanish version, and to assess its psychometric properties in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Methods The FIQR was translated into Spanish and administered, along with the FIQ, the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), to 113 Spanish fibromyalgia patients. The administration of the Spanish FIQR was repeated a week later. Results The Spanish FIQR had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α was 0.91 and 0.95 at visits 1 and 2 respectively). The test-retest reliability was good for the FIQR total score and its function and symptoms domains (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.70), but modest for the overall impact domain (ICC = 0.51). Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) were also found between the FIQR and the FIQ scores, as well as between the FIQR scores and the remaining scales’ scores. Conclusions The Spanish version of the FIQR has a good internal consistency and our findings support its validity for assessing fibromyalgia patients. It might be a valid instrument to apply in clinical and investigational grounds. PMID:23915386

  12. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Anxiety in Children With Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Yousefi Chaijan, Parsa; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Abdolrazaghnejad, Ali; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimi Monfared, Mohsen; Fatemi Tabaei, Saghi

    2016-11-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Anxiety is the most common childhood psychiatric disorder. Based on studies, these disorders are more prevalent in some chronic disease. This study aimed at investigating the prevalence of ADHD and anxiety in children with malignancy and anxiety in their parents and comparing the results with those of the control group. One hundred, 3-15-year-old children with malignancy and 100 healthy children without malignancy or any chronic disease were included in this case-control study as case and control groups, respectively. Subjects were selected from children who were referred to the pediatric ward of Amir Kabir Hospital of Arak, Iran, in the form of simple probability and based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. ADHD and Anxiety were diagnosed by Conner's Parent Rating Scale-48 (CPRS-48) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) and were confirmed by psychologist consult. Data were analyzed by Student t-test in SPSS18. ADHD was observed in 23 cases (23%) with malignancy and 5 controls (5%) (P=0.001). In the case group, 57 children (57%) and 45 of their parents (45%) were suffering from anxiety while in the control group the figure was observed in 12 children (12%) and 11 of their parents (11%) (P=0.001). ADHD and anxiety are more common in children with malignancy as compared with children without malignancy and anxiety is also more common in their parents. Therefore, implementing interventions and psychiatric counseling are recommended for these children and their parents.

  13. The Effect of Nasal Packing Removal on Patients Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Caner; Aras, Hatice Imer

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to investigate the effect of removal of merocel nasal packings on patients anxiety after septoplasty using Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Material and methods: Total amount of 50 patients who had septoplasty operation in the Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of our hospital were enrolled to the study. Patients anxiety determined using Hamilton Anxiety Scale. The patients anxiety levels were measured before 24 hours before the operation (Group 1), 48 hours after operation before nasal packing removal (Group 2) and 60 minutes after nasal packing removal (Group 3). Results: Patients were evaluated according to the Hamilton Anxiety Scale; in Group 1 15.3 ± 7.2, 19.3 ± 7 in Group 2, 14.6 ± 6,5 in Group 3 was measured. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 3. There is a statistically significant difference on patients anxiety levels 48 hours after operation before nasal packing removal (p<0.001). There is an statistically significant increase of patients anxiety before packing removal. We recommend using soluble packings or sewing techniques without nasal packings after septoplasty because of patient comfort after operation. PMID:26843732

  14. Secondary School Students' Reading Anxiety in a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Sadiq Abdulwahed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Developing an appropriate competence in reading in English as a second language is a key factor for subsequent academic success. This study investigated second language reading anxiety of secondary school students. A questionnaire was distributed to 72 female students and focus-group interviews were conducted with 19 volunteer students. Overall…

  15. Parental Rearing, Attachment, and Social Anxiety in Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mothander, Pia Risholm; Wang, Mo

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated associations between perceived parental rearing, attachment, and social anxiety. 510 Chinese middle school students, aged 12 to 20 years, completed a set of questionnaires including "Egna Minnen Beträffande Uppfostran" for Children (EMBU-C), Inventory for Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) and…

  16. HIV/AIDS-Anxiety among Adolescent Students in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyewadume, Mary Adeola

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated the incidence of HIV/AIDS anxiety among students in Botswana. The sample comprised 240 randomly selected students from six schools in three districts in Botswana, with data collected via a questionnaire. Percentages and Chi-square were used to analyze the extent to which the students were anxious about HIV/AIDS and if…

  17. Effect of Music Therapy on Patients’ Anxiety and Hemodynamic Parameters During Coronary Angioplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Forooghy, Masoumeh; Mottahedian Tabrizi, Elaheh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Pishgoo, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: A cardiac catheterization laboratory can be a frightening environment and music can be a supportive source of environmental sound that stimulates and maintains relaxation. However, the results of studies are conflicting in this regard. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music therapy on patients’ anxiety and hemodynamic parameters during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial, conducted in the Catheterization Laboratory Unit of Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, Iran. A sample of 64 patients, who were planned to undergo coronary angioplasty, was recruited. Patients were randomly allocated to either the control or the experimental groups. In the experimental group, patients received a 20 to 40-minute music therapy intervention, consisting of light instrumental music albums by Johann Sebastian Bach and Mariko Makino. Patients in the control group received the routine care of the study setting, which consisted of no music therapy intervention. Study data were collected by a demographic questionnaire, the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory, and a data sheet for documenting hemodynamic parameters. Chi-square, independent-samples t tests, paired-samples t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results: Before the intervention, the study groups did not differ significantly in terms of anxiety level and hemodynamic parameters. Moreover, the differences between the two groups, regarding hemodynamic parameters, were not significant after the intervention (P > 0.05). However, the level of post-intervention anxiety in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group (32.06 ± 8.57 and 38.97 ± 12.77, respectively; P = 0.014). Compared with the baseline readings, the level of anxiety in the control group did not change significantly after the study (41.91 ± 9.88 vs. 38.97 ± 12.77; P = 0

  18. CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM IN ANXIETY AND ANXIETY DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Roy J.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are some of the commonest psychiatric disorders and anxiety commonly co-exists with other psychiatric conditions. Anxiety can also be a normal emotion. Thus, study of the neurobiological effects of anxiety is of considerable significance. In the normal brain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMR) serve as indices of brain function. CBF/CMR research is expected to provide new insight into alterations in brain function in anxiety disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Possible associations between stress I anxiety I panic and cerebral ischemia I stroke give additional significance to the effects of anxiety on CBF. With the advent of non-invasive techniques, study of CBF/CMR in anxiety disorders became easier. A large numbers of research reports are available on the effects of stress, anxiety and panic on CBF/CMR in normals and anxiety disorder patients. This article reviews the available human research on this topic. PMID:21743685

  19. Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Sonja; Vögele, Claus; Furka, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea Hans

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants' ages ranged from 16 to 49 years with a mean age of 21.1 years (SD = 3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the assumptions of the TMDA, in that NA was a non-specific predictor for both depression and anxiety whilst lack of positive affectivity (PA) was related to depression only. Unexpectedly, perseverative thinking had an effect on the dependency of negative and positive affectivity. Worry was a significant moderator for the path NA-anxiety. All other hypothesized associations were only marginally significant. Alternative pathways as well as methodological implications regarding similarities and differences of the two types of perseverative thinking are discussed.

  20. Suicidal Ideation of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents has One-Year Predictive Validity for Suicide Attempts in Girls Only

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingmei; Czyz, Ewa K.; Kerr, David C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians commonly incorporate adolescents’ self-reported suicidal ideation into formulations regarding adolescents’ risk for suicide. Data are limited, however, regarding the extent to which adolescent boys’ and girls’ reports of suicidal ideation have clinically significant predictive validity in terms of subsequent suicidal behavior. This study examined psychiatrically hospitalized adolescent boys’ and girls’ self-reported suicidal ideation as a predictor of suicide attempts during the first year following hospitalization. A total of 354 adolescents (97 boys; 257 girls; ages 13–17 years) hospitalized for acute suicide risk were evaluated at the time of hospitalization as well as 3, 6, and 12 months later. Study measures included the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Youth Self-Report, and Personal Experiences Screen Questionnaire. The main study outcome was presence and number of suicide attempt(s) in the year after hospitalization, measured by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Results indicated a significant interaction between suicidal ideation, assessed during first week of hospitalization, and gender for the prediction of subsequent suicide attempts. Suicidal ideation was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts for girls, but not boys. Baseline history of multiple suicide attempts was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts across genders. Results support the importance of empirically validating suicide risk assessment strategies separately for adolescent boys and girls. Among adolescent boys who have been hospitalized due to acute suicide risk, low levels of self-reported suicidal ideation may not be indicative of low risk for suicidal behavior following hospitalization. PMID:23996157

  1. Betaxolol in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Swartz, C M

    1998-03-01

    Betaxolol, a long-acting beta-adrenergic blocker that enters the central nervous system, was examined for therapeutic effects on the persistent anxiety of anxiety disorders. Prior studies of beta-blockers examined only agents that were short-acting or did not enter the brain. Betaxolol was administered to 31 patients in open trials. Of 13 outpatients, 11 had generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and 2 had adjustment disorder with anxiety. Five with GAD had concurrent panic disorder. Of 18 inpatients, 16 had GAD and 2 had adjustment disorder with anxiety. Betaxolol doses were increased until the patient responded or declined further dosage. Severity was rated on a 4-point global scale. Before betaxolol, all were moderately or severely ill. In all patients with panic disorder panic attacks stopped within 2 days (p<0.001). Anxiety decreased to no more than marginally ill in 85% of outpatients (p<0.0001) and all inpatients (p<0.0001). Betaxolol doses were usually 5 mg once or twice daily; four inpatients took 10 to 20 mg twice daily. In sum, betaxolol administration was rapidly followed by improvements that were easily noticed by the doctor, even in patients with longstanding anxiety and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Preliminary observations in posttraumatic stress disorder are similar.

  2. A community-based epidemiological study of health anxiety and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sing; Lam, Ivy M H; Kwok, Kathleen P S; Leung, Candi M C

    2014-03-01

    This community-based study examined the frequency of worry about personal health in respondents with and without generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and the impact of health anxiety on the disorder. A random community-based telephone survey of 5118 Chinese respondents aged 18-64 was conducted. A fully structured questionnaire covered the DSM-IV-TR criteria of GAD, major depressive episode (MDE), eight domains of worry, the seven-item Whiteley Index (WI-7), health service use, and socio-demographic information. Worry about personal health ranked fifth (75.6%) among eight domains of worries examined. GAD respondents with high level of health anxiety were significantly older, less educated, and had lower family income. High health anxiety significantly increased the occurrence of one-year MDE, previous persistent worry, previous persistent low mood, number of domains of worries, number of non-core DSM-IV-TR GAD symptoms, health service use, and mistrust of doctors. Health anxiety is common in GAD and may signify greater severity of the disorder.

  3. The MPC&A Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire is the instrument used for recording performance data on the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system at a nuclear facility. The performance information provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the MPC&A system. The goal for the questionnaire is to provide an accurate representation of the performance of the MPC&A system as it currently exists in the facility. Performance grades for all basic MPC&A functions should realistically reflect the actual level of performance at the time the survey is conducted. The questionnaire was developed after testing and benchmarking the material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) in the United States. The benchmarking exercise at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) proved extremely valuable for improving the content and quality of the early versions of the questionnaire. Members of the INL benchmark team identified many areas of the questionnaire where questions should be clarified and areas where additional questions should be incorporated. The questionnaire addresses all elements of the MC&A system. Specific parts pertain to the foundation for the facility's overall MPC&A system, and other parts pertain to the specific functions of the operational MPC&A system. The questionnaire includes performance metrics for each of the basic functions or tasks performed in the operational MPC&A system. All of those basic functions or tasks are represented as basic events in the MPC&A fault tree. Performance metrics are to be used during completion of the questionnaire to report what is actually being done in relation to what should be done in the performance of MPC&A functions.

  4. The Michigan data needs questionnaire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill-Rowley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The data needs questionnaire is an element in the project design study for the Michigan Resource Inventory Act and is aimed at gathering information on what inventory information is required by land use planners throughout the state. Analysis of questionnaire responses is discussed. Some information on current use categories was tabulated. The respondents selected a broad range of categories at all levels of detail. Those most frequently indicated were urban categories.

  5. Characteristics of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Patients With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Calleo, Jessica; Kunik, Mark E.; Reid, Dana; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Paukert, Amber; Regev, Tziona; Wilson, Nancy; Petersen, Nancy J.; Snow, A. Lynn; Stanley, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Background Overlap of cognitive and anxiety symptoms (i.e., difficulty concentrating, fatigue, restlessness) contributes to inconsistent, complicated assessment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)in persons with dementia. Methods Anxious dementia patients completed a psychiatric interview, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated, and the Rating for Anxiety in Dementia scale. Analyses to describe the 43 patients with and without GAD included the Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney two-sample test, Fisher’s exact test. Predictors of GAD diagnosis were identified using logistic regression. Results Those with GAD were more likely to be male, have less severe dementia and endorsed more worry, and anxiety compared to patients without GAD. Gender, muscle tension and fatigue differentiated those with GAD from those without GAD. Conclusions Although this study is limited by a small sample, it describes clinical characteristics of GAD in dementia, highlighting the importance of muscle tension and fatigue in recognizing GAD in persons with dementia. PMID:22062223

  6. Foreign and Second Language Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Elaine K.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility that anxiety interferes with language learning has long interested scholars, language teachers, and language learners themselves. It is intuitive that anxiety would inhibit the learning and/or production of a second language (L2). The important term in the last sentence is "anxiety". The concept of anxiety is itself multi-faceted,…

  7. Predictors of Anxiety towards Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, F.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between anxiety toward computers and variables trait anxiety, anxiety toward mathematics, perceived impact of computers on society, and experience in using computers were studied in a sample of 81 male and 81 female university students. All of these variables were found to influence anxiety toward computers, and a significant…

  8. Role of Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalkur, Chaithra; Sattur, Atul Prahlad; Guttal, Kruthika Satyabodh

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lichen planus is a psychosomatic disease. Higher frequency of psychiatric symptoms, poor quality of life, higher level of anxiety and neuroendocrine and immune dysregulations, all these factors, will enhance the exacerbation of the disease. Aims: The present study was to assess depression, anxiety and stress levels in patients with oral lichen planus. Materials and Methods: The psychometric evaluation using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS)-42 questionnaire was carried out, by the same investigator on all members of group 1 (Oral Lichen Planus) and group 2 (Control). DASS-42 questionnaire consists of 42 symptoms divided into three subscales of 14 items: Depression scale, anxiety scale, and stress scale. Statistical Analysis Used: The Student t test was used to determine statistical difference for both the groups and to evaluate for significant relationships among variables. Results: Psychological assessment using DASS-42 reveals lichen planus patients showed higher frequency of psychiatric co morbidities like depression, anxiety and stress compared to control group. Conclusions: This study has provided evidence that the DASS-42 questionnaire is internally consistent and valid measures of depression, anxiety, and stress. Psychiatric evaluation can be considered for patients with oral lichen planus with routine treatment protocols are recommended. DASS-42 Questionnaire can also be used to determine the level of anxiety, stress and depression in diseases of the oral mucosa like recurrent apthous stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome and TMD disorders. PMID:26538689

  9. Clinical Use of Virtual Reality Distraction System to Reduce Anxiety and Pain in Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  10. Clinical use of virtual reality distraction system to reduce anxiety and pain in dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Mark D; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2014-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety.

  11. Attentional processing of emotional material in types of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Fajkowska, Małgorzata; Domaradzka, Ewa; Wytykowska, Agata

    2017-03-08

    The present study was designed to address the hypothesis that differences and similarities in patterns of attentional processing in recently proposed types of anxiety and depression are connected with the dominant (reactive, regulative) function they play in stimulation processing and their structural components. Participants (N = 1247) filled out the Anxiety and Depression Questionnaire, which assesses types of anxiety and depression, and completed the Emotional Faces Attentional Test one week later. The obtained results confirmed our prediction and suggested that the proposed typology of anxiety and depression is valid in the adaptive meanings of both phenomena.

  12. Measuring Emotions in Students' Learning and Performance: The Achievement Emotions Questionnaire (AEQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Barchfeld, Petra; Perry, Raymond P.

    2011-01-01

    Aside from test anxiety scales, measurement instruments assessing students' achievement emotions are largely lacking. This article reports on the construction, reliability, internal validity, and external validity of the Achievement Emotions Questionnaire (AEQ) which is designed to assess various achievement emotions experienced by students in…

  13. Using a Speech Apprehension Questionnaire as a Tool to Reduce Students' Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablamowicz, Halina

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an activity that makes use of a questionnaire similar to a Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA) which elicit students' responses about their previous speaking experiences, their own definitions of anxiety and its causes, and their plans for future careers. This activity is aimed at helping students overcome…

  14. Factorial Invariance of the Questionnaire about Interpersonal Difficulties for Adolescents across Spanish and Chinese Adolescent Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingles, Candido J.; Marzo, Juan C.; Hidalgo, Maria D.; Zhou, Xinyue; Garcia-Fernandez, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The Questionnaire about Interpersonal Difficulties for Adolescents (QIDA) is a self-report instrument designed to measure adolescents' perceived interpersonal anxiety levels in a wide range of relationships with people of different ages, genders, levels of authority, and levels of intimacy and in several contexts: family, school, friends, opposite…

  15. The association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khiavi, Farzad Faraji; Dashti, Rezvan; Zergani, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Job satisfaction is one of the most challenging organizational concepts, and it is the basis of management policies to increase productivity and efficiency of the organization. The general health rate may affect job satisfaction in several ways. This study aimed to determine the association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods The study population of this cross-sectional research included 100 employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. The data collection instruments were the General Health Questionnaire (28-GHQ) and the Job Descriptive Index (JDI) questionnaire. The data were analyzed using Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient, independent samples t-test, and ANOVA statistical tests in SPSS software. Results The mean general health was calculated as 26.19 ± 11.04, which indicated a positive psychiatric condition. Job satisfaction with a mean score of 89.67 ± 23.3 was deemed to be relatively dissatisfied. A medium negative and significant association was observed between job satisfaction and general health and its subscales (physical health, anxiety, social, and depression). Conclusions General health subscales and job satisfaction are associated. Some actions must be planned to cope with the negative factors in general health in order to increase employees’ satisfaction in university educational hospitals. PMID:27280002

  16. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  17. Does Body Mass Index Influence Behavioral Regulations, Dispositional Flow and Social Physique Anxiety in Exercise Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Ersöz, Gözde; Altiparmak, Ersin; Aşçı, F. Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow, social physique anxiety of exercisers in terms of body mass index (BMI). 782 university students participated in this study. Dispositional Flow State Scale-2, Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, Social Physique Anxiety Scale and Physical Activity Stages of Change Questionnaire were administered to participants. After controlling for gender, analysis indicated significant differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow and social physique anxiety of exercise participants with regards to BMI. In summary, the findings demonstrate that normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons while underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Additionally, participants who are underweight had higher dispositional flow and lower social physique anxiety scores than other BMI classification. Key points Normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons. Underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Underweighted participants had higher dispositional flow. Underweighted participants have lower social physique anxiety scores than normal weighted, overweight and obese participants. PMID:27274667

  18. Anxiety in early pregnancy: prevalence and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Rubertsson, C; Hellström, J; Cross, M; Sydsjö, G

    2014-06-01

    Antenatal anxiety symptoms are not only a health problem for the expectant mother. Research has found that maternal anxiety may also have an impact on the developing baby. Therefore, it is important to estimate the prevalence of maternal anxiety and associated factors. The current study aims to estimate the prevalence of anxiety symptoms during the first trimester of pregnancy and to identify associated risk factors. Secondly, to investigate other factors associated with anxiety during early pregnancy including fear of childbirth and a preference for cesarean section. In a population-based community sample of 1,175 pregnant women, 916 women (78%) were investigated in the first trimester (gestation week 8-12). The Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS-A) was used to measure anxiety symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A scores≥8 during pregnancy) was 15.6% in early pregnancy. Women under 25 years of age were at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy (OR 2.6, CI 1.7-4.0). Women who reported a language other than Swedish as their native language (OR 4.2, CI 2.7-7.0), reported high school as their highest level of education (OR 1.6, CI 1.1-2.3), were unemployed (OR 3.5, CI 2.1-5.8), used nicotine before pregnancy (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.5), and had a self-reported psychiatric history of either depression (OR 3.8, CI 2.6-5.6) or anxiety (OR 5.2, CI 3.5-7.9) before their current pregnancy were all at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy. Anxiety symptoms during pregnancy increased the rate of fear of birth (OR 3.0, CI 1.9-4.7) and a preference for cesarean section (OR 1.7, CI 1.0-2.8). Caregivers should pay careful attention to history of mental illness to be able to identify women with symptoms of anxiety during early pregnancy. When presenting with symptoms of anxiety, the women might need counseling and or treatment in order to decrease her anxiety.

  19. Online gaming addiction: the role of sensation seeking, self-control, neuroticism, aggression, state anxiety, and trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Mehroof, Mehwash; Griffiths, Mark D

    2010-06-01

    Research into online gaming has steadily increased over the last decade, although relatively little research has examined the relationship between online gaming addiction and personality factors. This study examined the relationship between a number of personality traits (sensation seeking, self-control, aggression, neuroticism, state anxiety, and trait anxiety) and online gaming addiction. Data were collected over a 1-month period using an opportunity sample of 123 university students at an East Midlands university in the United Kingdom. Gamers completed all the online questionnaires. Results of a multiple linear regression indicated that five traits (neuroticism, sensation seeking, trait anxiety, state anxiety, and aggression) displayed significant associations with online gaming addiction. The study suggests that certain personality traits may be important in the acquisition, development, and maintenance of online gaming addiction, although further research is needed to replicate the findings of the present study.

  20. Shame and Anxiety Feelings of a Roma Population in Greece.

    PubMed

    Gouva, M; Mentis, M; Kotrotsiou, S; Paralikas, Th; Kotrotsiou, E

    2015-12-01

    Shame is a crucial issue for Roma. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the severity of shame and anxiety feelings in a Roma population living in Greece and assess the differentiation of these feelings between Roma men and women. A quota sample of 194 Roma adult men and women living in Southern Greece was retrieved. The Experiences of Shame Scale (ESS), the Other As Shamer Scale (OAS) and the Spielberg's State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaires were used. Women scored statistically significantly higher than men on ESS, whereas men scored higher on OAS scale (52.27 ± 16.91 vs 45.42 ± 9.98 and 35.93 ± 16.94 vs 30.87 ± 13.72 respectively). Women scored higher than men in both STAI subscales, however significant differences were observed only in State Anxiety scale (48.83 ± 9.26 vs 43.20 ± 9.81). OAS total score was inversely related to state anxiety, whereas ESS total score was positive related to trait anxiety, all correlations being significant at p < 0.05 level. Roma men and women exhibit high levels of shame and anxiety. Cultural, social and minority issues contribute to feelings of inferiority and anxiety experience.

  1. Metacognitive beliefs and processes in clinical anxiety in children.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen E; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has explored the role of metacognitive beliefs and processes in clinical anxiety in youth. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between metacognitions and anxiety in 7- to 12-year-old children with and without clinical anxiety disorders. A secondary aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the recently developed Metacognitions Questionnaire for Children (MCQ-C). The sample consisted of 83 children (60.2% female; Oceanian 71.1%), comprising 49 children with anxiety disorders and 34 nonclinical children. All children completed self-report measures of anxiety, emotional difficulties, and metacognitions. A subsample of 7- to 8-year-old participants was used to explore whether young children could wholly comprehend all items on the MCQ-C. Positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and cognitive monitoring were significantly correlated with anxiety and emotional difficulties. Clinical children endorsed significantly more negative and more positive metacognitive beliefs than nonclinical children. Each subscale of the MCQ-C had poor internal consistency. Support for the criterion and convergent validity of the MCQ-C was found. The results suggest that certain metacognitions play a role in clinical anxiety in children but that psychometrically and developmentally validated measures of these concepts in younger individuals are needed.

  2. Attachment anxiety is related to Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Farrar, William B; Malarkey, William B; Chen, Min; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-10-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whether attachment anxiety was related to the expression of a latent herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), when individuals were being tested for breast or colon cancer and approximately 1 year later. Participants (N=183) completed a standard attachment questionnaire and provided blood to assess EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titers. Individuals with more attachment anxiety had higher EBV VCA IgG antibody titers than those with less attachment anxiety. The strength of the association between attachment anxiety and antibody titers was the same at both assessments. This study is the first to show an association between latent herpesvirus reactivation and attachment anxiety. Because elevated herpesvirus antibody titers reflect poorer cellular immune system control over the latent virus, these data suggest that high attachment anxiety is associated with cellular immune dysregulation.

  3. Relationship between group cohesion and anxiety in soccer.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Carla Chicau; Cid, Luis; Silva, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Group cohesion in sport is a widely spread theme today. Research has found cohesion to be influenced by several individual and group components. Among the cognitive variables that relate to cohesion we found competitive anxiety. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between task cohesion (ATG-T, and GI-T) and competitive state anxiety (A-state), and also if there would be a relation between cohesion and self-confidence. Participants were 366 football players of both genders male and female, aged between 15 to 23 years old, from Portugal's championships. Cohesion was measured using the Portuguese version of the Group Environment Questionnaire, and to assess competitive anxiety, we used the Portuguese version of the Competition State Anxiety Inventory 2. Our results show that female athletes report experiencing more cognitive anxiety and less self-confidence than male athletes. Only cognitive anxiety relates in a significantly negative way with the perception of cohesion (GI-T e ATG-T) in the total number of participants and in male athletes. Relatively to the somatic anxiety, it only relates negatively with the perception of the integration of the group in the total number of participants and in the male gender.

  4. Association of parental self-esteem and expectations with adolescents' anxiety about career and education.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Seyed-Hossein; Mirzamani, Seyed-Mahmoud; Shahiri-Tabarestani, Mostafa

    2005-06-01

    The views of students in their last year of high school on the effects of parental expectations on students' anxiety about education and a career were studied with 214 boys and girls from six single-sex high schools. Participants were asked to reply to two questionnaires, the Educational and Career Anxiety Questionnaire and the Parent's Self-esteem and Expectancy Questionnaire as well as to respond to a personal informational form. Analysis yielded negative significance for relations between parental self-esteem and expectations and students' anxiety about education and career. Moreover, the study showed that adolescent girls had significantly higher self-esteem than boys. In addition, comparing adolescents' views by their fathers' education showed that fathers with high education were more likely to have children with high parental self-esteem and rational expectations and lower anxiety about education and careers than those whose fathers had only primary education.

  5. Anxiety Sensitivity Dimensions and Generalized Anxiety‏ ‏Severity: The ‎Mediating Role of Experiential Avoidance and Repetitive‏ ‏Negative Thinking‎ ‎.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhani, Parvaneh; Pourshahbaz, Abbas; Kami, Maryam; Mazidi, Mahdi; Abasi, Imaneh

    2016-07-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general ‎population. Several studies suggest that anxiety sensitivity is a vulnerability factor in generalized ‎anxiety severity. However, some other studies suggest that negative repetitive thinking and ‎experiential avoidance as response factors can explain this relationship. Therefore, this study ‎aimed to investigate the mediating role of experiential avoidance and negative repetitive thinking ‎in the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and generalized anxiety severity.‎ Method: This was a cross-sectional and correlational study. A sample of 475 university students was ‎selected through stratified sampling method. The participants completed Anxiety Sensitivity ‎Inventory-3, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II, Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire, and ‎Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation, multiple ‎regression analysis and path analysis.‎ Results: The results revealed a positive relationship between anxiety sensitivity, particularly cognitive ‎anxiety sensitivity, experiential avoidance, repetitive thinking and generalized anxiety severity. In ‎addition, findings showed that repetitive thinking, but not experiential avoidance, fully mediated ‎the relationship between cognitive anxiety sensitivity and generalized anxiety severity. α Level ‎was p<0.005.‎ Conclusion: Consistent with the trans-diagnostic hypothesis, anxiety sensitivity predicts generalized anxiety‏ ‏severity, but its effect is due to the generating repetitive negative thought.‎.

  6. Patient room lighting influences on sleep, appraisal and mood in hospitalized people.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Marina C; Geerdinck, Leonie M; Versteylen, Mathijs; Leffers, Pieter; Meekes, Gaby J B M; Herremans, Hannelore; de Ruyter, Boris; Bikker, Jan Willem; Kuijpers, Petra M J C; Schlangen, Luc J M

    2017-04-01

    Irregular 24 h light/dark cycles with night-time light exposure and a low amplitude are disruptive for sleep, mood and circadian rhythms. Nevertheless such lighting conditions are quite common in medical care facilities. A controlled clinical trial among 196 cardiology ward patients (mean age 66.5 ± 13.1 years SD) investigated how a patient room lighting intervention affects sleep, appraisal and mood across hospitalization. Patients were either assigned to a standardly-lit room or to a room with an interventional lighting system offering a dynamic 24 h light/dark cycle with low nocturnal light exposure and 2 h of bright light (1750 lux) during daytime. Measures included wrist actigraphy and questionnaires assessing alertness, sleep quality, anxiety, depression and lighting appraisal. The median length of hospitalization was 5 days in both study arms. Subjective scores on sleep, alertness, anxiety and depression did not differ between arms. Lighting appraisal in intervention rooms was better as compared to standardly-lit rooms, both in patients (P < 0.001) and staff (P < 0.005). Actigraphic sleep duration of patients improved by 5.9 min (95% CI: 0.6-11.2; P = 0.03 intervention × time effect) per hospitalization day with interventional lighting instead of standard lighting. After 5 days of hospitalization, sleep duration in the lighting intervention rooms increased by 29 min, or a relative 7.3%, as compared to standardly-lit rooms. A 24 h lighting system with enhanced daytime brightness and restricted nocturnal light exposure can improve some aspects of appraisal and objective sleep in hospital patients. More clinical research is needed to establish the best lighting strategy to promote healing and wellbeing within healthcare settings.

  7. Trait Anxiety and Final Degree Performance at the University of Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellanby, Jane; Zimdars, Anna

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 1,929 applicants to Oxford University, including measures of trait anxiety, behavioural response to examinations and to breakdown in relationships. 635 of these applicants were admitted to the university and of these, 383 also responded to a questionnaire administered 4 years later, just before their final…

  8. Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... serve as an "alarm system," alerting you to danger. For example, imagine coming home and finding a ... extra spark to help you get out of danger. In more normal but busy situations, anxiety can ...

  9. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 8- to 12-Month-Old Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Communication and Your 1- to 2- ... on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © ...

  10. Anxiety and ritualized speech.

    PubMed

    Lalljee, M; Cook, M

    1975-08-01

    The experiment examines the effects on a number of words that seem irrevelant to semantic communication. The Units of Ritualized Speech (URSs) considered are: 'I mean', 'in fact', 'really', 'sort of', 'well', and 'you know'. Two hypotheses are tested: (i) that URS rate will increase with anxiety; and (ii) that the speaker's preferred URS will increase with anxiety. Subjects were interviewed on topics they had previously rated as anxiety-provoking and non-anxiety-provoking. Hypothesis (i) was supported, but hypothesis (ii) was not. More specifically, the use of 'I mean' and 'well' increases when the speaker is anxious. Explanation for this is sought in the grammatical location of these two units. Sex differences in the use of URSs, correlations between URSs and their relationship to other forms of disfluency are also considered.

  11. Prevalence and Measurement of Anxiety in Samples of Patients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Easton, Katherine; Coventry, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Deaton, Christi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rates of anxiety in patients with heart failure (HF) vary widely, and not all assessment instruments used in this patient population are appropriate. It is timely to consolidate the evidence base and establish the prevalence and variance of anxiety in HF samples. Methods: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression were conducted to identify the prevalence, variance, and measurement of anxiety in patients with HF. Results: A total of 14,367 citations were identified, with 73 studies meeting inclusion criteria. A random effects pooled prevalence of 13.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.25%–16.86%) for anxiety disorders, 28.79% (95% CI, 23.30%–34.29) for probable clinically significant anxiety, and 55.5% (95% CI, 48.08%–62.83%) for elevated symptoms of anxiety was identified. Rates of anxiety were highest when measured using the Brief Symptom Scale-Anxiety scale (72.3%) and lowest when measured using the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 (6.3%). Conclusion: Many patients with HF would benefit if screened for anxiety and treated. The conceptualization and measurement of anxiety accounted for most variance in prevalence rates. The Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 or the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale appear to be the most appropriate instruments for this clinical population, with evidence to suggest they can discriminate between depression and anxiety, omit somatic items that may contaminate identification of anxiety in a population with physical comorbidities, and provide thresholds with which to differentiate patients and target treatments. Although there are limitations with the collation of diverse measurement methods, the current review provides researchers and clinicians with a more granular knowledge of prevalence estimates of anxiety in a population of HF patients. PMID:25930162

  12. The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety and Depression of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jasemi, Madineh; Aazami, Sanaz; Zabihi, Roghaieh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Cancer patients often suffer from anxiety and depression. Various methods are used to alleviate anxiety and depression, but most of them have side effects. Music therapy can be used as a noninvasive method to reduce anxiety and depression. This study aimed to examine the effect of music therapy on anxiety and depression in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted attaching hospitals in Urmia city. A total number of sixty patients with depression and anxiety were recruited using random sampling method and divided into two groups of control and intervention. Patients in intervention group listened to light music at least 20 min per day for 3 days. The degree of patients’ anxiety and depression was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at baseline and 3 days after music therapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using t-test, Pearson, and ANOVA tests. Results: The results showed no significant differences between demographic variable of intervention and control groups. Our findings indicated a significant decrease in the level of depression and anxiety among intervention group. There were significant relationships between anxiety, depression, and sex (P < 0.001, r = 0.42) as well as education (P = 0.003, r = 0.37). Conclusion: This study revealed positive effects of music therapy on decreasing level of depression and anxiety in patients with cancer. Therefore, it is recommended to include music therapy in the nursing care. PMID:27803568

  13. Attentional Bias in Children with Asthma with and without Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dudeney, Joanne; Sharpe, Louise; Sicouri, Gemma; Lorimer, Sarah; Dear, Blake F; Jaffe, Adam; Selvadurai, Hiran; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-01-09

    Children with asthma have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders, however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confer vulnerability for anxiety in this population. This study investigated whether children with asthma and anxiety disorders display attentional biases towards threatening stimuli, similar to what has been seen in children with anxiety disorders more generally. We also examined the relationships between attentional biases and anxiety symptomatology and asthma control for children with asthma. Ninety-three children, aged 8-13, took part in the study and were recruited into one of four conditions (asthma/anxiety, asthma, anxiety, control). Asthma was medically confirmed and anxiety was assessed through clinical interview. We used self- and parent-report questionnaires to measure child asthma (ATAQ) and anxiety (SCAS, CASI) variables. Participants completed a visual dot-probe task designed to measure attentional bias towards two types of stimuli: asthma related words and general threat words, as well as tasks to assess reading ability and attentional control. Results showed that attentional biases did not differ between the groups, although children with anxiety disorders displayed poorer attentional control. A significant correlation was found between poor asthma control and an attentional bias of asthma stimuli. While we found no evidence that anxiety disorders in children with asthma were associated with threat- or asthma-related attentional biases, preliminary evidence suggested that children with poor asthma control displayed biases towards asthma-specific stimuli. Future research is needed to explore whether these attentional biases are adaptive.

  14. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Larzelere, Michele M; Wiseman, Pamela

    2002-06-01

    Evidence for alternative treatments for depression, anxiety, and insomnia are reviewed in this article. Treatment of depression with St. John's wort, L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, S-adenosylmethionine, dehydroepiandosterone, folate, exercise, acupuncture, and meditation are examined. Evidence for the efficacy of kava kava, exercise, relaxation therapies, and acupuncture in treatment anxiety is reviewed. The use of valerian, melatonin, chamomile, passionflower, exercise, acupuncture, and behavioral therapies (i.e., sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation, and sleep hygiene) for insomnia is discussed.

  15. Is there an association between anxiety/depression and temporomandibular disorders in college students?

    PubMed Central

    CALIXTRE, Letícia Bojikian; GRÜNINGER, Bruno Leonardo da Silva; CHAVES, Thais Cristina; de OLIVEIRA, Ana Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the high incidence of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in the population aged 15-30 years and the fact that students are exposed to stressful psychosocial factors, the purposes of this study were: to verify clinical symptoms and jaw functionality in college students with TMD according to the anxiety/depression (A/D) level and to evaluate the correlation between A/D and functionality, maximum mouth opening (MMO) and pain and muscle activity. Material and Methods Nineteen students with TMD diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders underwent two assessments during an academic semester. The evaluations were based on questionnaires (MFIQ - Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire; HADS - Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), clinical measurements (MMO without pain, MMO and assisted MMO; palpation of joint and masticatory muscles), and electromyography. The HADS scores obtained in the two assessments were used to classify all data as either "high" or "low" A/D. Data normality, differences and correlations were tested with the Shapiro-Wilk test, Student's t-test (or the Wilcoxon test), and Spearman test, respectively. The alpha level was set at 0.05. Results None of the clinical variables were significantly different when comparing low and high A/D data. In low A/D there was a significant correlation between HADS score and: MFIQ (P=0.005, r=0.61), and MMO without pain (P=0.01, r=-0.55). Conclusions Variation in A/D level did not change clinical symptoms or jaw functionality in college students with TMD. Apparently, there is a correlation between TMJ functionality and A/D level, which should be further investigated, taking into account the source of the TMD and including subjects with greater functional limitation. PMID:24626244

  16. Self-statements of test-anxious children: thought-listing and questionnaire approaches.

    PubMed

    Prins, P J; Hanewald, G J

    1997-06-01

    Two methods of assessing cognition in high, moderate, and low test-anxious children, thought listing and self-statement questionnaire approaches, were investigated under naturalistic test-taking conditions. The amount of cognition, its content, and its relation to level of anxiety and task performance were examined. States of mind (SOM) analyses were performed. Furthermore, the comparability of findings from both methods was examined. Results showed that, relative to the questionnaire method, the thought-listing procedure underestimated positive and coping cognition. The benefits of the questionnaire approach were seen in the power of its scores to predict task performance. Implications for cognitive assessment and treatment of anxious children are discussed.

  17. Anger Feelings and Anger Expression as a Mediator of the Effects of Witnessing Family Violence on Anxiety and Depression in Japanese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Toshinori; Hasui, Chieko

    2006-01-01

    The effects of anger feelings (rated by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory) and witnessing family violence on anxiety and depression (rated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were examined in 457 junior high school students. Anxiety and depression scores were correlated with frequencies of witnessing family violence. In a…

  18. Screening Tools for Anxiety in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Litster, Brittany; Fiest, Kirsten M.; Patten, Scott B.; Fisk, John D.; Walker, John R.; Graff, Lesley A.; Bolton, James M.; Sareen, Jitender; Marriott, James J.; Berrigan, Lindsay I.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Zarychanski, Ryan; Singer, Alexander; Hitchon, Carol A.; Peschken, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is prevalent in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Screening measures are used to identify symptoms of anxiety, but the optimal measure to screen for anxiety disorders in MS has not been established. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES Full Text, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, and Scopus databases from database inception until August 7, 2015. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts and full-text reports for study inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We included studies that evaluated the criterion validity of anxiety screening tools when measuring anxiety in individuals with well-documented MS, as measured by sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Results: Of the 3181 abstracts screened, 18 articles were reviewed in full text, of which 4 met the inclusion criteria. The criterion validity of three screening tools was assessed: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale–Anxiety (HADS-A), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7). The HADS-A was validated against the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) interview, and the BAI. The BAI was validated against the SCAN, and the GAD-7 was validated against the HADS-A. The HADS-A had higher measures of sensitivity and specificity than did the BAI and the GAD-7. Conclusions: Based on this small sample, the HADS-A shows promise as an applicable measure for people with MS. Screening scales used to identify anxiety in MS must be validated against appropriate reference standards. PMID:27999521

  19. Anxiety and depression symptoms in recurrent painful renal lithiasis colic.

    PubMed

    Diniz, D H M P; Blay, S L; Schor, N

    2007-07-01

    Several studies have reported that symptoms of anxiety and depression are significantly associated with diseases characterized by painful crises. However, there is little information about the psychological aspects of recurrent painful episodes of renal stone disease. Our objective was to evaluate the association of symptoms of anxiety, depression and recurrent painful renal colic in a case-control study involving 64 subjects (32 cases/32 controls) matched for age and sex. Cases were outpatients with a confirmed diagnosis of nephrolithiasis as per their case history, physical examination, image examination and other laboratory exams. Patients had a history of at least two episodes within a 3-year period, and were currently in an intercrisis interval. The control group consisted of subjects seen at the Ophthalmology Outpatient Clinic of this University Hospital with only eye refraction symptoms, and no other associated disease. Symptoms of anxiety were evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and symptoms of depression by the Beck Depression Inventory. Statistically significant differences were observed between patients with nephrolithiasis and controls for anxiety state (P = 0.001), anxiety trait (P = 0.005) and symptoms of depression (odds ratio = 3.74; 95%CI = 1.31-10.62). The Beck Depression Inventory showed 34.5% of respondents with moderate and 6% with severe levels of depression. There was a significant linear correlation between symptoms of anxiety (P = 0.002) and depression (P < 0.001) and the number of recurrent colic episodes (anxiety-state: P = 0.016 and anxiety-trait: P < 0.001). These data suggest an association between recurrent renal colic and symptoms of both anxiety and depression.

  20. Effectiveness of a Combined Dance and Relaxation Intervention on Reducing Anxiety and Depression and Improving Quality of Life among the Cognitively Impaired Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Dina; Ramli, Ayiesah; Shahar, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cognitive impairment is a common problem among the elderly and is believed to be a precursor to dementia. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of a combined dance and relaxation intervention as compared to relaxation alone in reducing anxiety and depression levels and improving quality of life (QOL) and cognitive function among the cognitively impaired elderly. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted between May and December 2013 in Peninsular Malaysia. Subjects from four government residential homes for older adults aged ≥60 years with mild to moderate cognitive function as assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination were included in the study. Subjects were divided into an intervention group and a control group; the former participated in a combined poco-poco dance and relaxation intervention whilst the latter participated in relaxation exercises only. Both groups participated in two sessions per week for six weeks. Anxiety and depression were self-assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and QOL was self-assessed using the Quality of Life in Alzheimer’s Disease questionnaire. Results: A total of 84 elderly subjects were included in the study; 44 were in the intervention group and 40 were in the control group. When compared to control subjects, those in the intervention group showed significantly decreased anxiety (P <0.001) and depression (P <0.001) levels as well as improved QOL (P <0.001) and cognitive impairment (P <0.001). Conclusion: Dance as a form of participation-based physical exercise was found to reduce anxiety and depression levels and improve QOL and cognitive function among the studied sample of cognitively impaired elderly subjects in Malaysia. PMID:26909213

  1. The comparison of severity and prevalence of major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder and eating disorders before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Matini, Diana; Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Ehtesham, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity is highly co-morbid with psychiatric disorders and may have effect on the quality of life. This study aimed to compare severity and prevalence rate of depression, anxiety and eating disorders and quality of life in severe obese patients before and 6 months after the gastric bypass surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study which conducted at Hazarat Rasool-Akram Hospital in Tehran, 2012. Questionnaires included demographic questions, eating disorder Inventory (EDI), The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) for quality of life, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and anxiety (HRSA). Participants were interviewed two times, before surgery and six months after, to determine changes of the disorders. Patients with the history of bariatric surgery, individuals younger than 18 year old and those who disagreed to join the study were excluded. Results: In assessing the eating disorder inventory-3rd version (EDI-3), Significant reduction in drive for thinness (DT) (p= 0.010), bulimia (B) (p< 0.0001) and body dissatisfaction mean (BD) (0.038) was observed at the 6-month follow-up. At this period, the mean for physical component summary of SF36, significantly decreased (p< 0.0001), however mental component summary did not significantly differ (p= 0.368); Also differences in severity of anxiety (p= 0.852), and depression in HRSD (p= 0.311), prevalence of depression (p= 0.189) and prevalence of general anxiety disorder according to SCID (p=0.167) did not differ significantly, at this period. Conclusion: Although weight loss after bariatric surgery improved the physical component of quality of life, this improvement did not affect the mental aspect of life, depression and anxiety and it seems that these psychopathologies need attention and treatment in addition to weight loss treatments in patients with obesity. PMID:25664310

  2. [Effects of the preparation on anxiety before bronchoscopy].

    PubMed

    Léophonte, P; Delon, S; Dalbiès, S; Fontes-Carrère, M; de Carvalho, E G; Lepage, S

    2000-03-01

    In their daily practice, the nurses note the patients' anxiety when they are in hospital for diagnosis exams. Considering this observation, we wanted to assess the potential benefits provided by the behavioural and relational techniques, such as sophrology, maintenance of the help relation, visualization-relaxation. In order to carry out this survey, we adopted the model of Betty NEUMAN, who relies on the concept of homeostasis and on the stress theory of Hans Seyle. The measurement of anxiety by the STAI (State Trait Anxiety Inventory), a scale worked out by SPIELBERGER, enabled us to prove that these relational tools, used by the nurses, made it possible for the patients to better mobilize their adjustment or coping strategies. Recommendations concerning the management of anxiety were set out as not to trigger an attitude of vigilant coping.

  3. The Influence of Anxiety Sensitivity on a Wish to Die in Complicated Grief.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amanda W; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Bui, Eric; Shah, Riva; Charney, Meredith E; Mauro, Christine; Shear, M Katherine; Simon, Naomi M

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with complicated grief are at elevated risk of suicidal thoughts. Anxiety sensitivity has recently emerged as a risk factor of suicide. This study aimed to investigate a possible association between anxiety sensitivity and a wish to die in individuals with complicated grief. Participants were evaluated for participation in a treatment study and completed an ancillary questionnaire-based study. Participants were 51 bereaved adults evaluated (age: mean, 54 [SD, 13.6] years; 78% [n = 40] women). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and a wish to die. Overall, anxiety sensitivity was associated with a wish to die at the level of a medium effect size, although it did not reach statistical significance. The anxiety sensitivity social concerns subscale was significantly associated with a wish to die. These findings add to a growing literature implicating anxiety sensitivity in reporting a wish to die.

  4. College Student Services Accreditation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1979-01-01

    This questionnaire is intended for use as one aspect in accrediting the "Student Personnel Services" which an institution of higher learning provides for students. Areas in question include personal development, health fostering, vocational preparation, effective personalized learning, economic viability, transpersonal offerings, and satisfactory…

  5. Diet History Questionnaire: Canadian Version

    Cancer.gov

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  6. [Separation anxiety and panic disorder].

    PubMed

    Seguí, J; Salvador, L; Canet, J; Márquez, M; Ortíz, M; García, L

    1998-01-01

    History od separation anxiety was investigated in several psychiatryc disorders and in 150 patients with panic disorder following DSM III-R criteria. Separation anxiety was reported by 15.3% of patients with panic disorder, 3.3% of the healthy control group, 13.3% of patients with major depression, 16.7% with dystymia, 13.3% with generalized anxiety and 33.3% with social phobia (p < 0.001). Separation anxiety is thus considered a common predisposing factor of anxiety and depressive disorders. Panic disorder patients with a history of separation anxiety had an earlier age at panic onset and greater comorbidity with social phobia and agoraphobia.

  7. The Selective Mutism Questionnaire: Measurement Structure and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Chavira, Denise A.; Hitchcock, Carla A.; Roesch, Scott C.; Shipon-Blum, Elisa; Stein, Murray B.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the 17-item Selective Mutism Questionnaire. Method Diagnostic interviews were administered via telephone to 102 parents of children identified with selective mutism (SM) and 43 parents of children without SM from varying U.S. geographic regions. Children were between the ages of 3 and 11 inclusive and comprised 58% girls and 42% boys. SM diagnoses were determined using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children - Parent Version (ADIS-C/P); SM severity was assessed using the 17-item Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ); and behavioral and affective symptoms were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to investigate the dimensionality of the SMQ and a modified parallel analysis procedure was used to confirm EFA results. Internal consistency, construct validity, and incremental validity were also examined. Results The EFA yielded a 13-item solution consisting of three factors: a) Social Situations Outside of School, b) School Situations, and c) Home and Family Situations. Internal consistency of SMQ factors and total scale ranged from moderate to high. Convergent and incremental validity were also well supported. Conclusions Measure structure findings are consistent with the 3-factor solution found in a previous psychometric evaluation of the SMQ. Results also suggest that the SMQ provides useful and unique information in the prediction of SM phenomenon beyond other child anxiety measures. PMID:18698268

  8. A Rating Scale Model for a Scale of Test Anxiety in Italy. Working Paper N. 11/2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliandri, Donatella; Cardone, Michele; Muzzioli, Paola; Romiti, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate a test anxiety scale for Italian students. The scale is part of a questionnaire administered after the students' annual competence test by the National Institute for the Educational Evaluation of Instruction and Training (INVALSI). The aim of the scale is to explore the anxiety levels of Italian students…

  9. Evolving with modern technology: Impact of incorporating audiovisual aids in preanesthetic checkup clinics on patient education and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Haramritpal; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Amandeep; Sharda, Gagandeep; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Perioperative stress is an often ignored commonly occurring phenomenon. Little or no prior knowledge of anesthesia techniques can increase this significantly. Patients awaiting surgery may experience high level of anxiety. Preoperative visit is an ideal time to educate patients about anesthesia and address these fears. The present study evaluates two different approaches, i.e., standard interview versus informative audiovisual presentation with standard interview on information gain (IG) and its impact on patient anxiety during preoperative visit. Settings and Design: This prospective, double-blind, randomized study was conducted in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in rural India over 2 months. Materials and Methods: This prospective, double-blind, randomized study was carried out among 200 American Society of Anesthesiologist Grade I and II patients in the age group 18–65 years scheduled to undergo elective surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were allocated to either one of the two equal-sized groups, Group A and Group B. Baseline anxiety and information desire component was assessed using Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale for both the groups. Group A patients received preanesthetic interview with the anesthesiologist and were reassessed. Group B patients were shown a short audiovisual presentation about operation theater and anesthesia procedure followed by preanesthetic interview and were also reassessed. In addition, patient satisfaction score (PSS) and IG was assessed at the end of preanesthetic visit using standard questionnaire. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. Nonparametric tests such as Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Patient's IG was significantly more in Group B (5.43 ± 0.55) as compared to Group A (4.41 ± 0.922) (P < 0.001). There was

  10. Anxiety and DSM-5

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The DSM-5 process, and the publication of DSM-5 in 2013, have had a considerable impact on the classification of anxiety disorders. Major changes included the reorganization of the chapter structure, individual groupings of disorders within each chapter from a life span viewpoint, and the use of specifiers. The DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorders does not include obsessive-compulsive disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. The chapter itself now reflects a developmental approach. The text of each disorder has been enhanced with short sections on development and course, risk and prognostic factors, etc. It is expected that the reformulation of anxiety disorders in DSM-5 will lead to greater precision in a variety of ways, as illustrated in the papers in this issue of Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience. In summary, these changes in the way we classify anxiety disorders reflect our best view on the clinical empirical data and should prove useful in the assessment of specific anxiety disorders. PMID:26487805

  11. Strategies and performance in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Madorrán García, Cristina; de Val Pardo, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Today, more than ever in the past, the variables within the health care environment (demand, costs, system deregulation) are undergoing such rapid change that hospital administrators are finding it necessary to develop and implement competitive strategies in order to survive in the increasingly competitive hospital environment. The primary aim of this paper is to answer the following question: Is it possible to transfer strategic management research from other sectors into the hospital industry? The first objective was to identify strategies in hospital management. A questionnaire was designed and sent to hospital CEOs and the data extracted were used to construct the variables needed to identify strategies and perform the subsequent analyses. The second aim was to try to identify groups of organizations using similar strategies and, finally, analyse the impact of these on hospital performance.

  12. An inquiry - aesthetics of art in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gates, Jillian

    2008-09-01

    Historically, art has served a significant purpose within hospital waiting rooms. However, in recent times we have experienced cuts in funding and less interest in improving the aesthetic of art displayed in Australian hospitals. This article briefly discusses the history of art in hospitals and explores a methodology for researching the preference of Australian patients today. Potentially, Australians waiting in hospitals and medical clinics could benefit from art works that reflect their preferences; this may help to ease the pain, anxiety, and boredom of waiting.

  13. Anxiety, automatic negative thoughts, and unconditional self-acceptance in rheumatoid arthritis: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Paloș, Ramona; Vîșcu, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This research was carried out in two stages: the objectives of the first stage were (1) to identify the existing relationships between the level of anxiety, the frequency of automatic negative thoughts, and unconditional self-acceptance and (2) to capture the existing differences regarding these variables between people diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and those with no such medical history. Methods. The sample made up of 50 subjects filled out the following three questionnaires: the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire, and the Unconditional Self-Acceptance Questionnaire. Results. Psychological anxiety is positively correlated with automatic negative thoughts, while unconditional self-acceptance is negatively correlated with both psychological anxiety and somatic anxiety as well as with automatic negative thoughts. All studied variables were significantly different in rheumatoid arthritis as compared to the control population. Conclusions. The results showed the presence to a greater extent of anxiety and automatic negative thoughts, along with reduced unconditional self-acceptance among people with rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention on these variables through support and counseling can lead to reducing anxiety and depression, to altering the coping styles, and, implicitly, to improving the patients' quality of life.

  14. Using food to soothe: Maternal attachment anxiety is associated with child emotional eating.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Charlotte A; Christiansen, Paul; Wilkinson, Laura L

    2016-04-01

    Attachment anxiety (fear of abandonment) is associated with disinhibited eating in adults. Both maternal disinhibited eating and use of emotional feedings strategies are associated with emotional eating in children. On this basis, the current study sought to determine whether attachment anxiety is an underlying maternal characteristic that predicts parental reports of child emotional over-eating via its effects on maternal disinhibited eating and emotional feeding. Mothers of a preadolescent child (N = 116) completed an internet-delivered questionnaire. Maternal attachment anxiety and dietary disinhibition were assessed by the Experiences in Close Relationships questionnaire and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, respectively. The Parental Feeding Strategies Questionnaire and the Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire were used to quantify emotional feeding and child emotional over-eating, respectively. Bias-corrected bootstrapping indicated a significant direct effect of maternal attachment anxiety on child emotional over-eating (i.e., controlling for maternal disinhibited eating and emotional feeding). There was also a significant indirect effect of maternal attachment anxiety on child emotional over-eating via emotional feeding strategies. In a subsequent model to investigate bi-directional relationships, the direct effect of maternal attachment anxiety on emotional feeding strategies was not statistically significant after controlling for child emotional over-eating. There was, however, a significant indirect effect of maternal attachment anxiety on emotional feeding strategies via child emotional over-eating. These findings highlight the influence of maternal attachment anxiety on parental reports of aberrant eating behaviour in children. While this may be partly due to use of emotional feeding strategies, there is stronger evidence for a "child-responsive" model whereby anxiously-attached mothers use these feeding practices in response to perceived

  15. Fear of clowns in hospitalized children: prospective experience.

    PubMed

    Meiri, Noam; Schnapp, Zeev; Ankri, Amichi; Nahmias, Itay; Raviv, Amnon; Sagi, Omer; Hamad Saied, Mohamad; Konopnicki, Muriel; Pillar, Giora

    2017-02-01

    Medical clowns (MC) have become an integral part of the pediatric staff of hospital wards. While several studies have demonstrated the huge benefits of MC, there are almost no data regarding fear of clowns, a known phenomenon that means an irrational fear of clowns. In the current study, we sought to examine the prevalence of fear of clowns in pediatrics wards, and to characterize the affected children. The clinical work of three certified MCs was prospectively assessed. Every child with fear of clowns was noted, data were retrieved from the medical records, and the parents/child completed a specific questionnaire with a research assistant. Fear of clowns was defined as crying, anxiety response or effort to avoid contact with the MCs in small children, while in older children, it was determined if the child either reported fear of MCs or made actions to avoid clowns' intervention. A total of 1160 children participated in the study. All were hospitalized in the department of pediatrics or the pediatric emergency medicine department at Carmel Medical Center, and were exposed to a MC intervention session. Of the 1160 children, 14 children experienced fear of clowns (1.2%). The average age of children who experienced fear of clowns was 3.5 years (range 1-15). Interestingly, most of the children demonstrating fear of clowns were girls (12 out of 14, 85.7%). We found no association between fear of clowns and specific diagnosis, fever, clinical appearance, religion, or ethnicity.

  16. The course of childhood anxiety symptoms: developmental trajectories and child-related factors in normal children.

    PubMed

    Broeren, Suzanne; Muris, Peter; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Baker, Jess R

    2013-01-01

    This three-wave longitudinal study explored developmental trajectories for various types of childhood anxiety symptoms (i.e., specific fears, social anxiety, generalized anxiety, and separation anxiety) and examined how these trajectories were associated with several factors thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of anxiety. Parents of a community sample of 224 children aged 4 to 11 years repeatedly completed a standardized questionnaire of anxiety symptoms during a 2-year period. At Time 1, parents also filled out scales for measuring children's level of behavioral inhibition (BI), internalizing and externalizing symptoms, and prosocial behaviors, while an interview was conducted with children to assess Theory-of-Mind (TOM) ability. Growth Mixture Modeling identified multiple developmental trajectories in childhood anxiety symptoms of which the 'stable-low' or 'stable-medium' reflected the normative trajectories. Further, multinomial regression analyses indicated that the higher developmental trajectories of anxiety were associated with higher levels of BI and internalizing symptoms at Time 1. In sum, results show heterogeneity in the development of anxiety symptoms and underline the importance of early prevention programs for children at high risk for developing an anxiety disorder.

  17. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  18. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dahl, V; Hagen, I E; Raeder, J C

    1998-04-30

    We report the results of a questionnaire sent to anaesthetists and midwives on the use of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Norwegian hospitals in 1996. 95% of the 49 hospitals involved responded to the questionnaire, representing a total of 56,884 births. The use of epidural analgesia in labour varied from 0 to 25% in the different hospitals with a mean value of 15%. Epidural analgesia was much more widely used in university and regional hospitals than in local hospitals (p < 0.001). Five of the local hospitals did not offer epidural analgesia during labour at all. The combination of low-dose local anaesthetic and an opioid (either sufentanil or fentanyl) had not been introduced in nine of the hospitals (20%). The optimal use of epidural analgesia to relieve labour pain was judged to be more frequent by the anaesthetists than by the midwives (19% versus 11%, p < 0.01). In response to what factors limited the frequency of epidural analgesia, the anaesthetists specified factors related to the attitude of the midwife, and the midwives specified factors related to the anaesthetist. Only five of the hospitals provided written information on the various analgesic methods that could be employed during labour. The majority of midwives considered the analgesic methods employed on their maternity ward to be good or excellent. The frequency of Caesarean section was 12%; spinal anaesthesia was used in 55%, epidural anaesthesia in 17%, and general anaesthesia in 28% of the cases.

  19. Historical aspects of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Sims, A

    1988-01-01

    Although the syndromes of anxiety have only been recognized this century, the belief that the emotion of fearful apprehension could cause physical illness has a much longer history. James Vere wrote his book entitled "A physical and moral enquiry into the causes of that internal restlessness and disorder in man which has been the complaint of all ages" in 1778. The earliest accounts of phobia, as anxiety associated with specific circumstances have been ascribed to two cases from Hippocrates, whilst one of the earliest accounts in the English language may be that of William Shakespeare in The Merchant of Venice describing a supposed phobia for cats. Robert Burton (1621) described various anxiety disorders in classical detail in his 'Anatomy of Melancholy'.

  20. Statistics Anxiety, State Anxiety during an Examination, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai; Freudenthaler, H. Harald; Arendasy, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: A large proportion of students identify statistics courses as the most anxiety-inducing courses in their curriculum. Many students feel impaired by feelings of state anxiety in the examination and therefore probably show lower achievements. Aims: The study investigates how statistics anxiety, attitudes (e.g., interest, mathematical…

  1. Anxiety-Expectation Mediation Model of Library Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Qun G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    This study presents a test of the Anxiety-Expectation Mediation (AEM) model of library anxiety. The AEM model contains variables that are directly or indirectly related to information search performance, as measured by students' scores on their research proposals. This model posits that library anxiety and self-perception serve as factors that…

  2. Development of the Geop-Pain questionnaire for multidisciplinary assessment of pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su-Hwan; Lee, Mi-Soon; Koo, Bon-Sung; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Chae, Won Seok; Jin, Hee Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Yong-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the multidisciplinary aspects of pain, various self-rating questionnaires have been developed, but there have not been sufficient relevant studies on this topic in South Korea. The aim of this study was to develop a new pain sensitivity-related questionnaire in the Korean language that would be simple and would well reflect Koreans' senses. Methods A new pain assessment questionnaire was developed through a pre-survey on "geop", which is the Korean word expressing fear, anxiety, or catastrophizing. We named the new assessment questionnaire the Geop-Pain Questionnaire (GPQ). The GPQ was composed of 15 items divided into three categories and rated on a 5-point scale. As a preliminary study, internal consistency and test-retest reliability analyses were conducted. Subsequently, 109 individuals completed the GPQ along with three pain-related questionnaires translated into Korean (Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire [PSQ], Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale [PASS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]), and the correlations were analyzed. Results All items in the GPQ showed appropriate internal consistency, and the test-retest reliability analysis showed no statistically significant differences. The correlations between the GPQ and the existing questionnaires revealed that the GPQ scores had mid-positive correlations with the PSQ scores and strong positive correlations with the PASS and PCS scores. Conclusions This study attempted to develop a questionnaire assessing pain sensitivity multidimensionally using the Korean word geop for the first time. The self-rating GPQ showed high correlations with the existing questionnaires and demonstrated potential to be utilized as a pain prediction index in clinical practice. PMID:27703631

  3. [Levels of state-trait anxiety between mothers and fathers who have children in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Carrasco, Karmina Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background: when there is a child patient in the family, it is frequent that parents get upset. Anxiety in the mother and father could be different depending on the way each one lives the critical situation of the child patient. The purpose was to measure levels of anxiety in fathers and mothers who had a hospitalized child in an intensive care unit. Methods: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was applied to a group of 50 pairs of parents who had a hospitalized child in the intensive care unit in a pediatric hospital. A no probabilistic intentional sample was used. Differences between groups were analyzed by Student's t test. Results: no significant differences were obtained between mothers and fathers for both state-anxiety and trait-anxiety. Significant differences were obtained intra-groups between both kinds of anxiety. Conclusions: having a child who is chronically sick or hospitalized for intensive therapy causes similar levels of anxiety in both parents. Anxiety is significantly increased in both parents when their child is hospitalized in an intensive therapy unit.

  4. Anxiety, Depression and Emotion Regulation Among Regular Online Poker Players.

    PubMed

    Barrault, Servane; Bonnaire, Céline; Herrmann, Florian

    2017-01-19

    Poker is a type of gambling that has specific features, including the need to regulate one's emotion to be successful. The aim of the present study is to assess emotion regulation, anxiety and depression in a sample of regular poker players, and to compare the results of problem and non-problem gamblers. 416 regular online poker players completed online questionnaires including sociodemographic data, measures of problem gambling (CPGI), anxiety and depression (HAD scale), and emotion regulation (ERQ). The CPGI was used to divide participants into four groups according to the intensity of their gambling practice (non-problem, low risk, moderate risk and problem gamblers). Anxiety and depression were significantly higher among severe-problem gamblers than among the other groups. Both significantly predicted problem gambling. On the other hand, there was no difference between groups in emotion regulation (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression), which was linked neither to problem gambling nor to anxiety and depression (except for cognitive reappraisal, which was significantly correlated to anxiety). Our results underline the links between anxiety, depression and problem gambling among poker players. If emotion regulation is involved in problem gambling among poker players, as strongly suggested by data from the literature, the emotion regulation strategies we assessed (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) may not be those involved. Further studies are thus needed to investigate the involvement of other emotion regulation strategies.

  5. Self-reported bruxism mirrors anxiety and stress in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lobbezoo, Frank; Ahlberg, Kristiina; Manfredini, Daniele; Hublin, Christer; Sinisalo, Juha; Könönen, Mauno; Savolainen, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aims were to analyze whether the levels of self-reported bruxism and anxiety associate among otherwise healthy subjects, and to investigate the independent effects of anxiety and stress experience on the probability of self-reported bruxism. Study Design: As part of a study on irregular shift work, a questionnaire was mailed to all employees of the Finnish Broadcasting Company with irregular shift work (number of subjects: n=750) and to an equal number of randomly selected employees in the same company with regular eight-hour daytime work. Results: The response rates were 82.3% (56.6 % men) and 34.3 % (46.7 % men), respectively. Among the 874 respondents, those aware of more frequent bruxism reported significantly more severe anxiety (p<0.001). Adjusted by age and gender, frequent bruxers were more than two times more likely to report severe stress (odds ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval 1.5-4.2) and anxiety (odds ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6) than non-or-mild bruxers. Conclusions: Present findings suggest that self-reported bruxism and psychological states such as anxiety or stress may be related in working age subjects. Key words:Bruxism, self-report, anxiety, stress, adult. PMID:22926484

  6. Anxiety, sedation, and simulated driving in binge drinkers.

    PubMed

    Aston, Elizabeth R; Shannon, Erin E; Liguori, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The current study evaluated the relationships among trait anxiety, subjective response to alcohol, and simulated driving following a simulated alcohol binge. Sixty drinkers with a binge history completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Alcohol Use Questionnaire, and subsequently completed a driving simulation. Participants were then administered 0.2 g/kg ethanol at 30-min intervals (cumulative dose 0.8 g/kg). Following alcohol consumption, the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) and visual analog scales of subjective impairment and driving confidence were administered, after which simulated driving was reassessed. Due to the emphasis on simulated driving after drinking in the current study, subjective response to alcohol (i.e., self-reported sedation, stimulation, impairment, and confidence in driving ability) was assessed once following alcohol consumption, as this is the time when drinkers tend to make decisions regarding legal driving ability. Alcohol increased driving speed, speeding tickets, and collisions. Sedation following alcohol predicted increased subjective impairment and decreased driving confidence. Subjective impairment was not predicted by sensitivity to stimulation or trait anxiety. High trait anxiety predicted low driving confidence after drinking and this relationship was mediated by sedation. Increased speed after alcohol was predicted by sedation, but not by trait anxiety or stimulation. Anxiety, combined with the sedating effects of alcohol, may indicate when consumption should cease. However, once driving is initiated, sensitivity to sedation following alcohol consumption is positively related to simulated driving speed.

  7. Anxiety, Sedation, and Simulated Driving in Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Elizabeth R.; Shannon, Erin E.; Liguori, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the relationships among trait anxiety, subjective response to alcohol, and simulated driving following a simulated alcohol binge. Sixty drinkers with a binge history completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Alcohol Use Questionnaire, and subsequently completed a driving simulation. Participants were then administered 0.2 g/kg ethanol at 30 minute intervals (cumulative dose 0.8 g/kg). Following alcohol consumption, the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) and visual analog scales of subjective impairment and driving confidence were administered, after which simulated driving was re-assessed. Due to the emphasis on simulated driving after drinking in the current study, subjective response to alcohol (i.e., self-reported sedation, stimulation, impairment, and confidence in driving ability) was assessed once following alcohol consumption, as this is the time when drinkers tend to make decisions regarding legal driving ability. Alcohol increased driving speed, speeding tickets, and collisions. Sedation following alcohol predicted increased subjective impairment and decreased driving confidence. Subjective impairment was not predicted by sensitivity to stimulation or trait anxiety. High trait anxiety predicted low driving confidence after drinking and this relationship was mediated by sedation. Increased speed after alcohol was predicted by sedation, but not by trait anxiety or stimulation. Anxiety, combined with the sedating effects of alcohol, may indicate when consumption should cease. However, once driving is initiated, sensitivity to sedation following alcohol consumption is positively related to simulated driving speed. PMID:24955664

  8. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Farzaneh; Nasiri, Ahmad; Akbari, Negarin; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety is the most common mental disorder in end-stage renal disease patients. The use of aromatherapy as a treatment for anxiety has increased substantially in most countries. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhaling rose water aromatherapy on anxiety in hemodialysis patients. Methods This randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out in the hemodialysis ward of Birjand Vali-Asr hospital on 46 patients who were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The standard state-trait anxiety inventory of Spielberger was used to investigate the anxiety level of the samples. The experimental group inhaled rose water for 4 weeks, but the control group did not undergo any intervention. At the end of week 2 and week 4, the participants’ anxiety was measured, and the results were statistically analyzed. Results Mean scores of state and trait anxiety in the experimental group before intervention were 47/47 ± 7/6 and 49/56 ± 13/8, respectively; those after week 4 following the intervention were reduced to 37/1 ± 6/5 and 42/9 ± 10/1; inhalation of rose water fragrance in the experimental group caused a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the state and trait anxiety levels compared with controls (P = 0.43). Conclusions According to the present study, rose water noticeably reduces the anxiety of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, inhalation of rose water can improve the patient’s emotional and spiritual condition during hemodialysis treatment. PMID:27878109

  9. The Cues and Care Trial: A randomized controlled trial of an intervention to reduce maternal anxiety and improve developmental outcomes in very low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Zelkowitz, Phyllis; Feeley, Nancy; Shrier, Ian; Stremler, Robyn; Westreich, Ruta; Dunkley, David; Steele, Russell; Rosberger, Zeev; Lefebvre, Francine; Papageorgiou, Apostolos

    2008-01-01

    Background Very low birthweight infants are at risk for deficits in cognitive and language development, as well as attention and behaviour problems. Maternal sensitive behaviour (i.e. awareness of infant cues and appropriate responsiveness to those cues) in interaction with her very low birthweight infant is associated with better outcomes in these domains; however, maternal anxiety interferes with the mother's ability to interact sensitively with her very low birthweight infant. There is a need for brief, cost-effective and timely interventions that address both maternal psychological distress and interactive behaviour. The Cues and Care trial is a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to reduce maternal anxiety and promote sensitive interaction in mothers of very low birthweight infants. Methods and design Mothers of singleton infants born at weights below 1500 g are recruited in the neonatal intensive care units of 2 tertiary care hospitals, and are randomly assigned to the experimental (Cues) intervention or to an attention control (Care) condition. The Cues intervention teaches mothers to attend to their own physiological, cognitive, and emotional cues that signal anxiety and worry, and to use cognitive-behavioural strategies to reduce distress. Mothers are also taught to understand infant cues and to respond sensitively to those cues. Mothers in the Care group receive general information about infant care. Both groups have 6 contacts with a trained intervener; 5 of the 6 sessions take place during the infant's hospitalization, and the sixth contact occurs after discharge, in the participant mother's home. The primary outcome is maternal symptoms of anxiety, assessed via self-report questionnaire immediately post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include maternal sensitive behaviour, maternal symptoms of posttraumatic stress, and infant development at 6 months corrected age. Discussion The Cues and Care trial will provide important information

  10. Comorbid anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Mark H

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety and depressive disorders often occur as comorbid illnesses and share many common symptoms. Risk factors for these disorders most likely include interactions of environmental and genetic factors. The presence of comorbid anxiety and depression adversely affects clinical and treatment outcomes. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually considered first-line treatment for patients with these disorders, although alternative antidepressants or additional therapies are often necessary. Studies suggest that benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and atypical antipsychotics may be effective as augmentation therapy to optimize outcome, with buspirone and beta-blockers useful in some patients as well. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is also an effective therapeutic alternative for affected patients.

  11. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqun; Zhao, Yueqiu; Mao, Shengqin; Li, Guohong; Yuan, Yonggui

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore health anxiety in a sample of nursing students to determine the relationships between health anxiety and life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia. Methods Two thousand and eighty-six nursing students in junior college, which were divided into five groups, were evaluated by questionnaires, including the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students, the Chinese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results The mean age, whether the individual was an only child, residence (urban or rural), and were significantly different between the groups. The self-assessment scores were also significantly different between the groups. The Short Health Anxiety Inventory total score and the factor of fearing the likelihood of becoming ill were significantly negatively correlated with the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students total score and its two factors, but were significantly positively correlated with psychoticism, neuroticism, and TAS-20 total scores and its scores of the three TAS-20 factors. The negative consequence scale of Short Health Anxiety Inventory was not significantly correlated with externally oriented thinking, but was significantly negatively correlated with extraversion. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that objective satisfaction, subjective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the three factors of TAS-20 were predictors of health anxiety. Conclusion Health anxiety was correlated with life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia in junior college nursing students. Subjective and objective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the identification and expression of emotions may be predictors of health anxiety in nursing students. PMID:25045266

  12. Factors That Explains Student Anxiety toward Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Santillán, Arturo; Escalera-Chávez, Milka Elena; Moreno-García, Elena; Santana-Villegas, Josefina del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to test whether anxiety toward mathematics is made up of a five-factor structure: anxiety toward evaluation, anxiety toward temporality, anxiety toward understanding of mathematical problems, anxiety toward numbers and operations, and anxiety toward mathematical situations in real life. Our study sample was formed of…

  13. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  14. The assessment of the phenomenology of sleep paralysis: the Unusual Sleep Experiences Questionnaire (USEQ).

    PubMed

    Paradis, Cheryl; Friedman, Steven; Hinton, Devon E; McNally, Richard J; Solomon, Linda Z; Lyons, Kelly A

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found a relationship between sleep paralysis (SP) and anxiety states and higher rates have been reported among certain ethnic groups. To advance the cross-cultural study of SP, we developed a brief assessment instrument (which can be self-administered), the Unusual Sleep Experiences Questionnaire (USEQ). In this article, we report on a pilot study with the USEQ in a sample of 208 college students. The instrument was easily understood by the participants, with one quarter reporting at least one lifetime episode of SP. As in previous studies, SP was associated with anxiety (in particular, panic attacks).

  15. Identifying anxiety and depressive disorders among primary care patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    el-Rufaie, O E; Albar, A A; Al-Dabal, B K

    1988-03-01

    One stage case-identification method, using the Arabic Version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) was applied in a pilot study for estimating the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders among a group of Saudi primary care attenders. The validity of the Arabic Version of the HAD scale was previously tested and found valid with high sensitivity and specificity. The total prevalence rate of depression was 17% and that of anxiety was 16%. Seven percent of the sample suffered both depression and anxiety i.e. the total percentage of patients with depression, anxiety or both was 26%. Higher morbidity of depression was recorded among females and a higher morbidity of anxiety among male patients.

  16. Anxiety and error-related brain activity.

    PubMed

    Hajcak, Greg; McDonald, Nicole; Simons, Robert F

    2003-10-01

    Error-related negativity (ERN/Ne) is a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) associated with monitoring action and detecting errors. It is a sharp negative deflection that generally occurs from 50 to 150 ms following response execution and has been associated with anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity. An enhanced ERN has been observed in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)--reflecting abnormal ACC activity hypothesized as part of the pathophysiology of OCD. We recently reported that the ERN is also enhanced in a group of college students with OC characteristics. The present study extended these findings by measuring the ERN in college undergraduates who scored high on either the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) or a combined version of the Snake (SNAQ) and Spider (SPQ) Questionnaires. Results indicate that, like OC subjects, subjects who score high on a measure of general anxiety and worry have enhanced error-related brain activity relative to both phobic and non-anxious control subjects. The enhanced ERN was found to generalize beyond OCD within the anxiety spectrum disorders but also shows some specificity within these disorders.

  17. The Effects of Math Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Amanda; Brown, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety is a reoccurring problem for many students, and the effects of this anxiety on college students are increasing. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between pre-enrollment math anxiety, standardized test scores, math placement scores, and academic success during freshman math coursework (i.e., pre-algebra, college…

  18. Math Anxiety: What Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.

    While much progress has been made in treating math anxiety, little is yet known about its causes, correlates or effects. The present study examined factors related to the prevalence and intensity of math anxiety in college students and the extent to which math anxiety is predictive of math course grades. The 655 subjects were obtained from two…

  19. Science Anxiety and Science Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallow, Jeffrey V.; Greenburg, Sharon L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses origins and nature of science anxiety and describes the Science Anxiety Clinic, outlining techniques used at the clinic. Techniques include science skills training and psychological interventions. Comments on the connection between science anxiety and cognitive processes in science learning. (Author/JN)

  20. Anxiety and Charles Bonnet Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geueke, Anna; Morley, Michael G.; Morley, Katharine; Lorch, Alice; Jackson, MaryLou; Lambrou, Angeliki; Wenberg, June; Oteng-Amoako, Afua

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Some persons with Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) suffer significant anxiety because of their visual hallucinations, while others do not. The aim of the study presented here was to compare levels of anxiety in persons with low vision with and without CBS. Methods: This retrospective study compared the level of anxiety in 31 persons…

  1. Can Coloring Mandalas Reduce Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Nancy A.; Kasser, Tim

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of different types of art activities in the reduction of anxiety. After undergoing a brief anxiety-induction, 84 undergraduate students were randomly assigned to color a mandala, to color a plaid form, or to color on a blank piece of paper. Results demonstrated that anxiety levels declined approximately the…

  2. Construction of a questionnaire for readiness to reconcile in victims of human rights violations

    PubMed Central

    Stammel, Nadine; Neuner, Frank; Böttche, Maria; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background Post-conflict reconciliation is supposed to have a positive impact on survivors of war and conflict. However, knowledge is limited as validated questionnaires to assess individual readiness to reconcile in the context of human rights violations are still missing. Objectives This study aimed to develop and pilot-test a questionnaire to assess individual readiness to reconcile in victims of human rights violations. Methods The questionnaire was developed and pilot-tested in a sample of 60 adult Kurdish refugees from Turkey. In addition to the questionnaire, trauma exposure, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, perceived emotional closeness to the Kurdish people as well as the participants’ ability to differentiate between perpetrators and the people in general were assessed in structured interviews, and their associations with readiness to reconcile were analyzed. Results Factor and item analysis resulted in an 18-item questionnaire with three subscales (openness to interactions; absence of feelings of revenge; openness to conflict resolution). Cronbach's α for the subscales ranged from 0.74 to 0.90, explaining 61% of the total variance. The ability to differentiate between perpetrators and people in general and perceived emotional closeness were the best predictors for readiness to reconcile. The level of trauma exposure was not linked to readiness to reconcile. Although readiness to reconcile was negatively related to PTSD, depression and anxiety, none of these associations reached statistical significance. Conclusions The questionnaire appears to be a reliable measure with good psychometric properties. Further validations in different samples are needed. PMID:22893837

  3. The Level of Anxiety and Pain Perception of Endodontic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perković, Ivana; Romić, Martina Knežević; Perić, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to compare the level of anxiety reported by patients and assessed by dentists. Also, the expected and actual pain during the treatment perceived by the patient and dentist were assessed. Methods sixty six endodontic patients filled in two questionnaires, prior to and after the treatment, so did their therapists. The first set of questions for patients was regarding demographics, the frequency of dental visits, the level of anxiety and expectations about the level of pain. Before the treatment, dentists estimated the level of patients' anxiety and the expected intensity of pain. After the treatment, the patients evaluated the level of experienced pain and dentists' empathy during the treatment, while dentists reassessed the intensity of patients' pain.The data were statistically analysed by t-test for paired samples and by Spearmans's Rho correlation coefficient at level of significance set at 0.05. Results Patients' expectation of pain intensity was higher than the actual pain during the treatment (t-test=3.540, p=0.001). There was no difference in the level of pain which dentists expected and their perception of pain during the procedure. There was a statistically significant correlation between the patients' level of anxiety and recognition of it by dentists (Spearman Rho=0.460, p<0.001). A higher level of anxiety increased the expected intensity of pain (Spearman Rho=0.401, p=0.001). Actual intensity of pain was not significantly associated with dental anxiety (Spearman Rho=0.080, p=0.524). Conclusion Since the level of dental anxiety was associated with the increased intensity of expected pain, a vicious cycle of pain and anxiety may be terminated by giving positive information to the patient before and during endodontic procedures. PMID:27688374

  4. Irritability and Anxiety Severity Among Youth With Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Cornacchio, Danielle; Crum, Kathleen I.; Coxe, Stefany; Pincus, Donna B.; Comer, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most research on irritability and child psychopathology has focused on depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, and/or oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Less is known about relationships between child anxiety and irritability and moderators of such associations. Method Structural equation modeling (SEM) examined associations between anxiety severity and irritability in a large sample of treatment-seeking youth with anxiety disorders (N=663, ages 7–19 years, M=12.25), after accounting for comorbid depressive disorders and ODD. Additional analyses examined whether associations were moderated by child gender, age, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) status. Results There was a direct link between child anxiety and irritability even after accounting for comorbid depressive disorders and ODD. Links between child anxiety and irritability were robust across child gender and age. Further, relationships between child anxiety and irritability were comparable across youth with and without GAD, suggesting that the anxiety–irritability link is relevant across child anxiety disorders and not circumscribed to youth with GAD. Conclusion Findings add to an increasing body of evidence linking child irritability to a range of internalizing and externalizing psychopathologies, and suggest that child anxiety assessment should systematically incorporate irritability evaluations. Further, youth in clinical settings displaying irritability should be assessed for the presence of anxiety. Moreover, treatments for childhood anxiety may do well to incorporate new treatment modules as needed that specifically target problems of irritability. PMID:26703910

  5. Managing Presentation Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jackie L.; LeMay, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    All business communication professors struggle with anxiety-ridden students when discussing public speaking. To alleviate students' fears of speaking in public a process was designed to allow business communication students to acknowledge, address, and annul their presentation fears. A six-year comparative study using qualitative methods and…

  6. Test Anxiety and Neuroticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erben Kecici, Sayime

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the association of the personality trait neuroticism and test anxiety (encoded as worry and emotionality) as well as social relationships (teacher-student and student-student relationship) as possible mediators for girls and boys. Participants were 8th grade students (N = 512) attending schools in Konya. Using…

  7. Mobile Computer Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Patricia Brisotti

    2012-01-01

    As the basis of a society undergoes a fundamental change, such as progression from the industrial age to the knowledge/information age, the massive change affects every aspect of life. Change causes stress in individuals that often manifest itself as anxiety. Using an economic model of the endogenous growth, which includes technology as input,…

  8. Understanding Undergraduate Statistical Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand undergraduate students' views of statistics. Results reveal that students with less anxiety have a higher interest in statistics and also believe in their ability to perform well in the course. Also students who have a more positive attitude about the class tend to have a higher belief in their…

  9. Affective Factors: Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasnimi, Mahshad

    2009-01-01

    Affective factors seem to play a crucial role in success or failure in second language acquisition. Negative attitudes can reduce learners' motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse. Discovering students' attitudes about language will help both teacher and student in teaching learning process. Anxiety is…

  10. Computer Anxiety and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarte, Roger

    While the computer is commonly viewed as a tool for simplifying and enriching lives, many individuals react to this technology with feelings of anxiety, paranoia, and alienation. These reactions may have potentially serious career and educational consequences. Fear of computers reflects a generalized fear of current technology and is most…

  11. A four-part setting on examining the anxiety-provoking capacity of the sound of dental equipment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming; Xu, Ying Feng

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a four-part questionnaire survey to assess the effects of the sound of dental equipment on people's perceptions and dental anxiety levels. The convenience sample for the survey comprised 230 dental students and 230 gender and age matched non-dental university students. The subjects were requested to complete the questionnaires themselves. The results show that the sound of dental equipment has a great influence on dental anxiety. Dental students, who are more familiar with the operation of this equipment, are less prone to anxiety when they hear its sound than their non-dental counterparts.

  12. Associations between Screen-Based Sedentary Behaviour and Anxiety Symptoms in Mothers with Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Teychenne, Megan; Hinkley, Trina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Anxiety is a serious illness and women (including mothers with young children) are at particular risk. Although physical activity (PA) may reduce anxiety risk, little research has investigated the link between sedentary behaviour and anxiety risk. The aim of this study was to examine the association between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms, independent of PA, amongst mothers with young children. Methods During 2013–2014, 528 mothers with children aged 2–5 years completed self-report measures of recreational screen-based sedentary behaviour (TV/DVD/video viewing, computer/e-games/hand held device use) and anxiety symptoms (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS-A). Linear regression analyses examined the cross-sectional association between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms. Results In models that adjusted for key demographic and behavioural covariates (including moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA, MVPA), computer/device use (B = 0.212; 95% CI = 0.048, 0.377) and total screen time (B = 0.109; 95% CI = 0.014, 0.205) were positively associated with heightened anxiety symptoms. TV viewing was not associated with anxiety symptoms in either model. Conclusions Higher levels of recreational computer or handheld device use and overall screen time may be linked to higher risk of anxiety symptoms in mothers with young children, independent of MVPA. Further longitudinal and intervention research is required to determine temporal associations. PMID:27191953

  13. Depressive, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorders at six years after occupational injuries.

    PubMed

    Chin, Wei-Shan; Shiao, Judith Shu-Chu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Kuo, Chun-Ya; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Guo, Yue Leon

    2017-01-02

    The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence rates of depressive, anxiety and PTSDs, and the risk factors for psychological symptoms at 6 years after occupational injury. This longitudinal study followed workers who were occupationally injured in 2009. Psychological symptoms and return to work were assessed at 3 and 12 months after injury. Injured workers who had completed the initial questionnaire survey at 3 or 12 months after injury were recruited. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to the participants. For workers with high Brief Symptom Rating Scale and Post-traumatic Symptom Checklist scores, an in-depth psychiatric evaluation was performed using the Mini-international Neuropsychiatric Interview. A total of 570 workers completed the questionnaire (response rate, 28.7%). Among them, 243 (42.6%) had high psychological symptom scores and were invited for a phone interview; 135 (55.6%) completed the interview. The estimated rates of major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/partial PTSD were 9.2 and 7.2%, respectively, and both these rates were higher at 6 years after injury than at 12 months after injury (2.0 and 5.1%). After adjustment for family and social factors, the risk factors for high psychological scores were length of hospitalization immediately after injury, affected physical appearance, repeated occupational injuries, unemployment, and number of quit jobs after the injury. At 6 years after occupational injury, the re-emergence of psychiatric disorders was observed. Relevant factors for poor psychological health were severity of injury and instability of work. Periodic monitoring of psychological and physical health and economic stability are warranted.

  14. Discrepancies between direct and indirect measures of death anxiety disappear in old age.

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Rudi; Van Der Speeten, Nele

    2008-01-01

    Mixed findings have been reported on the relationship between death anxiety and aging. However, practically all research on death anxiety is based on self-report measures, reflecting conscious consideration. The aim of this study was to investigate death anxiety in young and middle-aged versus elderly adults using a psychometrically sound questionnaire as a direct measure and an emotional variant of the Stroop task as an indirect index of death anxiety. We found no difference between the age groups based on the questionnaire, whereas the Stroop results revealed interference of death-related words only for the younger age group. The absence of a discrepancy between direct and indirect measures in old people could be indicative of genuine acceptance of the inevitability of their own death.

  15. [Anxiety and cognition disorders].

    PubMed

    Peretti, C S

    1998-01-01

    Anxious subjects present attentional disorders that are manifest with an increased bias towards threatening contents stimuli. In tasks derived from the Stroop task (such as emotional Stroop, a variant of the classic Stroop task) congruence between anxious themes or manifestations and stimuli content induces information processing changes leading to a slowness of response speed. In this case, results are similar to those obtained in signal detection tasks either when information is visually or auditorily presented. In anxious subjects an inconscious activation provoked by anxiogenic words is observed. Because such activation is independent from the semantic content of the words, an emotional priming has been hypothesized. Berck formulated an hypervigilance theory according to which anxiety provokes a selective distractibility regarding non pertinent stimuli. Such attentional selectivity would be responsible of a cognitive vulnerability in anxious subjects. State but not trait anxiety induces working memory performances deficit. On the bases of Baddeley's working memory framework, Eysenck proposed that anxiety uses part of the limited attentional capacity, placing the subject in a dual task situation. In that, he has to cope with pertinent information and anxiety generated information. If anxiety leads to better performance in simple tasks by recruiting motivational capacities, in tasks with high information content, anxious subjects performances are impaired. Changes in the long-term memory do not seem to fit with the theoretical models based on cognitive impairment observed in patients suffering from depressive states. Anxious subjects presented a memory bias towards anxiogenic information in implicit memory tasks. But experimental data are still too searce to describe implicit performance of anxious subjects and more systematic studies are therefore needed.

  16. Emotion dysregulation and sleep difficulties in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsypes, Aliona; Aldao, Amelia; Mennin, Douglas S

    2013-03-01

    Diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) include sleep problems, which often persist even after successful treatment of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine emotion dysregulation as a potential contributor to sleep problems in GAD patients. Participants comprised two groups: 59 individuals diagnosed with GAD and 66 healthy controls. They were assessed for the presence of mood and anxiety disorders and then completed self-report questionnaires assessing problems with sleep and emotion regulation. Participants in the GAD group scored significantly higher on a number of sleep outcomes than did the control group. Importantly, difficulties with emotion regulation statistically mediated the relationship between GAD and a wide range of outcomes of sleep dysfunction independently of the effects of depression and secondary anxiety diagnoses. Emotion regulation difficulties that characterize GAD mediate the relationship between symptoms of this disorder and a wide range of sleep problems. Implications for treatment and future research directions are discussed.

  17. Motivations, Death Anxiety, and Empathy in Hospice Volunteers in France.

    PubMed

    Garbay, Meriem; Gay, Marie-Claire; Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the motivations for volunteering of hospice volunteers in France. In addition, their levels of death anxiety and empathy were measured and compared with those of French non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers. Three questionnaires-the Inventory of Motivations for Hospice Palliative Care Volunteerism (IMHPCV), the Templer/McMordie Death Anxiety Scale, and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index-were sent via an Internet link to 2 hospice volunteer associations and to non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers (only the hospice volunteers received the IMHPCV). Altruistic motives had the most influence on the respondents' decision to become a hospice volunteer. French hospice volunteers scored significantly lower on 3 categories of motives on the IMHPCV compared to a sample of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers (study 2), suggesting that cultural differences may be involved. No significant differences were found in levels of death anxiety or empathy between the 3 groups of respondents of the study.

  18. Reliability and validity of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire in dyspepsia: A six-country study

    PubMed Central

    Kulich, Károly R; Madisch, Ahmed; Pacini, Franco; Piqué, Jose M; Regula, Jaroslaw; Van Rensburg, Christo J; Újszászy, László; Carlsson, Jonas; Halling, Katarina; Wiklund, Ingela K

    2008-01-01

    Background Symptoms of dyspepsia significantly disrupt patients' lives and reliable methods of assessing symptom status are important for patient management. The aim of the current study was to document the psychometric characteristics of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia