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Sample records for quiescent molecular clouds

  1. Quiescent Giant Molecular Cloud Cores in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Serabyn, E.; Zylka, R.; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to map the far-infrared continuum emission (45-175 micrometer) toward several massive Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) cores located near the Galactic center. The observed far-infrared and submillimeter spectral energy distributions imply low temperatures (approx. 15 - 22 K) for the bulk of the dust in all the sources, consistent with external heating by the diffuse ISRF and suggest that these GMCs do not harbor high- mass star-formation sites, in spite of their large molecular mass. Observations of FIR atomic fine structure lines of C(sub II) and O(sub I) indicate an ISRF enhancement of approx. 10(exp 3) in the region. Through continuum radiative transfer modeling we show that this radiation field strength is in agreement with the observed FIR and submillimeter spectral energy distributions, assuming primarily external heating of the dust with only limited internal luminosity (approx. 2 x 10(exp 5) solar luminosity). Spectroscopic observations of millimeter-wave transitions of H2CO, CS, and C-34S carried out with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and the Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30-meter telescope indicate a gas temperature of approx. 80 K, significantly higher than the dust temperatures, and density of approx. 1 x 10(exp 5)/cc in GCM0.25 + 0.01, the brightest submillimeter source in the region. We suggest that shocks caused by cloud collisions in the turbulent interstellar medium in the Galactic center region are responsible for heating the molecular gas. This conclusion is supported by the presence of wide-spread emission from molecules such as SiO, SO, and CH3OH, which are considered good shock tracers. We also suggest that the GMCs studied here are representative of the "typical", pre-starforming cloud population in the Galactic center.

  2. The carbon inventory in a quiescent, filamentary molecular cloud in G328

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Michael G.; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Braiding, Catherine; Storey, John W. V.; Kulesa, Craig; Hollenbach, David J.; Wolfire, Mark; Glück, Christian; Rowell, Gavin

    2014-02-20

    We present spectral line images of [C I] 809 GHz, CO J = 1-0 115 GHz and H I 1.4 GHz line emission, and calculate the corresponding C, CO and H column densities, for a sinuous, quiescent giant molecular cloud about 5 kpc distant along the l = 328° sightline (hereafter G328) in our Galaxy. The [C I] data comes from the High Elevation Antarctic Terahertz telescope, a new facility on the summit of the Antarctic plateau where the precipitable water vapor falls to the lowest values found on the surface of the Earth. The CO and H I data sets come from the Mopra and Parkes/ATCA telescopes, respectively. We identify a filamentary molecular cloud, ∼75 × 5 pc long with mass ∼4 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} and a narrow velocity emission range of just 4 km s{sup –1}. The morphology and kinematics of this filament are similar in CO, [C I], and H I, though in the latter appears as self-absorption. We calculate line fluxes and column densities for the three emitting species, which are broadly consistent with a photodissociation region model for a GMC exposed to the average interstellar radiation field. The [C/CO] abundance ratio averaged through the filament is found to be approximately unity. The G328 filament is constrained to be cold (T {sub Dust} < 20 K) by the lack of far-IR emission, to show no clear signs of star formation, and to only be mildly turbulent from the narrow line width. We suggest that it may represent a GMC shortly after formation, or perhaps still in the process of formation.

  3. The Nature of Carbon Dioxide Bearing Ices in Quiescent Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Cook, A. M.; Chiar, J. E.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Shenoy, S. S.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2009-04-01

    The properties of the ices that form in dense molecular clouds represent an important set of initial conditions in the evolution of interstellar and preplanetary matter in regions of active star formation. Of the various spectral features available for study, the bending mode of solid CO2 near 15 μm has proven to be a particularly sensitive probe of physical conditions, especially temperature. We present new observations of this absorption feature in the spectrum of Q21-1, a background field star located behind a dark filament in the Cocoon Nebula (IC 5146). We show the profile of the feature to be consistent with a two-component (polar + nonpolar) model for the ices, based on spectra of laboratory analogs with temperatures in the range 10-20 K. The polar component accounts for ~85% of the CO2 in the line of sight. We compare for the first time 15 μm profiles in three widely separated dark clouds (Taurus, Serpens, and IC 5146), and show that they are indistinguishable to within observational scatter. Systematic differences in the observed CO2/H2O ratio in the three clouds have little or no effect on the 15 μm profile. The abundance of elemental oxygen in the ices appears to be a unifying factor, displaying consistent behavior in the three clouds. We conclude that the ice formation process is robust and uniformly efficient, notwithstanding compositional variations arising from differences in how the O is distributed between the primary species (H2O, CO2, and CO) in the ices.

  4. THE NATURE OF CARBON DIOXIDE BEARING ICES IN QUIESCENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Cook, A. M.; Chiar, J. E.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Shenoy, S. S.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2009-04-10

    The properties of the ices that form in dense molecular clouds represent an important set of initial conditions in the evolution of interstellar and preplanetary matter in regions of active star formation. Of the various spectral features available for study, the bending mode of solid CO{sub 2} near 15 {mu}m has proven to be a particularly sensitive probe of physical conditions, especially temperature. We present new observations of this absorption feature in the spectrum of Q21-1, a background field star located behind a dark filament in the Cocoon Nebula (IC 5146). We show the profile of the feature to be consistent with a two-component (polar + nonpolar) model for the ices, based on spectra of laboratory analogs with temperatures in the range 10-20 K. The polar component accounts for {approx}85% of the CO{sub 2} in the line of sight. We compare for the first time 15 {mu}m profiles in three widely separated dark clouds (Taurus, Serpens, and IC 5146), and show that they are indistinguishable to within observational scatter. Systematic differences in the observed CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio in the three clouds have little or no effect on the 15 {mu}m profile. The abundance of elemental oxygen in the ices appears to be a unifying factor, displaying consistent behavior in the three clouds. We conclude that the ice formation process is robust and uniformly efficient, notwithstanding compositional variations arising from differences in how the O is distributed between the primary species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CO) in the ices.

  5. Are infrared dark clouds really quiescent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S.; Beuther, H.; Zhang, Q.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Ragan, S.; Smith, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The dense, cold regions where high-mass stars form are poorly characterized, yet they represent an ideal opportunity to learn more about the initial conditions of high-mass star formation (HMSF) since high-mass starless cores (HMSCs) lack the violent feedback seen at later evolutionary stages. Aims: We investigate the initial conditions of HMSF by studying the dynamics and chemistry of HMSCs. Methods: We present continuum maps obtained from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometry at 1.1 mm for four infrared dark clouds (IRDCs, G28.34 S, IRDC 18530, IRDC 18306, and IRDC 18308). For these clouds, we also present line surveys at 1 mm/3 mm obtained from IRAM 30 m single-dish observations. Results: (1) At an angular resolution of 2'' (~104 AU at an average distance of 4 kpc), the 1.1 mm SMA observations resolve each source into several fragments. The mass of each fragment is on average >10 M⊙, which exceeds the predicted thermal Jeans mass of the entire clump by a factor of up to 30, indicating that thermal pressure does not dominate the fragmentation process. Our measured velocity dispersions in the lines obtained by 30 m imply that non-thermal motion provides the extra support against gravity in the fragments. (2) Both non-detection of high-J transitions and the hyperfine multiplet fit of N2H+ (J = 1 → 0), C2H (N = 1 → 0), HCN(J = 1 → 0), and H13CN(J = 1 → 0) indicate that our sources are cold and young. However, the obvious detection of SiO and the asymmetric line profile of HCO+(J = 1 → 0) in G28.34 S indicate a potential protostellar object and probable infall motion. (3) With a large number of N-bearing species, the existence of carbon rings and molecular ions, and the anti-correlated spatial distributions between N2H+/NH2D and CO, our large-scale high-mass clumps exhibit similar chemical features to small-scale low-mass prestellar objects. Conclusions: This study of a small sample of IRDCs illustrates that thermal Jeans instability alone

  6. Nitrogen sulfide in quiescent dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgonagle, Douglas; Irvine, William M.; Ohishi, Masatoshi

    1994-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar nitrogen sulfide (NS) in cold dark clouds. Several components of the (2)Pi(sub 1/2), J = 3/2 to 1/2 and J = 5/2 to 3/2 transitions were observed in TMC-1 and L134N. The inferred column density for TMC-1 is N(sub NS) approximately 8 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm toward the NH3 peak in that cloud, and in L134N is N(sub NS) approximately 3 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm toward the position of peak NH3 emission. These values correspond to fractional abundances relative to molecular hydrogen of f(sub NS) approximately 8 x 10(exp -10) for TMC-1, and f(sub NS) approximately 6 x 10(exp -10) for L134N. The NS emission is extended along the TMC-1 ridge and is also extended in L134N. The measured abundances are significantly higher than those predicted by some recent gas phase ion-molecule models.

  7. Chemical evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Tarafdar, Sankar P.; Villere, Karen R.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The principles behind the coupled chemical-dynamical evolution of molecular clouds are described. Particular attention is given to current problems involving the simplest species (i.e., C. CO, O2, and H2) in quiescent clouds. The results of a comparison made between the molecular abundances in the Orion ridge and the hot core (Blake, 1986) are presented.

  8. Chemical evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Tarafdar, Sankar P.; Villere, Karen R.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The principles behind the coupled chemical-dynamical evolution of molecular clouds are described. Particular attention is given to current problems involving the simplest species (i.e., C. CO, O2, and H2) in quiescent clouds. The results of a comparison made between the molecular abundances in the Orion ridge and the hot core (Blake, 1986) are presented.

  9. ICES IN THE QUIESCENT IC 5146 DENSE CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Ennico, K.; Greene, T. P.; Roellig, T. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Keane, J. V.; Lada, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Decin, L.; Eriksson, K.

    2011-04-10

    This paper presents spectra in the 2 to 20 {mu}m range of quiescent cloud material located in the IC 5146 cloud complex. The spectra were obtained with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX instrument and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrometer. We use these spectra to investigate dust and ice absorption features in pristine regions of the cloud that are unaltered by embedded stars. We find that the H{sub 2}O-ice threshold extinction is 4.03 {+-} 0.05 mag. Once foreground extinction is taken into account, however, the threshold drops to 3.2 mag, equivalent to that found for the Taurus dark cloud, generally assumed to be the touchstone quiescent cloud against which all other dense cloud and embedded young stellar object observations are compared. Substructure in the trough of the silicate band for two sources is attributed to CH{sub 3}OH and NH{sub 3} in the ices, present at the {approx}2% and {approx}5% levels, respectively, relative to H{sub 2}O-ice. The correlation of the silicate feature with the E(J - K) color excess is found to follow a much shallower slope relative to lines of sight that probe diffuse clouds, supporting the previous results by Chiar et al.

  10. CO{sub 2} FORMATION IN QUIESCENT CLOUDS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE CO + OH PATHWAY

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, J. A.; Fraser, H. J.; Dulieu, F.; Congiu, E.

    2011-07-10

    The formation of CO{sub 2} in quiescent regions of molecular clouds is not yet fully understood, despite CO{sub 2} having an abundance of around 10%-34% H{sub 2}O. We present a study of the formation of CO{sub 2} via the nonenergetic route CO + OH on nonporous H{sub 2}O and amorphous silicate surfaces. Our results are in the form of temperature-programmed desorption spectra of CO{sub 2} produced via two experimental routes: O{sub 2} + CO + H and O{sub 3} + CO + H. The maximum yield of CO{sub 2} is around 8% with respect to the starting quantity of CO, suggesting a barrier to CO + OH. The rate of reaction, based on modeling results, is 24 times slower than O{sub 2} + H. Our model suggests that competition between CO{sub 2} formation via CO + OH and other surface reactions of OH is a key factor in the low yields of CO{sub 2} obtained experimentally, with relative reaction rates of k{sub CO+H}<molecular clouds could be explained by the reaction CO + OH occurring concurrently with the formation of H{sub 2}O via the route OH + H.

  11. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: mlombard@eso.or

    2009-09-20

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 +- 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A{sub K} > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} a few x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}.

  12. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  13. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  14. The resolved magnetic fields of the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Clemens, Dan P.

    2015-03-01

    Marchwinski et al. (2012) mapped the magnetic field strength across the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30 (shown in Figure 1 subtending 40x10 pc at a distance of 1.88 kpc) with the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method CF; Chandrasekhar & Fermi 1953) using near-infrared starlight polarimetry from the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (Clemens et al. 2012a, b) and gas properties from the Galactic Ring Survey (Jackson et al. 2006). The large-scale magnetic field is oriented parallel to the gas-traced `spine' of the cloud. Seven `magnetic cores' with high magnetic field strength were identified and are coincident with peaks in the gas column density. Calculation of the mass-to-flux ratio (Crutcher 1999) shows that these cores are exclusively magnetically subcritical and that magnetostatic pressure can support them against gravitational collapse.

  15. Feasibility of reduced gravity experiments involving quiescent, uniform particle cloud combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Facca, Lily T.; Berlad, Abraham L.; Tangirala, Venkat

    1989-01-01

    The study of combustible particle clouds is of fundamental scientific interest as well as a practical concern. The principal scientific interests are the characteristic combustion properties, especially flame structure, propagation rates, stability limits, and the effects of stoichiometry, particle type, transport phenomena, and nonadiabatic processes on these properties. The feasibility tests for the particle cloud combustion experiment (PCCE) were performed in reduced gravity in the following stages: (1) fuel particles were mixed into cloud form inside a flammability tube; (2) when the concentration of particles in the cloud was sufficiently uniform, the particle motion was allowed to decay toward quiescence; (3) an igniter was energized which both opened one end of the tube and ignited the suspended particle cloud; and (4) the flame proceeded down the tube length, with its position and characteristic features being photographed by high-speed cameras. Gravitational settling and buoyancy effects were minimized because of the reduced gravity enviroment in the NASA Lewis drop towers and aircraft. Feasibility was shown as quasi-steady flame propagation which was observed for fuel-rich mixtures. Of greatest scientific interest is the finding that for near-stoichiometric mixtures, a new mode of flame propagation was observed, now called a chattering flame. These flames did not propagate steadily through the tube. Chattering modes of flame propagation are not expected to display extinction limits that are the same as those for acoustically undisturbed, uniform, quiescent clouds. A low concentration of fuel particles, uniformly distributed in a volume, may not be flammable but may be made flammable, as was observed, through induced segregation processes. A theory was developed which showed that chattering flame propagation was controlled by radiation from combustion products which heated the successive discrete laminae sufficiently to cause autoignition.

  16. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  17. Nitrogen sulfide in giant molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGonagle, D.; Irvine, W. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report a survey for nitrogen sulfide (NS) toward regions of massive star formation. NS was observed by means of its 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2, J = 5/2 --> 3/2, and J = 7/2 --> 5/2 transitions at 69, 115, and 161 GHz, respectively, and was detected toward 12 of 14 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) observed. Analysis of the hyperfine component relative line strengths suggests that NS emission is optically thin toward these sources, with the possible exception of Sgr B2(M). The fractional abundance of NS relative to molecular hydrogen is best defined for the Orion molecular cloud, where it is typically (1-4) x 10(-10), which is about an order of magnitude larger than found by some recent gas-phase chemistry models developed for quiescent clouds. Toward OMC-1, the NS integrated intensity is strongly peaked toward KL, but also extends all along the Orion ridge, resembling the distribution of SO and CH3OH. We have identified a spectral feature seen toward several sources as the ortho-NKK = 4(04) --> 3(13) J = 3 --> 2, fine-structure component of methylene (CH2; cf. Hollis, Jewell, & Lovas). We also report the first detection of the SO+ 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2, parity-e transition toward W51(MS) and L134N.

  18. Nitrogen sulfide in giant molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGonagle, D.; Irvine, W. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report a survey for nitrogen sulfide (NS) toward regions of massive star formation. NS was observed by means of its 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2, J = 5/2 --> 3/2, and J = 7/2 --> 5/2 transitions at 69, 115, and 161 GHz, respectively, and was detected toward 12 of 14 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) observed. Analysis of the hyperfine component relative line strengths suggests that NS emission is optically thin toward these sources, with the possible exception of Sgr B2(M). The fractional abundance of NS relative to molecular hydrogen is best defined for the Orion molecular cloud, where it is typically (1-4) x 10(-10), which is about an order of magnitude larger than found by some recent gas-phase chemistry models developed for quiescent clouds. Toward OMC-1, the NS integrated intensity is strongly peaked toward KL, but also extends all along the Orion ridge, resembling the distribution of SO and CH3OH. We have identified a spectral feature seen toward several sources as the ortho-NKK = 4(04) --> 3(13) J = 3 --> 2, fine-structure component of methylene (CH2; cf. Hollis, Jewell, & Lovas). We also report the first detection of the SO+ 2 pi 1/2, J = 3/2 --> 1/2, parity-e transition toward W51(MS) and L134N.

  19. W3 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Thronson, H.A.,JR.; Lada, C.J.; Hewagama, T.

    1985-10-01

    Extensive J = 1 to 0 (C-12)(O-16) and (C-13)(O-16) observations of the W3 molecular cloud and the surrounding region are presented and discussed. The velocity structure in the region is strongly suggestive of a model of large-scale, externally induced star formation. It is shown that star formation occurred in W3 and the nearby star-forming region W3(OH) after the gas within which they lie was swept up by the expanding W4 ionization front. Two condensations dominate the mass structure of the core of W3, one associated with IRS 4 and the other with IRS 5 and 1. A velocity difference between the two condensations is interpreted as indicating the two sources actually are discrete knots. 31 references.

  20. Evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevenster, M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of interstellar molecular hydrogen was studied, with a special interest for the formation and evolution of molecular clouds and star formation within them, by a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation performed on a rectangular grid of physical sizes on the order of 100 pc. It is filled with an initial density of approx. 1 cm(exp -3), except for one cell (approx. 1 pc(exp 2)) at the center of the grid where an accretion core of 1-10(exp 3) solar masses is placed. The grid is co-moving with the gridcenter that is on a circular orbit around the Galactic center and that also is the guiding center of epicyclic approximation of orbits of the matter surrounding it. The initial radial velocity is zero; to account for differential rotation the initial tangential velocity (i.e. the movement around the galactic center) is proportional to the radial distance to the grid center. The rate is comparable to the rotation rate at the Local Standard of Rest. The influence of galactic rotation is noticed by spiral or elliptical forms, but on much longer time scales than self gravitation and cooling processes. Density and temperature are kept constant at the boundaries and no inflow is allowed along the tangential boundaries.

  1. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  2. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  3. Physical conditions in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments have complicated the picture of the physical conditions in molecular clouds. The discoveries of widespread emission from high-J lines of CD and 12-micron IRAS emission have revealed the presence of considerably hotter gas and dust near the surfaces of molecular clouds. These components can complicate interpretation of the bulk of the cloud gas. Commonly assumed relations between column density or mean density and cloud size are called into question by conflicting results and by consideration of selection effects. Analysis of density and density structure through molecular excitation has shown that very high densities exist in star formation regions, but unresolved structure and possible chemical effects complicate the interpretation. High resolution far-IR and submillimeter observations offer a complementary approach and are beginning to test theoretical predictions of density gradients in clouds.

  4. Physical conditions in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments have complicated the picture of the physical conditions in molecular clouds. The discoveries of widespread emission from high-J lines of CD and 12-micron IRAS emission have revealed the presence of considerably hotter gas and dust near the surfaces of molecular clouds. These components can complicate interpretation of the bulk of the cloud gas. Commonly assumed relations between column density or mean density and cloud size are called into question by conflicting results and by consideration of selection effects. Analysis of density and density structure through molecular excitation has shown that very high densities exist in star formation regions, but unresolved structure and possible chemical effects complicate the interpretation. High resolution far-IR and submillimeter observations offer a complementary approach and are beginning to test theoretical predictions of density gradients in clouds.

  5. Water in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Frerking, M. A.; Gulkis, S.; Pickett, H. M.; Wilson, W. J.; Pagani, L.; Lecacheux, A.; Encrenaz, P.

    1991-01-01

    The G.P. Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) was used to make initial observations of the half-millimeter ground-state transition of water in seven giant molecular clouds and in two late-type stars. No significant detections were made, and the resulting upper limits are significantly below those expected from other, indirect observations and from several theoretical models. The implied interstellar H2O/CO abundance is less than 0.003 in the cores of three giant molecular clouds. This value is less than expected from cloud chemistry models and also than estimates based on HDO and H3O(+) observations.

  6. Water in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Frerking, M. A.; Gulkis, S.; Pickett, H. M.; Wilson, W. J.; Pagani, L.; Lecacheux, A.; Encrenaz, P.

    1991-01-01

    The G.P. Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) was used to make initial observations of the half-millimeter ground-state transition of water in seven giant molecular clouds and in two late-type stars. No significant detections were made, and the resulting upper limits are significantly below those expected from other, indirect observations and from several theoretical models. The implied interstellar H2O/CO abundance is less than 0.003 in the cores of three giant molecular clouds. This value is less than expected from cloud chemistry models and also than estimates based on HDO and H3O(+) observations.

  7. Molecular clouds without detectable CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blitz, Leo; Bazell, David; Desert, F. Xavier

    1990-01-01

    The clouds identified by Desert, Bazell, and Boulanger (DBB clouds) in their search for high-latitude molecular clouds were observed in the CO (J = 1-0) line, but only 13 percent of the sample was detected. The remaining 87 percent are diffuse molecular clouds with CO abundances of about 10 to the -6th, a typical value for diffuse clouds. This hypothesis is shown to be consistent with Copernicus data. The DBB clouds are shown to ben an essentially complete catalog of diffuse molecular clouds in the solar vicinity. The total molecular surface density in the vicinity of the sun is then only about 20 percent greater than the 1.3 solar masses/sq pc determined by Dame et al. (1987). Analysis of the CO detections indicates that there is a sharp threshold in extinction of 0.25 mag before CO is detectable and is derived from the IRAS I(100) micron threshold of 4 MJy/sr. This threshold is presumably where the CO abundance exhibits a sharp increase

  8. Molecular clouds without detectable CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitz, Leo; Bazell, David; Desert, F. Xavier

    1990-03-01

    The clouds identified by Desert, Bazell, and Boulanger (DBB clouds) in their search for high-latitude molecular clouds were observed in the CO (J = 1-0) line, but only 13 percent of the sample was detected. The remaining 87 percent are diffuse molecular clouds with CO abundances of about 10 to the -6th, a typical value for diffuse clouds. This hypothesis is shown to be consistent with Copernicus data. The DBB clouds are shown to ben an essentially complete catalog of diffuse molecular clouds in the solar vicinity. The total molecular surface density in the vicinity of the sun is then only about 20 percent greater than the 1.3 solar masses/sq pc determined by Dame et al. (1987). Analysis of the CO detections indicates that there is a sharp threshold in extinction of 0.25 mag before CO is detectable and is derived from the IRAS I(100) micron threshold of 4 MJy/sr. This threshold is presumably where the CO abundance exhibits a sharp increase

  9. Molecular Hydrogen in the Quiescent Disk of SW UMa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The FUSE observation has been reduced and a paper has been submitted to ApJ. The analysis has been slow because of the very noisy quality of the data, but we have derived line profile information for O VI and limits to the continuum brightness which place an interesting limit on the white dwarf temperature. The primary results are that a narrow O VI emission component seems to arise from the accretion flow onto the white dwarf itself, in agreement with cooling flow models for the X-ray spectra of low accretion rate dwarf novae. The broad component of the O VI lines is weaker than the observed C IV emission, suggesting that the UV line emission from the disk comes from photoionized plasma. A secondary result is that there is no H-2 fluorescent emission. The upper limits indicate that if molecular gas is present in the disk, it is shielded from Ly alpha photons by a layer of atomic hydrogen on the disk surface. We also derive an upper limit to the continuum level is below that observed by IUE. The limits are compatible with the lower end of the WD temperature range derived from IUE measurements, and they appear to agree with unpublished analysis of HST spectra. The grant has provided partial support for a data aide (Matt Povich) and a postdoc (Alex Lobel). It purchased a computer for M. Menou.

  10. THE UPTAKE OF INTERSTELLAR GASEOUS CO INTO ICY GRAIN MANTLES IN A QUIESCENT DARK CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.

    2010-09-01

    Data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory CO Mapping Survey of the Taurus molecular cloud are combined with extinction data for a sample of 292 background field stars to investigate the uptake of CO from the gas to icy grain mantles on dust within the cloud. On the assumption that the reservoir of CO in the ices is represented well by the combined abundances of solid CO and solid CO{sub 2} (which forms by oxidation of CO on the dust), we find that the total column density (gas + solid) correlates tightly with visual extinction (A{sub V}) over the range 5 mag < A{sub V} < 30 mag, i.e., up to the highest extinctions covered by our sample. The mean depletion of gas-phase CO, expressed as {delta}(CO) = N(CO){sub ice}/N(CO){sub total}, increases monotonically from negligible levels for A{sub V} {approx}< 5 to {approx} 0.3 at A{sub V} = 10 and {approx} 0.6 at A{sub V} = 30. As these results refer to line-of-sight averages, they must be considered lower limits to the actual depletion at loci deep within the cloud, which may approach unity. We show that it is plausible for such high levels of depletion to be reached in dense cores on timescales {approx}0.6 Myr, comparable with their expected lifetimes. Dispersal of cores during star formation may be effective in maintaining observable levels of gaseous CO on the longer timescales estimated for the age of the cloud.

  11. The Evolution of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannier, Peter

    2002-07-01

    How is the evolution of dense clouds affected by their surrounding, more diffuse gas? Without an answer, it is not possible to understand the evolution of the ISM. Dense clouds can end their lives through the combined actions of star formation, violent disruption, and ablation. If ablation is an important process, then it is not a foregone conclusion that the dense clouds we see today will ever form stars. We will learn about the ablation process using STIS observations toward 18 stars for which we have existing FUSE observations, sightlines selected to lie behind the extended halos of four widely separated, molecular clouds. Our primary goal is to measure the gas pressure, the key to driving gas flows; secondary goals are to estimate the prevailing radiation and the CO column density. We have completed a pilot study of three stars in B5/Perseus, which enabled us to infer the presence near that cloud, of an isobaric, evaporative outflow, probably driven by UV irradiation. The 18 proposed sightlines lie near four dense clouds which have been well studied at radio, mm and far-IR wavelengths, providing needed auxiliary information about morphology and kinematics. The clouds {1} are nearby, {2} are unperturbed by massive star formation, and {3} sample a range of external environments. The combined STIS, FUSE and ground-based results will yield information needed to understand the role of ablation in the evolution of the central clouds.

  12. Water vapor in the Orion Molecular Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Larson, H. P.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared observations of interstellar gas-phase H2O in the spectrum of the BN object in Orion are reported. There are absorptions (S/N = 2-5) at the positions of four of the strong lines in the 000-001 nu3 vibration-rotation band. With an estimated excitation temperature of 150 K, the column density of gaseous H2O toward BN in the OMC-1 cloud is (2 + or - 1) x 10 to the 17th/sq cm. The intensities of the lines imply an ortho/para ratio of 1 + or - 0.5 indicating recent sublimation of H2O from low-temperature grains. The results give gas-phase abundance ratios of H2O/CO roughly 0.03 + or - 0.02 and HDO/H2O = 0.001-0.0001 toward BN. The velocities of the H2O absorptions agree with those of the ridge source and CO outflow, but the position along the line of sight is not well constrained. The gas/solid ratio is H2O(gas)/H20(ice) = 0.05 or less. Less than 1 percent of the oxygen is in H2O gas (assuming total cosmic abundance). Most of the H2O in the line of sight to BN, and by inference in quiescent regions of molecular clouds generally, is frozen on grains.

  13. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF THE QUIESCENT MEDIUM OF NEARBY CLOUDS. I. ICE FORMATION AND GRAIN GROWTH IN LUPUS

    SciTech Connect

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Chiar, J. E.; Knez, C.; Mundy, L. G.; Öberg, K. I.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-11-01

    Infrared photometry and spectroscopy (1-25 μm) of background stars reddened by the Lupus molecular cloud complex are used to determine the properties of grains and the composition of ices before they are incorporated into circumstellar envelopes and disks. H{sub 2}O ices form at extinctions of A{sub K} = 0.25 ± 0.07 mag (A{sub V} = 2.1 ± 0.6). Such a low ice formation threshold is consistent with the absence of nearby hot stars. Overall, the Lupus clouds are in an early chemical phase. The abundance of H{sub 2}O ice (2.3 ± 0.1 × 10{sup –5} relative to N{sub H}) is typical for quiescent regions, but lower by a factor of three to four compared to dense envelopes of young stellar objects. The low solid CH{sub 3}OH abundance (<3%-8% relative to H{sub 2}O) indicates a low gas phase H/CO ratio, which is consistent with the observed incomplete CO freeze out. Furthermore it is found that the grains in Lupus experienced growth by coagulation. The mid-infrared (>5 μm) continuum extinction relative to A{sub K} increases as a function of A{sub K}. Most Lupus lines of sight are well fitted with empirically derived extinction curves corresponding to R{sub V} ∼ 3.5 (A{sub K} = 0.71) and R{sub V} ∼ 5.0 (A{sub K} = 1.47). For lines of sight with A{sub K} > 1.0 mag, the τ{sub 9.7}/A{sub K} ratio is a factor of two lower compared to the diffuse medium. Below 1.0 mag, values scatter between the dense and diffuse medium ratios. The absence of a gradual transition between diffuse and dense medium-type dust indicates that local conditions matter in the process that sets the τ{sub 9.7}/A{sub K} ratio. This process is likely related to grain growth by coagulation, as traced by the A{sub 7.4}/A{sub K} continuum extinction ratio, but not to ice mantle formation. Conversely, grains acquire ice mantles before the process of coagulation starts.

  14. The evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the structure and evolution of molecular clouds is reviewed, with particular emphasis given to the relationship with star formation. The basic hypothesis is that magnetic fields are the primary agents for supporting molecular clouds, although damped Alfven waves may play an important role in the direction parallel to the field lines. This picture naturally leads to a conception of 'bimodal star formation'. It is proposed that high-mass stars form from the overall gravitational collapse of a supercritical cloud, whereas low-mass stars form from small individual cores that slowly condense by ambipolar diffusion from a more extended envelope until they pass the brink of graviational instability and begin to collapse dynamically from 'inside-out'. The evidence that the infall stage of protostellar evolution is terminated by the development of a powerful stellar wind is reviewed.

  15. The evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the structure and evolution of molecular clouds is reviewed, with particular emphasis given to the relationship with star formation. The basic hypothesis is that magnetic fields are the primary agents for supporting molecular clouds, although damped Alfven waves may play an important role in the direction parallel to the field lines. This picture naturally leads to a conception of 'bimodal star formation'. It is proposed that high-mass stars form from the overall gravitational collapse of a supercritical cloud, whereas low-mass stars form from small individual cores that slowly condense by ambipolar diffusion from a more extended envelope until they pass the brink of graviational instability and begin to collapse dynamically from 'inside-out'. The evidence that the infall stage of protostellar evolution is terminated by the development of a powerful stellar wind is reviewed.

  16. An upper limit to the acetylene abundance toward BN in the orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Kim, Y. H.; Irvine, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    A search for the acetylene (C2H2) nu3 infrared vibration-rotation absorption near 3 microns toward the Becklin-Neugebauer source in the Orion molecular cloud is reported. The relative abundance of C2H2/CO in the quiescent gas is less than 0.003.

  17. OH+ in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven R.; Porras, A. J.; Welty, D. E.; Ritchey, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    We are conducting a comprehensive survey of absorption from diffuse molecular clouds from archival UVES/VLT data. Here we focus on OH+ and OH results, which indicate these molecules prefer different environments. The dominant absorption feature in OH+ arises from a main component seen in CH+, while OH absorption follows CN absorption. This distinction provides useful constraints on OH chemistry in diffuse molecular clouds. Since CH+ detections favor low-density gas with small fractions of molecular hydrogen, this must be true for OH+ as well, confirming OH+ and H2O+ observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. Our observed correspondence indicates that the cosmic ray ionization rate derived from these measurements pertains to atomic gas. The association of OH absorption with gas rich in CN is attributed to the need for high enough density and molecular fraction before detectable amounts of OH are seen. Thus, while OH+ leads to OH production, chemical arguments suggest that their abundances are controlled by different sets of conditions and coexist with different sets of observed species. Of particular note is that non-thermal chemistry appears to play a limited role in the synthesis of OH in diffuse molecular clouds.

  18. Rethinking a Mysterious Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imara, N.

    2015-04-01

    I present high-resolution column density maps of two molecular clouds (MCs) having strikingly different star formation rates. To better understand the unusual, massive G216-2.5, an MC with no massive star formation, the distribution of its molecular gas is compared to that of the Rosette MC. Far-infrared data from Herschel are used to derive N(H2) maps of each cloud and are combined with {{I}CO} data to determine the CO-to-H2 ratio, {{X}CO}. In addition, the probability distribution functions (PDFs) and cumulative mass fractions of the clouds are compared. For G216-2.5, < N({{H}2})> =7.8× {{10}20} cm-2 and < {{X}CO}> =2.2× {{10}20} cm-2 (K km s-1)-1 for the Rosette, < N({{H}2})> =1.8× {{10}21} cm-2 and < {{X}CO}> =2.8× {{10}20} cm-2 (K km s-1)-1. The PDFs of both clouds are log-normal for extinctions below ˜2 mag and both show departures from log-normality at high extinctions. Although it is the less-massive cloud, the Rosette has a higher fraction of its mass in the form of dense gas and contains 1389 {{M}⊙ } of gas above the so-called extinction threshold for star formation, {{A}V}=7.3 mag. The G216-2.5 cloud has 874 {{M}⊙ } of dense gas above this threshold.

  19. OH+ in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, A. J.; Federman, S. R.; Welty, D. E.; Ritchey, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Near ultraviolet observations of OH+ and OH in diffuse molecular clouds reveal a preference for different environments. The dominant absorption feature in OH+ arises from a main component seen in CH+ (that with the highest CH+/CH column density ratio), while OH follows CN absorption. This distinction provides new constraints on OH chemistry in these clouds. Since CH+ detections favor low-density gas with small fractions of molecular hydrogen, this must be true for OH+ as well, confirming OH+ and H2O+ observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. Our observed correspondence indicates that the cosmic ray ionization rate derived from these measurements pertains to mainly atomic gas. The association of OH absorption with gas rich in CN is attributed to the need for a high enough density and molecular fraction before detectable amounts are seen. Thus, while OH+ leads to OH production, chemical arguments suggest that their abundances are controlled by different sets of conditions and that they coexist with different sets of observed species. Of particular note is that non-thermal chemistry appears to play a limited role in the synthesis of OH in diffuse molecular clouds.

  20. TWO POPULATIONS OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Lisa H.; Keto, Eric; Ho, Luis C.

    2012-05-10

    Super star clusters-extremely massive clusters found predominately in starburst environments-are essential building blocks in the formation of galaxies and thought to dominate star formation in the high-redshift universe. However, the transformation from molecular gas into these ultracompact star clusters is not well understood. To study this process, we used the Submillimeter Array and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to obtain high angular resolution ({approx}1.''5 or 160 pc) images of the Antennae overlap region in CO(2-1) to search for the molecular progenitors of the super star clusters. We resolve the molecular gas distribution into a large number of clouds, extending the differential cloud mass function down to a 5{sigma} completeness limit of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. We identify a distinct break in the mass function around log M{sub mol}/M{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 6.5, which separates the molecular clouds into two distinct populations. The smaller, less massive clouds reside in more quiescent areas in the region, while the larger, more massive clouds cluster around regions of intense star formation. A broken power-law fit to the mass function yields slopes of {alpha} = -1.39 {+-} 0.10 and {alpha} = -1.44 {+-} 0.14 for the low- and high-mass cloud population, well matched to the mass function found for super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies. We find large velocity gradients and velocity dispersions at the locations of intense star formation, suggestive of compressive shocks. It is likely that these environmental factors contribute to the formation of the observed massive molecular clouds and super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies.

  1. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  2. Molecular Clouds: Observation to Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Ryutov, D D; Mizuta, A; Remington, B A; Pound, M W

    2004-05-06

    Our ongoing investigation of how 'Pillars' and other structure form in molecular clouds irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) stars has revealed that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is strongly suppressed by recombination in the photoevaporated outflow, that clumps and filaments may be key, that the evolution of structure is well-modeled by compressible hydrodynamics, and that directionality of the UV radiation may have significant effects. We discuss a generic, flexible set of laboratory experiments that can address these issues.

  3. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  4. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  5. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  6. Formation of Massive Molecular Cloud Cores by Cloud-Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-01

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  7. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  8. SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yuri; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Sakai, Nami; Aikawa, Yuri; Kawamura, Akiko

    2016-02-20

    Spectral line survey observations of seven molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been conducted in the 3 mm band with the Mopra 22 m telescope to reveal chemical compositions in low metallicity conditions. Spectral lines of fundamental species such as CS, SO, CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC are detected in addition to those of CO and {sup 13}CO, while CH{sub 3}OH is not detected in any source and N{sub 2}H{sup +} is marginally detected in two sources. The molecular-cloud scale (10 pc scale) chemical composition is found to be similar among the seven sources regardless of different star formation activities, and hence, it represents the chemical composition characteristic of the LMC without influences by star formation activities. In comparison with chemical compositions of Galactic sources, the characteristic features are (1) deficient N-bearing molecules, (2) abundant CCH, and (3) deficient CH{sub 3}OH. Feature (1) is due to a lower elemental abundance of nitrogen in the LMC, whereas features (2) and (3) seem to originate from extended photodissociation regions and warmer temperature in cloud peripheries due to a lower abundance of dust grains in the low metallicity condition. In spite of general resemblance of chemical abundances among the seven sources, the CS/HCO{sup +} and SO/HCO{sup +} ratios are found to be slightly higher in a quiescent molecular cloud. An origin of this trend is discussed in relation to possible depletion of sulfur along the molecular cloud formation.

  9. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Yanett; Garay, Guido; Rathborne, Jill M.; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2016-02-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with overdensities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the overdensities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find that most clumps have sufficient mass and density to form high-mass stars, supporting the idea that high-mass stars and clusters form within filaments.

  10. The W3 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Lada, C. J.; Hewagama, T.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive J = 1 to 0 (C-12)(O-16) and (C-13)(O-16) observations of the W3 molecular cloud and the surrounding region are presented and discussed. The velocity structure in the region is strongly suggestive of a model of large-scale, externally induced star formation. It is shown that star formation occurred in W3 and the nearby star-forming region W3(OH) after the gas within which they lie was swept up by the expanding W4 ionization front. Two condensations dominate the mass structure of the core of W3, one associated with IRS 4 and the other with IRS 5 and 1. A velocity difference between the two condensations is interpreted as indicating the two sources actually are discrete knots.

  11. Hydroxyl emission in translucent molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Magnani, L.; Siskind, L. Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis )

    1990-08-01

    Observations of the 18 cm ground-state hyperfine transitions of OH in translucent molecular clouds at high Galactic latitudes are presented. Fifteen lines of sight in nine high-latitude clouds were observed with the Arecibo radio telescope. In all instances, the column density obtained from the 1665 and 1667 MHz transitions is less than 2.0 x 10 to the 14th/sq cm. If the visual extinction and gas-to-dust ratio along the observed lines of sight are typical of translucent clouds, then the OH abundance with respect to H is of order 10 to the -8th to 10 to the -7th. This value is normal for low-extinction dust clouds and contradicts an earlier study of the OH abundance in high-latitude clouds. Without an enhanced OH molecular abundance, the case for a shock-front origin for the high-latitude molecular clouds is weakened. 33 refs.

  12. Deuterium fractionation in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanova, A.; Caselli, P.; Pon, A.; Belloche, A.; André, Ph.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In cold (T< 25 K) and dense (nH> 104 cm-3) interstellar clouds, molecules such as CO are significantly frozen onto dust grain surfaces. Deuterium fractionation is known to be very efficient in these conditions as CO limits the abundance of H3+, which is the starting point of deuterium chemistry. In particular, N2D+ is an excellent tracer of dense and cold gas in star-forming regions. Aims: We measure the deuterium fraction, RD, and the CO depletion factor, fd, towards a number of starless and protostellar cores in the L1688 region of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex and search for variations based upon environmental differences across L1688. The kinematic properties of the dense gas traced by the N2H+ and N2D+ (1-0) lines are also discussed. Methods: Deuterium fraction has been measured via observations of the J = 1-0 transition of N2H+ and N2D+ towards 33 dense cores in different regions of L1688. We estimated the CO depletion factor using C17O(1-0) and 850 μm dust continuum emission from the SCUBA survey. We carried out all line observations with the IRAM 30 m antenna. Results: The dense cores show large (≃2-40%) deuterium fractions with significant variations between the sub-regions of L1688. The CO depletion factor also varies from one region to another (between ≃1 and 7). Two different correlations are found between deuterium fraction and CO depletion factor: cores in regions A, B2, and I show increasing RD with increasing fd, similar to previous studies of deuterium fraction in pre-stellar cores; cores in regions B1, B1B2, C, E, F, and H show a steeper RD - fd correlation with large deuterium fractions occurring in fairly quiescent gas with relatively low CO freeze-out factors. These are probably recently formed, centrally concentrated starless cores, which have not yet started the contraction phase towards protostellar formation. We also find that the deuterium fraction is affected by the amount of turbulence, dust temperature, and

  13. Variations in the HCN/HNC abundance ratio in the Orion molecular cloud.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, P F; Irvine, W M; Hjalmarson, A; Elldér, J

    1986-11-01

    We have used observations of the rare isotopes of HCN and HNC to determine the relative abundance of these two chemical isomers along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio [HCN]/[HNC] decreases by more than an order of magnitude from the relatively warm plateau and hot core sources toward the KL nebula to the colder, more quiescent clouds to the north and south. Even in the cooler regions, however, the ratio is an order of magnitude larger than that found in previous investigations of cold dark clouds. We determine the kinetic temperature in the regions we have studied from new observations of methylacetylene (CH3CCH), together with other recent estimates of the gas temperature near KL. The results suggest that the warmer portions of the cloud are dominated by different chemical pathways than those in the general interstellar cloud material.

  14. Molecular Anions in Protostars, Prestellar Cores and Dark Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, Steven; Buckle, Jane; Wash, Catherine; Millar, Tom

    2011-01-01

    From our recent survey work using the Green Bank Telescope, microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H have been detected in six new sources. Using HC3N = 10(exp -9) emission maps, we targeted the most carbon-chain-rich sources for our anion survey, which included the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1251A-IRS3, the prestellar cores L1389-SMM1 and L1512, and the interstellar clouds Ll172A, TMC-1C and L1495B. Derived [C6H(-)]/[C6H] anion-to-neutral ratios are approximately 1-10. The greatest C6H(-) column densities are found in the quiescent clouds TMC-1C and L1495B, but the anion-to-neutral ratios are greatest in the prestellar cores and protostars. These results are interpreted in terms of the physical and chemical properties of the sources, and the implications for molecular cloud chemistry are discussed.

  15. Theory of grain alignment in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne G.

    1993-01-01

    Research accomplishments are presented and include the following: (1) mathematical theory of grain alignment; (2) super-paramagnetic alignment of molecular cloud grains; and (3) theory of grain alignment by ambipolar diffusion.

  16. Star formation in evolving molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völschow, M.; Banerjee, R.; Körtgen, B.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular clouds are the principle stellar nurseries of our universe; they thus remain a focus of both observational and theoretical studies. From observations, some of the key properties of molecular clouds are well known but many questions regarding their evolution and star formation activity remain open. While numerical simulations feature a large number and complexity of involved physical processes, this plethora of effects may hide the fundamentals that determine the evolution of molecular clouds and enable the formation of stars. Purely analytical models, on the other hand, tend to suffer from rough approximations or a lack of completeness, limiting their predictive power. In this paper, we present a model that incorporates central concepts of astrophysics as well as reliable results from recent simulations of molecular clouds and their evolutionary paths. Based on that, we construct a self-consistent semi-analytical framework that describes the formation, evolution, and star formation activity of molecular clouds, including a number of feedback effects to account for the complex processes inside those objects. The final equation system is solved numerically but at much lower computational expense than, for example, hydrodynamical descriptions of comparable systems. The model presented in this paper agrees well with a broad range of observational results, showing that molecular cloud evolution can be understood as an interplay between accretion, global collapse, star formation, and stellar feedback.

  17. Dust scattering from the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Sathya; Murthy, Jayant; Karuppath, Narayanankutty

    2017-04-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse ultraviolet emission near the Taurus Molecular Cloud based on observations made by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. We used a Monte Carlo dust scattering model to show that about half of the scattered flux originates in the molecular cloud with 25 per cent arising in the foreground and 25 per cent behind the cloud. The best-fitting albedo of the dust grains is 0.3, but the geometry is such that we could not constrain the phase function asymmetry factor (g).

  18. Molecular Clouds in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Mark; Dame, T. M.

    2015-08-01

    In the past twenty years, the reconnaissance of 12CO and 13CO emission in the Milky Way by single-dish millimeter-wave telescopes has expanded our view and understanding of interstellar molecular gas. We enumerate the major surveys of CO emission along the Galactic plane and summarize the various approaches that leverage these data to determine the large-scale distribution of molecular gas: its radial and vertical distributions, its concentration into clouds, and its relationship to spiral structure. The integrated properties of molecular clouds are compiled from catalogs derived from the CO surveys using uniform assumptions regarding the Galactic rotation curve, solar radius, and the CO-to-H2 conversion factor. We discuss the radial variations of cloud surface brightness, the distributions of cloud mass and size, and scaling relations between velocity dispersion, cloud size, and surface density that affirm that the larger clouds are gravitationally bound. Measures of density structure and gas kinematics within nearby, well-resolved clouds are examined and attributed to the effects of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We review the arguments for short, intermediate, and long molecular lifetimes based on the observational record. The review concludes with questions that shall require further observational attention.

  19. Fast Molecular Cloud Destruction Requires Fast Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Burkert, Andreas; Ibáñez-Mejía, Juan C.

    2017-09-01

    A large fraction of the gas in the Galaxy is cold, dense, and molecular. If all this gas collapsed under the influence of gravity and formed stars in a local free-fall time, the star formation rate in the Galaxy would exceed that observed by more than an order of magnitude. Other star-forming galaxies behave similarly. Yet, observations and simulations both suggest that the molecular gas is indeed gravitationally collapsing, albeit hierarchically. Prompt stellar feedback offers a potential solution to the low observed star formation rate if it quickly disrupts star-forming clouds during gravitational collapse. However, this requires that molecular clouds must be short-lived objects, raising the question of how so much gas can be observed in the molecular phase. This can occur only if molecular clouds form as quickly as they are destroyed, maintaining a global equilibrium fraction of dense gas. We therefore examine cloud formation timescales. We first demonstrate that supernova and superbubble sweeping cannot produce dense gas at the rate required to match the cloud destruction rate. On the other hand, Toomre gravitational instability can reach the required production rate. We thus argue that, although dense, star-forming gas may last only around a single global free-fall time; the dense gas in star-forming galaxies can globally exist in a state of dynamic equilibrium between formation by gravitational instability and disruption by stellar feedback. At redshift z ≳ 2, the Toomre instability timescale decreases, resulting in a prediction of higher molecular gas fractions at early times, in agreement with the observations.

  20. Molecular Clouds in the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Y.

    Temperature, density, metallicity, and radiation field are important parameters that characterize the physical and chemical state of molecular clouds. In order to understand physics and chemistry, it is therefore necessary to observe and analyse molecular clouds in a variety of ennvironments and to combine observational data with results from model calculations. Observationally, it is possible to vary the first two parameters (temperature and density) within our Milky Way by observing clouds in different locations. The metallicity, however, does not change drastically in the plane of the Milky Way. As two of the closest galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds provide metallicities which are factors of 3 and 10 lower (Westerlund 1991). If we treat our Galaxy as a "chemically" evolved system, the Magellanic System are without doubt still in an early stage of "chemical" evolution, with elemental abundances that may resemble those that characterize larger galaxies at high redshifts. In addition, the radiation field is stronger than in the solar neighborhood. As a consequence of low metallicities and strong UV radiation field, the Magellanic Clouds are characterized by low dust-to-gas mass ratios. They are thus a "laboratory" where we can study molecular clouds with exotic boundary conditions and it is easy to foresee that detailed observations will have a great impact on our general knowledge of astrochemistry and astrophysice of interstellar clouds. To date, it is possible to carry out a detailed molecular study of Magellanic Cloud cores located at distances of 50 - 60 kpc. Two prominent molecular clouds -- one in the LMC and one in the SMC -- have been observed. Preliminary results are presented. On the other hand, searches for a variety of molecules in the LMC & SMC have been made (e.g. Johansson et al. 1994; Chin et al. 1997, 1998) so far mostly towards molecular cores associated with prominent HII regions. This does not cover, however, the entire range of physical and

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF WATER VAPOR IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Snell, Ronald L.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Hollenbach, David J.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li Di; Neufeld, David A. E-mail: vtolls@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: mkaufman@email.sjsu.edu E-mail: neufeld@pha.jhu.edu

    2011-01-20

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C{sub 2}H, {sup 13}CO J = 5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N{sub 2}H{sup +}. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to A{sub V}< 15 mag, the ratio of H{sub 2}O to C{sup 18}O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large A{sub V}. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations of comparing measured water-vapor column densities with such traditional cloud tracers as {sup 13}CO or C{sup 18}O. These results also support cloud models that incorporate freeze out of molecules as a critical component in determining the depth-dependent abundance of water vapor.

  2. Temperature Evolution of Molecular Clouds in the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Nico; Ott, Jürgen; Walter, Fabian; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Beuther, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    We infer the absolute time dependence of kinematic gas temperature along a proposed orbit of molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Galactic Center (GC). Ammonia gas temperature maps are one of the results of the ``Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center'' (SWAG, PI: J. Ott); the dynamical model of molecular clouds in the CMZ was taken from Kruijssen et al. (2015). We find that gas temperatures increase as a function of time in both regimes before and after the cloud passes pericenter on its orbit in the GC potential. This is consistent with the recent proposal that pericenter passage triggers gravitational collapse. Other investigated quantities (line width, column density, opacity) show no strong sign of time dependence but are likely dominated by cloud-to-cloud variations.

  3. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  4. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  5. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  6. Cold Atomic Hydrogen, Narrow Self-Absorption, and the Age of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history, and current work on HI and its importance in star formation. Through many observations of HI Narrow Self Absorption (HINSA) the conclusions are drawn and presented. Local molecular clouds have HI well-mixed with molecular constituents This HI is cold, quiescent, and must be well-shielded from the UV radiation field The density and fractional abundance (wrt H2) of the cold HI are close to steady state values The time required to convert these starless clouds from purely HI initial state to observed present composition is a few to ten million years This timescale is a lower limit - if dense clouds being swept up from lower density regions by shocks, the time to accumulate material to get A(sub v) is approximately 1 and provide required shielding may be comparable or longer

  7. Cold Atomic Hydrogen, Narrow Self-Absorption, and the Age of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history, and current work on HI and its importance in star formation. Through many observations of HI Narrow Self Absorption (HINSA) the conclusions are drawn and presented. Local molecular clouds have HI well-mixed with molecular constituents This HI is cold, quiescent, and must be well-shielded from the UV radiation field The density and fractional abundance (wrt H2) of the cold HI are close to steady state values The time required to convert these starless clouds from purely HI initial state to observed present composition is a few to ten million years This timescale is a lower limit - if dense clouds being swept up from lower density regions by shocks, the time to accumulate material to get A(sub v) is approximately 1 and provide required shielding may be comparable or longer

  8. Hydrodynamical processes in the Draco molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Odenwald, S.F.; Rickard, L.J.

    1987-07-01

    IRAS 100 micron images of the Draco cloud show several cloud components with cometary plumes of material extending 7-10 pc. The brightest plumes are very uniform in thickness but often terminate in large amorphous regions. The structure is consistent with low Reynolds number hydrodynamics and is suggestive of a molecular cloud shedding material in a plume as it falls onto the galactic plane from the halo region. A subsequent study of the 100 micron images from the entire IRAS survey has revealed a total of 14 additional cometlike objects with /b II/ greater then 15 deg. 42 references.

  9. On the Stability and Evolution of Isolated Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Nelson, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of three dimensional hydrodynamic models of evolving, isolated, low mass, quiescent clouds and Bok gobules, where the interstellar radiation field plays an important role in the thermal and chemical evolution, and thermal pressure provides dominant support against gravitational collapse.

  10. On the Stability and Evolution of Isolated Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Nelson, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of three dimensional hydrodynamic models of evolving, isolated, low mass, quiescent clouds and Bok gobules, where the interstellar radiation field plays an important role in the thermal and chemical evolution, and thermal pressure provides dominant support against gravitational collapse.

  11. Shock-Induced Molecular Astrochemistry in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Hewitt, John; Reach, William; Andersen, Morten; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Supernovae have a formidable impact on the dynamics, chemistry and evolution of their local environments. Shocks carve into dense molecular clouds, radiatively cooling the remnant through strong molecular hydrogen and atomic lines. One of important postshock reaction is to convert atomic oxygen to molecular form such as CO, OH and water and these lines fall into THz. I will present observations of a dozen interacting remnants with prominent infrared lines detected by Spitzer, ISO, and ground-based IR telescopes, and show motivation of our granted Herschel and SOFIA observations. Supernovae provide simpler cases of impact of shock than other systems such as protoplanetary disks or protostellar jets where photoionization takes place. In the supernova remnants, the excitation of IR lines of molecular hydrogen requires both a slow shock through dense clumps, and a fast shock through interclump gas. The ortho-to-para ratio is typically much less than LTE, indicating shocks propagating into cold quiescent cloud cores. Evidence of dust grain heating and shattering by the shock is derived from black-body fits to the dust continuum. While radiative cooling and dust processing is beginning to be well understood, the observed oxygen chemistry deviates from equilibrium. We observe enhanced ionization in the shocked gas, which may be by cosmic rays as several of these interacting remnants are prominent GeV gamma-ray sources. The CO, OH and water have been detected from remnants by ISO and water is more than OH, but OH has still elevated abundance compared to theoretical predictions. Finally with Herschel and SOFIA provide opportunity to resolve complicated cooling and astrochemical networks of oxygen-bearing molecules and oxygen chemistry.

  12. Molecular outflows in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, Michael; Lada, Charles J.; Snell, Ronald L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of J = 1-0 emission from CO in nine suspected molecular outflows in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud are presented. It is found that, if the five sources which are confirmed to be outflows conserve momentum as they evolve, they will sweep up at least 0.6 percent of the mass of the entire cloud before coming into pressure equilibrium with the ambient gas. This number indicates that it should take at most 160 episodes of similar outflow activity in order to sweep up the bulk of the Mon OB1 cloud to highly supersonic speeds.

  13. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  14. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale 13CO map (containing 33,000 spectra) of the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Orion is presented which contains the Orion Nebula, NGC1977, and the LI641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. This morphology may result from the effects of star formation in the region or embedded magnetic fields in the cloud. We suggest a simple picture for the evolution of the Orion-A cloud and the formation of the major filament. A rotating proto-cloud (counter rotating with respect to the galaxy) contians a b-field aligned with the galaxtic plane. The northern protion of this cloud collapsed first, perhaps triggered by the pressure of the Ori I OB association. The magnetic field combined with the anisotropic pressure produced by the OB-association breaks the symmetry of the pancake instability, a filament rather than a disc is produced. The growth of instabilities in the filament formed sub-condensations which are recent sites of star formation.

  15. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. S.; Cong, H.; Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Two large-scale 2.6 mm CO surveys of the galactic plane, one in the first quadrant (l = 12 to 60 deg, b = -1 to +1 deg), the other in the second (l = 105 to 139 deg, b = -3 to +3 deg), have provided evidence that, contrary to previous findings, molecular clouds constitute a highly specific tracer of spiral structure. Molecular counterparts of five of the classical 21-cm spiral arms have been identified: the Perseus arm, the local arm (including Lindblad's local expanding ring), the Sagittarius arm, the Scutum arm, and the 4-kpc arm. The region between the local arm and the Perseus arm is apparently devoid of molecular clouds, and the interarm regions of the inner Galaxy appear largely so. CO spiral structure implies that the mean lifetime of molecular clouds cannot be greater than 100 million years, the time required for interstellar matter to cross a spiral arm. Conservation of mass then sets a limit on the fraction of the interstellar medium in the form of molecular clouds: it cannot exceed one-half at any distance from the galactic center in the range 4-12 kpc.

  16. Gamma rays from giant molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Kanbach, Gottfried

    1990-01-01

    Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) are massive, bounded, cool, dense regions containing mostly H2, but also H I, CO, and other molecules. These clouds occupy less than 1 percent of the galactic volume, but are a substantial part of the interstellar mass. They are irradiated by the high energy cosmic rays which are possibly modulated by the matter and magnetic fields within the clouds. The product of cosmic-ray flux and matter density is traced by the emission of high energy gamma-rays. A spherical cloud model is considered and the gamma ray flux from several GMCs within 1 kpc of the sun which should be detectable by the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) instrument on GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory).

  17. Photodissociation of CO in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röllig, M.; Hegmann, M.; Kegel, W. H.

    2002-09-01

    We study the formation of CO molecules at the edge of dense molecular clouds. As shown by van Dishoeck & Black \\cite{dishoeck88} the CO photodissociation process is dominated by line rather than continuous absorption. Hence, a turbulent velocity field, modifying the line shape, strongly affects the CO density distribution. We investigate these effects in detail. To describe the turbulent velocity field we use the statistical approach by G. Traving and collaborators (cf. Gail et al. \\cite{GaH74}) which accounts for a finite correlation length for the velocity field. We solve the radiative transfer equation selfconsistently with the rate equations describing the chemical reactions. One main goal of the investigation is an improvement of molecular cloud models used to analyze observational data. To bring the observational data into agreement with the model of an isothermal spherical cloud being stabilized by turbulent and thermal pressure it turned out to be neccessary to implement a cut off radius for the CO density distribution in order to define a cloud edge (Piehler & Kegel \\cite{Pie95}). This radius depends heavily on the intensity and density distribution in the outer parts of the cloud. Our calculations show that turbulence has substantial influence on the penetration of UV radiation into a molecular cloud. Even turbulent velocities in the order of a few thermal velocities are sufficient to allow the radiation to penetrate significantly deeper into the cloud than in a nonturbulent medium. On the other hand correlation length effects may lead to a decrease in photodissociation efficiency. By accounting for a finite correlation length of the stochastic velocity field the self-shielding of CO absorption bands is considerably enhanced and CO molecules can effectively form in depths that have a much stronger UV intensity in standard radiative transfer models.

  18. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: The role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.; Stewart, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes.

  19. Cloud-cloud collision in the Galactic center 50 km s-1 molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uehara, Kenta

    2015-12-01

    We performed a search of star-forming sites influenced by external factors, such as SNRs, H II regions, and cloud-cloud collisions (CCCs), to understand the star-forming activity in the Galactic center region using the NRO Galactic Center Survey in SiO v = 0, J = 2-1, H13CO+J = 1-0, and CS J = 1-0 emission lines obtained with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We found a half-shell-like feature (HSF) with a high integrated line intensity ratio of ∫TB(SiO v = 0, J = 2-1)dv/∫TB(H13CO+J = 1-0)dv ˜ 6-8 in the 50 km s-1 molecular cloud; the HSF is a most conspicuous molecular cloud in the region and harbors an active star-forming site where several compact H II regions can be seen. The high ratio in the HSF indicates that the cloud contains huge shocked molecular gas. The HSF can be also seen as a half-shell feature in the position-velocity diagram. A hypothesis explaining the chemical and kinetic properties of the HSF is that the feature originates from a CCC. We analyzed the CS J = 1-0 emission line data obtained with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array to reveal the relation between the HSF and the molecular cloud cores in the cloud. We made a cumulative core mass function (CMF) of the molecular cloud cores within the HSF. The CMF in the CCC region is not truncated at least up to ˜2500 M⊙, although the CMF of the non-CCC region reaches the upper limit of ˜1500 M⊙. Most massive molecular cores with Mgas > 750 M⊙ are located only around the ridge of the HSF and adjoin the compact H II region. These may be a sign of massive star formation induced by CCCs in the Galactic center region.

  20. Molecular clouds. [significance in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand star formation in the context of the dense interstellar molecular gas from which stars are made. Attention is given to how molecular observations (e.g., UV spectroscopy and radio 21-cm and recombination line observations) provide data on the physical state of the dense interstellar gas; observations of H II regions, stellar associations, and dark nebulae are discussed. CO clouds are studied with reference to radial velocity, temperature, density, ionization, magnetic field.

  1. Molecular clouds. [significance in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand star formation in the context of the dense interstellar molecular gas from which stars are made. Attention is given to how molecular observations (e.g., UV spectroscopy and radio 21-cm and recombination line observations) provide data on the physical state of the dense interstellar gas; observations of H II regions, stellar associations, and dark nebulae are discussed. CO clouds are studied with reference to radial velocity, temperature, density, ionization, magnetic field.

  2. CHaMP: From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP), and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al. (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state. This is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two other posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas (Schap et al. 2015), and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT & CTIO data, and on MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al. 2015).

  3. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  4. Chemistry in Infrared Dark Cloud Clumps: a Molecular Line Survey at 3 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, J. M.; Foster, J. B.

    2011-05-01

    We have observed 37 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) containing a total of 159 clumps with the 22-meter ATNF Mopra Telescope in Australia using high-density molecular tracers at 3 mm. We carried out single-pointing observations in the broad-band mode and detected 10 different molecular lines. The detections rates are dominated by HNC (1-0) (98%), N2H+ (1-0) (97%), and HCO+ (1-0) (88%) lines, showing similar values when we divide the sample into active and quiescent clumps (based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS emission). However, we find differences of 30% in the detection rates for the H13CO+, HN13C, and HC3N lines. We also find that the N2H+ FWHMs of active clumps are broader than those of quiescent clumps, possibly due to ongoing star formation activity driving turbulence. Integrated intensity and abundance ratios of some molecular lines vary between quiescent and active clumps tracing chemical differences which arise from different evolutionary states.

  5. Translucent molecular clouds: Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandishoeck, E. F.; Black, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Few suitable stars behind molecular clouds have been identified. A limited survey was performed of interstellar lines toward highly reddened stars in the southern sky, using the ESO 1.4 m CAT telescope with a Reticon detector, and the Cerro Tololo 4 m telescope equipped with a GEC charge coupled device (CCD) detector. Because of the reduced extinction at longer wavelengths, molecules were searched for with transitions in the red part of the spectrum such as C2 and CN. For some lines-of-sight for which C2 was detected, the 4300 A line of CH was also observed. Absorption lines of interstellar C2 around 8750 A were detected in the spectra of about 1/4 of the 36 observed stars. The inferred C2 column densities range between 10 to the 13th power and 10 to the 14th power sq. cm., and are up to an order of magnitude larger than those found for diffuse clouds. The observed column densities of CH correlate very well with those of C2 over this range. In contrast, the measured column densities of CN vary by orders of magnitude between the various regions, and they do not correlate with those of C2 and CH. The observed rotational population distribution of C2 also provides information about the physical conditions in the clouds. Models of translucent molecular clouds have been constructed along the lines described by van Dishoeck and Black (1986) for diffuse clouds. The models compute accurately the fractions of atomic and molecular hydrogen as functions of depth into the clouds, as well as the excitation of H2 by ultraviolet pumping. They also incorporate a detailed treatment of the photodissociation processes of the molecules (cf. van Dishoeck 1986), which play an important role in the chemistry up to depths of about 3 mag.

  6. Thermal instabilities in diffuse molecular clouds - Formation of molecular cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Frank R.; Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of diffuse clouds to thermal instabilities is examined using the semiempirical cooling function derived by Tarafdar et al. (1985) for these clouds. It is found that diffuse clouds which obey such a cooling function are susceptible to thermal instability at densities n of less than about 70-80/cu cm. The growth rate for instability is large and the mass contained in unstable regions ranges from about 0.001 to 1 solar mass. It is suggested that such instabilities may trigger formation of molecular cloud cores of the type found in low-mass molecular clouds (e.g., TMC-2). Criteria for thermal instability in self-gravitating systems are also derived.

  7. Thermal instabilities in diffuse molecular clouds - Formation of molecular cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Frank R.; Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of diffuse clouds to thermal instabilities is examined using the semiempirical cooling function derived by Tarafdar et al. (1985) for these clouds. It is found that diffuse clouds which obey such a cooling function are susceptible to thermal instability at densities n of less than about 70-80/cu cm. The growth rate for instability is large and the mass contained in unstable regions ranges from about 0.001 to 1 solar mass. It is suggested that such instabilities may trigger formation of molecular cloud cores of the type found in low-mass molecular clouds (e.g., TMC-2). Criteria for thermal instability in self-gravitating systems are also derived.

  8. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andy; Johnstone, D. I.; Kaufman, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular clouds exhibit large linewidths, which are usually interpreted as being due to supersonic turbulence. This turbulence plays a key role in many theories of star formation, as it is believed to help support and fragment molecular clouds. Current numerical MHD simulations show that the turbulent energy of a molecular cloud dissipates on the order of a crossing time, but do not explicitly follow how this energy is released. We have run models of C-type shocks, based on Kaufman & Neufeld (1996), propagating into gas with densities near 1000 cm3 at velocities of a few km/s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with the dissipation of turbulent energy in shocks within molecular clouds. Combining these shock models and estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation (Basu & Murali 2001), we produce synthetic CO spectra and predict those line emissions that will be observable with current and upcoming observational facilities, such as Herschel, SOFIA, ALMA, and CCAT. We compare our synthetic shock spectra to the photodissociation region (PDR) models of Kaufman et al. (1999) and show that mid-J CO lines (e.g., CO J = 7 to 6) from molecular clouds illuminated by standard interstellar radiation fields are dominated by emission from shocked gas. We also present Herschel observations of these shock tracing lines. References: Basu, S. & Murali, C. 2001, ApJ, 551, 743 Kaufman, M. J. & Neufeld, D. A. 1996, ApJ, 456, 250 Kaufman, M. J., Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D. J., & Luhman, M. L. 1999, ApJ, 527, 795

  9. Molecular abundances in the Sagittarius A molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained column densities for HCO(+), HCO, HCS(+), C3H2, HC5N, SiO, OCS, HCOOH, CH3CH2OH, and CH3CCH toward Sgr A. The fractional abundance of SiO relative to molecular hydrogen in Sgr A is comparable to that for the Orion plateau, about 10 exp-7 to 10 exp -8, which may be a typical value for hot clouds. The abundances of HCO, CH3CH2OH, and CH3CCH all appear to be enhanced relative to other molecular clouds such as Sgr B2.

  10. Molecular abundances in the Sagittarius A molecular cloud.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Irvine, W M; Friberg, P

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained column densities for HCO+, HCO, HCS+, C3H2, HC5N, SiO, OCS, HCOOH, CH3CH2OH, and CH3CCH toward Sgr A. The fractional abundance of SiO relative to molecular hydrogen in Sgr A is comparable to that for the Orion plateau, approximately 10(-7)-10(-8), which may be a typical value for hot clouds. The abundances of HCO, CH3CH2OH and CH3CCH all appear to be enhanced relative to other molecular clouds such as Sgr B2.

  11. Striae and MHD Waves in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Heyer, Mark H.; Yildiz, Umut; Snell, Ronald L.; Falgarone, Edith; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of molecular striae aligned along the local magnetic field in the envelope of the Taurus molecular cloud is examined with new observations of 12CO and 13CO J=2-1 emission obtained with the 10m submillimeter telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These data identify a periodic pattern of excess blue and redshifted emission that is responsibe for the striae features. For both 12CO and 13CO, spatial variations of the J=2-1 to J=1-0 line ratio are small and are not spatially correlated with the striae locations. A medium comprised of small, unresolved cells of CO emission with a filling factor less than 1 is required to explain the average line ratios and brightness temperatures. We propose that the striae features result from the modulation of the velocities and the beam filling factor of the cells, as a result of magnetosonic waves propagating through the envelope of the Taurus molecular cloud. Such waves are likely a common feature of molecular clouds that are sub-Alfvenic and may explain low column density, cirrus-like features that are observed to be aligned along the magnetic field direction.

  12. Photoevaporating transitional discs and molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Sui, Ning

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of photoevaporating protoplanetary discs including mass influx from molecular cloud cores. We examine the influence of cloud core properties on the formation and evolution of transitional discs. We use one-dimensional thin disc assumption and calculate the evolution of the protoplanetary disc. The effects of X-ray photoevaporation are also included. Our calculations suggest that most discs should experience the transitional disc phase within 10 Myr. The formation time of a gap and its initial location are functions of the properties of the cloud cores. In some circumstances, discs can open two gaps by photoevaporation alone. The two gaps form when the gas in the disc can expand to large radius and if the mass at large radius is sufficiently small. The surface density profile of the disc determines whether the two gaps can form. Since the structure of a disc is determined by the properties of a molecular cloud core, the core properties determine the formation of two gaps in the disc. We further find that even when the photoevaporation rate is reduced to 10 per cent of the standard value, two gaps can still form in the disc. The only difference is that the formation time is delayed.

  13. Masses, luminosities and dynamics of galactic molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Rivolo, A. R.; Mooney, T. J.; Barrett, J. W.; Sage, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies takes place in molecular clouds and the Milky Way is the only galaxy in which it is possible to resolve and study the physical properties and star formation activity of individual clouds. The masses, luminosities, dynamics, and distribution of molecular clouds, primarily giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way are described and analyzed. The observational data sets are the Massachusetts-Stony Brook CO Galactic Plane Survey and the IRAS far IR images. The molecular mass and infrared luminosities of glactic clouds are then compared with the molecular mass and infrared luminosities of external galaxies.

  14. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnee, S.; Li, J.; Goodman, A. A.; Sargent, A. I.

    2008-09-01

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains (VSGs) and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity cannot be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but it is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  15. Dispersal of molecular clouds by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, S. K.; Whitworth, A. P.; Bisbas, T.; Wünsch, R.; Hubber, D.

    2012-11-01

    Feedback from massive stars is believed to be a key element in the evolution of molecular clouds. We use high-resolution 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to explore the dynamical effects of a single O7 star-emitting ionizing photons at 1049 s-1 and located at the centre of a molecular cloud with mass 104 M⊙ and radius 6.4 pc; we also perform comparison simulations in which the ionizing star is removed. The initial internal structure of the cloud is characterized by its fractal dimension, which we vary between D=2.0 and 2.8, and the standard deviation of the approximately log-normal initial densityPDF, which is σ10 = 0.38 for all clouds. (i) As regards star formation, in the short term ionizing feedback is positive, in the sense that star formation occurs much more quickly (than in the comparison simulations), in gas that is compressed by the high pressure of the ionized gas. However, in the long term ionizing feedback is negative, in the sense that most of the cloud is dispersed with an outflow rate of up to ˜10-2 M⊙yr-1, on a time-scale comparable with the sound-crossing time for the ionized gas (˜1-2 Myr ), and triggered star formation is therefore limited to a few per cent of the cloud's mass. We will describe in greater detail the statistics of the triggered star formation in a companion paper. (ii) As regards the morphology of the ionization fronts (IFs) bounding the H II region and the systematics of outflowing gas, we distinguish two regimes. For low D≲2.2, the initial cloud is dominated by large-scale structures, so the neutral gas tends to be swept up into a few extended coherent shells, and the ionized gas blows out through a few large holes between these shells; we term these H II regions shell dominated. Conversely, for high D≳2.6, the initial cloud is dominated by small-scale structures, and these are quickly overrun by the advancing IF, thereby producing neutral pillars protruding into the H II region, whilst the ionized gas

  16. Gravitational Infall in Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Mareike

    The detection and quantification of gravitational infall in molecular cloud cores is an important task for developing a self-consistent theory of star formation. First steps towards a quantification of the collapse have been performed by Larson (1981), who examined the line width-size relation of several molecular clouds and determined from their velocity dispersion the deviations from virial equilibrium. Soon after that, observational improvements made it possible to study this relation not only for molecular clouds but also in particular for its cores. Nowadays, increased observational performance allows to resolve the core region in detail (Barranco et al, 1998). Line-of-sight velocity profiles can therefore be analyzed dependend on their radial distance from the core's center. Myers et al. (1996) pointed out that observations of optically thick tracer profiles can be used to derive the strength of collapse motions. On the basis of our semi-analytical model we suggest here a further method how to determine the gravitational infall from the radial velocity gradients of optically thin tracers inside a core. Moreover, we discuss other impacts on the line-of-sight profile due to additional effects inside the core, like for instance rotation.

  17. The chemical evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, E.

    1977-01-01

    The nonequilibrium chemistry of dense molecular clouds (10,000 to 1 million hydrogen molecules per cu cm) is studied in the framework of a model that includes the latest published chemical data and most of the recent theoretical advances. In this model the only important external source of ionization is assumed to be high-energy cosmic-ray bombardment; standard charge-transfer reactions are taken into account as well as reactions that transfer charge from molecular ions to trace-metal atoms. Schemes are proposed for the synthesis of such species as NCO, HNCO, and CN. The role played by adsorption and condensation of molecules on the surface of dust grains is investigated, and effects on the chemical evolution of a dense molecular cloud are considered which result from varying the total density or the elemental abundances and from assuming negligible or severe condensation of gaseous species on dust grains. It is shown that the chemical-equilibrium time scale is given approximately by the depletion times of oxygen and nitrogen when the condensation efficiency is negligible; that this time scale is probably in the range from 1 to 4 million years, depending on the elemental composition and initial conditions in the cloud; and that this time scale is insensitive to variations in the total density.

  18. The chemical evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, E.

    1977-01-01

    The nonequilibrium chemistry of dense molecular clouds (10,000 to 1 million hydrogen molecules per cu cm) is studied in the framework of a model that includes the latest published chemical data and most of the recent theoretical advances. In this model the only important external source of ionization is assumed to be high-energy cosmic-ray bombardment; standard charge-transfer reactions are taken into account as well as reactions that transfer charge from molecular ions to trace-metal atoms. Schemes are proposed for the synthesis of such species as NCO, HNCO, and CN. The role played by adsorption and condensation of molecules on the surface of dust grains is investigated, and effects on the chemical evolution of a dense molecular cloud are considered which result from varying the total density or the elemental abundances and from assuming negligible or severe condensation of gaseous species on dust grains. It is shown that the chemical-equilibrium time scale is given approximately by the depletion times of oxygen and nitrogen when the condensation efficiency is negligible; that this time scale is probably in the range from 1 to 4 million years, depending on the elemental composition and initial conditions in the cloud; and that this time scale is insensitive to variations in the total density.

  19. The Formation of Molecular Clouds: Insights from Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2010-10-01

    Galactic star formation occurs at a surprisingly low rate. Yet, recent large-scale surveys of dark clouds in the Galaxy show that one rarely finds molecular clouds without young stellar objects, suggesting that star formation should occur rapidly upon molecular cloud formation. This rapid onset challenges the traditional concept of ``slow'' star formation in long-lived molecular clouds. It also imposes strong constraints on the physical properties of the parental clouds, mandating that a cloud's structure and dynamics controlling stellar birth must arise during its formation. This requires a new approach to study initial conditions of star formation, namely addressing the formation of molecular clouds. Taking into account the observational constraints, I will outline the physics of flow-driven molecular cloud formation. I will discuss the relevance and the limitations of this scenario for setting the star formation efficiency in our Galaxy and beyond.

  20. MOLECULAR TRACERS OF TURBULENT SHOCKS IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, A.; Johnstone, D.; Kaufman, M. J. E-mail: Douglas.Johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2012-03-20

    Giant molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence and simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence show that these supersonic motions decay in roughly a crossing time, which is less than the estimated lifetimes of molecular clouds. Such a situation requires a significant release of energy. We run models of C-type shocks propagating into gas with densities around 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} at velocities of a few km s{sup -1}, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with shock cooling of turbulent molecular clouds. We find that these shocks dissipate their energy primarily through CO rotational transitions and by compressing pre-existing magnetic fields. We present model spectra for these shocks, and by combining these models with estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation, we show that shock emission should dominate over emission from unshocked gas for mid to high rotational transitions (J > 5) of CO. We also find that the turbulent energy dissipation rate is roughly equivalent to the cosmic-ray heating rate and that the ambipolar diffusion heating rate may be significant, especially in shocked gas.

  1. Magnetic Support and Fragmentation of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Pudritz, R. E.

    1990-12-01

    Molecular clouds contain magnetic fields with energies comparable to their gravitational binding energies. In the dynamic environment of the interstellar medium, strong hydromagnetic waves are excited in this field on wavelengths longer than the ion-neutral mean free path. In a typical molecular cloud this length-scale, λmin, is of the order of 10-1 of the cloud size. On shorter length-scales the gas is without wave pressure support, and can flow down field lines. The joint effects of excess gravity and flux leakage causes a local dynamic collapse. We test our ideas with a detailed -body calculation in which we impose MHD waves on an initially uniform isothermal gas cloud. The effect of magnetic fields is included in our calculation by the frictional drag on the dominant, neutral population. In the absence of MHD waves the cloud fragments slightly while collapsing, then merges together at the centre into a single, pressure-supported, flattened object. We impose a spectrum of large amplitude Alfvén waves whose velocity amplitude varies as k-3/2, where k is the wavenumber. The initial background magnetic field is chosen to have an energy density slightly larger than the gravitational energy density. The damping is assumed to be balanced by a continuous external supply of wave energy. The simulation shows that the magnetic field and hydromagnetic waves provide sufficient support against gravity so that the cloud undergoes a global, isotropic contraction at a quarter the free-fall rate. The shortest wave present, λ≍λmin, sets the minimum fragment mass, for small Jeans masses. We follow the evolution of fragments having a minimum overdensity of 30 (corresponding to a mass m ≥ 0.4 × 10-3 Mcloud). The fragments appear quickly, and then agglomerate together, yielding an evolving mass spectrum that remains approximately a power law, dN/dm ∝ m-α, where a is 2.5 ± 0.5. Several specific tests of this theory are proposed: (i) that a short wavelength cut

  2. Molecular clouds in the extreme outer galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, S.; De Geus, E.; Thaddeus, P.

    1994-01-01

    We present observation of 11 molecular clouds with kinematic Galactocentric distances of 18-28 kpc. The most distant is approximately 10 kpc farther from the Galactic center than any previously known and apparently lies beyond the edge of the optical disk. All are associated with much larger H I concentrations, with typical offsets of approximately 40 pc from the H I peaks. CO observations with the CfA 1.2 m and National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 12 m telescopes indicate typical sizes of 20-40 pc, velocity widths of 1-3 km/s, and kinetic temperatures of 10-25 K. They apparently have lower CO luminosities than clouds near the solar circle with similar properties. Some may have associated infrared sources, but owing to the great distances of the clouds, the only general conclusion that can be made about star formation is that stars earlier than B1 are absent. The apparent scarcity of clouds like these indicates that their contribution to the mass of the ISM beyond R = 18 kpc is not significant.

  3. A search for HCCN in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGonagle, D.; Irvine, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted a deep search for HCCN towards the dark cloud TMC-l and several GMC's via its N(J) = 1(2)-->0(1) transition. HCCN was not detected in any of these sources. Towards TMC-l, assuming optically thin emission, the total column density upper limit is NHCCN < or = 2 x 10(12) cm-2, which corresponds to a fractional abundance upper limit with respect to molecular hydrogen of fHCCN < or = 2 x 10(-10). We find the abundance ratio of HCN:HCCN:HCCCN in TMC-l to be l : <0.01 : 0.3, which suggests that carbon-chain growth by the addition of single carbon atoms may not be efficient under dark cloud conditions. The HCCN abundance limit also places constraints on the branching ratio for the products of the dissociative electron recombination H3C2N+ + e.

  4. A search for HCCN in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGonagle, D.; Irvine, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted a deep search for HCCN towards the dark cloud TMC-l and several GMC's via its N(J) = 1(2)-->0(1) transition. HCCN was not detected in any of these sources. Towards TMC-l, assuming optically thin emission, the total column density upper limit is NHCCN < or = 2 x 10(12) cm-2, which corresponds to a fractional abundance upper limit with respect to molecular hydrogen of fHCCN < or = 2 x 10(-10). We find the abundance ratio of HCN:HCCN:HCCCN in TMC-l to be l : <0.01 : 0.3, which suggests that carbon-chain growth by the addition of single carbon atoms may not be efficient under dark cloud conditions. The HCCN abundance limit also places constraints on the branching ratio for the products of the dissociative electron recombination H3C2N+ + e.

  5. Molecular clouds in the Carina arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabelsky, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Results from the first large-scale survey in the CO(J = 1 to 0) line of the Vela-Carina-Centaurus region of the Southern Milky Way are reported. The observations, made with the Columbia University 1.2 m millimeter-wave telescope at Cerro Tololo, were spaced every beamwidth (0.125 deg) in the range 270 deg is less than or = l is less than or = 300 deg and -1 deg less than or = b less then or = 1 deg, with latitude extensions to cover all Carina arm emission beyond absolute b = 1 deg. In a concurrent survey made with the same telescope, every half-degree in latitude and longitude was sampled. Both surveys had a spectral coverage of 330 km/s with a resolution of 1.3 km/s. The Carina arm is the dominant feature in the data. Its abrupt tangent at l is approx. = 280 deg and characteristic loop in the l,v diagram are unmistakable evidence for CO spiral structure. When the emission is integrated over velocity and latitude, the height of the step seen in the tangent direction suggests that the arm-interarm contrast is at least 13:1. Comparison of the CO and H I data shows close agreement between these two species in a segment of the arm lying outside the solar circle. The distribution of the molecular layer about the galactic plane in the outer Galaxy is determined. Between R = 10.5 and 12.5 kpc, the average CO midplane dips from z = -48 to -167 pc below the b = 0 deg plane, following a similar well-known warping of the H I layer. In the same range of radii the half-thickness of the CO layer increases from 112 to 182 pc. Between l = 270 deg and 300 deg, 27 molecular clouds are identified and cataloged along with heliocentric distances and masses. An additional 16 clouds beyond 300 deg are cataloged from an adjoining CO survey made with the same telescope. The average mass for the Carina arm clouds is 1.4x 10(6)M (solar), and the average intercloud spacing along the arm is 700 pc. Comparison of the distribution of the Carina arm clouds with that of similarly massive

  6. The varying mass distribution of molecular clouds across M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Pamela; Rosolowsky, Erik; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate; Adamo, Angela

    2017-06-01

    The work of Adamo et al. showed that the mass distributions of young massive stellar clusters were truncated above a maximum-mass scale in the nearby galaxy M83 and that this truncation mass varies with the galactocentric radius. Here, we present a cloud-based analysis of Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array CO(1 → 0) observations of M83 to search for such a truncation mass in the molecular cloud population. We identify a population of 873 molecular clouds in M83 that is largely similar to those found in the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies, though clouds in the centre of the galaxy show high surface densities and enhanced turbulence, as is common for clouds in high-density nuclear environments. Like the young massive clusters, we find a maximum-mass scale for the molecular clouds which decreases radially in the galaxy. We find that the most young massive cluster tracks the most massive molecular cloud with the cluster mass being 10-2 times that of the most massive molecular cloud. Outside the nuclear region of M83 (Rg > 0.5 kpc), there is no evidence for changing internal conditions in the population of molecular clouds, with the average internal pressures, densities and free-fall times remaining constant for the cloud population over the galaxy. This result is consistent with the bound cluster formation efficiency depending only on the large-scale properties of the interstellar medium rather than the internal conditions of individual clouds.

  7. Calibrating Column Density Tracers with Gamma-Ray Observations of the ρ Ophiuchi Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Ryan D.; Teachey, Alex; Paglione, Timothy A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse gamma-ray emission from interstellar clouds results largely from cosmic ray (CR) proton collisions with ambient gas, regardless of the gas state, temperature, or dust properties of the cloud. The interstellar medium is predominantly transparent to both CRs and gamma-rays, so GeV emission is a unique probe of the total gas column density. The gamma-ray emissivity of a cloud of known column density is then a measure of the impinging CR population and may be used to map the k-scale CR distribution in the Galaxy. To this end, we test a number of commonly used column density tracers to evaluate their effectiveness in modeling the GeV emission from the relatively quiescent, nearby ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud. We confirm that both H i and an appropriate {{{H}}}2 tracer are required to reproduce the total gas column densities probed by diffuse gamma-ray emisison. We find that the optical depth at 353 GHz ({τ }353) from Planck best reproduces the gamma-ray data overall, based on the test statistic across the entire region of interest, but near-infrared stellar extinction also performs very well, with smaller spatial residuals in the densest parts of the cloud.

  8. Cluster assembly in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds. Recent evidence, both observational and numerical, suggests that molecular clouds (MCs) may be undergoing global, hierarchical gravitational collapse. The "hierarchical" regime consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The former occur in a more scattered fashion and at slightly earlier times, and are themselves falling into the larger potential well of the still-ongoing large-scale collapse. Instead, the large-scale collapse culminates a few Myr later, in a highly focused region, of higher density, mass, and velocity dispersion. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall velocity of their parent clumps towards the larger potential trough, while those formed later, in the aforementioned trough, form from gas that has already dissipated some of its kinetic energy, and thus have a lower velocity dispersion. This leads to a radial age gradient in the stellar population, in agreement with recent observations.

  9. Large molecular cloud in Lupus far from the Galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, L.A.; Thaddeus, P.; Bronfman, L.; Cohen, R.S.

    1987-03-01

    The detection of a large molecular cloud at a distance of more than 200 pc from the Galactic plane, situated above a prominent hole in the CO distribution in the plane, is reported. The cloud has a radial velocity of -41 km/s, much larger than is characteristic of most local, high-latitude gas. The cloud's displacement above the plane is the largest for any cloud yet detected. The mass of the cloud is about 100,000 solar masses, and its gravitational potential energy is about 7 x 10 to the 50th ergs. A single event may have created both the cloud and the nearby hole. 27 references.

  10. HOT MOLECULAR CORES IN INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Garay, G.; Jackson, J. M.; Longmore, S.; Zhang, Q.; Simon, R. E-mail: guido@das.uchile.cl E-mail: slongmore@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: simonr@ph1.uni-koeln.de

    2011-11-10

    We present high angular resolution continuum images and molecular line spectra obtained at 345 GHz with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward two massive cores that lie within Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs): G034.43+00.24 MM1 and G024.33+00.11 MM1. Both of these cores contain bright, unresolved (<2'') objects that have previously been imaged in the millimeter/submillimeter continuum with the Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) Plateau de Bure Interferometer and SMA and show complex molecular line chemistry. The new, higher angular resolution SMA continuum images reveal that both cores contain massive (8, 26 M{sub Sun }), unresolved (0.''6; {approx}3000 AU) continuum emission features and emission from many complex molecular transitions, which confirm that these are hot molecular cores, an early stage in the formation of a high-mass star. Because these hot cores are located within IRDCs, they may well represent the very earliest phases in the formation of high-mass protostars and, hence, their detailed study may reveal the initial conditions within high-mass star-forming cores, before they are shredded apart by stellar winds and radiation.

  11. On the massive star-forming capacity of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Shore, Steven N.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Assuming that photoionization is the self-limiting process for continued star formation, we estimate the maximum number of massive (OB) stars that can form within a molecular cloud. The most efficient cloud destruction mechanism in the early stages of H II region evolution is the evaporation of the cloud by stars located near the cloud boundary. The maximum number of OB stars is of order 1 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of average molecular gas, or 10 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of dense molecular gas. The resulting star-forming efficiencies within cloud complexes range from 2% to 16% depending on both the location of the stars in the cloud and the details of the initial mass function, with an overall value of about 5% for average molecular gas.

  12. Star Formation in High-Latitude Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus McGehee, Peregrine

    2015-08-01

    Galactic star formation preferentially occurs within the dense molecular clouds that reside primarily near the disk mid-plane and are thus seen in projection against the Milky Way. A population of molecular clouds are seen at higher Galactic latitude although distance determinations are required in order to identify those that are actually in extraplanar environments.We review the known high-latitude star formation regions (MBM 12, LDN 1642, and HRK 81.4-77.8) and discuss the nature and environment of other high-latitude molecular clouds. Distances to each of these structures are deduced from optical reddening profiles derived from analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry. In particular, we examine those molecular clouds found within the complex of intermediate and high velocity HI clouds that span the Northern 2nd Galactic Quadrant: the Draco clouds, the IVC pair at (l+b) = 135+51 and 135+54, and IREC 306.

  13. Revealing a spiral-shaped molecular cloud in our galaxy: Cloud fragmentation under rotation and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl

    2017-02-01

    The dynamical processes that control star formation in molecular clouds are not well understood, and in particular, it is unclear if rotation plays a major role in cloud evolution. We investigate the importance of rotation in cloud evolution by studying the kinematic structure of a spiral-shaped Galactic molecular cloud G052.24+00.74. The cloud belongs to a large filament, and is stretching over 100 pc above the Galactic disk midplane. The spiral-shaped morphology of the cloud suggests that the cloud is rotating. We have analysed the kinematic structure of the cloud, and study the fragmentation and star formation. We find that the cloud exhibits a regular velocity pattern along west-east direction - a velocity shift of 10km s-1 at a scale of 30 pc. The kinematic structure of the cloud can be reasonably explained by a model that assumes rotational support. Similarly to our Galaxy, the cloud rotates with a prograde motion. We use the formalism of Toomre (1964) to study the cloud's stability, and find that it is unstable and should fragment. The separation of clumps can be consistently reproduced assuming gravitational instability, suggesting that fragmentation is determined by the interplay between rotation and gravity. Star formation occurs in massive, gravitational bound clumps. Our analysis provides a first example in which the fragmentation of a cloud is regulated by the interplay between rotation and gravity.

  14. Giant Molecular Cloud Structure and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David (Technical Monitor); Bodenheimer, P. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bodenheimer and Burkert extended earlier calculations of cloud core models to study collapse and fragmentation. The initial condition for an SPH collapse calculation is the density distribution of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere, with near balance between turbulent plus thermal energy and gravitational energy. The main parameter is the turbulent Mach number. For each Mach number several runs are made, each with a different random realization of the initial turbulent velocity field. The turbulence decays on a dynamical time scale, leading the cloud into collapse. The collapse proceeds isothermally until the density has increased to about 10(exp 13) g cm(exp -3). Then heating is included in the dense regions. The nature of the fragmentation is investigated. About 15 different runs have been performed with Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 (the typical value observed in molecular cloud cores is 0.7). The results show a definite trend of increasing multiplicity with increasing Mach number (M), with the number of fragments approximately proportional to (1 + M). In general, this result agrees with that of Fisher, Klein, and McKee who published three cases with an AMR grid code. However our results show that there is a large spread about this curve. For example, for M=0.3 one case resulted in no fragmentation while a second produced three fragments. Thus it is not only the value of M but also the details of the superposition of the various velocity modes that play a critical role in the formation of binaries. Also, the simulations produce a wide range of separations (10-1000 AU) for the multiple systems, in rough agreement with observations. These results are discussed in two conference proceedings.

  15. MHD Turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gong, H.; Brunt, C.; Ostriker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of MHD turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud is examined from 12CO and 13CO J=1-0 imaging observations using the FCRAO 14 meter telescope. The degree of velocity anisotropy is measured from velocity structure functions derived separately along the x and y axes using Principal Component Analysis of spectroscopic imaging data (Brunt & Heyer 2002). Such anisotropy is predicted from model descriptions and computational simulations of MHD turbulence in the case of strong magnetic fields (Goldreich & Sridhar 1995; Cho, Lazarian, & Vishniac 2002; Vestuto, Ostriker, & Stone 2003). Within a subfield of the Taurus image where the column densities are low, this velocity anisotropy is largest along an angle that is coincident with the local magnetic field direction determined independently from optical polarization of background stars.The structure function derived from data perpendicular to the local field shows a shallower scaling exponent and a larger scaling coefficient than the values that describe the structure function constructed along the magnetic field as predicted by the MHD models. This alignment provides strong evidence that the magnetic field is a significant dynamical force within this column density regime of the Taurus cloud.

  16. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  17. Submillimeter polarimetry of giant molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Bai

    This dissertation presents submillimeter polarimetry methods and scientific results. The scientific results focus on revealing the magnetic field structure of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). The basic principles, instrumentation, observing strategy, and data analysis methods of submillimeter polarimetry are introduced. The scientific data were acquired by SPARO during the observing campaign of Austral Winter 2003. SPARO is a 450 [mu]m polarimeter used with a two-meter telescope at South Pole. We mapped four GMCs: NGC 6334, the Carina Nebula, G333.6-0.2, and G331.5-0.1. Comparing the mean field direction with optical polarimetry data, we suggest that field direction tends to be preserved during GMC formation. By comparing the observed field disorder with that from GMC simulations, we conclude that the magnetic field energy density is at least comparable to that of turbulence.

  18. NONIDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENT DECAY IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Downes, T. P.; O'Sullivan, S.

    2009-08-20

    It is well known that nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects are important in the dynamics of molecular clouds: both ambipolar diffusion and possibly the Hall effect have been identified as significant. We present the results of a suite of simulations with a resolution of 512{sup 3} of turbulent decay in molecular clouds, incorporating a simplified form of both ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect simultaneously. The initial velocity field in the turbulence is varied from being super-Alfvenic and hypersonic, through to trans-Alfvenic but still supersonic. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence increasing the decay from t {sup -1.25} to t {sup -1.4}. The Hall effect has virtually no impact in this regard. The power spectra of density, velocity, and the magnetic field are all affected by the nonideal terms, being steepened significantly when compared with ideal MHD turbulence with exponents. The density power-spectra components change from {approx}1.4 to {approx}2.1 for the ideal and nonideal simulations respectively, and power spectra of the other variables all show similar modifications when nonideal effects are considered. Again, the dominant source of these changes is ambipolar diffusion rather than the Hall effect. There is also a decoupling between the velocity field and the magnetic field at short length scales. The Hall effect leads to enhanced magnetic reconnection, and hence less power, at short length scales. The dependence of the velocity dispersion on the characteristic length scale is studied and found not to be power law in nature.

  19. STUDIES OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS ASSOCIATED WITH H II REGIONS: S175

    SciTech Connect

    Azimlu, Mohaddesseh; Fich, Michel; McCoey, Carolyn

    2009-06-15

    We are studying the impact of H II regions on star formation in their associated molecular clouds. In this paper, we present James Clerk Maxwell Telescope R x A molecular line observations of S175 and environs. This is the first within a sample of 10 H II regions and their surrounding molecular clouds selected for our study. We first make 7' x 7' maps in {sup 12}CO(2-1), which are used to investigate the structure of the cloud and to identify individual clumps. Single point observations were made in {sup 13}CO(2-1) and CS(5-4) at the peak of the {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission within each clump in order to measure the physical properties of the gas. Densities, temperatures, clump masses, peak velocities, and line widths were measured and calculated using these observations. We have identified two condensations (S175A and S175B) in the molecular cloud associated with this H II region. S175A is adjacent to the ionization front and is expected to be affected by the H II region, while S175B is too distant to be disturbed. We compare the structure and gas properties of these two regions to investigate how the molecular gas has been affected by the H II region. S175A has been heated by the H II region and partially compressed by the ionized gas front, but contrary to our expectation it is a quiescent region while S175B is very turbulent and dynamically active. Our investigation for the source of turbulence in S175B resulted in the detection of an outflow within this region.

  20. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2011-05-10

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution {sup 13}CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H I Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient-ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}-whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding H I by a factor of 1-6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated-by as much as 130 deg. in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  1. Effect of magnetic field on the rotating filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghili, P.; Kokabi, K.

    2017-04-01

    The Purpose of this work is to study the evolution of magnetized rotating filamentary molecular clouds. We consider cylindrical symmetric filamentary molecular clouds at an early stage of evolution. For the first time we consider the rotation of filamentary molecular in the presence of an axial and azimuthal magnetic field without any assumption of density and magnetic functions. We show that in addition to decreasing the radial collapse velocity, the rotational velocity is also affected by the magnetic field. The existence of rotation yields fragmentation of filaments. Moreover, we show that the magnetic field has a significant effect on the fragmentation of filamentary molecular clouds.

  2. Molecular Line Observations of Chemically Young Dark Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    In order to understand initial conditions of low-mass star formation, it is essential to study dark cloud cores in the early evolutionary stage. For the purpose of this, we carried out mapping observations with various molecular lines in quiescent starless cores L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B (Hirota et al. 2002, 2004), which are known to be rich in carbon-chain molecules like the cyanopolyyne peak of TMC-1 and hence, called "carbon-chain-producing regions" (Suzuki et al. 1992). The important results of our studies are as follows; (1) there exist compact dense cores traced by the H13CO+, HN13C, CCS, C3S, and HC3N lines, and their distributions have a single peak at the same position; (2) the distribution of CCS in these cores are different from those in well-studied starless cores such as L1544, where the distribution of CCS shows a shell-like structure; (3) although the H2 densities are as high as 105 cm-3 at the peak position of these cores, the spectral lines of NH3 and N2H+ are found to be very faint, indicating the low NH3 and N2H+ abundances; (4) abundances of carbon-chain molecules in these cores are systematically higher than those in the other dark cloud cores, and especially the abundances of sulfur-bearing carbon-chain molecules CnS are comparable to those in cyanopolyyne peak of TMC-1; (5) longer carbon-chain molecules such as HC5N and C4H are more abundant in TMC-1 than in L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B while those of sulfur-bearing molecules such as C34S, CCS, and C3S are comparable; (6) the deuterium fractionation ratios of DNC/HNC and DCO+/HCO+ are systematically lower in L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B than in the other dark cores (Hirota et al. 2001, 2003); (7) there exist neither IRAS point sources, evidence of molecular outflows, nor signature of infall motions in these cores. All these characteristic features suggest that L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B would be in the early stage of dynamical and chemical evolution, and the depletion factor of heavy atoms are

  3. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko S.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2017-03-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters from turbulent molecular clouds using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and direct N-body methods. We find that the shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with power-law slopes of β = -1.73. The superposition of mass functions turn out to have a power-law slope of < -2. The mass of the most massive cluster formed from a single molecular cloud with mass M g scales with 6.1 M 0.51 g. The molecular clouds that tend to form massive clusters are much denser than those typical found in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20km s-1 and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603 and Westerlund 2, for which a triggered star formation by cloud-cloud collisions is suggested.

  4. Molecular clouds photoevaporation and FIR line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving predictions on far infrared (FIR) line emission from Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), we study the effects of photoevaporation (PE) produced by external far-ultraviolet (FUV) and ionizing (extreme-ultraviolet, EUV) radiation on GMC structure. We consider three different GMCs with mass in the range M_GMC = 10^{3-6} {M_{⊙}}. Our model includes: (i) an observationally-based inhomogeneous GMC density field, and (ii) its time evolution during the PE process. In the fiducial case (MGMC ≈ 105M⊙), the photoevaporation time (tpe) increases from 1 Myr to 30 Myr for gas metallicity Z=0.05-1 Z_{⊙}, respectively. Next, we compute the time-dependent luminosity of key FIR lines tracing the neutral and ionized gas layers of the GMCs, ([C II] at 158 {μ m}, [O III] at 88 μ m) as a function of G0, and Z until complete photoevaporation at tpe. We find that the specific [C II] luminosity is almost independent on the GMC model within the survival time of the cloud. Stronger FUV fluxes produce higher [C II] and [O III] luminosities, however lasting for progressively shorter times. At Z = Z⊙ the [C II] emission is maximized (L_CII≈ 10^4 {L_{⊙}} for the fiducial model) for t<1 {Myr} and log G0 ≥ 3. Noticeably, and consistently with the recent detection by Inoue et al. (2016) of a galaxy at redshift z ≈ 7.2, for Z≤ 0.2 {Z_{⊙}} the [O III] line might outshine [C II] emission by up to ≈1000 times. We conclude that the [O III] line is a key diagnostic of low metallicity ISM, especially in galaxies with very young stellar populations.

  5. Supernova Driving. III. Synthetic Molecular Cloud Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padoan, Paolo; Juvela, Mika; Pan, Liubin; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2016-08-01

    We present a comparison of molecular clouds (MCs) from a simulation of supernova (SN) driven interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence with real MCs from the Outer Galaxy Survey. The radiative transfer calculations to compute synthetic CO spectra are carried out assuming that the CO relative abundance depends only on gas density, according to four different models. Synthetic MCs are selected above a threshold brightness temperature value, T B,min = 1.4 K, of the J = 1 - 0 12CO line, generating 16 synthetic catalogs (four different spatial resolutions and four CO abundance models), each containing up to several thousands MCs. The comparison with the observations focuses on the mass and size distributions and on the velocity-size and mass-size Larson relations. The mass and size distributions are found to be consistent with the observations, with no significant variations with spatial resolution or chemical model, except in the case of the unrealistic model with constant CO abundance. The velocity-size relation is slightly too steep for some of the models, while the mass-size relation is a bit too shallow for all models only at a spatial resolution dx ≈ 1 pc. The normalizations of the Larson relations show a clear dependence on spatial resolution, for both the synthetic and the real MCs. The comparison of the velocity-size normalization suggests that the SN rate in the Perseus arm is approximately 70% or less of the rate adopted in the simulation. Overall, the realistic properties of the synthetic clouds confirm that SN-driven turbulence can explain the origin and dynamics of MCs.

  6. Molecular abundances in OMC-1 - The chemical composition of interstellar molecular clouds and the influence of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.; Sutton, E. C.; Masson, C. R.; Phillips, T. G.

    1987-04-01

    The chemical composition of the various regions in the core of OMC-1 is investigated based on millimeter-wave spectral line survey results. The cool and extended quiescent ridge gas is characterized by fairly simple carbon-rich species whose abundances are similar to those found in other well-studied objects like TMC-1 and Sgr B2. Its chemical composition is reasonably well predicted by purely gas phase ion-molecule reaction networks. Abundances in the high-velocity plateau are dominated by outflow from IRc 2. The hot core is interpreted as a particularly large and dense clump or clumps of gas left over from the formation of IRc 2. The production of complex oxygen-rich species such as CH3OH in the compact ridge is accomplished by radiation association reactions between smaller molecular ions in the quiescent cloud material and highly abundant neutral species such as HCN and H2O supplied by the outflow from IRc 2.

  7. RE-EXAMINING LARSON'S SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN GALACTIC MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, Mark; Krawczyk, Coleman; Duval, Julia; Jackson, James M.

    2009-07-10

    The properties of Galactic molecular clouds tabulated by Solomon et al. (SRBY) are re-examined using the Boston University-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey of {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. These new data provide a lower opacity tracer of molecular clouds and improved angular and spectral resolution compared with previous surveys of molecular line emission along the Galactic Plane. We calculate giant molecular cloud (GMC) masses within the SRBY cloud boundaries assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions throughout the cloud and a constant H{sub 2} to {sup 13}CO abundance, while accounting for the variation of the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C with galactocentric radius. The LTE-derived masses are typically five times smaller than the SRBY virial masses. The corresponding median mass surface density of molecular hydrogen for this sample is 42 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}, which is significantly lower than the value derived by SRBY (median 206 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}) that has been widely adopted by most models of cloud evolution and star formation. This discrepancy arises from both the extrapolation by SRBY of velocity dispersion, size, and CO luminosity to the 1 K antenna temperature isophote that likely overestimates the GMC masses and our assumption of constant {sup 13}CO abundance over the projected area of each cloud. Owing to the uncertainty of molecular abundances in the envelopes of clouds, the mass surface density of GMCs could be larger than the values derived from our {sup 13}CO measurements. From velocity dispersions derived from the {sup 13}CO data, we find that the coefficient of the cloud structure functions, v{sup 0} = {sigma}{sub v}/R {sup 1/2}, is not constant, as required to satisfy Larson's scaling relationships, but rather systematically varies with the surface density of the cloud as {approx}{sigma}{sup 0.5} as expected for clouds in self-gravitational equilibrium.

  8. On the masses of giant molecular cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, A. A.; Blitz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A method of mass estimation for molecular clouds is presented which is based on approximate balance in the outer cloud layers between the cloud's gravitation, the galactic tide, and internal pressure. The largest observed clouds, which have greatest linear extents of 100 pc, are found to have masses of at least 200,000 solar masses. The cloud masses cannot exceed this lower limit by more than a factor of 3, or the velocity distributions of disk stars would be more relaxed than is actually observed. This implied upper limit to cloud masses combined with the galactic tide may be related to the absence of clouds at galactocentric radii less than 4 kpc. If Sagittarius B2 is bound, its mass must be more than 50 million solar masses.

  9. The emerging role of cloud computing in molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Ebejer, Jean-Paul; Fulle, Simone; Morris, Garrett M; Finn, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of cloud computing for large-scale and data-intensive applications. The distinguishing features of cloud computing and their relationship to other distributed computing paradigms are described, as are the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. We review the use made to date of cloud computing for molecular modelling projects and the availability of front ends for molecular modelling applications. Although the use of cloud computing technologies for molecular modelling is still in its infancy, we demonstrate its potential by presenting several case studies. Rapid growth can be expected as more applications become available and costs continue to fall; cloud computing can make a major contribution not just in terms of the availability of on-demand computing power, but could also spur innovation in the development of novel approaches that utilize that capacity in more effective ways.

  10. Molecular hydrogen in interstellar dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M.; Robinson, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified H2 formation mechanism is proposed in which small interstellar grains furnish the reaction sites. This mechanism results in a maximum value for the rate constant of about 2 by 10 to the -18th power per cu cm/sec for dark clouds at 10 K. Also, the nascent molecules are ejected in excited states, in qualitative agreement with Copernicus observations. A time-dependent treatment of the chemical evolution of a dark cloud with little or no ionizing radiation shows that the clouds require more than 10 million years to achieve chemical equilibrium. The observed residual atomic hydrogen in several dark clouds suggests that the clouds are 1 to 10 million years old. Other consequences of the temporal cloud model are in accord with astronomical observations.

  11. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  12. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  13. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR CONTENT IN THE W3 GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-10

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the 'Class' scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  14. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-03-10

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds.

  15. Global star formation in the L1630 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Elizabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The first systematic and coordinated surveys for both dense gas and young stellar objects within a single molecular cloud, the L1630 molecular cloud are compared. It is found that (1) star formation in the L1630 molecular cloud occurs almost exclusively within the dense gas; (2) star formation does not occur uniformly throughout the dense gas and is strongly favored in a few very massive dense cores, where efficient conversion of molecular gas into stars has resulted in the production of rich stellar clusters; and (3) high gas densities and high gas mass may be necessary but not sufficient conditions for the formation of star clusters since two of the five most massive dense cores in the cloud have very low levels of star formation activity.

  16. Giant molecular clouds as regions of particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dogiel, V. A.; Gurevich, A. V.; Istomin, Y. N.; Zybin, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most interesting results of investigations carried out on the satellites SAS-II and COS-B is the discovery of unidentified discrete gamma sources. Possibly a considerable part of them may well be giant molecular clouds. Gamma emission from clouds is caused by the processes with participation of cosmic rays. The estimation of the cosmic ray density in clouds has shown that for the energy E approx. = I GeV their density can 10 to 1000 times exceed the one in intercloud space. We have made an attempt to determine the mechanism which could lead to the increase in the cosmic ray density in clouds.

  17. OH 18 cm TRANSITION AS A THERMOMETER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebisawa, Yuji; Inokuma, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Nami; Menten, Karl M.; Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-10

    We have observed the four hyperfine components of the 18 cm OH transition toward the translucent cloud eastward of Heiles Cloud 2 (HCL2E), the cold dark cloud L134N, and the photodissociation region of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud with the Effelsberg 100 m telescope. We have found intensity anomalies among the hyperfine components in all three regions. In particular, an absorption feature of the 1612 MHz satellite line against the cosmic microwave background has been detected toward HCL2E and two positions of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud. On the basis of statistical equilibrium calculations, we find that the hyperfine anomalies originate from the non-LTE population of the hyperfine levels, and can be used to determine the kinetic temperature of the gas over a wide range of H{sub 2} densities (10{sup 2}–10{sup 7} cm{sup −3}). Toward the center of HCL2E, the gas kinetic temperature is determined to be 53 ± 1 K, and it increases toward the cloud peripheries (∼60 K). The ortho-to-para ratio of H{sub 2} is determined to be 3.5 ± 0.9 from the averaged spectrum for the eight positions. In L134N, a similar increase of the temperature is also seen toward the periphery. In the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud, the gas kinetic temperature decreases as a function of the distance from the exciting star HD 147889. These results demonstrate a new aspect of the OH 18 cm line that can be used as a good thermometer of molecular cloud envelopes. The OH 18 cm line can be used to trace a new class of warm molecular gas surrounding a molecular cloud, which is not well traced by the emission of CO and its isotopologues.

  18. OH 18 cm Transition as a Thermometer for Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisawa, Yuji; Inokuma, Hiroshi; Sakai, Nami; Menten, Karl M.; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    We have observed the four hyperfine components of the 18 cm OH transition toward the translucent cloud eastward of Heiles Cloud 2 (HCL2E), the cold dark cloud L134N, and the photodissociation region of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud with the Effelsberg 100 m telescope. We have found intensity anomalies among the hyperfine components in all three regions. In particular, an absorption feature of the 1612 MHz satellite line against the cosmic microwave background has been detected toward HCL2E and two positions of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud. On the basis of statistical equilibrium calculations, we find that the hyperfine anomalies originate from the non-LTE population of the hyperfine levels, and can be used to determine the kinetic temperature of the gas over a wide range of H2 densities (102-107 cm-3). Toward the center of HCL2E, the gas kinetic temperature is determined to be 53 ± 1 K, and it increases toward the cloud peripheries (˜60 K). The ortho-to-para ratio of H2 is determined to be 3.5 ± 0.9 from the averaged spectrum for the eight positions. In L134N, a similar increase of the temperature is also seen toward the periphery. In the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud, the gas kinetic temperature decreases as a function of the distance from the exciting star HD 147889. These results demonstrate a new aspect of the OH 18 cm line that can be used as a good thermometer of molecular cloud envelopes. The OH 18 cm line can be used to trace a new class of warm molecular gas surrounding a molecular cloud, which is not well traced by the emission of CO and its isotopologues.

  19. Squeezed between shells: The fate of the Lupus I molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaczkowski, Benjamin; Preibisch, Thomas; Stanke, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Today molecular cloud formation is attributed to collisions of large-scale flows in the ISM. Such flows can be driven by stellar feedback processes and supernovae. The numerous massive stars in the three sub-groups of the Sco-Cen OB-association created a huge system of expanding loop-like H I structures around each of the sub-groups. The Lupus I molecular cloud is situated in the middle between the Upper-Scorpius (USco) and the Upper-Centaurus-Lupus (UCL) sub-groups. At this location the expanding USco H I shell interacts with a bubble driven by the winds of the remaining B-stars of UCL. With a distance of 150 pc Lupus I represents the nearest example where we can study how such a collision process forms and influences new dense clouds in the ISM. We present LABOCA continuum sub-mm observations of Lupus I, complemented by Herschel and Planck data from which we constructed column density and temperature maps to characterize the cloud in a multi-wavelength approach. All maps revealed that the cloud can be divided into two distinct regions. The northern part that has on average lower densities and higher temperatures as well as no active star formation and the center-south part with dozens of pre-stellar and protostellar cores where density and temperature reach their maximum and minimum, respectively. The column density PDFs from the Herschel data show double-peaked profiles for all parts of the cloud. In those parts with active star formation also a power-law tail is found. With LABOCA the PDFs follow the denser parts of the cloud showing good agreement with those from Herschel for the second lognormal component and the power-law tail. The distribution of the 15 cores we found with LABOCA confirms that only the center-south part of Lupus I is actively forming stars whereas the north is quiescent. We argue that the main driving agents in the formation process of Lupus I are the advancing USco H I shell in whose edge the cloud is most likely embedded colliding with

  20. The large system of molecular clouds in Orion and Monoceros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalena, R. J.; Moscowitz, J.; Thaddeus, P.; Morris, M.

    1986-01-01

    Emission is noted over about one-eighth of an 850-sq deg region centered on Orion and Monoceros that has been surveyed in the J = 1 to 0 line of CO; most of the emission arises from giant molecular clouds associated with Orion A and B, and Mon R2. A much smaller area was surveyed for C-13O emission. A comparison of cloud masses obtained by three independent methods indicates that CO luminosity is as accurate a measure of cloud mass as other indicators. The possible relationships among clouds in the survey are discussed, including the conjecture that the overall Orion complex of clouds is a much larger system than previously considered, incorporating most of the clouds in the present survey.

  1. Torsionally excited methanol in hot molecular cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Henkel, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Snyder, L. E.; Hollis, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Torsionally excited methanol lines were detected in the direction of four galactic molecular cloud regions by means of scans in the 20-24 GHz interval with the Effelsberg 100 m radiotelescope. Transitions in both the first torsionally excited state, with excitation energies of about 450 K, and the ground state were seen in the direction of the hot, molecular cloud cores of the Orion-KL region, W3(OH), NGC 7538 and W51. The emission in Orion originated from a hot region in the southern ridge cloud 4 arcsec from the hot core. The greatest deviations from LTE occurred when a strong compact continuum source was present.

  2. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. 2: Collapse induced by stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    The standard scenario for low-mass star formation involves 'inside-out' collapse of a dense molecular cloud core following loss of magnetic field support through ambipolar diffusion. However, isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and meteoritical inclusions imply that the collapse of the presolar cloud may have been triggered by a stellar shock wave. This paper explores 'outside-in' collapse, that is, protostellar collapse initiated directly by the compression of quiescent dense cloud cores impacted by relatively slow stellar shock waves. A second-order accurate, gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to study both the spherically symmetrical and three-dimensional evolution of initially centrally condensed, isothermal, self-gravitating, solar-mass cloud cores that are struck by stellar shock waves with velocities up to 25 km/s and postshock temperatures of 10 to 10,000 K. The models show that such mild shock waves do not completely shred and destroy the cloud, and that the dynamical ram pressure can compress the cloud to the verge of self-gravitational collapse. However, compression caused by a high postshock temperature is a considerably more effective means of inducing collapse. Shock-induced collapse produces high initial mass accretion rates (greater than 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr in a solar-mass cloud) that decline rapidly to much lower values, depending on the presence (approximately 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr) or absence (approximately 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr) of an infinite reservoir of mass. Stellar mass accretion rates approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr have been previously inferred from the luminosities of T Tauri stars; balanced mass accretion (stellar rate = envelope rate) at approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr could then be possible if accretion occurs from a finite mass reservoir. Fluid tracers are used to determine what fraction of the stellar shock material is incorporated into the resulting protostellar object and disk

  3. Properties of Diffuse Molecular Gas in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Studies of the interstellar medium in the lower-metallicity Magellanic Clouds explore somewhat different environmental conditions from those typically probed in our own Galactic ISM. Recent studies based on optical/UV spectra of SMC and LMC targets, for example, have revealed unexpected differences in gas-phase abundance patterns {for various atomic and molecular species} and have begun to explore the effects of differences in metallicity on the atomic-to-molecular transition and resulting molecular fraction f{H_2} - a key aspect in the formation of molecular clouds. We propose a more detailed study of the abundances, depletions, and local physical conditions characterizing diffuse molecular material in the Magellanic Clouds, using STIS E140H and E230M spectra of two sight lines with N{H_2} > 10^20 cm^-2 {both probing the outskirts of molecular clouds seen in CO emission}. The two STIS settings will include lines from various neutral and ionized species {with a range in depletion behavior}, several C I multiplets, and several bands of CO and C_2. By probing and characterizing the atomic-to-molecular transition in the Magellanic Clouds, we will address key issues regarding the effects of differences in metallicity on the relationship between the atomic and molecular gas in galaxies; on cloud structure, physical conditions, and diffuse cloud chemistry; and on the composition and properties of interstellar dust. The results of this project should thus aid in the interpretation of observations of atomic and molecular material in more distant low-metallicity systems.

  4. Connecting diverse molecular cloud environments with nascent protostars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Megeath, S.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Furlan, E.; Tobin, J. J.; Stanke, T.; Henning, T.; Krause, O.; Manoj, P.; Osorio, M.; Robitaille, T.; HOPS Team

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the gas environment within molecular clouds influences the properties of protostars is a key step towards understanding the physical factors that control star formation. We report on an analysis of the connection between molecular cloud environment and protostellar properties using the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a large multi-observatory survey of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. HOPS has produced well sampled 1 um to 870 um SEDs of over 300 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using images and spectra from 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel and APEX. Furthermore, the combination of APEX 870 um continuum observations with the HOPS/PACS 160 um data over the same area allows for a determination of the temperatures and column densities in the often filamentary dense gas surrounding the Orion protostars. Based on these data, we link the protostellar properties with their environmental properties. Utilizing the diverse environments present within the Orion molecular clouds, we show how the luminosity and spacing of protostars in Orion depends on the local gas column density. Furthermore, we report an unusual concentration of the youngest known protostars (the Herschel identified PBRS, PACS Bright Red Sources) in the Orion B cloud, and we discuss possible reasons for this concentration.

  5. 13CO Molecular Clouds and Clumps in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Stark, A. A.

    2004-12-01

    Using the 13CO Bell Laboratories Survey for one third of galactic plane, (l, b) = (-5° to 117°, -1° to +1°), and our revised cloud identification code, 13CO clouds have been identified and cataloged as a function of threshold temperature; 1,400 of molecular clouds with 1 K threshold temperature and with a 4-threshold number of pixels, 629 clouds with 2 K threshold temperature, and 263 clouds with 3 K. Clouds with the brightest cores (TR*(13CO) > 3 K) are confined to the 5 Kpc Molecular Ring (l<40°) and l=80° region. In addition to cloud identification, dense clump regions can be located using this 13CO survey and then combined with existing UMass-Stony Brook 12CO data for the first quadrant of the Galactic Plane. Numbers of identified clumps are 3,156 with 0.4 threshold 13CO optical depth, 2,134 with 0.6, 1,190 with 0.8, and 662 with 1.0. It is found that the hot clumps are heavily crowded between l = 10° to 20°. Good correlation is found between 13CO integrated intensity and column density. We discuss some statistical characteristics of clouds, cores, and the column density distribution.

  6. The Magellanic Mopra Assessment (MAGMA). I. The Molecular Cloud Population of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tony; Hughes, Annie; Ott, Jürgen; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Chu, You-Hua; Fukui, Yasuo; Gruendl, Robert A.; Henkel, Christian; Kawamura, Akiko; Klein, Ulrich; Looney, Leslie W.; Maddison, Sarah; Mizuno, Yoji; Paradis, Deborah; Seale, Jonathan; Welty, Daniel E.

    2011-12-01

    We present the properties of an extensive sample of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) mapped at 11 pc resolution in the CO(1-0) line. Targets were chosen based on a limiting CO flux and peak brightness as measured by the NANTEN survey. The observations were conducted with the ATNF Mopra Telescope as part of the Magellanic Mopra Assessment. We identify clouds as regions of connected CO emission and find that the distributions of cloud sizes, fluxes, and masses are sensitive to the choice of decomposition parameters. In all cases, however, the luminosity function of CO clouds is steeper than dN/dLvpropL -2, suggesting that a substantial fraction of mass is in low-mass clouds. A correlation between size and linewidth, while apparent for the largest emission structures, breaks down when those structures are decomposed into smaller structures. We argue that the correlation between virial mass and CO luminosity is the result of comparing two covariant quantities, with the correlation appearing tighter on larger scales where a size-linewidth relation holds. The virial parameter (the ratio of a cloud's kinetic to self-gravitational energy) shows a wide range of values and exhibits no clear trends with the CO luminosity or the likelihood of hosting young stellar object (YSO) candidates, casting further doubt on the assumption of virialization for molecular clouds in the LMC. Higher CO luminosity increases the likelihood of a cloud harboring a YSO candidate, and more luminous YSOs are more likely to be coincident with detectable CO emission, confirming the close link between giant molecular clouds and massive star formation.

  7. OT1_dhunter_3: Characterizing Molecular Clouds at Low Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, D.

    2010-07-01

    Molecular gas is difficult to detect from traditional millimeter CO transitions in dwarf galaxies below a certain metallicity. Yet, there is evidence for lots of molecular H_2 in these galaxies. Fortunately, Photo-dissociation Regions are a better tracer of the molecular material in low metallicity systems. In metal-poor galaxies, PDRs dominate the molecular core where CO is found, and in the current paradigm the PDR grows and the core shrinks as metallicity decreases. Thus, we expect critical differences in the molecular clouds of dwarfs compared to spirals, with the differences becoming more extreme with lower metallicity. Yet, understanding these differences and their consequences to star formation is essential to understanding the processes that drive star formation at low metallicities. Therefore, we propose to observe the PDRs in 5 regions in 5 typical metal-poor dwarf galaxies spanning a range in oxygen abundance. We will use these observations to characterize the molecular gas, examine the correspondence between the molecular clouds and the atomic gas and star formation characteristics, and determine the characteristics of the atomic ISM that are necessary for the formation of these dense molecular clouds. We will also test the molecular cloud structure paradigm as a function of metallicity.

  8. Spectral Line Survey toward a Molecular Cloud in IC10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yuri; Shimonishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Aikawa, Yuri; Kawamura, Akiko; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    We have conducted a spectral line survey observation in the 3 mm band toward the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy IC10 with the 45 m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory to explore its chemical composition at a molecular-cloud scale (∼80 pc). The CS, SO, CCH, HCN, HCO+, and HNC lines are detected for the first time in this galaxy in addition to the CO and 13CO lines, while the c-C3H2, CH3OH, CN, C18O, and N2H+ lines are not detected. The spectral intensity pattern is found to be similar to those observed toward molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), whose metallicity is as low as IC10. Nitrogen-bearing species are deficient in comparison with the Galactic molecular clouds due to a lower elemental abundance of nitrogen. CCH is abundant in comparison with Galactic translucent clouds, whereas CH3OH may be deficient. These characteristic trends for CCH and CH3OH are also seen in the LMC, and seem to originate from photodissociation regions more extended in the peripheries of molecular clouds due to the lower metallicity condition.

  9. SUPERGIANT SHELLS AND MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wong, T.; Hughes, A.; Fukui, Y.; Kawamura, A.

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the influence of large-scale stellar feedback on the formation of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Examining the relationship between H I and {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) in supergiant shells (SGSs), we find that the molecular fraction in the total volume occupied by SGSs is not enhanced with respect to the rest of the LMC disk. However, the majority of objects ({approx}70% by mass) are more molecular than their local surroundings, implying that the presence of a supergiant shell does on average have a positive effect on the molecular gas fraction. Averaged over the full SGS sample, our results suggest that {approx}12%-25% of the molecular mass in supergiant shell systems was formed as a direct result of the stellar feedback that created the shells. This corresponds to {approx}4%-11% of the total molecular mass of the galaxy. These figures are an approximate lower limit to the total contribution of stellar feedback to molecular cloud formation in the LMC, and constitute one of the first quantitative measurements of feedback-triggered molecular cloud formation in a galactic system.

  10. H2, CO, and dust absorption through cold molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, John H.; Sneden, Chris; Kim, Hwihyun; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We have made observations with IGRINS on the Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory of near-infrared absorption by H2, CO, and dust toward stars behind molecular clouds, primarily the TMC. Prior to these observations, the abundance of H2 in molecular clouds, relative to the commonly used tracer CO, had only been measured toward a few embedded stars, which may be surrounded by atypical gas. The new observations provide a representative sample of these molecules in cold molecular gas. We find N(H2)/Av ~ 0.9e+21, N(CO)/Av ~ 1.6e+17, and H2/CO ~ 6000. The measured H2/CO ratio is consistent with that measured toward embedded stars in various molecular clouds, but half that derived from mm-wave observations of CO emission and star counts or other determinations of Av.

  11. Molecular clumps in the W51 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, H.; Thompson, M. A.; Clark, J. S.; Chrysostomou, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we present a catalogue of dense molecular clumps located within the W51 giant molecular cloud (GMC). This work is based on Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme 13CO J = 3-2 observations of the W51 GMC and uses the automated CLUMPFIND algorithm to decompose the region into a total of 1575 clumps of which 1130 are associated with the W51 GMC. We clearly see the distinct structures of the W51 complex and the high-velocity stream previously reported. We find the clumps have characteristic diameters of 1.4 pc, excitation temperatures of 12 K, densities of 5.6 × 1021 cm-2, surface densities 0.02 g cm-2 and masses of 90 M⊙. We find a total mass of dense clumps within the GMC of 1.5 × 105 M⊙, with only 1 per cent of the clumps detected by number and 4 per cent by mass found to be supercritical. We find a clump-forming efficiency of 14 ± 1 per cent for the W51 GMC and a supercritical clump-forming efficiency of 0.5-0.5+2.3 per cent. Looking at the clump mass distribution, we find it is described by a single power law with a slope of α=2.4-0.1+0.2 above ˜100 M⊙. By comparing locations of supercritical clumps and young clusters, we see that any future star formation is likely to be located away from the currently active W51A region.

  12. Molecular-cloud-scale Chemical Composition. I. A Mapping Spectral Line Survey toward W51 in the 3 mm Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Nishimura, Yuri; Harada, Nanase; Sakai, Nami; Shimonishi, Takashi; Aikawa, Yuri; Kawamura, Akiko; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    We have conducted a mapping spectral line survey toward the Galactic giant molecular cloud W51 in the 3 mm band with the Mopra 22 m telescope in order to study an averaged chemical composition of the gas extended over a molecular-cloud scale in our Galaxy. We have observed the area of 25‧ × 30‧, which corresponds to 39 pc × 47 pc. The frequency ranges of the observation are 85.1-101.1 GHz and 107.0-114.9 GHz. In the spectrum spatially averaged over the observed area, spectral lines of 12 molecular species and 4 additional isotopologues are identified. An intensity pattern of the spatially averaged spectrum is found to be similar to that of the spiral arm in the external galaxy M51, indicating that these two sources have similar chemical compositions. The observed area has been classified into five subregions according to the integrated intensity of 13CO(J = 1 - 0) ({I}{13{CO}}), and contributions of the fluxes of 11 molecular lines from each subregion to the averaged spectrum have been evaluated. For most of the molecular species, 50% or more of the flux comes from the subregions with {I}{13{CO}} from 25 to 100 K km s-1, which does not involve active star-forming regions. Therefore, the molecular-cloud-scale spectrum observed in the 3 mm band hardly represents the chemical composition of star-forming cores, but mainly represents the chemical composition of an extended quiescent molecular gas. The present result constitutes a sound base for interpreting the spectra of external galaxies at a resolution of a molecular-cloud scale (˜10 pc) or larger.

  13. OB associations and giant molecular clouds in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan; Mckee, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMC's) are the sites of all OB star formation in the Galaxy. These OB stars typically form in large associations and photoionize the surrounding gas, eventually destroying the clouds from which they were born. CO surveys have revealed the distribution of GMC's in the Galaxy, and radio observations provide data on the distribution of associations. These results are extrapolated to determine Galactic mean distribution functions of each and then combined to determine how GMC's and OB associations are correlated. The resulting probability distribution of luminosity given cloud mass implies that although most of the molecular mass of the Galaxy is in massive star forming complexes, a large number of clouds above which massive star formation is extremely likely and abundant and below which it is almost certainly absent.

  14. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and direct N-body methods. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud with a turbulent velocity field, a mass of 10^4 to 10^6 M_sun, and a density between 17 and 1700 cm^-3. We continue the SPH simulations for a free-fall time scale, and analyze the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution is very clumpy with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100 to 10000 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyze the results of the N-body simulations at 2 Myr and 10 Myr. From dense massive molecular clouds, massive clusters grow via hierarchical merging of smaller clusters. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of beta = -1.73 at 2 Myr and beta = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of < -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of M_g scales with 6.1 M_g^0.51 which also agrees with recent observation in M51. The molecular clouds which can form massive clusters are much denser than those typical in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20 km/s and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603

  15. Association of Presolar Grains with Molecular Cloud Material in IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere appear chemically, mineralogically, and texturally primitive in comparison to meteorites. Particles that escape significant atmospheric entry heating have highly unequilibrated mineralogy, are volatile element rich, and, overall, appear to have escaped significant parent body hydrothermal alteration. These IDPs are comprised of the building blocks of the solar system. The strongest evidence that anhydrous IDPs are primitive is that they contain abundant stardust and molecular cloud material. In particular, presolar silicates were first identified in IDPs and are present in abundances (450-5,500 ppm) that are well above that observed in primitive meteorites (less than 170 ppm). The most fragile (cluster) IDPs also commonly exhibit large H and N isotopic anomalies that likely originated by isotopic fractionation during extremely low temperature chemical reactions in a presolar cold molecular cloud. The D/H ratios exceed that of most primitive meteorites, and in rare cases reach values directly observed from simple gas phase molecules in cold molecular clouds. The most extreme D- and N-15-enrichments are usually observed at the finest spatial scales (0.5-2 microns) that can be measured. These observations suggest that D and N-15 hotspots are in fact preserved nuggets of molecular cloud material, and that the materials within them also have presolar origins. The advanced capabilities of the NanoSIMS ion microprobe now enable us to test this hypothesis. Here, we report two recent examples of presolar silicates found to be directly associated with molecular cloud material.

  16. Giant molecular cloud scaling relations: the role of the cloud definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, S. A.; Vasiliev, E. O.; Ladeyschikov, D. A.; Sobolev, A. M.; Khoperskov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the physical properties of molecular clouds in disc galaxies with different morphologies: a galaxy without prominent structure, a spiral barred galaxy and a galaxy with flocculent structure. Our N-body/hydrodynamical simulations take into account non-equilibrium H2 and CO chemical kinetics, self-gravity, star formation and feedback processes. For the simulated galaxies, the scaling relations of giant molecular clouds, or so-called Larson's relations, are studied for two types of cloud definition (or extraction method): the first is based on total column density position-position (PP) data sets and the second is indicated by the CO (1-0) line emission used in position-position-velocity (PPV) data. We find that the cloud populations obtained using both cloud extraction methods generally have similar physical parameters, except that for the CO data the mass spectrum of clouds has a tail with low-mass objects M ˜ 103-104 M⊙. Owing toa varying column density threshold, the power-law indices in the scaling relations are significantly changed. In contrast, the relations are invariant to the CO brightness temperature threshold. Finally, we find that the mass spectra of clouds for PPV data are almost insensitive to the galactic morphology, whereas the spectra for PP data demonstrate significant variation.

  17. Supergiant molecular clouds and the formation of globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    1994-07-01

    Data from several large elliptical and disk galaxies now show that globular clusters more massive than approximately 105 solar mass follow a power-law number distribution by mass, N approximately M-1.7, which is virtually independent of environment. Within observational uncertainty, this relation is identical to the shape of the mass distributions of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in large spiral galaxies, the cloud cores embedded in GMCs, and giant H II regions in large spiral galaxies. We interpret this within a model whereby globular clusters formed out of dense cores within supergiant molecular clouds (SGMCs) that were present in the early protogalactic epoch. We construct a theory of pressure confined, self-gravitating, isothermal, magnetized molecular clouds and cores, based on the viral theorem and the observed mass spectra, and derive the characteristic physical properties of these parent SGMCs. These turn out to be of the right mass and density range to resemble the Searle-Zinn primordial fragments from which larger galaxies may have assembled. We suggest that the protocluster clouds were supported against gravitational collapse primarily by a combination of magnetic field pressure and Alfvenic turbulence, as is observed to be the case for contemporary molecular clouds. This approach removes the need for arbitrary external heat sources (such as long-lasting AGNs or Population III stars) to keep the clouds stable for long enough times to build up to globular-sized masses and more easily permits the global properties of the emergent clusters to be similar from one galaxy to another. By calculating lifetimes through a standard cloud growth model, we estimate that the principal epoch of globular cluster formation should have begun no earlier than a redshift of z approximately equal to 6.

  18. A BUBBLING NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUD: COMPLETE SHELLS IN PERSEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Arce, Hector G.; Borkin, Michelle A.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Beaumont, Christopher N. E-mail: michelle_borkin@harvard.edu E-mail: jaime.pineda@manchester.ac.uk E-mail: cbeaumont@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of the shells (and bubbles) in the Perseus molecular cloud using the COMPLETE survey large-scale {sup 12}CO(1-0) and {sup 13}CO(1-0) maps. The 12 shells reported here are spread throughout most of the Perseus cloud and have circular or arc-like morphologies with a range in radius of about 0.1-3 pc. Most of them have not been detected before most likely because maps of the region lacked the coverage and resolution needed to distinguish them. The majority of the shells are coincident with infrared nebulosity of similar shape and have a candidate powering source near the center. We suggest that they are formed by the interaction of spherical or very wide angle winds powered by young stars inside or near the Perseus molecular cloud-a cloud that is commonly considered to be forming mostly low-mass stars. Two of the 12 shells are powered by high-mass stars close to the cloud, while the others appear to be powered by low- or intermediate-mass stars in the cloud. We argue that winds with a mass loss rate of about 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} are required to produce the observed shells. Our estimates indicate that the energy input rate from these stellar winds is similar to the turbulence dissipation rate. We conclude that in Perseus the total energy input from both collimated protostellar outflows and powerful spherical winds from young stars is sufficient to maintain the turbulence in the molecular cloud. Large-scale molecular line and IR continuum maps of a sample of clouds will help determine the frequency of this phenomenon in other star-forming regions.

  19. Molecular Clouds, Star Formation and Galactic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoville, Nick; Young, Judith S.

    1984-01-01

    Radio observations show that the gigantic clouds of molecules where stars are born are distributed in various ways in spiral galaxies, perhaps accounting for the variation in their optical appearance. Research studies and findings in this area are reported and discussed. (JN)

  20. Molecular Clouds, Star Formation and Galactic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoville, Nick; Young, Judith S.

    1984-01-01

    Radio observations show that the gigantic clouds of molecules where stars are born are distributed in various ways in spiral galaxies, perhaps accounting for the variation in their optical appearance. Research studies and findings in this area are reported and discussed. (JN)

  1. Shock chemistry in the molecular clouds associated with SNR IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Snell, Ronald L.; Dickman, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of several interstellar molecules toward the highly perturbed B and G clouds associated with SNR IC 443 are reported. The results suggest that hot and dense material is present in the SNR, and that shocks are present in both regions. The HCO(+) abundance is shown to be a few times greater that found in cold quiescent gas, in contradiction with previous results. The SO, CS, CN, and NH3 abundances are similar to those found in cold dark clouds.

  2. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  3. Waves on the surface of the Orion molecular cloud.

    PubMed

    Berné, Olivier; Marcelino, Núria; Cernicharo, José

    2010-08-19

    Massive stars influence their parental molecular cloud, and it has long been suspected that the development of hydrodynamical instabilities can compress or fragment the cloud. Identifying such instabilities has proved difficult. It has been suggested that elongated structures (such as the 'pillars of creation') and other shapes arise because of instabilities, but alternative explanations are available. One key signature of an instability is a wave-like structure in the gas, which has hitherto not been seen. Here we report the presence of 'waves' at the surface of the Orion molecular cloud near where massive stars are forming. The waves seem to be a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that arises during the expansion of the nebula as gas heated and ionized by massive stars is blown over pre-existing molecular gas.

  4. HCO emission from H II-molecular cloud interface regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenewerk, M. S.; Jewell, P. R.; Snyder, L. E.; Hollis, J. M.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of well-known molecular clouds in the four strongest HCO N(k-,k+) = 1(01)-O(60) hyperfine transitions has been carried out to determine the prevalence of HCO and to study its chemistry. HCO emission was observed in seven molecular clouds. Three of these, NGC 2264, W49, and NGC 7538, were not previously known sources of HCO. In addition, NGC 2024 and Sgr B2 were mapped and shown to have extensive HCO emission. The survey results show the HCO abundance to be enhanced in H II-molecular cloud interface regions and support a correlation between C(+) and HCO emission. The strength of the HCO emission in NGC 2024 is interpreted in terms of this enhancement and the source structure and proximity to Earth.

  5. HCO emission from H II-molecular cloud interface regions.

    PubMed

    Schenewerk, M S; Snyder, L E; Hollis, J M; Jewell, P R; Ziurys, L M

    1988-05-15

    A survey of well-known molecular clouds in the four strongest HCO NK-,K+ = 1(01)-0(00) hyperfine transitions has been carried out to determine the prevalence of HCO and to study its chemistry. HCO emission was observed in seven molecular clouds. Three of these, NGC 2264, W49, and NGC 7538, were not previously known sources of HCO. In addition, NGC 2024 and Sgr B2 were mapped and shown to have extensive HCO emission. The survey results show the HCO abundance to be enhanced in H II-molecular cloud interface regions and support a correlation between C+ and HCO emission. The strength of the HCO emission in NGC 2024 is interpreted in terms of this enhancement and the source structure and proximity to Earth.

  6. Physical properties of giant molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A.; Wong, T.; Ott, J.; Muller, E.; Pineda, J. L.; Mizuno, Y.; Bernard, J.-P.; Paradis, D.; Maddison, S.; Reach, W. T.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Kawamura, A.; Meixner, M.; Kim, S.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, N.; Fukui, Y.

    2010-08-01

    The Magellanic Mopra Assessment (MAGMA) is a high angular resolution 12CO (J = 1 -> 0) mapping survey of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud using the Mopra Telescope. Here we report on the basic physical properties of 125 GMCs in the LMC that have been surveyed to date. The observed clouds exhibit scaling relations that are similar to those determined for Galactic GMCs, although LMC clouds have narrower linewidths and lower CO luminosities than Galactic clouds of a similar size. The average mass surface density of the LMC clouds is 50 Msolarpc-2, approximately half that of GMCs in the inner Milky Way. We compare the properties of GMCs with and without signs of massive star formation, finding that non-star-forming GMCs have lower peak CO brightness than star-forming GMCs. We compare the properties of GMCs with estimates for local interstellar conditions: specifically, we investigate the HI column density, radiation field, stellar mass surface density and the external pressure. Very few cloud properties demonstrate a clear dependence on the environment; the exceptions are significant positive correlations between (i) the HI column density and the GMC velocity dispersion, (ii) the stellar mass surface density and the average peak CO brightness and (iii) the stellar mass surface density and the CO surface brightness. The molecular mass surface density of GMCs without signs of massive star formation shows no dependence on the local radiation field, which is inconsistent with the photoionization-regulated star formation theory proposed by McKee. We find some evidence that the mass surface density of the MAGMA clouds increases with the interstellar pressure, as proposed by Elmegreen, but the detailed predictions of this model are not fulfilled once estimates for the local radiation field, metallicity and GMC envelope mass are taken into account.

  7. Carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds: Theory and observational constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    For the most part, gas phase models of the chemistry of dense molecular clouds predict the abundances of simple species rather well. However, for larger molecules and even for small systems rich in carbon these models often fail spectacularly. Researchers present a brief review of the basic assumptions and results of large scale modeling of the carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds. Particular attention is to the influence of the gas phase C/O ratio in molecular clouds, and the likely role grains play in maintaining this ratio as clouds evolve from initially diffuse objects to denser cores with associated stellar and planetary formation. Recent spectral line surveys at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths along with selected observations in the submillimeter have now produced an accurate inventory of the gas phase carbon budget in several different types of molecular clouds, though gaps in our knowledge clearly remain. The constraints these observations place on theoretical models of interstellar chemistry can be used to gain insights into why the models fail, and show also which neglected processes must be included in more complete analyses. Looking toward the future, larger molecules are especially difficult to study both experimentally and theoretically in such dense, cold regions, and some new methods are therefore outlined which may ultimately push the detectability of small carbon chains and rings to much heavier species.

  8. Molecular Cloud Chemistry and the Importance of Dielectronic Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, P.; Kreckel, H.; Roueff, E.; Wakelam, V.; Savin, D. W.

    2009-03-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of singly charged ions is a reaction pathway that is commonly neglected in chemical models of molecular clouds. In this study we include state-of-the-art DR data for He+, C+, N+, O+, Na+, and Mg+ in chemical models used to simulate dense molecular clouds, protostars, and diffuse molecular clouds. We also update the radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficients for H+, He+, C+, N+, O+, Na+, and Mg+ to the current state-of-the-art values. The new RR data have little effect on the models. However, the inclusion of DR results in significant differences in gas-grain models of dense, cold molecular clouds for the evolution of a number of surface and gas-phase species. We find differences of a factor of 2 in the abundance for 74 of the 655 species at times of 104-106 yr in this model when we include DR. Of these 74 species, 16 have at least a factor of 10 difference in abundance. We find the largest differences for species formed on the surface of dust grains. These differences are due primarily to the addition of C+ DR, which increases the neutral C abundance, thereby enhancing the accretion of C onto dust. These results may be important for the warm-up phase of molecular clouds when surface species are desorbed into the gas phase. We also note that no reliable state-of-the-art RR or DR data exist for Si+, P+, S+, Cl+, and Fe+. Modern calculations for these ions are needed to better constrain molecular cloud models.

  9. Molecular Complexity in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Recently, we studied chemical complexity in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds. These are irregular satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Both are metal- and dust-poor, although the SMC is significantly poorer in both. The dust temperature in these galaxies could also be higher compared to our Galaxy; this can have a profound effect on the synthesis of molecules in these galaxies. Our simulations show that the cold, dense regions of the LMC and SMC can have a rich chemistry. We found major gas phase species, as well as water and CO2 ices, could be found in abundant quantity. In this presentation I will discuss the complex organic molecules that are found in abundant quantity in our Galaxy, and how their abundance varies in the Magellanic clouds. This comparison will help us to understand the role of metallicity and dust grain temperature in the formation of complex organic molecules.

  10. Warm neutral halos around molecular clouds. IV - H I and continuum: Aperture synthesis observations towards the molecular cloud B5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Roger, R. S.; Wannier, Peter G.

    1992-01-01

    We present aperture synthesis observations of H I (21 cm) line radiation and continuum emission at 408 and 1420 MHz towards a field centered on the molecular cloud B5. The H I emission shows an extended atomic halo around the molecular cloud. The opacity of the halo is derived using H I absorption toward several background sources and a simple source model is presented. The model indicates that the halo is not gravitationally bound to the molecular cloud and that it is in fact expanding away from it. Approximately 350 solar masses are contained in the H I halo. Flux densities and spectral indices for the sources detected in both of the continuum bands are given.

  11. Revising the forty-year old paradigm: from Giant Molecular Clouds to Molecular Gas Clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik William; Duarte Cabral, Ana; Ginsburg, Adam; Hughes, Annie; Kalinova Dimitrova, Veselina

    2015-08-01

    Since the first large surveys of early 80s, the statistical description of Giant Molecular Cloud properties has provided important insights into the physics that govern the star formation itself. However, those statistics heavily rely on the performance of automatic identification algorithms that are often seriously affected by the survey design — notably sensitivity and resolution.In this presentation, I will discuss how some of the limitations of commonly used algorithms can be overcome by considering the cloud segmentation problem in the broad framework of the graph theory. Additionally, the clustering analysis provides a natural and robust mathematical description of the molecular ISM discrete features that might be viewed as “Molecular Gas Clusters”.In particular, the algorithm we designed (SCIMES - Spectral Clustering for Molecular Emission Segmentation) applies the spectral clustering approach to look for relevant objects within topological graphs of emission (dendrograms) from star-forming clouds. SCIMES appears especially useful for the cloud identification within complex molecular emission data cubes since, in contrast to other algorithms, it does not over-divide structures, faithfully reproducing the work of the human eyes.To prove this, I will show the cloud decomposition obtained by SCIMES from the CO High Resolution Survey, where the clustering approach allows to automatically identify a variety of gas morphologies including coherent filamentary structures and holes within the molecular ISM. To calculate the cloud physical properties, distances to the clouds are attributed through the dendrograms using data from the BOLOCAM Survey, while the cloud size-line width relation is explored using a Principal Component Analysis approach as well as in the classical way.Finally, I will discuss how SCIMES introduces a new philosophy in the identification of the molecular clouds, where virtually every property of the molecular emission might be used for the

  12. Revising the forty-year old paradigm: from Giant Molecular Clouds to Molecular Gas Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik William; Duarte Cabral, Ana; Ginsburg, Adam; Hughes, Annie; Kalinova Dimitrova, Veselina

    2015-08-01

    Since the first large surveys of early 80s, the statistical description of Giant Molecular Cloud properties has provided important insights into the physics that govern the star formation itself. However, those statistics heavily rely on the performance of automatic identification algorithms that are often seriously affected by the survey design — notably sensitivity and resolution.In this presentation, I will discuss how some of the limitations of commonly used algorithms can be overcome by considering the cloud segmentation problem in the broad framework of the graph theory. Additionally, the clustering analysis provides a natural and robust mathematical description of the molecular ISM discrete features that might be viewed as “Molecular Gas Clusters”.In particular, the algorithm we designed (SCIMES - Spectral Clustering for Molecular Emission Segmentation) applies the spectral clustering approach to look for relevant objects within topological graphs of emission (dendrograms) from star-forming clouds. SCIMES appears especially useful for the cloud identification within complex molecular emission data cubes since, in contrast to other algorithms, it does not over-divide structures, faithfully reproducing the work of the human eyes.To prove this, I will show the cloud decomposition obtained by SCIMES from the CO High Resolution Survey, where the clustering approach allows to automatically identify a variety of gas morphologies including coherent filamentary structures and holes within the molecular ISM. To calculate the cloud physical properties, distances to the clouds are attributed through the dendrograms using data from the BOLOCAM Survey, while the cloud size-line width relation is explored using a Principal Component Analysis approach as well as in the classical way.Finally, I will discuss how SCIMES introduces a new philosophy in the identification of the molecular clouds, where virtually every property of the molecular emission might be used for the

  13. Aspects of HI behaviour in the birth of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joncas, Gilles; Fortier, Pierre; Scholtys, Jeremy; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the processes related to the formation and evolution of molecular clouds is essential to our understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM) at large and of star formation. High galactic latitude clouds are ideal laboratories for studying the physics of the ISM as only turbulence, magnetic fields and the interstellar radiation field come into play. Using clues from UV H2 absorption lines and by comparing IRAS dust emission to HI column density from aperture synthesis observations obtained using the DRAO interferometer, we have probed the morphology and dynamics of 14 potential molecular sites (totaling 151 square degrees), in the hopes of identifying molecular clouds at different stages of evolution. Seven sites have confirmed molecular clouds. Most are new, four of which have been observed in CO using the Onsala 20m telescope. The HI line shows varying degrees of velocity shears very probably related to the age of the molecular site. Our newobservations will be presented. Simulations of turbulent HI fields have recently been acquired andwill be compared to our observations.

  14. H2, CO, and Dust Absorption through Cold Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, John H.; Sneden, Christopher; Kim, Hwihyun; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2017-03-01

    The abundance of H2 in molecular clouds, relative to the commonly used tracer CO, has only been measured toward a few embedded stars, which may be surrounded by atypical gas. We present observations of near-infrared absorption by H2, CO, and dust toward stars behind molecular clouds, providing a representative sample of these molecules in cold molecular gas, primarily in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. We find {{{N}}}{{{H}}2}/{A}{{V}} ≈ 1.0 × 1021 cm‑2, {{{N}}}{CO}/{A}{{V}} ≈ 1.5 × 1017 cm‑2 (1.8 × 1017 including solid CO), and {{{N}}}{{{H}}2}/{{{N}}}{CO} ≈ 6000. The measured {{{N}}}{{{H}}2}/{{{N}}}{CO} ratio is consistent with that toward embedded stars in various molecular clouds, but both are less than that derived from millimeter-wave observations of CO and star counts. The difference apparently results from the higher directly measured {{{N}}}{CO}/{A}{{V}} ratio.

  15. The 12CO/13CO ratio in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szűcs, László; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-12-01

    The 13CO molecule is often used as a column density tracer in regions where the 12CO emission saturates. The 13CO column density is then related to that of 12CO by a uniform isotopic ratio. A similar approximation is frequently used when deriving 13CO emission maps from numerical simulations of molecular clouds. To test this assumption, we calculate the 12CO/13CO ratio self-consistently, taking the isotope-selective photodissociation and the chemical fractionation of CO into account. We model the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution and the emergent 13CO emission of isolated, starless molecular clouds in various environments. Selective photodissociation has a minimal effect on the ratio, while the chemical fractionation causes a factor of 2-3 decrease at intermediate cloud depths. The variation correlates with both the 12CO and the 13CO column densities. Neglecting the depth dependence results in ≤60 per cent error in 12CO column densities derived from 13CO. The same assumption causes ≤50 per cent disparity in the 13CO emission derived from simulated clouds. We show that the discrepancies can be corrected by a fitting formula. The formula is consistent with millimetre-wavelength isotopic ratio measurements of dense molecular clouds, but underestimates the ratios from the ultraviolet absorption of diffuse regions.

  16. Interaction between Cassiopeia A and nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, C. D.; Bieging, J. H.; Rieke, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present spectroscopy of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) observed at infrared wavelengths from 10 to 40 μm with the Spitzer Space Telescope and at millimeter wavelengths in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J =2-1 (230 and 220 GHz) with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. The IR spectra demonstrate high-velocity features toward a molecular cloud coincident with a region of bright radio continuum emission along the northern shock front of Cas A. The millimeter observations indicate that CO emission is broadened by a factor of two in some clouds toward Cas A, particularly to the south and west. We believe that these features trace interactions between the Cas A shock front and nearby molecular clouds. In addition, some of the molecular clouds that exhibit broadening in CO lie 1'-2' away from the furthest extent of the supernova remnant shock front. We propose that this material may be accelerated by ejecta with velocity significantly larger than the observed free-expansion velocity of the Cas A shock front. These observations may trace cloud interactions with fast-moving outflows such as the bipolar outflow along the southwest to northeast axis of the Cas A supernova remnant, as well as fast-moving knots seen emerging in other directions.

  17. Neutral atomic carbon in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Goldhaber, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The 370 micron 3P2-3P1 fine-structure line of neutral carbon was detected in seven sources: OMC 1, NGC 2024, S140, W3, DR 21, M17, and W51. Simultaneous analysis of J = 2-1 data and available observations of the J = 1-0 line make it possible to deduce optical depths and excitation temperatures for these lines. These data indicate that both C I lines are likely to be optically thin, and that the ratio of C I to CO column densities in these clouds is typically about 0.1.

  18. Star formation in the L1333 molecular cloud in Cassiopeia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Ayano; Kun, Mária; Sato, Fumio; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Fukui, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    Radio and optical observations have been made in order to examine star formation in the dark cloud L1333. A study of the cumulative distribution of field star distance moduli yields a distance value close to 180 pc for the L1333 molecular cloud. (C-13)O observations revealed two filamentary molecular clouds with distinct velocities of VLSR about -2 and 3 km/s, respectively. Thirteen (C-18) cores, characterized by an average molecular mass (MLTE) of 9 M and a mean density of 1.4 x 10 exp 4/cu cm, are embedded in the two (C-13)O clouds. We have detected 18 H-alpha emission-line stars projected within or near the (C-13)O clouds on objective-prism plates. They can be regarded as candidate premain-sequence stars formed in the clouds. Five IRAS sources with flux density distributions characteristic of young stellar objects (YSOs) are found in the area of the cloud. Three of the IRAS sources coincide with H emission-line stars, the others with faint stars without detected H-alpha emission. One of the latter sources is associated with a (C-18)O core and exhibits a protostar-type infrared spectrum. The IRAS source exhibits a winglike feature of 1.6 km/s in (C-18)O, which may indicate that the YSO has an outflow. We note that the (C-18)O core has the smallest ratio of virial mass to MLTE among the C18O cores in L1333, suggesting that star formation occurs preferentially in a core whose internal kinetic energy is low compared with the self-gravitational energy.

  19. Electron densities and the excitation of CN in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1991-01-01

    In molecular clouds of modest density and relatively high fractional ionization, the rotational excitation of CN is controlled by a competition among electron impact, neutral impact and the interaction with the cosmic background radiation. The degree of excitation can be measured through optical absorption lines and millimeter-wave emission lines. The available, accurate data on CN in diffuse and translucent molecular clouds are assembled and used to determine electron densities. The derived values, n(e) = roughly 0.02 - 0.5/cu cm, imply modest neutral densities, which generally agree well with determinations by other techniques. The absorption- and emission-line measurements of CN both exclude densities higher than n(H2) = roughly 10 exp 3.5/cu cm on scales varying from 0.001 to 60 arcsec in these clouds.

  20. Gravity, turbulence and the scaling ``laws'' in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    The so-called Larson (1981) scaling laws found empirically in molecular clouds have been generally interpreted as evidence that the clouds are turbulent and fractal. In the present contribution we discussed how recent observations and models of cloud formation suggest that: (a) these relations are the result of strong observational biases due to the cloud definition itself: since the filling factor of the dense structures is small, by thresholding the column density the computed mean density between clouds is nearly constant, and nearly the same as the threshold (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2012). (b) When accounting for column density variations, the velocity dispersion-size relation does not appears anymore. Instead, dense cores populate the upper-left corner of the δ v-R diagram (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a). (c) Instead of a δ v-R relation, a more appropriate relation seems to be δ v 2 / R = 2 GMΣ, which suggest that clouds are in collapse, rather than supported by turbulence (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a). (d) These results, along with the shapes of the star formation histories (Hartmann, Ballesteros-Paredes & Heitsch 2012), line profiles of collapsing clouds in numerical simulations (Heitsch, Ballesteros-Paredes & Hartmann 2009), core-to-core velocity dispersions (Heitsch, Ballesteros-Paredes & Hartmann 2009), time-evolution of the column density PDFs (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011b), etc., strongly suggest that the actual source of the non-thermal motions is gravitational collapse of the clouds, so that the turbulent, chaotic component of the motions is only a by-product of the collapse, with no significant ``support" role for the clouds. This result calls into question if the scale-free nature of the motions has a turbulent, origin (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a; Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011b, Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2012).

  1. The dynamical evolution of molecular clouds near the Galactic Centre - I. Orbital structure and evolutionary timeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Dale, James E.; Longmore, Steven N.

    2015-02-01

    We recently proposed that the star-forming potential of dense molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ, i.e. the central few 100 pc) of the Milky Way is intimately linked to their orbital dynamics, potentially giving rise to an absolute-time sequence of star-forming clouds. In this paper, we present an orbital model for the gas stream(s) observed in the CMZ. The model is obtained by integrating orbits in the empirically constrained gravitational potential and represents a good fit (χ _red^2=2.0) to the observed position-velocity distribution of dense (n > several 103 cm-3) gas, reproducing all of its key properties. The orbit is also consistent with observational constraints not included in the fitting process, such as the 3D space velocities of Sgr B2 and the Arches and Quintuplet clusters. It differs from previous, parametric models in several respects: (1) the orbit is open rather than closed due to the extended mass distribution in the CMZ, (2) its orbital velocity (100-200 km s-1) is twice as high as in previous models, and (3) Sgr A* coincides with the focus of the (eccentric) orbit rather than being offset. Our orbital solution supports the recently proposed scenario in which the dust ridge between G0.253+0.016 (`the Brick') and Sgr B2 represents an absolute-time sequence of star-forming clouds, of which the condensation was triggered by the tidal compression during their most recent pericentre passage. We position the clouds on a common timeline and find that their pericentre passages occurred 0.30-0.74 Myr ago. Given their short free-fall times (tff ˜ 0.34 Myr), the quiescent cloud G0.253+0.016 and the vigorously star-forming complex Sgr B2 are separated by a single free-fall time of evolution, implying that star formation proceeds rapidly once collapse has been initiated. We provide the complete orbital solution, as well as several quantitative predictions of our model (e.g. proper motions and the positions of star formation `hotspots'). The

  2. The Chemistry and Excitation of Water in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2003-01-01

    We model the chemistry and thermal balance of opaque molecular clouds exposed to an external flux of ultraviolet photons. We include the processes of gas phase and grain surface chemical reactions; in particular we examine closely the freezing of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces and the desorption of molecules from grain surfaces as a function of depth into a molecular cloud. We find that on the surface of a molecular cloud the gas phase water abundances are low because of photodissociation, and the grain phase water (ice) abundance is low because of photodesorption of water from the grain surfaces. Deeper into the cloud, at A(sub v) less than or approximately 2-8 depending on the strength of the external ultraviolet flux, the gas phase water abundance increases with depth as the photodissociation rates decline due to dust attenuation of the ultraviolet field. However, beyond A(sub v) less than or approximately 2-8 the gas phase water abundance declines because the water freezes as water ice on the grains, and photodesorption is no longer effective in clearing the ice. A peak water abundance of about 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -7) occurs at about A(sub v) approximately 2-8, relatively independent of the gas density and the ultraviolet field. We show that such a model matches very closely the observations of the Submillimeter Wave Astronomical Satellite (SWAS), a NASA Small Explorer Mission. The model elucidates several mechanisms that have been recently invoked to understand gas phase chemistry in clouds, including-the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surface, the desorption of these molecules from the surfaces, and the abundance gradients of molecules as functions of depth into molecular clouds.

  3. The Chemistry and Excitation of Water in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2003-01-01

    We model the chemistry and thermal balance of opaque molecular clouds exposed to an external flux of ultraviolet photons. We include the processes of gas phase and grain surface chemical reactions; in particular we examine closely the freezing of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces and the desorption of molecules from grain surfaces as a function of depth into a molecular cloud. We find that on the surface of a molecular cloud the gas phase water abundances are low because of photodissociation, and the grain phase water (ice) abundance is low because of photodesorption of water from the grain surfaces. Deeper into the cloud, at A(sub v) less than or approximately 2-8 depending on the strength of the external ultraviolet flux, the gas phase water abundance increases with depth as the photodissociation rates decline due to dust attenuation of the ultraviolet field. However, beyond A(sub v) less than or approximately 2-8 the gas phase water abundance declines because the water freezes as water ice on the grains, and photodesorption is no longer effective in clearing the ice. A peak water abundance of about 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -7) occurs at about A(sub v) approximately 2-8, relatively independent of the gas density and the ultraviolet field. We show that such a model matches very closely the observations of the Submillimeter Wave Astronomical Satellite (SWAS), a NASA Small Explorer Mission. The model elucidates several mechanisms that have been recently invoked to understand gas phase chemistry in clouds, including-the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surface, the desorption of these molecules from the surfaces, and the abundance gradients of molecules as functions of depth into molecular clouds.

  4. Primordial Molecular Cloud Material in Metal-Rich Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    The menagerie of objects that make up our Solar System reflects the composition of the huge molecular cloud in which the Sun formed, a late addition of short-lived isotopes from an exploding supernova or stellar winds from a neighboring massive star, heating and/or alteration by water in growing planetesimals that modified and segregated the primordial components, and mixing throughout the Solar System. Outer Solar System objects, such as comets, have always been cold, hence minimizing the changes experienced by more processed objects. They are thought to preserve information about the molecular cloud. Elishevah Van Kooten (Natural History Museum of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen) and co-authors in Denmark and at the University of Hawai'i, measured the isotopic compositions of magnesium and chromium in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites. They found that the meteorites preserve an isotopic signature of primordial molecular cloud materials, providing a potentially detailed record of the molecular cloud's composition and of materials that formed in the outer Solar System.

  5. Supersonic turbulence and structure of interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Nordlund, Ake; Padoan, Paolo

    2002-07-15

    The interstellar medium provides a unique laboratory for highly supersonic, driven hydrodynamic turbulence. We propose a theory of such turbulence, test it by numerical simulations, and use the results to explain observational scaling properties of interstellar molecular clouds, the regions where stars are born.

  6. Filament L1482 in the California molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. L.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Lou, Y.-Q.; Wu, G.; Tang, X. D.; He, Y. X.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The process of gravitational fragmentation in the L1482 molecular filament of the California molecular cloud is studied by combining several complementary observations and physical estimates. We investigate the kinematic and dynamical states of this molecular filament and physical properties of several dozens of dense molecular clumps embedded therein. Methods: We present and compare molecular line emission observations of the J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 transitions of 12CO in this molecular complex, using the Kölner Observatorium für Sub-Millimeter Astronomie (KOSMA) 3-m telescope. These observations are complemented with archival data observations and analyses of the 13CO J = 1-0 emission obtained at the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) 13.7-m radio telescope at Delingha Station in QingHai Province of west China, as well as infrared emission maps from the Herschel Space Telescope online archive, obtained with the SPIRE and PACS cameras. Comparison of these complementary datasets allows for a comprehensive multiwavelength analysis of the L1482 molecular filament. Results: We have identified 23 clumps along the molecular filament L1482 in the California molecular cloud. For these molecular clumps, we were able to estimate column and number densities, masses, and radii. The masses of these clumps range from ~6.8 to 62.8 M⊙ with an average value of 24.7-16.2+31.1 M⊙. Eleven of the identified molecular clumps appear to be associated with protostars and are thus referred to as protostellar clumps. Protostellar clumps and the remaining starless clumps of our sample appear to have similar temperatures and linewidths, yet on average, the protostellar clumps appear to be slightly more massive than the latter. All these molecular clumps show supersonic nonthermal gas motions. While surprisingly similar in mass and size to the much better known Orion molecular cloud, the formation rate of high-mass stars appears to be suppressed in the California molecular cloud

  7. Excitation and Disruption of a Giant Molecular Cloud by the Sepurnova Remnant 3C 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, W. T.; Rho, J.

    1998-01-01

    The ambient molecular gas at the distance of the remnant comprises a giant molecular cloud whose edge is closely parallel to a ridge of bright non-thermal radio continuum, which evidently delineates the blast-wave into the cloud.

  8. Protostellar clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneman, Martin

    The HOBYS Herschel observations of Rosette reveal a population of about 50 very compact far-infrared sources. We find a dense cluster toward the cloud centre and others in the imme-diate vicinity of high-mass young stellar objects or distributed. A fraction of them lack Spitzer counterparts which indicates a very early evolutionary stage. We extract the spectral energy dis-tributions of this new population of protostars to constrain their basic properties, in particular envelope masses and bolometric luminosities. These key characteristics of the Rosette protostar population are used to build an evolutionary diagram (Me nvvsLb ol)tocompletethatmadef orlow- massstar-f ormingregions.T hecomparisontoevolutionarytracksshowsthatRosettef ormslow- tohigh-massstars.W ealsoassesstheapparentmasssegregationof theseprotostarswithrespecttothecloudde massyoungstellarobjects.

  9. Molecular Development in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Using a new network and a new model, we have studied chemical complexity in cold portions of dense clouds of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We varied the hydrogen number density between 1 × 105 and 5 × 105 cm-3 and, for each density, we ran models for AV = 3, 5, and 10. Then, for each density and visual extinction we varied the grain temperature between 10 and 50 K in small intervals, while keeping the gas temperature constant at 20 K. We used a gas-to-dust mass ratio based on a variety of observations and analyses, and scaled the elemental abundances of the LMC so that they are representative of so-called “low” metallic abundances. We found that although the LMC is metal-poor, it still shows a rich chemistry; almost all the major observed species in the gas phase of our Galaxy should be detectable using present-day observational facilities. We compared our model results with observed gas-phase abundances in some cold and dense sources, and found reasonably good agreement for most species. We also found that some observed results, especially for methanol, are better matched if these regions currently possess lower temperatures, or possessed them in the past. Finally, we discussed our simulated abundances for H2O ice with respect to total hydrogen, and CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3 ices with respect to water ice, and compared our values with those for two observed ices—CO2 and CO—detected in front of young stellar objects in the LMC.

  10. Tidal disruption of open clusters in their parent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kevin

    1989-01-01

    A simple model of tidal encounters has been applied to the problem of an open cluster in a clumpy molecular cloud. The parameters of the clumps are taken from the Blitz, Stark, and Long (1988) catalog of clumps in the Rosette molecular cloud. Encounters are modeled as impulsive, rectilinear collisions between Plummer spheres, but the tidal approximation is not invoked. Mass and binding energy changes during an encounter are computed by considering the velocity impulses given to individual stars in a random realization of a Plummer sphere. Mean rates of mass and binding energy loss are then computed by integrating over many encounters. Self-similar evolutionary calculations using these rates indicate that the disruption process is most sensitive to the cluster radius and relatively insensitive to cluster mass. The calculations indicate that clusters which are born in a cloud similar to the Rosette with a cluster radius greater than about 2.5 pc will not survive long enough to leave the cloud. The majority of clusters, however, have smaller radii and will survive the passage through their parent cloud.

  11. Irradiation of dust in molecular clouds. IV. ACR doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikyan, A. G.; Barsamyan, L.

    2013-09-01

    The fluxes of anomalous cosmic rays inside typical molecular clouds produced during collisions of stars with clouds are calculated. The charged particles formed in the cloud in the neighborhood of the star are accelerated in a shock front in the astrosphere by known statistical mechanisms to energies on the order of a few 100 MeV. It is shown that protons and α-particles with energies in the 1 keV ≤ E ≤ 10 GeV range penetrate deeply enough that, over the time of 1-5 hundred thousand years a star is passing through a cloud, they produce sufficient irradiation doses for the ice mantle of dust particles such that the cumulative effect owing to multiple passages would exceed a threshold value on the order of 0.1-1 eV/amu. The possible use of these results for astrophysical interpretation of laboratory experiments on the irradiation of H2O:CH3OH:NH3:CO ice mixtures is discussed. The complex organic substances formed by radiation-chemical transformation may play an important role in the prebiological evolution of the dust component of molecular clouds.

  12. Sandqvist 187 - A dense molecular cloud in Norma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.; Bronfman, L.; Cohen, R.; Garay, G.; Graham, J.; Thaddeus, P.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of Sandqvist 187, an elongated dust cloud in the southern constellation Norma are presented and discussed. The cloud contains two Herbig-Haro objects, HH 56 and HH 57. HH 57 currently displays on its NE edge a 17th mag variable star of the FU Ori type. Using the Columbia University 1.2 m millimeter-wave telescope at Cerro Tololo, the region is mapped and an extended CO cloud which envelops and is elongated along the optical dust cloud is found. The position of maximum CO emission coincides with HH 56 and HH 57. Assuming a distance of 0.7 kpc, the total mass of the cloud is found to be close to 500 solar masses. The CO spectra show evidence of a molecular flow. Photographs and CCD images obtained mostly with the CTIO 4 m telescope show the detailed optical structure of the dark cloud's core region. The Herbig-Haro object HH 56 appears to be related to an emission-line star embedded in the small nebula Reipurth 13, not to the FU Ori star in HH 57.

  13. Sandqvist 187 - A dense molecular cloud in Norma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.; Bronfman, L.; Cohen, R.; Garay, G.; Graham, J.; Thaddeus, P.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of Sandqvist 187, an elongated dust cloud in the southern constellation Norma are presented and discussed. The cloud contains two Herbig-Haro objects, HH 56 and HH 57. HH 57 currently displays on its NE edge a 17th mag variable star of the FU Ori type. Using the Columbia University 1.2 m millimeter-wave telescope at Cerro Tololo, the region is mapped and an extended CO cloud which envelops and is elongated along the optical dust cloud is found. The position of maximum CO emission coincides with HH 56 and HH 57. Assuming a distance of 0.7 kpc, the total mass of the cloud is found to be close to 500 solar masses. The CO spectra show evidence of a molecular flow. Photographs and CCD images obtained mostly with the CTIO 4 m telescope show the detailed optical structure of the dark cloud's core region. The Herbig-Haro object HH 56 appears to be related to an emission-line star embedded in the small nebula Reipurth 13, not to the FU Ori star in HH 57.

  14. Chemical evolution of giant molecular clouds in simulations of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richings, Alexander J.; Schaye, Joop

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within hydrodynamic simulations of isolated, low-mass (M* ˜ 109 M⊙) disc galaxies. We study the evolution of molecular abundances and the implications for CO emission and the XCO conversion factor in individual clouds. We define clouds either as regions above a density threshold n_{H, min} = 10 {cm}^{-3}, or using an observationally motivated CO intensity threshold of 0.25 {K} {km} {s}^{-1}. Our simulations include a non-equilibrium chemical model with 157 species, including 20 molecules. We also investigate the effects of resolution and pressure floors (i.e. Jeans limiters). We find cloud lifetimes up to ≈ 40 Myr, with a median of 13 Myr, in agreement with observations. At one-tenth solar metallicity, young clouds ( ≲ 10-15 Myr) are underabundant in H2 and CO compared to chemical equilibrium, by factors of ≈3 and one to two orders of magnitude, respectively. At solar metallicity, GMCs reach chemical equilibrium faster (within ≈ 1 Myr). We also compute CO emission from individual clouds. The mean CO intensity, ICO, is strongly suppressed at low dust extinction, Av, and possibly saturates towards high Av, in agreement with observations. The ICO-Av relation shifts towards higher Av for higher metallicities and, to a lesser extent, for stronger UV radiation. At one-tenth solar metallicity, CO emission is weaker in young clouds ( ≲ 10-15 Myr), consistent with the underabundance of CO. Consequently, XCO decreases by an order of magnitude from 0 to 15 Myr, albeit with a large scatter.

  15. Atomic and molecular gas in interstellar cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1994-01-01

    The dust, atomic gas, and molecular gas content of a sample of 26 of isolated, degree-sized infrared clouds are compared. Half of the clouds have an infrared excess indicating the presence of H2, and 14 contain compact CO-emitting regions. Complete, high angular resolution H I and CO maps of one cloud, G236+39, resolve the transition between atomic and molecular H, as well as the location of CO formation. Assuming the infrared emission traces the total column density, H2 is inferred to be much more widely distributed than the CO. The CO rotational levels are subthermally excited, and the (2 - 1)/(1 - 0) line ratios suggest a density n(H2) approximately 200/cm(exp 3) where CO was detected. A model of H2 formation on grain surfaces balanced by self-shielded photodissociation fits the variation of infrared brightness with H I column density. Assuming a temperature of 80 K, typical of diffuse H2 (Savage et al. 1977), the H2 chemistry requires an average density n(H + 2H2) approximately 50/cm(exp 3). For G236+39, if the distance is 100 pc, the H I and H2 masses are estimated to be 90 and 70 solar mass, respectively. High-resolution H I and infrared maps of a smaller cloud, G249.0+73.7, reveal no evidence for molecular gas, which is likely due to the low total column density through this cloud. These results suggest the H2 and H I content are comparable for some interstellar cirrus clouds with column densities N(H I) greater than 4 x 10(exp 20)/cm(exp 2), even where CO was not detected.

  16. Rosette: Understanding Star Formation in Molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2010-09-01

    We propose Chandra imaging of three embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) complex. With complementary existing Spitzer and FLAMINGOS infrared surveys, the Chandra observation is critical for us to: (1) create a complete census of the young stars in the cloud; (2) study the spatial distribution of the young stars in different evolutionary stages within the RMC and the disk frequency in the embedded clusters; (3) construct X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) and Initial Mass Function (IMF) for the clusters to examine XLF/IMF variations; (4) elucidate star formation history in this complex.

  17. Supernova feedback in molecular clouds: global evolution and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körtgen, Bastian; Seifried, Daniel; Banerjee, Robi; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We use magnetohydrodynamical simulations of converging warm neutral medium flows to analyse the formation and global evolution of magnetized and turbulent molecular clouds subject to supernova feedback from massive stars. We show that supernova feedback alone fails to disrupt entire, gravitationally bound, molecular clouds, but is able to disperse small-sized (˜10 pc) regions on time-scales of less than 1 Myr. Efficient radiative cooling of the supernova remnant as well as strong compression of the surrounding gas result in non-persistent energy and momentum input from the supernovae. However, if the time between subsequent supernovae is short and they are clustered, large hot bubbles form that disperse larger regions of the parental cloud. On longer time-scales, supernova feedback increases the amount of gas with moderate temperatures (T ≈ 300-3000 K). Despite its inability to disrupt molecular clouds, supernova feedback leaves a strong imprint on the star formation process. We find an overall reduction of the star formation efficiency by a factor of 2 and of the star formation rate by roughly factors of 2-4.

  18. Polarization of far-infrared radiation from molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D. P.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Platt, S. R.; Dragovan, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper reports measurements of the polarization of far-infrared emission from dust in nine molecular clouds. Detections were obtained in Mon R2, in the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula in Orion, and in Sgr A. Upper limits were set for six other clouds. A comparison of the 100 micron polarization of KL with that previously measured at 270 microns provides new evidence that the polarization is due to emission from magnetically aligned dust grains. Comparing the results for Orion with measurements at optical wavelengths, it is inferred that the magnetic field direction in the outer parts of the Orion cloud is the same as that in the dense core. This direction is nearly perpendicular to the ridge of molecular emission and is parallel to both the molecular outflow in KL and the axis of rotation of the cloud core. In Mon R2, the field direction which the measurements imply does not agree withthat derived from 0.9-2.2 micron polarimetry. The discrepancy is attributed to scattering in the near-infrared. In Orion and Sgr A, where comparisons are possible, the measurements are in good agreement with 10 micron polarization measurements.

  19. MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN FINITE MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, A.; Johnstone, D.; Heitsch, F. E-mail: Douglas.Johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2011-10-20

    We analytically investigate the modes of gravity-induced star formation possible in idealized finite molecular clouds where global collapse competes against both local Jeans instabilities and discontinuous edge instabilities. We examine these timescales for collapse in spheres, disks, and cylinders, with emphasis on the structure, size, and degree of internal perturbations required in order for local collapse to occur before global collapse. We find that internal, local collapse is more effective for the lower dimensional objects. Spheres and disks, if unsupported against global collapse, must either contain strong perturbations or must be unrealistically large in order for small density perturbations to collapse significantly faster than the entire cloud. We find, on the other hand, that filamentary geometry is the most favorable situation for the smallest perturbations to grow before global collapse overwhelms them and that filaments containing only a few Jeans masses and weak density perturbations can readily fragment. These idealized solutions are compared with simulations of star-forming regions in an attempt to delineate the role of global, local, and edge instabilities in determining the fragmentation properties of molecular clouds. The combined results are also discussed in the context of recent observations of Galactic molecular clouds.

  20. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR CARBON AS A TRACER OF TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Burgh, Eric B.; France, Kevin; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    Using archival, high-resolution far-ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectra of 34 Galactic O and B stars, we measure C I column densities and compare them with measurements from the literature of CO and H{sub 2} with regard to understanding the presence of translucent clouds along the line of sight. We find that the CO/H{sub 2} and CO/C I ratios provide good discriminators for the presence of translucent material, and both increase as a function of molecular fraction, f{sup N} = 2N(H{sub 2})/N(H). We suggest that sightlines with values below CO/H{sub 2} approx10{sup -6} and CO/C I approx1 contain mostly diffuse molecular clouds, while those with values above sample clouds in the transition region between diffuse and dark. These discriminating values are also consistent with the change in slope of the CO versus H{sub 2} correlation near the column density at which CO shielding becomes important, as evidenced by the change in photochemistry regime studied by Sheffer et al. Based on the lack of correlation of the presence of translucent material with traditional measures of extinction, we recommend defining 'translucent clouds' based on the molecular content rather than line-of-sight extinction properties.

  1. Cosmic Ray-Induced Polycondensate Hydrocarbons in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keheyan, Y.; Cataldo, F.; Yyghikyan, A.

    2004-07-01

    Astrophysical and cosmochemical data show that many kinds of hydrocarbons are widespread in space, including giant molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar medium, comets, interplanetary dust particles, and carbonaceous meteorites. Here an effort is made to show the close relation between high-molecular weight hydrocarbons observed in space and existing on Earth. Results of astrochemical modelling of dust grains in dense collapsing cores of giant molecular clouds are also presented. They show that about 10% of the total abundance of dust grains may be the result of aliphatic hydrocarbons. This dust serves as initial material for comets, formed in protosolar nebula. The problem of survival of cometary organics during impact onto the Earth is discussed, and it is shown that the so-called soft-landing comet hypothesis may explain the accumulation of complex hydrocarbons on the Earth's surface. We conclude that a significant fraction of terrestrial prebiotic petroleum was delivered by extraterrestrial matter.

  2. Giant Molecular Clouds in NGC5128 (Centaurus A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialetski, Y.; Bender, R.; Alves, J.

    2005-12-01

    The physics of the formation of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC) is one of the major unsolved problems of the interstellar medium. A study of GMCs in external galaxies can address the fundamental questions of whether the molecular ISM in external galaxies is organized differently than in the Milky Way and whether GMCs play the same central role in massive star formation as in the Milky Way, and are then responsible for galaxy evolution. We report the results of our study of 436 giant molecular clouds in NGC5128 using dust extinction. The proposed technique allows us to probe the extinction up to 10m in this galaxy. The clump mass spectrum, derived by a clumpfind algorithm, is consistent with a power law with the index of 2.3.

  3. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  4. Rapid formation of molecular clouds from turbulent atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    The characteristic lifetimes of molecular clouds remain uncertain and a topic of frequent debate, with arguments having recently been advanced both in support of short-lived clouds, with lifetimes of a few Myr or less (see e.g. Elmegreen 2000; Hartmann et al. 2001) and in support of much longer-lived clouds, with lifetimes of the order of 10 Myr or more (see e.g. Tassis & Mouschovias, 2004; Goldsmith & Li, 2005). An argument that has previously been advanced in favour of longer lived clouds is the apparent difficulty involved in converting sufficient atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen within the short timescale required by the rapid cloud formation scenario. However, previous estimates of the time required for this conversion to occur have not taken into account the effects of the supersonic turbulence which is inferred to be present in the atomic gas. In this contribution, we present results from a set of high resolution three-dimensional simulations of turbulence in gravitationally unstable atomic gas. These simulations were performed using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP hydrodynamical code (Norman 2000), and include a detailed treatment of the thermal balance of the gas and of the formation of molecular hydrogen. The effects of photodissociation of H2 by the Galactic UV field are also included, with a simple local approximation used to compute the effects of H2 self-shielding. The results of our simulations demonstrate that H2 formation occurs rapidly in turbulent atomic gas. Starting from purely atomic gas, large quantities of molecular gas can be produced on timescales of less than a Myr, given turbulent velocity dispersions and magnetic field strengths consistent with observations. Moreover, as our simulations underestimate the effectiveness of H2 self-shielding and dust absorption, we can be confident that the molecular fractions which we compute are strong lower limits on the true values. The formation of large quantities of molecular gas on the

  5. Completing the Mapping of the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud; Testing Models and the Importance of Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Toby; Allsopp, James; Jones, Huw

    2006-05-01

    It is proposed to complete the R. Gehrz's mapping of W3 at both IRAC and MIPS 24um wavelengths. W3 is an outer galaxy Giant Molecular Cloud comprising of two regions; a quiescent, spontaneously star forming region and a region compressed by the W4 OB association containing the majority of star formation and all of the high mass star formation. Currently only the high-density region, Lada( put date) is mapped, but for a scientifically-valid comparision between the triggered and spontaneous modes we require the remainder of the cloud to be mapped. Triggered star formation is vitally important as it provides a mechanism for understanding the massive disparity between the low star formation efficiencies of galaxies such as our own andmore violent events such as galaxy mergers. Currently we have mapped the majority of the cloud at 850 um using SCUBA and the whole cloud using the CO(J=1-0) with the 12CO, 13CO and C18O isotomers. From these studies we have identified and measured the masses of 230 clumps. Without Spitzer data we have no way of determining which of these clumps have formed stars. This project forms the final crucial piece which when added to our current observations of the mass in the cloud will quantify the local star formation efficiency for each region. This is the first part of an ongoing much larger study into triggered star formation. We used Aztec (1.1mm continuum) on the JCMT in January 2006 to map two more clouds and Spitzer data on these from other observers has either been recently released or is about to be. In 2007, we will expand on the knowledge gained from this with the SCUBA2 JCMT Galactic Plane Survey (JPS) in which we are collaborators.

  6. Molecular Clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg2 area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M ⊙ pc-2 and a mean H2 column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 1021 cm-2 for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 104 M ⊙ (12CO), 2.0 × 104 M ⊙ (13CO), and 6.1 × 103 M ⊙ (C18O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (~10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of 13CO emission range within 2-10 pc2 with mass of (1-5) × 103 M ⊙ and line width of a few km s-1. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the 13CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  7. Distances of Four High-Galactic Latitude Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Sharon L.; Rombach, C. E.; Birney, C. Y.; Burrows, D. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Sun is embedded within a large, irregularly-shaped region of plasma called the Local Bubble that formed when relatively nearby stars exploded as supernovae several million years ago. Lallement et al. (2003) have traced its convoluted boundary by using the equivalent widths of NaD lines in 1005 distant stars. To avoid directional bias, however, they intentionally avoided targeting stars that shared lines-of-sight with clouds visible on IR, X-ray, or radio maps. Thus, to complement their study, we have determined the distances and radial velocities of four molecular clouds that were also classified as soft X-ray shadows by Snowden et al. (2000). We targeted these objects since X-ray shadows are expected to lie at or near the bubble’s boundary. Thus, their distances and radial velocities provide information about the bubble’s edge. In addition, a small fraction of the clouds that are also shadows may prove to lie well within the bubble. The number and nature of such interlopers places constraints on the bubble’s history. The clouds' distances and radial velocities were determined using moderately high-resolution spectra of 88 bright, early-type stars lying near the clouds. The spectra were obtained using the Sandiford Cassegrain-Echelle spectrograph of the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope. We then searched the stars’ spectra for interstellar Na-D lines and used their known distances to bracket the distances to the clouds. We use the derived distances to calculate the density and pressure of the Local Bubble in the direction of these clouds.

  8. (abstract) Supernova Remnant and Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1993-01-01

    Upon impact of the shockwaves generated by a supernova remnant, molecular gas and the associated dust grains are substantially excited and become prominent sources of infrared emission. Recent studies of such interactions, utilizing the infrared data and information from other wavelengths, have revealed many details of the physical processes in the interstellar medium. In particluar, the understanding of the temperature and ionization structures in the postshock material is helpful in modeling the star-gas cycles in the Galaxy, and probing the circumstances of star formation.

  9. Pressure-confined clumps in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the mass of a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the Galaxy is confined to clumps which occupy a small fraction of the volume of the cloud. A majority of the clumps in several well-studied GMCs (Ophiuchus, Orion G, Rosette, Cepheus OB3) are not in gravitational virial equilibrium, but instead are confined by the pressure of the surrounding medium. These clumps thus violate one of 'Larson's (1981) laws'. Generalizing the standard virial analysis for spherical clouds to spheroidal clouds, we determine the Jeans mass and the magnetic critical mass for the clumps in these clouds. The Alfven Mach number, which is proportional to the internal velocity dispersion of the clumps divided by the Alfven velocity, is estimated to be of order unity for all the clumps. The more massive clumps, which are in gravitational virial equilibrium, are too massive to be supported by magnetic fields alone (i.e., they are magnetically supercritical). Internally generated turbulence must play a key role in supporting these clumps.

  10. Runaway stars as cosmic ray injectors inside molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E.; Santos-Lima, R.

    2015-03-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are a new population of gamma-ray sources, being the target of cosmic rays (CRs) - locally accelerated or not. These clouds host very young stellar clusters where massive star formation takes place. Eventually, some of the stars are ejected from the clusters, becoming runaway stars. These stars move supersonically through the cloud and develop bowshocks where particles can be accelerated up to relativistic energies. As a result, the bowshocks present non-thermal emission, and inject relativistic protons in the cloud. These protons diffuse in the GMC interacting with the matter. We present a model for the non-thermal radiation generated by protons and secondary pairs accelerated in the bowshocks of massive runaway stars within young GMCs. We solve the transport equation for primary protons and secondary pairs as the stars move through the cloud. We present non-thermal emissivity maps in radio and in gamma-rays as a function of time. We obtain X-ray luminosities of the order of ˜1032 erg s-1 and gamma-ray luminosities ˜1034 erg s-1. We conclude that, under some assumptions, relativistic protons from massive runaway stars interacting with matter in GMCs give rise to extended non-thermal sources.

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION CH OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSLUCENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, Raymond J.; Cotten, David; Magnani, Loris

    2010-01-15

    We present high-resolution (1.'3 x 1.'6) observations of the CH {sup 2}{pi}{sub 1/2} (F = 1-1) emission line at 3335 MHz in two high-latitude translucent clouds, MBM 3 and 40. At the assumed cloud distances, the angular resolution corresponds to {approx}0.05 pc, nearly an order of magnitude better than previous studies. Comparisons of the CH emission with previously obtained CO(1-0) data are difficult to interpret: the CO and CH line emission correlates in MBM 40 but not in MBM 3. In both clouds, there is a spatial offset in the peak emission, and perhaps in velocity for MBM 40. The difference in emission characteristics for the two tracers are noticeable in these two nearby clouds because of the high spatial resolution. Since both CH and CO are deemed to be reliable tracers of H{sub 2}, our results indicate that more care should be taken when using one of these tracers to determine the mass of a nearby molecular cloud.

  12. Pressure-confined clumps in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the mass of a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the Galaxy is confined to clumps which occupy a small fraction of the volume of the cloud. A majority of the clumps in several well-studied GMCs (Ophiuchus, Orion G, Rosette, Cepheus OB3) are not in gravitational virial equilibrium, but instead are confined by the pressure of the surrounding medium. These clumps thus violate one of 'Larson's (1981) laws'. Generalizing the standard virial analysis for spherical clouds to spheroidal clouds, we determine the Jeans mass and the magnetic critical mass for the clumps in these clouds. The Alfven Mach number, which is proportional to the internal velocity dispersion of the clumps divided by the Alfven velocity, is estimated to be of order unity for all the clumps. The more massive clumps, which are in gravitational virial equilibrium, are too massive to be supported by magnetic fields alone (i.e., they are magnetically supercritical). Internally generated turbulence must play a key role in supporting these clumps.

  13. Anisotropic Turbulence and Protostellar Feedback in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Charles Edward

    I investigate the decay and regeneration of turbulence in molecular clouds and the resulting star formation in those clouds in the presence of protostellar feedback. Studies of turbulence generally only consider isotropic turbulence, while the turbulence in molecular clouds may be anisotropic. I perform a series of simulations of anisotropic turbulence and measure its decay rate. I find that anisotropic turbulence decays slower than isotropic turbulence. When I break the velocity dispersion into isotropic and anisotropic components, I find the decay time is the crossing time of the isotropic component, which can be much slower than the total velocity dispersion. As part of this study, I present a measure of anisotropy that can be calculated in observations of molecular clouds. I also investigate the effects of compression on turbulence. This is motivated by the need to replenish turbulent energy. Using a series of simulations of contracting turbulence, I find that turbulence behaves as a monatomic ideal gas under isotropic compression. I also find that compression in a single direction imparts energy to that direction, but does not transfer that energy to the other two directions. Finally, I perform a series of high resolution star formation simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) including hydrodynamics, gravity, radiation, protostellar outflows and protostellar luminosity. The simulations provide a self-consistent story of star formation, all while matching observations. The matched observations include the masses of both stars and prestellar cores, the clustering of cores and the luminosity function of protostars. In this story of star formation, cores form on the Jeans length of the host cloud. Each core forms a central star or binary, but also fragments repeatedly down 0.05 M⊙ stars. The stellar radiation prevents fragmentation below this mass scale, but is not important on larger scales. The protostellar outflows eject 2/3 of the incoming mass

  14. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Wirström, E. S.; Persson, C. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.; Buckle, J. V.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-06-20

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (∼10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H{sub 2}O (J = 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01}) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  15. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Persson, C. M.; Buckle, J. V.; Cordiner, M. A.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold ((is) approximately 10 K) water vapor has been detected-L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work-likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  16. Interstellar C2, CH, and CN in translucent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1989-01-01

    Optical absorption-line techniques have been applied to the study of a number of translucent molecular clouds in which the total column densities are large enough that substantial molecular abundances can be maintained. Results are presented for a survey of absorption lines of interstellar C2, CH, and CN. Detections of CN through the A 2Pi-X 2Sigma(+) (1,O) and (2,O) bands of the red system are reported and compared with observations of the violet system for one line of sight. The population distributions in C2 provide diagnostic information on temperature and density. The measured column densities of the three species can be used to test details of the theory of molecule formation in clouds where photoprocesses still play a significant role. The C2 and CH column densities are strongly correlated with each other and probably also with the H2 column density. In contrast, the CN column densities are found to vary greatly from cloud to cloud. The observations are discussed with reference to detailed theoretical models.

  17. Interstellar C2, CH, and CN in translucent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1989-01-01

    Optical absorption-line techniques have been applied to the study of a number of translucent molecular clouds in which the total column densities are large enough that substantial molecular abundances can be maintained. Results are presented for a survey of absorption lines of interstellar C2, CH, and CN. Detections of CN through the A 2Pi-X 2Sigma(+) (1,O) and (2,O) bands of the red system are reported and compared with observations of the violet system for one line of sight. The population distributions in C2 provide diagnostic information on temperature and density. The measured column densities of the three species can be used to test details of the theory of molecule formation in clouds where photoprocesses still play a significant role. The C2 and CH column densities are strongly correlated with each other and probably also with the H2 column density. In contrast, the CN column densities are found to vary greatly from cloud to cloud. The observations are discussed with reference to detailed theoretical models.

  18. ALMA view of the Galactic Center 50km/s molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Kenta; Tsuboi, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    We have observed the Galactic Center 50km/s molecular cloud (50MC) with ALMA to search for filamentary structures. In the CS J=2-1 emission line channel maps, we succeeded in identifying 27 molecular cloud filaments using the DisPerSE algorithm. This is the first attempt of filament-finding in the Galactic Center Region. These molecular cloud filaments strongly suggest that the molecular cloud filaments are also ubiquitous in the molecular clouds of the Galactic Center Region.

  19. H2 distribution during the formation of multiphase molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gérin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Context. H2 is the simplest and the most abundant molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM), and its formation precedes the formation of other molecules. Aims: Understanding the dynamical influence of the environment and the interplay between the thermal processes related to the formation and destruction of H2 and the structure of the cloud is mandatory to understand correctly the observations of H2. Methods: We performed high-resolution magnetohydrodynamical colliding-flow simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES in which the physics of H2 has been included. We compared the simulation results with various observations of the H2 molecule, including the column densities of excited rotational levels. Results: As a result of a combination of thermal pressure, ram pressure, and gravity, the clouds produced at the converging point of HI streams are highly inhomogeneous. H2 molecules quickly form in relatively dense clumps and spread into the diffuse interclump gas. This in particular leads to the existence of significant abundances of H2 in the diffuse and warm gas that lies in between clumps. Simulations and observations show similar trends, especially for the HI-to-H2 transition (H2 fraction vs. total hydrogen column density). Moreover, the abundances of excited rotational levels, calculated at equilibrium in the simulations, turn out to be very similar to the observed abundances inferred from FUSE results. This is a direct consequence of the presence of the H2 enriched diffuse and warm gas. Conclusions: Our simulations, which self-consistently form molecular clouds out of the diffuse atomic gas, show that H2 rapidly forms in the dense clumps and, due to the complex structure of molecular clouds, quickly spreads at lower densities. Consequently, a significant fraction of warm H2 exists in the low-density gas. This warm H2 leads to column densities of excited rotational levels close to the observed ones and probably reveals the complex intermix between

  20. A Full Virial Analysis of the Prestellar Cores in the Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, Kate; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    We use SCUBA-2, HARP C18O J= 3 -> 2, Herschel and IRAM N2H+ J= 1 -> 0 observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud to identify and characterise the properties of the starless cores in the region. The SCUBA-2, HARP and Herschel data were taken as part of the JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Surveys. We determine masses and temperatures and perform a full virial analysis on our cores, and find that our cores are all either bound or virialised, with gravitational energy and external pressure energy on average of similar importance in confining the cores. There is wide variation from region to region, with cores in the region influenced by B stars (Oph A) being substantially gravitationally bound, and cores in the most quiescent region (Oph C) being pressure-confined. We observe dissipation of turbulence in all our cores, and find that this dissipation is more effective in regions which do not contain outflow-driving protostars. Full details of this analysis are presented by Pattle et al. (2015).

  1. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  2. Draco Nebula, a molecular cloud associated with a high velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P.W.M.

    1984-11-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  3. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  4. Molecular cloud shredding in the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, H. S.

    2006-02-01

    Seen just outside the innermost regions of the galactic center, the kinematics of molecular gas are dominated by a handful of compact but unusually broad-lined features of enigmatic origin. We show, using previous data, that there is a family of such features whose members are distinguished morphologically by their extreme vertical extension, perpendicular to the inclined plane of the overall gas tilt. Having isolated the features spatially, we mapped them with varying degrees of completeness at high resolution (1´) in lines of 12CO, 13CO and CS. Although very broad profiles exist in some individual beams, more generally we resolved the kinematics into spatial gradients which earlier were smeared in broader beams to form wider lines. The largest apparent velocity gradients are typically with respect to galactic latitude but motions are confined to the range of velocities inside the galactic terminal velocity, indicating that it is the galactic gravitational potential which is being tapped to create the observed kinematics. We interpret the broad-lined features qualitatively in terms of recent hydrodynamical models of gas flow in strongly barred galaxies: standing shocks which occur where gas enters the Galactic dust lane can account for the presence of broad lines over small spatial volumes wherever molecular gas is actually engaged in this process. To interpret the dynamical sequencing of the complex behaviour seen within the broad-line features we discuss how the Sun must be oriented with respect to the bar. In doing so, we identify the nuclear star-forming rings seen in other galaxies with the complex of giant H II regions Sgr A, B, C etc. and show that the kinematics are as expected for a ring of radius 175 pc (for a Sun-center distance of 8.5 kpc) rotating at about 210 km s-1. Gas having clear and strong outward-directed non-circular motion around l=0° (the famous "expanding molecular ring") is then associated with the "spray" of incoming gas at the inner

  5. The Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey. II. A lack of dense gas and cloud evolution along Galactic center orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Zhang, Qizhou; Menten, Karl M.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Lu, Xing; Guzmán, Andrés E.; Schmiedeke, Anika

    2017-07-01

    We present the first systematic study of the density structure of clouds found in a complete sample covering all major molecular clouds in the central molecular zone (CMZ; inner 200 pc) of the Milky Way. This is made possible with data from the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), which is the first study resolving all major molecular clouds in the CMZ at interferometer angular resolution. We find that many CMZ molecular clouds have unusually shallow density gradients compared to regions elsewhere in the Milky Way. This is possibly a consequence of weak gravitational binding of the clouds. The resulting relative absence of dense gas on spatial scales 0.1 pc is probably one of the reasons why star formation (SF) in dense gas of the CMZ is suppressed by a factor 10, compared to solar neighborhood clouds. Another factor suppressing star formation is the high SF density threshold that likely results from the observed gas kinematics. Further, it is possible but not certain that the star formation activity and cloud density structure evolve systematically as clouds orbit the CMZ.

  6. IRAS observations of giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozurkewich, D.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The IRAS data base has been used to study infrared radiation from molecular clouds in our galaxy. The sample of clouds was restricted to those with reliably determined molecular masses from large area, multi-isotope CO maps. They were normalized to X(CO-13)= 2x10 to the -6. Flux densities at 60 microns and 100 microns were determined by integrating the flux density within rectangles drawn on the sky flux plates after subtracting a suitable background. The rectangles were chosen to be coextensive with the areas mapped in CO. Color corrections were made and luminosites calculated by assuming the optical depths were proportional to frequency. The flux densities were converted to dust masses with a value for 4a rho/3Q = .04 g/cm at 100 microns.

  7. ALMA Reveals Internal Structure of Molecular Clouds in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out high-resolution (0.7 pc) CO J=1-0 mosaic observations of five giant molecular clouds, which cover a wide range of evolutionary stages based on their associations to recent star formation, in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ALMA. The observations revealed a variety of spatial structures of the gas, from faint and diffuse emission to bright and compact structures. The variation of structures, which is similar to that seen in the Milky Way, is quantified by the brightness distribution function (BDF) and brightness distribution index (BDI) established in our prior studies. The structured molecular gas may indicate the readiness for, rather than the outcome of, star formation.

  8. CO abundance variations in the Orion Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripple, F.; Heyer, M. H.; Gutermuth, R.; Snell, R. L.; Brunt, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    Infrared stellar photometry from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and spectral line imaging observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 1-0 line emission from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) 14-m telescope are analysed to assess the variation of the CO abundance with physical conditions throughout the Orion A and Orion B molecular clouds. Three distinct Av regimes are identified in which the ratio between the 13CO column density and visual extinction changes corresponding to the photon-dominated envelope, the strongly self-shielded interior, and the cold, dense volumes of the clouds. Within the strongly self-shielded interior of the Orion A cloud, the 13CO abundance varies by 100 per cent with a peak value located near regions of enhanced star formation activity. The effect of CO depletion on to the ice mantles of dust grains is limited to regions with Av > 10 mag and gas temperatures less than ˜20 K as predicted by chemical models that consider thermal evaporation to desorb molecules from grain surfaces. Values of the molecular mass of each cloud are independently derived from the distributions of Av and 13CO column densities with a constant 13CO-to-H2 abundance over various extinction ranges. Within the strongly self-shielded interior of the cloud (Av> 3 mag), 13CO provides a reliable tracer of H2 mass with the exception of the cold, dense volumes where depletion is important. However, owing to its reduced abundance, 13CO does not trace the H2 mass that resides in the extended cloud envelope, which comprises 40-50 per cent of the molecular mass of each cloud. The implied CO luminosity to mass ratios, M/LCO, are 3.2 and 2.9 for Orion A and Orion B, respectively, which are comparable to the value (2.9), derived from γ-ray observations of the Orion region. Our results emphasize the need to consider local conditions when applying CO observations to derive H2 column densities.

  9. FUSE Team Project on Molecular Hydrogen in Translucent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Theodore P.

    This Cycle 2 program plans observations of 11 stars (in addition to the original list) as an add-on to our medium project to study molecular hydrogen in translucent clouds. The new stars have been selected on the basis of reddening, known extinction and interstellar line parameters, and inclusion in the comprehensive survey of diffuse interstellar bands being carried out by group member Don York and collaborators (e.g. Snow, Welty et al.).

  10. The Formation of Molecular Clouds in the Galaxy and the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Young

    In this thesis, I provide observational constraints on the formation of molecular clouds, precursors of star formation, by conducting high-resolution, multi-wavelength investigations of dense gas in the Galaxy and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). By applying the unsharp-masking technqiue to the mid-infrared image obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope , I identify 55 high-contrast regions (HCRs) in the SMC. The follow-up molecular line observations toward one of the HCRs suggest that the HCRs are likely moderately dense and trace regions where the transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen occurs in this low-metallicity galaxy. Motivated by this result, I investigate the transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen at high resolution across the Perseus molecular cloud in the Galaxy. By deriving the atomic and molecular hydrogen column density images on sub-parsec scales, I find that the atomic gas distribution is relatively uniform across Perseus and as a result, the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen linearly increases with the total gas column density. These results are consistent with the theoretical perspective that formation and photodissociation of molecular hydrogen are in balance and the abundance of molecular hydrogen is controlled by the minimum gas column density required for shielding of molecular hydrogen. Finally, I perform a detailed study of the relation between the molecular hydrogen column density and the carbon monoxide integrated intensity in Perseus and show that the ratio of the two, so called X-factor, varies spatially by up to a factor of 100. I compare the atomic/molecular hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and X-factor data with two contrasting theoretical models. I find that the steady state and equilibrium chemistry model reproduces the observations very well but requires an extended, diffuse halo around a dense core. While agreeing with the observations reasonably well, the macroturbulent and non-equilibrium chemistry model shows

  11. Molecular Clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Yang, Ji; Xu, Ye

    2015-08-01

    We present observations of a 9 deg2 area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. Three molecular species show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. We search line wing structures in the 12CO spectra as outflow candidates, and distinguish the candidates with carefully selected criteria. We study the physical properties of the identified outflows and their energy contributions to the supersonic turbulence in parent molecular clouds. Several CO outflows are associated with massive star forming cores and outflow features detected in other bands.

  12. Pervasive small-scale structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, B.; Lada, E.

    1986-01-01

    An unbiased CO survey of molecular cloud cores was completed, and the profiles were analyzed within the context of a model for emission from clumpy clouds. It was found that all sources observed contain a significant amount of structure that is not resolved with our 2.3-arcmin beam, and that the parameters which describe the degree of clumping span a remarkably narrow range of the possible values. We studied two separate samples of cloud cores: a large sample of warm cores from the Massachusetts-Stony Brook 12CO survey of the first galactic quadrant, and a sample of cool cores in the Taurus dark clouds chosen primarily on the basis of H2CO emission. We observed all sources in the 1-0 transition of 12CO and 13CO with the 5-m telescope of the Millimeter Wave Observatory. The 12CO/13CO ratios can be explained if there is unresolved structure giving rise to significant variations of opacity across the beam. Our model cloud consists of a large number of identical clumps distributed randomly in the beam. These clumps have velocity widths v small compared to the width of the observed profile, which is determined by the relative motion of the clumps. The entire cloud is isothermal and in local thermodynamic equilibrium. With these assumptions the intensity and linewidth ratios depend on three parameters: the abundance ratio; the peak 13CO opacity through a single clump, tau(0); and the average number of clumps on a line of sight N. Small tau(0) and large N correspond to the microturbulent limit, which is indistinguishable from a uniform gas distribution. In the other extreme, large tau(0) and snall N, at a given velocity at most one clump contributes to the profile on each line of sight. A figure is presented which shows the model parameters which reproduce the measured intensity and linewidth ratios for the sample of warm cores, assuming an abundance ratio of 75.

  13. MOLECULAR CLOUDS TOWARD RCW49 AND WESTERLUND 2: EVIDENCE FOR CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, N.; Dawson, J. R.; Ohama, A.; Kawamura, A.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Fukui, Y.

    2009-05-10

    We have made CO(J = 2-1) observations toward the H II region RCW 49 and its ionizing source, the rich stellar cluster Westerlund 2, with the NANTEN2 submillimeter telescope. These observations have revealed that two molecular clouds in velocity ranges of -11 to +9 km s{sup -1} and 11 to 21 km s{sup -1}, respectively, show remarkably good spatial correlations with the Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared image of RCW 49, as well a velocity structures indicative of localized expansion around the bright central regions and stellar cluster. This strongly suggests that the two clouds are physically associated with RCW 49. We obtain a new kinematic distance estimate to RCW 49 and Wd2 of 5.4{sup +1.1} {sub -1.4} kpc, based on the mean velocity and velocity spread of the associated gas. We argue that the acceleration of the gas by stellar winds from Westerlund 2 is insufficient to explain the entire observed velocity dispersion of the molecular gas, and suggest a scenario in which a collision between the two clouds {approx}4 Myr ago may have triggered the formation of the stellar cluster.

  14. A hierarchical method for molecular docking using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ling; Guo, Quan; Wang, Xicheng

    2012-11-01

    Discovering small molecules that interact with protein targets will be a key part of future drug discovery efforts. Molecular docking of drug-like molecules is likely to be valuable in this field; however, the great number of such molecules makes the potential size of this task enormous. In this paper, a method to screen small molecular databases using cloud computing is proposed. This method is called the hierarchical method for molecular docking and can be completed in a relatively short period of time. In this method, the optimization of molecular docking is divided into two subproblems based on the different effects on the protein-ligand interaction energy. An adaptive genetic algorithm is developed to solve the optimization problem and a new docking program (FlexGAsDock) based on the hierarchical docking method has been developed. The implementation of docking on a cloud computing platform is then discussed. The docking results show that this method can be conveniently used for the efficient molecular design of drugs.

  15. Molecular Gas toward the Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud Complex. I. Observation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Yang, Ji; Xu, Ye; Li, Facheng; Su, Yang; Zhang, Shaobo

    2017-05-01

    We present a large-scale mapping toward the GEM OB1 association in the galactic anti-center direction. The 9° × 6.°5 area was mapped in 12CO, 13CO, and C18O with ˜50″ angular resolution at 30″ sampling. The region was divided into four main components based on spatial distribution and velocity: the Gemini OB1 Giant Molecular Cloud (GGMC) Complex, the Lynds Dark Clouds and the West Front Clouds, the Swallow and Horn, and the Remote Clouds. The GGMC Complex is located in the Perseus arm, while the Lynds Dark Clouds and the West Front Clouds are located in the Local arm. Swallow and Horn are revealed for the first time in this paper. The two clouds have a similar velocity interval ([11, 21] km s-1) and have similar sizes (0.6 and 0.8 deg2). We analyzed the structure of these clouds in detail and calculated their parameters (mass, temperature, etc.). Two elongated structures were discovered in a longitude-velocity map in the velocity interval [11, 30] km s-1. We also found an interesting filament that shows a 0.8 km s-1 pc-1 gradient perpendicular to the direction of the long axis.

  16. A far-infrared survey of molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, N. E.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present a catalogue of molecular cloud cores drawn from high-latitude, medium-opacity clouds, using the all-sky IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA) images at 60 and 100μm. The typical column densities of the cores are N(H2)~3.8x1021cm-2 and the typical volume densities are n(H2)~2x103cm-3. They are therefore significantly less dense than many other samples obtained in other ways. Those cloud cores with IRAS point sources are seen to be already forming stars, but this is found to be only a small fraction of the total number of cores. The fraction of the cores at the protostellar stage is used to estimate the pre-stellar time-scale - the time until the formation of a hydrostatically supported protostellar object. We argue, on the basis of a comparison with other samples, that a trend exists for the pre-stellar lifetime of a cloud core to decrease with the mean column density and number density of the core. We compare this with model predictions and show that the data are consistent with star formation regulated by the ionization fraction.

  17. The Fractal Dimension of the ρ Ophiucus Molecular Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongung; Yi, Di; Kim, Y. S.; Jung, J. H.; Kang, H. W.; Lee, C. H.; Yim, I. S.; Kim, H. G.

    2016-12-01

    We estimate the fractal dimension of the ρ Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud Complex, associated with star forming regions. We selected a cube (v, l, b) database, obtained with J=1-0 transition lines of \\coand tco at a resolution of 22'' using a multibeam receiver system on the 14-m telescope of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory. Using a code developed within IRAF, we identified slice-clouds with two threshold temperatures to estimate the fractal dimension. With threshold temperatures of 2.25 K (3σ) and 3.75 K (5σ), the fractal dimension of the target cloud is estimated to be D = 1.52-1.54, where P ∝ A^{D/2} , which is larger than previous results. We suggest that the sampling rate (spatial resolution) of observed data must be an important parameter when estimating the fractal dimension, and that narrower or wider dispersion around an arbitrary fit line and the intercepts at NP = 100 should be checked whether they relate to rms noise level or characteristic structure of the target cloud. This issue could be investigated by analysing several high resolution databases with different quality (low or moderate sensitivity).

  18. Magnetic Field Structure in Molecular Clouds by Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Su, B. H.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, A. K.; Wang, C. W.; Lai, S. P.; Tamura, M.; Sato, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a program to delineate magnetic field structure inside molecular clouds by optical and infrared polarization observations. An ordered magnetic field inside a dense cloud may efficiently align the spinning dust grains to cause a detectable level of optical and near-infrared polarization of otherwise unpolarized background starlight due to dichroic extinction. The near-infrared polarization data were taken by SIRPOL mounted on IRSF in SAAO. Here we present the SIRPOL results in RCW 57, for which the magnetic field is oriented along the cloud filaments, and in Carina Nebula, for which no intrinsic polarization is detected in the turbulent environment. We further describe TRIPOL, a compact and efficient polarimer to acquire polarized images simultaneously at g', r', and i' bands, which is recently developed at Nagoya University for adaption to small-aperture telescopes. We show how optical observations probe the translucent outer parts of a cloud, and when combining with infrared observations probing the dense parts, and with millimeter and submillimeter observations to sutdy the central embedded protostar, if there is one, would yield the magnetic field structure on different length scales in the star-formation process.

  19. ANISOTROPY LENGTHENS THE DECAY TIME OF TURBULENCE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Charles E.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-09-01

    The decay of isothermal turbulence with velocity anisotropy is investigated using computational simulations and synthetic observations. We decompose the turbulence into isotropic and anisotropic components with total velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub iso} and {sigma}{sub ani}, respectively. We find that the decay rate of the turbulence depends on the crossing time of the isotropic component only. A cloud of size L with significant anisotropy in its turbulence has a dissipation time, t{sub diss} = L/(2{sigma}{sub iso}). This translates into turbulent energy decay rates on the cloud scale that can be much lower for anisotropic turbulence than for isotropic turbulence. To help future observations determine whether observed molecular clouds have the level of anisotropy required to maintain the observed level of turbulence over their lifetimes, we performed a principal component analysis on our simulated clouds. Even with projection effects washing out the anisotropic signal, there is a measurable difference in the axis-constrained principal component analysis performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum velocity dispersion. When this relative difference, {psi}, is 0.1, there is enough anisotropy for the dissipation time to triple the expected isotropic value. We provide a fit for converting {psi} into an estimate for the dissipation time, t{sub diss}.

  20. Time Evolution of the Giant Molecular Cloud Mass Functions across Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masato I. N.; Inutsuka, Shu-Ichiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    We formulate and conduct the time-integration of time evolution equation for the giant molecular cloud mass function (GMCMF) including the cloud-cloud collision (CCC) effect. Our results show that the CCC effect is only limited in the massive-end of the GMCMF and indicate that future high resolution and sensitivity radio observations may constrain giant molecular cloud (GMC) timescales by observing the GMCMF slope in the lower mass regime.

  1. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion Molecular Cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New observations of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 have been made from 1 to 100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry, and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near-infrared sources, IRS 1 and IRS 4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS 1 and IRS 4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far-infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS 1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS 1 can be characterized by L of 500 solar luminosities or less and T of roughly 1000 K. The near-infrared albedo of the grains in the IRS 1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  2. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion molecular cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y.; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New obervations of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 have been made from 1-100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near infrared sources, IRS1 and IRS4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS1 and IRS4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS1 can be characterized by L less than or equal to 500 Solar luminosities and T approx. 1000 K. The near infrared (1-5) micron albedo of the grains in the IRS1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  3. On the nearest molecular clouds. II - MBM 12 and 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Penprase, B. E.; Welty, D. E.; Blitz, L.; Magnani, L.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents echelle spectra recorded at the D lines of Na I for three stars projected on the high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 16 at l = 172 deg, b = -38 deg. The A stars HD 21142 at about 95 pc and HD 21134 at about 240 pc show strong D-line absorption at the same velocities as the CO emission observed at these positions. The distance to MBM 16 therefore is in the range of 60 to 95 pc. MBM 16 is only 11 deg away from MBM 12, previously placed by the same method at distance of about 65 pc. Consideration is given to the relationship between clouds 12 and 16 and the local hot low-density interstellar gas.

  4. THE FORMATION OF FILAMENTARY BUNDLES IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Moeckel, Nickolas; Burkert, Andreas E-mail: burkert@usm.uni-muenchen.de

    2015-07-01

    The classical picture of a star-forming filament is a near-equilibrium structure with its collapse dependent on its gravitational criticality. Recent observations have complicated this picture, revealing filaments to be a mess of apparently interacting subfilaments with transsonic internal velocity dispersions and mildly supersonic intra-subfilament dispersions. How structures like this form is unresolved. Here, we study the velocity structure of filamentary regions in a simulation of a turbulent molecular cloud. We present two main findings. First, the observed complex velocity features in filaments arise naturally in self-gravitating hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent clouds without the need for magnetic or other effects. Second, a region that is filamentary only in projection and is in fact made of spatially distinct features can display these same velocity characteristics. The fact that these disjoint structures can masquerade as coherent filaments in both projection and velocity diagnostics highlights the need to continue developing sophisticated filamentary analysis techniques for star formation observations.

  5. Dust emission in the Sagittarius B2 molecular cloud core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, Dariusz C.; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    1989-01-01

    A model is presented for the dust emission from the Sagittarius B2 molecular cloud core which reproduces the observed spectrum between 30 and 1300 micron, as well as the distribution of the emission at 1300 micron. The model is based on the assumption that Sgr B2(N) continuum source is located behind the dust cloud associated with Sgr B2(M) continuum source. The fact that Sgr B2(N) is stronger at 1300 micron can be attributed to a local column density maximum at the position of this source. Absence of a 53 micron emission peak at the position of Sgr B2(N) suggests that the luminosity of the north source is lower than that of the middle source.

  6. Temperatures of galactic molecular clouds showing CO self-absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.; Knapp, G. R.; Wannier, P. G.; Huggins, P. J.; Werner, M. W.; Neugebauer, G.; Ennis, D.

    1981-01-01

    The CO J = 2-1 line has been observed and, in most cases, mapped in 10 star-forming molecular clouds (W3, NGC 1333, NGC 2071, Mon R2, CRL 961, Rho Oph, W49N, W51A, DR 21, and Cep A). The CO J = 3-2 line has been observed in W3 and DR 21. The CO lines from all these sources are strongly self-absorbed. By comparing the present results with published CO(1-0) line profiles, it is found that large corrections to the temperatures of the cloud cores, as measured by the CO(1-0) lines, are required. The corrections for self-absorption bring the CO brightness temperatures into closer agreement with the grain temperatures inferred from far-IR photometry.

  7. Ambipolar Diffusion Effects on Weakly Ionized Turbulence Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-04-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is a key process in molecular clouds (MCs). Non-ideal MHD turbulence simulations are technically very challenging because of the large Alfvén speed of ions in weakly ionized clouds. Using the Heavy-Ion Approximation method (Li, McKee & Klein 2006), we have carried out two-fluid simulations of AD in isothermal, turbulent boxes at a resolution of 5123, to investigate the effect of AD on the weakly ionized turbulence in MCs. Our simulation results show that the neutral gas component of the two-fluid system gradually transforms from an ideal MHD turbulence system to near a pure hydrodynamic turbulence system within the standard AD regime, in which the neutrals and ions are coupled over a flow time. The change of the turbulent state has a profound effect on the weakly ionized MCs.

  8. Molecular line observations and chemical modelling of galactic edge clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffle, Paul; Millar, Tom; Roberts, Helen; Lubowich, Don; Henkel, Christian

    2008-10-01

    Edge Clouds 1 and 2 (EC1 and EC2) are large molecular clouds with the largest galactocentric distances known to exist in the Milky Way. We present observations of these clouds and use them to determine physical characteristics. For EC2 we calculate a gas temperature of 20 K and a density of n(H2) ~ 104 cm-3. Based on our CO maps, we estimate the mass of EC2 at around 104 M⊙, and continuum observations suggest a dust-to-gas mass ratio as low as 0.001. Chemical models have been developed to reproduce the abundances in EC2 and they indicate that: heavy element abundances may be reduced by a factor of five relative to the solar neighbourhood (similar to dwarf irregular galaxies and damped Lyman alpha systems); very low extinction (AV < 4 mag) due to a very low dust-to-gas ratio; an enhanced cosmic ray ionisation rate; and a higher UV field compared to local interstellar values. The reduced abundances may be attributed to the low level of star formation in this region and are probably also related to the continuing infall of low metallicity halo gas since the Milky Way formed. We find that shocks from an old supernova remnant may have determined the morphology and dynamics of EC2, including the recently discovered star clusters embedded in the northern and southern cores. However, compared to EC2, EC1 appears to be a chemically less varied environment. The apparent molecule-poor nature of EC1 demonstrates the characteristics of clouds that have not had the benefit of SN shocks to stimulate an active cloud chemistry and star formation.

  9. Chemical Variation in Molecular Cloud Cores in the Orion A Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hirota, Tomoya; Kandori, Ryo; Umemoto, Tomofumi

    2010-12-01

    We have observed molecular cloud cores in the Orion A giant molecular cloud (GMC) in CCS, HC3N, DNC, and HN13C to study their chemical characteristics. We detected CCS in the Orion A GMC for the first time. CCS was detected in about a third of the observed cores. The cores detected in CCS are not localized, but widely distributed over the Orion A GMC. The CCS peak intensity of the core tends to be high in the southern region of the Orion A GMC. The HC3N peak intensity of the core also tends to be high in the southern region, while there are HC3N intense cores near Orion KL, which is not seen in CCS. The core associated with Orion KL shows a broad HC3N line profile, and the star-formation activity near to Orion KL seems to enhance the HC3N emission. The column density ratio of NH3 to CCS is lower near the middle of the filament, and higher toward the northern and southern regions along the Orion A GMC filament. This ratio is known to trace the chemical evolution in nearby dark cloud cores, but seems to be affected by the core gas temperature in the Orion A GMC: cores with low NH3 to CCS column density ratios tend to have a warmer gas temperature. The value of the column density ratio of DNC to HN13 is generally similar to that in dark cloud cores, but becomes lower around Orion KL due to a higher gas temperature.

  10. Molecular clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg{sup 2} area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} and a mean H{sub 2} column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} for {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} ({sup 12}CO), 2.0 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} ({sup 13}CO), and 6.1 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} (C{sup 18}O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (∼10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of {sup 13}CO emission range within 2-10 pc{sup 2} with mass of (1-5) × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} and line width of a few km s{sup –1}. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the {sup 13}CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  11. Ionized carbon in side-illuminated molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1990-01-01

    The C II fine-structure line has been observed in five sources for which the ionization front/molecular cloud interface is viewed approximately edge-on. The LSR velocity of the C II emission is generally in good agreement with that observed for molecular species such as CO. However, the observed linewidths of 3-14 km/s are typically wider than those of molecular lines and often show rapid spatial variations in the observed regions. The C II brightness temperature are typically equal to or slightly higher than the dust temperature at all locations observed. In the optically thin approximation, C II excitation temperatures are 100 K or more and column densities are 10 to the 18th/sq cm for all sources except M17, which has a more intense and complicated line profile with a larger spatial extent than any other source observed.

  12. A source model for the L134N molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swade, Daryl A.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    The dark molecular cloud L134N is observed at millimeter wavelengths in the CS (J = 3-2), OCS (J = 7-6), and HDO (1 sub 11-1 sub 10) transitions. The CS (J = 3-2) transition was observed at four positions within the cloud, while the other two transitions were observed at one position each. Fractional abundances in the LTE approximation are calculated for each emission line detected. L134N appears to have a high-density core characterized by NH3, C3H2, and H(C-13)O(+) emission maps. A lower density envelope characterized by C(0-18), CS (J = 2-1), and SO emission surrounds the core. There appears to be a gas-phase oxygen abundance gradient in L134N with atomic oxygen depleted in the high-density core. Observed molecular distributions within L134N can be explained by a model in which chemical and physical processes in icy-dust-grain mantles influence the gas-phase molecular abundances.

  13. GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn

    2013-09-20

    Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

  14. Gravitational instability of filamentary molecular clouds, including ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinirad, Mohammad; Naficy, Kazem; Abbassi, Shahram; Roshan, Mahmood

    2017-02-01

    The gravitational instability of a filamentary molecular cloud in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics is investigated. The filament is assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium. We add the effect of ambipolar diffusion to the filament which is threaded by an initial uniform axial magnetic field along its axis. We write down the fluid equations in cylindrical coordinates and perform linear perturbation analysis. We integrate the resultant differential equations and then derive the numerical dispersion relation. We find that a more efficient ambipolar diffusion leads to an enhancement of the growth of the most unstable mode, and to the increase of the fragmentation scale of the filament.

  15. Nonequilibrium chemistry in shocked molecular clouds. [interstellar gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, E. R.; Silk, J.

    1978-01-01

    The gas-phase chemistry is studied behind a 10-km/s shock propagating into a dense molecular cloud. The principal conclusions are that: the concentrations of certain molecules (CO, NH3, HCN, N2) are unperturbed by the shock; other molecules (H2CO, CN, HCO(+)) are greatly decreased in abundance; and substantial amounts of H2O, HCO, and CH4 are produced. Approximately 1 million yr (independent of the density) must elapse after shock passage before chemical equilibrium is attained.

  16. FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2016-08-01

    FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

  17. Galactic Edge Clouds. I. Molecular Line Observations and Chemical Modeling of Edge Cloud 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffle, P. M. E.; Millar, T. J.; Roberts, H.; Lubowich, D. A.; Henkel, C.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Brammer, G.

    2007-12-01

    Edge Cloud 2 (EC2) is a molecular cloud, about 35 pc in size, with one of the largest galactocentric distances known to exist in the Milky Way. We present observations of a peak CO emission region in the cloud and use these to determine its physical characteristics. We calculate a gas temperature of 20 K and a density of n(H2)~104 cm-3. Based on our CO maps, we estimate the mass of EC2 at around 104 Msolar and continuum observations suggest a dust-to-gas mass ratio as low as 0.001. Chemical models have been developed to reproduce the abundances in EC2, and they indicate that heavy element abundances may be reduced by a factor of 5 relative to the solar neighborhood (similar to dwarf irregular galaxies and damped Lyα systems), very low extinction (AV<4 mag) due to a very low dust-to-gas mass ratio, an enhanced cosmic-ray ionization rate, and a higher UV field compared to local interstellar values. The reduced abundances may be attributed to the low level of star formation in this region and are probably also related to the continuing infall of primordial (or low-metallicity) halo gas since the Milky Way formed. Finally, we note that shocks from the old supernova remnant GSH 138-01-94 may have determined the morphology and dynamics of EC2.

  18. {sup 13}CO CORES IN THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Lei; Li Di; Goldsmith, Paul F. E-mail: ithaca.li@gmail.com

    2012-12-01

    Young stars form in molecular cores, which are dense condensations within molecular clouds. We have searched for molecular cores traced by {sup 13}CO J = 1 {yields} 0 emission in the Taurus molecular cloud and studied their properties. Our data set has a spatial dynamic range (the ratio of linear map size to the pixel size) of about 1000 and spectrally resolved velocity information, which together allow a systematic examination of the distribution and dynamic state of {sup 13}CO cores in a large contiguous region. We use empirical fit to the CO and CO{sub 2} ice to correct for depletion of gas-phase CO. The {sup 13}CO core mass function ({sup 13}CO CMF) can be fitted better with a log-normal function than with a power-law function. We also extract cores and calculate the {sup 13}CO CMF based on the integrated intensity of {sup 13}CO and the CMF from Two Micron All Sky Survey. We demonstrate that core blending exists, i.e., combined structures that are incoherent in velocity but continuous in column density. The core velocity dispersion (CVD), which is the variance of the core velocity difference {delta}v, exhibits a power-law behavior as a function of the apparent separation L: CVD (km s{sup -1}) {proportional_to}L(pc){sup 0.7}. This is similar to Larson's law for the velocity dispersion of the gas. The peak velocities of {sup 13}CO cores do not deviate from the centroid velocities of the ambient {sup 12}CO gas by more than half of the line width. The low velocity dispersion among cores, the close similarity between CVD and Larson's law, and the small separation between core centroid velocities and the ambient gas all suggest that molecular cores condense out of the diffuse gas without additional energy from star formation or significant impact from converging flows.

  19. Turbulence in giant molecular clouds: the effect of photoionization feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneberg, D. M.; Dale, J. E.; Girichidis, P.; Ercolano, B.

    2015-02-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are observed to be turbulent, but theory shows that without a driving mechanism turbulence should quickly decay. The question arises by which mechanisms turbulence is driven or sustained. It has been shown that photoionizing feedback from massive stars has an impact on the surrounding GMC and can for example create vast H II bubbles. We therefore address the question of whether turbulence is a consequence of this effect of feedback on the cloud. To investigate this, we analyse the velocity field of simulations of high-mass star-forming regions by studying velocity structure functions and power spectra. We find that clouds whose morphology is strongly affected by photoionizing feedback also show evidence of driving of turbulence by preserving or recovering a Kolmogorov-type velocity field. On the contrary, control run simulations without photoionizing feedback have a velocity distribution that bears the signature of gravitational collapse and of the dissipation of energy, where the initial Kolmogorov-type structure function is erased.

  20. Supernova Driving. II. Compressive Ratio in Molecular-cloud Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2016-07-01

    The compressibility of molecular cloud (MC) turbulence plays a crucial role in star formation models, because it controls the amplitude and distribution of density fluctuations. The relation between the compressive ratio (the ratio of powers in compressive and solenoidal motions) and the statistics of turbulence has been previously studied systematically only in idealized simulations with random external forces. In this work, we analyze a simulation of large-scale turbulence (250 pc) driven by supernova (SN) explosions that has been shown to yield realistic MC properties. We demonstrate that SN driving results in MC turbulence with a broad lognormal distribution of the compressive ratio, with a mean value ≈0.3, lower than the equilibrium value of ≈0.5 found in the inertial range of isothermal simulations with random solenoidal driving. We also find that the compressibility of the turbulence is not noticeably affected by gravity, nor are the mean cloud radial (expansion or contraction) and solid-body rotation velocities. Furthermore, the clouds follow a general relation between the rms density and the rms Mach number similar to that of supersonic isothermal turbulence, though with a large scatter, and their average gas density probability density function is described well by a lognormal distribution, with the addition of a high-density power-law tail when self-gravity is included.

  1. Molecular evidence for species-level distinctions in clouded leopards.

    PubMed

    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A; Johnson, Warren E; Nash, Willliam G; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C; Driscoll, Carlos A; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E; Roelke, Melody E; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K; Lam, Phan V; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2006-12-05

    Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats. This secretive, mid-sized (16-23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A). We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known geographic origin (Figure 1A, Tables S1 ans S2 in the Supplemental Data available online). We found strong phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distances between N. n. nebulosa (mainland) and N. n. diardi (Borneo; n = 3 individuals) with mtDNA (771 bp), nuclear DNA (3100 bp), and 51 microsatellite loci. Thirty-six fixed mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide differences and 20 microsatellite loci with nonoverlapping allele-size ranges distinguished N. n. nebulosa from N. n. diardi. Along with fixed subspecies-specific chromosomal differences, this degree of differentiation is equivalent to, or greater than, comparable measures among five recognized Panthera species (lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard). These distinctions increase the urgency of clouded leopard conservation efforts, and if affirmed by morphological analysis and wider sampling of N. n. diardi in Borneo and Sumatra, would support reclassification of N. n. diardi as a new species (Neofelis diardi).

  2. Molecular Evidence for Species-Level Distinctions in Clouded Leopards

    PubMed Central

    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A.; Johnson, Warren E.; Nash, Willliam G.; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E.; Roelke, Melody E.; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P.; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K.; Lam, Phan V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats [1–5]. This secretive, mid-sized (16–23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A) [4–8]. We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known geographic origin (Figure 1A, Tables S1 and S2 in the Supplemental Data available online). We found strong phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distances between N. n. nebulosa (mainland) and N. n. diardi (Borneo; n = 3 individuals) with mtDNA (771 bp), nuclear DNA (3100 bp), and 51 microsatellite loci. Thirty-six fixed mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide differences and 20 microsatellite loci with nonoverlapping allele-size ranges distinguished N. n. nebulosa from N. n. diardi. Along with fixed subspecies-specific chromosomal differences, this degree of differentiation is equivalent to, or greater than, comparable measures among five recognized Panthera species (lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard). These distinctions increase the urgency of clouded leopard conservation efforts, and if affirmed by morphological analysis and wider sampling of N. n. diardi in Borneo and Sumatra, would support reclassification of N. n. diardi as a new species (Neofelis diardi). PMID:17141620

  3. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  4. Molecular Line Observations and Chemical Modelling of Edge Cloud 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffle, P.; Millar, T.; Roberts, H.; Lubowich, D.; Henkel, C.

    2009-01-01

    Edge Cloud 2 (EC2) is a large molecular cloud with one of the largest galactocentric distances known to exist in the Milky Way. We present observations of the cloud and use these to determine its physical characteristics. We calculate a gas temperature of 20 K and a density of n({H}2) ˜ 104 cm-3. Based on our CO maps, we estimate the mass of EC2 at around 104 Msun and continuum observations suggest a dust-to-gas mass ratio as low as 0.001. Chemical models have been developed to reproduce the abundances in EC2 and they indicate that: heavy element abundances may be reduced by a factor of five relative to the solar neighbourhood (similar to dwarf irregular galaxies and damped Lyman alpha systems); very low extinction (AV < 4 mag) due to a very low dust-to-gas ratio; an enhanced cosmic ray ionisation rate; and a higher UV field compared to local interstellar values. The reduced abundances may be attributed to the low level of star formation in this region and are probably also related to the continuing infall of low metallicity halo gas since the Milky Way formed. Finally, we note that shocks from the old supernova remnant GSH 138-01-94 may have determined the morphology and dynamics of EC2.

  5. Molecular clouds toward Spitzer Bubble S145 (RCW79); evidence for triggered formation of a twelve-O-star cluster by a cloud-cloud collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Keisuke; Torii, Kazufumi; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    S145 (RCW79) is one of the largest Spitzer bubbles ionized by 12 O stars clustered inside the bubble. We have carried out multi-J CO observations toward S145 with NANTEN2, ASTE and Mopra mm/sub-mm telescopes. We discovered two molecular clouds having velocities around -60 km s-1 and -45 km s-1. The two clouds are likely physically associated with the cluster as verified by the high intensity ratio of the J=3-2 emission to the J=1-0 emission and the bridging features connecting the two clouds in velocity. We present a scenario that cloud-cloud collision triggered formation of the 12 O stars, because the total mass of the clouds and the cluster is too small to gravitationally bind the velocity and any gravitational motion is excluded.S145 is different from another Spitzer bubble RCW120 where cloud-cloud collision is also suggested by Torii et al. (2015); the number of O stars is more than ten and the inside of the S145 bubble is almost completely empty, whereas RCW120 has a single O star and has yet a large amount of molecular gas inside the bubble. We suggest that the difference reflects the low density of the smaller cloud by considering the numerical simulations of collision between a small cloud and a large cloud (Habe and Ohta 1992).It is becoming probable that cloud-cloud collisions play an important role in triggering formation of super star clusters (for NGC3603, Fukui et al. 2014; for Westerlund 2 Furukawa et al. 2009), single O stars in M20 (Torii et al. 2011) in addition to the two Spitzer bubbles, RCW120 and S116/117/118, and N159 West in the LMC.

  6. Exploring Grain Alignment Mechanisms in Giant Molecular Clouds using GPIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Katherine; Clemens, D.; Pinnick, A.; Pavel, M.; Moreau, J.; Taylor, B.

    2009-01-01

    The linear polarization of starlight along a line of sight arises from the alignment of anisotropic dust grains with the local magnetic field direction. The exact process which aligns the dust grains with the local magnetic field is still unknown. However, an understanding of the alignment mechanism is necessary to be able to interpret polarization maps as tracers of the galactic magnetic field. Recent arguments suggest that radiative aligned torques (RATs) dominate alignment in giant molecular clouds (GMCs), including the infrared dark cloud cores (IRDCs) within them. To test RAT theory, a nearby GMC at l = 53, b = 0 was chosen to be observed this past June as part of the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS). The cloud covers a 1 x 2 degree region of the galactic plane ( 200 GPIPS field-of-views), and displays regions of varying extinction, morphology, and radiation environments as seen using the GLIMPSE, MIPS, and GRS 13CO data. With an average sampling of 100 stars per GPIPS field-of-view (10’ x 10'), we expect 20,000 stars will show detectable polarizations -a factor of 600 greater than in previous polarimetric studies. A plot of degree of NIR polarization P(%) vs. I/Imax, found using GRS 13CO data, is ideal for comparison to the models of Cho & Lazarian (2005). Approximate Av values are found using the 2MASS color excesses, EH-K. This aids in the generation of a plot of P(%)/Av vs. Av in dark clouds, to compare to the results of Arce et al. (1998) to test the notion that grains are aligned only for a few skin-depths. This work is partially supported by NSF grant AST-0607500.

  7. A Uniform Catalog of Molecular Clouds in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Thomas S.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Beaumont, Christopher; Dame, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    The all-Galaxy CO survey of Dame et al. is by far the most uniform, large-scale Galactic CO survey. Using a dendrogram-based decomposition of this survey, we present a catalog of 1064 massive molecular clouds throughout the Galactic plane. This catalog contains 2.5 × 108 solar masses, or {25}-5.8+10.7% of the Milky Way's estimated H2 mass. We track clouds in some spiral arms through multiple quadrants. The power index of Larson's first law, the size-linewidth relation, is consistent with 0.5 in all regions—possibly due to an observational bias—but clouds in the inner Galaxy systematically have significantly (˜30%) higher linewidths at a given size, indicating that their linewidths are set in part by the Galactic environment. The mass functions of clouds in the inner Galaxy versus the outer Galaxy are both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct. The inner Galaxy mass spectrum is best described by a truncated power law with a power index of γ = -1.6 ± 0.1 and an upper truncation mass of M 0 = (1.0 ± 0.2) × 107 M ⊙, while the outer Galaxy mass spectrum is better described by a non-truncating power law with γ = -2.2 ± 0.1 and an upper mass of M 0 = (1.5 ± 0.5) × 106 M ⊙, indicating that the inner Galaxy is able to form and host substantially more massive GMCs than the outer Galaxy. Additionally, we have simulated how the Milky Way would appear in CO from extragalactic perspectives, for comparison with CO maps of other galaxies.

  8. Testing Equilibrium Models of Molecular Gas in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tony

    We propose to study the molecular gas fractions and physical conditions of diffuse molecular clouds in the Magellanic Clouds using ultraviolet (UV) and optical absorption spectra, principally from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archives. We will use these data to constrain the abundance of molecular hydrogen (H_2) undetectable in CO emission surveys and to test equilibrium models that seek to predict the H_2 mass fraction and the H_2/HI ratio as functions of metallicity, column density, and thermal pressure. Our approach complements HI and CO surveys by providing direct estimates of HI and H_2 column densities. For sight lines where sufficiently high resolution spectra are available, we will use the excitation of CI to determine thermal pressures, allowing us to test models that assume thermodynamic equilibrium in order to determine the HI-H_2 balance. The recently completed Spitzer Legacy surveys of the MCs provide images of PAH emission on sub-parsec scales, which may provide a means to model the distribution and small-scale clumping of gas in the vicinity of the absorption sight lines, and thus connect the absorption data with the much coarser resolution radio data. We will investigate this possibility and the implications that small-scale clumping have for comparisons with theoretical models. A preliminary analysis of the FUSE and HST data is already underway, and we present a few early results. We seek support to continue this effort over the next two years and to disseminate our results. Our methodology is novel in several respects. It includes the use of high-resolution optical spectra to derive component models for the FUSE absorption spectra, in order to derive more accurate column densities, especially for the higher J transitions of H_2 which provide key diagnostics of density and radiation field strength. Such component models will also aid in the analysis of the CI spectra. We will work to increase

  9. QUANTIFYING OBSERVATIONAL PROJECTION EFFECTS USING MOLECULAR CLOUD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, Christopher N.; Offner, Stella S.R.; Shetty, Rahul; Glover, Simon C. O.; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    2013-11-10

    The physical properties of molecular clouds are often measured using spectral-line observations, which provide the only probes of the clouds' velocity structure. It is hard, though, to assess whether and to what extent intensity features in position-position-velocity (PPV) space correspond to 'real' density structures in position-position-position (PPP) space. In this paper, we create synthetic molecular cloud spectral-line maps of simulated molecular clouds, and present a new technique for measuring the reality of individual PPV structures. Using a dendrogram algorithm, we identify hierarchical structures in both PPP and PPV space. Our procedure projects density structures identified in PPP space into corresponding intensity structures in PPV space and then measures the geometric overlap of the projected structures with structures identified from the synthetic observation. The fractional overlap between a PPP and PPV structure quantifies how well the synthetic observation recovers information about the three-dimensional structure. Applying this machinery to a set of synthetic observations of CO isotopes, we measure how well spectral-line measurements recover mass, size, velocity dispersion, and virial parameter for a simulated star-forming region. By disabling various steps of our analysis, we investigate how much opacity, chemistry, and gravity affect measurements of physical properties extracted from PPV cubes. For the simulations used here, which offer a decent, but not perfect, match to the properties of a star-forming region like Perseus, our results suggest that superposition induces a ∼40% uncertainty in masses, sizes, and velocity dispersions derived from {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0). As would be expected, superposition and confusion is worst in regions where the filling factor of emitting material is large. The virial parameter is most affected by superposition, such that estimates of the virial parameter derived from PPV and PPP information typically disagree

  10. Molecular line observations of infrared dark clouds in the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Susanna C.

    Although massive stars play many important roles in the universe, their formation is poorly understood. Recently, a class of interstellar clouds known as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) has been identified as likely progenitors of massive stars and clusters. These clouds are dense (nH 2 > 105 cm--3), cold (T < 20 K), have very high column densities (N ˜ 1023--10 25 cm--2), and contain dense clumps and cores. In this dissertation, I present radio observations of a large sample of IRDCs in order to examine their properties and explore the hypothesis that high-mass stars and clusters form in these dense, cold molecular clouds. I determine kinematic distances to a large sample of IRDCs in the inner Galaxy based on CS (2--1) radial velocities. IRDCs are concentrated at specific Galactocentric radii and their distribution appears to trace Milky Way spiral structure. To identify IRDC clumps and determine properties such as mass, size, and chemical evolution, I map a sample of IRDCs in various high density-tracing molecular transitions. The size and mass estimates show that IRDC clumps are comparable in size to more evolved regions of massive star formation. I compare the integrated intensities and linewidths of the molecular emission with a proposed evolutionary sequence of the clumps. The ratio of N2H + with HNC, HCN, and HCO+ is a function of evolutionary stage. The linewidths and virial parameters of the clumps show no clear trend with the evolutionary sequence. Finally, I explore the filamentary shape of IRDCs. The "sausage instability," which describes clumps forming in a gas cylinder, is explored as a mechanism for star-forming clumps to collapse in filaments. First, I compare observations of the "Nessie Nebula," an extreme case of a filamentary IRDC, with predictions from the theory of the fluid instability and then expand the sample to other filamentary IRDCs. The observations are consistent with theoretical predictions of clump spacing, clump masses, and linear

  11. Nest of Molecular Outflows in the Circinus Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Kazuhito; Sato, Fumio; Mizuno, Akira

    1998-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a large and bright molecular outflow associated with an intense CO clump in the Circinus cloud, which was detected with the CO (J=1--0) emission line using the new Nagoya 4 meter radio telescope ``Nanten'' installed at Las Campanas Observatory (Chile). The outflow is quite large, extending over an area of 10'times20 ' ( ~ 4times8 pc at its distance of 1.26 kpc) that covers most of the clump surface, and having very high radio brightness; actually, the CO brightness of the high velocity wings integrated over the outflow lobes amounts to as high as 1.5*E(-1) K km s(-1) deg(2) , which makes this CO outflow one of the brightest reported so far. The outflow is also massive ( ~ 50 MO ) and energetic ( ~ 4300 MO km(2) s(-2) ). The outflow exhibits a complex morphology, having 2 local peaks at each of the red- and blue-shifted lobes. Comparing the outflow morphology with the locations of the protostellar candidates selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog, we conclude that the detected outflow is most likely to be driven by at least 4 distinct protostars forming in the clump, namely, IRAS 14562-6248, 14563-6301, 14564-6254, and 14568-6304. Thereby, we suggest to designate the CO clump as the ``Nest of Molecular Outflows'' in the Circinus cloud.

  12. Characterization of molecular structural changes in pectin during juice cloud destabilization in frozen concentrated orange juice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pectin comprises one of the major components of cloud material in citrus juices. Juice cloud is a complex mixture of polysaccharides, proteins and lower molecular weight compounds that are responsible for the turbid appearance of citrus juices. The stability of juice cloud depends on a number of fac...

  13. 1.0 Mm Maps and Radial Density Distributions of Southern Hii/molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, L. H.; Frogel, J. A.; Gezar, D. Y.; Hauser, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Several 1.0 continuum mapping observations were made of seven southern hemisphere h12/molecular cloud complexes with 65 arcsec resolution. The radial density distribution of the clouds with central luminosity sources was determined observationally. Strong similarities in morphology and general physical conditions were found to exist among all of the southern clouds in the sample.

  14. Molecular spectral line surveys and the organic molecules in the interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2008-10-01

    It is known that more than 140 interstellar and circumstellar molecules have so far been detected, mainly by means of the radio astronomy observations. Many organic molecules are also detected, including alcohols, ketons, ethers, aldehydes, and others, that are distributed from dark clouds and hot cores in the giant molecular clouds. It is believed that most of the organic molecules in space are synthesized through the grain surface reactions, and are evaporated from the grain surface when they are heated up by the UV radiation from adjacent stars. On the other hand the recent claim on the detection of glycine have raised an important issue how difficult it is to confirm secure detection of weak spectra from less abundant organic molecules in the interstellar molecular cloud. I will review recent survey observations of organic molecules in the interstellar molecular clouds, including independent observations of glycine by the 45 m radio telescope in Japan, and will discuss the procedure to securely identify weak spectral lines from organic molecules and the importance of laboratory measurement of organic species.

  15. High spectral resolution observations of fluorescent molecular hydrogen in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Geballe, T. R.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Moorhouse, A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1-0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen has been observed at high spectral resolution in several sources where the emission was suspected of being fluorescent. In NGC 2023, the Orion Bar, and Parsamyan 18, the S(1) line is unresolved, and the line center close to the rest velocity of the ambient molecular cloud. Such behavior is expected for UV-excited line emission. The H2 line widths in molecular clouds thus can serve as diagnostic for shocked and UV-excitation mechanisms. If the lines are broader than several km/s or velocity shifts are observed across a source it is likely that shocks are responsible for the excitation of the gas.

  16. High spectral resolution observations of fluorescent molecular hydrogen in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, M.G.; Geballe, T.R.; Brad, P.W.J.L.; Moorhouse, A. Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, HI ASTRON, Amsterdam Edinburgh Univ. )

    1990-04-01

    The 1-0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen has been observed at high spectral resolution in several sources where the emission was suspected of being fluorescent. In NGC 2023, the Orion Bar, and Parsamyan 18, the S(1) line is unresolved, and the line center close to the rest velocity of the ambient molecular cloud. Such behavior is expected for UV-excited line emission. The H2 line widths in molecular clouds thus can serve as diagnostic for shocked and UV-excitation mechanisms. If the lines are broader than several km/s or velocity shifts are observed across a source it is likely that shocks are responsible for the excitation of the gas. 27 refs.

  17. High spectral resolution observations of fluorescent molecular hydrogen in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Geballe, T. R.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Moorhouse, A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1-0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen has been observed at high spectral resolution in several sources where the emission was suspected of being fluorescent. In NGC 2023, the Orion Bar, and Parsamyan 18, the S(1) line is unresolved, and the line center close to the rest velocity of the ambient molecular cloud. Such behavior is expected for UV-excited line emission. The H2 line widths in molecular clouds thus can serve as diagnostic for shocked and UV-excitation mechanisms. If the lines are broader than several km/s or velocity shifts are observed across a source it is likely that shocks are responsible for the excitation of the gas.

  18. The probability density function in molecular gas in the G333 and Vela C molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Maria

    2015-08-01

    The probability density function (PDF) is a simple analytical tool for determining the hierarchical spatial structure of molecular clouds. It has been used frequently in recent years with dust continuum emission, such as that from the Herschel space telescope and ALMA. These dust column density PDFs universally show a log-normal distribution in low column density gas, characteristic of unbound turbulent gas, and a power-law tail at high column densities, indicating the presence of gravitationally bound gas. We have recently conducted a PDF analysis of the molecular gas in the G333 and Vela C giant molecular cloud complexes, using transitions of CO, HCN, HNC, HCO+ and N2H+.The results show that CO and its isotopologues trace mostly the log-normal part of the PDF, while HCN and HCO+ trace both a log-normal part and a power law part to the distribution. On the other hand, HNC and N2H+ mostly trace only the power law tail. The difference between the PDFs of HCN and HNC is surprising, as is the similarity between HNC and the N2H+ PDFs. The most likely explanation for the similar distributions of HNC and N2H+ is that N2H+ is known to be enhanced in cool gas below 20K, where CO is depleted, while the reaction that forms HNC or HCN favours the former at similar low temperatures. The lack of evidence for a power law tail in 13CO and C18O, in conjunction for the results for the N2H+ PDF suggest that depletion of CO in the dense cores of these molecular clouds is significant. In conclusion, the PDF has proved to be a surprisingly useful tool for investigating not only the spatial distribution of molecular gas, but also the wide scale chemistry of molecular clouds.

  19. Structure and chemistry in the northwestern condensation of the Serpens molecular cloud core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmullin, Joseph P.; Mundy, Lee G.; Wilking, Bruce A.; Hezel, T.; Blake, Geoff A.

    1994-01-01

    We present single-dish and interferometric observations of gas and dust in the core of the Serpens molecular cloud, focusing on the northwestern condensation. Single-dish molecular line observations are used to probe the structure and chemistry of the condensation while high-resolution images of CS and CH30H are combined with continuum observations from lambda = 1.3 mm to lambda = 3.5 cm to study the subcondensations and overall distribution of dust. For the northwestern condensation, we derive a characteristic density of 3 x 10(exp 5)/ cu cm and an estimated total mass of approximately 70 solar mass. We find compact molecular emission associated with the far-infrared source S68 FIRS 1, and with a newly detected subcondensation named S68 N. Comparison of the large-and small-scale emission reveals that most of the material in the northwest condensation is not directly associated with these compact sources, suggesting a youthful age for this region. CO J = 1 approaches 0 observations indicate widespread outflow activity. However, no unique association of embedded objects with outflows is possible with our observations. The SiO emission is found to be extended with the overall emission centered about S68 FIRS 1; the offset of the peak emission from all of the known continuum sources and the coincidence between the blueshifted SiO emission and blueshifted high-velocity gas traced by CO and CS is consistent with formation of SiO in shocks. Derived abundances of CO and HCO(+) are consistent with quiescent and other star-forming regions while CS, HCN, and H2CO abundances indicate mild depletions within the condensation. Spectral energy distribution fits to S68 FIRS 1 indicate a modest luminosity (50-60 solar luminosity), implying that it is a low-mass (0.5-3 solar mass) young stellar object. Radio continuum observations of the triple source toward S68 FIRS 1 indicate that the lobe emission is varying on timescales less than or equal to 1 yr while the central component is

  20. Structure and chemistry in the northwestern condensation of the Serpens molecular cloud core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmullin, Joseph P.; Mundy, Lee G.; Wilking, Bruce A.; Hezel, T.; Blake, Geoff A.

    1994-01-01

    We present single-dish and interferometric observations of gas and dust in the core of the Serpens molecular cloud, focusing on the northwestern condensation. Single-dish molecular line observations are used to probe the structure and chemistry of the condensation while high-resolution images of CS and CH30H are combined with continuum observations from lambda = 1.3 mm to lambda = 3.5 cm to study the subcondensations and overall distribution of dust. For the northwestern condensation, we derive a characteristic density of 3 x 10(exp 5)/ cu cm and an estimated total mass of approximately 70 solar mass. We find compact molecular emission associated with the far-infrared source S68 FIRS 1, and with a newly detected subcondensation named S68 N. Comparison of the large-and small-scale emission reveals that most of the material in the northwest condensation is not directly associated with these compact sources, suggesting a youthful age for this region. CO J = 1 approaches 0 observations indicate widespread outflow activity. However, no unique association of embedded objects with outflows is possible with our observations. The SiO emission is found to be extended with the overall emission centered about S68 FIRS 1; the offset of the peak emission from all of the known continuum sources and the coincidence between the blueshifted SiO emission and blueshifted high-velocity gas traced by CO and CS is consistent with formation of SiO in shocks. Derived abundances of CO and HCO(+) are consistent with quiescent and other star-forming regions while CS, HCN, and H2CO abundances indicate mild depletions within the condensation. Spectral energy distribution fits to S68 FIRS 1 indicate a modest luminosity (50-60 solar luminosity), implying that it is a low-mass (0.5-3 solar mass) young stellar object. Radio continuum observations of the triple source toward S68 FIRS 1 indicate that the lobe emission is varying on timescales less than or equal to 1 yr while the central component is

  1. MIXING OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA INTO MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Liubin; Desch, Steven J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova. Previous models have invoked supernova material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here, we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy supernova ejecta, as observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an H II region created by the supernova's progenitor star. To track these interactions, we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500{sup 3} effective) three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud or mix with it, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances {approx}10{sup 18} cm and mix effectively with large regions of star-forming molecular gas. In fact, the {approx}2 M{sub Sun} of high-metallicity ejecta from a single core-collapse supernova is likely to mix with {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} of molecular gas material as it is collapsing. Thus, all stars forming late ( Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr) in the evolution of an H II region may be contaminated by supernova ejecta at the level {approx}10{sup -4}. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system and is

  2. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  3. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  4. MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE TRIFID NEBULA M20: POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR A CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION IN TRIGGERING THE FORMATION OF THE FIRST GENERATION STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, K.; Enokiya, R.; Sano, H.; Yoshiike, S.; Hanaoka, N.; Ohama, A.; Furukawa, N.; Dawson, J. R.; Moribe, N.; Oishi, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Okuda, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawamura, A.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2011-09-01

    A large-scale study of the molecular clouds toward the Trifid Nebula, M20, has been made in the J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 transitions of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO. M20 is ionized predominantly by an O7.5 star HD164492. The study has revealed that there are two molecular components at separate velocities peaked toward the center of M20 and that their temperatures-30-50 K as derived by a large velocity gradient analysis-are significantly higher than the 10 K of their surroundings. We identify the two clouds as the parent clouds of the first generation stars in M20. The mass of each cloud is estimated to be {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun} and their separation velocity is {approx}8 km s{sup -1} over {approx}1-2 pc. We find that the total mass of stars and molecular gas in M20 is less than {approx}3.2 x 10{sup 3} M{sub sun}, which is too small by an order of magnitude to gravitationally bind the system. We argue that the formation of the first generation stars, including the main ionizing O7.5 star, was triggered by the collision between the two clouds in a short timescale of {approx}1 Myr, a second example alongside Westerlund 2, where a super-star cluster may have been formed due to cloud-cloud collision triggering.

  5. A survey of molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy with the highest spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Nishimura, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kuno, Nario; Fujita, Shinji; Tosaki, Tomoka; Tsuda, Yuya; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Kohno, Mikito; FUGIN team

    2017-03-01

    We report a recent result of the FUGIN project, a Galactic plane CO survey using the Nobeyama 45-m Telescope and the FOREST receiver. In the third galactic quadrant, 42 square degrees are observed and 4752 molecular clouds are detected. Among them, 12 clouds are located at R (distance from the Galactic center) > 16 kpc. Molecular clouds at R < 16 kpc trace the Local, Perseus, and Outer arms.

  6. Molecular Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.

    2005-07-01

    Part I. Molecular Clouds and the Distribution of Molecules in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies: 1. Molecular clouds in the Milky Way P. Friberg and A. Hjalmarson; 2. Molecules in galaxies L. Blitz; Part II. Diffuse Molecular Clouds: 3. Diffuse cloud chemistry E. F. Van Dishoeck; 4. Observations of velocity and density structure in diffuse clouds W. D. Langer; 5. Shock chemistry in diffuse clouds T. W. Hartquist, D. R. Flower and G. Pineau des Forets; Part III. Quiescent Dense Clouds: 6. Chemical modelling of quiescent dense interstellar clouds T. J. Millar; 7. Interstellar grain chemistry V. Buch; 8. Large molecules and small grains in astrophysics S. H. Lepp; Part IV. Studies of Molecular Processes: 9. Molecular photoabsorption processes K. P. Kirby; 10. Interstellar ion chemistry: laboratory studies D. Smith, N. G. Adams and E. E. Ferguson; 11. Theoretical considerations on some collisional processes D. R. Bates; 12. Collisional excitation processes E. Roueff; 13. Neutral reactions at Low and High Temperatures M. M. Graff; Part V. Atomic Species in Dense Clouds: 14. Observations of atomic species in dense clouds G. J. Melnick; 15. Ultraviolet radiation in molecular clouds W. G. Roberge; 16. Cosmic ray induced photodissociation and photoionization of interstellar molecules R. Gredel; 17. Chemistry in the molecular cloud Barnard 5 S. B. Charnley and D. A. Williams; 18. Molecular cloud structure, motions, and evolution P. C. Myers; Part VI. H in Regions of Massive Star Formation: 19. Infrared observations of line emission from molecular hydrogen T. R. Geballe; 20. Shocks in dense molecular clouds D. F. Chernoff and C. F. McKee; 21. Dissociative shocks D. A. Neufeld; 22. Infrared molecular hydrogen emission from interstellar photodissociation regions A. Sternberg; Part VII. Molecules Near Stars and in Stellar Ejecta: 23. Masers J. M. Moran; 24. Chemistry in the circumstellar envelopes around mass-losing red giants M. Jura; 25. Atoms and molecules in supernova 1987a R

  7. The Two Molecular Clouds in RCW 38: Evidence for the Formation of the Youngest Super Star Cluster in the Milky Way Triggered by Cloud-Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Ohama, A.; Hasegawa, K.; Hattori, Y.; Sano, H.; Ohashi, S.; Fujii, K.; Kuwahara, S.; Mizuno, N.; Dawson, J. R.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K.; Okuda, T.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.

    2016-03-01

    We present distributions of two molecular clouds having velocities of 2 and 14 km s-1 toward RCW 38, the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, in the 12CO J = 1-0 and 3-2 and 13CO J = 1-0 transitions. The two clouds are likely physically associated with the cluster as verified by the high intensity ratio of the J = 3-2 emission to the J = 1-0 emission, the bridging feature connecting the two clouds in velocity, and their morphological correspondence with the infrared dust emission. The velocity difference is too large for the clouds to be gravitationally bound. We frame a hypothesis that the two clouds are colliding with each other by chance to trigger formation of the ˜20 O stars that are localized within ˜0.5 pc of the cluster center in the 2 km s-1 cloud. We suggest that the collision is currently continuing toward part of the 2 km s-1 cloud where the bridging feature is localized. This is the third super star cluster alongside Westerlund 2 and NGC 3603 where cloud-cloud collision has triggered the cluster formation. RCW 38 is the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, holding a possible sign of on-going O star formation, and is a promising site where we may be able to witness the moment of O star formation.

  8. Turbulence in molecular clouds - A new diagnostic tool to probe their origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Battaglia, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented to uncover the instability responsible for the type of turbulence observed in molecular clouds and the value of the physical parameters of the 'placental medium' from which turbulence originated. The method utilizes the observational relation between velocities and sizes of molecular clouds, together with a recent model for large-scale turbulence (constructed by Canuto and Goldman, 1985).

  9. Characterizing molecular clouds in the earliest phases of high-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanhueza, Patricio A.

    High-mass stars play a key role in the energetics and chemical evolution. of molecular clouds and galaxies. However, the mechanisms that allow. the formation of high-mass stars are far less clear than those of. their low-mass. counterparts. Most of the research on high-mass star formation has focused. on regions currently undergoing star formation. In contrast, objects. in the earlier prestellar stage have been more difficult to identify. Recently, it has been. suggested that the cold, massive, and dense Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) host. the earliest stages of high-mass star formation. The chemistry of IRDCs remains poorly explored. In this dissertation, an. observational program to search for chemical. variations in IRDC clumps as a function of their age is described. An increase in N2H+ and HCO+ abundances. is found from the quiescent, cold phase to the protostellar, warmer phases, reflecting chemical. evolution. For HCO+ abundances, the observed trend is consistent with. theoretical predictions. However, chemical models fail to explain the observed. trend of increasing N2H+ abundances. Pristine high-mass prestellar clumps are ideal for testing and constraining. theories of high-mass star formation because their predictions differ. the most at the early stages of evolution. From the initial IRDC sample, a high-mass clump that is the best candidate to be in the prestellar phase. was selected (IRDC G028.23-00.19 MM1). With a new set of observations, the prestellar nature of the clump is confirmed. High-angular resolution. observations of IRDC G028.23-00.19 suggest that in. order to form high-mass stars, the detected cores have to accrete a large. amount of material, passing through a low- to intermediate-mass phase. before having the necessary mass to form a. high-mass star. The turbulent core accretion model. is inconsistent with this observational result, but on the other hand, the. observations support the competitive accretion model. Embedded cores have. to

  10. Star formation in the M17 SW giant molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    1982-01-01

    The first high-sensitivity, high-resolution far-IR survey of an entire molecular cloud complex is presented. The 20 km/s M17 SW complex, in addition to the three luminous M17 sources, contains 10 sources spread over 110 pc. The 10 lower luminosity sources divide into two groups: small blister sources powered by late O stars and compact sources powered by clusters of early B stars. No compact far-IR sources with luminosities between the detection limit and 10,000 solar luminosities were detected. Three possible formation mechanisms for the stars that power the far-IR sources in the M17 SW complex are examined. Sequential formation cannot explain the sources seen throughout the complex. Some type of stochastic formation mechanism or collapse induced by a spiral density wave could explain the observations.

  11. An infrared study of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 (OMC-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.J.; Gehrz, R.D.; Jones, T.J.; Hackwell, J.A.; Grasdalen, G.L. The Aerospace Corp., Space Sciences Laboratory, Los Angeles, CA Wyoming Infrared Observatory, Laramie )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports 1.2-23 micron photometry for 11 discrete sources in Orion Molecular Cloud-2 (OMC-2). These data, combined with H and K photometric and K polarimetric images, are used to model the cluster sources. Most appear to be young stars of roughly solar mass. Some have circumstellar dust reradiation or reflection nebulosity. A model based on single scattering of light from an exciting star explains some features of the IRS 1 nebula, the largest reflection nebula in OMC-2. However, the red colors and high surface brightness of the IRS 1 nebula require a cool excitation source that is more luminous than far-infrared observations would indicate. 34 refs.

  12. Star formation in the M17 SW giant molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    1982-01-01

    The first high-sensitivity, high-resolution far-IR survey of an entire molecular cloud complex is presented. The 20 km/s M17 SW complex, in addition to the three luminous M17 sources, contains 10 sources spread over 110 pc. The 10 lower luminosity sources divide into two groups: small blister sources powered by late O stars and compact sources powered by clusters of early B stars. No compact far-IR sources with luminosities between the detection limit and 10,000 solar luminosities were detected. Three possible formation mechanisms for the stars that power the far-IR sources in the M17 SW complex are examined. Sequential formation cannot explain the sources seen throughout the complex. Some type of stochastic formation mechanism or collapse induced by a spiral density wave could explain the observations.

  13. Mass-density relationship in molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, Sava; Veltchev, Todor V.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2011-12-01

    We study the mass-density relationship n ∝ mx in molecular cloud condensations (clumps), considering various equipartition relations between their gravitational, kinetic, internal and magnetic energies. Clumps are described statistically, with a density distribution that reflects a lognormal probability density function in turbulent cold interstellar medium. The clump mass-density exponent x derived at different scales L varies in most of the cases within the range -2.5 ≲x≲-0.2, with a pronounced scale dependence and in consistency with observations. When derived from the global size-mass relationship ? for set of clumps, generated at all scales, the clump mass-density exponent has typical values -3.0 ≲x(γglob) ≲-0.3 that depend on the forms of energy, included in the equipartition relations, and on the velocity scaling law, whereas the description of clump geometry is important when magnetic energy is taken into account.

  14. Composite Polytrope Models of Molecular Clouds. I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Charles L.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2000-01-01

    We construct spherical, hydrostatic models of dense molecular cores and Bok globules consisting of two distinct, spatially separate gas components: a central, isothermal region surrounded by a negative-index, polytropic envelope. The clouds are supported against their own self-gravity by a combination of thermal, mean magnetic, and turbulent wave pressure. The latter two are included by allowing for locally adiabatic, nonisentropic pressure components. Such models are meant to represent, in a schematic manner, the velocity and density structure of cores and globules, as inferred from molecular line and dust continuum observations. In addition, our picture reflects the theoretical expectation that MHD wave motions, which are important at scales >~0.1 pc in typical low-mass star-forming regions, are damped at smaller scales, giving rise to a finite-sized, thermally dominated core region. We show that if the pressure components are isentropic, then the pressure drop from the center to the edge of the composite polytropes we consider is limited to 197, the square of the value for the Bonnor-Ebert sphere. If the pressure components are nonisentropic, it is possible to have arbitrarily large pressure drops, in agreement with the recent work of McKee & Holliman. However, we find that even for nonisentropic pressure components, the ratio of the mean to surface pressure in the composite polytropes we consider is less than 4. We show by explicit construction that it is possible to have dense cores comparable to the Jeans mass embedded in stable clouds of much larger mass. In a subsequent paper, we show that composite polytropes on the verge of gravitational instability can reproduce the observed velocity and density structure of cores and globules under a variety of physical conditions.

  15. The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP): From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    2015-08-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars, and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state, which is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas using a full LTE solution for the column density from the hyperfine line ratios (Schap et al), which identifies low-luminosity but high-column areas that significantly increase the clumps' mass estimates, and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT and CTIO data and MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al), which gives basic cluster parameters such as mass and luminosity as well as the associated star formation efficiency (SFE).

  16. A wide-latitude CO survey of molecular clouds in the northern Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wide-latitude, low angular resolution survey of CO along most of the first Galactic quadrant and part of the second was undertaken in order to investigate molecular clouds associated with the Great Rift and the diffuse component of Galactic gamma rays. The main nearby clouds have masses between a few times 10,000 and a few times 100,000 solar masses, versus a few times a million solar masses for the largest complexes elsewhere. The CO emission in the survey comes nearly equally from local clouds associated with the Great Rift and from distant clouds in the inner arms of the Galaxy 4-7 kpc from the Galactic center. The half-thickness at half-intensity of the local molecular cloud layer is greater than 50 pc and is estimated to be 75 + or - 25 pc. The results strongly support the notion that all dark nebulae are molecular clouds, and vice-versa.

  17. The chemistry and kinematics of two molecular clouds near Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, John A. P.; Cunningham, Maria R.; Jones, Paul A.; Marshall, Jonathan P.; Bronfman, Leonardo; Lo, Nadia; Walsh, Andrew J.

    2016-12-01

    We have analysed the chemical and kinematic properties of the 20 and 50 km s-1 molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way Galaxy, as well as those of the molecular ridge bridging these two clouds. Our work has utilized 37 molecular transitions in the 0.65, 3 and 7-mm wavebands, from the Mopra and NANTEN2 telescopes. The 0.65-mm NANTEN2 data highlights a dense condensation of emission within the western part of the 20 km s-1 cloud, visible in only four other transitions, which are 3-mm H13CN (1-0), H13CO+ (1-0), HNC (1-0) and N2H+ (1-0), suggesting that the condensation is moderately optically thick and cold. We find that while the relative chemical abundances between both clouds are alike in many transitions, suggesting little variation in the chemistry between both clouds; the 20 km s-1, cold cloud is brighter than the 50 km s-1 cloud in shock and high density tracers. The spatial distribution of enhanced emission is widespread in the 20 km s-1 cloud, as shown via line ratio maps. The position velocity diagrams across both clouds indicate that the gas is well mixed. We show that the molecular ridge is most likely part of the 20 km s-1 cloud and that both of them may possibly extend to include the 50 km s-1 cloud, as part of one larger cloud. Furthermore, we expect that the 20 km s-1 cloud is being tidally sheared as a result of the gravitational potential from Sgr A*

  18. Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-14

    Clouds are common near the north polar caps throughout the spring and summer. The clouds typically cause a haze over the extensive dune fields. This image from NASA Mars Odyssey shows the edge of the cloud front.

  19. Evolving molecular cloud structure and the column density probability distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Rachel L.; Wadsley, James; Sills, Alison

    2014-12-01

    The structure of molecular clouds can be characterized with the probability distribution function (PDF) of the mass surface density. In particular, the properties of the distribution can reveal the nature of the turbulence and star formation present inside the molecular cloud. In this paper, we explore how these structural characteristics evolve with time and also how they relate to various cloud properties as measured from a sample of synthetic column density maps of molecular clouds. We find that, as a cloud evolves, the peak of its column density PDF will shift to surface densities below the observational threshold for detection, resulting in an underlying lognormal distribution which has been effectively lost at late times. Our results explain why certain observations of actively star-forming, dynamically older clouds, such as the Orion molecular cloud, do not appear to have any evidence of a lognormal distribution in their column density PDFs. We also study the evolution of the slope and deviation point of the power-law tails for our sample of simulated clouds and show that both properties trend towards constant values, thus linking the column density structure of the molecular cloud to the surface density threshold for star formation.

  20. STAR FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES. I. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS VIA GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY AND CLOUD COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2009-07-20

    We investigate the formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a Milky-Way-like disk galaxy with a flat rotation curve. We perform a series of three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement numerical simulations that follow both the global evolution on scales of {approx}20 kpc and resolve down to scales {approx}<10 pc with a multiphase atomic interstellar medium. In this first study, we omit star formation and feedback, and focus on the processes of gravitational instability and cloud collisions and interactions. We define clouds as regions with n {sub H} {>=} 100 cm{sup -3} and track the evolution of individual clouds as they orbit through the galaxy from their birth to their eventual destruction via merger or via destructive collision with another cloud. After {approx}140 Myr a large fraction of the gas in the disk has fragmented into clouds with masses {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub sun} and a mass spectrum similar to that of Galactic GMCs. The disk settles into a quasi-steady-state in which gravitational scattering of clouds keeps the disk near the threshold of global gravitational instability. The cloud collision time is found to be a small fraction, {approx}1/5, of the orbital time, and this is an efficient mechanism to inject turbulence into the clouds. This helps to keep clouds only moderately gravitationally bound, with virial parameters of order unity. Many other observed GMC properties, such as mass surface density, angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and vertical distribution, can be accounted for in this simple model with no stellar feedback.

  1. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. I - Moderately centrally condensed cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    3D calculations of the collapse of moderately centrally condensed molecular cloud cores with varied thermal and rotational energies are presented. The calculations are carried out using a newly developed and tested second-order accurate radiative hydrodynamics code. Because of the use of a second-order accurate numerical scheme and initial clouds that resemble both observed prolate molecular cloud cores and magnetically supported clouds at the initiation of the dynamic collapse phase, the new models provide a superior estimate of the likelihood of fragmentation as a mechanism for binary star formation.

  2. MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN OORT CLOUD COMET 1P/HALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Dishoeck, E. F. van; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-10

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O{sub 2} is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O{sub 2} abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O{sub 2} of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O{sub 2} might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  3. The CO Transition from Diffuse Molecular Gas to Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Johnathan S.; Federman, Steven

    2017-06-01

    The atomic to molecular transitions occurring in diffuse interstellar gas surrounding molecular clouds are affected by the local physical conditions (density and temperature) and the radiation field penetrating the material. Our optical observations of CH, CH^{+}, and CN absorption from McDonald Observatory and the European Southern Observatory are useful tracers of this gas and provide the velocity structure needed for analyzing lower resolution ultraviolet observations of CO and H_{2} absorption from Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We explore the changing environment between diffuse and dense gas by using the column densities and excitation temperatures from CO and H_{2} to determine the gas density. The resulting gas densities from this method are compared to densities inferred from other methods such as C_{2} and CN chemistry. The densities allow us to interpret the trends from the combined set of tracers. Groupings of sight lines, such as those toward h and χ Persei or Chameleon provide a chance for further characterization of the environment. The Chameleon region in particular helps illuminate CO-dark gas, which is not associated with emission from H I at 21 cm or from CO at 2.6 mm. Expanding this analysis to include emission data from the GOT C+ survey allows the further characterization of neutral diffuse gas, including CO-dark gas.

  4. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  5. STELLAR 'EGGS' EMERGE FROM MOLECULAR CLOUD (Star-Birth Clouds in M16)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation'. As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules'. The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo:

  6. STELLAR 'EGGS' EMERGE FROM MOLECULAR CLOUD (Star-Birth Clouds in M16)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation'. As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules'. The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo:

  7. Constructing multiscale gravitational energy spectra from molecular cloud surface density PDF - interplay between turbulence and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Gravity is believed to be important on multiple physical scales in molecular clouds. However, quantitative constraints on gravity are still lacking. We derive an analytical formula which provides estimates on multiscale gravitational energy distribution using the observed surface density probability distribution function (PDF). Our analytical formalism also enables one to convert the observed column density PDF into an estimated volume density PDF, and to obtain average radial density profile ρ(r). For a region with N_col ˜ N^{-γ _N}, the gravitational energy spectra is E_p(k)˜ k^{-4(1 - 1/γ _N)}. We apply the formula to observations of molecular clouds, and find that a scaling index of -2 of the surface density PDF implies that ρ ˜ r-2 and Ep(k) ˜ k-2. The results are valid from the cloud scale (a few parsec) to around ˜ 0.1 pc. Because of the resemblance the scaling index of the gravitational energy spectrum and the that of the kinetic energy power spectrum of the Burgers turbulence (where E ˜ k-2), our result indicates that gravity can act effectively against turbulence over a multitude of physical scales. This is the critical scaling index which divides molecular clouds into two categories: clouds like Orion and Ophiuchus have shallower power laws, and the amount of gravitational energy is too large for turbulence to be effective inside the cloud. Because gravity dominates, we call this type of cloud g-type clouds. On the other hand, clouds like the California molecular cloud and the Pipe nebula have steeper power laws, and turbulence can overcome gravity if it can cascade effectively from the large scale. We call this type of cloud t-type clouds. The analytical formula can be used to determine if gravity is dominating cloud evolution when the column density PDF can be reliably determined.

  8. Molecular clouds in Orion and Monoceros. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalena, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    About one-eighth of a well-sampled 850 deg. sq. region of Orion and Monoceros shows CO emission coming from either local clouds (d < 1 kpc) lying as much as 25 deg. from the galactic plane or from more distant objects located within a few degrees of the plane. Local giant clouds associated with Orion A and B have enhanced temperatures and densities near their western edges possibly due to compression by a high pressure region created by approx.10 supernovae that occurred in the Orion OB association. Another giant cloud associated with Mon R2 may be related to the Orion clouds. Two filamentary clouds (one possibly 300 pc long but 10 pc wide) may represent a new class of object. An expanding ring of clouds concentric with the H II region ionized by lambda Ori probably constitute fragments of the original cloud from which lambda Ori formed; the gas pressure of the H II region and the rocket effect probably disrupted the original cloud. At a distance of 3 kpc, a large (250 x 100 pc) and massive (7-11x10 to the 5th power solar mass) cloud was found with the unusual combination of low temperatures (T sub R < 2.7 K) and wide spectral lines (approx. 7 km /sec). Most of the signs of star formation expected for such a massive cloud being absent, this may be a young cloud that has not yet started to form stars. The approx. 15 large clouds found in the outer galaxy (1 approx. 206 deg. - 220 deg.) probably lie in two spiral arms. The distribution of outer galaxy clouds and a comparison of the properties of these clouds and those of local clouds are given.

  9. Hierarchical star cluster assembly in globally collapsing molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; González-Samaniego, Alejandro; Colín, Pedro

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in a numerical simulation of a molecular cloud (MC) undergoing global hierarchical collapse, focusing on how the gas motions in the parent cloud control the assembly of the cluster. The global collapse implies that the star formation rate (SFR) increases over time. The collapse is hierarchical because it consists of small-scale collapses within larger scale ones. The latter culminate a few Myr later than the first small-scale ones and consist of filamentary flows that accrete on to massive central clumps. The small-scale collapses consist of clumps that are embedded in the filaments and falling on to the large-scale collapse centres. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall motion of their parent clumps, so that the filaments feed both gas and stars to the massive central clump. This process leads to the presence of a few older stars in a region where new protostars are forming, and also to a self-similar structure, in which each unit is composed of smaller scale subunits that approach each other and may merge. Because the older stars formed in the filaments share the infall motion of the gas on to the central clump, they tend to have larger velocities and to be distributed over larger areas than the younger stars formed in the central clump. Finally, interpreting the initial mass function (IMF) simply as a probability distribution implies that massive stars only form once the local SFR is large enough to sample the IMF up to high masses. In combination with the increase of the SFR, this implies that massive stars tend to appear late in the evolution of the MC, and only in the central massive clumps. We discuss the correspondence of these features with observed properties of young stellar clusters, finding very good qualitative agreement.

  10. Velocity Anisotropy in Self-gravitating Molecular Clouds. I. Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Ji, Weiguang; Li, Hua-bai

    2017-02-01

    The complex interplay between turbulence, magnetic fields, and self-gravity leads to the formation of molecular clouds out of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). One avenue of studying this interplay is by analyzing statistical features derived from observations, where the interpretation of these features is greatly facilitated by comparisons with numerical simulations. Here we focus on the statistical anisotropy present in synthetic maps of velocity centroid data, which we derive from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating patch of ISM. We study how the orientation and magnitude of the velocity anisotropy correlate with the magnetic field and with the structures generated by gravitational collapse. Motivated by recent observational constraints, our simulations focus on the supersonic (sonic Mach number { M }≈ 2{--}17) but sub- to trans-alfvénic (alfvénic Mach number {{ M }}{{A}}≈ 0.2{--}1.2) turbulence regime, and we consider clouds that are barely to mildly magnetically supercritical (mass-to-flux ratio equal to once or twice the critical value). Additionally we explore the impact of the turbulence driving mechanism (solenoidal or compressive) on the velocity anisotropy. While we confirm previous findings that the velocity anisotropy generally aligns well with the plane-of-sky magnetic field, our inclusion of the effects of self-gravity reveals that in regions of higher column density, the velocity anisotropy may be destroyed or even reoriented to align with the gravitationally formed structures. We provide evidence that this effect is not necessarily due to the increase of {{ M }}{{A}} inside the high-density regions.

  11. The Far Infrared Lines of OH as Molecular Cloud Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    Future IR missions should give some priority to high resolution spectroscopic observations of the set of far-IR transitions of OH. There are 15 far-IR lines arising between the lowest eight rotational levels of OH, and ISO detected nine of them. Furthermore, ISO found the OH lines, sometimes in emission and sometimes in absorption, in a wide variety of galactic and extragalactic objects ranging from AGB stars to molecular clouds to active galactic nuclei and ultra-luminous IR galaxies. The ISO/LWS Fabry-Perot resolved the 119 m doublet line in a few of the strong sources. This set of OH lines provides a uniquely important diagnostic for many reasons: the lines span a wide wavelength range (28.9 m to 163.2 m); the transitions have fast radiative rates; the abundance of the species is relatively high; the IR continuum plays an important role as a pump; the contribution from shocks is relatively minor; and, not least, the powerful centimeter-wave radiation from OH allows comparison with radio and VLBI datasets. The problem is that the large number of sensitive free parameters, and the large optical depths of the strongest lines, make modeling the full set a difficult job. The SWAS montecarlo radiative transfer code has been used to analyze the ISO/LWS spectra of a number of objects with good success, including in both the lines and the FIR continuum; the DUSTY radiative transfer code was used to insure a self-consistent continuum. Other far IR lines including those from H2O, CO, and [OI] are also in the code. The OH lines all show features which future FIR spectrometers should be able to resolve, and which will enable further refinements in the details of each cloud's structure. Some examples are given, including the case of S140, for which independent SWAS data found evidence for bulk flows.

  12. Molecular cloud photoevaporation and far-infrared line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.

    2017-05-01

    With the aim of improving predictions on far-infrared (FIR) line emission from Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), we study the effects of photoevaporation (PE) produced by external far-ultraviolet (FUV) and ionizing (extreme-ultraviolet) radiation on GMC structure. We consider three different GMCs with mass in the range MGMC = 103-106 M⊙. Our model includes (i) an observationally based inhomogeneous GMC density field, and (ii) its time evolution during the PE process. In the fiducial case (MGMC ≈ 105 M⊙), the PE time (tpe) increases from 1 to 30 Myr for gas metallicity Z = 0.05-1 Z⊙, respectively. Next, we compute the time-dependent luminosity of key FIR lines tracing the neutral and ionized gas layers of the GMCs, ([C ii] at 158 μm, [O iii] at 88 μm) as a function of G0, and Z until complete PE at tpe. We find that the specific [C ii] luminosity is almost independent of the GMC model within the survival time of the cloud. Stronger FUV fluxes produce higher [C ii] and [O iii] luminosities, however, lasting for progressively shorter times. At Z = Z⊙, the [C ii] emission is maximized (L_{C II} ≈ 10^4 {L_{{⊙}}} for the fiducial model) for t < 1 Myr and log G0 ≥ 3. Noticeably, and consistently with the recent detection by Inoue et al. of a galaxy at redshift z ≈ 7.2, for Z ≤ 0.2 Z⊙, the [O iii] line might outshine [C ii] emission by up to ≈1000 times. We conclude that the [O iii] line is a key diagnostic of low-metallicity interstellar medium, especially in galaxies with very young stellar populations.

  13. Magnetic Field of the Vela C Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Shuji

    2016-10-01

    We have performed extensive near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ˜70-310 μG in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  14. Populations of Young Stellar Objects in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping

    2013-03-01

    We develop a new method for identifying young stellar objects (YSOs) from star-forming regions using the photometry data from Spitzer's c2d Legacy Project. The aim is to obtain YSO lists as complete as possible for studying statistical properties such as the star formation rate (SFR) and lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages. The largest obstacle in identifying YSOs comes from background galaxies with similar spectral energy distributions to YSOs. Traditionally, selected color-color and color-magnitude criteria are used to separate YSOs and galaxies. However, since there is no obvious boundary between YSOs and galaxies in color-color diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), those criteria may exclude faint YSOs near the boundary. In this paper, we separate the YSOs and galaxies in a multi-dimensional (multi-D) magnitude space, which is equivalent to using all variations of CMDs simultaneously. Comparing sources from molecular clouds to Spitzer's SWIRE data, which have a negligible amount of YSOs, we can naturally identify YSO candidates (YSOc) located outside of the galaxy-populated regions in the multi-D space. In the five c2d surveyed clouds, we select 322 new YSOc and miss/exclude 33 YSOc compared to Evans et al., and this results in 1313 YSOc in total. As a result, SFR increases 28% correspondingly, but the lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages remain unchanged. Compared to theories by Krumholz & McKee, our derived SFR suggests that star formation at a large scale is dominated by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields. Furthermore, we identify seven new very low luminosity objects.

  15. POPULATIONS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping E-mail: slai@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2013-03-01

    We develop a new method for identifying young stellar objects (YSOs) from star-forming regions using the photometry data from Spitzer's c2d Legacy Project. The aim is to obtain YSO lists as complete as possible for studying statistical properties such as the star formation rate (SFR) and lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages. The largest obstacle in identifying YSOs comes from background galaxies with similar spectral energy distributions to YSOs. Traditionally, selected color-color and color-magnitude criteria are used to separate YSOs and galaxies. However, since there is no obvious boundary between YSOs and galaxies in color-color diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), those criteria may exclude faint YSOs near the boundary. In this paper, we separate the YSOs and galaxies in a multi-dimensional (multi-D) magnitude space, which is equivalent to using all variations of CMDs simultaneously. Comparing sources from molecular clouds to Spitzer's SWIRE data, which have a negligible amount of YSOs, we can naturally identify YSO candidates (YSOc) located outside of the galaxy-populated regions in the multi-D space. In the five c2d surveyed clouds, we select 322 new YSOc and miss/exclude 33 YSOc compared to Evans et al., and this results in 1313 YSOc in total. As a result, SFR increases 28% correspondingly, but the lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages remain unchanged. Compared to theories by Krumholz and McKee, our derived SFR suggests that star formation at a large scale is dominated by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields. Furthermore, we identify seven new very low luminosity objects.

  16. Approaching hell's kitchen: Molecular daredevil clouds in the vicinity of Sagittarius A* ⋆⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Lydia; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Eckart, Andreas; Requena-Torres, Miguel A.; García-Marin, Macarena; Kunneriath, Devaky; Zensus, Anton; Britzen, Silke; Sabha, Nadeen; Shahzamanian, Banafsheh; Borkar, Abhijeet; Fischer, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    We report serendipitous detections of line emission with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in bands 3, 6, and 7 in the central parsec down to within 1'' around Sgr A* at an up to now highest resolution (<0.5'') view of the Galactic center (GC) in the submillimeter (sub-mm) domain. From the 100 GHz continuum and the H39α emission we obtain a uniform electron temperature around Te 6000 K for the minispiral. The spectral index (S ∝ να) of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is 0.5 at 100-250 GHz and 0.0 at 230-340 GHz. The bright sources in the center show spectral indices around -0.1 implying Bremsstrahlung emission, while dust emission is emerging in the minispiral exterior. Apart from CS, which is most widespread in the center, H13CO+, HC3N, SiO, SO, C2H, CH3OH, 13CS and N2H+ are also detected. The bulk of the clumpy emission regions is at positive velocities and in a region confined by the minispiral northern arm (NA), bar, and the sources IRS 3 and 7. Although partly spatially overlapping with the radio recombination line (RRL) emission at same negative velocities, the relation to the minispiral remains unclear. A likely explanation is an infalling clump consisting of denser cloud cores embedded in diffuse gas. This central association (CA) of clouds shows three times higher CS/X (X: any other observed molecule) ratios than the circumnuclear disk (CND) suggesting a combination of higher excitation, by a temperature gradient and/or infrared (IR) pumping, and abundance enhancement due to UV and/or X-ray emission. Hence, we conclude that this CA is closer to the center than the CND is to the center. Moreover, we find molecular line emission at velocities up to 200 km s-1. Apart from the CA, we identified two intriguing regions in the CND. One region shows emission in all molecular species and higher energy levels tested in this and previous observations and contains a methanol class I maser. The other region shows similar behavior of the line ratios

  17. Dissipation of Molecular Cloud Turbulence by Magnetohydrodynamic Shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks—fast, intermediate and slow—differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions.Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables only weakly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow MHD shocks are driven by gas pressure where neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock.We computed observational diagnostics for fast and slow shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km/s and preshock Hydrogen nuclei densities n(H) = 102-4 cm-3. We followed the abundances of molecules relevant for a simple oxygen chemistry and include cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. Estimates of intensities of CO rotational lines show that high-J lines, above J = 6→5, are more strongly excited in slow MHD shocks. We discuss how these shocks could help interpret recently observed anomalously strong mid- and high-J CO lines emitted by warm gas in the Milky Way and external galaxies, and implications for simulations of MHD turbulence.

  18. Supernova remnant masers: Shock interactions with molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John William

    Maser emission from the 1720-MHz transition of hydroxyl(OH) has identified shock interactions in 10% of all supernova remnants(SNRs). Such maser-emitting SNRs are also bright in molecular line emission. Though somewhat rare, SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds are an important class in which to study cosmic ray acceleration, SNR evolution, and effects on the energetics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. To study molecular shocks via a multiwavelength approach, the VLA, GBT, Spitzer Space Telescope have been used in the following ways: (i) With the GBT widespread OH(1720 MHz) emission and absorption in other OH lines is observed across the interaction site. Observations of all four ground-state transitions at 1720, 1667/5 and 1612 MHz allows us to model OH excitation, yielding the temperature, density and OH abundance in the post-shock gas. Maser emission is found to have a higher flux density with the GBT than with high-resolution VLA observations for 10 of 15 observed remnants, suggesting maser emission is present on large spatial scales. (ii) Sensitive VLA observations of select SNRs (W44, IC 443, Kes 69, 3C 391, G357.7+0.3) reveal the nature of enhanced 1720 MHz emission. Numerous weak compact masers as well as diffuse extended emission are detected tracing the shock-front. Zeeman splitting of masers permits the post-shock magnetic field strength and the line of sight field direction to be directly measured. (iii) Rotational lines of molecular hydrogen are detected at the position of several masers with Spitzer IRS spectroscopy between 5 and 35 mm. Excitation of the hydrogen lines requires the passage of a C-type shock through dense molecular gas, in agreement with the conditions derived from OH excitation. The presence of bright ionic lines requires multiple shocks present at the interaction site. (iv) A new survey for SNR-masers has identified four new interacting SNRs within 10 degrees of the Galactic Center. Maser-emitting SNRs are found to

  19. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  20. The Molecular Gas Environment in the 20 km s‑1 Cloud in the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xing; Zhang, Qizhou; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Longmore, Steven N.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Battersby, Cara; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ginsburg, Adam; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported a population of protostellar candidates in the 20 km s‑1 cloud in the Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way, traced by H2O masers in gravitationally bound dense cores. In this paper, we report molecular line studies with high angular resolution (∼3″) of the environment of star formation in this cloud. Maps of various molecular line transitions as well as the continuum at 1.3 mm are obtained using the Submillimeter Array. Five NH3 inversion lines and the 1.3 cm continuum are observed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The interferometric observations are complemented with single-dish data. We find that the CH3OH, SO, and HNCO lines, which are usually shock tracers, are better correlated spatially with the compact dust emission from dense cores among the detected lines. These lines also show enhancement in intensities with respect to SiO intensities toward the compact dust emission, suggesting the presence of slow shocks or hot cores in these regions. We find gas temperatures of ≳100 K at 0.1 pc scales based on RADEX modeling of the H2CO and NH3 lines. Although no strong correlations between temperatures and linewidths/H2O maser luminosities are found, in high-angular-resolution maps we note several candidate shock-heated regions offset from any dense cores, as well as signatures of localized heating by protostars in several dense cores. Our findings suggest that at 0.1 pc scales in this cloud star formation and strong turbulence may together affect the chemistry and temperature of the molecular gas.

  1. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Dawson, J. R.; Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  2. Molecular Clouds toward the Super Star Cluster NGC 3603 Possible Evidence for a Cloud-Cloud Collision in Triggering the Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Dawson, J. R.; Mizuno, N.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kawamura, A.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions 12CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and 13CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s-1 and 28 km s-1 are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ~20 km s-1. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  3. The H I Probability Distribution Function and the Atomic-to-molecular Transition in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imara, Nia; Burkhart, Blakesley

    2016-10-01

    We characterize the column-density probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the atomic hydrogen gas, H i, associated with seven Galactic molecular clouds (MCs). We use 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H i Survey to derive column-density maps and PDFs. We find that the peaks of the H i PDFs occur at column densities in the range ˜1-2 × 1021 {{cm}}-2 (equivalently, ˜0.5-1 mag). The PDFs are uniformly narrow, with a mean dispersion of {σ }{{H}{{I}}}≈ {10}20 {{cm}}-2 (˜0.1 mag). We also investigate the H i-to-H2 transition toward the cloud complexes and estimate H i surface densities ranging from 7 to 16 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2 at the transition. We propose that the H i PDF is a fitting tool for identifying the H i-to-H2 transition column in Galactic MCs.

  4. The structure of the high-latitude molecular cloud toward HD 210121

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; De Vries, Cor P.; Black, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Optical absorption line observations and millimeter emission of the high-latitude cloud toward the star HD 21021 are reported. The cloud was mapped with the ESO submillimeter telescope. Maps of (C-12)O and (C-13)O emission are presented and the line profiles and velocity structure of the cloud are discussed. The optical absorption line observations allow an independent determination of the H2 column density along the line of sight. The molecular column densities found in this cloud were consistent with those measured in diffuse and translucent clouds. Attention is given to the physical and chemical properties of the cloud with reference to chemical models. Analysis indicates that small fluctuations in H2 column density and other factors can produce large variations of CO abundance and column density in clouds where carbon is just being transformed into CO.

  5. Bipolar flows, molecular gas disks, and the collapse and accretion of rotating interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    Rigorous numerical models of the collapse and accretion of rotating, axisymmetric, isothermal interstellar clouds are studied. The results show that molecular gas disks and evacuated bipolar cavities both appear to be natural consequences of the collapse of rotating interstellar clouds. Dynamically significant magnetic fields may not be necessary for explaining either phenomenon. The models strongly support theoretical models of the type where an isotropic wind from a pre-main sequence star is extrinsically collimated by a rotationally derived molecular gas cloud. The models imply that collimation should be strongest on small scales where rotational effects are most important, i.e., in the dense region of the molecular gas disk.

  6. Millimeter continuum observations of Galactic center giant molecular cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Keene, Jocelyn

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of 1.3- and 0.8-mm continuum emission toward the cores of three Galactic center molecular clouds with ongoing massive star formation, Sagittarius B2, C, and D, which were made in order to study possible variations in the high-mass star formation rate per unit mass between the Galactic center and the disk. The luminosity-to-mass ratio, based on the mass estimates derived from the millimeter continuum emission, is used as a tracer of the high-mass star formation rate in GMC cores. The magnitude of errors involved in using millimeter continuum emission for determining the core mass is estimated through radiative transfer modeling. It is inferred from the present millimeter data, along with previously published far-infrared data, that the Sgr C and D cores are very similar in terms of mean dust optical depth and temperature. The luminosity-to-mass ratios derived for the Sgr C and D cores are found to be consistent with those of typical disk GMC cores with comparable far-infrared luminosities.

  7. Dynamics of molecular clouds: observations, simulations, and NIF experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave O.; Martinez, David A.; Pound, Marc W.; Heeter, Robert F.; Casner, Alexis; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2015-02-01

    For over fifteen years astronomers at the University of Maryland and theorists and experimentalists at LLNL have investigated the origin and dynamics of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula, and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds. Eagle Nebula was selected as one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Science programs, and has been awarded four NIF shots to study the cometary model of pillar formation. These experiments require a long-duration drive, 30 ns or longer, to drive deeply nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. The NIF shots will feature a new long-duration x-ray source prototyped at the Omega EP laser, in which multiple hohlraums are driven with UV light in series for 10 ns each and reradiate the energy as an extended x-ray pulse. The new source will be used to illuminate a science package with directional radiation mimicking a cluster of stars. The scaled Omega EP shots tested whether a multi-hohlraum concept is viable — whether earlier time hohlraums would degrade later time hohlraums by preheat or by ejecting ablated plumes that would deflect the later beams. The Omega EP shots illuminated three 2.8 mm long by 1.4 mm diameter Cu hohlraums for 10 ns each with 4.3 kJ per hohlraum. At NIF each hohlraum will be 4 mm long by 3 mm in diameter and will be driven with 80 kJ per hohlraum.

  8. Comparing simulated emission from molecular clouds using experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremi, Miayan; Flynn, Mallory; Loeppky, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik; Offner, Stella

    2014-03-10

    We propose a new approach to comparing simulated observations that enables us to determine the significance of the underlying physical effects. We utilize the methodology of experimental design, a subfield of statistical analysis, to establish a framework for comparing simulated position-position-velocity data cubes to each other. We propose three similarity metrics based on methods described in the literature: principal component analysis, the spectral correlation function, and the Cramer multi-variate two-sample similarity statistic. Using these metrics, we intercompare a suite of mock observational data of molecular clouds generated from magnetohydrodynamic simulations with varying physical conditions. Using this framework, we show that all three metrics are sensitive to changing Mach number and temperature in the simulation sets, but cannot detect changes in magnetic field strength and initial velocity spectrum. We highlight the shortcomings of one-factor-at-a-time designs commonly used in astrophysics and propose fractional factorial designs as a means to rigorously examine the effects of changing physical properties while minimizing the investment of computational resources.

  9. Supernova Driving. I. The Origin of Molecular Cloud Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padoan, Paolo; Pan, Liubin; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2016-05-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in molecular clouds (MCs), but its origin is still unclear because MCs are usually assumed to live longer than the turbulence dissipation time. Interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence is likely driven by supernova (SN) explosions, but it has never been demonstrated that SN explosions can establish and maintain a turbulent cascade inside MCs consistent with the observations. In this work, we carry out a simulation of SN-driven turbulence in a volume of (250 pc)3, specifically designed to test if SN driving alone can be responsible for the observed turbulence inside MCs. We find that SN driving establishes a velocity scaling consistent with the usual scaling laws of supersonic turbulence, suggesting that previous idealized simulations of MC turbulence, driven with a random, large-scale volume force, were correctly adopted as appropriate models for MC turbulence, despite the artificial driving. We also find that the same scaling laws extend to the interiors of MCs, and that the velocity-size relation of the MCs selected from our simulation is consistent with that of MCs from the Outer-Galaxy Survey, the largest MC sample available. The mass-size relation and the mass and size probability distributions also compare successfully with those of the Outer Galaxy Survey. Finally, we show that MC turbulence is super-Alfvénic with respect to both the mean and rms magnetic-field strength. We conclude that MC structure and dynamics are the natural result of SN-driven turbulence.

  10. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko S.

    2015-08-01

    Young massive clusters are as young as open clusters but more massive and compact compared with typical open clusters. The formation process of young massive clusters is still unclear, and it is an open question whether the formation process is the same for typical open clusters or not. We perform a series of N-body simulations starting from initial conditions constructed from the results of hydrodynamical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds. In our simulations, both open clusters and young massive clusters form when we assume a density-dependent star-formation efficiency. We find that a local star-formation efficiency higher than 50% is necessary for the formation of young massive clusters, but open clusters form from less dense regions with a local star formation efficiency of < 50%. We confirm that the young massive clusters formed in our simulations have mass, size, and density profile similar to those of observed young massive clusters such as NGC 3603 and Trumpler 14. We also find that these simulated clusters evolve via hierarchical mergers of sub-clusters within a few mega years, as is suggested by recent simulations and observations. Although we do not assume initial mass segregation, we observe that the simulated massive clusters show a shallower slope of the mass function (Γ ˜ -1) in the cluster center compared to that of the entire cluster (Γ ˜ -1.3). These values are consistent with those of some young massive clusters in the Milky Way such as Westerlund 1 and Arches.

  11. The largest molecular cloud complexes in the first galactic quadrant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Cohen, R. S.; Thaddeus, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Columbia CO survey of the first Galactic quadrant was used to determine the locations and physical properties of the largest molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy. Within the range of the survey (l = 12-60 deg), 26 complexes were detected with masses greater than 5 x 10 to the 5th solar masses, and roughly several hundred such complexes are deduced to exist throughout the Galaxy within the solar circle. These complexes are the parent objects of much of the Population I in the Galaxy. Distances to most of the complexes were determined kinematically, the distance ambiguity being resolved with the aid of associated H II regions, OB associations, masers, and other early Population I objects. The largest complexes are good tracers of spiral structure, the Sagittarius arm in particular being delineated with unprecedented clarity. A total of 17 large complexes are distributed rather uniformly along a 15 kpc stretch of the arm with a spacing comparable to that of the strings of regularly spaced H Ii regions observed in external galaxies. Power-law relations exist between the line widths and sizes of the complexes and between their densities and sizes. The forms of these relations are in good agreement with those found previously and are extended by roughly an order of magnitude in cloud mass.

  12. Contraction Signatures toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δv, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δv and collapse model results, we find that δv is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s-1) to supersonic (0.4 km s-1), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/MJ > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/MJ, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  13. CONTRACTION SIGNATURES TOWARD DENSE CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Pineda, J. E.; Kauffmann, J.

    2016-03-10

    We report the results of an HCO{sup +} (3–2) and N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3–2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO{sup +} asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δ{sub v}, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO{sup +} profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δ{sub v} and collapse model results, we find that δ{sub v} is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s{sup −1}) to supersonic (0.4 km s{sup −1}), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/M{sub J} > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/M{sub J}, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  14. Molecular Clouds and OB Association in the Sco-Cen-Lup Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachihara, K.; Neuhäuser, R.; Toyoda, S.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Fukui, Y.

    With the NANTEN radio telescope, we have surveyed more than 500 deg2 around the Scorpius-Centaurus-Lupus region in 12CO, and the molecular gas distribution has been revealed. Total mass of ~ 104 Msolar and ~ 100 of small clouds have been detected as the Lupus cloud complex. There are two subgroups of Sco OB2 association, Upper-Sco and Upper-Cen-Lup (e.g., de Geus 1989), and many star-forming scenarios controlled by the OB association are suggested (e.g., de Geus 1992). In the association, a large number of coexisting T Tauri stars (TTSs) have been found with the ROSAT All Sky Survey (Krautter et al. 1997; Wichmann et al. 1997; Preibisch et al. 1999). On the other hand, active cluster formation is taking place in ρ Oph cloud core and Lupus 3 (Tachihara et al. 1996; 2000). In order to understand the star-formation history and the effect of OB association on cloud formation and dissipation, we investigate the distribution of the TTSs, molecular clouds, and OB stars. The distribution of the OB stars and the molecular clouds show clear anti-correlation. On the other hand, considerable fractions of the TTSs distribute away from the molecular clouds (so-called ``isolated TTSs''). These suggest that molecular clouds have been dissipated quickly due to the OB stars. On the other hand, there is an expanding HI shell centered in Upper-Sco, and the Lupus cloud complex exists between the shell and the Upper-Cen-Lup. The young star clusters are located at the edge of the shell, which suggests triggered star formation. Molecular clouds and star-formation seem to be affected strongly by the present OB stars and the past supernova explosion.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M33 molecular clouds and young stellar clusters (Corbelli+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbelli, E.; Braine, J.; Bandiera, R.; Brouillet, N.; Combes, F.; Druard, C.; Gratier, P.; Mata, J.; Schuster, K.; Xilouris, M.; Palla, F.

    2017-04-01

    Table 5 : Physical parameters for the 566 molecular clouds identified through the IRAM 30m CO J=2-1 survey of the star forming disk of M33. For each cloud the cloud type and the following properties are listed: celestial coordinates, galactocentric radius, cloud deconvolved effective radius and its uncertainty, CO(2-1) line velocity dispersion from CPROPS and its uncertainty, line velocity dispersion from a Gaussian fit, CO luminous mass and its uncertainty, and virial mass from a Gaussian fit. In the last column the identification number of the young stellar cluster candidates associated with the molecular cloud are listed. Notes: We identify up to four young stellar cluster candidates (YSCCs) associated with each molecular cloud and we list them according to the identification number of Sharma et al. (2011, Cat. J/A+A/545/A96) given also in Table 6. Table 6 : Physical parameters for the 630 young stellar cluster candidates identified via their mid-infrared emission in the star forming disk of M33. For each YSCC we list the type of source, the identified number of the molecular clouds associated with it (if any) and the corresponding cloud classes. In addition, for each YSCC we give the celestial coordinates, the bolometric, total infrared, FUV and Halpha luminosities, the estimated mass and age, the visual extinction, the galactocentric radius, the source size, and its flux at 24μm. (2 data files).

  16. MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION FROM THE BOUNDARIES OF THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Li Di; Langer, William D.

    2010-06-01

    We report Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the four lowest rotational transitions of H{sub 2} in three portions of the boundary of the Taurus molecular cloud. Emission in the two lowest transitions, S(0) and S(1), was detected in almost all pointing directions, while the S(2) and S(3) lines were marginally detected only after further averaging of data. The widespread detection of lines coming from levels 510 K and 1016 K above the molecular ground state is indicative of gas at a temperature of at least 200 K containing column densities (1-5) x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} of H{sub 2}. For the region with the simplest geometry, we have used the Meudon PDR code to model the chemistry, radiative transfer, and excitation of molecular hydrogen. We conclude that models with acceptable values of the UV interstellar radiation field can reproduce the amount of H{sub 2} in the lowest excited state, but cannot account for the degree of excitation of the H{sub 2}. The unexpectedly high degree of excitation of the H{sub 2} in the boundary layer of a molecular cloud, which cannot be explained by the presence of stellar sources, points to an enhanced heating rate which may be the result of, e.g., dissipation of turbulence. We have in one boundary region been able to obtain the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) for H{sub 2}, which by modeling and possible detection of the S(2) and S(3) lines has a range 1.0 {>=} OPR {>=} 0.15, although this result must be treated with caution. The fact that the ortho-to-para ratio is lower than that expected for equilibrium at the gas kinetic temperature may be indicative of circulation of material from cold, purely molecular regions into the boundary layer, possibly due to turbulent diffusion. The explanation of these data may thus be suggestive of processes that are having a significant effect on the structure and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation that takes place within them.

  17. Magnetic field dissipation and contraction of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takenori; Nishi, Ryoichi; Umebayashi, Toyoharu

    The magnetic flux phi of a cloud or a cloud core is 0.1 to one times the critical flux phicr which is proportional to its mass M. The phi/M (or equivalently phi/phicr) ratio for a cloud or a cloud core is several hundred to 105 times greater than the ratio for magnetic stars with mean surface field of one to 30 kG. The dissipation of magnetic fields in clouds is complicated because they contain various kinds of charged particles (electrons, ions, and grains) whose degree of freezing to field lines vary widely and whose relative abundance changes drastically as the cloud contracts. With a quite general formalism applicable to such wide range of physical situation, the field dissipation in clouds containing ice-mantled grains were investigated, and existence of a decoupling density ndec with the flux loss time tB is less than the free-fall time tf only at the cloud density nH less than ndec or tB approximately equals (10 - 500)tf(phicr/phi) 2 at nH much less than ndec at least for phi approximately equal (1 - 0.1) phicr was found. The value of ndec depends rather sensitively on the grain model and the minimum value found is four times 109 cu cm including the cases of grains without ice mantles.

  18. On the origin of the Orion and Monoceros molecular cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed model for the origin of the Orion and Monoceros cloud complexes is presented, showing that a single high-velocity H I cloud-galaxy collision can explain their main observed features. The collision generates massive shocked layers, and self-gravity can then provide the conditions for the transformation of these layers into molecular clouds. The clouds formed by the collision maintain the motion of their parental shocked gas and reach positions located far away from the plane. According to this model, both the Orion and Monoceros complexes were formed some 60 million yr ago, when the original shocked layer was fragmented by Galactic tidal forces.

  19. On the origin of the Orion and Monoceros molecular cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed model for the origin of the Orion and Monoceros cloud complexes is presented, showing that a single high-velocity H I cloud-galaxy collision can explain their main observed features. The collision generates massive shocked layers, and self-gravity can then provide the conditions for the transformation of these layers into molecular clouds. The clouds formed by the collision maintain the motion of their parental shocked gas and reach positions located far away from the plane. According to this model, both the Orion and Monoceros complexes were formed some 60 million yr ago, when the original shocked layer was fragmented by Galactic tidal forces.

  20. Star Formation in the Molecular Cloud Associated with the Monkey Head Nebula: Sequential or Spontaneous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, J. O.; Imura, K.; Omodaka, T.; Handa, T.; Nagayama, T.; Fujisawa, K.; Sunada, K.; Nakano, M.; Kamezaki, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2013-03-01

    We mapped the NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with 1'.6 angular resolution using Kashima 34 m telescope. Its kinetic temperature distribution was contrary to what is expected for a molecular cloud at the edge of an expanding H II region and suggested that the massive star associated with S252A compact HII region formed spontaneously rather than through a sequential process.

  1. Theory of Molecular Cloud Formation through Colliding Flows: Successes and Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, P.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the recent efforts which have been made to understand the formation of molecular clouds through the accumulation of diffuse material, a scenario sometimes called “colliding flows”. We present a set of statistics which have been inferred from these simulations and which seem to agree reasonably with observations seemingly suggesting that this scenario could indeed be applied to understand molecular cloud formation. We also emphasize the limits of this highly idealized model.

  2. The roles of stellar feedback and galactic environment in star-forming molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Raposo, Ramon; Dobbs, Clare; Agertz, Oscar; Alig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from massive stars is thought to play an important role in the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, we analyse the effects of stellar winds and supernovae (SNe) in the evolution of two massive (˜106 M⊙) giant molecular clouds: one gravitationally bound collapsing cloud and one unbound cloud undergoing disruption by galactic shear. These two clouds have been extracted from a large-scale galaxy model and are re-simulated at a spatial resolution of ˜0.01 pc, including feedback from winds, SNe, and the combined effect of both. We find that stellar winds stop accretion of gas on to sink particles, and can also trigger star formation in the shells formed by the winds, although the overall effect is to reduce the global star formation rate of both clouds. Furthermore, we observe that winds tend to escape through the corridors of diffuse gas. The effect of SNe is not so prominent and the star formation rate is similar to models neglecting stellar feedback. We find that most of the energy injected by the SNe is radiated away, but overdense areas are created by multiple and concurrent SN events especially in the most virialized cloud. Our results suggest that the impact of stellar feedback is sensitive to the morphology of star-forming clouds, which is set by large-scale galactic flows, being of greater importance in clouds undergoing gravitational collapse.

  3. A large catalog of accurate distances to molecular clouds from PS1 photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafly, E. F.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Green, G.; Finkbeiner, D. P.; Bell, E. F.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    Distance measurements to molecular clouds are important but are often made separately for each cloud of interest, employing very different data and techniques. We present a large, homogeneous catalog of distances to molecular clouds, most of which are of unprecedented accuracy. We determine distances using optical photometry of stars along lines of sight toward these clouds, obtained from PanSTARRS-1. We simultaneously infer the reddenings and distances to these stars, tracking the full probability distribution function using a technique presented in Green et al. We fit these star-by-star measurements using a simple dust screen model to find the distance to each cloud. We thus estimate the distances to almost all of the clouds in the Magnani et al. catalog, as well as many other well-studied clouds, including Orion, Perseus, Taurus, Cepheus, Polaris, California, and Monoceros R2, avoiding only the inner Galaxy. Typical statistical uncertainties in the distances are 5%, though the systematic uncertainty stemming from the quality of our stellar models is about 10%. The resulting catalog is the largest catalog of accurate, directly measured distances to molecular clouds. Our distance estimates are generally consistent with available distance estimates from the literature, though in some cases the literature estimates are off by a factor of more than two.

  4. Distance to the High-Latitude Molecular Cloud MBM 37 (LDN 183)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Richard P.; Janusz, Robert; Straizys, Vytautas; Corbally, Christopher J.; Munari, Ulisse; Andersson, B.-G.; Zdanavicius, Justas; Maskoliunas, Marius; Kazlauskas, Algirdas

    2017-01-01

    The molecular cloud MBM 37 and the corresponding dust cloud LDN 183 belong to a group of high-latitude clouds near the Serpens Caput and Libra border at b = +36 deg. We determined the distance to this cloud applying the extinction Av vs. distance diagram based on two-dimensional photometric classification of about 800 stars down to V = 15 mag and about 200 stars down to V = 19 mag observed in the Vilnius seven-color system. Additionally, for the stars brighter than V = 12 mag MK types were determined spectroscopically. Distances for part of them, located nearer than 500 pc, were calculated from the Gaia parallaxes. The distance to MBM 37 is found to be at 90 pc placing it among the dust and molecular clouds closest to the Sun.

  5. An unbiased survey for dense cores in the Lynds 1630 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Elizabeth A.; Bally, John; Stark, Antony A.

    1991-01-01

    An unbiased, systematic survey for dense cores within the L1630 (Orion B) molecular cloud has been completed. This survey provides the first complete census of dense (n greater tha 10,000/cu cm) cores within a molecular cloud. To identify the dense gas, 3.6 square degrees of the L1630 cloud were surveyed in the J = 2-1 transition of CS. CS emission was detected over 10 percent of the area surveyed, and this emission is not uniformly distributed throughout the cloud but is confined to 42 dense cores. The size, shape, velocity dispersion, and mass of these cores are examined. Comparison of the mass contained within dense cores with the total gas mass within the surveyed region, estimated from CO emission, reveals that the dense cores constitute only a small fraction (not greater than 19 percent) of the total cloud mass.

  6. A Herschel-SPIRE Survey of the MonR2 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Riwaj; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Ali, Babar; Megeath, S. Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Myers, Philip C.; Fischer, William J.; Henning, Thomas; Wolk, Scott J.; Allen, Lori; Tobin, John J.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new survey of the MonR2 giant molecular cloud with SPIRE on the Herschel Space Observatory. We cross-calibrated SPIRE data with Planck-HFI and accounted for its absolute offset and zero point correction. We fixed emissivity with the help of flux-error and flux ratio plots. As the best representation of cold dusty molecular clouds, we did greybody fits of the SEDs. We studied the nature of distribution of column densities above and below certain critical limit, followed by the mass and temperature distributions for different regions. We isolated the filaments and studied radial column density profile in this cloud.

  7. The dynamics of charged dust in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunseok; Hopkins, Philip F.; Squire, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    We study the dynamics of large, charged dust grains in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Massive dust grains behave as aerodynamic particles in primarily neutral dense gas, and thus are able to produce dramatic small-scale fluctuations in the dust-to-gas ratio. Hopkins & Lee directly simulated the dynamics of neutral dust grains in supersonic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, typical of GMCs, and showed that the dust-to-gas fluctuations can exceed factor ∼1000 on small scales, with important implications for star formation, stellar abundances and dust behaviour and growth. However, even in primarily neutral gas in GMCs, dust grains are negatively charged and Lorentz forces are non-negligible. Therefore, we extend our previous study by including the effects of Lorentz forces on charged grains (in addition to drag). For small-charged grains (sizes ≪ 0.1 μm), Lorentz forces suppress dust-to-gas ratio fluctuations, while for large grains (sizes ≳ 1 μm), Lorentz forces have essentially no effect, trends that are well explained with a simple theory of dust magnetization. In some special intermediate cases, Lorentz forces can enhance dust-gas segregation. Regardless, for the physically expected scaling of dust charge with grain size, we find the most important effects depend on grain size (via the drag equation) with Lorentz forces/charge as a second-order correction. We show that the dynamics we consider are determined by three dimensionless numbers in the limit of weak background magnetic fields: the turbulent Mach number, a dust drag parameter (proportional to grain size) and a dust Lorentz parameter (proportional to grain charge); these allow us to generalize our simulations to a wide range of conditions.

  8. The Density and Molecular Column Density Structure of Three Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee George

    Multi-transition studies using CS, C('34)S, and H(,2)CO are presented for the dense cores in the molecular clouds M17, S140, and NGC 2024. The typical peak density derived for these cores is -10('6) cm('-3), much larger than the average density in molecular clouds, but the gas density is not strongly correlated with the line intensities within the core itself. A map of line intensity appears to be a map of molecular column density whereas the gas density is evident in the ratios of intensities of different lines. Although the data do not have the spatial resolution to directly "see" clumps in the core, statistical equilibrium modeling of the data does provide evidence for an inhomogeneous distribution of the dense gas within the telescope beam. Many aspects of the data can best be explained by a model in which the gas with density > 10('5) cm('-3) is distributed in numerous small (< 1 are minmute) clumps. In the context of this model, the molecular column density structure of the core is caused by a decrease in the number density of clumps with increasing radial distance from the center of the core. The large number of observed transitions in the three molecules also allows us to evaluate the effectiveness of the individual molecules as density probes. We find that the gas densities derived from CS, C('34)S, and H(,2)CO are in reasonable agreement and present guidelines for future use of these molecules as density probes.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of mechanical stellar feedback in a sheet-like molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2017-03-01

    We have used the adaptive-mesh-refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity of stellar feedback in a sheet-like molecular cloud formed through the action of the thermal instability. We simulate the interaction of the mechanical energy input from a 15 star and a 40 M⊙ star into a 100 pc-diameter 17 000 M⊙ cloud with a corrugated sheet morphology that in projection appears filamentary. The stellar winds are introduced using appropriate Geneva stellar evolution models. In the 15 M⊙ star case, the wind forms a narrow bipolar cavity with minimal effect on the parent cloud. In the 40 M⊙ star case, the more powerful stellar wind creates a large cylindrical cavity through the centre of the cloud. After 12.5 and 4.97 Myr, respectively, the massive stars explode as supernovae (SNe). In the 15 M⊙ star case, the SN material and energy is primarily deposited into the molecular cloud surroundings over ∼105 yr before the SN remnant escapes the cloud. In the 40 M⊙ star case, a significant fraction of the SN material and energy rapidly escapes the molecular cloud along the wind cavity in a few tens of kiloyears. Both SN events compress the molecular cloud material around them to higher densities (so may trigger further star formation), and strengthen the magnetic field, typically by factors of 2-3 but up to a factor of 10. Our simulations are relevant to observations of bubbles in flattened ring-like molecular clouds and bipolar H II regions.

  10. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. III. Probability distribution functions of molecular lines in Cygnus X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Ossenkopf, V.; Klessen, R. S.; Simon, R.; Fechtenbaum, S.; Herpin, F.; Tremblin, P.; Csengeri, T.; Myers, P. C.; Hill, T.; Cunningham, M.; Federrath, C.

    2016-03-01

    The probability distribution function of column density (N-PDF) serves as a powerful tool to characterise the various physical processes that influence the structure of molecular clouds. Studies that use extinction maps or H2 column-density maps (N) that are derived from dust show that star-forming clouds can best be characterised by lognormal PDFs for the lower N range and a power-law tail for higher N, which is commonly attributed to turbulence and self-gravity and/or pressure, respectively. While PDFs from dust cover a large dynamic range (typically N ~ 1020-24 cm-2 or Av~ 0.1-1000), PDFs obtained from molecular lines - converted into H2 column density - potentially trace more selectively different regimes of (column) densities and temperatures. They also enable us to distinguish different clouds along the line of sight through using the velocity information. We report here on PDFs that were obtained from observations of 12CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, and N2H+ in the Cygnus X North region, and make a comparison to a PDF that was derived from dust observations with the Herschel satellite. The PDF of 12CO is lognormal for Av ~ 1-30, but is cut for higher Av because of optical depth effects. The PDFs of C18O and 13CO are mostly lognormal up to Av ~ 1-15, followed by excess up to Av ~ 40. Above that value, all CO PDFs drop, which is most likely due to depletion. The high density tracers CS and N2H+ exhibit only a power law distribution between Av ~ 15 and 400, respectively. The PDF from dust is lognormal for Av ~ 3-15 and has a power-law tail up to Av ~ 500. Absolute values for the molecular line column densities are, however, rather uncertain because of abundance and excitation temperature variations. If we take the dust PDF at face value, we "calibrate" the molecular line PDF of CS to that of the dust and determine an abundance [CS]/[H2] of 10-9. The slopes of the power-law tails of the CS, N2H+, and dust PDFs are -1.6, -1.4, and -2.3, respectively, and are thus consistent

  11. Warm neutral halos around molecular clouds. II - H I and CO (J = 1-0) observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, Peter G.; Lichten, Steven M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Morris, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Observational data are presented relating to the boundary regions between dense, molecular clouds and the more diffuse atomic gas. The data set consists of H I 21 cm and CO (J = 1-0) strip maps in 14 molecular clouds which traverse 62 known CO cloud boundaries. The angular lengths of the strips range from 0.5 deg to several degrees of arc, which is generally adequate to eliminate confusion with background (and foreground) H I. Most of the crossed boundaries (49 of 62) show clear evidence for the presence of H I emission maxima, or halos, lying outside the molecular clouds' gas. There is also general evidence for limb brightening in the CO emission.

  12. On the virial theorem for turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian, rather than Lagrangian, form of the virial theorem is derived for a turbulent, magnetized cloud embedded in a steady, turbulent, low-density intercloud medium. The role of turbulent pressure in cloud confinement is clarified, and it is shown that, in the absence of a magnetic field, a cloud can be at a somewhat lower pressure than the intercloud medium. Simple forms for the magnetic term in the virial equation are obtained. Radiation pressure is considered; its effects are relatively small under average conditions in the interstellar medium. Under typical conditions, external pressure and magnetic fields are shown to have a relatively small effect on virial estimates of the mass of self-gravitating clouds.

  13. On the virial theorem for turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian, rather than Lagrangian, form of the virial theorem is derived for a turbulent, magnetized cloud embedded in a steady, turbulent, low-density intercloud medium. The role of turbulent pressure in cloud confinement is clarified, and it is shown that, in the absence of a magnetic field, a cloud can be at a somewhat lower pressure than the intercloud medium. Simple forms for the magnetic term in the virial equation are obtained. Radiation pressure is considered; its effects are relatively small under average conditions in the interstellar medium. Under typical conditions, external pressure and magnetic fields are shown to have a relatively small effect on virial estimates of the mass of self-gravitating clouds.

  14. Quiescent Prominence Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong; Lin, Lupin C. C.

    1999-06-01

    With a new analytical method, we present a static model for quiescent solar prominences of inverse polarity. These prominences have a plasma β slightly below unity and correspond to those located in the lower corona. Although this static model cannot address the helmet-like features at the top of the prominences, which are believed to be associated with the open-field topology and driven by outflows, the model may nevertheless capture several characteristic features of the solar prominences. These features include the sheetlike gas condensation hanging above an asymptotically weak magnetic cusp, the sheared magnetic arcades/loops, the coronal cavity, radio dark strips cospatial with the Hα filaments, bright radio ribbons located on both sides of the dense prominence sheet, and the increasing magnetic field strength with height along the prominence sheet. In our model, the densest gas is contained within a narrow field-free tube immediately above the prominence sheet. Thermally insulated by the surrounding strong fields, this narrow tube may be a natural site for housing the cool gas (>=104 K) siphoned from the lower solar atmosphere. We also find that there are hot spots (<=107 K) located on the sides of the prominence loop, which might be the source of thermal X-ray emission in the quiet Sun.

  15. Molecular clouds associated with luminous far-infrared sources in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, John M.; Snell, Ronald L.; Schloerb, F. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The stellar content and physical properties of the molecular clouds associated with 21 bright far-IR sources in the outer Galaxy have been determined through C-12O, C-13O, 6-cm radio continuum, and IRAS observations. The molecular cloud masses range from 200 to about 10,000 solar masses. The far-IR luminosity-to-mass ratio for these clouds has a mean value of 6.8 solar luminosity/solar masses and shows no correlation with the cloud mass, a result similar to that found for more massive clouds in the inner Galaxy. The radio continuum survey of the 21 bright far-IR sources indicates that most of these regions probably have a single, massive star providing most of the ionization. The cloud masses derived from virial and LTE analyses are in agreement, supporting the assumptions commonly made in their calculations, and a tight, near-linear correlation is found between the C-12O luminosity and the cloud mass. The H2 column density and integrated C-12O intensity are also correlated on a point-by-point basis, although the scatter is larger than the C-12O luminosity-cloud mass relation.

  16. THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN A PRE-SUPER STAR CLUSTER MOLECULAR CLOUD IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K. E.; Indebetouw, R.; Evans, A. S.; Leroy, A. K.; Brogan, C. L.; Hibbard, J.; Sheth, K.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2015-06-10

    We present an analysis of the physical conditions in an extreme molecular cloud in the Antennae merging galaxies. This cloud has properties consistant with those required to form a globular cluster. We have obtained ALMA CO and 870 μm observations of the Antennae galaxy system with ∼0.″5 resolution. This cloud stands out in the data with a radius of ≲24 pc and mass of >5 × 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}. The cloud appears capable of forming a globular cluster, but the lack of associated thermal radio emission indicates that star formation has not yet altered the environment. The lack of thermal radio emission places the cloud in an early stage of evolution, which we expect to be short-lived (≲1 Myr) and thus rare. Given its mass and kinetic energy, for the cloud to be confined (as its appearance strongly suggests) it must be subject to an external pressure of P/k{sub B} ≳ 10{sup 8} K cm{sup −3}–10,000 times higher than typical interstellar pressure. This would support theories that high pressures are required to form globular clusters and may explain why extreme environments like the Antennae are preferred environments for generating such objects. Given the cloud temperature of ∼25 K, the internal pressure must be dominated by non-thermal processes, most likely turbulence. We expect the molecular cloud to collapse and begin star formation in ≲1 Myr.

  17. Fragmentation of Filamentary Molecular Clouds Threaded by Perpendicular Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Kudoh, Takahiro; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2017-01-01

    Filamentary clouds are ubiquitously seen in the star forming regions and the fragmentation of them are thought to result in star formation. Some of them are threaded by magnetic field parallel to the cloud axis and some others are thread by perpendicular ones. The effects of the parallel magnetic field on fragmentation have been studied well. However we know little about the effects of the perpendicular magnetic field on fragmentation. A strong perpendicular magnetic field is likely to suspend the fragmentation. In order to assess this effect, we have performed a linear stability analysis of an isothermal filamentary cloud while taking account of a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the cloud axis. We have used the ideal MHD approximation in the stability analysis for simplicity. Then the analysis is formulated to be an eigenvalue problem in which each eigenmode has either a real frequency (stable) or a pure imaginary one (unstable). The growth rate of the instability as well as the eigenmode is obtained numerically as a function of the wavelength and magnetic field strength.The magnetic field suppresses gas motion perpendicular to it. Accordingly, the growth rate of an unstable eigenmode decreases monotonically as the magnetic field is strengthened. The wavelength of the most unstable mode is slightly increased by the magnetic field. When the plasma beta at the cloud center is slightly below 2, the fragmentation instability is completely suppressed. When the unstable mode is excited, only the magnetic field lines that thread the high region near the cloud axis move appreciably. We compare our analysis with those for magnetized sheet-like clouds.

  18. Isotopic evidence for primordial molecular cloud material in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites.

    PubMed

    Van Kooten, Elishevah M M E; Wielandt, Daniel; Schiller, Martin; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Thomen, Aurélien; Larsen, Kirsten K; Olsen, Mia B; Nordlund, Åke; Krot, Alexander N; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-02-23

    The short-lived (26)Al radionuclide is thought to have been admixed into the initially (26)Al-poor protosolar molecular cloud before or contemporaneously with its collapse. Bulk inner Solar System reservoirs record positively correlated variability in mass-independent (54)Cr and (26)Mg*, the decay product of (26)Al. This correlation is interpreted as reflecting progressive thermal processing of in-falling (26)Al-rich molecular cloud material in the inner Solar System. The thermally unprocessed molecular cloud matter reflecting the nucleosynthetic makeup of the molecular cloud before the last addition of stellar-derived (26)Al has not been identified yet but may be preserved in planetesimals that accreted in the outer Solar System. We show that metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites and their components have a unique isotopic signature extending from an inner Solar System composition toward a (26)Mg*-depleted and (54)Cr-enriched component. This composition is consistent with that expected for thermally unprocessed primordial molecular cloud material before its pollution by stellar-derived (26)Al. The (26)Mg* and (54)Cr compositions of bulk metal-rich chondrites require significant amounts (25-50%) of primordial molecular cloud matter in their precursor material. Given that such high fractions of primordial molecular cloud material are expected to survive only in the outer Solar System, we infer that, similarly to cometary bodies, metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites are samples of planetesimals that accreted beyond the orbits of the gas giants. The lack of evidence for this material in other chondrite groups requires isolation from the outer Solar System, possibly by the opening of disk gaps from the early formation of gas giants.

  19. Isotopic evidence for primordial molecular cloud material in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites

    PubMed Central

    Van Kooten, Elishevah M. M. E.; Wielandt, Daniel; Schiller, Martin; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Thomen, Aurélien; Olsen, Mia B.; Nordlund, Åke; Krot, Alexander N.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The short-lived 26Al radionuclide is thought to have been admixed into the initially 26Al-poor protosolar molecular cloud before or contemporaneously with its collapse. Bulk inner Solar System reservoirs record positively correlated variability in mass-independent 54Cr and 26Mg*, the decay product of 26Al. This correlation is interpreted as reflecting progressive thermal processing of in-falling 26Al-rich molecular cloud material in the inner Solar System. The thermally unprocessed molecular cloud matter reflecting the nucleosynthetic makeup of the molecular cloud before the last addition of stellar-derived 26Al has not been identified yet but may be preserved in planetesimals that accreted in the outer Solar System. We show that metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites and their components have a unique isotopic signature extending from an inner Solar System composition toward a 26Mg*-depleted and 54Cr-enriched component. This composition is consistent with that expected for thermally unprocessed primordial molecular cloud material before its pollution by stellar-derived 26Al. The 26Mg* and 54Cr compositions of bulk metal-rich chondrites require significant amounts (25–50%) of primordial molecular cloud matter in their precursor material. Given that such high fractions of primordial molecular cloud material are expected to survive only in the outer Solar System, we infer that, similarly to cometary bodies, metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites are samples of planetesimals that accreted beyond the orbits of the gas giants. The lack of evidence for this material in other chondrite groups requires isolation from the outer Solar System, possibly by the opening of disk gaps from the early formation of gas giants. PMID:26858438

  20. METHANOL IN THE STARLESS CORE, TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Soma, Tatsuya; Sakai, Nami; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    To explore the formation mechanisms of gas phase CH{sub 3}OH in cold starless cores, we have conducted high spectral resolution observations toward the cyanopolyyne peak of Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (TMC-1 CP) with the IRAM 30 m telescope, the Green Bank Telescope, and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The spectral lines of CH{sub 3}OH toward TMC-1 CP are found to have a double-peaked profile separated by 0.5 km s{sup −1}. Since the double-peaked profile is observed for {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH, it is not due to optical depth and/or self-absorption effects. The spectral line profile of CH{sub 3}OH is much different from those of C{sup 34}S, C{sub 3}S, and HC{sub 7}N observed toward this source. The H{sub 2} densities of the emitting region of CH{sub 3}OH for the blueshifted and redshifted components are derived to be (1.7 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} and (4.3 ± 1.2) × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3}, respectively. These densities are similar to or slightly lower than those found for the other molecules. These results suggest a chemical differentiation between CH{sub 3}OH and the other molecules, which has indeed been confirmed by mapping observations of the CH{sub 3}OH and C{sup 34}S lines. These results are consistent with the general idea that CH{sub 3}OH is formed on dust grains and is liberated into the gas phase by non-thermal desorption. The grain-surface origin of CH{sub 3}OH is further confirmed by the CH{sub 3}OH/{sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH ratio. Weak shocks caused by accreting diffuse gas to the TMC-1 filament, photoevaporation caused by cosmic-ray induced UV radiation, and the desorption of excess reaction energy in the formation of CH{sub 3}OH on dust grains are discussed for the desorption mechanisms.

  1. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Our relative closeness to the Orion nebula (about 1,350 light years away from Earth) means that we can study the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud in detail. Visible-light observations of the Orion Bar show that the transition between the hot ionized gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionization front) is spatially well separated from the transition between atomic and molecular gas (the dissociation front), by about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Static equilibrium models used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Orion Bar (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure comprised of dense clumps embedded in a lower-density extended gas component. Here we report one-arcsecond-resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface. In contrast to stationary model predictions, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO+ emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C+/C/CO transition zones are very close. We find a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photoablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. The results suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that is moving into the molecular cloud, demonstrating that dynamical and non-equilibrium effects are important for the cloud evolution.

  2. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-09-08

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Our relative closeness to the Orion nebula (about 1,350 light years away from Earth) means that we can study the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud in detail. Visible-light observations of the Orion Bar show that the transition between the hot ionized gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionization front) is spatially well separated from the transition between atomic and molecular gas (the dissociation front), by about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Static equilibrium models used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Orion Bar (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure comprised of dense clumps embedded in a lower-density extended gas component. Here we report one-arcsecond-resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface. In contrast to stationary model predictions, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO(+) emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition zones are very close. We find a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photoablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. The results suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that is moving into the molecular cloud, demonstrating that dynamical and non-equilibrium effects are important for the cloud evolution.

  3. A simulation of the collapse and fragmentation of cooling molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Joe J.; Lattanzio, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The application of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method to the fragmentation of rotating cloud and disk systems is described, allowing for molecular cooling due to H2 and CO. A novel approach to solving Poisson's equation for disklike structures which exploits the multigrid algorithm is also described. Numerical studies are presented which investigate the evolution of both rotating clouds and Maclaurin disks, in each case with both an isothermal equation of state and with molecular cooling. The results establish the influence of molecular cooling on the fragmentation of molecular clouds. The isothermal sequences, if they fragment at all, do so into far fewer lumps than the cooling sequences. This is not due to a cooling instability as such, but rather to the reduced thermal support. One of the sequences shows a remarkable similarity to the W49A star-forming region.

  4. The heating of interstellar clouds by vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, T. P.; Williams, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility that vibrationally excited H2 may be collisionally de-excited, so providing a heating mechanism for interstellar clouds which operates by coupling the stellar radiation to the gas, is discussed. The majority of excitations in the Lyman and Werner bands of H2 return the molecules to the ground electronic state in a vibrationally excited level, the most favored level being 7. The heating rate obtained in this way is compared with other mechanisms which have been postulated, and the results of calculations of temperature as a function of depth into clouds of different densities are presented. It appears that this mechanism is a significant one, which should be taken into account in detailed models of dense clouds.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Star Formation in Filamentary Dark Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) are believed to be the precursors to star clusters and massive stars (e.g. Bergin & Tafalla 2007). The complex intertwined braid-like structure of IRDCs (e.g. André et al. 2014) poses a challenge to theorists to explain their dynamics and formation. We have performed large-scale adaptive mesh refinement, driven turbulence, MHD simulations to study the structure and formation of IRDCs. Filamentary structure emerges naturally from the simulations. Magnetic field lines pierce the dark cloud filament primarily in the direction normal to the filament axis. The column density profiles of the main features are well fit by the power law as observations have found (e.g. Hill et al. 2011, Arzoumanian et al. 2011). The dark cloud filaments in the simulation resemble the dark cloud SDC13 (Peretto et al. 2014) and the 3D information from the simulation can be used to explain the observed structure and dynamics of SDC13. We have carried out a detailed analysis of the magnetic field properties of the cloud clumps in our simulations (Li et al. 2015), finding good agreement with the Zeeman observations of Crutcher et al. (2010). We then added radiation, zoomed into the main IRDC filament, and continued one of the simulations to study the star formation inside IRDCs. By including radiation feedback and proto-stellar outflows, we obtain a proto-stellar mass function (PMF) for comparison with theoretical PMFs (McKee & Offner 2010) and the Chabrier IMF. In this presentation, we summarize what we have learned about the formation of filamentary IRDCs, their complex braided filamentary structure, the magnetic properties of cloud clumps inside the IRDC filaments, and star formation in the first half of a free fall time of the system.

  6. Probes of turbulent driving mechanisms in molecular clouds from fluctuations in synchrotron intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, C. A.; Federrath, C.; Gaensler, B. M.; Lewis, G. F.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Burkhart, Blakesley

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that star formation depends on the driving of molecular cloud turbulence, and differences in the driving can produce an order of magnitude difference in the star formation rate. The turbulent driving is characterized by the parameter ζ, with ζ = 0 for compressive, curl-free driving (e.g. accretion or supernova explosions), and ζ = 1 for solenoidal, divergence-free driving (e.g. Galactic shear). Here we develop a new method to measure ζ from observations of synchrotron emission from molecular clouds. We calculate statistics of mock synchrotron intensity images produced from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of molecular clouds, in which the driving was controlled to produce different values of ζ. We find that the mean and standard deviation of the log-normalized synchrotron intensity are sensitive to ζ, for values of ζ between 0 (curl-free driving) and 0.5 (naturally mixed driving). We quantify the dependence of zeta on the direction of the magnetic field relative to the line of sight. We provide best-fitting formulae for ζ in terms of the log-normalized mean and standard deviation of synchrotron intensity, with which ζ can be determined for molecular clouds that have similar Alfvénic Mach number to our simulations. These formulae are independent of the sonic Mach number. Signal-to-noise ratios larger than 5, and angular resolutions smaller than 5 per cent of the cloud diameter, are required to apply these formulae. Although there are no firm detections of synchrotron emission from molecular clouds, by combining Green Bank Telescope and Very Large Array observations it should be possible to detect synchrotron emission from molecular clouds, thereby constraining the value of ζ.

  7. The Distance to an X-Ray Shadowing Molecular Cloud in Ursa Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Robert A.; Venn, Kim A.; Hiltgen, Daniel D.; Sneden, Christopher

    1996-06-01

    We have obtained high-resolution optical spectra toward nine stars in the direction of a high-latitude, intermediate-velocity neutral cloud in Ursa Major in order to ascertain the distance to this complex. This cloud is of interest for several reasons. It is an infrared cirrus cloud, shows a distinct X-ray shadow, and turns out to be one of only three molecular clouds known to be well above the plane of the Galaxy. Interstellar Na I absorption is detected in four of the nine stars, but only the most distant star in our sample (BD +63°985) shows absorption at the velocity of the cloud as determined by the 21 cm and CO observations of Heiles, Reach, & Koo. We use several Fe I and Fe II stellar absorption features to determine the spectral type and luminosity class of the three most distant stars. Using the spectral type- absolute magnitude relationship from Schmidt-Kaler, and making no correction for extinction, we derive a distance to the cloud of d = 355±95 pc, which corresponds to z = 285±75 pc. Estimating the effects of extinction, we find that the true value could be as low as d = 240 pc. This distance puts the cloud beyond the expected extent of the Local Bubble of hot (T ≍ 106 K) gas, showing that the X-ray emission behind this cloud arises in the Galactic halo. The cloud has dimensions ˜15 x SO pc, with a total estimated atomic mass of ˜1600 Msun. The molecular mass of the cloud core, G135.3 + 54.5, is ˜0.1 Msun.

  8. The ability of a protostellar disc to fragment and the properties of molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunjian; Li, Min; Yao, Zhen; Mao, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    We explore the ability of a protostellar disc to fragment using an evolutionary disc model. Our disc model includes the mass influx from a molecular cloud core, the irradiation from the central star, the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and the gravitational instability (Kratter et al. in Astrophys. J. 681:375, 2008). We use the fragmentation criterion of Gammie (Astrophys. J. 553:174, 2001) and Rafikov (Astrophys. J. 621:L69, 2005) to judge whether or not a protostellar disc can fragment. We find that there is a link between whether a protostellar disc can fragment and the properties of the molecular cloud cores (angular velocity ω, temperature T_{core}, and mass M_{core}). In the parameter space ω-M_{core}, there is a critical value ω_{crit}, which divides the parameter space into two regions: one is the fragmentation region, the other is the non-fragmentation region. The protostellar disc can only fragment when ω> ω_{crit}. The reason can be understood as follows. The protostellar disc is formed from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core, the properties of the molecular cloud core determine the properties of the protostellar disc. Thus the two categories of protostellar discs correspond to two categories of molecular cloud cores. Moreover, we find that ω_{crit} is approximately a linear function of M_{core} in log-scale coordinates.

  9. Discovery of Molecular and Atomic Clouds Associated with the Magellanic Superbubble 30 Doradus C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, H.; Yamane, Y.; Voisin, F.; Fujii, K.; Yoshiike, S.; Inaba, T.; Tsuge, K.; Babazaki, Y.; Mitsuishi, I.; Yang, R.; Aharonian, F.; Rowell, G.; Filipović, M. D.; Mizuno, N.; Tachihara, K.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-07-01

    We analyzed the 2.6 mm CO and 21 cm H i lines toward the Magellanic superbubble 30 Doradus C, in order to reveal the associated molecular and atomic gas. We uncovered five molecular clouds in a velocity range from 251 to 276 km s-1 toward the western shell. The non-thermal X-rays are clearly enhanced around the molecular clouds on a parsec scale, suggesting possible evidence for magnetic field amplification via shock-cloud interaction. The thermal X-rays are brighter in the eastern shell, where there are no dense molecular or atomic clouds, opposite to the western shell. The TeV γ-ray distribution may spatially match the total interstellar proton column density as well as the non-thermal X-rays. If the hadronic γ-ray is dominant, the total energy of the cosmic-ray protons is at least ˜ 1.2× {10}50 erg with the estimated mean interstellar proton density ˜60 cm-3. In addition, the γ-ray flux associated with the molecular cloud (e.g., MC3) could be detected and resolved by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). This should permit CTA to probe the diffusion of cosmic-rays into the associated dense ISM.

  10. THERMAL INSTABILITY BEHIND A SHOCK WAVE IN H I AND MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Aota, Takuhiro; Aikawa, Yuri; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2013-09-20

    We performed one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with detailed cooling, heating, and chemical processes to examine the thermal stability of shocked gas in cold neutral medium (CNM) and molecular clouds. We find that both CNM and molecular clouds can be thermally unstable in the cooling layer behind the shock wave. The characteristic wavelength of the thermal instability ranges from 10{sup –5} pc to 0.1 pc in the CNM, and from 10{sup –7} pc to 0.1 pc in the molecular clouds. This coincides with the size of observed tiny scale structures in the CNM and molecular clouds, indicating that the thermal instability in the shocked gas could be a formation mechanism of these tiny structures in the interstellar medium. We have also calculated the e-folding number of the thermal instability to estimate the amplification of the density fluctuation in the shocked gas. Density perturbations in the CNM grow by a factor of exp (5) ≅ 150, whereas the perturbations in the molecular clouds grow only by a factor of a few behind a high Mach number shock. The amplification factor is larger at lower densities and higher velocities. Formation of very small scale structures by thermal instability in shocked gas is more effective in lower densities.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN THE MOLECULAR CLOUD ASSOCIATED WITH THE MONKEY HEAD NEBULA: SEQUENTIAL OR SPONTANEOUS?

    SciTech Connect

    Chibueze, James O.; Imura, Kenji; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nakano, Makoto; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    We mapped the (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of NH{sub 3} toward the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with a 1.'6 angular resolution using a Kashima 34 m telescope operated by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The kinetic temperature of the molecular gas is 15-30 K in the eastern part and 30-50 K in the western part. The warmer gas is confined to a small region close to the compact H II region S252A. The cooler gas is extended over the cloud even near the extended H II region, the MHN. We made radio continuum observations at 8.4 GHz using the Yamaguchi 32 m radio telescope. The resultant map shows no significant extension from the H{alpha} image. This means that the molecular cloud is less affected by the MHN, suggesting that the molecular cloud did not form by the expanding shock of the MHN. Although the spatial distribution of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey point sources suggests that triggered low- and intermediate-mass star formation took place locally around S252A, but the exciting star associated with it should be formed spontaneously in the molecular cloud.

  12. Star Formation in the Molecular Cloud Associated with the Monkey Head Nebula: Sequential or Spontaneous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Imura, Kenji; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Fujisawa, Kenta; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Nakano, Makoto; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    We mapped the (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of NH3 toward the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with a 1.'6 angular resolution using a Kashima 34 m telescope operated by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The kinetic temperature of the molecular gas is 15-30 K in the eastern part and 30-50 K in the western part. The warmer gas is confined to a small region close to the compact H II region S252A. The cooler gas is extended over the cloud even near the extended H II region, the MHN. We made radio continuum observations at 8.4 GHz using the Yamaguchi 32 m radio telescope. The resultant map shows no significant extension from the Hα image. This means that the molecular cloud is less affected by the MHN, suggesting that the molecular cloud did not form by the expanding shock of the MHN. Although the spatial distribution of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey point sources suggests that triggered low- and intermediate-mass star formation took place locally around S252A, but the exciting star associated with it should be formed spontaneously in the molecular cloud.

  13. Turbulence and star formation efficiency in molecular clouds: solenoidal versus compressive motions in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orkisz, Jan H.; Pety, Jérôme; Gerin, Maryvonne; Bron, Emeric; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Bardeau, Sébastien; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Gratier, Pierre; Le Petit, Franck; Levrier, François; Liszt, Harvey; Öberg, Karin; Peretto, Nicolas; Roueff, Evelyne; Sievers, Albrecht; Tremblin, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Context. The nature of turbulence in molecular clouds is one of the key parameters that control star formation efficiency: compressive motions, as opposed to solenoidal motions, can trigger the collapse of cores, or mark the expansion of Hii regions. Aims: We try to observationally derive the fractions of momentum density (ρv) contained in the solenoidal and compressive modes of turbulence in the Orion B molecular cloud and relate these fractions to the star formation efficiency in the cloud. Methods: The implementation of a statistical method applied to a 13CO(J = 1-0) datacube obtained with the IRAM-30 m telescope, enables us to retrieve 3-dimensional quantities from the projected quantities provided by the observations, which yields an estimate of the compressive versus solenoidal ratio in various regions of the cloud. Results: Despite the Orion B molecular cloud being highly supersonic (mean Mach number 6), the fractions of motion in each mode diverge significantly from equipartition. The cloud's motions are, on average, mostly solenoidal (excess > 8% with respect to equipartition), which is consistent with its low star formation rate. On the other hand, the motions around the main star forming regions (NGC 2023 and NGC 2024) prove to be strongly compressive. Conclusions: We have successfully applied to observational data a method that has so far only been tested on simulations, and we have shown that there can be a strong intra-cloud variability of the compressive and solenoidal fractions, these fractions being in turn related to the star formation efficiency. This opens a new possibility for star formation diagnostics in galactic molecular clouds. Based on observations carried out at the IRAM-30 m single-dish telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  14. Internal structure of a cold dark molecular cloud inferred from the extinction of background starlight.

    PubMed

    Alves, J F; Lada, C J; Lada, E A

    2001-01-11

    Stars and planets form within dark molecular clouds, but little is understood about the internal structure of these clouds, and consequently about the initial conditions that give rise to star and planet formation. The clouds are primarily composed of molecular hydrogen, which is virtually inaccessible to direct observation. But the clouds also contain dust, which is well mixed with the gas and which has well understood effects on the transmission of light. Here we use sensitive near-infrared measurements of the light from background stars as it is absorbed and scattered by trace amounts of dust to probe the internal structure of the dark cloud Barnard 68 with unprecedented detail. We find the cloud's density structure to be very well described by the equations for a pressure-confined, self-gravitating isothermal sphere that is critically stable according to the Bonnor-Ebert criteria. As a result we can precisely specify the physical conditions inside a dark cloud on the verge of collapse to form a star.

  15. The chemical state of dense interstellar clouds - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Herbst, E.

    1985-01-01

    The currently known interstellar molecules and isotopes are listed, procedures for determining relative chemical abundances in molecular clouds are discussed, and current best estimates for such abundances in regions of differing physical properties are presented. Among the results are a general chemical similarity across a range of density and temperature for quiescent clouds, and some striking differences among regions which are not easily related to such physical parameters and may instead reflect cloud history and evolution. The possibility of constraining chemical models via measurements of relative abundances for the isomeric pairs HNC/HCN, CH3NC/CH3CN, and HOC(+)/HCO(+) is discussed in detail.

  16. Laboratory and modeling studies of chemistry in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Prasad, S. S.; Mitchell, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    A chemical evolutionary model with a large number of species and a large chemical library is used to examine the principal chemical processes in interstellar clouds. Simple chemical equilibrium arguments show the potential for synthesis of very complex organic species by ion-molecule radiative association reactions.

  17. Collapse and Fragmentation Models of Prolate Molecular Cloud Cores. II. Initial Differential Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di G. Sigalotti, Leonardo

    1998-05-01

    The prevalence of companions to pre-main-sequence stars and the emerging observational evidence for binary and multiple protostellar condensations suggest that fragmentation during protostellar collapse is a mechanism that may occur frequently in the star formation process. Here a second-order accurate hydrodynamic code has been used to investigate the gravitational (postmagnetic) collapse and fragmentation of low-mass (~1 M⊙), small (~0.05 pc) molecular cloud cores, starting from moderately centrally condensed (Gaussian), prolate (2:1 and 4:1 axial ratios) configurations with varying thermal energies (α) and degrees of differential rotation (ν = 1/3 and 2/3). To facilitate comparisons with previous collapse calculations of uniformly rotating prolate cloud cores (Sigalotti & Klapp), all the models were made to start with a ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of β ~ 0.036. The results indicate that prolate clouds are highly susceptible to binary fragmentation and that with respect to uniformly rotating initial conditions, differential rotation plays no role in either determining or enhancing fragmentation in initially slowly rotating clouds. In contrast to the fragmentation criteria previously established by Boss and Myhill, the results also indicate that clouds with α = 0.56 and varied prolateness collapse in a similar fashion, producing intermediate central condensations of oblate spheroidal shape before fragmenting into either a binary (2:1 clouds) or multiple protostellar core (4:1 clouds). The models with α <= 0.45 all produced binary systems after having formed intermediate central condensations, which might be of prolate ellipsoidal (2:1 clouds) or narrow cylindrical (4:1 clouds) shape. The mass and separation of the binary fragments increase with decreasing α and with an increase of both the degree of differential rotation and the cloud elongation. The results imply that for initial low β, the degree of cloud prolateness has a greater effect

  18. Can the removal of molecular cloud envelopes by external feedback affect the efficiency of star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, William E.; Bonnell, Ian A.; Forgan, Duncan H.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate how star formation efficiency (SFE) can be significantly decreased by the removal of a molecular cloud's envelope by feedback from an external source. Feedback from star formation has difficulties halting the process in dense gas but can easily remove the less dense and warmer envelopes where star formation does not occur. However, the envelopes can play an important role keeping their host clouds bound by deepening the gravitational potential and providing a constraining pressure boundary. We use numerical simulations to show that removal of the cloud envelopes results in all cases in a fall in the SFE. At 1.38 free-fall times, our 4 pc cloud simulation experienced a drop in the SFE from 16 to 6 per cent, while our 5 pc cloud fell from 27 to 16 per cent. At the same time, our 3 pc cloud (the least bound) fell from an SFE of 5.67 per cent to zero when the envelope was lost. The SFE per free-fall time varied from zero to ≈0.25 according to α, defined to be the ratio of the kinetic plus thermal to gravitational energy, and irrespective of the absolute star-forming mass available. Furthermore, the fall in SFE associated with the loss of the envelope is found to even occur at later times. We conclude that the SFE will always fall should a star-forming cloud lose its envelope due to stellar feedback, with less bound clouds suffering the greatest decrease.

  19. Can the removal of molecular cloud envelopes by external feedback affect the efficiency of star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, William E.; Bonnell, Ian A.; Forgan, Duncan H.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate how star formation efficiency can be significantly decreased by the removal of a molecular cloud's envelope by feedback from an external source. Feedback from star formation has difficulties halting the process in dense gas but can easily remove the less dense and warmer envelopes where star formation does not occur. However, the envelopes can play an important role keeping their host clouds bound by deepening the gravitational potential and providing a constraining pressure boundary. We use numerical simulations to show that removal of the cloud envelopes results in all cases in a fall in the star formation efficiency (SFE). At 1.38 free-fall times our 4 pc cloud simulation experienced a drop in the SFE from 16 to six percent, while our 5 pc cloud fell from 27 to 16 per cent. At the same time, our 3 pc cloud (the least bound) fell from an SFE of 5.67 per cent to zero when the envelope was lost. The star formation efficiency per free-fall time varied from zero to ≈0.25 according to α, defined to be the ratio of the kinetic plus thermal to gravitational energy, and irrespective of the absolute star forming mass available. Furthermore the fall in SFE associated with the loss of the envelope is found to even occur at later times. We conclude that the SFE will always fall should a star forming cloud lose its envelope due to stellar feedback, with less bound clouds suffering the greatest decrease.

  20. THE GLOBAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE ROLE OF ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Matzner, Christopher D.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-09-01

    We present virial models for the global evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Focusing on the presence of an accretion flow and accounting for the amount of mass, momentum, and energy supplied by accretion and star formation feedback, we are able to follow the growth, evolution, and dispersal of individual GMCs. Our model clouds reproduce the scaling relations observed in both galactic and extragalactic clouds. We find that accretion and star formation contribute roughly equal amounts of turbulent kinetic energy over the lifetime of the cloud. Clouds attain virial equilibrium and grow in such a way as to maintain roughly constant surface densities, with typical surface densities of order 50-200 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}, in good agreement with observations of GMCs in the Milky Way and nearby external galaxies. We find that as clouds grow, their velocity dispersion and radius must also increase, implying that the linewidth-size relation constitutes an age sequence. Lastly, we compare our models to observations of GMCs and associated young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud and find good agreement between our model clouds and the observed relationship between H II regions, young star clusters, and GMCs.

  1. Giant Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Non-Grand Design Spiral Galaxy NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, David; Wong, T.; Leroy, A.

    2012-01-01

    Although the internal physical properties of molecular clouds have been extensively studied (Solomon et al. 1987), a more detailed understanding of their origin and evolution in different types of galaxies is needed. In order to disentangle the details of this process, we performed CO(1-0) CARMA observations of the eastern part of the multi-armed galaxy NGC 6946. Although we found no evidence of an angular offset between molecular gas, atomic gas and star formation regions in our observations (Tamburro et al. 2008), we observe a clear radial progression from regions where molecular gas dominates over atomic gas (for r ≤ 2.8 kpc) to regions where the gas becomes mainly atomic (5.6 kpc ≤ r ≤ 7.6 kpc) when azimuthally averaged. In addition, we found that the densest concentrations of molecular gas are located on arms, particularly where they appear to intersect, which is in concordance with the predictions by simulations of the spiral galaxies with an active potential (Clarke & Gittins 2006; Dobbs & Bonnell 2008). At CO(1-0) resolution (140 pc), we were able to find CO emitting complexes with masses greater than those of typical Giant Molecular Clouds (105-106 M⊙). To identify GMCs individually and make a more detailed study of their physical properties, we made D array observations of CO(2-1) toward the densest concentrations of gas, achieving a resolution similar to GMCs sizes found in other galaxies (Bolatto et al. 2008). We present first results about differences in properties of the on-arm clouds and inter-arm clouds. We found that, in general, on-arm clouds present broader line widths, are more massive and more active in star formation than inter-arm clouds. We investigated if the velocity dispersion observed in CO(1-0) emitting complexes reflects velocity differences between unresolved smaller clouds, or if it corresponds to actual internal turbulence of the gas observed.

  2. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar

    PubMed Central

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Owing to the close distance to Orion (about 1,350 light-year), the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud can be studied in detail. Visible-light observations of the Bar1 show that the transition between the hot ionised gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionisation front) is spatially well separated from the transition from atomic to molecular gas (the dissociation front): about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units. (One astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance.) Static equilibrium models2,3 used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Bar4,5,6 (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure consisting of dense clumps embedded in a lower density extended gas component. Here we report 1 arcsecond resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface and constrain the gas density and temperature structures at small spatial scales. In contrast to stationary model predictions7,8,9, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO+ emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C+/C/CO transition zones are very close. These observations reveal a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photo-ablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. They suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that currently moves into the molecular cloud. The images demonstrate that dynamical and nonequilibrium effects are important. Thus, they should be included in any realistic description of irradiated interstellar matter. PMID:27509859

  3. A Wide Latitude CO Survey of Molecular Clouds in the Northern Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1984-01-01

    It is now well established that molecular clouds are an important part of the interstellar medium, containing much or most of the dense, cold component of the gas, and producing the massive stars and supernovae responsible for the diffuse, hot component. It would therefore appear essential in formulating a complete picture of the local interstellar medium to have some knowledge of the distribution and properties of nearly molecular clouds. The Goddard-Columbia 1.2 meter telescope was used to carry out a wide latitude, low angular resolution survey of CO along most of the first galactic quadrant and a small part of the second. A plane-of-the-sky map, which resulted from numerically integrating the survey over radial velocity, is presented. The Great Rift and the Aquila Rift molecular clouds of the Milky Way are discussed.

  4. Probing the molecular hydrogen fraction in diffuse molecular clouds with observations of HCl+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David

    Using the GREAT instrument, we will observe the Doublet Pi 3/2 J = 5/2 - 3/2 transitions of the H-37Cl+ and (where not already observed in Cycle 4) the H-35Cl+ molecular ions at 1.442 and 1.444 THz, in absorption, toward the bright continuum sources Sgr B2 (M), W31C (G10.6-0.4), W49N, and W51. The observations will yield robust estimates of the HCl+ column densities in diffuse clouds lying along the sight-lines to those sources. Because HCl+ reacts rapidly and exothermically with H2 to yield H2Cl+, the abundance ratio HCl+/H2Cl+ is sensitive to the H2 abundance in the interstellar gas; combining the HCl+ measurements with ones already available for H2Cl+ will thus permit independent estimates of the molecular hydrogen fraction along the proposed sight-lines. This proposal follows up on a successful detection of HCl+ obtained in a pilot program performed in Cycle 4.

  5. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.; Federrath, C.; Bontemps, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Minier, V.; André, Ph.; Hill, T.; Zavagno, A.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Attard, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Griffin, M.; Kirk, J.; Klessen, R.; Könyves, V.; Martin, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Russeil, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Sousbie, T.; Testi, L.; Tremblin, P.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. Instead, gravitational collapse of filaments and/or merging of filamentary structures can lead to building up dense high-mass star-forming clumps. However, the overall density structure of the cloud has a large influence on this process, and requires a better understanding. Methods: The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC 2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. Results: The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression, while the PDFs of the center and other cloud parts are more complex, partly with a power-law tail. A deviation of the log-normal PDF form occurs at AV ≈ 9m for the center, and around 4m for the other regions. Only the part of the cloud farthest from the Rosette nebula shows a log-normal PDF. Conclusions: The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at AV ≈ 3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star

  6. Forming protostars in molecular clouds with shocked envelope expansion and core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Gao, Yang

    2011-04-01

    Spectral observations of molecular line profiles reveal the so-called 'blue profiles' for double-peaked molecular spectral lines with stronger blue and weaker red peaks as notable features for star-forming cloud core collapses under the self-gravity. In contrast, ˜25-30 per cent of observed molecular spectral line profiles in star-forming clouds or cores also show the so-called double-peaked 'red profiles' with red peaks stronger than blue peaks. Gao & Lou show that these unexplained 'red profiles' can be signatures of global self-similar dynamics for envelope expansion with core collapse (EECC) within star-forming molecular clouds or cores. We demonstrate here that spatially resolved 'red profiles' of HCO+ (J= 1-0) and CS (J= 2-1) molecular transitions from the low-mass star-forming cloud core FeSt 1-457 together with its radial profile of column density inferred from dust extinction observations appear to reveal a self-similar hydrodynamic shock phase for global EECC. Observed spectral profiles of C18O (J= 1-0) are also fitted by the same EECC model. For further observational tests, the spatially resolved profiles of molecular transitions HCO+ (J= 3-2) and CS (J= 3-2) as well as the radial profiles of (sub)millimetre continuum emissions at three wavelengths of 1.2, 0.85 and 0.45 mm from FeSt 1-457 are also predicted.

  7. Hydrodynamic simulations of mechanical stellar feedback in a molecular cloud formed by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2017-09-01

    We have used the AMR hydrodynamic code, mg, to perform 3D hydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity of stellar feedback in a spherical clumpy molecular cloud formed through the action of thermal instability. We simulate the interaction of the mechanical energy input from 15, 40, 60 and 120 M⊙ stars into a 100 pc diameter 16 500 M⊙ cloud with a roughly spherical morphology with randomly distributed high-density condensations. The stellar winds are introduced using appropriate non-rotating Geneva stellar evolution models. In the 15 M⊙ star case, the wind has very little effect, spreading around a few neighbouring clumps before becoming overwhelmed by the cloud collapse. In contrast, in the 40, 60 and 120 M⊙ star cases, the more powerful stellar winds create large cavities and carve channels through the cloud, breaking out into the surrounding tenuous medium during the wind phase and considerably altering the cloud structure. After 4.97, 3.97 and 3.01 Myr, respectively, the massive stars explode as supernovae (SNe). The wind-sculpted surroundings considerably affect the evolution of these SN events as they both escape the cloud along wind-carved channels and sweep up remaining clumps of cloud/wind material. The 'cloud' as a coherent structure does not survive the SN from any of these stars, but only in the 120 M⊙ case is the cold molecular material completely destabilized and returned to the unstable thermal phase. In the 40 and 60 M⊙ cases, coherent clumps of cold material are ejected from the cloud by the SN, potentially capable of further star formation.

  8. Properties of Low Metallicity Molecular Clouds: A 0.3 Parsec Resolution Map of SMC B1 #1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodea, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    Stars form in molecular clouds, therefore understanding their structure is important in understanding this key process in galaxy evolution. Studies of clouds in the Milky Way have provided insight to their internal structures, but until recently we have not been able to study clouds in low metallicity conditions at the same resolution. We use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array to map a molecular cloud in the nearby, low metallicity galaxy the SMC at 0.3 pc spatial resolution in 12CO (2-1). We use the CPROPS algorithm (Rosolowsky & Leroy 2006) to measure structural properties of the cloud (mass, size, velocity dispersion, temperature) and compare to molecular clouds in the Milky Way observed at comparable resolution. We present the results of this comparison and discuss the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, virial parameter and mass-radius-velocity dispersion relationships (i.e. Larson's Laws) for the cloud.

  9. Dynamical evolution and molecular abundances of interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Heere, Karen R.; Tarafdar, Shankar P.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical models are presented that start with interstellar gas in an initial diffuse state and consider their gravitational collapse and the formation of dense cores. Frozen-in tangled magnetic fields are included to mimic forces that might oppose gravitational contraction and whose effectiveness may increase with increasing core densities. Results suggest the possibility that dense cloud cores may be dynamically evolving ephemeral objects, such that their lifespan at a given core density decreases as that density increases.

  10. Dynamical evolution and molecular abundances of interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Heere, Karen R.; Tarafdar, Shankar P.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical models are presented that start with interstellar gas in an initial diffuse state and consider their gravitational collapse and the formation of dense cores. Frozen-in tangled magnetic fields are included to mimic forces that might oppose gravitational contraction and whose effectiveness may increase with increasing core densities. Results suggest the possibility that dense cloud cores may be dynamically evolving ephemeral objects, such that their lifespan at a given core density decreases as that density increases.

  11. H_2 Emission as a Large-Scale Tracer of Molecular Hydrogen in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1994-12-01

    We have detected extremely extended (>1.5deg , or 12 pc) near-infrared H_2 line emission from the Orion A giant molecular cloud. We have used a new instrument, the University of Texas Near-Infrared Fabry-Perot spectrometer, which is optimized for the detection of low surface brightness line emission from 1.4 microns to 2.4 microns (Luhman et al. 1995, PASP, in press). Our Orion observations show that we can directly trace H_2 along the outlying surfaces of interstellar molecular clouds, well away from the star-forming cores. The diffuse, extended H_2 emission provides a unique new view of molecular clouds to complement conventional large-scale tracers such as CO and is an excellent probe of cloud energetics. In Orion, we have mapped the emission in the 1.601 microns v=6--4 Q(1), 2.121 microns v=1--0 S(1), and 2.247 microns v=2--1 S(1) lines of H_2. The surface brightness of the extended H_2 line emission is 10(-6) to 10(-5) ergs s(-1) cm(-2) sr(-1) . Based on the distribution and relative strengths of the H_2 emission lines, we conclude that H_2 excited by ultraviolet radiation dominates the global H_2 line emission from the Orion molecular cloud, even though this cloud has a powerful shock-excited H_2 source in its core. We are comparing our H_2 data and observations of the 63 microns [O I] and 158 microns [C II] emission to the predictions of theoretical models of photodissociation or photon dominated regions to examine the physical conditions throughout the Orion A cloud. This work was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation through a fellowship to D.T.J. and by a NASA Graduate Traineeship grant NGT-50998 held by M.L.L.

  12. On the effective turbulence driving mode of molecular clouds formed in disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Keitaro; Salim, Diane M.; Federrath, Christoph; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao; Kainulainen, Jouni T.

    2017-07-01

    We determine the physical properties and turbulence driving mode of molecular clouds formed in numerical simulations of a Milky Way-type disc galaxy with parsec-scale resolution. The clouds form through gravitational fragmentation of the gas, leading to average values for mass, radii and velocity dispersion in good agreement with observations of Milky Way clouds. The driving parameter (b) for the turbulence within each cloud is characterized by the ratio of the density contrast (σ _{ρ /ρ _0}) to the average Mach number (M) within the cloud, b=σ _{ρ /ρ _0}/M. As shown in previous works, b ˜ 1/3 indicates solenoidal (divergence-free) driving and b ˜ 1 indicates compressive (curl-free) driving. We find that the average b value of all the clouds formed in the simulations has a lower limit of b > 0.2. Importantly, we find that b has a broad distribution, covering values from purely solenoidal to purely compressive driving. Tracking the evolution of individual clouds reveals that the b value for each cloud does not vary significantly over their lifetime. Finally, we perform a resolution study with minimum cell sizes of 8, 4, 2 and 1 pc and find that the average b value increases with increasing resolution. Therefore, we conclude that our measured b values are strictly lower limits and that a resolution better than 1 pc is required for convergence. However, regardless of the resolution, we find that b varies by factors of a few in all cases, which means that the effective driving mode alters significantly from cloud to cloud.

  13. A Herschel-SPIRE Survey of the MonR2 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Riwaj; Gutermuth, Robert; Ali, Babar; Megeath, Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Myers, Philip; Fischer, William; Henning, Thomas; Wolk, Scott; Allen, Lori; Tobin, John

    2015-08-01

    We present a new survey of the MonR2 giant molecular cloud with SPIRE on the Herschel Space Observatory. We cross-calibrated SPIRE data with Planck-HFI and accounted for its absolute offset and zero point correction. We fixed emissivity with the help of flux-error and flux ratio plots. As the best representation of cold dusty molecular clouds, we did greybody fits of the SEDs. We studied the nature of distribution of column densities above and below certain critical limit, followed by the mass and temperature distributions for different regions. We used dendrograms as a technique to study the hierarchical structures in the GMC.

  14. The observation of correlated velocity structures in a translucent molecular cloud and implications for turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnani, L.; Larosa, T. N.; Shore, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    We present a formaldehyde map of the translucent high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 16. The molecular gas traced by the H2CO is located in spatially distinct large structures that exhibit velocity coherence on a scale of 0.5 pc. These structures are not pressure-confined and are probably not self-gravitating. They may be transient structures. If so, we suggest that they are produced by shear flows whose scale length is of order the size of the cloud.

  15. Giant Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Tidal Molecular Arm of NGC 4039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espada, D.; Komugi, S.; Muller, E.; Nakanishi, K.; Saito, M.; Tatematsu, K.; Iguchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Mizuno, N.; Iono, D.; Matsushita, S.; Trejo, A.; Chapillon, E.; Takahashi, S.; Su, Y. N.; Kawamura, A.; Akiyama, E.; Hiramatsu, M.; Nagai, H.; Miura, R. E.; Kurono, Y.; Sawada, T.; Higuchi, A. E.; Tachihara, K.; Saigo, K.; Kamazaki, T.

    2012-12-01

    The properties of tidally induced arms provide a means to study molecular cloud formation and the subsequent star formation under environmental conditions which, in principle, are different from quasi-stationary spiral arms. We report the properties of a newly discovered molecular gas arm of likely tidal origin at the south of NGC 4039 and the overlap region in the Antennae galaxies, with a resolution of 1farcs68 × 0farcs85, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array science verification CO(2-1) data. The arm extends 3.4 kpc (34'') and is characterized by widths of lsim200 pc (2'') and velocity widths of typically ΔV ~= 10-20 km s-1. About 10 clumps are strung out along this structure, most of them unresolved, with average surface densities of Σgas ~= 10-100 M ⊙ pc-2, and masses of (1-8)×106 M ⊙. These structures resemble the morphology of beads on a string, with an almost equidistant separation between the beads of about 350 pc, which may represent a characteristic separation scale for giant molecular associations. We find that the star formation efficiency at a resolution of 6''(600 pc) is in general a factor of 10 higher than in disk galaxies and other tidal arms and bridges. This arm is linked, based on the distribution and kinematics, to the base of the western spiral arm of NGC 4039, but its morphology is different to that predicted by high-resolution simulations of the Antennae galaxies.

  16. Ambiguities in the identification of giant molecular cloud complexes from longitude-velocity diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, David S.; Roberts, William W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques which use longitude-velocity diagrams to identify molecular cloud complexes in the disk of the Galaxy are investigated by means of model Galactic disks generated from N-body cloud-particle simulations. A procedure similar to the method used to reduce the low-level emission in Galactic l-v diagrams is employed to isolate complexes of emission in the model l-v diagram (LVCs) from the 'background'clouds. The LVCs produced in this manner yield a size-line-width relationship with a slope of 0.58 and a mass spectrum with a slope of 1.55, consistent with Galactic observations. It is demonstrated that associations identified as LVCs are often chance superpositions of clouds spread out along the line of sight in the disk of the model system. This indicates that the l-v diagram cannot be used to unambiguously determine the location of molecular cloud complexes in the model Galactic disk. The modeling results also indicate that the existence of a size-line-width relationship is not a reliable indicator of the physical nature of cloud complexes, in particular, whether the complexes are gravitationally bound objects.

  17. Relationship between the column density distribution and evolutionary class of molecular clouds as viewed by ATLASGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu-Vicente, J.; Kainulainen, J.; Stutz, A.; Henning, Th.; Beuther, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first study of the relationship between the column density distribution of molecular clouds within nearby Galactic spiral arms and their evolutionary status as measured from their stellar content. We analyze a sample of 195 molecular clouds located at distances below 5.5 kpc, identified from the ATLASGAL 870 μm data. We define three evolutionary classes within this sample: starless clumps, star-forming clouds with associated young stellar objects, and clouds associated with H ii regions. We find that the N(H2) probability density functions (N-PDFs) of these three classes of objects are clearly different: the N-PDFs of starless clumps are narrowest and close to log-normal in shape, while star-forming clouds and H ii regions exhibit a power-law shape over a wide range of column densities and log-normal-like components only at low column densities. We use the N-PDFs to estimate the evolutionary time-scales of the three classes of objects based on a simple analytic model from literature. Finally, we show that the integral of the N-PDFs, the dense gas mass fraction, depends on the total mass of the regions as measured by ATLASGAL: more massive clouds contain greater relative amounts of dense gas across all evolutionary classes. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Dynamical cooling of galactic discs by molecular cloud collisions - origin of giant clumps in gas-rich galaxy discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Different from Milky Way-like galaxies, discs of gas-rich galaxies are clumpy. It is believed that the clumps form because of gravitational instability. However, a necessary condition for gravitational instability to develop is that the disc must dissipate its kinetic energy effectively, this energy dissipation (also called cooling) is not well understood. We propose that collisions (coagulation) between molecular clouds dissipate the kinetic energy of the discs, which leads to a dynamical cooling. The effectiveness of this dynamical cooling is quantified by the dissipation parameter D, which is the ratio between the free-fall time t_ff≈ 1/ √{G ρ _{disc}} and the cooling time determined by the cloud collision process tcool. This ratio is related to the ratio between the mean surface density of the disc Σdisc and the mean surface density of molecular clouds in the disc Σcloud. When D < 1/3 (which roughly corresponds to Σ _{disc} < 1/3 Σ _cloud), cloud collision cooling is inefficient, and fragmentation is suppressed. When D > 1/3 (which roughly corresponds to Σdisc > 1/3Σcloud), cloud-cloud collisions lead to a rapid cooling through which clumps form. On smaller scales, cloud-cloud collisions can drive molecular cloud turbulence. This dynamical cooling process can be taken into account in numerical simulations as a sub-grid model to simulate the global evolution of disc galaxies.

  19. DETECTION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE UNUSUALLY COLD GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD G216-2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Megeath, S. T.; Allgaier, E.; Allen, T.; Young, E.; Pipher, J. L.; Wilson, T. L.

    2009-04-15

    The giant molecular cloud G216-2.5, also known as Maddalena's cloud or the Maddalena-Thaddeus cloud, is distinguished by an unusual combination of high gas mass (1-6 x 10{sup 5} M {sub sun}), low kinetic temperatures (10 K), and the lack of bright far-IR emission. Although star formation has been detected in neighboring satellite clouds, little evidence for star formation has been found in the main body of this cloud. Using a combination of mid-IR observations with the IRAC and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, and near-IR images taken with the Flamingos camera on the KPNO 2.1 m telescope, we identify a population of 41 young stars with disks and 33 protostars in the center of the cloud. Most of the young stellar objects are coincident with a filamentary structure of dense gas detected in CS (2 {yields} 1). These observations show that the main body of G216 is actively forming stars, although at a low stellar density comparable to that found in the Taurus cloud.

  20. Detection of Star Formation in the Unusually Cold Giant Molecular Cloud G216-2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Allgaier, E.; Young, E.; Allen, T.; Pipher, J. L.; Wilson, T. L.

    2009-04-01

    The giant molecular cloud G216-2.5, also known as Maddalena's cloud or the Maddalena-Thaddeus cloud, is distinguished by an unusual combination of high gas mass (1-6 × 105 M sun), low kinetic temperatures (10 K), and the lack of bright far-IR emission. Although star formation has been detected in neighboring satellite clouds, little evidence for star formation has been found in the main body of this cloud. Using a combination of mid-IR observations with the IRAC and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, and near-IR images taken with the Flamingos camera on the KPNO 2.1 m telescope, we identify a population of 41 young stars with disks and 33 protostars in the center of the cloud. Most of the young stellar objects are coincident with a filamentary structure of dense gas detected in CS (2 → 1). These observations show that the main body of G216 is actively forming stars, although at a low stellar density comparable to that found in the Taurus cloud. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Observatory.

  1. Far-infrared line intensities of H2O and CO from warm molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Takahashi et al. (1983) have studied the role of H2O in the overall energetics of warm molecular clouds with large optical depths. It was found that in molecular clouds associated with nearby or embedded luminosity sources, the dust is likely to be warmer than the molecular gas. Thus, the warm dust represents the primary source of heat for the gas. In some cases, H2O was found to cool the gas. Takahashi et al. (1983) have presented the formalism for treating H2O in an optically thick molecular cloud with embedded sources of luminosity. The total H2O heating and cooling rates were also calculated. In the present investigation, the emergent intensities of far-infrared lines of H2O and excited, rotational CO transitions from relatively warm molecular clouds based on the large-velocity gradient model of the previous study are calculated. It is found that the dominant submillimeter CO transitions are related to emission, while the H2O transitions can be either absorption or emission lines.

  2. STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

  3. Probing the evolution of molecular cloud structure. II. From chaos to confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, J.; Beuther, H.; Banerjee, R.; Federrath, C.; Henning, T.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analysis of the large-scale molecular cloud structure and of the stability of clumpy structures in nearby molecular clouds. In our recent work, we identified a structural transition in molecular clouds by studying the probability distributions of their gas column densities. In this paper, we further examine the nature of this transition. The transition takes place at the visual extinction of A_V^tail = 2{-4} mag, or equivalently, at Σtail ≈ 40-80 M⊙ pc-2. The clumps identified above this limit have wide ranges of masses and sizes, but a remarkably constant mean volume density of overline{n ≈ 10^3} cm-3. This is 5-10 times higher than the density of the medium surrounding the clumps. By examining the stability of the clumps, we show that they are gravitationally unbound entities, and that the external pressure from the parental molecular cloud is a significant source of confining pressure for them. Then, the structural transition at A_V^tail may be linked to a transition between this population and the surrounding medium. The star-formation rates in the clouds correlate strongly with the total mass in the clumps, i.e., with the mass above A_V^tail, and drops abruptly below that threshold. These results imply that the formation of pressure-confined clumps introduces a prerequisite for star formation. Furthermore, they give a physically motivated explanation for the recently reported relation between the star-formation rates and the amount of dense material in molecular clouds. Likewise, they give rise to a natural threshold for star formation at A_V^tail.

  4. Studying the Formation and Development of Molecular Clouds: With the CCAT Heterodyne Array Instrument (CHAI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Surveys of all different types provide basic data using different tracers. Molecular clouds have structure over a very wide range of scales. Thus, "high resolution" surveys and studies of selected nearby clouds add critical information. The combination of large-area and high resolution allows Increased spatial dynamic range, which in turn enables detection of new and perhaps critical morphology (e.g. filaments). Theoretical modeling has made major progress, and suggests that multiple forces are at work. Galactic-scale modeling also progressing - indicates that stellar feedback is required. Models must strive to reproduce observed cloud structure at all scales. Astrochemical observations are not unrelated to questions of cloud evolution and star formation but we are still learning how to use this capability.

  5. Studying the Formation and Development of Molecular Clouds: With the CCAT Heterodyne Array Instrument (CHAI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Surveys of all different types provide basic data using different tracers. Molecular clouds have structure over a very wide range of scales. Thus, "high resolution" surveys and studies of selected nearby clouds add critical information. The combination of large-area and high resolution allows Increased spatial dynamic range, which in turn enables detection of new and perhaps critical morphology (e.g. filaments). Theoretical modeling has made major progress, and suggests that multiple forces are at work. Galactic-scale modeling also progressing - indicates that stellar feedback is required. Models must strive to reproduce observed cloud structure at all scales. Astrochemical observations are not unrelated to questions of cloud evolution and star formation but we are still learning how to use this capability.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  7. Hydrogen in diffuse molecular clouds in the Milky Way. Atomic column densities and molecular fraction along prominent lines of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Menten, K. M.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Neufeld, D.; Gerin, M.; Indriolo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Recent submillimeter and far-infrared wavelength observations of absorption in the rotational ground-state lines of various simple molecules against distant Galactic continuum sources have opened the possibility of studying the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds throughout the Milky Way. In order to calculate abundances, the column densities of molecular and atomic hydrogen, H i, must be known. Aims: We aim at determining the atomic hydrogen column densities for diffuse clouds located on the sight lines toward a sample of prominent high-mass star-forming regions that were intensely studied with the HIFI instrument onboard Herschel. Methods: Based on Jansky Very Large Array data, we employ the 21 cm H i absorption-line technique to construct profiles of the H i opacity versus radial velocity toward our target sources. These profiles are combined with lower resolution archival data of extended H i emission to calculate the H i column densities of the individual clouds along the sight lines. We employ Bayesian inference to estimate the uncertainties of the derived quantities. Results: Our study delivers reliable estimates of the atomic hydrogen column density for a large number of diffuse molecular clouds at various Galactocentric distances. Together with column densities of molecular hydrogen derived from its surrogates observed with HIFI, the measurements can be used to characterize the clouds and investigate the dependence of their chemistry on the molecular fraction, for example. The data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A2

  8. The dependence of stellar age distributions on giant molecular cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Pringle, J. E.; Naylor, T.

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we analyse the distributions of stellar ages in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in spiral arms, interarm spurs and at large galactic radii, where the spiral arms are relatively weak. We use the results of numerical simulations of galaxies, which follow the evolution of GMCs and include star particles where star formation events occur. We find that GMCs in spiral arms tend to have predominantly young (<10 Myr) stars. By contrast, clouds which are the remainders of spiral arm giant molecular asssociations that have been sheared into interarm GMCs contain fewer young (<10 Myr) stars and more ˜20 Myr stars. We also show that clouds which form in the absence of spiral arms, due to local gravitational and thermal instabilities, contain preferentially young stars. We propose that the age distributions of stars in GMCs will be a useful diagnostic to test different cloud evolution scenarios, the origin of spiral arms and the success of numerical models of galactic star formation. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of Galactic and extragalactic molecular clouds.

  9. What Sets the Massive Star Formation Rates and Efficiencies of Giant Molecular Clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, Bram B.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Rahman, Mubdi; Evans, Neal J., II

    2017-06-01

    Galactic star formation scaling relations show increased scatter from kpc to sub-kpc scales. Investigating this scatter may hold important clues to how the star formation process evolves in time and space. Here, we combine different molecular gas tracers, different star formation indicators probing distinct populations of massive stars, and knowledge of the evolutionary state of each star-forming region to derive the star formation properties of ˜150 star-forming complexes over the face of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find that the rate of massive star formation ramps up when stellar clusters emerge and boost the formation of subsequent generations of massive stars. In addition, we reveal that the star formation efficiency of individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) declines with increasing cloud gas mass ({M}{cloud}). This trend persists in Galactic star-forming regions and implies higher molecular gas depletion times for larger GMCs. We compare the star formation efficiency per freefall time ({ɛ }{ff}) with predictions from various widely used analytical star formation models. While these models can produce large dispersions in {ɛ }{ff} similar to those in observations, the origin of the model-predicted scatter is inconsistent with observations. Moreover, all models fail to reproduce the observed decline of {ɛ }{ff} with increasing {M}{cloud} in the LMC and the Milky Way. We conclude that analytical star formation models idealizing global turbulence levels and cloud densities and assuming a stationary star formation rate (SFR) are inconsistent with observations from modern data sets tracing massive star formation on individual cloud scales. Instead, we reiterate the importance of local stellar feedback in shaping the properties of GMCs and setting their massive SFR.

  10. Optical observations related to the molecular chemistry in diffuse interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    Observations, which have been published since 1979, of molecular species in diffuse clouds are discussed. Particular attention is given to the ultraviolet measurements of CO with the Copernicus and IUE satellites and to ground-based optical measurements of CH, CH(+), CN, and 02. These data encompass large enough samples to test the chemical schemes expected to occur in diffuse clouds. Upper limits for other species (e.g., H2O, H2O(+), and C3) place restrictions on the pathways for molecular production. Moreover, analysis of the rotational distribution of the C2 molecule results in the determination of the physical conditions of the cloud. These parameters, including density, temperature, and the intensity of the radiation field, are necessary for modeling the chemistry.

  11. Broad-wing molecular lines without internal energy sources. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blitz, Leo; Magnani, Loris; Wandel, Amri

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of broad CO wings in four high-latitude molecular clouds which do not have associated internal energy sources is reported. The velocity width of the wings is as much as five times greater than the width of the cloud cores. Neither visible stars brighter than the background population, optical nebulosity, nor IRAS point sources are found at the position of the wings, except for one case with an IRAS source 3 arcmin from the peak position of the wings. The possibility that the wings are the result of conductive interfaces resulting from cold molecular clouds in a hotter ambient medium is examined, and it is concluded that the expected column density of such gas is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that observed.

  12. Can we trust CO emission as a probe of the densities and temperatures of molecular clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, F.; Glover, S.; Federrath, C.

    2011-05-01

    We have analyzed the distributions of CO and temperature in a large suite of simulated molecular clouds, in order to help us understand how to interpret CO line emission from real molecular clouds. The simulations were performed using a fully dynamical 3D model of magnetized turbulence coupled to a chemical network simplified to follow the dominant pathways for CO formation and destruction. We find that most of the CO is located at densities over 10^3 cm^-3 where the temperature is roughly 10-40 K independently of the mean density, metallicity and UV field strength. Although most of the volume is in warmer and less dense regions, CO photodisociation is more efficient there making the CO abundance small. It follows that CO observations alone give a misleading view of the physical conditions in the clouds.

  13. Star formation efficiencies of molecular clouds in a galactic centre environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Erik; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-08-01

    We use the AREPO moving mesh code to simulate the evolution of molecular clouds exposed to a harsh environment similar to that found in the galactic centre (GC), in an effort to understand why the star formation efficiency (SFE) of clouds in this environment is so small. Our simulations include a simplified treatment of time-dependent chemistry and account for the highly non-isothermal nature of the gas and the dust. We model clouds with a total mass of 1.3 × 105 M⊙ and explore the effects of varying the mean cloud density and the virial parameter, α = Ekin/|Epot|. We vary the latter from α = 0.5 to 8.0, and so many of the clouds that we simulate are gravitationally unbound. We expose our model clouds to an interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and cosmic ray flux (CRF) that are both a factor of 1000 higher than the values found in the solar neighbourhood. As a reference, we also run simulations with local solar neighbourhood values of the ISRF and the CRF in order to better constrain the effects of the extreme conditions in the GC on the SFE. Despite the harsh environment and the large turbulent velocity dispersions adopted, we find that all of the simulated clouds form stars within less than a gravitational free-fall time. Increasing the virial parameter from α = 0.5 to 8.0 decreases the SFE by a factor of ˜4-10, while increasing the ISRF/CRF by a factor of 1000 decreases the SFE again by a factor of ˜2-6. However, even in our most unbound clouds, the SFE remains higher than that inferred for real GC clouds. We therefore conclude that high levels of turbulence and strong external heating are not enough by themselves to lead to a persistently low SFE at the centre of the Galaxy.

  14. Molecular line mapping of the giant molecular cloud associated with RCW 106 - I. 13CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, I.; Wong, T.; Cunningham, M.; Sparks, P.; Brisbin, D.; Calisse, P.; Dempsey, J. T.; Deragopian, G.; Ellingsen, S.; Fulton, B.; Herpin, F.; Jones, P.; Kouba, Y.; Kramer, C.; Ladd, E. F.; Longmore, S. N.; McEvoy, J.; Maller, M.; Minier, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Phillips, C.; Purcell, C. R.; Walsh, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Burton, M. G.

    2006-04-01

    We present the first paper in a series detailing the results of 13CO observations of a ~1 deg2 region of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) complex associated with the HII region RCW 106. The 13CO observations are also the first stage of a multimolecular line study of the same region. These observations were amongst the first made using the new on-the-fly mapping capability of the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra Telescope. In the configuration used, the instrument provided a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) beam size of 33 arcsec and a velocity resolution of 0.17 kms-1. The gas emission takes the form of a string of knots, oriented along an axis that extends from the north-west (NW) to the south-east (SE) of the field of the observations, and which is surrounded by a more extended, diffuse emission. We analyse the 2D integrated 13CO emission using the CLUMPFIND algorithm and identify 61 clumps. We compare the gas data in the GMC with the dust data provided by 21-μm Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and 1.2-mm Swedish European Southern Observatory Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) images that we both regridded to the cell spacing of the Mopra data and smoothed to the same resolution. The 13CO emission is more diffuse and extended than the dust emission revealed at the latter two wavebands, which both have a much higher contrast between the peaks and the extended emission. From comparison of their centre positions, we find that only ~50 per cent of the 13CO clump fits to the data are associated with any dust clumps. Using the clump fits, the total local thermodynamic equilibrium gas mass above the 3σ level measured from the molecular data is 2.7 × 105Msolar, whereas that measured from the smoothed 1.2-mm SEST dust data is 2.2 × 105Msolar.

  15. Infrared Polarization of the Molecular Cloud Associated to IRAS 18236-1205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, A.; Retes, R.; Devaraj, R.; Maya, Y. D.; Carrasco, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present the near-infrared polarization observations towards the star forming molecular cloud associated with the IRAS source 18236-1205, obtained with the near-infrared (NIR) imaging polarimeter POLICAN at the Guillermo Haro Astrophysical Observatory in Cananea, Sonora, México.

  16. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant/molecular cloud associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Krause, Julian; Morlino, Giovanni; Nava, Lara

    2015-12-01

    The gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds associated with supernova remnants are considered one of the most promising ways to search for a solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin. Here we briefly review the status of the field, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the problem.

  17. Formation of low-mass condensations in molecular cloud cores via thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad-Asghar, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Low-mass condensations (LMCs) have been observed within molecular cloud cores. In this study, we investigate the effect of the application of isobaric thermal instability (TI) in forming these LMCs. For this purpose, we first investigate the occurrence of TI in molecular clouds. Then, to study the significance of linear isobaric TI, we use a contracting axisymmetric cylindrical core with an axial magnetic field. Consideration of cooling and heating mechanisms in molecular clouds shows that including the heating due to ambipolar diffusion can lead to the occurrence of TI on a time-scale smaller than the dynamical time-scale. Application of linear perturbation analysis shows that isobaric TI can take place in the outer regions of molecular cloud cores. Furthermore, the results show that perturbations with wavelengths greater than few astronomical units are protected from the destabilization property of thermal conduction, so that they can grow to form LMCs. Thus, the results show that the mechanism of TI can be used to explain the formation of LMCs as the progenitors of collapsing protostellar entities, brown dwarfs or protoplanets.

  18. [Cii] emission from L1630 in the Orion B molecular cloud

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, C. H. M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Teyssier, D.; Berné, O.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Wolfire, M. G.; Higgins, R. D.; Riquelme, D.; Risacher, C.; Pety, J.; Le Petit, F.; Roueff, E.; Bron, E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Context L1630 in the Orion B molecular cloud, which includes the iconic Horsehead Nebula, illuminated by the star system σ Ori, is an example of a photodissociation region (PDR). In PDRs, stellar radiation impinges on the surface of dense material, often a molecular cloud, thereby inducing a complex network of chemical reactions and physical processes. Aims Observations toward L1630 allow us to study the interplay between stellar radiation and a molecular cloud under relatively benign conditions, that is, intermediate densities and an intermediate UV radiation field. Contrary to the well-studied Orion Molecular Cloud 1 (OMC1), which hosts much harsher conditions, L1630 has little star formation. Our goal is to relate the [Cii] fine-structure line emission to the physical conditions predominant in L1630 and compare it to studies of OMC1. Methods The [Cii] 158 μm line emission of L1630 around the Horsehead Nebula, an area of 12′ × 17′, was observed using the upgraded German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies (upGREAT) onboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Results Of the [Cii] emission from the mapped area 95%, 13 L⊙, originates from the molecular cloud; the adjacent Hii region contributes only 5%, that is, 1 L⊙. From comparison with other data (CO(1-0)-line emission, far-infrared (FIR) continuum studies, emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)), we infer a gas density of the molecular cloud of nH ∼ 3 · 103 cm−3, with surface layers, including the Horsehead Nebula, having a density of up to nH ∼ 4 · 104 cm−3. The temperature of the surface gas is T ∼ 100 K. The average [Cii] cooling efficiency within the molecular cloud is 1.3 · 10−2. The fraction of the mass of the molecular cloud within the studied area that is traced by [Cii] is only 8%. Our PDR models are able to reproduce the FIR-[Cii] correlations and also the CO(1-0)-[Cii] correlations. Finally, we compare our results on the

  19. [C II] emission from L1630 in the Orion B molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, C. H. M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Teyssier, D.; Berné, O.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Wolfire, M. G.; Higgins, R. D.; Riquelme, D.; Risacher, C.; Pety, J.; Le Petit, F.; Roueff, E.; Bron, E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. L1630 in the Orion B molecular cloud, which includes the iconic Horsehead Nebula, illuminated by the star system σ Ori, is an example of a photodissociation region (PDR). In PDRs, stellar radiation impinges on the surface of dense material, often a molecular cloud, thereby inducing a complex network of chemical reactions and physical processes. Aims: Observations toward L1630 allow us to study the interplay between stellar radiation and a molecular cloud under relatively benign conditions, that is, intermediate densities and an intermediate UV radiation field. Contrary to the well-studied Orion Molecular Cloud 1 (OMC1), which hosts much harsher conditions, L1630 has little star formation. Our goal is to relate the [C ii] fine-structure line emission to the physical conditions predominant in L1630 and compare it to studies of OMC1. Methods: The [C ii] 158 μm line emission of L1630 around the Horsehead Nebula, an area of 12' × 17', was observed using the upgraded German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies (upGREAT) onboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Results: Of the [C ii] emission from the mapped area 95%, 13 L⊙, originates from the molecular cloud; the adjacent H ii region contributes only 5%, that is, 1 L⊙. From comparison with other data (CO (1 - 0)-line emission, far-infrared (FIR) continuum studies, emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)), we infer a gas density of the molecular cloud of nH 3 × 103 cm-3, with surface layers, including the Horsehead Nebula, having a density of up to nH 4 × 104 cm-3. The temperature of the surface gas is T 100 K. The average [C ii] cooling efficiency within the molecular cloud is 1.3 × 10-2. The fraction of the mass of the molecular cloud within the studied area that is traced by [C ii] is only 8%. Our PDR models are able to reproduce the FIR-[C ii] correlations and also the CO (1 - 0)-[C ii] correlations. Finally, we compare our results on the

  20. The Relationship between the Dust and Gas-Phase CO across the California Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, S.; Lada, C. J.; Lada, E. A.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Bieging, J. H.; Lombardi, M.; Forbrich, J.; Alves, J. F.

    2015-05-01

    We present results of an extinction-CO line survey of the southeastern part of the California molecular cloud (CMC). Deep, wide-field, near-infrared images were used to construct a sensitive, relatively high resolution (˜0.5 arcmin) (NICEST) extinction map of the region. The same region was also surveyed in the 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and C18O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. These data were used to investigate the relation between the molecular gas, traced by CO emission lines, and the dust column density, traced by extinction, on spatial scales of 0.04 pc across the cloud. We found strong spatial variations in the abundances of 13CO and C18O that were correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature-dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The 13CO-to-C18O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C18O by the ambient UV radiation field. The effect is particularly pronounced in the vicinity of an embedded cluster where the UV radiation appears to have penetrated deeply (i.e., {{A}V} ≲ 15 mag) into the cloud. We derived the cloud-averaged X-factor to be < XCO > = 2.53 × 1020 c{{m}-2}{{≤ft( K km {{s}-1} \\right)}-1}, a value somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find there is no single empirical value of the 12CO X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (Tk ≲ 15 K) cloud regions, with XCO ∝ AV0.74 for {{A}V} ≳ 3 mag. However, in regions containing relatively hot (Tex ≳ 25 K) molecular gas we find a clear correlation between W(12CO) and {{A}V} over a large (3 ≲ {{A}V} ≲ 25 mag) range of extinction. This results in a constant XCO = 1.5 × 1020 c{{m}-2} {{≤ft( K km {{s}-1} \\right)}-1} for the hot gas, a lower value than either the average for the CMC or the Milky Way. Overall we find an (inverse) correlation between XCO and Tex in the cloud with XCO ∝ Tex -0.7. This correlation

  1. Nonthermal Chemistry in Diffuse Clouds with Low Molecular Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsargó, J.; Federman, S. R.

    2003-05-01

    High-quality archival spectra of interstellar absorption from C I toward nine stars, taken with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, were analyzed. Our sample was supplemented by two sight lines, 23 Ori and β1 Sco, for which the C I measurements of Federman, Welty, & Cardelli were used. Directions with known CH+ absorption, but only upper limits on absorption from C2 and CN, were considered for our study. This restriction allows us to focus on regions where CH+ chemistry dominates the production of carbon-bearing molecules. Profile synthesis of several multiplets yielded column densities and Doppler parameters for the C I fine-structure levels. Equilibrium excitation analyses, using the measured column densities as well as the temperature from H2 excitation, led to values for gas density. These densities, in conjunction with measurements of CH, CH+, C2, and CN column densities, provided estimates for the amount of CH associated with CH+ production, which in turn set up constraints on the present theories for CH+ formation in this environment. We found for our sample of interstellar clouds that on average 30%-40% of the CH originates from CH+ chemistry, and in some cases it can be as high as 90%. A simple chemical model for gas containing nonequilibrium production of CH+ was developed for the purpose of predicting column densities for CH, CO, HCO+, CH+2, and CH+3 generated from large abundances of CH+. Again, our results suggest that nonthermal chemistry is necessary to account for the observed abundance of CH and probably that of CO in these clouds. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. A detailed view of a molecular cloud in the far outer disk of M 33. Molecular cloud formation in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braine, J.; Gratier, P.; Contreras, Y.; Schuster, K. F.; Brouillet, N.

    2012-12-01

    The amount of H2 present in spiral galaxies remains uncertain, particularly in the dim outer regions and in low-metallicity environments. We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations with the Plateau de Bure interferometer of the most distant molecular cloud in the local group galaxy M 33. The cloud is a single entity rather than a set of smaller clouds within the broad beam of the original single-dish observations. The interferometer and single-dish fluxes are very similar and the line widths are indistinguishable, despite the difference in beamsize. At a spatial resolution of 10 pc, beyond the optical radius of the M 33, the CO brightness temperature reaches 2.4 Kelvins. A virial mass estimate for the cloud yields a mass of 4.3 × 104 M⊙ and a ratio N(H2)/ICO(1-0) ≃ 3.5 × 1020 cm-2/(K km s-1). While no velocity gradient is seen where the emission is strong, the velocity is redshifted to the extreme SW and blue-shifted to the far NE. If the orientation of the cloud is along the plane of the disk (i.e. not perpendicular), then these velocities correspond to slow infall or accretion. The rather modest infall rate would be about 2 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Data cube in FITS files is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/548/A52

  3. Using CO line ratios to trace the physical properties of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñaloza, Camilo H.; Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2017-02-01

    The carbon monoxide (CO) rotational transition lines are the most common tracers of molecular gas within giant molecular clouds (MCs). We study the ratio (R2-1/1-0) between CO's first two emission lines and examine what information it provides about the physical properties of the cloud. To study R2-1/1-0, we perform smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations with time-dependent chemistry (using GADGET-2), along with post-process radiative transfer calculations on an adaptive grid (using RADMC-3D) to create synthetic emission maps of a MC. R2-1/1-0 has a bimodal distribution that is a consequence of the excitation properties of each line, given that J = 1 reaches local thermal equilibrium while J = 2 is still sub-thermally excited in the considered clouds. The bimodality of R2-1/1-0 serves as a tracer of the physical properties of different regions of the cloud, and it helps constrain local temperatures, densities and opacities. Additionally, this bimodal structure shows an important portion of the CO emission comes from diffuse regions of the cloud, suggesting that the commonly used conversion factor of R2-1/1-0 ∼ 0.7 between both lines may need to be studied further.

  4. The gravitational wakefield of a molecular cloud in a disk galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagger, M.; Pellat, R.; Sygnet, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    A molecular cloud (considered as a point macroparticle) represents a clump of increased mass density moving in the disk of a galaxy. Its presence generates a gravitational polarization of the disk, somewhat analogous to the polarization of a dielectric medium by a test charged particle. This means that the cloud travels along with a wakefield (a region of increased mass density) which is the collective response of the stars and gas to the perturbing mass. It can represent many times the mass of the cloud, and emits spiral density waves which propagate away. In terms of statistical mechanics, this wakefield will appear as an increased two-particle correlation function which is the equivalent of the Debye sphere in a plasma - despite the absence here of negative charges. At short distances clouds will thus interact through their own gravitational field amplified by their wakefields, which might thus strongly affect their collisionality. Researchers present a calculation of this wakefield and discuss its importance in the collisional dynamics of molecular clouds.

  5. Diversity of extrasolar planets and diversity of molecular cloud cores. I. Semimajor axes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Liping; Li, Min E-mail: minli09@mails.jlu.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    We show that the diversity of extrasolar planetary systems may be related to the diversity of molecular cloud cores. In previous studies of planet formation, artificial initial conditions of protoplanetary disks or steady state disks, such as the minimum mass nebula model, have often been used so that the influence of cloud core properties on planet formation is not realized. To specifically and quantitatively demonstrate our point, we calculate the dependence of disk properties on cloud core properties and show that the boundary of the giant planet formation region in a disk is a function of cloud core properties with the conventional core accretion model of giant planet formation. The gravitational stability of a disk depends on the properties of its progenitor cloud core. We also compare our calculations with observations of extrasolar planets. From the observational data of cloud cores, our model could infer the range and most frequent values of observed semimajor axes of extrasolar planets. Our calculations suggest that planet formation at the snowline alone could not completely explain the semimajor axis distribution. If the current observations are not biased, our calculations indicate that the planet formation at the snowline is inefficient. We suggest that there will be more observed planets with semimajor axis <9 AU than >9 AU, even with a longer duration of observations, if the planet formation at the snowline is inefficient.

  6. Molecular cloud/HII region interfaces in the star forming region NGC 6357.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Brand, J.; Felli, M.

    1997-04-01

    We have performed ^12^CO(1-0), ^12^CO(2-1), ^13^CO(1-0), ^13^CO(2-1), C^18^O(1-0), C^18^O(2-1), HCO^+^(1-0) and H^13^CO^+^(1-0) observations towards two selected areas in the star forming complex NGC 6357 with angular resolutions from 21" to 55". In particular, we have mapped the molecular gas around the two HII regions G353.1+0.6 and G353.2+0.9 in the ^12^CO(1-0) and ^13^CO(1-0) transitions with a resolution of ~43". This improves on the coarser ^12^CO(1-0) observations previously carried out by others. We have also studied the physical properties of gas along strips through the molecular cloud/HII region interfaces. For G353.1+0.6, the observations confirm that an ionization front is eroding a warm, dense molecular cloud located to the north of the optical nebula. The molecular gas appears fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc and not all the components are related to the HII region. There is evidence of a density increase near the front and indications of temperature gradients toward the exciting stars. This is further suggested by the presence of ^12^CO(1-0) self-absorption produced by a cooler external layer. The isotopic ratio X(^13^CO)/X(C^18^O) decreases from the inner part of the clouds towards the front, contrary to what is theoretically predicted and observed in many other regions. This may be due to excitation or optical depths effects. An evolutionary scenario is proposed where the exciting stars form at the edge of a molecular cloud. The morphology of G353.2+0.9 is rather different from what previously believed. Only a weak "bar" of molecular material was found to the south of the sharp ionization front observed optically and in the radio-continuum, and most of the molecular emission arises from regions behind or to the north of the HII region. This indicates that we are viewing a late stage "blister" configuration face-on. This region is fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc, and a warm, dense and compact molecular fragment coincides with the elephant trunk

  7. Ultraviolet Escape Fractions from Giant Molecular Clouds during Early Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey; Pudritz, Ralph; Klessen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The UV photon escape fraction from molecular clouds is a key parameter for understanding the ionization of the interstellar medium and extragalactic processes such as cosmic reionization. We present the ionizing photon flux and the corresponding photon escape fraction (fesc) arising as a consequence of star cluster formation in a turbulent, 106 M⊙ giant molecular cloud, simulated using the code FLASH. We make use of sink particles to represent young, star-forming clusters coupled with a radiative transfer scheme to calculate the emergent UV flux. We find that the ionizing photon flux across the cloud boundary is highly variable in time and space due to the turbulent nature of the intervening gas. The escaping photon fraction remains at ∼5% for the first 2.5 Myr, followed by two pronounced peaks at 3.25 and 3.8 Myr with a maximum fesc of 30% and 37%, respectively. These peaks are due to the formation of large H ii regions that expand into regions of lower density, some of which reaching the cloud surface. However, these phases are short-lived, and fesc drops sharply as the H ii regions are quenched by the central cluster passing through high-density material due to the turbulent nature of the cloud. We find an average fesc of 15% with factor of two variations over 1 Myr timescales. Our results suggest that assuming a single value for fesc from a molecular cloud is in general a poor approximation, and that the dynamical evolution of the system leads to large temporal variation.

  8. Collapse and Fragmentation of Molecular Cloud Cores. VIII. Magnetically Supported Infinite Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2005-03-01

    The collapse and fragmentation of initially sheetlike, magnetic molecular clouds is calculated in three dimensions with a gravitational, radiative hydrodynamics code. The code includes a crude representation of magnetic field effects and ambipolar diffusion through the magnetic pressure and magnetic tension approximations and a simple parameterization based on previous magnetohydrodynamic calculations, respectively. The computational volume is a spherical portion of an initially isothermal, infinite sheet of self-gravitating gas, symmetric about its midplane, with the portion of the cloud exterior to the spherical volume represented through its effect on the gravitational potential inside the spherical volume. The gas layer is initially in hydrostatic equilibrium, but with a mass equal to or greater than the critical mass (~1 Msolar) for the growth of gravitational instability. The magnetic field pressure acts to further stabilize the initial cloud. Over 106 active grid points are employed in the models, sufficient to resolve the Jeans length and so avoid artificial fragmentation. The parameters varied are the ratio of the ambipolar diffusion time to the midplane free fall time (10 or 20), the cloud's reference magnetic field strength (100 or 200 μG, corresponding to initially magnetically supercritical or subcritical clouds, respectively), the ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of the sheet (0.0 or 0.01), and the form of the initial density perturbation applied to the infinite sheet. Three types of outcomes are observed: formation of one or two protostars near the edge of the spherical volume, formation of a protostar near (but not at) the center of the cloud, or formation of a rotating ring near the center of the cloud, which appears likely to fragment into two or more protostars. Flow speeds of ~0.1 km s-1 are generated as the sheet begins to break up into collapsing protostars. The forming protostars are separated by distances approximately equal to

  9. Physical Properties of Molecular Clouds for the Entire Milky Way Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Murray, Norman; Lee, Eve J.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a catalog of 8107 molecular clouds that covers the entire Galactic plane and includes 98% of the 12CO emission observed within b+/- 5^\\circ . The catalog was produced using a hierarchical cluster identification method applied to the result of a Gaussian decomposition of the Dame et al. data. The total H2 mass in the catalog is 1.2× {10}9 {M}ȯ , in agreement with previous estimates. We find that 30% of the sight lines intersect only a single cloud, with another 25% intersecting only two clouds. The most probable cloud size is R∼ 30 pc. We find that M\\propto {R}2.2+/- 0.2, with no correlation between the cloud surface density, Σ, and R. In contrast with the general idea, we find a rather large range of values of Σ, from 2 to 300 M⊙ pc‑2, and a systematic decrease with increasing Galactic radius, {R}{gal}. The cloud velocity dispersion and the normalization {σ }0={σ }v/{R}1/2 both decrease systematically with {R}{gal}. When studied over the whole Galactic disk, there is a large dispersion in the line width–size relation and a significantly better correlation between {σ }v and {{Σ }} R. The normalization of this correlation is constant to better than a factor of two for {R}{gal}< 20 {kpc}. This relation is used to disentangle the ambiguity between near and far kinematic distances. We report a strong variation of the turbulent energy injection rate. In the outer Galaxy it may be maintained by accretion through the disk and/or onto the clouds, but neither source can drive the 100 times higher cloud-averaged injection rate in the inner Galaxy.

  10. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kirk, Helen

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ∼ 2-4 pc and densities of n ∼ 400-1000 cm-3 with Alfvén Mach numbers near unity. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyse the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DISPERSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that our simulated clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic field depends on the virial parameter. Sub-virial clumps undergo strong gravitational collapse and magnetic field lines are dragged with the accretion flow. We see evidence of filament-aligned flow and accretion flow on to the filament in the sub-virial cloud. Magnetic fields oriented more parallel in the sub-virial cloud and more perpendicular in the denser, marginally bound cloud. Radiative feedback from a 16 M⊙ star forming in a cluster in one of our simulation's ultimately results in the destruction of the main filament, the formation of an H II region, and the sweeping up of magnetic fields within an expanding shell at the edges of the H II region.

  11. The James Clerk Maxwell telescope Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a molecular line study of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Glenn J.; Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Davis, C. J.; Gregson, Jon; Hatchell, Jenny; Etxaluze, Mireya; Stickler, Sarah; Buckle, Jane; Johnstone, Doug; Friesen, Rachel; Sadavoy, Sarah; Natt, Kieran. V.; Currie, Malcolm; Richer, J. S.; Pattle, Kate; Spaans, Marco; di Francesco, James; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2015-02-01

    CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 3-2 observations are presented of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. The 13CO and C18O emission is dominated by the Oph A clump, and the Oph B1, B2, C, E, F, and J regions. The optically thin(ner) C18O line is used as a column density tracer, from which the gravitational binding energy is estimated to be 4.5 × 1039 J (2282 M⊙ km2 s-2). The turbulent kinetic energy is 6.3 × 1038 J (320 M⊙ km2 s-2), or seven times less than this, and therefore the Oph cloud as a whole is gravitationally bound. 30 protostars were searched for high-velocity gas, with 8 showing outflows, and 20 more having evidence of high-velocity gas along their lines of sight. The total outflow kinetic energy is 1.3 × 1038 J (67 M⊙ km2 s-2), corresponding to 21 per cent of the cloud's turbulent kinetic energy. Although turbulent injection by outflows is significant, but does not appear to be the dominant source of turbulence in the cloud. 105 dense molecular clumplets were identified, which had radii ˜0.01-0.05 pc, virial masses ˜0.1-12 M⊙, luminosities ˜0.001-0.1 K km s-1 pc-2, and excitation temperatures ˜10-50 K. These are consistent with the standard Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) based size-linewidth relationships, showing that the scaling laws extend down to size scales of hundredths of a parsec, and to subsolar-mass condensations. There is however no compelling evidence that the majority of clumplets are undergoing free-fall collapse, nor that they are pressure confined.

  12. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between HII Regions and Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J O; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Takabe, H

    2006-04-20

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm HI region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regimes does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and in density in HII region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  13. Hadronic Scenarios for Gamma-Ray Emission from Three Supernova Remnants Interacting with Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huan; Fang, Jun; Zhang, Li

    2014-04-01

    GeV γ-rays detected with the large area telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray space telescope in the direction of HB21, MSH 17-39 and G337.0-0.1 have been recently reported. The three supernova remnants (SNRs) show interactions with molecular clouds, and they are effective gamma-ray emitters as the relativistic protons accelerated by the SNR shocks inelastically colliding with the dense gas in the clouds. The origin of the observed γ-rays for the three remnants is investigated in the scenario of the diffusive shock acceleration. In the model, a part of the SNR shock transmits into the nearby molecular clouds, and the shock velocity is greatly reduced. As a result, a shock with a relatively low Alfvén Mach number is generated, and the spectra of the accelerated protons and the γ-ray photons produced via proton-proton interaction can be obtained. The results show that the observed γ-ray spectra for the three SNRs interacting with the molecular clouds can be reproduced. It can be concluded that the hadronic origin of the γ-rays for the three SNRs is approved, and the ability of SNR shocks to accelerate protons is also supported.

  14. IMAGING OF THE CCS 22.3 GHz EMISSION IN THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Nirupam; Momjian, Emmanuel; Datta, Abhirup; Sarma, Anuj P.

    2011-09-20

    Thioxoethenylidene (CCS) is an abundant interstellar molecule and a good tracer of high density and evolutionary stage of dense molecular clouds. It is also a suitable candidate for Zeeman splitting observations for its high splitting factor and narrow thermal line widths. We report here Expanded Very Large Array 22.3 GHz observations of three dense molecular cores TMC-1, TMC-1C, and L1521B in the Taurus molecular cloud complex to image the CCS 2{sub 1}-1{sub 0} transition. For all three sources, the clumpy CCS emission is most likely tracing the starless cores. However, these compact structures account for only {approx}1%-13% of the integrated emission detected in single-dish observations, indicating the presence of significant large-scale diffuse emission in favorable conditions for producing CCS.

  15. Warm neutral halos around molecular clouds. V - OH (1665 and 1667 MHz) observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, Peter G.; Andersson, B.-G.; Federman, S. R.; Lewis, B. M.; Viala, Y. P.; Shaya, E.

    1993-01-01

    Ten strip maps of 1665- and 1667-MHz OH emission, traversing the outer boundaries of five molecular clouds, were made. The OH emission is found to be significantly extended relative to CO, from which it inferred that OH is to be found in abundance in the shell of partly atomic, partly molecular gas surrounding the dense molecular clouds. The fractional OH abundance is calculated using existing H I and CO observations, and detailed source models which include a complete chemistry network and a radiative transfer code. It is concluded that the extended OH is formed, not by the exothermic reaction of O with H3(+), but by the endothermic reaction, H(+) + O yields H + O(+).

  16. The road toward a full, high resolution Molecular Cloud catalog of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Hughes, Annie

    The statistical description of Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) properties relies heavily on the performance of automatic identification algorithms, which are often seriously affected by the survey design. The algorithm we designed, SCIMES (Spectral Clustering for Molecular Emission Segmentation), is able to overcome some of these limitations by considering the cloud segmentation problem in the broad framework of the graph theory. The application of the code on the CO(3-2) High Resolution Survey (COHRS) data allowed for a robust decomposition of more than 12,000 objects in the Galactic Plane. Together with the wealth of Galactic Plane surveys of the recent years, this approach will help to open the door to a future, systematic cataloging of all discrete molecular features of our own Galaxy.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF MOLECULAR ANIONS ON THE CHEMISTRY OF DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2009-07-20

    We have investigated the role of molecular anion chemistry in pseudo-time-dependent chemical models of dark clouds. With oxygen-rich elemental abundances, the addition of anions results in a slight improvement in the overall agreement between model results and observations of molecular abundances in Taurus molecular cloud 1 (TMC-1 (CP)). More importantly, with the inclusion of anions, we see an enhanced production efficiency of unsaturated carbon-chain neutral molecules, especially in the longer members of the families C{sub n}H, C{sub n}H{sub 2}, and HC{sub n}N. The use of carbon-rich elemental abundances in models of TMC-1 (CP) with anion chemistry worsens the agreement with observations compared with model results obtained in the absence of anions.

  18. Giant Molecular Clouds with High Abundance of Atomic Carbon and Cyano Radical in the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Oka, Tomoharu; Nagai, Makoto; Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2015-08-01

    The central 400 pc region of the Milky Way Galaxy is the closest galactic central region to us, providing a unique opportunity to detailedly investigate gas dynamics, star formation activity, and chemistry under the extreme environment of galactic centers, where the presence of bar, intense UV/cosmic-ray fluxes, high degree of turbulence may significantly affect those processes. We report the results of molecular line surveys toward the Milky Way's central molecular zone (CMZ) performed with the ASTE 10m telescope, the Mopra 22m telescope, and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. With the observations of the 500 GHz [CI] fine structure line of atomic carbon (C0), we have found a molecular cloud structure with remarkably bright [CI] emission in the Sgr A comlex in the innermost 20 pc region. The [CI] cloud is more extended than the GMCs in the region, and appears to connect the northern part of the 50 kms-1 (M-0.02-0.07) and the circumnuclear disk (CND), though no corresponding structures are visible in other molecular lines. The [C0]/[CO] abundance ratio is measured to be 0.5-2, which is 2-10 times those measured to the clouds at larger Galactic radii. This high ratio is close to the values measured toward centers of galaxies with starburst and AGN, suggesting that the chemical state of the cloud is similar to that in those active galaxies. We have also found a large scale gradient of the cyano radical (CN) abundance toward the Galactic center in the innermost 100 pc radius, showing near the Sgr A complex. We suggest that the cloud with high C0 and CN abundance is a feature formed as a result of inward transfer of diffuse molecular gas by the bar potential in the inner Galaxy, in which PDR-like chemical composition remains preserved, and that thus the [CI] cloud could be deeply related to formation of the GMCs and star formation in the CMZ. We also discuss other possible mechanisms to enhance C0 and CN abundances, including the enhanced cosmic-ray dissociation ratio.

  19. Kinetic temperature of massive star-forming molecular clumps measured with formaldehyde. II. The Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Henkel, C.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Menten, K. M.; Indebetouw, R.; Zheng, X. W.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Yuan, Y.; Li, D. L.; He, Y. X.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The kinetic temperature of molecular clouds is a fundamental physical parameter affecting star formation and the initial mass function. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is the closest star-forming galaxy with a low metallicity and provides an ideal laboratory for studying star formation in such an environment. Aims: The classical dense molecular gas thermometer NH3 is seldom available in a low-metallicity environment because of photoionization and a lack of nitrogen atoms. Our goal is to directly measure the gas kinetic temperature with formaldehyde toward six star-forming regions in the LMC. Methods: Three rotational transitions (JKAKC = 303-202, 322-221, and 321-220) of para-H2CO near 218 GHz were observed with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) 12 m telescope toward six star-forming regions in the LMC. These data are complemented by C18O 2-1 spectra. Results: Using non-local thermal equilibrium modeling with RADEX, we derive the gas kinetic temperature and spatial density, using as constraints the measured para-H2CO 321-220/303-202 and para-H2CO 303-202/C18O 2-1 ratios. Excluding the quiescent cloud N159S, where only one para-H2CO line could be detected, the gas kinetic temperatures derived from the preferred para-H2CO 321-220/303-202 line ratios range from 35 to 63 K with an average of 47 ± 5 K (errors are unweighted standard deviations of the mean). Spatial densities of the gas derived from the para-H2CO 303-202/C18O 2-1 line ratios yield 0.4-2.9 × 105 cm-3 with an average of 1.5 ± 0.4 × 105 cm-3. Temperatures derived from the para-H2CO line ratio are similar to those obtained with the same method from Galactic star-forming regions and agree with results derived from CO in the dense regions (n(H2) > 103 cm-3) of the LMC. A comparison of kinetic temperatures derived from para-H2CO with those from the dust also shows good agreement. This suggests that the dust and para-H2CO are well mixed in the studied star-forming regions. A comparison of

  20. FORMATION PUMPING OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Farahjabeen; Viti, Serena; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Casu, Silvia E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.u E-mail: scasu@ca.astro.i

    2010-12-10

    Many theoretical and laboratory studies predict H{sub 2} to be formed in highly excited rovibrational states. The consequent relaxation of excited levels via a cascade of infrared transitions might be observable in emission from suitable interstellar regions. In this work, we model H{sub 2} formation pumping in standard dense clouds, taking into account the H/H{sub 2} transition zone, through an accurate description of chemistry and radiative transfer. The model includes recent laboratory data on H{sub 2} formation, as well as the effects of the interstellar UV field, predicting the populations of gas-phase H{sub 2} molecules and their IR emission spectra. Calculations suggest that some vibrationally excited states of H{sub 2} might be detectable toward lines of sight where significant destruction of H{sub 2} occurs, such as X-ray sources, and provides a possible explanation as to why observational attempts resulted in no detections reported to date.

  1. WHAT DETERMINES THE DENSITY STRUCTURE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS? A CASE STUDY OF ORION B WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Andre, Ph.; Koenyves, V.; Motte, F.; Arzoumanian, D.; Didelon, P.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bressert, E.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A{sub V} {approx} 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -2} profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A{sub V} > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A{sub V} -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations.

  2. What Determines the Density Structure of Molecular Clouds? A Case Study of Orion B with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; André, Ph.; Könyves, V.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Federrath, C.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Arzoumanian, D.; Benedettini, M.; Bressert, E.; Didelon, P.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Pezzuto, S.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G.

    2013-04-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A V ~ 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a ρvpropr -2 profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A V > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A V -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. Physical Properties of the 1.1 mm selected Giant Molecular Clouds in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekoshi, Tatsuya

    2015-08-01

    The first 1.1 mm continuum survey toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is performed with the AzTEC instrument installed on the ASTE 10 m telescope. This survey covers 4.5 square degrees of the SMC, and achieves the 1σ noise levels of 5-13 mJy beam-1. As a result of the analysis, 44 extended objects are identified. The 1.1 mm extended emission has good spatial correlation with 160 μm, indicating that the origin of the 1.1 mm continuum is thermal emission from cold dust component. Spectral energy distribution analysis are performed assuming single-temperature thermal emission from the cold dust component. Assuming a gas-to-dust ratio of 1000, the 1.1 mm objects have gas mass ranges from 7×103 to 4×105 M⊙, which is typical mass range of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), implying that the detected objects are dust-selected GMCs. The 1.1 mm objects show good spatial correlation with the 24 μm and CO emission, and the physical properties are very similar to that of our Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The existences of star formation activity or CO detection provide the information about the evolutionary sequence. Comparisions with signs of star-formation and CO emission provide information about the evolutionary sequence. We found 2, 8, 13, and 21 samples of the starless/CO-detected, starless/CO-dark, star-forming/CO-dark, and star-forming/CO-detected objects, respectively. This result implies the existence of three main evolutionary phases, and the starless/CO-dark samples can be explained as the youngest evolution phase of GMCs. The deficiency of the starless/CO-detected samples suggests that the detectable amount of CO forms after the onset of star formation in the low metallicity environment of the SMC.

  4. C3H2 observations as a diagnostic probe for molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recently the three-membered ring molecule, cyclopropenylidene, C3H2, has been identified in the laboratory and detected in molecular clouds by Thaddeus, Vrtilek and Gottlieb (1985). This molecule is wide-spread throughout the Galaxy and has been detected in 25 separate sources including cold dust clouds, circumstellar envelopes, HII regions, and the spiral arms observed against the Cas supernova remnant. In order to evaluate the potential of C3H2 as a diagnostic probe for molecular clouds, and to attempt to identify the most useful transitions, statistical equilibrium calculations were carried out for the lowest 24 levels of the ortho species and the lowest 10 levels of the para species. Many of the sources observed by Matthews and Irvine (1985) show evidence of being optically thick in the 1(10)-1(01) line. Consequently, the effects of radiative trapping should be incorporated into the equilibrium calculations. This was done using the Large Velocity Gradient approximation for a spherical cloud of uniform density. Some results of the calculations for T(K)=10K are given. Figures are presented which show contours of the logarithm of the ratio of peak line brightness temperatures for ortho-para pairs of lines at similar frequencies. It appears that the widespread nature of C3H2, the relatively large strength of its spectral lines, and their sensitivity to density and molecular abundance combine to make this a useful molecule for probing physical conditions in molecular clouds. The 1(10)-1(01) and 2(20)-2(11) K-band lines may be especially useful in this regard because of the ease with which they are observed and their unusual density-dependent emission/absorption properties.

  5. Detection of interstellar PN - The first phosphorus-bearing species observed in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.

    1987-01-01

    Phosphorus nitride (PN) has been detected in the interstellar medium. The J = 2-1, 3-2, 5-4, and 6-5 rotational lines of this species have been observed toward Orion-KL, and the J = 2-1 transition in Sgr B2 and W51. The PN line profiles in Orion indicate that the molecule's emission arises from the 'plateau' or 'doughnut' region associated with the outflow from IRc2. The species is thus primarily present in hot, dense gas. Column densities derived for PN toward Orion-KL are (3-4) x 10 to the 13th/sq cm, but may be as high as 10 to the 14th/sq cm, if the species is located in a 10-arcsec region. These column densities imply a fractional abundance for PN in the Orion 'plateau' of (1-4) x 10 to the -10th. Such a large abundance for PN is not predicted by quiescent cloud ion-molecule chemistry and suggests that high-temperature processes are responsible for the synthesis of PN in the KL outflow.

  6. Detection of interstellar PN - The first phosphorus-bearing species observed in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.

    1987-01-01

    Phosphorus nitride (PN) has been detected in the interstellar medium. The J = 2-1, 3-2, 5-4, and 6-5 rotational lines of this species have been observed toward Orion-KL, and the J = 2-1 transition in Sgr B2 and W51. The PN line profiles in Orion indicate that the molecule's emission arises from the 'plateau' or 'doughnut' region associated with the outflow from IRc2. The species is thus primarily present in hot, dense gas. Column densities derived for PN toward Orion-KL are (3-4) x 10 to the 13th/sq cm, but may be as high as 10 to the 14th/sq cm, if the species is located in a 10-arcsec region. These column densities imply a fractional abundance for PN in the Orion 'plateau' of (1-4) x 10 to the -10th. Such a large abundance for PN is not predicted by quiescent cloud ion-molecule chemistry and suggests that high-temperature processes are responsible for the synthesis of PN in the KL outflow.

  7. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as Gamma-Ray Sources for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D.

    2005-01-28

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  8. A note on compressibility and energy cascade in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, R. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Observed velocity-size correlations are reexamined in the light of an improved theory of turbulent energy cascade that is developed. It is shown that observed velocity-size correlations cannot be compared with the Kolmogorov law, which is based on incompressible turbulent flow. The fact that the log v-log(l/rho) scaling law (v the turbulent velocity, l the associated region size, and rho the fluid density) predicted for compressible energy cascade is always steeper than that observed in molecular clouds indicates the injection rather than the dissipation of mechanical energy at smaller scales of motion. It is also shown that the concept of strict energy cascade may not be generally applicable in the interstellar medium. The agreement between theory and observation turns out to be best for small cool clouds and cloud cores, suggesting that, for these regions at least, the dominant process in establishing the observed v-l-rho correlation is a turbulent energy cascade.

  9. Molecular Clouds Toward a New OB Association in Pup-CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Gyulbudaghian, A. L.; Alvarez, H.

    2005-10-01

    We have mapped 16 molecular clouds toward a new OB association in the Pup-CMa region to derive their physical properties. The observations were carried out in the 12CO (J = 1 0) line with the Southern millimetre-wave Telescope at Cerro Tololo, Chile. Distances have been determined kinematically using the rotation curve of Brand with R⊙ = 8.5 kpc and V⊙ = 220 km/s. Masses have been derived adopting a CO luminosity to H2 conversion factor X = 3.8 . 1020 molecules cm-2 (K km/s)-1. The observed mean radial velocity of the clouds is comparable with the mean radial velocity of stars composing an OB association in Pup-CMa; it is in favor of the close connection of clouds with these stars.

  10. CO J = 3-2 observations of translucent and high-latitude molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Van DDishoeck, E.F.; Phillips, T.G.; Black, J.H.; Gredel, R. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ European Southern Observatory, Garching )

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were carried out on the CO J = 3-2 emission line at 345 GHz from a number of translucent and high-latitude molecular clouds, as well as on the J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 lines of both the (C-12)O and (C-13)O. It is shown that the physical conditions in the high-latitude clouds are very similar to those in the translucent clouds. The densities derived from measured (C-12)O 1-0/3-2 ratios were often found to be higher than those based on the C2 excitation, while densities derived from measured 3-2/(C-13)O 1-0 ratios were similar to those based on C2. 70 refs.

  11. CO J = 3-2 observations of translucent and high-latitude molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Phillips, T. G.; Black, John H.; Gredel, R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were carried out on the CO J = 3-2 emission line at 345 GHz from a number of translucent and high-latitude molecular clouds, as well as on the J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 lines of both the (C-12)O and (C-13)O. It is shown that the physical conditions in the high-latitude clouds are very similar to those in the translucent clouds. The densities derived from measured (C-12)O 1-0/3-2 ratios were often found to be higher than those based on the C2 excitation, while densities derived from measured 3-2/(C-13)O 1-0 ratios were similar to those based on C2.

  12. Gravitational fragmentation caught in the act: the filamentary Musca molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, J.; Hacar, A.; Alves, J.; Beuther, H.; Bouy, H.; Tafalla, M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Filamentary structures are common in molecular clouds. Explaining how they fragment to dense cores is a missing step in understanding their role in star formation. Aims: We perform a case study of whether low-mass filaments are close to hydrostatic prior to their fragmentation, and whether their fragmentation agrees with gravitational fragmentation models. To accomplish this, we study the ~6.5 pc long Musca molecular cloud, which is an ideal candidate for a filament at an early stage of fragmentation. Methods: We employ dust extinction mapping, in conjunction with near-infrared JHKS-band data from the CTIO/NEWFIRM instrument, and 870 μm dust continuum emission data from the APEX/LABOCA instrument to estimate column densities in Musca. We use the data to identify fragments from the cloud and to determine the radial density distribution of its filamentary part. We compare the cloud's morphology with 13CO and C18O line emission observed with the APEX/SHeFI instrument. Results: The Musca cloud is pronouncedly fragmented at its ends, but harbors a remarkably well-defined, ~1.6 pc long filament in its center region. The line mass of the filament is 21-31 M⊙ pc-1 and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) 0.07 pc. The radial profile of the filament can be fitted with a Plummer profile, which has the power-index of 2.6 ± 11% and is flatter than that of an infinite hydrostatic filament. The profile can also be fitted with a hydrostatic cylinder truncated by external pressure. These models imply a central density of ~5-10 × 104 cm-3. The fragments in the cloud have a mean separation of ~0.4 pc, in agreement with gravitational fragmentation. These properties, together with the subsonic and velocity-coherent nature of the cloud, suggest a scenario in which an initially hydrostatic cloud is currently gravitationally fragmenting. The fragmentation started a few tenths of a Myr ago from the ends of the cloud, leaving its center still relatively nonfragmented

  13. Shocks, Superbubbles, and Filaments: Investigations into Large Scale Gas Motions in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andrew Richard

    2013-12-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs), out of which stars form, are complex, dynamic systems, which both influence and are shaped by the process of star formation. In this dissertation, I examine three different facets of the dynamical motions within GMCs. Collapse modes in different dimensional objects. Molecular clouds contain lower dimensional substructures, such as filaments and sheets. The collapse properties of finite filaments and sheets differ from those of spherical objects as well as infinite sheets and filaments. I examine the importance of local collapse modes of small central perturbations, relative to global collapse modes, in different dimensional objects to elucidate whether strong perturbations are required for molecular clouds to fragment to form stars. I also calculate the dependence of the global collapse timescale upon the aspect ratio of sheets and filaments. I find that lower dimensional objects are more readily fragmented, and that for a constant density, lower dimensional objects and clouds with larger aspect ratios collapse more slowly. An edge-driven collapse mode also exists in sheets and filaments and is most important in elongated filaments. The failure to consider the geometry of a gas cloud is shown to lead to an overestimation of the star formation rate by up to an order of magnitude. Molecular tracers of turbulent energy dissipation. Molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence that simulations predict will decay rapidly via shocks. I use shock models to predict which species emit the majority of the turbulent energy dissipated in shocks and find that carbon monoxide, CO, is primarily responsible for radiating away this energy. By combining these shock models with estimates for the turbulent energy dissipation rate of molecular clouds, I predict the expected shock spectra of CO from molecular clouds. I compare the results of these shock models to predictions for the emission from the unshocked gas in GMCs and show that mid

  14. Large scale IRAM 30 m CO-observations in the giant molecular cloud complex W43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlhoff, P.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Heitsch, F.; Hill, T.; Kramer, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Schuller, F.; Simon, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2013-12-01

    We aim to fully describe the distribution and location of dense molecular clouds in the giant molecular cloud complex W43. It was previously identified as one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. To trace the moderately dense molecular clouds in the W43 region, we initiated W43-HERO, a large program using the IRAM 30 m telescope, which covers a wide dynamic range of scales from 0.3 to 140 pc. We obtained on-the-fly-maps in 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) with a high spectral resolution of 0.1 km s-1 and a spatial resolution of 12''. These maps cover an area of ~1.5 square degrees and include the two main clouds of W43 and the lower density gas surrounding them. A comparison to Galactic models and previous distance calculations confirms the location of W43 near the tangential point of the Scutum arm at approximately 6 kpc from the Sun. The resulting intensity cubes of the observed region are separated into subcubes, which are centered on single clouds and then analyzed in detail. The optical depth, excitation temperature, and H2 column density maps are derived out of the 13CO and C18O data. These results are then compared to those derived from Herschel dust maps. The mass of a typical cloud is several 104 M⊙ while the total mass in the dense molecular gas (>102 cm-3) in W43 is found to be ~1.9 × 106 M⊙. Probability distribution functions obtained from column density maps derived from molecular line data and Herschel imaging show a log-normal distribution for low column densities and a power-law tail for high densities. A flatter slope for the molecular line data probability distribution function may imply that those selectively show the gravitationally collapsing gas. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe final datacubes (13CO and C18O) for the entire survey are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A24

  15. A quiescent magnetosphere for Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1989-08-01

    It is argued that, if Neptune has a large magnetic moment, a weak supply of plasma for its magnetosphere, and a magnetic moment that is in near alignment with the planetary spin axis, the Neptunian magnetosphere is almost completely quiescent except for a region near the magnetopause. There are two magnetic power sources: the flowing, magnetized solar wind, and the kinetic energy of planetery spin. It is predicted that Neptune has a magnetic moment of at least 1 G-RN to the 3rd, the sum of ionospheric and Triton injections of plasma into Neptune's magnetosphere is less than 1 kg/sec, and Neptune's dipole is aligned with the spin axis and located close to the center of the planet. The criterion for Neptune to be a quiescent magnetosphere is defined by the expenditure of less than 10 to the 9th Watts from all power sources.

  16. A quiescent magnetosphere for Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1989-01-01

    It is argued that, if Neptune has a large magnetic moment, a weak supply of plasma for its magnetosphere, and a magnetic moment that is in near alignment with the planetary spin axis, the Neptunian magnetosphere is almost completely quiescent except for a region near the magnetopause. There are two magnetic power sources: the flowing, magnetized solar wind, and the kinetic energy of planetery spin. It is predicted that Neptune has a magnetic moment of at least 1 G-RN to the 3rd, the sum of ionospheric and Triton injections of plasma into Neptune's magnetosphere is less than 1 kg/sec, and Neptune's dipole is aligned with the spin axis and located close to the center of the planet. The criterion for Neptune to be a quiescent magnetosphere is defined by the expenditure of less than 10 to the 9th Watts from all power sources.

  17. All-sky census of Galactic high-latitude molecular intermediate-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhser, T.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.

    2016-12-01

    Context. The H i halo clouds of the Milky Way, and in particular the intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs), are thought to be connected to Galactic fountain processes. Observations of fountain clouds are important for understanding the role of matter recycling and accretion onto the Galactic disk and subsequent star formation. Aims: Here, we quantify the amount of molecular gas in the Galactic halo. We focus on the rare class of molecular IVCs (MIVCs) and search for new objects. Methods: The H i-FIR correlation was studied across the entire northern and southern Galactic hemispheres at Galactic latitudes | b | > 20° to determine the amount and distribution of molecular gas in IVCs. We used the most recent large-scale H i and FIR data, the Effelsberg Bonn-H i Survey, the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey, and the Planck FIR surveys. Results: We present a catalogue of 239 MIVC candidates on the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres. Among these candidates, all previously known MIVCs are recovered except for one single source. The frequency of candidates differs significantly between the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres and between negative and positive LSR velocities as well. Conclusions: In our approach we analyse the local Galactic environment. Extrapolating our results to the entire Galaxy, the global inflow of atomic and molecular IVC gas onto the Milky Way may account for the major fraction of the gaseous mass that is required to sustain the current Galactic star formation rate.

  18. JCMT SCUBA-Diving in Nearby Molecular Clouds: The Case for Large Systematic Surveys with FIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, D.

    2001-07-01

    Results from two sub-millimeter surveys of the nearby molecular clouds rho Oph, Taurus, Orion A and Orion B are presented. Combining large area (100's of square arc-minute) JCMT continuum emission images at 450 microns (8") and 850 microns (14"), sensitive to ~ 0.01 Msolar condensations, with molecular line data (CO isotopes, formaldehyde, etc.) allows for a glimpse into the physical properties of molecular clouds on small scales. Both barely resolved condensations and large scale features are visible in the maps, revealing the variety of dynamical events which operate in star forming regions. The important physics associated with these regions, as evidenced by the survey results, are discussed. Equilibrium Bonnor-Ebert models are fit to the compact clumps found in the dust continuum images in order to derive their physical properties - mass, temperature, and bounding pressure. The cumulative mass functions for the clumps in both Orion B and rho Oph are remarkably similar to the stellar IMF. The survey results are used to argue for a strong multi-wavelength and multi-instrument survey component to the FIRST mission in order to best unlock the secrets of star formation in molecular clouds.

  19. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merín, Bruno; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 μm observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg{sup 2} with IRAC and 10.47 deg{sup 2} with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHα 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  20. THE TWO MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN RCW 38: EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF THE YOUNGEST SUPER STAR CLUSTER IN THE MILKY WAY TRIGGERED BY CLOUD–CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Ohama, A.; Hasegawa, K.; Hattori, Y.; Sano, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K.; Ohashi, S.; Fujii, K.; Kuwahara, S.; Mizuno, N.; Okuda, T.; Dawson, J. R.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.

    2016-03-20

    We present distributions of two molecular clouds having velocities of 2 and 14 km s{sup −1} toward RCW 38, the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, in the {sup 12}CO J = 1–0 and 3–2 and {sup 13}CO J = 1–0 transitions. The two clouds are likely physically associated with the cluster as verified by the high intensity ratio of the J = 3–2 emission to the J = 1–0 emission, the bridging feature connecting the two clouds in velocity, and their morphological correspondence with the infrared dust emission. The velocity difference is too large for the clouds to be gravitationally bound. We frame a hypothesis that the two clouds are colliding with each other by chance to trigger formation of the ∼20 O stars that are localized within ∼0.5 pc of the cluster center in the 2 km s{sup −1} cloud. We suggest that the collision is currently continuing toward part of the 2 km s{sup −1} cloud where the bridging feature is localized. This is the third super star cluster alongside Westerlund 2 and NGC 3603 where cloud–cloud collision has triggered the cluster formation. RCW 38 is the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, holding a possible sign of on-going O star formation, and is a promising site where we may be able to witness the moment of O star formation.

  1. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. II. Signatures of gravitational collapse of IRDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Tremblin, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.; Bontemps, S.; Federrath, C.

    2015-06-01

    We analyse column density and temperature maps derived from Herschel dust continuum observations of a sample of prominent, massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) i.e. G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, G28.37+0.07, and G28.53-0.25. We disentangle the velocity structure of the clouds using 13CO 1→0 and 12CO 3→2 data, showing that these IRDCs are the densest regions in massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and not isolated features. The probability distribution function (PDF) of column densities for all clouds have a power-law distribution over all (high) column densities, regardless of the evolutionary stage of the cloud: G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, and G28.37+0.07 contain (proto)-stars, while G28.53-0.25 shows no signs of star formation. This is in contrast to the purely log-normal PDFs reported for near and/or mid-IR extinction maps. We only find a log-normal distribution for lower column densities, if we perform PDFs of the column density maps of the whole GMC in which the IRDCs are embedded. By comparing the PDF slope and the radial column density profile of three of our clouds, we attribute the power law to the effect of large-scale gravitational collapse and to local free-fall collapse of pre- and protostellar cores for the highest column densities. A significant impact on the cloud properties from radiative feedback is unlikely because the clouds are mostly devoid of star formation. Independent from the PDF analysis, we find infall signatures in the spectral profiles of 12CO for G28.37+0.07 and G11.11-0.12, supporting the scenario of gravitational collapse. Our results are in line with earlier interpretations that see massive IRDCs as the densest regions within GMCs, which may be the progenitors of massive stars or clusters. At least some of the IRDCs are probably the same features as ridges (high column density regions with N> 1023 cm-2 over small areas), which were defined for nearby IR-bright GMCs. Because IRDCs are only confined to the densest (gravity dominated

  2. Shock propagation and the generation of magnetohydrodynamic wave fields in inhomogeneous molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a simple one-dimensional model for the interaction of a steady, thin, planar shock wave with a nonrigid cloud which may be in motion relative to the surrounding medium, and we apply the model to shocks impinging on, and propagating through, molecular clouds. Both 'adiabatic' (gamma = 5/3) and radiative (gamma = 1) shocks are considered and we allow for the presence of a uniform magnetic field directed either parallel or perpendicular to the shock normal. The former field orientation is equivalent to the hydrodynamic case, and the latter involves only fast MHD shocks. We focus on the manner in which such shocks can generate internal kinetic motions in the cloud on a range of size and density scales through the direct acceleration of cores and clumps by shocks transmitted into them and through the generation of an MHD wavefield via the reflection of the incident shock at clump boundaries. We find that stronger incident Mach numbers and smaller density contrasts lead to more efficient cloud acceleration, as do isothermal intercloud shocks and small intercloud magnetic field strengths. The acceleration efficiency is insensitive to the adiabatic index and the magnetic field strength in the cloud itself. For typical parameter choices, the direct acceleration of clouds and clumps by strong shocks is found to be substantial and could at least in part account for their observed velocity dispersions. If the shocks are moderately weak, the final velocity of the cloud is linearly related to its initial velocity, with higher acceleration giving shallower slopes (i.e., final velocity distributions which are less sensitive to the initial distribution). Compared to the kinetic energy of the postshock cloud, the energy given to the wavefield at each encounter is small, and the heating of the interclump medium by the dissipation of this wavefield is found to be insufficient to balance the cooling rate in the cloud as a whole (although it may be important in particular

  3. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared observations of the high-latitude molecular cloud toward HD 210121

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Daniel E.; Fowler, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Low-resolution UV spectra of the B3 V star HD 210121, located behind the high-latitude molecular cloud DBB 80, yield an extinction curve exhibiting a far-UV rise that is among the steepest known. The apparently simple line of sight affords an excellent opportunity for investigating the absorption and emission characteristics of a single, isolated interstellar cloud characterized by extreme UV extinction. The low ratios of the IRAS bands with respect to I(100 microns) suggest that the radiation field incident on the cloud is lower than the average interstellar field, with further attenuation of the field within the cloud. The apparent relative enhancement of I(12 microns) compared with models of dust emission, and the extremely steep far-UV extinction together are consistent with the presence of an enhanced population of very small grains; the normal calcium depletion suggests that there has been little wholesale grain destruction. The steep far-UV extinction may help to explain the relatively high abundances of CO and CN. The disagreement in density for this cloud inferred from C2 absorption versus that inferred from CO emission may be due in part to clumping in the gas sample by the radio beams.

  4. Ammonia-line observations of the Mon R2 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, R.F.; Folch-Pi, F.J.

    1981-07-01

    Line emission of the (J,K) = (1,1) and (2,2) transition of ammonia, NH/sub 3/, has been mapped across the Mon R2 molecular cloud with an angular resolution of 1.5' and a velocity resolution of 0.1 km s/sup -1/. The observations show that the NH/sub 3/ emission is contained within an ellipsoidal region whose major axis lies nearly along the galactic plane. The line velocities vary systematically along the major axis, suggesting that the cloud is rotating along the galactic plane with a period of about 8 x 10/sup 6/ yr. We failed to observe any systematic variations of the linewidths across the cloud, indicating that the denser interior of the cloud outlined by the NH/sub 3/ emission is not collapsing or expanding. Kinetic temperatures of about 15 K, hydrogen densities of about 3 x 10/sup 3/ cm/sup -3/, and a cloud mass of 300M/sub sun/ are inferred from the observations.

  5. The abundance and excitation of the carbon chains in interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Guelin, M.; Morris, M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1981-01-01

    Emission lines from the carbon chains HC3N, HC5N, HC7N and HC9N were observed at 3 mm, 7 mm, and 1.4 cm in a number of dark clouds, Orion A and IRC(plus)10216. Non-LTE models were constructed to describe excitation and column densities. Component models for the Taurus dark cloud TMC-1 suggested that relative molecular abundances do not vary substantially along the cloud ridge, whereas the H2 density does by a factor of three. Data available for other dark clouds showed that the decrease in abundance with length from one carbon chain to the next is nearly constant, being close to 2.3. The decline in carbon chain abundance with length is steeper in Orion KL than in dark clouds by a factor of approximately four. Abundance ratios derived for the carbon star IRC(plus)10216 are uncertain, due to difficulties in modeling excitation rates in this environment.

  6. Ultraviolet-illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micron emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Van Der Werf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have made a large-scale map of the 158 micrometers C(+) line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud. The map covers a approximately 35 min x 45 min area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula. Emission in the (C II) line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the (C II) flux. Over this approximately 1.5 x 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas-phase carbon in the form of C(+) is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the (C II) distribution, implies that (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the (C II) emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the (C II) emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines, but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in (C II) and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the (C II) emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the radio of the (C II) and CO J = 1 goes to 0 intensities. Models of photon-dominated regions can explain the relation between (C II) and CO intensities only if one considers the cloud edges and cloud interior separately. We propose a method for using (C II) and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon-dominated regions.

  7. Ultraviolet illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micrometer emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Vanderwerf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    The construction of a large scale map of the 158 micrometer C+ line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud, covering an approximately 35' by 45' area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta-Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula, is reported. Emission in the C II line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 0.0001 erg/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the C II flux. Over this approximately 1.5 by 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas phase carbon in the form of C+ is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the C II distribution implies that C II emission arises on the surface of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the C II emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the C II emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in C II and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the C II emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the ratio of the C II and J = 1 towards 0 intensities. Models of photon dominated regions can explain the relation between C II and CO intensities only if the cloud edges and cloud interior are considered separately. A method for using C II and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon dominated regions is proposed.

  8. Ultraviolet illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micrometer emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Vanderwerf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    The construction of a large scale map of the 158 micrometer C+ line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud, covering an approximately 35' by 45' area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta-Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula, is reported. Emission in the C II line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 0.0001 erg/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the C II flux. Over this approximately 1.5 by 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas phase carbon in the form of C+ is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the C II distribution implies that C II emission arises on the surface of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the C II emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the C II emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in C II and molecular line distributions, in particular, the larger extent of the C II emission west of NGC 2024 implies large variations in the ratio of the C II and J = 1 towards 0 intensities. Models of photon dominated regions can explain the relation between C II and CO intensities only if the cloud edges and cloud interior are considered separately. A method for using C II and radio continuum emission to characterize the relationship between OB stars and photon dominated regions is proposed.

  9. Ultraviolet-illuminated molecular cloud boundaries: Extended (C II) 158 micron emission toward L1630

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Zhou, S.; Howe, J. E.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Poglitsch, A.; Van Der Werf, P. P.; Stacey, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have made a large-scale map of the 158 micrometers C(+) line toward the L1630/Orion B molecular cloud. The map covers a approximately 35 min x 45 min area which includes the NGC 2024 H II region, zeta Ori, the reflection nebula NGC 2023, and the Horsehead nebula. Emission in the (C II) line is very widespread. The line was detected at levels in excess of a few 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm/s/sr over almost the entire mapped region. Extended emission associated with the NGC 2024 H II region and its envelope accounts for more than half of the (C II) flux. Over this approximately 1.5 x 2.5 pc region, the amount of gas-phase carbon in the form of C(+) is comparable to the amount of carbon in CO. This result, together with the (C II) distribution, implies that (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of clumps throughout the cloud rather than in a single layer at the H II region boundary. Away from the H II region, most of the (C II) emission comes from the western edge of the L1630 cloud and probably results from excitation by external OB stars. The overall extent of the (C II) emission is comparable to that of millimeter molecular lines, but the distributions are different in detail. The difference in (C II) and molecular line distri