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Sample records for quiet solar emission

  1. STUDY OF CALIBRATION OF SOLAR RADIO SPECTROMETERS AND THE QUIET-SUN RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chengming; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying; Xu, Guirong

    2015-07-20

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness, and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0–2.0 GHz, 2.6–3.8 GHz, and 5.2–7.6 GHz) during 1997–2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about 10%–20% at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  2. Solar magnetic field studies using the 12 micron emission lines. I - Quiet sun time series and sunspot slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Boyle, Robert J.; Jennings, Donald E.; Wiedemann, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    The use of the extremely Zeeman-sensitive IR emission line Mg I, at 12.32 microns, to study solar magnetic fields. Time series observations of the line in the quiet sun were obtained in order to determine the response time of the line to the five-minute oscillations. Based upon the velocity amplitude and average period measured in the line, it is concluded that it is formed in the temperature minimum region. The magnetic structure of sunspots is investigated by stepping a small field of view in linear 'slices' through the spots. The region of penumbral line formation does not show the Evershed outflow common in photospheric lines. The line intensity is a factor of two greater in sunspot penumbrae than in the photosphere, and at the limb the penumbral emission begins to depart from optical thinness, the line source function increasing with height. For a spot near disk center, the radial decrease in absolute magnetic field strength is steeper than the generally accepted dependence.

  3. The heating of the quiet solar chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    The quiet solar chromosphere shows three distinct regions. Ordered according to the strength of the emission from the low and middle chromosphere they are (1) the magnetic elements on the boundary of supergranulation cells, (2) the bright points in the cell interior, and (3) the truly quiet chromosphere, also in the cell interior. The magnetic elements on the cell boundary are associated with intense magnetic fields and are heated by waves with very long periods, ranging from six to twelve minutes; the bright points are associated with magnetic elements of low field strength and are heated by (long-period) waves with periods near the acoustic cutoff period of three minutes; and the quiet cell interior, which is free of magnetic field, may be heated by short-period acoustic waves, with periods below one minute. This paper reviews mainly the heating of the bright points and concludes that the large-amplitude, long-period waves heating the bright points dissipate enough energy to account for their chromospheric temperature structure.

  4. Substorm occurrence during quiet solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Partamies, N.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2014-04-01

    We examine the OMNI database and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain records to study the substorm occurrence and characteristics during quiet solar driving periods, especially during the solar minimum period in 2009. We define substorm-like activations as periods where the hourly average AL is below -200 nT. Using the OMNI data set, we demonstrate that there are limiting solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field magnitude, and driving electric field values below which substorm-like activations (AL < 200 nT, intensification and decay of the electrojet) do not occur. These minimum parameter values are V < 266 km/s, B < 1.4 nT, and E < 0.025 mV/m such low values are observed less than 1% of the time. We also show that for the same level of driving solar wind electric field, the electrojet intensity is smaller (by few tens of nT), and the electrojet resides farther poleward (by over 1°) during extended quiet solar driving in 2009 than during average solar activity conditions. During the solar minimum period in 2009, we demonstrate that substorm-like activations can be identified from the IMAGE magnetometer chain observations during periods when the hourly average IL index is below -100 nT. When the hourly IL activity is smaller than that, which covers 87% of the nighttime observations, the electrojet does not show coherent behavior. We thus conclude that substorm recurrence time during very quiet solar wind driving conditions is about 5-8 h, which is almost double that of the average solar activity conditions.

  5. Reconnection brightenings in the quiet solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouppe van der Voort, Luc H. M.; Rutten, Robert J.; Vissers, Gregal J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new quiet-Sun phenomenon which we call quiet-Sun Ellerman-like brightenings (QSEB). QSEBs are similar to Ellerman bombs (EB) in some respects but differ significantly in others. EBs are transient brightenings of the wings of the Balmer Hα line that mark strong-field photospheric reconnection in complex active regions. QSEBs are similar but smaller and less intense Balmer-wing brightenings that occur in quiet areas away from active regions. In the Hα wing, we measure typical lengths of less than 0.5 arcsec, widths of 0.23 arcsec, and lifetimes of less than a minute. We discovered them using high-quality Hα imaging spectrometry from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) and show that, in lesser-quality data, they cannot be distinguished from more ubiquitous facular brightenings, nor in the UV diagnostics currently available from space platforms. We add evidence from concurrent SST spectropolarimetry that QSEBs also mark photospheric reconnection events, but in quiet regions on the solar surface. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. What Is the Source of Quiet Sun Transition Region Emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2016-11-01

    Dating back to the first observations of the on-disk corona, there has been a qualitative link between the photosphere’s magnetic network and enhanced transition-temperature plasma emission. These observations led to the development of a general model that describes emission structures through the partitioning of the atmospheric volume with different magnetic loop geometries that exhibit different energetic equilibria. Does the internetwork produce transition-temperature emission? What fraction of network flux connects to the corona? How does quiet Sun emission compare with low-activity Sun-like stars? In this work, we revisit the canonical model of the quiet Sun, with high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and HMI in hand, to address those questions. We use over 900 deep exposures of Si iv 1393 Å from IRIS along with nearly simultaneous HMI magnetograms to quantify the correlation between transition-temperature emission structures and magnetic field concentrations through a number of novel statistics. Our observational results are coupled with analysis of the Bifrost MHD model and a large-scale potential field model. Our results paint a complex portrait of the quiet Sun. We measure an emission signature in the distant internetwork that cannot be attributed to network contribution. We find that the dimmest regions of emission are not linked to the local vertical magnetic field. Using the MHD simulation, we categorize the emission contribution from cool mid-altitude loops and high-altitude coronal loops and discuss the potential emission contribution of spicules. Our results provide new constraints on the coupled solar atmosphere so that we can build on our understanding of how dynamic thermal and magnetic structures generate the observed phenomena in the transition region.

  7. MWA Observations of Solar Radio Bursts and the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I.; Oberoi, D.; Morgan, J.; Bastian, T.; Bhatnagar, S.; Bisi, M.; Benkevitch, L.; Bowman, J.; Donea, A.; Giersch, O.; Jackson, B.; Chat, G. L.; Golub, L.; Hariharan, K.; Herne, D.; Kasper, J.; Kennewell, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Lobzin, V.; Matthews, L.; Mohan, A.; Padmanabhan, J.; Pankratius, V.; Pick, M.; Subramanian, P.; Ramesh, R.; Raymond, J.; Reeves, K.; Rogers, A.; Sharma, R.; Tingay, S.; Tremblay, S.; Tripathi, D.; Webb, D.; White, S.; Abidin, Z. B. Z.

    2017-01-01

    A hundred hours of observing time for solar observations is requested during the 2017-A observing semester. These data will be used to address science objectives for solar burst science (Goal A), studies of weak non-thermal radiation (Goal B) and quiet sun science (Goal C). Goal A will focus on detailed investigations of individual events seen in the MWA data, using the unsurpassed spectroscopic imaging ability of the MWA to address some key solar physics questions. Detailed observations of type II bursts, of which MWA has observed two, will be one focus, with MWA polarimetric imaging observations of type III bursts another focus. Goal B will address studies of the numerous short lived and narrow band emission features, significantly weaker than those seen by most other instruments revealed by the MWA. These emission features do not resemble any known types of solar bursts, but are possible signatures of "nanoflares" which have long been suspected to play a role in coronal heating. A large database of these events is needed to be able to reliably estimate their contribution to coronal heating. These observations will contribute to this database. Goal C will focus on characterizing the Sun's background thermal emission, their short and long term variability and looking for evidence of a scattering disc around the Sun.

  8. Multiwavelength analysis of a solar quiet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.; Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: We examine oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region from multi-wavelength observations obtained by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) and by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on the spacecraft Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO). The observations were obtained during a coordinated observing campaign in October 2005. Aims: We investigate the temporal variations of the intensities and the velocities in two distinct regions of the quiet Sun, one containing several dark mottles and the other several bright points defining the network boundaries (NB). The aim is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in these two regions and in different spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the transition region, as well as the propagation characteristics of waves. Methods: Intensity and velocity variations are studied with wavelet and phase difference analyses. Results: Both regions (i.e. mottles and NB) show a periodicity of ~5 min in all considered lines. The V-V phase differences in the NB region point to an upward propagation of waves; in the region of mottles, for periods of 250-400 s, the phase difference is mainly negative, which suggests a downward propagation, in turn indicating a refraction of waves from the inclined magnetic field of mottles along the line-of-sight. Conclusions: The phase differences at the NB arise from a predominance of upward propagating waves. In the mottles' region, the negative phase differences we found suggest that propagating waves encounter a boundary and are refracted and reflected. Of course, several limitations exist in the exact interpretation of the phase differences, e.g. the complex topology of the magnetic field, the formation conditions and heights of the examined spectral lines, and the low spatial resolution.

  9. Multi-wavelength Analysis of a Quiet Solar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.; Giannikakis, J.; Young, P.; Schühle, U.; Heinzel, P.

    2007-05-01

    We present observations of a solar quiet region obtained by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), and by instruments on the spacecraft SOHO and TRACE. The observations were obtained during a coordinated observing campaign on October 2005. The aim of this work is to present the rich diversity of fine-scale structures that are found at the network boundaries and their appearance in different instruments and different spectral lines that span the photosphere to the corona. Detailed studies of these structures are crucial to understanding their dynamics in different solar layers, as well as the role such structures play in the mass balance and heating of the solar atmosphere.

  10. Models of the quiet and active solar atmosphere from Harvard OSO data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Review of some Harvard Observatory programs aimed at defining the physical conditions in quiet and active solar regions on the basis of data obtained from the OSO-IV and OSO-VI spacecraft. The spectral range covered is from 300 A to 1400 A. This spectral range consists of emission lines and continua from abundant elements such as hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, magnesium, aluminum, neon, iron, and calcium in various ionization states ranging from neutral to 15 times ionized. The structure is discussed of the quiet solar atmosphere as deduced from center-to-limb behavior of spectral lines and continua formed in the chromosphere and corona. In reviewing investigations of solar active regions, it is shown that the structure of these regions varies in a complicated manner from point to point. The local structure is influenced by factors such as the magnetic field configuration within the active region and the age or evolutionary state of the region.

  11. Energy and helicity injection in solar quiet regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.; Park, S.-H.; Tsiropoula, G.; Kontogiannis, I.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity injection in solar quiet regions. Methods: We use the DAVE4VM method to infer the photospheric velocity field and calculate the free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity injection rates in 16 quiet-Sun vector magnetograms sequences. Results: We find that there is no dominant sense of helicity injection in quiet-Sun regions, and that both helicity and energy injections are mostly due to surface shuffling motions that dominate the respective emergence by factors slightly larger than two. We, furthermore, estimate the helicity and energy rates per network unit area as well as the respective budgets over a complete solar cycle. Conclusions: Derived helicity and energy budgets over the entire solar cycle are similar to respective budgets derived in a recent work from the instantaneous helicity and free magnetic energy budgets and higher than previously reported values that relied on similar approaches to this analysis. Free-energy budgets, mostly generated like helicity at the network, are high enough to power the dynamics of fine-scale structures residing at the network, such as mottles and spicules, while corresponding estimates of helicity budgets are provided, pending future verification from high-resolution magneto-hydrodynamic simulations and/or observations.

  12. A theory of heating of quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2015-03-15

    A theory is proposed to discuss the creation of hot solar corona. We pay special attention to the transition region and the low corona, and consider that the sun is quiet. The proposed scenario suggests that the protons are heated by intrinsic Alfvénic turbulence, while the ambient electrons are heated by the hot protons via collisions. The theory contains two prime components: the generation of the Alfvénic fluctuations by the heavy minor ions in the transition region and second, the explanation of the temperature profile in the low solar atmosphere. The proposed heating process operates continuously in time and globally in space.

  13. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude ≳ 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  14. Solar extreme ultraviolet variability of the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, F.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    The last solar minimum has been unusually quiet compared to the previous minima (since space-based radiometric measurements are available). The Sun's magnetic flux was substantially lower during this minimum. Some studies also show that the total solar irradiance during the minimum after cycle 23 may have dropped below the values known from the two minima prior to that. For chromospheric and coronal radiation, the situation is less clear-cut. The Sun's 10.7 cm flux shows a decrease of ~4% during the solar minimum in 2008 compared to the previous minimum, but Ca ii K does not. Here we consider additional wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV), specifically transitions of He i at 584.3 Å and O v at 629.7 Å, of which the CDS spectrometer aboard SOHO has been taking regular scans along the solar central meridian since 1996. We analysed this unique dataset to verify if and how the radiance distribution undergoes measurable variations between cycle minima. To achieve this aim we determined the radiance distribution of quiet areas around the Sun centre. Concentrating on the last two solar minima, we found out that there is very little variation in the radiance distribution of the chromospheric spectral line He i between these minima. The same analysis shows a modest, although significant, 4% variation in the radiance distribution of the TR spectral line O v. These results are comparable to those obtained by earlier studies employing other spectral features, and they confirm that chromospheric indices display a small variation, whereas in the transition region a more significant reduction of the brighter features is visible.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  16. Shocks in the Quiet Solar Photosphere: A Rather Common Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2005-02-01

    We present observations of the quiet solar photosphere in the Fe I lines at 6302 Å where at least four different spatial locations exhibit upward-directed supersonic flows. These upflows can only be detected in the circular polarization profiles as a double-peaked structure in the blue lobe of both Fe I lines. We have detected cases of either magnetic polarity in the data. The polarization signals associated with the upflows are very weak, which is probably why they had not been seen before in this type of observation. We propose that the observed flows are the signature of aborted convective collapse, similar to the case reported by Bellot Rubio et al. Our data indicate that this phenomenon occurs frequently in the quiet Sun, which means that many magnetic elements (although the fraction is still unknown) are destroyed even before they are formed completely. The spectral signatures of supersonic upflows reported here are probably present in most spectropolarimetric observations of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution.

  17. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  18. Contributions of Active Regions, Sunspots, Quiet Sun to the Solar UV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; McMullin, D. R.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    During the declining phase of the most recent solar cycle, the full disk solar UV spectrum was measured by several space-based instruments, including the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments on the SORCE satellite and the SUSIM instrument on the UARS satellite. These results show distinctively different behavior and have implications for our understanding of the contributions played by various surface features in producing the disk integrated UV spectrum as well as the impact of solar UV emissions on climate. The primary goal of this study is to determine the impact of regions of increased activity (e.g. plage and sunspots) during the recent solar cycle and how this relates to variability of the solar spectrum. Two important results from this study will be the plage and sunspot UV contrast compared to the quiet as well as the center to limb variability of plage, sunspots, and the quiet sun at UV wavelengths. This study will estimate the solar spectrum by utilizing the recently digitized UV spectral radiance observations of plage, sunspots, the quiet sun made by the S082B spectrograph on Skylab, Ca II K images collected at San Fernando Observatory during the recent solar cycle, and a solar spectral model developed under a previous NASA grant. Once generated, these spectra will be compared to the UV observations produced by the above instruments. An important step in the estimation process involves the calibration of the Skylab data for a valid comparison between model and observed spectra. This will require separate calibration curves for SUSIM and SORCE observations. These will be generated from days of no or minimal activity. The determination of separate calibrations will allow any subtle contributions due to variations in instrument performance to be accounted for in the comparison of model and observed spectra. Also, changes in instrumental behavior over time will be separable from real changes in the solar spectrum which are due to contributions of active solar

  19. Contributions of Active Regions, Sunspots, Quiet Sun to the Solar UV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; McMullin, D. R.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the declining phase of the most recent solar cycle, the full disk solar UV spectrum was measured by several space-based instruments, including the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments on the SORCE satellite and the SUSIM instrument on the UARS satellite. These results show distinctively different behavior and have implications for our understanding of the contributions played by various surface features in producing the disk integrated UV spectrum as well as the impact of solar UV emissions on climate. The primary goal of this study is to determine the impact of regions of increased activity (e.g. plage and sunspots) during the recent solar cycle and how this relates to variability of the solar spectrum. Two important results from this study will be the plage and sunspot UV contrast compared to the quiet as well as the center to limb variability of plage, sunspots, and the quiet sun at UV wavelengths. This study will estimate the solar spectrum by utilizing the recently digitized UV spectral radiance observations of plage, sunspots, the quiet sun made by the S082B spectrograph on Skylab, Ca II K images collected at San Fernando Observatory during the recent solar cycle, and a solar spectral model developed under a previous NASA grant. Once generated, these spectra will be compared to the UV observations produced by the above instruments. An important step in the estimation process involves the calibration of the Skylab data for a valid comparison between model and observed spectra. This will require separate calibration curves for SUSIM and SORCE observations. These will be generated from days of no or minimal activity. The determination of separate calibrations will allow any subtle contributions due to variations in instrument performance to be accounted for in the comparison of model and observed spectra. Also, changes in instrumental behavior over time will be separable from real changes in the solar spectrum which are due to contributions of active solar

  20. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-11-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvénic interactions.

  1. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  2. Physical properties of the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin-Barkovskaya, O. V.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region are studied. Here the structure of the solar atmosphere is governed by the interaction of magnetic fields above the photosphere. Magnetic fields are concentrated into thin tubes inside which the field strength is great. We have studied how the plasma temperature, density, and velocity distributions change along a magnetic tube with one end in the chromosphere and the other one in the corona, depend on the plasma velocity at the chromospheric boundary of the transition region. Two limiting cases are considered: horizontally and vertically oriented magnetic tubes. For various plasma densities we have determined the ranges of plasma velocities at the chromospheric boundary of the transition region for which no shock waves arise in the transition region. The downward plasma flows at the base of the transition region are shown to be most favorable for the excitation of shock waves in it. For all the considered variants of the transition region we show that the thermal energy transfer along magnetic tubes can be well described in the approximation of classical collisional electron heat conduction up to very high velocities at its base. The calculated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission agrees well with the present-day space observations of the Sun.

  3. Variation of solar acoustic emission and its relation to phase of the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and photospheric magnetic field. Variation of acoustic emission and its relation to the phase of solar cycles are important to understand dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 6 years of SDO/HMI Dopplergram data to study acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of the quiet-sun regions, respectively, in multiple acoustic frequency bands. We show the variation of acoustic emission from May 2010 to April 2016, covering half of the solar cycle 24, and analyze its correlation with the solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and total magnetic flux. Results show that the correlation between the whole-Sun acoustic emission and the solar activity level is strongly negative for low frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 mHz, but strongly positive for high frequencies between 4.5 and 6.0 mHz. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the acoustic emission in quiet regions and the solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, also varies during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  4. CO emission from radio quiet quasars - New detections support a thermal origin for the FIR emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloin, D.; Barvainis, R.; Gordon, M. A.; Antonucci, R. R. J.

    1992-11-01

    We report detections of CO emission from the radio quiet quasars and luminous Seyfert 1 galaxies 0050+12, 0157+00, 0232-09, 0838+77, 1353+18, 1434+59, and 1613+65, and upper limits in five others. The observations show the same correlation between CO and FIR luminosity, and between 60-100 micron color temperature and the ratio L(FIR)/M(H2), as has previously been found for luminous IR galaxies. These results support thermal radiation from dust as the far-infrared source rather than synchrotron emission. Because we have observed with two different telescopes, and in two different transitions, we have been able to constrain source sizes in a few objects.

  5. Aborted jets and the X-ray emission of radio-quiet AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Matt, G.

    2004-01-01

    We propose that radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert galaxies have central black holes powering outflows and jets which propagate only for a short distance, because the velocity of the ejected material is smaller than the escape velocity. We call them ``aborted" jets. If the central engine works intermittently, blobs of material may be produced, which can reach a maximum radial distance and then fall back, colliding with the blobs produced later and still moving outwards. These collisions dissipate the bulk kinetic energy of the blobs by heating the plasma, and can be responsible (entirely or at least in part) for the generation of the high energy emission in radio-quiet objects. This is alternative to the more conventional scenario in which the X-ray spectrum of radio-quiet sources originates in a hot (and possibly patchy) corona above the accretion disk. In the latter case the ultimate source of energy of the emission of both the disk and the corona is accretion. Here we instead propose that the high energy emission is powered also by the extraction of the rotational energy of the black hole (and possibly of the disk). By means of Montecarlo simulations we calculate the time dependent spectra and light curves, and discuss their relevance to the X-ray spectra in radio-quiet AGNs and galactic black hole sources. In particular, we show that time variability and spectra are similar to those observed in Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  6. QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-01

    We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

  7. The Temperature and Density Structure of the Solar Corona. I. Observations of the Quiet Sun with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Brooks, David H.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of the temperature and density structure of the solar corona provide critical constraints on theories of coronal heating. Unfortunately, the complexity of the solar atmosphere, observational uncertainties, and the limitations of current atomic calculations, particularly those for Fe, all conspire to make this task very difficult. A critical assessment of plasma diagnostics in the corona is essential to making progress on the coronal heating problem. In this paper, we present an analysis of temperature and density measurements above the limb in the quiet corona using new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. By comparing the Si and Fe emission observed with EIS we are able to identify emission lines that yield consistent emission measure distributions. With these data we find that the distribution of temperatures in the quiet corona above the limb is strongly peaked near 1 MK, consistent with previous studies. We also find, however, that there is a tail in the emission measure distribution that extends to higher temperatures. EIS density measurements from several density sensitive line ratios are found to be generally consistent with each other and with previous measurements in the quiet corona. Our analysis, however, also indicates that a significant fraction of the weaker emission lines observed in the EIS wavelength ranges cannot be understood with current atomic data.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  9. Simultaneous observation of whistlers and emissions during a geomagnetically quiet period at low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, K. K.; Singh, A. K.; Lalmani

    2011-02-01

    A unique night-time natural electromagnetic disturbances in the VLF/ELF range received during a magnetically quite period at a low latitude Indian ground station, Jammu (geomag. lat. 19°26' N, L=1.17) has been reported. During the routine observation of VLF waves at Jammu, whistlers and different types of VLF/ELF emissions such as whistlers of varying dispersion confined to a small band limited frequency range, hisslers, pulsing hiss, discrete chorus emissions of rising and falling tones with multiple bands, oscillating tone discrete emission, whistler-triggered hook and discrete chorus risers emissions, etc. have been observed simultaneously during the quiet period on a single night. Such type of unique simultaneous observations has never been reported from any of the low latitude ground stations and this is the first observation of its kind. The results are discussed in the light of recorded features of whistlers and emissions. Generation and propagation mechanism are discussed briefly. Plasma parameters are further derived from the dispersion analysis of nighttime whistlers and emissions recorded simultaneously during magnetically quiet periods.

  10. Correlation between solar acoustic emission and phase of the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    The solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and magnetic field. Understanding the relation between the acoustic emission and the phase of a solar cycle is important to understand the dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 4 years of SDO/HMI data from 05/2010 to 04/2014, covering the growing phase of the solar cycle 24, to study the acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of only the quiet sun regions respectively, at multiple frequency bands. We also analyze the correlations between the acoustic emissions and solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and magnetic flux. The results show that the correlation between the whole-sun acoustic emission and solar activity level is negative for low frequencies at 2.5-4.5 mHz, with a peak value around -0.9, and is positive for high frequencies at 4.5-6.0 mHz, with a peak value around 0.9. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the quiet-sun acoustic emission and solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz, with peak values over ±0.8. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, is indeed varying during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  11. Solar wind entry into the high-latitude terrestrial magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet times.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q Q; Zong, Q-G; Fu, S Y; Dunlop, M W; Pu, Z Y; Parks, G K; Wei, Y; Li, W H; Zhang, H; Nowada, M; Wang, Y B; Sun, W J; Xiao, T; Reme, H; Carr, C; Fazakerley, A N; Lucek, E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the transport of solar wind plasma into and throughout the terrestrial magnetosphere is crucial to space science and space weather. For non-active periods, there is little agreement on where and how plasma entry into the magnetosphere might occur. Moreover, behaviour in the high-latitude region behind the magnetospheric cusps, for example, the lobes, is poorly understood, partly because of lack of coverage by previous space missions. Here, using Cluster multi-spacecraft data, we report an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetosphere tailward of the cusps. From statistical observational facts and simulation analysis we suggest that these regions are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause, although other processes, such as impulsive penetration, may not be ruled out entirely. We find that the degree of entry can be significant for solar wind transport into the magnetosphere during such quiet times.

  12. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-27

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona.

  13. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Oscillations of a Solar Quiet Region Using Multi-Wavelength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the temporal behavior of a solar quiet region using a set of multi-wavelength observations obtained during a coordinated campaign. The observations were acquired by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on-board SOHO and the UV filters of the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). A large range of height in the solar atmosphere, from the deep photosphere to the upper chromosphere is covered by these instruments. We investigate the oscillation properties of the intensities and velocities in distinct regions of the quiet Sun, i.e. internetwork, bright points (NBP) defining the network boundaries and dark mottles forming a well-defined rosette, as observed by the different instruments and in the different heights. The variations of the intensities and velocities are studied with wavelet analysis. The aim of our work is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in the different examined regions, as well as comprehensive information on the interaction of the oscillations and the magnetic field.

  15. Quasar feedback and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-01

    We analyse Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of 568 obscured luminous quasars. The [O III] λ5007 Å emission line shows blueshifts and blue excess, indicating that some of the narrow-line gas is undergoing an organized outflow. The velocity width containing 90 per cent of line power ranges from 370 to 4780 km s-1, suggesting outflow velocities up to ˜2000 km s-1, and is strongly correlated with the radio luminosity among the radio-quiet quasars. We propose that radio emission in radio-quiet quasars is due to relativistic particles accelerated in the shocks within the quasar-driven outflows; star formation in quasar hosts is insufficient to explain the observed radio emission. The median radio luminosity of the sample of νLν[1.4 GHz] = 1040 erg s-1 suggests a median kinetic luminosity of the quasar-driven wind of Lwind = 3 × 1044 erg s-1, or about 4 per cent of the estimated median bolometric luminosity Lbol = 8 × 1045 erg s-1. Furthermore, the velocity width of [O III] is positively correlated with mid-infrared luminosity, which suggests that outflows are ultimately driven by the radiative output of the quasar. Emission lines characteristic of shocks in quasi-neutral medium increase with the velocity of the outflow, which we take as evidence of quasar-driven winds propagating into the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Quasar feedback appears to operate above the threshold luminosity of Lbol ˜ 3 × 1045 erg s-1.

  16. SCATTERING POLARIZATION OF THE Ca II IR TRIPLET FOR PROBING THE QUIET SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J. E-mail: jtb@iac.e

    2010-10-20

    The chromosphere of the quiet Sun is a very important stellar atmospheric region whose thermal and magnetic structure we need to decipher in order to unlock new discoveries in solar and stellar physics. To this end, we need to identify and exploit observables sensitive to weak magnetic fields (B {approx}< 100 G) and to the presence of cool and hot gas in the bulk of the solar chromosphere. Here, we report on an investigation of the Hanle effect in two semi-empirical models of the quiet solar atmosphere with different chromospheric thermal structures. Our study reveals that the linear polarization profiles produced by scattering in the Ca II IR triplet have thermal and magnetic sensitivities potentially of great diagnostic value. The linear polarization in the 8498 A line shows a strong sensitivity to inclined magnetic fields with strengths between 0.001 and 10 G, while the emergent linear polarization in the 8542 A and 8662 A lines is mainly sensitive to magnetic fields with strengths between 0.001 and 0.1 G. The reason for this is that the scattering polarization of the 8542 A and 8662 A lines, unlike the 8498 A line, is controlled mainly by the Hanle effect in their (metastable) lower levels. Therefore, in regions with magnetic strengths noticeably larger than 1 G, their Stokes Q and U profiles are sensitive only to the orientation of the magnetic field vector. We also find that for given magnetic field configurations the sign of the Q/I and U/I profiles of the 8542 A and 8662 A lines is the same in both atmospheric models, while the sign of the linear polarization profile of the 8498 A line turns out to be very sensitive to the thermal structure of the lower chromosphere. We suggest that spectropolarimetric observations providing information on the relative scattering polarization amplitudes of the Ca II IR triplet will be very useful to improve our empirical understanding of the thermal and magnetic structure of the quiet chromosphere.

  17. Searching for Hard X-Ray Emission from Radio-Loud Gamma-Ray Quiet Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Katelyn R.; Macomb, Daryl J.

    2017-01-01

    While the Swift BAT AGN source catalog is dominated by radio-quiet Seyfert AGN, around 15% of the sample are radio galaxies or blazars (Ajello et al., 2009). There is an overlap of about 40 sources between the Fermi LAT and Swift BAT detected AGN populations, only a few percent of the Fermi total. These small numbers are presumably a result of selection bias as the SSC peak often falls squarely within the Fermi LAT bandpass while the Swift BAT sensitivity is highest in the spectral region straddling the synchrotron and SSC components.Recently however, a significant sample of bright (F 15GHz >1.5 Jy), radio selected AGN was found, surprisingly, to overlap with Fermi at only the ~80% level (Lister et. al., 2015). This could be a result of selection bias as well as the gamma-ray quiet objects of that survey having synchrotron peak frequencies of 10^13.4 Hz or less. On the other hand it could be due to deficient Doppler boosting among that ~20%. One can, in principle, test the former possibility by assessing emission from the low-energy wings of putative sub-GeV peaked SSC components. We describe our ongoing joint Swift BAT analysis project that attempts to address this possibility. Initial results, comparisons with INTEGRAL observations, and conclusions are presented.

  18. Intranight optical variability of radio-quiet weak emission line quasars - IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parveen; Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna

    2016-09-01

    We report an extension of our programme to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intranight optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intranight CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 h. For each session, differential light curves of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of ˜3 per cent for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude ψ > 10 per cent), hence blazar-like. We briefly point out the prospects of an appreciable rise in the estimated INOV duty cycle for RQWLQs with a relatively modest increase in sensitivity for monitoring these rather faint objects.

  19. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    We report the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval Z is greater than or equal to 2 and Z is less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between 1994 November and 1998 April as measured by the large-geometry Low Energy Matrix Telescope (LEMT) telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and "anomalous" cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  20. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-01-01

    This report concerns the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval 2 greater than or equal to Z and Z less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between November 1994 and April 1998 as measured by the large-geometry LEMT telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and 'anomalous' cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  1. Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Solar Quiet-region Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Chakrapani, Prithi

    2016-11-01

    We report observations of 10 random on-disk solar quiet-region coronal jets found in high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and having good coverage in magnetograms from the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a small-scale filament (called a minifilament). However, the trigger of these eruptions is still unknown. In the present study, we address the question: what leads to the jet-driving minifilament eruptions? The EUV observations show that there is a cool-transition-region-plasma minifilament present prior to each jet event and the minifilament eruption drives the jet. By examining pre-jet evolutionary changes in the line of sight photospheric magnetic field, we observe that each pre-jet minifilament resides over the neutral line between majority-polarity and minority-polarity patches of magnetic flux. In each of the 10 cases, the opposite-polarity patches approach and merge with each other (flux reduction between 21% and 57%). After several hours, continuous flux cancelation at the neutral line apparently destabilizes the field holding the cool-plasma minifilament to erupt and undergo internal reconnection, and external reconnection with the surrounding coronal field. The external reconnection opens the minifilament field allowing the minifilament material to escape outward, forming part of the jet spire. Thus, we found that each of the 10 jets resulted from eruption of a minifilament following flux cancelation at the neutral line under the minifilament. These observations establish that magnetic flux cancelation is usually the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions.

  2. Markov Properties of the Magnetic Field in the Quiet Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, A. Y.; Borrero, J. M.; Berdyugina, S.

    2016-07-01

    The observed magnetic field on the solar surface is characterized by a very complex spatial and temporal behavior. Although feature-tracking algorithms have allowed us to deepen our understanding of this behavior, subjectivity plays an important role in the identification and tracking of such features. In this paper, we study the temporal stochasticity of the magnetic field on the solar surface without relying on either the concept of magnetic feature or on the subjective assumptions about their identification and interaction. The analysis is applied to observations of the magnetic field of the quiet solar photosphere carried out with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) instrument on board the stratospheric balloon, Sunrise. We show that the joint probability distribution functions of the longitudinal ({B}\\parallel ) and transverse ({B}\\perp ) components of the magnetic field, as well as of the magnetic pressure ({B}2={B}\\perp 2+{B}\\parallel 2), verify the necessary and sufficient condition for the Markov chains. Therefore, we establish that the magnetic field as seen by IMaX with a resolution of 0.″15-0.″18 and 33 s cadence, which can be considered as a memoryless temporal fluctuating quantity.

  3. DETECTION OF SMALL-SCALE GRANULAR STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, V. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2012-09-10

    Results of a statistical analysis of solar granulation are presented. A data set of 36 images of a quiet-Sun area on the solar disk center was used. The data were obtained with the 1.6 m clear aperture New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory and with a broadband filter centered at the TiO (705.7 nm) spectral line. The very high spatial resolution of the data (diffraction limit of 77 km and pixel scale of 0.''0375) augmented by the very high image contrast (15.5% {+-} 0.6%) allowed us to detect for the first time a distinct subpopulation of mini-granular structures. These structures are dominant on spatial scales below 600 km. Their size is distributed as a power law with an index of -1.8 (which is close to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law) and no predominant scale. The regular granules display a Gaussian (normal) size distribution with a mean diameter of 1050 km. Mini-granular structures contribute significantly to the total granular area. They are predominantly confined to the wide dark lanes between regular granules and often form chains and clusters, but different from magnetic bright points. A multi-fractality test reveals that the structures smaller than 600 km represent a multi-fractal, whereas on larger scales the granulation pattern shows no multi-fractality and can be considered as a Gaussian random field. The origin, properties, and role of the population of mini-granular structures in the solar magnetoconvection are yet to be explored.

  4. Aircraft Crew Radiation Exposure in Aviation Altitudes During Quiet and Solar Storm Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Peter

    The European Commission Directorate General Transport and Energy published in 2004 a summary report of research on aircrew dosimetry carried out by the EURADOS working group WG5 (European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org/). The aim of the EURADOS working group WG5 was to bring together, in particular from European research groups, the available, preferably published, experimental data and results of calculations, together with detailed descriptions of the methods of measurement and calculation. The purpose is to provide a dataset for all European Union Member States for the assessment of individual doses and/or to assess the validity of different approaches, and to provide an input to technical recommendations by the experts and the European Commission. Furthermore EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org/) started to coordinate research activities in model improvements for dose assessment of solar particle events. Preliminary results related to the European research project CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) on complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces are presented. The major aim of this work is the validation of models for dose assessment of solar particle events, using data from neutron ground level monitors, in-flight measurement results obtained during a solar particle event and proton satellite data. The radiation protection quantity of interest is effective dose, E (ISO), but the comparison of measurement results obtained by different methods or groups, and comparison of measurement results and the results of calculations, is done in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H* (10). This paper gives an overview of aircrew radiation exposure measurements during quiet and solar storm conditions and focuses on dose results using the EURADOS In-Flight Radiation Data Base and published data on solar particle events

  5. The Far-Infrared Emission of Radio Loud and Radio Quiet Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polletta, M.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Wilkes, B. J.; Hooper, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Continuum observations at radio, millimeter, infrared and soft X-ray energies are presented for a sample of 22 quasars, consisting of flat and steep spectrum radio loud, radio intermediate and radio quiet objects. The primary observational distinctions, among the different kinds of quasars in the radio and IR energy domains are studied using large observational datasets provided by ISOPHOT on board the Infrared Space Observatory, by the IRAM interferometer, by the sub-millimetre array SCUBA on JCMT, and by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) facilities IRAC1 on the 2.2 m telescope and SEST. The spectral energy distributions of all quasars from radio to IR energies are analyzed and modeled with non-thermal and thermal spectral components. The dominant mechanism emitting in the far/mid-IR is thermal dust emission in all quasars, with the exception of flat spectrum radio loud quasars for which the presence of thermal IR emission remains rather uncertain, since it is difficult to separate it from the bright non-thermal component. The dust is predominantly heated by the optical/ultraviolet radiation emitted from the external components of the AGN. A starburst contributes to the IR emission at different levels, but always less than the AGN (<= 27%). The distribution of temperatures, sizes, masses, and luminosities of the emitting dust are independent of the quasar type.

  6. Spatial variability of solar quiet fields along 96° magnetic meridian in Africa: Results from MAGDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Rabiu, A. B.; Bello, O. R.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.; Odeyemi, O. O.; Ogunmodimu, O.

    2015-05-01

    We have used chains of Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) magnetometer records of the horizontal (H) and vertical (Z) magnetic field intensities during September 2008 to August 2009 (year of deep minimum) across Africa to study their variability during the quietest international days, which coincidently associated with the sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event in January 2009. This selection of the most international quiet days is indicative of 80% that are strongly associated with days when unusually strong and prolonged sudden SSW event occurs in January 2009. Interestingly, in January, a significant magnitude depletion of solar quiet (Sq) equivalent current was observed near noon hours around the magnetic equator (Addis Ababa, ABB) compared to any other months along with a consistent significantly reduced value across the Northern Hemisphere and moderate decrease at the Southern Hemisphere. Also, we found that Nairobi and Dar es Salaam at the Southern Hemisphere, which are close to ABB (dip equator), are strongly prone to westward electric field compared to the magnetic equator and Khartoum at the Northern Hemisphere. Significant negative values of MSq(Z) magnitudes observed near noon hours at Hermanus indicate the presence of induced currents that suggest ocean effects along with reversal to significant positive values in the afternoon, which subsided before 1800 LT in almost all the months, indicate stronger influence of ionospheric currents. On seasonal variability of Sq(H), a slight depression at ABB during September equinox is one of the evidences of seasonal Sq focus shift. Latitudinal variability of Sq near-noon hours was also investigated.

  7. Radar observations of magnetospheric activity during extremely quiet solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. D. M.; Baker, K. B.; Pinnock, M.; Dudeney, J. R.; Rash, J. P. S.

    2002-04-01

    During a period of extremely quiet solar wind conditions from 8 to 10 March 1997, strong activity was observed by the Southern Hemisphere Auroral Radar Experiment Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars in the Antarctic premidnight ionosphere. This activity took the form of quasiperiodic flow bursts with ionospheric drift velocities exceeding 2 km s-1. Data from the Satellite Experiments Simultaneous with Antarctic Measurements (SESAME) automated geophysical observatories in Antarctica and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program and Polar satellites are used with the radar data to study the convection flow in the southern polar ionosphere at the time of these flow bursts. The study shows that the bursts occurred with an approximate period of 12 min. Their direction was westward, and they were superimposed on a background westward flow. In the premidnight sector this is interpreted as a flow associated with dipolarization of the magnetotail tail field. There is a band of strong particle precipitation associated with the flow bursts. The location suggests that they occur deep in the magnetotail and cannot be associated with any lobe reconnection. They are at a latitude near the region where a viscously driven convection cell is expected to exist, and their sense is that of the return convection flow in such a cell. The results suggest that there is an internal magnetospheric mechanism for sporadic energy release in the magnetotail that need not be associated with changes in solar wind reconnection on the magnetopause.

  8. Tether-Cutting Energetics of a Solar Quiet Region Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We study the morphology and energetics of a slowly-evolving quiet region solar prominence eruption occurring on 1999 February 8-9 in the solar north polar crown region, using soft X-ray data from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh and Fe xv EUV 284 A data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on SOHO. After rising at approx. 1 km/s for about six hours, the prominence accelerates to a velocity of approx. 10 km/s, leaving behind EUV and soft X-ray loop arcades of a weak flare in its source region. Intensity dimmings occur in the eruption region cospatially in EUV and soft X-rays, indicating that the dimmings result from a depletion of material. Over the first two hours of the prominence s rapid rise, flare-like brightenings occur beneath the rising prominence which may correspond to "tether cutting" magnetic reconnection. These brightenings have heating requirements of up to approx. 10(exp 28)-10(exp 29) ergs, and this is comparable to the mechanical energy required for the rising prominence over the same time period. If the ratio of mechanical energy to heating energy remains constant through the early phase of the eruption, then we infer that coronal signatures for the tether cutting may not be apparent at or shortly after the start of the fast phase in this or similar low-energy eruptions, since the plasma-heating energy levels would not exceed that of the background corona.

  9. On the Solar Quiet Variation Measured in Latin America by the Embrace Magnetometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Moro, Juliano; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Chen, Sony Su

    2016-07-01

    The present work show the first results of the study about the seasonal variation of the Solar quiet (Sq) Earth's magnetic field based on magnetic measurements from the Embrace Magnetic Network (MagNet) at several latitudes in South America, covering the equatorial and low latitudinal region. For this study, we used data covering the period from September 2010 to December 2015, during the ascending phase of the solar cycle 24. Before analyzing the magnetic data collected from the Embrace Magnet, we compared the magnetic data collected by the Embrace variometer installed at Vassouras-RJ, in Brazil, with the same data collected by the absolute magnetometer installed by the Intermagnet at the same observatory. We show that our data is in pretty good agreement to the absolute values. With respect to the seasonal variation, we show clear seasonal modulation in all components, irrespective the latitude. The H component analysis revealed to have a seasonal dependence in both aspects: the duration of positive excursion along the day and the maximum amplitude. And the other components have also shown remarkable regional characteristic of the variation of the Sq. Finally, we take these results as the first steps towards developing a Sq model to be superimposed to International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model as a useful tool for space weather forecast.

  10. Tether-Cutting Energetics of a Solar Quiet Region Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We study the morphology and energetics of a slowly evolving quiet-region solar prominence eruption occurring on 1999 February 8-9 in the solar north polar crown region, using soft X-ray data from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh and Fexv EUV 284 Angstrom data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). After rising at approximately equal to l kilometer per second for about six hours, the prominence accelerates to a velocity of approximately equal to 10 kilometers per second, leaving behind EUV and soft X-ray loop arcades of a weak flare in its source region. Intensity dimmings occur in the eruption region cospatially in EUV and soft X-rays, indicating that the dimmings result from a depletion of material. Over the first two hours of the prominences rapid rise, flare-like brightenings occur beneath the rising prominence that might correspond to tether-cutting magnetic reconnection. These brightenings have heating requirements of up to approximately 10(exp 28)-10(exp 29) ergs, and this is comparable to the mechanical energy required for the rising prominence over the same time period. If the ratio of mechanical energy to heating energy remains constant through the early phase of the eruption, then we infer that coronal signatures for the tether cutting may not be apparent at or shortly after the start of the fast phase in this or similar low-energy eruptions, since the plasma-heating energy levels would not exceed that of the background corona.

  11. Influence of the solar UV-radiation intensity on the 630-nm nightglow emission in the 23rd solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, I. B.; Alekseev, V. N.; Parnikov, S. G.

    2011-10-01

    It is well known that the 630-nm nightglow emission intensity in midlatitudes increases by more than a factor of 2 during a sunspot maximum. It has been assumed that the phenomenon is caused by variations in solar UV radiation during a solar cycle (Fishkova, 1983). We present the results of photometric measurements of the nightglow 630.0 nm emission intensity at a latitude of 63° E and longitude of 130° E (Yakutsk) in 1990-2007. The dependence of the 630-nm emission intensity on solar activity on magnetically quiet days in the 22nd and 23rd solar cycles is shown. The close relationship between the 630-nm nightglow intensity and the intensity of extreme UV (EUV) with a correlation coefficient of 0.8-0.9 in 1997-2007 is ascertained from the SOHO/SEM data. The dominance of solar EUV in the excitation of nightglow 630-nm emission has thus been experimentally proved.

  12. Solar quiet current response in the African sector due to a 2009 sudden stratospheric warming event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Owolabi, O. P.; Yamazaki, Y.; Rabiu, A. B.; Okoh, D.; Fujimoto, A.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Seemala, G. K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Onanuga, O. K.

    2016-08-01

    We present solar quiet (Sq) variation of the horizontal (H) magnetic field intensity deduced from Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) records over Africa during an unusual strong and prolonged 2009 sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event. A reduction in the SqH magnitude that enveloped the geomagnetic latitudes between 21.13°N (Fayum FYM) in Egypt and 39.51°S (Durban DRB) in South Africa was observed, while the stratospheric polar temperature was increasing and got strengthened when the stratospheric temperature reached its maximum. Another novel feature associated with the hemispheric reduction is the reversal in the north-south asymmetry of the SqH, which is indicative of higher SqH magnitude in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern Hemisphere during SSW peak phase. The reversal of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) or the counter electrojet (CEJ) was observed after the polar stratospheric temperature reached its maximum. The effect of additional currents associated with CEJ was observed in the Southern Hemisphere at middle latitude. Similar changes were observed in the EEJ at the South America, Pacific Ocean, and Central Asia sectors. The effect of the SSW is largest in the South American sector and smallest in the Central Asian sector.

  13. Small Scale Dynamo Magnetism And the Heating of the Quiet Sun Solar Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding problem of the solar atmosphere heating has been addressed by many theoretical studies. Two specific mechanisms have been shown to play a key role in those : magnetic reconnection and waves. On the other hand the necessity of treating together chromosphere and corona has also been been stressed, with debates going on about the possibility of heating coronal plasma by energetic phenomena observed in the chromosphere,based on many key observations such as spicules, tornadoes…. We present some recent results about the modeling of quiet Sun heating in which magnetic fields are generated by a subphotospheric fluid dynamo which is connected to granulation. The model shows a topologically complex magnetic field of 160 G on the Sun's surface, agreeing with inferences obtained from spectropolarimetric observations.Those generated magnetic fields emerge into the chromosphere, providing the required energy flux and then small-scale eruptions releasing magnetic energy and driving sonic motions. Some of the more energetic eruptions can affect the very low corona only.It is also found that taking into account a vertical weak network magnetic field then allows to provide energy higher in the corona, while leaving unchanged the physics of chromospheric eruptions. The coronal heating mechanism rests on the eventual dissipation of Alfven waves generated inside the chromosphere and carrying upwards an adequate energy flux, while more energetic phenomena contribute only weakly to the heating of the corona.

  14. Explaining Inverted-temperature Loops in the Quiet Solar Corona with Magnetohydrodynamic Wave-mode Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Avery J.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal loops trace out bipolar, arch-like magnetic fields above the Sun’s surface. Recent measurements that combine rotational tomography, extreme-ultraviolet imaging, and potential-field extrapolation have shown the existence of large loops with inverted-temperature profiles, i.e., loops for which the apex temperature is a local minimum, not a maximum. These “down loops” appear to exist primarily in equatorial quiet regions near solar minimum. We simulate both these and the more prevalent large-scale “up loops” by modeling coronal heating as a time-steady superposition of (1) dissipation of incompressible Alfvén wave turbulence and (2) dissipation of compressive waves formed by mode conversion from the initial population of Alfvén waves. We found that when a large percentage (>99%) of the Alfvén waves undergo this conversion, heating is greatly concentrated at the footpoints and stable “down loops” are created. In some cases we found loops with three maxima that are also gravitationally stable. Models that agree with the tomographic temperature data exhibit higher gas pressures for “down loops” than for “up loops,” which is consistent with observations. These models also show a narrow range of Alfvén wave amplitudes: 3 to 6 km s-1 at the coronal base. This is low in comparison to typical observed amplitudes of 20-30 km s-1 in bright X-ray loops. However, the large-scale loops we model are believed to compose a weaker diffuse background that fills much of the volume of the corona. By constraining the physics of loops that underlie quiescent streamers, we hope to better understand the formation of the slow solar wind.

  15. If the Sun is so quiet, why is the Earth ringing? A comparison of two solar minimum intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kozyra, J. U.; de Toma, G.; Emery, B. A.; Onsager, T. G.; Thompson, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    A system-oriented analysis of new observations from the recent international Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) campaign in comparison with the equivalent Whole Sun Month (WSM) campaign from last cycle’s minimum yields new insight into solar quiet intervals and the solar minimum Sun-Earth system. We use a side-by-side comparison of these two intervals to demonstrate that sunspot numbers, while providing a good measure of solar activity, do not provide sufficient information to gauge solar and heliospheric magnetic complexity and its effect at the Earth. The present solar minimum is exceptionally quiet, with sunspot numbers the lowest in 75 years, solar wind density and IMF strength at the lowest values ever observed, and geomagnetic indices and solar EUV fluxes the lowest in three solar cycles. Despite, or perhaps because of this global weakness in the heliospheric magnetic field, large near-equatorial coronal holes lingered even as the sunspots disappeared, indicating significant open magnetic flux at low latitudes. Consequently, for the months surrounding the WHI campaign, strong, long, and recurring high-speed streams in the solar wind intercepted the Earth in contrast to the weaker and more sporadic streams that occurred around the time of the WSM campaign. Since the speed, duration and southward magnetic field component in wind streams determine the severity of space weather effects, the geospace environment responded quite differently to the two solar minimum heliospheric morphologies. We illustrate this point with the behavior of relativistic electrons in the Earth’s outer radiation belt, which were more than three times stronger during WHI than in WSM. The cause is clear: it is well-known that high-speed streams drive radiation belt population, and indeed, for the months surrounding WHI, geospace and upper atmospheric parameters were ringing with the periodicities of the solar wind in a manner that was absent last cycle minimum. Such behavior could not

  16. Heating of the quiet solar corona from measurements of the FET/TESIS instrument on-board the KORONAS-FOTON satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybák, J.; Gömöry, P.; Benz, A.; Bogachev, P.; Brajša, R.

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents the first results of the observations of time evolution of the quiet solar corona brightenings obtained due to very rapid photography of the corona with full-disk EUV telescopes of the FET/TESIS instrument onboard the KORONA FOTON satellite. The measurements were performed simultaneously in the emission of the Fe IX / X 17.1 and Fe VIII 13.1 spectral lines with 10 second temporal cadence and spatial scale of 1.7 arc seconds within one hour. This test observation, carried out on 15 July 2009, was analyzed in order to determine whether this type of observation can be used to identify individual microevents in the solar corona heating that are above the tresholds of spatial and temporal resolutions of the observations of non-active regions in the solar atmosphere. For this purpose, a simple method was used involving cross-correlation of the plasma emission time evolution at different temperatures, each time from observations of identical elements. The results obtained are confronted with the expected observable manifestations of the corona heating via nanoflares. TESIS is a set of instruments for the Sun photography developed in the Lebedev Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences that was launched into orbit in January 2009.

  17. Solar emission levels at low radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solar radio emission could seriously interfere with observations made by a low frequency (1 to 10 MHz) array in space. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) radio data were used to determine solar emission level. The results indicate that solar emission should seriously disturb less than ten percent of the data, even during the years of solar maximum. Thus it appears that solar emission should not cause a disastrous loss of data. The information needed to design procedures to excise solar interference from the data produced by any low-frequency array is provided.

  18. Pole-equator difference and the variability of the brightness of the chromospheric CaII-K-network elements in quiet regions over the solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kariyappa, R.

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the brightness of chromospheric network elements on latitude was investigated for quiet solar regions. Calibrated photographic CaII K-spectroheliograms were used to compare the variation in brightness at the center of the disk with higher latitude of chromospheric network elements in a quiet region as a function of solar activity. It was found that there was no significant difference in brightness between the center of the solar disk and higher latitude. It is concluded that the brightness of the chromospheric network elements in a quiet region does not depend on the latitude, but that the variation in the intensity enhancement is related to the level of solar activity.

  19. Upper limits to the quiet-time solar neutron flux from 10 to 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, S.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The UCR large area solid-angle double scatter neutron telescope was flown to search for solar neutrons on 3 balloon flights on September 26, 1971, May 14, 1972 and September 19, 1972. The first two flights were launched from Palestine, Texas and the third from Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The float altitude on each flight was at about 5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere. Neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV were measured. No solar flares occurred during the flights. Upper limits to the quiet time solar neutron fluxes at the 95% confidence level are .00028, .00046, .00096 and .00090 neutrons/sq cm-sec in the energy intervals of 10-30, 30-50, 50-100 and 10-100 MeV, respectively.

  20. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2. [Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.

    1988-01-01

    The time sequences of diffraction limited granulation images obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter on Spacelab 2 are presented. The uncorrection autocorrelation limetime in magnetic regions is dominated by the 5-min oscillation. The removal of this oscillation causes the autocorrelation lifetime to increase by more than a factor of 2. The results suggest that a significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Horizontal displacements and transverse velocities in the intensity field are measured. Lower limits to the lifetime in the quiet and magnetic sun are set at 440 s and 950 s, respectively.

  1. The Angular Distribution of Quiet-time ~20-300 keV Superhalo Electrons in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Wang, L.; He, J.; Tu, C. Y.; Pei, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The angular distribution of solar wind superhalo electrons carries important information on the electron acceleration location and scattering in the interplanetary medium. Here we present a comprehensive study of the angular distribution of ~20-300 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3DP instrument during quiet-time periods from 1995 January through 2013 December. For quiet-time intervals, we re-bin the observed electron pitch angle distributions into the outward-traveling and inward-traveling bins, according the direction of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The inward-outward anisotropy of superhalo electrons at energy E is defined as A = 2(fout - fin)/(fout + fin), where fout (fin) is the average flux of outward-traveling (inward-traveling) electrons. We find that among all the ~640 quiet-time intervals, ~5% have an A > 0.1 (referred to as "outward events"), ~5% have an A < -0.1 (referred to as "inward events"), and ~90% have an |A| ≤ 0.1 (referred to as "isotropic events"). Isotropic events show no clear correlation with solar wind parameters (nSW, Vsw and Tp), IMF and solar wind turbulence spectrum. Inward and outward events also have no association with the IMF and nSW. But the occurrence ratio of outward (inward) events over all the events, α, roughly decreases (increases) with increasing VSW. Moreover, for outward (inward) events, α roughly increases with ρe/ρTp, where ρTp is the solar wind thermal proton gyroradius that is related to the separation between the turbulence inertial and dissipation ranges. These results suggest that quite-time superhalo electrons are generally isotropic due to the wave-particle interaction in the interplanetary medium; outward-traveling (inward-traveling) superhalo electrons may come from the acceleration occurring beyond (within) 1 AU, probably by CIRs or turbulence. We will also present a case study of several quiet-time electron events with the anisotropy A increasing with the electron energy E.

  2. QUIET-TIME SUPRATHERMAL (∼0.1–1.5 keV) ELECTRONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Bale, Stuart D.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2016-03-20

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (∼0.1–1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3DP instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. After separating (beaming) strahl electrons from (isotropic) halo electrons according to their different behaviors in the angular distribution, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both strahl and halo electrons at ∼0.1–1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ and effective temperature T{sub eff}. We also calculate the number density n and average energy E{sub avg} of strahl and halo electrons by integrating the electron measurements between ∼0.1 and 1.5 keV. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and T{sub eff} for both strahl and halo electrons, and a strong positive correlation between the strahl n and halo n, likely reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. In both solar cycles, κ is larger at solar minimum than at solar maximum for both strahl and halo electrons. The halo κ is generally smaller than the strahl κ (except during the solar minimum of cycle 23). The strahl n is larger at solar maximum, but the halo n shows no difference between solar minimum and maximum. Both the strahl n and halo n have no clear association with the solar wind core population, but the density ratio between the strahl and halo roughly anti-correlates (correlates) with the solar wind density (velocity)

  3. Observations and Modeling of the Emerging Extreme-ultraviolet Loops in the Quiet Sun as Seen with the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, L. P.; Kariyappa, R.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.; Hasan, S. S.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2013-05-01

    We used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to study coronal loops at small scales, emerging in the quiet Sun. With HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, we derive the integrated and unsigned photospheric magnetic flux at the loop footpoints in the photosphere. These loops are bright in the EUV channels of AIA. Using the six AIA EUV filters, we construct the differential emission measure (DEM) in the temperature range 5.7-6.5 in log T (K) for several hours of observations. The observed DEMs have a peak distribution around log T ≈ 6.3, falling rapidly at higher temperatures. For log T < 6.3, DEMs are comparable to their peak values within an order of magnitude. The emission-weighted temperature is calculated, and its time variations are compared with those of magnetic flux. We present two possibilities for explaining the observed DEMs and temperatures variations. (1) Assuming that the observed loops are composed of a hundred thin strands with certain radius and length, we tested three time-dependent heating models and compared the resulting DEMs and temperatures with the observed quantities. This modeling used enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), a zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic code. The comparisons suggest that a medium-frequency heating model with a population of different heating amplitudes can roughly reproduce the observations. (2) We also consider a loop model with steady heating and non-uniform cross-section of the loop along its length, and find that this model can also reproduce the observed DEMs, provided the loop expansion factor γ ~ 5-10. More observational constraints are required to better understand the nature of coronal heating in the short emerging loops on the quiet Sun.

  4. Long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hori, T.; Nose, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate characteristics of the long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere, we analyzed the amplitude of geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) field daily variation using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations within the period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET) products (metadata database and analysis software) for finding and handling the long-term observation data obtained at many observatories. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear solar activity dependence and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009. This significant depression implies that the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation responsible for ionization of the upper atmosphere decreased during this solar cycle minimum. In order to examine a global distribution of the long-term trend in the Sq amplitude, we derived the residual Sq amplitude from the deviation from the fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. Moreover, we estimate the neutral wind in the lower thermosphere from the Sq amplitude and height-integrated ionospheric conductivity in order to know the physical mechanism of the long-term trend in the residual Sq amplitude. As a result, the estimated thermospheric zonal and meridional winds showed a seasonal variation with a period of one year or less, but the solar activity dependence was unclear. This result suggests that the solar cycle dependence of the Sq amplitude may be mainly attributed to the variation of the ionospheric conductivity.

  5. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, Atsuki; Koyama, Yukinobu; Nose, Masahito; Hori, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet (Sq) geomagnetic field daily variation have been investigated using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic observation stations within the period of 1947 to 2013. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear dependence on the 10- to 12-year solar activity cycle and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008 to 2009. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude was approximately linear but about 53% of geomagnetic stations showed a weak nonlinear relation to the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second-order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947 to 2013 and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, the majority of trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity at 100-km altitude and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71% of the geomagnetic stations. Furthermore, the residual Sq amplitude at the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  6. How Quiet is the Quiet Magnetosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M.; Moretto, T.; Friis-Christensen, E. A.; Opgenoorth, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    The term "quiet magnetosphere" has been accepted as a descriptor of a magnetospheric state under small solar wind driving conditions. Observations indicate that such a state entails a substantial reduction of field-aligned currents, the polar cap potential, polar cap size, and general convection in the magnetosphere. While this paradigm is often discussed, little research has been applied to determine the detailed state of the structure of the magnetosphere. Due to basic constraints, such as entropy conservation, it appears, for example, very likely that the state of the quiet magnetosphere depends on the dynamic history. Relaxation to a unique relaxed state, should, if at all, only be possible on some yet undetermined relaxation time scale. Finally, the quiet state should depend on residual fluctuations in the solar wind driver, even if the IMF is northward. This presentation is shedding some first light on the issue of the quiet magnetosphere. We are using global MHD simulations to study the relaxation process starting from different driven states. By studying different key parameters, we derive estimates for relaxation time scales, and we will demonstrate the role solar wind fluctuations play in shaping the typical behavior of a relaxed magnetosphere.

  7. Nanoflare Heating of the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, N. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    How the solar corona is heated to temperatures of over 1 MK, while the photosphere below is only ~ 6000 K remains one of the outstanding problems in all of space science. Solving this problem is crucial for understanding Sun-Earth connections, and will provide new insight into universal processes such as magnetic reconnection and wave-particle interactions. We use a systematic technique to analyze the properties of coronal heating throughout the solar corona using data taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Our technique computes cooling times of the coronal plasma on a pixel-by-pixel basis and has the advantage that it analyzes all of the coronal emission, including the diffuse emission surrounding distinguishable coronal features. We have already applied this technique to 15 different active regions, and find clear evidence for dynamic heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with the 'impulsive nanoflare' scenario. What about the rest of the Solar corona? Whether the quiet Sun is heated in a similar or distinct manner from active regions is a matter of great debate. Here we apply our coronal heating analysis technique to quiet Sun locations. We find areas of quiet Sun locations that also undergo dynamic heating and cooling cycles, consistent with impulsive nanoflares. However, there are important characteristics that are distinct from those of active regions.

  8. Comparison of physical properties of quiet and active regions through the analysis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Criscuoli, S.

    2013-11-20

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  9. Comparison of Physical Properties of Quiet and Active Regions Through the Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2013-11-01

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  10. CORONAL HEATING BY THE INTERACTION BETWEEN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE QUIET SUN OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Chen, Feng; Peter, Hardi E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: chen@mps.mpg.de

    2015-02-01

    The question of what heats the solar corona remains one of the most important puzzles in solar physics and astrophysics. Here we report Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of coronal heating by the interaction between emerging active regions (EARs) and the surrounding quiet Sun (QS). The EARs continuously interact with the surrounding QS, resulting in dark ribbons which appear at the boundary of the EARs and the QS. The dark ribbons visible in extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths propagate away from the EARs with speeds of a few km s{sup −1}. The regions swept by the dark ribbons are brightening afterward, with the mean temperature increasing by one quarter. The observational findings demonstrate that uninterrupted magnetic reconnection between EARs and the QS occurs. When the EARs develop, the reconnection continues. The dark ribbons may be the track of the interface between the reconnected magnetic fields and the undisturbed QS’s fields. The propagating speed of the dark ribbons reflects the reconnection rate and is consistent with our numerical simulation. A long-term coronal heating which occurs in turn from nearby the EARs to far away from the EARs is proposed.

  11. The solar XUV He I and He II emission lines. I - Intensities and gross center-to-limb behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, S. A.; Bohlin, J. D.; Glackin, D. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The center-to-limb variation of the He II 304- and 256-A lines and He I 584- and 537-A lines is derived for different solar features, but averaged over the chromospheric supergranulation structure. The general trend is for limb brightening in quiet-sun regions, limb neutrality in unipolar magnetic regions (UMR), and limb darkening in polar coronal holes. The center-to-limb behavior in these optically thick emission lines indicates collisional excitation and decreasing transition-region temperature gradients with respect to optical depth in the sequence quiet sun to UMR to coronal hole.

  12. Middle- and low-latitude emissions from energetic neutral atom precipitation seen from ATLAS 1 under quiet magnetic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Ishimoto, M.; Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    During the ATLAS 1 mission spectral observations were made at middle and low latitudes of features expected from the precipitation of energetic neutral atoms. The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory was used at night in the UV and visible with maximum gain. The tangent ray heights of the look directions ranged from near 100 km to near 200 km, and the geomagnetic conditions were quiet during the observations, which were made March 28 to April 3, 1992. The N2(+) 1N 391.4-nm and O I 130.4 and 135.6-nm emissions were observed at all latitudes, with lower emission rates at lower magnetic dip latitudes, except that enhancements in the O I lines were seen within 30 deg of the dip equator to radiative recombination of ionospheric plasma. The latitude profile observed for the N2(+) 1N emission did not show an equatorial or midlatitude peak. This implies that the source of energetic neutrals is more consistent with prompt charge exchange loss of freshly injected trapped ions with relatively low mirror heights (i.e., ions on higher L shells with equatorial pitch angle distributions nearly isotropic to the loss cone) than loss of highly eroded populations of particles with high mirror heights (i.e., ions on lower L shells with pancake equatorial pitch angle distributions). The N2(+) 1N emission rates have been compared with models of atmospheric emission due to fluxes of O/O(+) and H/H(+) in the thermosphere, as produced by energetic neutral oxygen or hydrogen atom precipitation. Energy deposition rates are inferred.

  13. Wave propagation in a solar quiet region and the influence of the magnetic canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We seek indications or evidence of transmission/conversion of magnetoacoustic waves at the magnetic canopy, as a result of its impact on the properties of the wave field of the photosphere and chromosphere. Methods: We use cross-wavelet analysis to measure phase differences between intensity and Doppler signal oscillations in the Hα, Ca ii h, and G-band. We use the height of the magnetic canopy to create appropriate masks to separate internetwork (IN) and magnetic canopy regions. We study wave propagation and differences between these two regions. Results: The magnetic canopy affects wave propagation by lowering the phase differences of progressive waves and allowing the propagation of waves with frequencies lower than the acoustic cut-off. We also find indications in the Doppler signals of Hα of a response to the acoustic waves at the IN, observed in the Ca ii h line. This response is affected by the presence of the magnetic canopy. Conclusions: Phase difference analysis indicates the existence of a complicated wave field in the quiet Sun, which is composed of a mixture of progressive and standing waves. There are clear imprints of mode conversion and transmission due to the interaction between the p-modes and small-scale magnetic fields of the network and internetwork.

  14. The Brightness Temperature of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere at 2.6 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Shimojo, Masumi; Asayama, Shinichiro; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; White, Stephen; Bastian, Timothy; Saito, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The absolute brightness temperature of the Sun at millimeter wavelengths is an important diagnostic of the solar chromosphere. Because the Sun is so bright, measurement of this property usually involves the operation of telescopes under extreme conditions and requires a rigorous performance assessment of the telescope. In this study, we establish solar observation and calibration techniques at 2.6 mm wavelength for the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and accurately derive the absolute solar brightness temperature. We tune the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) receiver by inducing different bias voltages onto the SIS mixer to prevent saturation. Then, we examine the linearity of the receiver system by comparing outputs derived from different tuning conditions. Furthermore, we measure the lunar filled beam efficiency of the telescope using the New Moon, and then derive the absolute brightness temperature of the Sun. The derived solar brightness temperature is 7700 ± 310 K at 115 GHz. The telescope beam pattern is modeled as a summation of three Gaussian functions and derived using the solar limb. The real shape of the Sun is determined via deconvolution of the beam pattern from the observed map. Such well-calibrated single-dish observations are important for high-resolution chromospheric studies because they provide the absolute temperature scale that is lacking from interferometer observations.

  15. Physical Properties of Large and Small Granules in Solar Quiet Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daren; Xie, Zongxia; Hu, Qinghua; Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jingxiu

    2011-12-01

    The normal mode observations of seven quiet regions obtained by the Hinode spacecraft are analyzed to study the physical properties of granules. An artificial intelligence technique is introduced to automatically find the spatial distribution of granules in feature spaces. In this work, we investigate the dependence of granular continuum intensity, mean Doppler velocity, and magnetic fields on granular diameter. We recognized 71,538 granules by an automatic segmentation technique and then extracted five properties: diameter, continuum intensity, Doppler velocity, and longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux density to describe the granules. To automatically explore the intrinsic structures of the granules in the five-dimensional parameter space, the X-means clustering algorithm and one-rule classifier are introduced to define the rules for classifying the granules. It is found that diameter is a dominating parameter in classifying the granules and two families of granules are derived: small granules with diameters smaller than 1farcs44, and large granules with diameters larger than 1farcs44. Based on statistical analysis of the detected granules, the following results are derived: (1) the averages of diameter, continuum intensity, and Doppler velocity in the upward direction of large granules are larger than those of small granules; (2) the averages of absolute longitudinal, transverse, and unsigned flux density of large granules are smaller than those of small granules; (3) for small granules, the average of continuum intensity increases with their diameters, while the averages of Doppler velocity, transverse, absolute longitudinal, and unsigned magnetic flux density decrease with their diameters. However, the mean properties of large granules are stable; (4) the intensity distributions of all granules and small granules do not satisfy Gaussian distribution, while that of large granules almost agrees with normal distribution with a peak at 1.04 I 0.

  16. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF LARGE AND SMALL GRANULES IN SOLAR QUIET REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Xie Zongxia; Hu Qinghua; Yang Shuhong; Zhang Jun; Wang Jingxiu E-mail: zjun@ourstar.bao.ac.cn

    2011-12-10

    The normal mode observations of seven quiet regions obtained by the Hinode spacecraft are analyzed to study the physical properties of granules. An artificial intelligence technique is introduced to automatically find the spatial distribution of granules in feature spaces. In this work, we investigate the dependence of granular continuum intensity, mean Doppler velocity, and magnetic fields on granular diameter. We recognized 71,538 granules by an automatic segmentation technique and then extracted five properties: diameter, continuum intensity, Doppler velocity, and longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux density to describe the granules. To automatically explore the intrinsic structures of the granules in the five-dimensional parameter space, the X-means clustering algorithm and one-rule classifier are introduced to define the rules for classifying the granules. It is found that diameter is a dominating parameter in classifying the granules and two families of granules are derived: small granules with diameters smaller than 1.''44, and large granules with diameters larger than 1.''44. Based on statistical analysis of the detected granules, the following results are derived: (1) the averages of diameter, continuum intensity, and Doppler velocity in the upward direction of large granules are larger than those of small granules; (2) the averages of absolute longitudinal, transverse, and unsigned flux density of large granules are smaller than those of small granules; (3) for small granules, the average of continuum intensity increases with their diameters, while the averages of Doppler velocity, transverse, absolute longitudinal, and unsigned magnetic flux density decrease with their diameters. However, the mean properties of large granules are stable; (4) the intensity distributions of all granules and small granules do not satisfy Gaussian distribution, while that of large granules almost agrees with normal distribution with a peak at 1.04 I{sub 0}.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Solar Quiet Daily Sq Variation and Equatorial Electrojet Over Africa: Results From International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiu, A.; Yumoto, K.; Bello, O.

    2010-12-01

    Space Environment Research Centre of Kyushu University, Japan, installed 13 units of Magnetic Data Acquisition Systems MAGDAS over Africa during the International Heliophysical Year IHY. Magnetic records from 10 stations along the African 96o Magnetic Meridian (Geographical 30o - 40o East) were examined for Solar quiet daily Sq variation in the three geomagnetic field components H, D and Z. Spatial variations of Sq in the geomagnetic components were examined. Signatures of equatorial electrojet and worldwide Sq were identified and studied in detail. H field experienced more variation within the equatorial electrojet zone. Diurnal and seasonal variations of the geomagnetic variations in the three components were discussed. Levels of inter-relationships between the Sq and its variability in the three components were statistically derived and interpreted in line with the mechanisms responsible for the variations of the geomagnetic field. Data from 2 magnetic observatories within equatorial electrojet EEJ strip and 2 stations outside the EEJ strip were employed to evaluate and study the signatures of the Equatorial electrojet over the African sector. The transient variations of the EEJ at two almost parallel axes using Lagos-Ilorin and Nairobi-Addis pairs were examined. The EEJ appear stronger in East than West Africa. The magnitudes and patterns of variation of EEJ strength along the two axes were examined for any simultaneity or otherwise of responses to ionospheric processes. The flow gradient of EEJ along the African sector was estimated and its diurnal variation studied.

  18. The EUV Helium Spectrum in the Quiet Sun: A By-Product of Coronal Emission?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andretta, Vincenzo; DelZanna, Giulio; Jordan, Stuart D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we test one of the mechanisms proposed to explain the intensities and other observed properties of the solar helium spectrum, and in particular of its Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) resonance lines. The so-called Photoionisation-Recombination (P-R) mechanism involves photoionisation of helium atoms and ions by EUV coronal radiation, followed by recombination cascades. We present calibrated measurements of EUV flux obtained with the two CDS spectrometers on board SOHO, in quiescent solar regions. We were able to obtain an essentially complete estimate of the total photoionizing flux in the wavelength range below 504 A (the photoionisation threshold for He(I)), as well as simultaneous measurements with the same instruments of the intensities of the strongest EUV helium lines: He(II) lambda304, He(I) lambda584, and He(I) lambda537. We find that there are not enough EUV photons to account for the observed helium line intensities. More specifically, we conclude that He(II) intensities cannot be explained by the P-R mechanism. Our results, however, leave open the possibility that the He(I) spectrum could be formed by the P-R mechanism, with the He(II) lambda304 line as a significant photoionizating source.

  19. Solar mass emission and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-07-01

    The properties of the solar wind and the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) have been directly measured by satellite observations since the early 1960s, thus covering only the declining phase of the Grand modern maximum (GMM) of solar activity. The information on the properties of solar wind and HMF in the earlier decades is based on different indices of geomagnetic activity, based on observations of the geomagnetic field since the 1840s. While the 19th century is covered by a rather small number of observations, there are several independent series of observations from the early 1900s onwards, yielding a fairly reliable view of solar wind and HMF over the whole GMM. Geomagnetic activity is mainly produced by two major solar wind structures: coronal mass ejections (CME) and high-speed solar wind streams (HSS), whose properties and occurrences differ notably. While CMEs cause the most dramatic individual storms, HSSs are the most effective long-term driver of magnetospheric energetic particles, for which homogeneous, long-term databases of fluxes have recently become available. The new long-term information also allows interesting possibilities to more reliably study the long-term evolution of solar effects in the Earth's atmosphere and climate. E.g., there is evidence that processes related to HSSs may modulate regional/hemispheric climate patterns, in particular the NAO/NAM oscillation. Moreover, other, independent climate effects due to the HMF have been suggested. We review the different approaches used to obtain information on the centennial solar wind and HMF, as well as their suggested atmospheric and climatic effects.

  20. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the amplitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Tsuda, T.

    2011-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region from middle latitudes to the magnetic equator. These currents are generated by a dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the thermosphere and ionosphere. From the Ohm's equation, the ionospheric currents strongly depend on the ionospheric conductivity, polarization electric field and neutral wind. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Elias et al. [2010] found that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes from 1961 to 2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effects in the thermosphere due to increasing the greenhouse gases. In this talk, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. These observation data have been provided by the IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork) project. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 flux as an indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range, geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum per day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the Sq amplitude at all the stations strongly depends on 11-year solar activity, and tends to enhance more during the high activities (19- and 22- solar cycles) than during the low activity (20-solar cycle). The Fourier spectra of the F10.7 flux and Sq

  1. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by the global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region, which are generated by dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Recently, Elias et al. [2010] reported that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes in a period of 1961-2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is due to ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effect in the thermosphere due to increasing greenhouse gas. In the present study, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 solar flux as a good indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range as well as geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour observed at 184 geomagnetic stations. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum every day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude at all the geomagnetic stations shows a strong correlation with the solar F10.7 flux which depends on 11-year solar activity. The relationship between the Sq amplitude and F10.7 flux was not linear but nonlinear. This nonlinearity could be interpreted as the decrease of production rate of electrons and ions in the ionosphere for the strong EUV and UV fluxes as already reported by Balan et al. [1993]. In order to minimize the solar

  2. Quiet Ride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Several companies are marketing maintenance equipment to education institutions on a "quiet platform," citing benefits such as a safer, more pleasant indoor environment and unobtrusive operations during day cleaning or operating hours. This is basically "sound advice" (no one likes noisy equipment), but some of the messages can be confusing and…

  3. Determination of Geomagnetically Quiet Time Disturbances of the Ionosphere over Uganda during the Beginning of Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habyarimana, Valence

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere is prone to significant disturbances during geomagnetically active and quiet conditions. This study focused on the occurrence of ionospheric disturbances during geomagnetically quiet conditions. Ionospheric data comprised of Global Positioning System (GPS)-derived Total Electron Content (TEC), obtained over Mt. Baker, Entebbe, and Mbarara International Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Service (IGS) stations. The Disturbance storm time (Dst) index was obtained from Kyoto University website. The number of geomagnetically quiet days in the period under study were first identified. Their monthly percentages were compared for the two years. The monthly percentage of geomagnetically quiet days for all the months in 2009 numerically exceeded those in 2008. December had the highest percentage of geomagnetically quiet days for both years (94 % in 2008 and 100 % in 2009). Geomagnetically quiet days did not show seasonal dependence. The variation in percentage of geomagnetically quiet days during solstice months (May, June, July, November, December, and January) and equinoctial months (February, March, April, August, September, and October) was not uniform. Geomagnetically quiet time disturbances were found to be more significant from 09:00 UT to 13:00 UT. However, there were some other disturbances of small scale amplitude that occurred between 14:00 UT and 22:00 UT. Further analysis was done to identify the satellites that observed the irregularities that were responsible for TEC perturbations. Satellites are identified by Pseudo Random Numbers (PRNs). The ray path between individual PRNs and the corresponding receivers were analysed. Satellites with PRNs: 3, 7, 8, 19 and 21 registered most of the perturbations. It was found that Q disturbances led to fluctuations in density gradients. Significant TEC perturbations were observed on satellite with PRN 21 with receivers at Entebbe and Mbarara on June 28, 2009 between 18:00 UT and 21:00 UT.

  4. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  5. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    PubMed

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  6. Luminescent solar concentrator improvement by stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Argyros, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) offer the prospect of reducing the cost of solar energy, and are a promising candidate for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, the realization of commercially viable efficiency of LSCs is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. In this work, a method is introduced for reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire length of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption, and directed by the seed laser towards a small target PV cell. A mathematical model of such a system is presented which identifies different physical parameters responsible for the power conversion efficiency and gives the net effective output power.

  7. Analyses of cosmic ray induced-neutron based on spectrometers operated simultaneously at mid-latitude and Antarctica high-altitude stations during quiet solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, G.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper are described a new neutron spectrometer which operate in the Concordia station (Antarctica, Dome C) since December 2015. This instrument complements a network including neutron spectrometers operating in the Pic-du-Midi and the Pico dos Dias. Thus, this work present an analysis of cosmic ray induced-neutron based on spectrometers operated simultaneously in the Pic-du-Midi and the Concordia stations during a quiet solar activity. The both high station platforms allow for investigating the long period dynamics to analyze the spectral variation and effects of local and seasonal changes, but also the short term dynamics during solar flare events. A first part is devoted to analyze the count rates, the spectrum and the neutron fluxes, implying cross-comparisons between data obtained in the both stations. In a second part, measurements analyses were reinforced by modeling based on simulations of atmospheric cascades according to primary spectra which only depend on the solar modulation potential.

  8. Storm/Quiet Ratio Comparisons Between TIMED/SABER NO (sup +)(v) Volume Emission Rates and Incoherent Scatter Radar Electron Densities at E-Region Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, J. R.; Mertens, C. J.; Bilitza, D.; Xu, X.; Russell, J. M., III; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband infrared limb emission at 4.3 microns is measured by the TIMED/SABER instrument. At night, these emission observations at E-region altitudes are used to derive the so called NO+(v) Volume Emission Rate (VER). NO+(v) VER can be derived by removing the background CO2(v3) 4.3 microns radiance contribution using SABER-based non-LTE radiation transfer models, and by performing a standard Abel inversion on the residual radiance. SABER observations show that NO+(v) VER is significantly enhanced during magnetic storms in accordance with increased ionization of the neutral atmosphere by auroral electron precipitation, followed by vibrational excitation of NO+ (i.e., NO+(v)) from fast exothermic ion-neutral reactions, and prompt infrared emission at 4.3 m. Due to charge neutrality, the NO+(v) VER enhancements are highly correlated with electron density enhancements, as observed for example by Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR). In order to characterize the response of the storm-time E-region from both SABER and ISR measurements, a Storm/Quiet ratio (SQR) quantity is defined as a function of altitude. For SABER, the SQR is the ratio of the storm-to-quiet NO+(v) VER. SQR is the storm-to-quiet ratio of electron densities for ISR. In this work, we compare SABER and ISR SQR values between 100 to 120 km. Results indicate good agreement between these measurements. SQR values are intended to be used as a correction factor to be included in an empirical storm-time correction to the International Reference Ionosphere model at E-region altitudes.

  9. OBSERVATION OF HIGH-SPEED OUTFLOW ON PLUME-LIKE STRUCTURES OF THE QUIET SUN AND CORONAL HOLES WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Habbal, Shadia Rifal; He Jiansen E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu E-mail: jshept@gmail.com

    2011-08-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s{sup -1} at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun (QS) regions. Outflows are also visible in the 'inter-plume' regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the QS and coronal holes (CHs), and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mass into the corona and serve as an important source of mass supply to the solar wind. We demonstrate that the QS plume flows can sometimes significantly contaminate the spectroscopic observations of the adjacent CHs-greatly affecting the Doppler shifts observed, thus potentially impacting significant investigations of such regions.

  10. New views on the emission and structure of the solar transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Curdt, Werner; He, Jiansen

    2010-04-01

    The Sun is the only star that we can spatially resolve and it can be regarded as a fundamental plasma laboratory of astrophysics. The solar transition region (TR), the layer between the solar chromosphere and corona, plays an important role in solar wind origin and coronal heating. Recent high-resolution observations made by SOHO, TRACE, and Hinode indicate that the TR is highly nonuniform and magnetically structured. Through a combination of spectroscopic observations and magnetic field extrapolations, the TR magnetic structures and plasma properties have been found to be different in coronal holes and in the quiet Sun. In active regions, the TR density and temperature structures also differ in sunspots and the surrounding plage regions. Although the TR is believed to be a dynamic layer, quasi-steady flows lasting from several hours to several days are often present in the quiet Sun, coronal holes, and active regions, indicating some kind of plasma circulation/convection in the TR and corona. The emission of hydrogen Lyman lines, which originates from the lower TR, has also been intensively investigated in the recent past. Observations show clearly that the flows and dynamics in the middle and upper TR can greatly modify the Lyman line profiles.

  11. Low-frequency heliographic observations of the quiet Sun corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results of heliographic observations of quiet-Sun radio emission fulfilled by the UTR-2 radio telescope. The solar corona investigations have been made close to the last solar minimum (Cycle 23) in the late August and early September of 2010 by means of the two-dimensional heliograph within 16.5-33 MHz. Moreover, the UTR-2 radio telescope was used also as an 1-D heliograph for one-dimensional scanning of the Sun at the beginning of September 2010 as well as in short-time observational campaigns in April and August of 2012. The average values of integral flux density of the undisturbed Sun continuum emission at different frequencies have been found. Using the data, we have determined the spectral index of quiet-Sun radio emission in the range 16.5-200 MHz. It is equal to -2.1±0.1. The brightness distribution maps of outer solar corona at frequencies 20.0 MHz and 26.0 MHz have been obtained. The angular sizes of radio Sun were estimated. It is found that the solar corona at these frequencies is stretched-out along equatorial direction. The coefficient of corona ellipticity varies slightly during above period. Its mean magnitudes are equal to ≈ 0.75 and ≈ 0.73 at 20.0 MHz and 26.0 MHz, respectively. The presented results for continuum emission of solar corona conform with being ones at higher frequencies.

  12. A multidisciplinary study of planetary, solar and astrophysical radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Calvert, W.; Fielder, R.; Goertz, C.; Grabbe, C.; Kurth, W.; Mutel, R.; Sheerin, J.; Mellott, M.; Spangler, S.

    1986-01-01

    Combination of the related fields of planetary, solar, and astrophysical radio emissions was attempted in order to more fully understand the radio emission processes. Topics addressed include: remote sensing of astrophysical plasma turbulence; Alfven waves; astrophysical shock waves; surface waves; very long base interferometry results; very large array observations; solar magnetic flux; and magnetohydrodynamic waves as a tool for solar corona diagnostics.

  13. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  14. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  15. PENGUIn/AGO and THEMIS conjugate observations of whistler mode chorus waves in the dayside uniform zone under steady solar wind and quiet geomagnetic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Spasojevic, Maria; Li, Wen; Bortnik, Jacob; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2012-07-01

    We perform a case study of conjugate observations of whistler mode chorus waves on the dayside made on 26 July 2008 by three THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based ELF/VLF receivers at the Automatic Geophysical Observatories (AGO) in Antarctica supported by the U.S. Polar Experiment Network for Geospace Upper-atmosphere Investigations (PENGUIn) project. The dayside chorus waves were excited during a period of no substorm activity with geomagnetic indices indicating quiet conditions (Dst ˜ -10 nT; AE < 200 nT). The solar wind dynamic pressure was almost constant during the chorus wave intensification. Conjugate observations in the outer magnetosphere confirm that the chorus intensification was localized within the radial distance R = 7-10 RE near noon (12.5 < MLT < 13.5 h). The waves persisted for at least 1.5 h in the same location, where field lines are not accompanied by off-equatorial minimum-B pockets but rather exhibit nearly zero dB/ds, the field-aligned gradient in B-magnitude, over a wide range of magnetic latitudes (˜±20°). The location did not seem to corotate with the Earth or drift with the energetic electrons. The chorus waves consisted of discrete, rising tone elements, propagating away from the magnetic equator, quasi-parallel to the ambient magnetic field (wave-normal angles < 20°). We conclude that the long-lasting, localized, quiet time dayside chorus amplification was due to the nearly zero dB/ds conditions that occur naturally in the dayside uniform zone (DUZ), the transition region between the near-Earth dipole and the compressed, off-equatorial double-minimum field configuration found closer to the magnetopause. We thus suggest that the magnetic field configuration in the dayside outer magnetosphere plays a key role in the generation of dayside chorus waves under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  16. Solar Cyclical Trend Study of the Mid-Latitude, Quiet-Time, Meridional, Neutral Winds at Winter Solstice Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    thermosphere , as seen in Figure 1 [Banks and Kockarts, 1973; Jacchia and Slowey, 1973; Hedin and Mayr, 1987]. A similar solar cycle effect is expected in...approximately two times lower at solar minimum than it is at solar maximum. Cor- responding to this solar cycle effect , a factor of 4.5 difference has been...investigation of the effect of combined auroral forcing and solar forcing on the mid- latitude thermospheric winds. This type of study would provide

  17. USING REALISTIC MHD SIMULATIONS FOR THE MODELING AND INTERPRETATION OF QUIET-SUN OBSERVATIONS WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Couvidat, S.; Lagg, A.

    2015-07-20

    The solar atmosphere is extremely dynamic, and many important phenomena develop on small scales that are unresolved in observations with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. For correct calibration and interpretation of the observations, it is very important to investigate the effects of small-scale structures and dynamics on the HMI observables, such as Doppler shift, continuum intensity, spectral line depth, and width. We use 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and the atmosphere of the Sun, and a spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code to study observational characteristics of the Fe i 6173 Å line observed by HMI in quiet-Sun regions. We use the modeling results to investigate the sensitivity of the line Doppler shift to plasma velocity, and also sensitivities of the line parameters to plasma temperature and density, and determine effective line formation heights for observations of solar regions located at different distances from the disk center. These estimates are important for the interpretation of helioseismology measurements. In addition, we consider various center-to-limb effects, such as convective blueshift, variations of helioseismic travel-times, and the “concave” Sun effect, and show that the simulations can qualitatively reproduce the observed phenomena, indicating that these effects are related to a complex interaction of the solar dynamics and radiative transfer.

  18. Quiet time long term variations of electric fields over São Luís, Brazil, during the last solar minimum (2001-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Juliano; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Marcos Denardini, Clezio; Chen, Sony Su

    Long term variations of vertical and zonal electric fields at Brazilian equatorial E-region heights over São Luís (dip: ~-0.5) are presented. The vertical electric fields estimation includes observations of the type II irregularities embedded in the electrojet current system made with the 50 MHz coherent backscatter (RESCO) radar during quiet time from January 2001 through August 2009. The zonal electric fields are therefore obtained from the vertical electric fields and the Hall-to-Pedersen ionospheric conductivities ratio. The conductivities are field-line-integrated obtained from a conductivity model developed for the Brazilian equatorial E-region. The results are discussed in terms of the local time, seasonal and solar radio flux.

  19. Long-term monthly statistics of mid-latitudinal NmF2 in the Northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    Long-term mid-latitude hourly values of NmF2 measured in 1957-2015 by 10 ionosondes (Point Arguello, Wallops Is., Boulder, de l'Ebre, Rome, Ottawa, Pruhonice, Dourbes, Slough, and Juliusruh) in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of the noon NmF2 for each month, including the mathematical expectation, most probable value, arithmetic average, and arithmetic average median. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). The calculated month-to-month variations of the NmF2 statistical parameters made it possible to study the winter anomaly and spring-autumn asymmetry in these statistical parameters.

  20. Dependences of statistical characteristics of NmE on the month of the year at middle and low latitudes under daytime geomagnetically quiet conditions at low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2016-07-01

    Month-to-month changes in the statistical characteristics of the ionospheric E layer peak electron density NmE at medium and low geomagnetic latitudes under daytime geomagnetically quiet conditions are investigated. Critical frequencies of the ionospheric E layer measured by the middle latitude ionosonde Boulder and low latitude ionosondes Huancayo and Jicamarca at low solar activity from 1957 to 2015 have been used in the conducted statistical analysis. The mathematical expectation of NmE, standard deviation of NmE from the expectation of NmE, and NmE variation coefficient have been calculated for each month of the year. The months of the formation of extrema of these statistical parameters of NmE were found.

  1. Sampling Studies Of Quasars, Radio-loud Galaxies, & Radio-quiet Galaxies -- Searching For The Cause Of Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, G.; Salois, Amee; Soechting, I.; Smith, M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparing the environments of Radio-Loud Galaxies, Radio-Quiet Galaxies, and Quasars offers an opportunity to study the evolution of these objects. Our samples have been carefully chosen from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which also includes samples studied in the FIRST survey, and have been cut to determine the best possible results. Our study includes three samples. The Quasar sample currently contains 69 objects, the Radio-Loud Galaxy (RLG) sample has 1,335 objects, and the Radio-Quiet Galaxy (RQG) sample contains 2,436 objects (any updates will be given at the meeting). A number of trims were made to produce (smaller) samples with characteristics suited for precise results. By comparing the environments of these three samples we will be able to see any similarities or differences between them. If similarities are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to 'nature' - in an isolated manner with little environmental feedback, which may or may not have an effect on its evolution, as supposed by Coldwell et al. (2009). If differences are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to `nurture’ and that the environment may have played an important role in the development of their properties. We employ similar procedures used by Coldwell et al. (2009) in their study of blue and red AGNs. Upon the completion of an accurate sample, future work will be pursued studying a number of properties of the environments including studies of: the stellar masses, star formation rates, sersic morphologies, as well as densities and ages of the environments.

  2. Charge States and FIP Bias of the Solar Wind from Coronal Holes, Active Regions, and Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, Maria S.; Xia, LiDong; Li, Bo; Huang, ZhengHua; Wangguan, Zhipeng

    2017-02-01

    Connecting in situ measured solar-wind plasma properties with typical regions on the Sun can provide an effective constraint and test to various solar wind models. We examine the statistical characteristics of the solar wind with an origin in different types of source regions. We find that the speed distribution of coronal-hole (CH) wind is bimodal with the slow wind peaking at ∼400 km s‑1 and the fast at ∼600 km s‑1. An anti-correlation between the solar wind speeds and the O7+/O6+ ion ratio remains valid in all three types of solar wind as well during the three studied solar cycle activity phases, i.e., solar maximum, decline, and minimum. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range and its average values all decrease with the increasing solar wind speed in different types of solar wind. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range (0.06–0.40, first ionization potential (FIP) bias range 1–7) for active region wind is wider than for CH wind (0.06–0.20, FIP bias range 1–3), while the minimum value of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} (∼ 0.06) does not change with the variation of speed, and it is similar for all source regions. The two-peak distribution of CH wind and the anti-correlation between the speed and O7+/O6+ in all three types of solar wind can be explained qualitatively by both the wave-turbulence-driven and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, whereas the distribution features of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} in different source regions of solar wind can be explained more reasonably by the RLO models.

  3. The emission-line spectrum above the limb of a solar coronal hole - 1175-1940 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Vanhoosier, M. E.; Purcell, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Emission-line spectra of a coronal hole that coincided with the north pole of the sun are discussed which were obtained with a slit spectrograph aboard Skylab at positions within and above the solar white-light limb in the wavelength range from 1175 to 1940 A. Relative line intensities, line profiles, and full widths at half-maximum are presented for selected chromospheric and transition-zone lines observed above the present polar coronal hole. Average mass motions in the transition zone are determined as a function of electron temperature from the widths of the optically thin lines by assuming ionization equilibrium. The line intensities and profiles are compared with corresponding results deduced from spectra obtained above a quiet solar region. The coronal-hole spectra are found to imply an angular dependence for the source function as well as a radial dependence such that the source function is the smallest at the south pole and increases with decreasing solar latitude.

  4. Transmission and Emission of Solar Energetic Particles in Semi-transparent Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, Leon; Laitinen, Timo; Usoskin, Ilya; Vainio, Rami

    2014-06-01

    While major solar energetic particle (SEP) events are associated with coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks in solar wind, accurate SEP measurements reveal that more than one component of energetic ions exist in the beginning of the events. Solar electromagnetic emissions, including nuclear gamma-rays, suggest that high-energy ions could also be accelerated by coronal shocks, and some of those particles could contribute to SEPs in interplanetary space. However, the CME-driven shock in solar wind is thought to shield any particle source beneath the shock because of the strong scattering required for the diffusive shock acceleration. In this Letter, we consider a shock model that allows energetic particles from the possible behind-shock source to appear in front of the shock simultaneously with SEPs accelerated by the shock itself. We model the energetic particle transport in directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field in a spherical shock expanding through the highly turbulent magnetic sector with an embedded quiet magnetic tube, which makes the shock semi-transparent for energetic particles. The model energy spectra and time profiles of energetic ions escaping far upstream of the shock are similar to the profiles observed during the first hour of some gradual SEP events.

  5. Fourier transform spectrometer observations of solar carbon monoxide. II - Simultaneous cospatial measurements of the fundamental and first-overtone bands, and Ca II K, in quiet and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Testerman, L.; Brault, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometry has yielded simultaneous cospatial measurements of important diagnostics of thermal structure in the high solar photosphere and low chromosphere. It is noted that the anomalous behavior of the fundamental bands of CO in quiet areas near the limb is accentuated in an active region plage observed close to the limb. The difference between the core temperatures of the CO fundamental bands in a plage and a nearby quiet region at the limb is larger than the corresponding brightness temperature differences in the inner wings of the Ca II line measured in a quiet region and several plages closer to the disk center. Numerical simulations indicate that the disparate behavior of the CO bands with respect to Ca II K cannot be reconciled with existing single component thermal structure models; a two-component atmosphere is required.

  6. STRONG RESPONSE OF THE VERY BROAD H{beta} EMISSION LINE IN THE LUMINOUS RADIO-QUIET QUASAR PG 1416-129

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Li, Y.

    2011-11-20

    We report new spectroscopic observations performed in 2010 and 2011 for the luminous radio-quiet quasar PG 1416-129. Our new spectra with high quality cover both H{beta} and H{alpha} regions, and show negligible line profile variation within a timescale of one year. The two spectra allow us to study the variability of the Balmer line profile by comparing the spectra with previous ones taken at 10 and 20 years ago. By decomposing the broad Balmer emission lines into two Gaussian profiles, our spectral analysis suggests a strong response to the continuum level for the very broad component, and significant variations in both bulk blueshift velocity/FWHM and flux for the broad component. The new observations additionally indicate flat Balmer decrements (i.e., too strong H{beta} emission) at the line wings, which is hard to reproduce using recent optically thin models. With these observations we argue that a separate inner optically thin emission-line region might not be necessary in the object to reproduce the observed line profiles.

  7. On the statistical characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet halo coronal mass ejections and their associated flares during solar cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Nishant; Sharma, Joginder; Verma, Virendar Kumar; Garg, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the characteristics of radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) front side halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) (angular width 360°) observed between the time period years 1996-2014. RL-HCMEs are associated with type II radio bursts, while RQ-HCMEs are not associated with type II radio bursts. CMEs near the Sun in the interplanetary medium associated with radio bursts also affect the magnetosphere. The type II radio burst data was observed by WIND/WAVES instrument and HCMEs were observed by LASCO/ SOHO instruments. In our study, we have examined the properties of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs and found that RL-HCMEs follow the solar cycle variation. Our study also shows that the 26% of slow speed HCMEs and 82% of fast speed HCMEs are RL. The average speed of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs are 1370 km/s and 727 km/s, respectively. Most of the RQ-HCMEs occur around the solar disc center while most of RL-HCMEs are uniformly distributed across the solar disc. The mean value of acceleration of RL-HCMEs is more than twice that of RQ-HCMEs and mean value of deceleration of RL- HCMEs is very small compare to RQ-HCMEs events. It is also found that RQ-HCMEs events are associated with C- and M-class of SXR flares, while RL-HCMEs events are associated with M and X-class of SXR flares, which indicates that the RQ-HCMEs are less energetic than the RL-HCMEs. We have also discussed the various results obtained in present investigation in view of recent scenario of solar physics.

  8. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  9. Evidence for solar wind control of Saturn radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Using data collected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in 1980 and 1981, strong evidence is presented for a direct correlation between variations in the solar wind at Saturn and the level of activity of Saturn's nonthermal radio emission. Correlation coefficients of 57 to 58% are reached at lag times of 0 to 1 days between the arrival at Saturn of high pressure solar wind streams and the onset of increased radio emission. The radio emission exhibits a long-term periodicity of 25 days, identical to the periodicity seen in the solar wind at this time and consistent with the solar rotation period. The energy coupling efficiency between the solar wind with the Saturn radio emission is estimated and compared with that for Earth.

  10. Windblown dust emission, transport and deposition in solar farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuanjin; Li, Zhen; Ma, Yanbao

    2012-11-01

    Dust accumulation on solar collectors can significantly reduce the electrical output of solar farms. The presence of solar panel array can significantly accelerate or decelerate wind speed and distort the wind velocity profiles near the ground, which leads to considerable changes in dust emissions, transportation as well as deposition. To examine the effects of solar panels on dust emission, transportation and deposition, the incompressible viscous flow past flat solar panels with ground effect was numerically investigated based on finite volume method. A hybrid approach known as detached-eddy simulation (DES), combining the main features of both large-eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), is utilized to the compute the turbulence flow. Results show how aerolian dust emissions, transport and deposition are affected by wind speeds, solar panel orientation angles and panel geometries.

  11. Using Strong Solar Coronal Emission Lines as Coronal Flux Proxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Jordan, Studart D.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Andretta, Vincenzo; Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Hara, Hirosha

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of Skylab results with observations of the strong EUV lines of Fe XVI at 335 A and 361 A from the Goddard Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) flight of 1989 suggests that these lines, and perhaps others observed with SERTS, might offer good proxies for estimating the total coronal flux over important wavelength ranges. In this paper, we compare SERTS observations from a later, 1993 flight with simultaneous cospatial Yohkoh soft X-ray observations to test this suggestion over the energy range of the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. Both polynomial and power-law fits are obtained, and errors are estimated, for the SERTS lines of Fe XVI 335 A and 361 A, Fe XV 284 A and 417 A, and Mg IX 368 A. It is found that the power-law fits best cover the full range of solar conditions from quiet Sun through active region, though not surprisingly the 'cooler' Mg IX 368 A line proves to be a poor proxy. The quadratic polynomial fits yield fair agreement over a large range for all but the Mg IX line, but the linear fits fail conspicuously when extrapolated into the quiet Sun regime. The implications of this work for the He 11 304 A line formation problem are briefly considered. The paper concludes with a discussion of the value of these iron lines observed with SERTS for estimating stellar coronal fluxes, as observed for example with the EUVE satellite.

  12. Changes in solar quiet magnetic variations since the Maunder Minimum: A comparison of historical observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cnossen, Ingrid; Matzka, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic measurements going back to the eighteenth century offer a unique opportunity to study multicentennial changes in the upper atmosphere. We analyzed measurements from Rome and Mannheim from May 1782 to May 1783 and measurements from Greenwich, St. Helena, Cape of Good Hope, and Singapore from May 1841 to May 1842. A comparison of the daily magnetic variations in these historical data with modern-day observations from 2010 at nearby stations (where available) showed notable differences in the amplitude and/or phase of the X and Y components. Model simulations indicated that these can be explained at least to some extent by changes in the Earth's main magnetic field. Changes in the main field strength and the northwestward movement of the magnetic equator, in particular in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly, have caused changes in the positioning, shape, and strength of the equivalent current vortices in the ionosphere that result in the magnetic perturbations on the ground. Differences in solar activity between the historical and modern epochs, which were all near solar minima, were too small to have a notable effect on the ground magnetic perturbations. However, in regions where main magnetic field changes have been relatively small for the last 400 years, e.g., in Singapore, the effects of a long-term increase in solar activity from Maunder Minimum conditions to normal solar minimum conditions (an increase in F10.7 of 35 solar flux units) were comparable to the effects of geomagnetic main field changes.

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  14. Solar wind control of Jupiter's hectometric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Desch, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Radio, plasma, and magnetic field data obtained by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were used to examine the manner in which the Jovian hectometric radio emission (HOM) is controlled by the solar wind. Using the method of superposed epochs, it was found that the higher energy HOM is correlated with the IMF as well as with the solar wind density and pressure. However, unlike the Io-independent decametric radio emission (Non-Io DAM), the HOM displayed no correlation with the solar wind velocity, although this radio component appear to be also influenced by the IMF. The results suggest separate HOM amd Non-Io DAM sources.

  15. Suzaku Observations of Charge Exchange Emission from Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Oishi, S.; Miyoshi, Y; Terada, N.; Futaana, Y.; Porter, F. S.; Brown, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Recent results of charge exchange emission from solar system objects observed with the Japanese Suzaku satellite are reviewed. Suzaku is of great importance to investigate diffuse X-ray emission like the charge exchange from planetary exospheres and comets. The Suzaku studies of Earth's exosphere, Martian exosphere, Jupiter's aurorae, and comets are overviewed.

  16. Radio-Quiet Quasars in the VIDEO Survey: Evidence for AGN-powered radio emission below 1 mJy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Sarah; Jarvis, Matt; Haeussler, Boris; Maddox, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the interaction between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation is responsible for the co-evolution of black hole mass with galaxy bulge mass. Therefore studying this interplay is crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The new generation of radio surveys are able to play a key role in this area, as both processes produce radio emission.We use a combination of optical and near-infrared photometry to select a sample of 72 quasars from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) Survey, over 1 deg2. The depth of VIDEO allows us to study very low accretion rates and/or lower-mass black holes. 26% of the candidate quasar sample has been spectroscopically confirmed using the Southern African Large Telescope and the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. We then use a radio-stacking technique to sample below the nominal flux-density threshold of existing Very Large Array data at 1.4 GHz. In agreement with other work, we show that a power-law fit to the radio number counts is inadequate, with an upturn in the counts being observed at these faint luminosities. Previous authors attribute this to an emergent star-forming population. However, by comparing radio emission from our quasars with that from a control sample of galaxies, we suggest that this emission is predominantly caused by accretion activity. Further support for an AGN origin is provided by a comparison of two independent estimates of star formation rate. These findings have important implications for modelling radio populations below 1 mJy, which is necessary for the development of the Square Kilometre Array.

  17. A model for radio emission from solar coronal shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Solar coronal shocks are very common phenomena in the solar atmosphere and are believed to be the drivers of solar type II radio bursts. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open question. This paper proposes that electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is responsible for the generation of radiation from the coronal shocks. In the present model, an energetic ion beam accelerated by the shock first excites the Alfvén wave (AW), then the excited AW leads to the formation of a density-depleted duct along the foreshock boundary of the shock. In this density-depleted duct, the energetic electron beam produced via the shock acceleration can effectively excite radio emission by ECM instability. Our results show that this model may potentially be applied to solar type II radio bursts.

  18. Interpretation of second solar spectrum observations of the Sr I 4607 Å line in a quiet region: Turbulent magnetic field strength determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Derouich, M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Molodij, G.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents and interprets some observations of the limb polarization of Sr I 4607 Å obtained with the spectropolarimeter of the French-Italian telescope THEMIS in quiet regions close to the solar North Pole on 2002 December 7-9. The linear polarization was measured for a series of limb distances ranging from 4 to 160 arcsec, corresponding to heights of optical depth unity in the line core ranging from about 330 to 220 km, respectively, above the τ5000=1 level. To increase the polarimetric sensitivity, the data were averaged along the spectrograph slit (one arcmin long) set parallel to the solar limb. Since the data show no rotation of the linear polarization direction with respect to the limb direction, the observed depolarization is ascribed to the Hanle effect of a turbulent weak magnetic field, the zero-field polarization being derived from a model. The interpretation is performed by means of an algorithm which describes the process of line formation in terms of the atomic density matrix formalism, the solar atmosphere being described by an empirical, plane-parallel model. The collisional rates entering the model (inelastic collisions with electrons, elastic depolarizing collisions with neutral hydrogen), have been computed by applying fast semi-classical methods having a typical accuracy of the order of 20% or better (see Derouich [CITE]), leading to 6% inaccuracy on the magnetic field strength determination. We assume a unimodal distribution for the intensity of the turbulent field. The computed intensity profile has been adjusted to the observed one in both depth and width, by varying both microturbulent and macroturbulent velocities. The best adjustment is obtained for respectively 1.87 km s-1 (micro) and 1.78 km s-1 (macro). The evaluation of the magnetic depolarization leads then to the average value of 46 Gauss for the turbulent magnetic field strength, with a gradient of -0.12 Gauss/km. Our results are in very good agreement with the value of

  19. Air emissions due to wind and solar power.

    PubMed

    Katzenstein, Warren; Apt, Jay

    2009-01-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) encourage large-scale deployment of wind and solar electric power. Their power output varies rapidly, even when several sites are added together. In many locations, natural gas generators are the lowest cost resource available to compensate for this variability, and must ramp up and down quickly to keep the grid stable, affecting their emissions of NOx and CO2. We model a wind or solar photovoltaic plus gas system using measured 1-min time-resolved emissions and heat rate data from two types of natural gas generators, and power data from four wind plants and one solar plant. Over a wide range of renewable penetration, we find CO2 emissions achieve approximately 80% of the emissions reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions. Using steam injection, gas generators achieve only 30-50% of expected NOx emissions reductions, and with dry control NOx emissions increase substantially. We quantify the interaction between state RPSs and NOx constraints, finding that states with substantial RPSs could see significant upward pressure on NOx permit prices, if the gas turbines we modeled are representative of the plants used to mitigate wind and solar power variability.

  20. An introduction to quiet daily geomagnetic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    On days that are quiet with respect to solar-terrestrial activity phenomena, the geomagnetic field has variations, tens of gamma in size, with major spectral components at about 24, 12, 8, and 6 hr in period. These quiet daily field variations are primarily due to the dynamo currents flowing in the E region of the earth's ionosphere, are driven by the global thermotidal wind systems, and are dependent upon the local tensor conductivity and main geomagnetic field vector. The highlights of the behavior and interpretation of these quiet field changes, from their discovery in 1634 until the present, are discussed as an introduction to the special journal issue on Quiet Daily Geomagnetic Fields. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  1. Dependences of the NmF2 midlatitude statistical characteristics on the month of a year under geomagnetically quiet conditions near noon at low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2015-07-01

    The month-to-month variations in the statistical characteristics of the electron density at the mid-latitude ionospheric F2 layer maximum ( NmF2) were studied for geomagnetically quiet conditions near noon. The ionospheric F2 layer critical frequencies, measured by ionosondes in Ashkhabad, Tashkent, Rostov, Irkutsk, Moscow, Sverdlovsk, Tomsk, and Magadan at low solar activity from 1957 to 2013, were used in the performed statistical analysis. The mathematical expectation and the arithmetical mean value of NmF2, the arithmetical mean value of the NmF2 median, and the most probable NmF2 value were calculated for each month. The months with local extremums of these NmF2 statistical characteristics were indicated. It was demonstrated that the semiannual symmetry in the implementation time of local maximums of the NmF2 mathematical expectation, arithmetical mean values, and mean median is observed in the month-to-month variations over Ashkhabad, Tashkent, and Sverdlovsk. The semiannual symmetry of the most probable NmF2 value was found over Ashkhabad. The NmF2 statistical characteristics were compared with one another for each ionosonde at a fixed month. This comparison shows that the values of the most probable NmF2 and the NmF2 mathematical expectation and arithmetically mean median can pronouncedly differ from one another, and the maximal difference of the NmF2 mathematical expectation from the NmF2 arithmetical mean is 0.9%.

  2. Statistical Study of Network Jets Observed in the Solar Transition Region: a Comparison Between Coronal Holes and Quiet-Sun Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Nancy; Arbacher, Rebecca T.; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Cranmer, Steven R.; DeLuca, Ed E.; McKillop, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Recent IRIS observations have revealed a prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with apparent speeds of 80 - 250 km s^{-1}, emanating from small-scale bright regions inside network boundaries of coronal holes. We find that these network jets appear not only in coronal holes but also in quiet-sun regions. Using IRIS 1330 Å (C II) slit-jaw images, we extracted several parameters of these network jets, e.g. apparent speed, length, lifetime, and increase in foot-point brightness. Using several observations, we find that some properties of the jets are very similar, but others are obviously different between the quiet Sun and coronal holes. For example, our study shows that the coronal-hole jets appear to be faster and longer than those in the quiet Sun. This can be directly attributed to a difference in the magnetic configuration of the two regions, with open magnetic field lines rooted in coronal holes and magnetic loops often present in the quiet Sun. We also detected compact bright loops that are most likely transition region loops and are mostly located in quiet-Sun regions. These small loop-like regions are generally devoid of network jets. In spite of different magnetic structures in the coronal hole and quiet Sun in the transition region, there appears to be no substantial difference for the increase in footpoint brightness of the jets, which suggests that the generation mechanism of these network jets is very likely the same in both regions.

  3. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  4. Thermodynamics of photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reck, Kasper; Hansen, Ole

    2014-01-13

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) cells in which direct photon energy as well as thermal energy can be harvested have recently been suggested as a new candidate for high efficiency solar cells. Here, we present an analytic thermodynamical model for evaluation of the efficiency of PETE solar cells including an analysis of the entropy production due to thermionic emission of general validity. The model is applied to find the maximum efficiency of a PETE cell for given cathode and anode work functions and temperatures.

  5. Airborne interferometer for atmospheric emission and solar absorption.

    PubMed

    Keith, D W; Dykema, J A; Hu, H; Lapson, L; Anderson, J G

    2001-10-20

    The interferometer for emission and solar absorption (INTESA) is an infrared spectrometer designed to study radiative transfer in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from a NASA ER-2 aircraft. The Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) operates from 0.7 to 50 mum with a resolution of 0.7 cm(-1). The FTS observes atmospheric thermal emission from multiple angles above and below the aircraft. A heliostat permits measurement of solar absorption spectra. INTESA's calibration system includes three blackbodies to permit in-flight assessment of radiometric error. Results suggest that the in-flight radiometric accuracy is ~0.5 K in the mid-infrared.

  6. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  7. Recent Advances in the Exploration of the Small-Scale Structure of the Quiet Solar Atmosphere: Vortex Flows, the Horizontal Magnetic Field, and the Stokes- V Line-Ratio Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, O.; Rezaei, R.

    2012-05-01

    We review (i) observations and numerical simulations of vortical flows in the solar atmosphere and (ii) measurements of the horizontal magnetic field in quiet Sun regions. First, we discuss various manifestations of vortical flows and emphasize the role of magnetic fields in mediating swirling motion created near the solar surface to the higher layers of the photosphere and to the chromosphere. We reexamine existing simulation runs of solar surface magnetoconvection with regard to vortical flows and compare to previously obtained results. Second, we reviews contradictory results and problems associated with measuring the angular distribution of the magnetic field in quiet Sun regions. Furthermore, we review the Stokes-V-amplitude ratio method for the lines Fe i λλ 630.15 and 630.25 nm. We come to the conclusion that the recently discovered two distinct populations in scatter plots of this ratio must not bee interpreted in terms of “uncollapsed'' and “collapsed'' fields but stem from weak granular magnetic fields and weak canopy fields located at the boundaries between granules and the intergranular space. Based on new simulation runs, we reaffirm earlier findings of a predominance of the horizontal field components over the vertical one, particularly in the upper photosphere and at the base of the chromosphere.

  8. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ≲2 to ≳50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ∼2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ≳10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ∼0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  9. Constraining Solar Flare Differential Emission Measures with EVE and RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-01

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from lsim2 to gsim50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ~2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to gsim10 MK together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ~0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  10. The quiet and disturbed time performance of the IRI 2012 within 90°-130°E longitude sector during solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Supnithi, Pornchai; Kalita, Bitap Raj; Wang, Kehe; Komolmis, Tharadol; Yatini, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the IRI 2012 model is examined for the double peaked solar cycle 24 in the low latitude region of 90-130oE longitude in the context of the global longitudinal wave number four structure (WN4). The monthly mean values of the foF2 and the hmF2(if available) measurements at low and low mid-latitude stations Dibrugarh (27.5°N, 95°E), Hainan (19.2°N,109.7°E),Okinawa (26.5°N,128°E) and Cocos Island (12.2°S,96.8°E) during quiet times and Dibrugarh (27.5°N, 95°E), Chiang Mai (18.76°N,98.93°E), Chumphon (10.72°N,99.37°E), Kototabang (0.2°S,100.32°E) and Cocos Island (12.2°S,96.8°E ) during the disturbed days of a severe geomagnetic storm are investigated. These stations are located under the strongest peak of the longitudinal WN4 structure in NmF2 along 90-130°E longitudes. The IRI is quite successful in predicting the seasonal averages of NmF2 over this region except in the equinox afternoon period where IRI underestimates the NmF2 in low latitudes. When the monthly mean measured data is compared with IRI, the difference between the IRI model predictions and the measurements are found to follow a systematic pattern. The IRI-2012 with CCIR options slightly underestimates foF2 over Dibrugarh in day time and overestimates in the night time. The amount of underestimation varies from month to month and also depends on the solar activity levels. The IRI also underestimated the day time hmF2 and overestimated the night time hmF2 over Dibrugarh. In case of Hainan, the IRI overestimates the NmF2 in the equinox months and generally in the afternoon to post sunset period. The model values are closer in the solstice than in the equinox. In Okinawa, the trend reverses and the IRI overestimates the NmF2 in the day time and underestimates in the night time. The IRI overestimated the day time hmF2 and underestimated the night time hmF2 over Okinawa. In case of Cocos Island which lies almost on the EIA anomaly region of the southern hemisphere, IRI

  11. Amplified spontaneous emission in solar-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Yong S.; Hwang, In H.; Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1992-01-01

    The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from a long pulse, solar-simulating radiation pumped iodine laser amplifier is studied. The ASE threshold pump intensity is almost proportional to the inverse of the laser gain length when the gas pressure is constant in the laser tube.

  12. The EUV Emission in Comet-Solar Corona Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, Paul; Pesnell, William Dean; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Brown, John C.; Battams, Karl; Saint-Hilaire, Pasal; Liu, Wei; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AlA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) viewed a comet as it passed through the solar corona on 2011 July 5. This was the first sighting of a comet by a EUV telescope. For 20 minutes, enhanced emission in several of the AlA wavelength bands marked the path of the comet. We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Water ice in the comet rapidly sublimates as it approaches the Sun. This water vapor is then photodissociated, primarily by Ly-alpha, by the solar radiation field to create atomic Hand O. Other molecules present in the comet also evaporate and dissociate to give atomic Fe and other metals. Subsequent ionization of these atoms can be achieved by a number of means, including photoionization, electron impact, and charge exchange with coronal protons and other highly-charged species. Finally, particles from the cometary atmosphere are thermalized to the background temperature of the corona. Each step could cause emission in the AlA bandpasses. We will report here on their relative contribution to the emission seen in the AlA telescopes.

  13. Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have important connections to various types of radio emissions from the Sun. The persistent noise storm radiation (type I storm at metric wavelengths, type III storms at longer wavelengths) can be clearly interrupted by the occurrence of a CME in the active region that produces the storm. Sometimes the noise storm completely disappears and other times, it reappears in the active region. Long-lasting type III bursts are associated with CME eruption, thought to be due to the reconnection process taking place beneath the erupting CME. Type II bursts are indicative of electron acceleration in the CME-driven shocks and hence considered to be the direct response of the CME propagation in the corona and interplanetary medium. Finally type IV bursts indicate large-scale post-eruption arcades containing trapped electrons that produce radio emission. This paper summarizes some key results that connect CMEs to various types of radio emission and what we can learn about particle acceleration in the corona) and interplanetary medium. Particular emphasis will be placed on type If bursts because of their connection to interplanetary shocks detected in situ.

  14. What is magnetically quiet time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friel, M. M.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ohtani, S.; Martin, P.; Muhleisen, M.; Olsen, N.; Korth, H.; Foerland, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present the new SuperMAG Disturbance Level indices SMDL_hi (> 55 deg MLat) and SMDL_lo (<55 deg MLat). These indices objectively quantify the external magnetic field perturbations with a 1 min temporal resolution appropriate for the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) system (reconfiguration time ~10 min). The indices are derived from all the ground based magnetometer stations that are part of the SuperMAG collaboration and thus they have the sufficient spatial coverage. Historically the selection of the quietest days (Q-days) and most disturbed days (D-days) of each month is deduced from the Kp indices. Other techniques include the use of magnetic indices and solar wind conditions. Common for these techniques is the long list of assumptions on which they are based. For example: duration of quiet period (e.g. 1 hour or 24 hours), start of quiet periods (e.g. 0 UT), inferred response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to solar wind conditions, and the ability of the magnetic indices to quantify the external field contributions (e.g. using only north-south component). We show that previous published techniques include periods of intense substorms and magnetic storms while SMDL effectively excludes these disturbances. The SMDL indices provides more temporal coverage through better quantification of the external field component. We show events, statistics, and we show that the SMDL index provides a powerful tool to quantify the external field contribution.

  15. Photon-enhanced thermionic emission for solar concentrator systems.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Jared W; Bargatin, Igor; Riley, Daniel C; Hardin, Brian E; Rosenthal, Samuel J; Sun, Yun; Schmitt, Felix; Pianetta, Piero; Howe, Roger T; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A

    2010-09-01

    Solar-energy conversion usually takes one of two forms: the 'quantum' approach, which uses the large per-photon energy of solar radiation to excite electrons, as in photovoltaic cells, or the 'thermal' approach, which uses concentrated sunlight as a thermal-energy source to indirectly produce electricity using a heat engine. Here we present a new concept for solar electricity generation, photon-enhanced thermionic emission, which combines quantum and thermal mechanisms into a single physical process. The device is based on thermionic emission of photoexcited electrons from a semiconductor cathode at high temperature. Temperature-dependent photoemission-yield measurements from GaN show strong evidence for photon-enhanced thermionic emission, and calculated efficiencies for idealized devices can exceed the theoretical limits of single-junction photovoltaic cells. The proposed solar converter would operate at temperatures exceeding 200 degrees C, enabling its waste heat to be used to power a secondary thermal engine, boosting theoretical combined conversion efficiencies above 50%.

  16. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  17. Current State of Seismic Emission Associated with Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besliu-Ionescu, D.; Donea, A.; Cally, P.

    2017-01-01

    Certain solar flares are followed by photospheric seismic emission, also known as sunquakes. Sunquakes were predicted more than 40 years ago, but observed for the first time 20 years ago. A valid scenario that would fit all discoveries made so far is still missing. This paper summarises the current state of the literature concerning sunquakes. It describes all published reports of known seismic sources to date and presents possible triggering mechanisms.

  18. Radio emission of the sun at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Piotrovich, V. V.

    This review article deals with the radio emission originating from different solar atmospheric regions - the quiet solar atmosphere, active regions and solar flares. All experimental data of the quiet Sun brightness temperature at the region of 0.1 - 20 mm wavelength are summarized. The quiet Sun brightness distributions across the disk and values of the solar radio radius are reviewed. The properties of the sources of sunspot-associated active region emission and radio brightness depression associated with Hα-filaments are considered in comparison with observations at centimetre and optical domains. The observational properties of millimetre wave bursts and their correlations with similar phenomena at other domains are reviewed. Special reference is devoted to nearly 100% correlation impulsive radio bursts with hard X-ray bursts. Existence of the fine temporal structure containing many spikes with time scales up to 10 ms as well as observations of quasi-periodic millisecond oscillations are discussed.

  19. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K.

    2012-09-10

    Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  20. TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R.; Giordano, S.; Ko, Y.-K.; Ciaravella, A.

    2011-07-10

    There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

  1. Characteristics of long-term variation in the amlitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation using the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Gobal Observation NETwork (IUGONET) data analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet geomagnetic field daily variation (Sq) have been investigated using 1-hour geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations in a period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the IUGONET data analysis system. The Sq amplitude clearly showed a 10-12 year solar activity dependence and it tended to enhance during each solar maximum. During the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009, the Sq amplitude became the smallest in the investigated period. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude is approximately linear but 64 percent of geomagnetic stations show a weak nonlinear dependence on the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947-2013, and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed a negative value in a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71 percent of geomagnetic stations. On the other hand, the residual Sq amplitude in the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies the movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  2. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Solar Source Regions of Energetic 3He Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, G. M.; Nitta, N. V.; Cohen, C. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the surprising observations from the ACE mission has been the detection of energetic 3He emission occurring over multi-day periods. Previously observations of solar energetic 3He had detected short-lived "impulsive" energetic particle events which were associated with type III bursts and energetic electrons. The ACE observations were able to detect 3He at very low levels (<1% of 4He compared to ~10% in most earlier work) and this showed that the impulsive events often occurred during seemingly continuous multi-day periods of 3He emission. During solar active periods, 3He was present at 1 AU the majority of the time, giving evidence for either semi-continuous processes or else unresolved multiple small injections. The obvious injections during such periods were strongly associated with jet activity By adding STEREO and SDO observations we are seeking to extend the observational picture for these events. First, by following single 3He emitting regions from STEREO-B to ACE to STEREO-A we seek to examine for how long the 3He emission can continue, since any single spacecraft can be magnetically connected to a single region for only a few days and ACE often sees emission periods of that length. Second, by using SDO-AIA we seek to probe further the properties of the emitting regions to see if the previously reported association with jets is seen in events which we can now observe with greater resolution, sensitivity, and cadence than previously possible.

  4. A New Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M.; Kaiser, M.; Fainberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    From May 17 to 22, 2002 a highly circularly polarized solar radio source was observed by the WAVES receivers on the Wind spacecraft. This unique event, which became quite intense and definite after May 19 and which was observed continuously for 6 days, was characterized by fine frequency structures, 1 to 2 hour amplitude periodicities, and a peaked frequency spectrum. Indeed, this emission has characteristics more typical of planetary emissions than of solar emissions. This is the only such event observed by Wind/WAVES in its 8 years of operation. (The only other example of an event of similar nature may have been observed more than 20 years ago by the ISEE-3 spacecraft.) The direction-finding analysis for this event indicates a relatively small radio source that may lie somewhere between 0.06 and 0.36 AU from the sun. The radiation from this event was very weak at the onset, being nearly an order of magnitude below the galactic background radiation level. It is speculated that this radio event may be a unique hectometric manifestation of a moving type IV burst. The radiation mechanism is unknown--possibilities include plasma emission, gyro-synchrotron, and cyclotron maser.

  5. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  6. Solar Flare Impulsive Phase Emission Observed with SDO/EVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-12-01

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log Te = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  7. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  8. The Quiet Skies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Steve

    2008-01-01

    To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space…

  9. Neutral Hydrogen and Its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-12-01

    Since the Lyman-α rocket observations of Gabriel ( Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and that they offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisional and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun center) in the corona, and the integrated intensities are computed at heights up to five solar radii. We compare our results with previous computations and observations ( e.g. Lα from Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer) and find a rough (model-dependent) agreement. Since the Hα line is a possible candidate for ground-based polarimetry, we show that in order to detect its emission in various coronal structures, it is necessary to use a very narrow (less than 2 Å wide) bandpass filter.

  10. Impulsive solar wind-driven emission from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    Several days prior to the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Uranus, the plasma wave and radio astronomy receivers detected extraordinarily narrowband bursty signals, the first indication of any radio emission from the planet. The characteristics of these signals were so unusual that their identity as a natural planetary emission was questioned at first. Subsequent analysis has shown, however, that the n bursts are modulated at the 17.24-hour Uranus rotation period and are therefore planetary in origin. The authors show, in addition, that the typical bandwidth and time scale for the bursts are about 5 kHz and 250 ms, respectively. The phase of the rotation modulation suggests a probable source for these events in the vicinity of the north (weak) magnetic pole. The waves are right-hand polarized and are therefore emitted in the extraordinary magnetoionic mode if the emission in fact originates above the north magnetic pole. In the context of the electron cyclotron maser mechanism, inferred upper limit electron densities range from 15 cm{sup {minus}3} at 0.9 R{sub U} altitude to 0.4 cm{sup {minus}3} at 2.4 R{sub U} altitude. Discovery of events predating the counter identification by up to 1 month indicates the n bursts were organized into two major {approx equal} 10-day-long episodes. These episodes were simultaneous with times of enhanced solar wind levels at Uranus, leading to the first evidence of a solar wind-driven radiation at Uranus.

  11. Solar wind control of Jupiter's decametric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Genova, F.; Desch, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind close to Jupiter are compared with the decametric radio emission (DAM), using data recorded by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 during 1979. The Non-Io DAM, recorded by both spacecraft and combined using the superposed epoch technique, is found to correlate with the solar wind density and velocity, as well as with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude. In agreement with earlier work using ground-based observations, there are indications that the Non-Io DAM is somehow associated with magnetic sector structure although the precise details of the relationship are still not known and it is not clear if this is a fundamental effect or some secondary effect of intercorrelation.

  12. Theory of Type 3 and Type 2 Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    2000-01-01

    The main features of some current theories of type III and type II bursts are outlined. Among the most common solar radio bursts, type III bursts are produced at frequencies of 10 kHz to a few GHz when electron beams are ejected from solar active regions, entering the corona and solar wind at typical speeds of 0.1c. These beams provide energy to generate Langmuir waves via a streaming instability. In the current stochastic-growth theory, Langmuir waves grow in clumps associated with random low-frequency density fluctuations, leading to the observed spiky waves. Nonlinear wave-wave interactions then lead to secondary emission of observable radio waves near the fundamental and harmonic of the plasma frequency. Subsequent scattering processes modify the dynamic radio spectra, while back-reaction of Langmuir waves on the beam causes it to fluctuate about a state of marginal stability. Theories based on these ideas can account for the observed properties of type III bursts, including the in situ waves and the dynamic spectra of the radiation. Type 11 bursts are associated with shock waves propagating through the corona and interplanetary space and radiating from roughly 30 kHz to 1 GHz. Their basic emission mechanisms are believed to be similar to those of type III events and radiation from Earth's foreshock. However, several sub-classes of type II bursts may exist with different source regions and detailed characteristics. Theoretical models for type II bursts are briefly reviewed, focusing on a model with emission from a foreshock region upstream of the shock for which observational evidence has just been reported.

  13. Observations of the Solar Continuum Radio Emission at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, Anatoliy I.; Mel'Nik, Valentin N.; Konovalenko, Alexander A.; Abranin, Edward P.; Dorovskyy, Vladimir V.; Vashchishin, Rostislav V.; Frantzusenko, Anatoly V.; Rucker, Helmut O.

    2010-01-01

    Results of study of the continuum radio emission of the Sun in the decameter range are presented. Observations were carried out with radio telescope URAN-2 in summer months in 2008-2009. Radio fluxes at frequencies 20 MHz and 25 MHz in frequency band 250 kHz were obtained during the time, when there were no active regions on the solar disk. Their average values for two years were 670 Jy and 850 Jy at frequencies 20 MHz and 25 MHz correspondingly. These fluxes are in agreement with high frequency values.

  14. ON THE 'EXTENDED' SOLAR CYCLE IN CORONAL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Robbrecht, E.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Rich, N. B. E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mi E-mail: nathan.rich@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-06-10

    Butterfly diagrams (latitude-time plots) of coronal emission show a zone of enhanced brightness that appears near the poles just after solar maximum and migrates toward lower latitudes; a bifurcation seems to occur at sunspot minimum, with one branch continuing to migrate equatorward with the sunspots of the new cycle and the other branch heading back to the poles. The resulting patterns have been likened to those seen in torsional oscillations and have been taken as evidence for an extended solar cycle lasting over {approx}17 yr. In order to clarify the nature of the overlapping bands of coronal emission, we construct butterfly diagrams from green-line simulations covering the period 1967-2009 and from 19.5 nm and 30.4 nm observations taken with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during 1996-2009. As anticipated from earlier studies, we find that the high-latitude enhancements mark the footpoint areas of closed loops with one end rooted outside the evolving boundaries of the polar coronal holes. The strong underlying fields were built up over the declining phase of the cycle through the poleward transport of active-region flux by the surface meridional flow. Rather than being a precursor of the new-cycle sunspot activity zone, the high-latitude emission forms a physically distinct, U-shaped band that curves upward again as active-region fields emerge at midlatitudes and reconnect with the receding polar-hole boundaries. We conclude that the so-called extended cycle in coronal emission is a manifestation not of early new-cycle activity, but of the poleward concentration of old-cycle trailing-polarity flux by meridional flow.

  15. Microwave subsecond pulses in solar flares - source localization, emission mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, A. T.; Kardapolova, N. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lesovoi, S. V.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Yan, Y.

    The observations of bursts with fine temporal structures is one of few ways to study the primary energy release sites in solar flares. The localization of their sources in a flare region using the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope data (5.7 GHz) provide us with the unique possibility to determine plasma parameters, and to verify emission mechanisms. The simultaneous spectral observations (5.2 - 7.7 GHz) were provided by National Astronomical Observatories/Beijing spectropolarimeters. An analysis is made of the subsecond pulses of different types: short duration wide band pulses, U-type cm-bursts, the bursts with the "zebra" pattern. The suggestion is justified that in many cases the frequency drifts are response to the plasma density dynamics in the local sites in flare loops. It is argued that the conditions of emission escaping from the source strongly influent the apparent source sizes and the polarization degree of the subsecond sources. This research was supported by Grants 02-02-39030 and 03-02-16229 of RFBR, and E02-3.2-489 of Education department of Russia.

  16. The vertical propagation of waves in the solar atmosphere. II Phase delays in the quiet chromosphere and cell-network distinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, B. W.; Chipman, E. G.; White, O. R.

    1982-01-01

    The differences in the phase of the velocity oscillations between a pair of chromospheric Ca II lines was measured using the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Sacramento Peak Observatory. The observed phase differences indicate that the acoustic modes are trapped or envanescent, rather than propagating, in the chromosphere. Systematic distinctions are found in the phase delays between quiet network and cell interior regions for both intensity and velocity oscillations in photospheric and chromospheric lines. The theory of linear perturbations in an isothermal atmosphere is invoked to interpret these differences. From this analysis it is found that one or more of the following explanations is possible: (1) the radiative damping is more effective in the network than in the cell interior; (2) the network features exclude oscillations of large horizontal wavenumber; or (3) the scale height of the chromosphere is larger in the network than in the cell interior.

  17. Investigation on Radio-Quiet and Radio-Loud Fast CMEs and Their Associated Flares During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis on the differences between radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ( V≥900 km s-1) observed during the period 1996 - 2012. The analysis consists of three different steps in which we examined the properties of (i) RL and RQ CMEs, (ii) accelerating (class-A) and decelerating (class-D) CMEs among RL and RQ CMEs, and (iii) associated flares. The last two steps and events from a longer period are the extensions of the earlier work on RL and RQ CMEs that mainly aimed to determine the reason for the radio-quietness of some fast CMEs. During this period, we found that 38 % of fast CMEs are RL and 62 % of fast CMEs are RQ. Moreover, fewer RQ CMEs occur around the disc centre. The average speeds of RL and RQ CMEs are 1358 km s-1 and 1092 km s-1. Around 10 % of the RQ events are halo CMEs, but ≈ 66 % of RL events are halo CMEs. The mean acceleration or deceleration value of RL-CMEs is slightly greater than that of RQ-CMEs. When we divide these events based on their acceleration behaviour into class A and class D, there are no considerable differences between classes A and D of RL-CMEs or between classes A and D of RQ CMEs, except for their initial acceleration values. But there are significant differences among their associated flare properties. According to our study here, the RQ CMEs are less energetic than RL CMEs, and they are not associated with flares as strong as those associated with RL CMEs. This confirms the previous results that RQ CMEs do not often exceed the critical Alfvén speed of 1000 km s-1 in the outer corona that is needed to produce type II radio bursts.

  18. Second solar spectrum of the Sr I 4607 Å line: depth probing of the turbulent magnetic field strength in a quiet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouich, M.; Bommier, V.; Malherbe, J. M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.This paper is devoted to an interpretation of Quiet-Sun, spatially-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of the Hanle effect in terms of turbulent weak magnetic field determination. Methods: . Observations: the slit was positioned perpendicular to the limb, and the spatial resolution along the slit was 1 arcsec, leading to a depth probing along 132 different limb distances. The new polarimeter of the Pic-du-Midi Turret Dome was used on May 14, 2004 to observe a quiet region at the East limb equator in the resonance line of neutral Strontium at 4607 Å. Results: . For each limb distance, we properly adjusted the theoretical intensity profile obtained by applying a zero-field model to the observed one. Micro- and macroturbulent velocities were thus derived (average values v{micro}=1.77 km s-1 and v{macro}=1.95 km s-1). The magnetic field was determined in a second step by interpreting the Hanle effect on the line center linear polarization degree. The depolarizing collisions with neutral hydrogen were taken fully into account through a semi-classical calculation of their rates. An average value of B=38 Gauss was thus derived. Finally, error bars on the magnetic field values were evaluated from a) the polarimetric inaccuracy, b) the limb distance determination inaccuracy, and c) the uncertainty on our theoretical collisional depolarizing rates that we evaluated. This combination leads to 10-20% as total relative error on the magnetic field determination by the Hanle effect method. Since the inaccuracy due to the model itself was hard to properly evaluate, it was ignored. An uncertainty of ±60 km on the line formation depth was, however, derived from the contribution functions. The magnetic field is found to increase slowly with height in the height range 220-300 km above τ5000=1 and then decrease in the height range 300-370 km.

  19. A New Observation of the Quiet Sun Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Stone, J.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable with solar activity. While this is particularly true during solar flares, when emission can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude up to gamma-ray energies, even the so-called "quiet Sun" is bright in soft X-rays (SXRs), as the ~1-2 MK ambient plasma of the corona emits significant thermal bremsstrahlung up to ~5 keV. However, the actual solar SXR (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include ultra-high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystral spectrometers (e.g. Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g. GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with fair energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and XRS on MESSENGER, although they did not extend below ~1 keV. We present observations of the quiet Sun SXR emission obtained using a new SXR spectrometer flown on the third SDO/EVE underflight calibration rocket (NASA 36.286). The commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123 silicon drift detector, with an 8-micron Be window and custom aperture, measured the solar SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution (though, due to hardware limitations, with only ~0.12 keV binning) and 2-sec cadence over ~5 minutes on 23 June 2012. Despite the rising solar cycle, activity on 23 June 2012 was abnormally low, with no visible active regions and GOES XRS emission near 2010 levels; we measured no solar counts above ~4 keV during the observation period. We compare our X123 measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including the SphinX observations during the deep solar minimum of 2009, and with upper limits of >3 keV quiet Sun emission

  20. Emissive Molecular Aggregates and Energy Migration in Luminescent Solar Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Banal, James L; Zhang, Bolong; Jones, David J; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Wong, Wallace W H

    2017-01-17

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are light harvesting devices that are ideally suited to light collection in the urban environment where direct sunlight is often not available. LSCs consist of highly luminescent compounds embedded or coated on a transparent substrate that absorb diffuse or direct solar radiation over a large area. The resulting luminescence is trapped in the waveguide by total internal reflection to the thin edges of the substrate where the concentrated light can be used to improve the performance of photovoltaic devices. The concept of LSCs has been around for several decades, and yet the efficiencies of current devices are still below expectations for commercial viability. There are two primary challenges when designing new chromophores for LSC applications. Reabsorption of dye emission by chromophores within the waveguide is a significant loss mechanism attenuating the light output of LSCs. Concentration quenching, particularly in organic dye systems, restricts the quantity of chromophores that can be incorporated in the waveguide thus limiting the light absorbed by the LSC. Frequently, a compromise between increased light harvesting of the incident light and decreasing emission quantum yield is required for most organic chromophore-based systems due to concentration quenching. The low Stokes shift of common organic dyes used in current LSCs also imposes another optimization problem. Increasing light absorption of LSCs based on organic dyes to achieve efficient light harvesting also enhances reabsorption. Ideally, a design strategy to simultaneously optimize light harvesting, concentration quenching, and reabsorption of LSC chromophores is clearly needed to address the significant losses in LSCs. Over the past few years, research in our group has targeted novel dye structures that address these primary challenges. There is a common perception that dye aggregates are to be avoided in LSCs. It became apparent in our studies that aggregates

  1. Solar system radio emissions studies with the largest low-frequency radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Mylostna, K.; Vasylieva, I.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the trends and tasks in the field of lowfrequency studies of radio emission from the Solar system's objects. The world's largest decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN have a unique combination of sensitivity and time/frequency resolution parameters, providing the capability of the most detailed studies of various types of solar and planetary emissions.

  2. Observations of Quiet Sun Chromosphere Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoni, Angelo; Denker, C.; Deng, N.; Tritschler, A.

    2007-05-01

    The quiet Sun shows a multitude of fine structure in both the photosphere and chromosphere. Observations with high spatial and temporal resolution are required to study their dynamics. In June 2006, simultaneous broad-band continuum (600 nm) and narrow-band spectroscopic (Hα and Na 589.0 nm) data were obtained of a quiet Sun region near disk center using the Dunn Solar Telescope and high-order adaptive optics at the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak. The time-series of continuum data was restored using the speckle masking technique to achieve almost diffraction-limited resolution across the entire field-of-view (80" by 80"). The spectroscopic data were taken with a two-dimensional spectrometer, which is currently being upgraded for spectro-polarimetry. The Visible-light Imaging Magnetograph (VIM) is a telecentric two-dimensional Fabry-Perot based spectro-polarimeter, which will become one of the first-light instruments of the future 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). This work was supported by NSF under grants ATM 00-86999, ATM 02-36945, IIS ITR 03-24816, and AST MRI 00-79482 and by NASA under grant NAG 5-12782.

  3. Herringbone bursts associated with type II solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed observations of the herringbone (HB) fine structure on type II solar radio bursts are presented. Data from the Culgoora radiospectrograph, radiometer and radioheliograph are analyzed. The characteristic spectral profiles, frequency drift rates and exciter velocities, fluxes, source sizes, brightness temperatures, and polarizations of individual HB bursts are determined. Correlations between individual bursts within the characteristic groups of bursts and the properties of the associated type II bursts are examined. These data are compatible with HB bursts being radiation at multiples of the plasma frequency generated by electron streams accelerated by the type II shock. HB bursts are physically distinct phenomena from type II and type III bursts, differing significantly in emission processes and/or source conditions; this conclusion indicates that many of the presently available theoretical ideas for HB bursts are incorrect.

  4. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu

    2012-02-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft R{sub j} = I{sub j} /{Sigma}I{sub j} (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of {approx}2 Degree-Sign and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from {approx} - 100 Degree-Sign to {approx}100 Degree-Sign . The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  5. Direct evidence for solar wind control of Jupiter's hectometer-wavelength radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Barrow, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind close to Jupiter, by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1978 and 1979, are compared with the hectometer wavelength radio emission from the planet. A significant positive correlation is found between variations in the solar wind plasma density at Jupiter and the level of Jovian radio emission output. During the 173-day interval studied for the Voyager 2 data, the radio emission displayed a long term periodicity of about 13 days, identical to that shown by the solar wind density at Jupiter and consistent with the magnetic sector structure association already proposed for groundbased observations of the decameter wavelength emission.

  6. The QUIET Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, T.; Kangaslahti, P.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leitch, E. M.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ( approx 1 deg.) . Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 micro Ks(exp 1/2)) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 micro Ks(exp 1/2) at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01 (QUIET Collaboration 2012) The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range l approximately equals 25-975 . These are the largest HEMT-ba.sed arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument,

  7. Light absorption and emission in nanowire array solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kupec, Jan; Stoop, Ralph L; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2010-12-20

    Inorganic nanowires are under intense research for large scale solar power generation intended to ultimately contribute a substantial fraction to the overall power mix. Their unique feature is to allow different pathways for the light absorption and carrier transport. In this publication we investigate the properties of a nanowire array acting as a photonic device governed by wave-optical phenomena. We solve the Maxwell equations and calculate the light absorption efficiency for the AM1.5d spectrum and give recommendations on the design. Due to concentration of the incident sunlight at a microscopic level the absorptivity of nanowire solar cells can exceed the absorptivity of an equal amount of material used in thin-film devices. We compute the local density of photon states to assess the effect of emission enhancement, which influences the radiative lifetime of excess carriers. This allows us to compute the efficiency limit within the framework of detailed balance. The efficiency is highly sensitive with respect to the diameter and distance of the nanowires. Designs featuring nanowires below a certain diameter will intrinsically feature low short-circuit current that cannot be compensated even by increasing the nanowire density. Optimum efficiency is not achieved in densely packed arrays, in fact spacing the nanowires further apart (simultaneously decreasing the material use) can even improve efficiency in certain scenarios. We observe absorption enhancement reducing the material use. In terms of carrier generation per material use, nanowire devices can outperform thin-film devices by far.

  8. Diurnal variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity on quiet days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, S.; Datt, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of the diurnal variation on long term basis was performed on geomagnetically quiet days using the experimental data of the cosmic ray intensity from the worldwide neutron monitoring stations. During the period when the polarity of the solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere of the sun is negative the phase and amplitude of the diurnal anisotropy on quiet days was observed to remain almost constant. When the polarity of solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere changes from negative to positive, a shift in the phase of the diurnal anisotropy on quiet days towards earlier hours is observed and the shift is found to be maximum during minimum solar activity periods 1953-54 and 1975-76. When the polarity of solar magnetic field changes from positive to negative in the Northern Hemisphere of the Sun the phase of the diurnal anisotropy on quiet days recovers to its usual direction of corotational anisotropy and is observed to remain almost constant till the polarity of the solar magnetic field does not change.

  9. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  10. The quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    An up-to-date textbook of solar physics is presented. The solar structure and processes, and the interior are described along with the photosphere, the chromosphere, and the corona. The strongest Fraunhofer lines, visible coronal lines, and coronal UV, XUV, and X-ray lines are listed.

  11. Long-term monthly statistics of the mid-latitude ionospheric E-layer peak electron density in the Northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    Long-term hourly values of the ionospheric E-layer peak electron density, NmE, measured during the time period of 1957-2014 by 4 mid-latitude ionosondes (Wallops Island, Boulder, de l'Ebre, and Rome) in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of NmE close to noon for each month in a year, including the mathematical expectation of NmE, the standard deviations of NmE from the mathematically expected NmE, and the NmE variation coefficient. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). We found that the most probable NmE cannot be considered as the best statistical parameter among the most probable NmE and the mathematically expected NmE in statistical studies of month-to-month variations of NmE. Depending on a choice of an ionosonde and a month, the calculated NmE variation coefficient changes from 5 to 12 %.

  12. Origin of the 30 THz Emission Detected During the Solar Flare on 2012 March 13 at 17:20 UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trottet, G.; Raulin, J.-P.; Mackinnon, A.; Giménez de Castro, G.; Simões, P. J. A.; Cabezas, D.; de La Luz, V.; Luoni, M.; Kaufmann, P.

    2015-10-01

    Solar observations in the infrared domain can bring important clues on the response of the low solar atmosphere to primary energy released during flares. At present, the infrared continuum has been detected at 30 THz (10 μm) in only a few flares. SOL2012-03-13, which is one of these flares, has been presented and discussed in Kaufmann et al. ( Astrophys. J. 768, 134, 2013). No firm conclusions were drawn on the origin of the mid-infrared radiation. In this work we present a detailed multi-frequency analysis of the SOL2012-03-13 event, including observations at radio-millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, in hard X-rays (HXR), gamma-rays (GR), Hα, and white light. The HXR/GR spectral analysis shows that SOL2012-03-13 is a GR line flare and allows estimating the numbers of and energy contents in electrons, protons, and α particles produced during the flare. The energy spectrum of the electrons producing the HXR/GR continuum is consistent with a broken power-law with an energy break at {˜} 800 keV. We show that the high-energy part (above {˜} 800 keV) of this distribution is responsible for the high-frequency radio emission ({>} 20 GHz) detected during the flare. By comparing the 30 THz emission expected from semi-empirical and time-independent models of the quiet and flare atmospheres, we find that most ({˜} 80 %) of the observed 30 THz radiation can be attributed to thermal free-free emission of an optically thin source. Using the F2 flare atmospheric model (Machado et al. in Astrophys. J. 242, 336, 1980), this thin source is found to be at temperatures T {˜} 8000 K and is located well above the minimum temperature region. We argue that the chromospheric heating, which results in 80 % of the 30 THz excess radiation, can be due to energy deposition by nonthermal flare-accelerated electrons, protons, and α particles. The remaining 20 % of the 30 THz excess emission is found to be radiated from an optically thick atmospheric layer at T {˜} 5000 K, below the

  13. Solar Radio Emission as a Prediction Technique for Coronal Mass Ejections' registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiner, Olga; Fridman, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    The concept of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) as global phenomenon of solar activity caused by the global magnetohydrodynamic processes is considered commonly accepted. These processes occur in different ranges of emission, primarily in the optical and the microwave emission being generated near the surface of the sun from a total of several thousand kilometers. The usage of radio-astronomical data for CMEs prediction is convenient and promising. Actually, spectral measurements of solar radio emission cover all heights of solar atmosphere, sensitivity and accuracy of measurements make it possible to record even small energy changes. Registration of the radio emission is provided by virtually all-weather ground-based observations, and there is the relative cheapness to obtain the corresponding information due to a developed system of monitoring observations. On the large statistical material there are established regularities of the existence of sporadic radio emission at the initial stage of CMEs' formation and propagation in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere during the time interval from 2-3 days to 2 hours before registration of CMEs on coronagraph. In this report we present the prediction algorithm and scheme of short-term forecasting developed on the base of statistical analysis regularities of solar radio emission data prior to "isolated" solar Coronal Mass Ejections registered in 1998, 2003, 2009-2013.

  14. Electron-cyclotron maser and solar microwave millisecond spike emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Qi-Jun

    1986-01-01

    An intense solar microwave millisecond spike emission (SMMSE) event was observed on May 16, 1981 by Zhao and Jin at Beijing Observatory. The peak flux density of the spikes is high to 5 x 100,000 s.f.u. and the corresponding brightness temperature (BT) reaches approx. 10 to the 15th K. In order to explain the observed properties of SMMSE, it is proposed that a beam of electrons with energy of tens KeV injected from the acceleration region downwards into an emerging magnetic arch forms so-called hollow beam distribution and causes electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) instability. The growth rate of second harmonic X-mode is calculated and its change with time is deduced. It is shown that the saturation time of ECM is t sub s approx. equals 0.42 ms and only at last short stage (delta t less than 0.2 t sub s) the growth rate decreases to zero rather rapidly. So a SMMSE with very high BT will be produced if the ratio of number density of nonthermal electrons to that of background electrons, n sub s/n sub e, is larger than 4 x .00001.

  15. Costs of solar and wind power variability for reducing CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Lueken, Colleen; Cohen, Gilbert E; Apt, Jay

    2012-09-04

    We compare the power output from a year of electricity generation data from one solar thermal plant, two solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and twenty Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) wind farms. The analysis shows that solar PV electricity generation is approximately one hundred times more variable at frequencies on the order of 10(-3) Hz than solar thermal electricity generation, and the variability of wind generation lies between that of solar PV and solar thermal. We calculate the cost of variability of the different solar power sources and wind by using the costs of ancillary services and the energy required to compensate for its variability and intermittency, and the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. We show the costs of variability are highly dependent on both technology type and capacity factor. California emissions data were used to calculate the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. Variability cost is greatest for solar PV generation at $8-11 per MWh. The cost of variability for solar thermal generation is $5 per MWh, while that of wind generation in ERCOT was found to be on average $4 per MWh. Variability adds ~$15/tonne CO(2) to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV.

  16. Solar Emissions From GHz to Sub-THz Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    long before a very large flare. Similarities between solar flare particle accelerators to laboratory high energy accelerators have been proposed. A...before a very large flare. Possible similarities between solar flare particle accelerators to laboratory high energy accelerators have been proposed. A...various energies prior to the impulsive phase of the large solar flare and coronal mass ejection of 4 November 2003”. Solar Physics, 279, 465-475, 2012

  17. The QUIET Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  18. Energetic analysis of the white light emission associated to seismically active flares in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2014-06-01

    Solar flares are explosive phenomena, thought to be driven by magnetic free energy accumulated in the solar corona. Some flares release seismic transients, "sunquakes", into the Sun's interior. Different mechanisms are being considered to explain how sunquakes are generated. We are conducting an analysis of white-light emission associated with those seismically active solar flares that have been reported by different authors within the current solar cycle. Seismic diagnostics are based upon standard time-distance techniques, including seismic holography, applied to Dopplergrams obtained by SDO/HMI and GONG. The relation between white-light emissions and seismic activity may provide important information on impulsive chromospheric heating during flares, a prospective contributor to seismic transient emission, at least in some instances. We develop a method to get an estimation of Energy associated whit white-light emission and compare those results whit values of energy needed to generate a sunquake according with holographic helioseismology techniques.

  19. Radio Emissions Precursors of Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares Recorded by CALLISTO-BR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Francisco; Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Galdino, Marcela; Sodré, Zuleika

    2016-07-01

    A solar flare consists in an eruptive process and involves a sudden release of energy generated by processes carried on from instabilities in the magnetic configuration at solar atmosphere, generating emissions at different wavelengths. Usually, the pre-flare phase presents an increasing of soft X-ray, ultraviolet and radio emissions. In this work, we present a survey of solar radio emission recorded in metric wavelengths (45 - 250 MHz) by CALLISTO-BR spectrograph, belong to the e-Callisto network, associated with pre-flare phase of solar X-rays flares. A sample of 281 radio emissions was analyzed, and 120 were identified as precursor emissions of X-rays flares. The main results of the statistics can be summarized as: (a) 55% of the precursor radio emissions start less than 60 minutes before the beginning of the associated X-ray flare and about 20% start less than 20 minutes before the X-ray emission; (b) 27% of flares with precursor emissions are classified as B class, 61% of C class, and less than 22% of M class. No precursors radio emissions were associated with X class flare; (c) about 42% of radio precursor emissions are of type III bursts and 33% have complex morphology, as drifting pulsating structures. Analysis of global emission trends recorded during the precursor phase of the C4.8 flare of February 15, 2011 (14:32-14:51 UT) is also presented. The occurrence of radio emission during the pre-impulsive phase of a solar flare suggests the presence of plasma turbulence in the active region, since during the impulsive phase, when the energy is released, occur the heating of the plasma and increasing of soft X-ray emission as identified in the event analyzed. The results are presented and discussed.

  20. Quiet powered-lift propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Latest results of programs exploring new propulsion technology for powered-lift aircraft systems are presented. Topics discussed include results from the 'quiet clean short-haul experimental engine' program and progress reports on the 'quiet short-haul research aircraft' and 'tilt-rotor research aircraft' programs. In addition to these NASA programs, the Air Force AMST YC 14 and YC 15 programs were reviewed.

  1. On three-dimensional reconstruction of optically thin solar emission sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Thomas, R. J.; Wade, C.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations are given for constructing the three dimensional distribution of optically thin EUV emission sources associated with solar active regions, from two dimensional observations (projections) recorded by the spectroheliograph on the OSO 7 satellite. The relation of the method to other image reconstruction methods is briefly discussed as well as the special requirements imposed in the solar case such as a knowledge of the true solar rotation function. A useful correlation criterion for establishing the physical validity of solutions is given.

  2. Observations of the quiet Sun from the soft x ray telescope on Yohkoh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    1992-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh has obtained many thousands of images suitable for studying the quiet Sun. It will give a new perspective on the types of structures, their frequency of occurrence, and their lifetimes that will provide an invaluable tool for planning SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) observations of the solar corona. The range of corona phenomena and the dynamic nature of the quiet Sun are illustrated.

  3. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  4. Comparison between laser terahertz emission microscope and conventional methods for analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa Kawayama, Iwao Murakami, Hironaru Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-15

    A laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM) can be used for noncontact inspection to detect the waveforms of photoinduced terahertz emissions from material devices. In this study, we experimentally compared the performance of LTEM with conventional analysis methods, e.g., electroluminescence (EL), photoluminescence (PL), and laser beam induced current (LBIC), as an inspection method for solar cells. The results showed that LTEM was more sensitive to the characteristics of the depletion layer of the polycrystalline solar cell compared with EL, PL, and LBIC and that it could be used as a complementary tool to the conventional analysis methods for a solar cell.

  5. Is the O2(a1Δg) Venus nightglow emission controlled by solar activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Lauriane; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2015-12-01

    Several past studies showed that the O2(a1Δg) Venus nightglow emission at 1.27 μm is highly variable on a timescale of hours. We examine whether the intensity of this emission shows a more global trend linked to solar activity.

  6. Observations of an Energetically Isolated Quiet Sun Transient: Evidence of Quasi-steady Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, N. Brice; Chesny, David L.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.

    2015-09-01

    Increasing evidence for coronal heating contributions from cooler solar atmospheric layers, notably quiet Sun (QS) conditions, challenges standard solar atmospheric descriptions of bright transition region (TR) emission. As such, questions about the role of dynamic QS transients in contributing to the total coronal energy budget are raised. Using observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and numerical model extrapolations of coronal magnetic fields, we investigate a dynamic QS transient that is energetically isolated to the TR and extrudes from a common footpoint shared with two heated loop arcades. A non-causal relationship is established between episodic heating of the QS transient and widespread magnetic field re-organization events, while evidence is found favoring a magnetic topology that is typical of eruptive processes. Quasi-steady interchange reconnection events are implicated as a source of the transient’s visibly bright radiative signature. We consider the QS transient’s temporally stable (≈35 minutes) radiative nature to occur as a result of the large-scale magnetic field geometries of the QS and/or relatively quiet nature of the magnetic photosphere, which possibly act to inhibit energetic build-up processes that are required to initiate a catastrophic eruption phase. This work provides insight into the QS’s thermodynamic and magnetic relation to eruptive processes that quasi-steadily heat a small-scale dynamic and TR transient. This work explores arguments of non-negligible coronal heating contributions from cool atmospheric layers in QS conditions and contributes evidence to the notion that solar wind mass feeds off of dynamic transients therein.

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF AN ENERGETICALLY ISOLATED QUIET SUN TRANSIENT: EVIDENCE OF QUASI-STEADY CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Orange, N. Brice; Chesny, David L.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.

    2015-09-10

    Increasing evidence for coronal heating contributions from cooler solar atmospheric layers, notably quiet Sun (QS) conditions, challenges standard solar atmospheric descriptions of bright transition region (TR) emission. As such, questions about the role of dynamic QS transients in contributing to the total coronal energy budget are raised. Using observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and numerical model extrapolations of coronal magnetic fields, we investigate a dynamic QS transient that is energetically isolated to the TR and extrudes from a common footpoint shared with two heated loop arcades. A non-causal relationship is established between episodic heating of the QS transient and widespread magnetic field re-organization events, while evidence is found favoring a magnetic topology that is typical of eruptive processes. Quasi-steady interchange reconnection events are implicated as a source of the transient’s visibly bright radiative signature. We consider the QS transient’s temporally stable (≈35 minutes) radiative nature to occur as a result of the large-scale magnetic field geometries of the QS and/or relatively quiet nature of the magnetic photosphere, which possibly act to inhibit energetic build-up processes that are required to initiate a catastrophic eruption phase. This work provides insight into the QS’s thermodynamic and magnetic relation to eruptive processes that quasi-steadily heat a small-scale dynamic and TR transient. This work explores arguments of non-negligible coronal heating contributions from cool atmospheric layers in QS conditions and contributes evidence to the notion that  solar wind mass feeds off of dynamic transients therein.

  8. SOHO reveals violent action on the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    SOHO's scientists are impressed by the vigorous action that they see going on every day, because the Sun is in the very quietest phase of its eleven-year cycle of activity. To ground-based observatories it appears extremely calm just now. The early indications of SOHO's performance amply justify the creation of a sungazing spacecraft capable of observing ultraviolet emissions that are blotted out by the Earth's atmosphere. Apart from the imager, two ultraviolet spectrometers and an ultraviolet coronagraph (an imager for the outer atmosphere) are busy analysing the violent processes at a wide range of wavelengths. Between them, these instruments should cure long-lasting ignorance concerning the Sun, especially about why the atmosphere is so hot and what drives the solar wind that blows non-stop into the Solar System. Scientists from other experimental teams use SOHO to explore the Sun from its deep interior to the far reaches of the solar wind. They have watched the supposedly quiet Sun belching huge masses of gas into space. They have mapped a hole burnt by the solar wind in a breeze of gas coming from the stars. And they have detected currents of gas flowing just below the visible surface. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The spacecraft was built in Europe and instrumented by scientists on both sides of the Atlantic. NASA launched SOHO on 2 December 1995, and also provides the ground stations and an operations centre near Washington. The first results are the more remarkable because SOHO arrived at its vantage point 1,500,000 kilometres out in space only in February, and formally completed its commissioning on 16 April. It has a long life ahead of it. All scientific instruments are working well. The luminosity oscillation imager belonging to the VIRGO experiment had trouble with its lens cover. When opened, the cover rebounded on its hinges and closed again. Commands were devised that gave a shorter impulse

  9. Space Environment Effects: Model for Emission of Solar Protons (ESP): Cumulative and Worst Case Event Fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Barth, J. L.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Burke, E. A.; Gee, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary and polar orbits and for interplanetary missions. Designers of spacecraft and mission planners are required to assess the performance of microelectronic systems under a variety of conditions. A number of useful approaches exist for predicting information about solar proton event fluences and, to a lesser extent, peak fluxes. This includes the cumulative fluence over the course of a mission, the fluence of a worst-case event during a mission, the frequency distribution of event fluences, and the frequency distribution of large peak fluxes. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the sponsorship of NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program, have developed a new model for predicting cumulative solar proton fluences and worst-case solar proton events as functions of mission duration and user confidence level. This model is called the Emission of Solar Protons (ESP) model.

  10. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Edward L.; Ryan, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emissions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the accelerator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decay gamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowledge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare capabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  11. SUMER observations detecting downward propagating waves in the solar transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikstol, O.; Judge, P. G.; Hansteen, V.; Wilhelm, K.; Schuehle, U.; Moran, T.

    1997-01-01

    The O IV density sensitive emission lines around 1400 A, using the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) instrument onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), are reported on. The data for the quiet sun, obtained close to the disk center and the solar limb were acquired. A systematic correlation between a density sensitive emission line ratio and Doppler shift across the same emission profiles was obtained. The correlation is such that the density is higher in the downflowing than in the upflowing plasma. The results are in good agreement with the simulations of downward propagating waves.

  12. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  13. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

  14. Emissivity-corrected power loss calibration for lock-in thermography measurements on silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemann, Martin; Walter, Benjamin; Meinhardt, Christoph; Ebser, Jan; Kwapil, Wolfram; Warta, Wilhelm

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes power loss calibration procedures with implemented emissivity correction. The determination of our emissivity correction matrix does neither rely on blackbody reference measurements nor on the knowledge of any sample temperatures. To describe the emissivity-corrected power calibration procedures in detail, we review the theory behind lock-in thermography and show experimentally that the lock-in signal is proportional to the power dissipation in the solar cell. Experiments show the successful application of our emissivity correction procedure, which significantly improves the informative value of lock-in thermography images and the reliability of the conclusions drawn from these images.

  15. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  16. The effect of solar wind and geomagnetic indices on emissions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Richard; Walker, Simon

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigate which of the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic indices have the greatest influence on plasma waves in the radiation belts. We analysed three emission types for this study: Lower Band Chorus (LBC), Hiss and Equatorial MagnetoSonic (EMS) waves. The Error Reduction Ratio (ERR) analysis was used to identify the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic indices with the greatest control over the waves. The ERR analysis plays a key role in structure detection for nonlinear system identification modelling techniques. In this application, the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices are the input data, while the wave magnitudes for the three emission types at different locations are considered as the output data. The ERR analysis is able to automatically determine a set of the most influential parameters that explain the variations in the emissions. The results of the analysis were obtained in frame of the PROGRESS project funded by the Horizon 2020 EU program.

  17. Detection and Analysis of Neutron Emissions from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Galicia, J. F.

    2013-05-01

    The Sun provides unique opportunities to study particle acceleration at flares using data from detectors placed on the surface of the Earth and on board spacecrafts. Particles may gain high energies by several physical mechanisms. Differentiating between these possibilities is a fundamental problem of cosmic ray physics. In some of the most energetic events, neutrons produced in solar flares provide information that keeps the signatures of the acceleration site. A summary of some representative solar neutron events observed on the surface of the Earth, including associated X and gamma-ray observations from spacecrafts will be presented. The solar neutron event that occurred on September 7th 2005 and detected by several observatories at Earth is analyzed closely, since it produced evidence of acceleration of particles by the Sun to energies up to tens of GeV according to comparisons of data with detailed numerical simulations of a Solar Neutron Telescope. In addition, the progress in the plans to install a new Scintillator Solar Cosmic Ray Super Telescope (SciCRST) on the top of Mount Sierra Negra (4600m asl) in the east of Mexico will be discussed. Results obtained with a prototype of the SciCRST that operated in the mountain during 2010 and 2011 will be presented together with preliminary data of the SciCRST tests done in Puebla, Mexico (2200m asl).

  18. Looking for Peace and Quiet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palin, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Ray Palin, librarian at Sunapee Middle High School in Sunapee, New Hampshire describes what it takes to make the school library a space for those looking for "peace and quiet." Palin begins this article by noting that much has been written about the advantages associated with the learning commons model of library design, however less has…

  19. The solar wind control of Jupiter's broad-band kilometric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Leblanc, Y.; Desch, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind close to Jupiter are compared with the broad-band kilometric radio emission (bKOM), using data recorded by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 during 1979. The lower bKOM frequencies, less than about 300 kHz, are found to correlate with the solar wind density and pressure and with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude during periods when there is a well-defined magnetic sector structure. The results suggest that lower frequency bKOM events are most likely to occur after a sector boundary has passed Jupiter during the period when the solar wind density and the IMF magnitude are increasing towards the sector center. The average bKOM energy per Jovian rotation tends to have lower values soon after the sector center has passed. Higher-frequency/higher-energy bKOM emission may be contaminated by hectometric emission (HOM) and differently correlated with solar activity. The solar wind control may also be obscured by some stronger control. It is suggested that electron density fluctuations in the Io torus, where the source is believed to be located, may be responsible for variations in the beaming and hence variations in the observed emission.

  20. Solar EUV measurements at Venus based on photoelectron emission from the Pioneer Venus Langmuir Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Brace, L.H.; Hoegy, W.R.; Theis, R.F. )

    1988-07-01

    The photoelectron current from the Pioneer Venus Langmuir probe has provided measurements of the solar extreme ultraviolet flux at Venus since 1979. This current is the product of the photoelectric yield of the collector and the solar spectrum at wavelengths short enough to cause emission. Calculations show that approximately 51% of the emission is due to Lyman {alpha} (1,216 {angstrom}), 46% is produced by wavelengths between 550 and 1,100 {angstrom}, and less than 3% is due to wavelengths longer than Lyman {alpha}. Thus, the Langmuir probe provides a direct measure of the total solar EUV flux, including most of the wavelengths that produce the Venus ionosphere and heat and excite neutrals in the thermosphere. The measurement technique is described, and the daily average measurements of photocurrent obtained between 1979 and 1987 are presented. The photocurrents exhibit variations related to the solar cycle and solar rotation, as well as a major 7.2-month periodicity. The authors present three indices of EUV based on the measurements: (1) the photoemission current itself, (2) the total EUV flux, and (3) an F{sub 10.7}-like solar index. These are compared with related measurements made simultaneously at Earth. These data may also help solar physicists track the intensity of EUV emission regions on the Sun while they are not visible from the Earth. The EUV flux profile of a solar flare event is also illustrated. In the future the method also could be applied on a comet mission to obtain the incident solar EUV flux, to measure the EUV extinction profiles of the cometary atmosphere, and to sample directly the dust and gas environment of the comet through the ionization the dust and gas produce when they impact the collector.

  1. The role of solar wind reconnection in driving the Neptune radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Steinberg, J. T.; Villanueva, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    The only remote diagnostic of conditions within the outer planets' magnetospheres is the highly variable flux of low-frequency radio waves. As at the other radio planets, Neptune radio emission also manifests, on a time scale of days, major intensity fluctuations that are indicative of a solar wind energy-coupling process of some kind. It is found that the merging of interplanetary magnetic field lines with Neptune's magnetosphere is the best predictor of emitted radio energy. By contrast, viscouslike energy coupling processes, such as might be caused by solar wind density or bulk speed fluctuations, are apparently ineffective in driving the radio emission.

  2. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  3. Observations of the 12.3 micron Mg I emission line during a major solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Hewagama, Tilak

    1990-01-01

    The extremely Zeeman-sensitive 12.32 micron Mg I solar emission line was observed during a 3B/X5.7 solar flare on October 24, 1989. When compared to postflare values, Mg I emission-line intensity in the penumbral flare ribbon was 20 percent greater at the peak of the flare in soft X-rays, and the 12 micron continuum intensity was 7 percent greater. The flare also excited the emission line in the umbra where it is normally absent. The umbral flare emission exhibits a Zeeman splitting 200 G less than the adjacent penumbra, suggesting that it is excited at higher altitude. The absolute penumbral magnetic field strength did not change by more than 100 G between the flare peak and postflare period. However, a change in the inclination of the field lines, probably related to the formation and development of the flare loop system, was seen.

  4. Radiance And Irradiance Of The Solar HeII 304 Emission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Floyd, L. E.; Auchère, F.

    2013-12-01

    For over 17 years, EIT and the later EUVI instruments aboard SoHO and STEREO, respectively, have provided a time series of radiant images in the HeII 30.4 nm transition region and three coronal emission lines (FeIX/X, FeXII, and FeXV). While the EIT measurements were gathered from positions approximately on the Earth-Sun axis, EUVI images have been gathered at angles ranging to more than ×90 degrees in solar longitude relative the Earth-Sun axis. Using a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) model, these measurements provide a basis for estimates of the spectral irradiance for the solar spectrum of wavelengths between 15 and 50 nm at any position in the heliosphere. In particular, we generate the He 30.4 spectral irradiance in all directions in the heliosphere and examine its time series in selected directions. Such spectra are utilized for two distinct purposes. First, the photoionization rate of neutral He at each position is calculated. Neutral He is of interest because it traverses the heliopause relatively undisturbed and therefore provides a measure of isotopic parameters beyond the heliosphere. Second, we use these generate a time series of estimates of the solar spectral luminosity in the HeII 30.4 nm emission line extending from the recent past solar cycle 23 minimum into the current weak solar cycle 24 enabling an estimate of its variation over the solar cycle. Because this 30.4~nm spectral luminosity is the sum of such radiation in all directions, its time series is devoid of the 27-day solar rotation periodicity present in indices typically used to represent solar activity.

  5. Trade-offs between solar radiation management, carbon dioxide removal, emissions mitigation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Naomi; Lenton, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    The possible use of solar radiation control strategies to counteract global warming is explored through a number scenarios of different anthropogenic CO2 emission reduction pathways and carbon dioxide removal interventions. Using a simple Earth system model, we illustrate the trade-offs between CO2 emission reduction, the use of carbon dioxide removal geoengineering interventions (‘negative emissions') and solar radiation management (SRM). These relationships are illustrated over a multi-centennial timescale, allowing sufficient time for the carbon-cycle to respond to the anthropogenic perturbation. The anthropogenic CO2 emission scenarios (focussing on those from fossil fuel combustion) range from more to less stringent mitigation of emissions and includes the scenario assumed in our previous work on the maximum cooling potential of different geoengineering options. Results are presented in terms of transient atmospheric CO2 concentration and global mean temperature from year 1900 to year 2500. Implementation of solar radiation control strategies requires an understanding of the timing and effect of terminating such an intervention, a so called ‘exit strategy'. The results illustrate a number of considerations regarding exit strategies, including the inherent commitment to either carbon dioxide removal interventions, or the length of time the solar radiation control mechanism must be maintained for. The impacts of the various trade-offs are also discussed in the context of adaptation and adaptive resilience. The results have a bearing on policy and long term planning by illustrating some of the important assumptions regarding implementation of solar radiation management. These include baseline assumptions about emission mitigation efforts, timescale of intervention maintenance and impacts on adaptation.

  6. The Role of Velocity Redistribution in Enhancing the Intensity of the He II 304 A Line in the Quiet Sun Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andretta, Vincenzo; Jordan, Stuart D.; Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Behring, William E.; Thompson, William T.; Garcia, Adriana

    1999-01-01

    We present observational evidence of the effect of small scale ("microturbulent") velocities in enhancing the intensity of the He II lambda304 line with respect to other transition region emission lines, a process we call "velocity redistribution". We first show results from the 1991 and 1993 flights of SERTS (Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph). The spectral resolution of the SERTS instrument was sufficient to infer that, at the spatial resolution of 5", the line profile is nearly gaussian both in the quiet Sun and in active regions. We were then able to determine, for the quiet Sun, a lower limit for the amplitude of non-thermal motions in the region of formation of the 304 A line of the order of 10 km/s. We estimated that, in the presence of the steep temperature gradients of the solar Transition Region (TR), velocities of this magnitude can significantly enhance the intensity of that line, thus at least helping to bridge the gap between calculated and observed values. We also estimated the functional dependence of such an enhancement on the relevant parameters (non-thermal velocities, temperature gradient, and pressure). We then present results from a coordinated campaign, using SOHO/CDS and H-alpha spectroheliograms from Coimbra Observatory, aimed at determining the relationship between regions of enhanced helium emission and chromospheric velocity fields and transition region emission in the quiescent atmosphere. Using these data, we examined the behavior of the He II lambda304 line in the quiet Sun supergranular network and compared it with other TR lines, in particular with O III lambda600. We also examined the association of 304 A emission with the so-called "coarse dark mottle", chromospheric structures seen in H-alpha red wing images and associated with spicules. We found that all these observations are consistent with the velocity redistribution picture.

  7. Theoretical models of free-free microwave emission from solar magnetic loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    1986-01-01

    The free-free microwave emission is calculated from a series of model magnetic loops. The loops are surrounded by a cooler external plasma, as required by recent simultaneous X ray and microwave observations, and a narrow transition zone separating the loops from the external plasma. To be consistent with the observational results, upper limits on the density and temperature scale lengths in the transition zone are found to be 360 km and 250 km, respectively. The models which best produce agreement with X ray and microwave observations also yielded emission measure curves which agree well with observational emission measure curves for solar active regions.

  8. Theoretical models of free-free microwave emission from solar magnetic loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    1988-01-01

    The free-free microwave emission is calculated from a series of model magnetic loops. The loops are surrounded by a cooler external plasma, as required by recent simultaneous X ray and microwave observations, and a narrow transition zone separating the loops from the external plasma. To be consistent with the observational results, upper limits on the density and temperature scale lengths in the transition zone are found to be 360 km and 250 km, respectively. The models which best produce agreement with X-ray and microwave observations also yielded emission measure curves which agree well with observational emission measure curves for solar active regions.

  9. A Long-Term Decrease of the Mid-Size Segmentation Lengths Observed in the He ii (30.4 nm) Solar EUV Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid; Wieman, Seth; Korogodina, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Power spectra of segmentation-cell length (a dominant length scale of EUV emission in the transition region) from full-disk He ii extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images observed by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) during periods of quiet-Sun conditions for a time interval from 1996 to 2015 were analyzed. The spatial power as a function of the spatial frequency from about 0.04 to 0.27 (EIT) or up to 0.48 (AIA) Mm-1 depends on the distribution of the observed segmentation-cell dimensions - a structure of the solar EUV network. The temporal variations of the spatial power reported by Didkovsky and Gurman ( Solar Phys. 289, 153, 2014) were suggested as decreases at the mid-spatial frequencies for the compared spectra when the power curves at the highest spatial frequencies of 0.5 pix-1 were adjusted to match each other. This approach has been extended in this work to compare spectral ratios at high spatial frequencies expressed in the solar spatial frequency units of Mm-1. A model of EIT and AIA spatial responses allowed us to directly compare spatial spectral ratios at high spatial frequencies for five years of joint operation of EIT and AIA, from 2010 to 2015. Based on this approach, we represent these ratio changes as a long-term network transformation that may be interpreted as a continuous dissipation of mid-size network structures to the smaller-size structures in the transition region. In contrast to expected cycling of the segmentation-cell dimension structures and associated spatial power in the spectra with the solar cycle, the spectra demonstrate a significant and steady change of the EUV network. The temporal trend across these structural spectra is not critically sensitive to any long-term instrumental changes, e.g. degradation of sensitivity, but to the change of the segmentation-cell dimensions of the EUV

  10. A Solar Minimum Irradiance Spectrum for Wavelengths below 1200 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2005-03-01

    NRLEUV represents an independent approach to modeling the Sun's EUV irradiance and its variability. Our model utilizes differential emission measure distributions derived from spatially and spectrally resolved solar observations, full-disk solar images, and a database of atomic physics parameters to calculate the solar EUV irradiance. In this paper we present a new solar minimum irradiance spectrum for wavelengths below 1200 Å. This spectrum is based on extensive observations of the quiet Sun taken with the CDS and SUMER spectrometers on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the most recent version of the CHIANTI atomic physics database. In general, we find excellent agreement between this new irradiance spectrum and our previous quiet-Sun reference spectrum derived primarily from Harvard Skylab observations. Our analysis does show that the quiet-Sun emission measure above about 1 MK declines more rapidly than in our earlier emission measure distribution and that the intensities of the EUV free-bound continua at some wavelengths are somewhat smaller than indicated by the Harvard observations. Our new reference spectrum is also generally consistent with recent irradiance observations taken near solar minimum. There are, however, two areas of persistent disagreement. Our solar spectrum indicates that the irradiance measurements overestimate the contribution of the EUV free-bound continua at some wavelengths by as much as a factor of 10. Our model also cannot reproduce the observed irradiances at wavelengths below about 150 Å. Comparisons with spectrally resolved solar and stellar observations indicate that only a small fraction of the emission lines in the 60-120 Å wavelength range are accounted for in CHIANTI.

  11. Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) technology study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an engine which satisfies the requirements of a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) engine is described. Also an experimental program to demonstrate performance is suggested. The T700 QCGAT engine preliminary design indicates that it will radiate noise at the same level as an aircraft without engine noise, have exhaust emissions within the EPA 1981 Standards, have lower fuel consumption than is available in comparable size engines, and have sufficient life for five years between overhauls.

  12. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  13. How is the Jovian main auroral emission affected by the solar wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chané, E.; Saur, J.; Keppens, R.; Poedts, S.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the solar wind on Jupiter's magnetosphere is studied via three-dimensional global MHD simulations. We especially examine how solar wind density variations affect the main auroral emission. Our simulations show that a density increase in the solar wind has strong effects on the Jovian magnetosphere: the size of the magnetosphere decreases, the field lines are compressed on the dayside and elongated on the nightside (this effect can be seen even deep inside the magnetosphere), and dawn-dusk asymmetries are enhanced. Our results also show that the main oval becomes brighter when the solar wind is denser. But the precise response of the main oval to such a density enhancement in the solar wind depends on the local time: on the nightside the main oval becomes brighter, while on the dayside it first turns slightly darker for a few hours and then also becomes brighter. Once the density increase in the solar wind reaches the magnetosphere, the magnetopause moves inward, and in less than 5 h, a new approximate equilibrium position is obtained. But the magnetosphere as a whole needs much longer to adapt to the new solar wind conditions. For instance, the total electrical current closing in the ionosphere slowly increases during the simulation and it takes about 60 h to reach a new equilibrium. By then the currents have increased by as much as 45%.

  14. Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Pan, Heng; Ban-Weiss, George; Rosado, Pablo; Paolini, Riccardo; Akbari, Hashem

    2011-05-11

    Abstract: Vehicle thermal loads and air conditioning ancillary loads are strongly influenced by the absorption of solar energy. The adoption of solar reflective coatings for opaque surfaces of the vehicle shell can decrease the ?soak? temperature of the air in the cabin of a vehicle parked in the sun, potentially reducing the vehicle?s ancillary load and improving its fuel economy by permitting the use of a smaller air conditioner. An experimental comparison of otherwise identical black and silver compact sedans indicated that increasing the solar reflectance (?) of the car?s shell by about 0.5 lowered the soak temperature of breath-level air by about 5?6?C. Thermal analysis predicts that the air conditioning capacity required to cool the cabin air in the silver car to 25?C within 30min is 13percent less than that required in the black car. Assuming that potential reductions in AC capacity and engine ancillary load scale linearly with increase in shell solar reflectance, ADVISOR simulations of the SC03 driving cycle indicate that substituting a typical cool-colored shell (?=0.35) for a black shell (?=0.05) would reduce fuel consumption by 0.12L per 100km (1.1percent), increasing fuel economy by 0.10kmL?1 [0.24mpg] (1.1percent). It would also decrease carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 2.7gkm?1 (1.1percent), nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by 5.4mgkm?1 (0.44percent), carbon monoxide (CO) emissions by 17mgkm?1 (0.43percent), and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions by 4.1mgkm?1 (0.37percent). Selecting a typical white or silver shell (?=0.60) instead of a black shell would lower fuel consumption by 0.21L per 100km (1.9percent), raising fuel economy by 0.19kmL?1 [0.44mpg] (2.0percent). It would also decrease CO2 emissions by 4.9gkm?1 (1.9percent), NOx emissions by 9.9mgkm?1 (0.80percent), CO emissions by 31mgkm?1 (0.79percent), and HC emissions by 7.4mgkm?1 (0.67percent). Our simulations may underestimate emission reductions because emissions in standardized driving cycles are

  15. White-light continuum emission from solar flare and plages: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Observations of flares in optical continuum emission are very rare. Therefore, the analysis of such observations is very useful and may contribute to our understanding of the flaring chromosphere. We study the white-light continuum emission observed during the X6.9 flare observed on August 09, 2011. This emission comes not only from the flare ribbons but also form the nearby plage area observed within the active region. The main aim of this work is to disentangle the flare and plage emission and to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the production of white-light continuum.There are two main mechanisms which can be responsible for the optical continuum emission of the solar atmosphere: enhanced photospheric H- continuum due to the temperature increase below the temperature minimum region, or hydrogen recombination continua (Balmer, Paschen) formed in solar chromosphere. In our work we analyse the physical conditions in solar active atmosphere in order to obtain the contribution from these two mechanisms to the whole continuum emission of the flare and plage.We analyzed the spatial, spectral and temporal evolution study of the flare and plage parameters by analyzing multi-wavelength observations obtained from ground and space based solar observatories. We study the morphological correlation of the white-light continuum emission observed with different instruments. Moreover, we also explore the non-thermal electron beam properties by forward fitting the observed X-ray spectra.The unique opportunity of an intense X6.9 flare occurrence close to the limb enabled us to explore the origin of white-light continuum with better visibility. The analysis of multi-wavelength data revealed the origin of this emission from the foot-points of the loops. Spatial association of HXR foot-points synthesized from RHESSI observations confirmed this finding. In addition, we found a good temporal correlation of hard (>30 keV) X-ray with the white-light emission. However

  16. The Central Engines of Radio-Quiet Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, K.

    1999-05-01

    Before high-resolution imaging of the faint radio emission from Radio-Quiet Quasars was possible, two rival hypotheses had been proposed for the origin of the radio flux in these RQQs: i) it represented emission from a circumnuclear starburst (e.g., Terlevich et al 1995 and Sopp & Alexander 1991) or ii) it was caused by radio jets with powers considerably lower than those of Radio-Loud Quasars with comparable luminosities in the other wavebands (Miller et al. 1993). Imaging with the VLBA has provided a definitive test between these rival hypotheses, since a mere detection of a RQQ with the VLBA implies extreme brightness temperature, hence excluding the hypothesis that a starburst could be the sole source of emission. Blundell & Beasley (1998) have used the VLBA to image a sample of RQQs and I will discuss both the implications of these detections and subsequent multi-epoch observations which indicate superluminal motion in one of these radio-quiet quasars, further pointing towards a fundamental link between radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars.

  17. INTENSITY ENHANCEMENT OF O VI ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION LINES IN SOLAR SPECTRA DUE TO OPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, F. P.; Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Madjarska, M. S.; Rose, S. J.; Bowler, L. A.; Britton, J.; McCrink, L.

    2014-04-01

    Opacity is a property of many plasmas. It is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, then its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to an optically thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depths. While previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, here we investigate the spatially resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) intensity ratio of O VI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite. We find several I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) ratios observed on the disk to be significantly larger than the optically thin value of 2.0, providing the first detection (to our knowledge) of intensity enhancement in the ratio arising from opacity effects in the solar atmosphere. The agreement between observation and theory is excellent and confirms that the O VI emission originates from a slab-like geometry in the solar atmosphere, rather than from cylindrical structures.

  18. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  19. On Using Solar Radio Emission to Probe Interiors of Asteroids and Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Gary, D. E.; Sahr, J. D.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2015-12-01

    Asteroids, comets and other primitive solar system bodies are key sources of information on the early solar system, on volatiles and organics delivered to the terrestrial planets, and on processes of planetary formation now observed in operation around other stars. Whether asteroids (in various size classes) are rubble piles or monolithic, and whether any porosity or internal voids contain volatiles, are first-order questions for understanding the delivery of volatiles to the early Earth, and for assessing impact hazards. Information on bulk composition aids discrimination between types and origins of primitive bodies, .e.g., the degree of aqueous alteration and bound-water content of carbonaceous chondrite bodies, and the volatile mass fraction of comets. Radar and radio methods can provide direct information on bulk composition, micro- and macro-porosity, body-scale internal structure, and on whether voids in rocky materials are volatile- or vacuum-filled. Such methods therefore figure prominently in current missions to primitive bodies (e.g., CONSERT) and in a variety of proposed missions. Radio transmitters necessary for conventional methods, however, add considerably to spacecraft mass and power requirements. Moreover, at many wavelengths most useful for radio sounding, powerful radio emission from the Sun strongly interferes with conventional signals. Here we present initial results from an investigation of how solar radio emission could serve as a natural resource for probing interiors of primitive bodies, rather than as interference. We briefly review methods for using stochastic radio illumination (aka noise radar methods), and illustrate the characteristics of solar radio emission relevant to mission design (e.g., observed intervals between emission events of specified intensity for different points in the solar cycle). We then discuss methods for selecting and interpreting observations in terms of interior properties, for bodies is different size classes

  20. Observation and modeling of geocoronal charge exchange X-ray emission during solar wind gusts

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kornbleuth, M.; Juda, M.; Martin, P. L.

    2014-11-20

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O{sup 7{sup +}} collide with neutral gas, including the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere (exosphere or geocorona) and hydrogen and helium from the local interstellar medium drifting through the heliosphere. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises a significant and varying fraction of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) and is seen in every X-ray observation, with the intensity dependent on solar wind conditions and observation geometry. Under the right conditions, geocoronal emission can increase the apparent SXRB by roughly an order of magnitude for an hour or more. In this work, we study a dozen occasions when the near-Earth solar wind flux was exceptionally high. These gusts of wind lead to abrupt changes in SWCX X-ray emission around Earth, which may or may not be seen by X-ray observatories depending on their line of sight. Using detailed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere, and element abundances and ionization states measured by ACE, we model the time-dependent brightness of major geocoronal SWCX emission lines during those gusts and compare with changes in the X-ray background measured by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find reasonably good agreement between model and observation, with measured geocoronal line brightnesses averaged over 1 hr of up to 136 photons s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1} in the O VII Kα triplet around 564 eV.

  1. Coupling of soil solarization and reduced rate fumigation: effects on methyl iodide emissions from raised beds under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Daniel J; Yates, Scott R; Luo, Lifang; Lee, Sang R; Xuan, Richeng

    2013-12-26

    Using field plots, we studied the effect on methyl iodide (MeI) emissions of coupling soil solarization (passive and active) and reduced rate fumigation (70% of a standard fumigation) in raised beds under virtually impermeable film (VIF). The results showed that for the standard fumigation and the passive solarization + fumigation treatments, emissions from the nontarped furrow were very high (∼50%). Emissions from the bed top and sidewall of these treatments were relatively low but were increased in the latter due to the longer environmental exposure of the VIF covering with the coupled approach (increased tarp permeability). Overall, this approach offered no advantage over fumigation-only in terms of emission reduction. With active solarization + fumigation, the large application of hot water during solarization apparently led to severely limited diffusion causing very low total emissions (<1%). Although this suggests a benefit in terms of air quality, a lack of diffusion could limit the pesticidal efficacy of the treatment.

  2. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  3. Visualization of Photoexcited Carrier Responses in a Solar Cell Using Optical Pump—Terahertz Emission Probe Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi; Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    We observed photoexcited carrier responses in solar cells excited by femtosecond laser pulses with spatial and temporal resolution using an optical pump-terahertz emission probe technique. We visualized the ultrafast local variation of the intensity of terahertz emission from a polycrystalline silicon solar cell using this technique and clearly observed the change in signals between a grain boundary and the inside of a grain in the solar cell. Further, the time evolution of the pump-probe signals of the polycrystalline and monocrystalline silicon solar cells was observed, and the relaxation times of photoexcited carriers in the emitter layers of crystalline silicon solar cells were estimated using this technique. The estimated relaxation time was consistent with the lifetime of the Auger recombination process that was dominant in heavily doped silicon used as an emitter layer for the silicon solar cells, which is difficult to obtain with photoluminescence method commonly used for the evaluation of solar cells.

  4. Plasma turbulence and impulsive UV line emission in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Observations show that hard X-ray burst and UV lines rise and fall simultaneously on time scales of seconds. Hydrodynamic simulations of beam-heated atmospheres, based on collisional transport, however, produce only a gradual fall in UV emission, when the beam flux falls, due to the long time scale of conductive relaxation. It is suggested that this discrepancy might be explained by onset of plasma turbulence driven by the strong heat flux or by the beam return current going unstable. Such turbulence greatly reduces electrical and thermal conductivities. Fall in electrical conductivity reduces the hard X-ray flux by enhanced ohmic dissipation of the return current, while fall in thermal conductivity may cause the UV line to fall by reducing the transition region thickness.

  5. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  6. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission from Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2008-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth s magnetosheath. The light curve of the O VII (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.36). The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  7. Conditions for electron-cyclotron maser emission in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosan, D. E.; Zucca, P.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Gallagher, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission ranging from long duration radio bursts associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections to more complex, short duration radio bursts such as solar S bursts, radio spikes and fibre bursts. While plasma emission is thought to be the dominant emission mechanism for most radio bursts, the electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) mechanism may be responsible for more complex, short-duration bursts as well as fine structures associated with long-duration bursts. Aims: We investigate the conditions for ECM in the solar corona by considering the ratio of the electron plasma frequency ωp to the electron-cyclotron frequency Ωe. The ECM is theoretically possible when ωp/ Ωe< 1. Methods: Two-dimensional electron density, magnetic field, plasma frequency, and electron cyclotron frequency maps of the off-limb corona were created using observations from SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO, together with potential field extrapolations of the magnetic field. These maps were then used to calculate ωp/Ωe and Alfvén velocity maps of the off-limb corona. Results: We found that the condition for ECM emission (ωp/ Ωe< 1) is possible at heights <1.07 R⊙ in an active region near the limb; that is, where magnetic field strengths are >40 G and electron densities are >3 × 108 cm-3. In addition, we found comparatively high Alfvén velocities (>0.02c or >6000 km s-1) at heights <1.07 R⊙ within the active region. Conclusions: This demonstrates that the condition for ECM emission is satisfied within areas of the corona containing large magnetic fields, such as the core of a large active region. Therefore, ECM could be a possible emission mechanism for high-frequency radio and microwave bursts.

  8. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Farnik, F.; Kundu, M. R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Valio, A. V. R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Vilmer, N.; Warmuth, A.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard Xray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, including the case of microflares, and the comparison of images at radio and hard X-ray wavelengths is presented. There have been puzzling results obtained from observations of solar flares at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, and the comparison of these results with corresponding hard X-ray data is presented. Finally, the review discusses the association of hard X-ray releases with radio emission at decimeter and meter wavelengths, which is dominated by plasma emission (at lower frequencies) and electron cyclotron maser emission (at higher frequencies), both coherent emission mechanisms that require small numbers of energetic electrons. These comparisons show broad general associations but detailed correspondence remains more elusive.

  9. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-10-20

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere.

  10. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  11. Detection of Thermal Radio Emission from Evolved Solar-Type Stars with the Jansky VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, G.; Bourke, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of evolved solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in calcium H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Jansky VLA with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. All three stars are detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratio of between 4.3 and 8.4, with upper limits at 10.0 and/or 15.0 GHz that imply a rising spectral index. The measured 34.5-GHz fluxes correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically-thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with the possibility of a minor contribution from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions.

  12. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  13. Helium emission from model flare layers. [of outer solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulander, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    The emission of visible and UV He I and He II line radiation from a plane-parallel model flare layer characterized by electron temperatures of 10,000 to 50,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 15th power per cu cm is analyzed by solving the statistical-equilibrium equations for a 30-level He I-II-III system, using parametric representations of the line and continuum radiation fields. The atomic model was chosen to provide accurate solutions for the first two resonance lines of He I and He II as well as for the D3 and 10,830-A lines of He I. Reaction rates are discussed, and sample solutions to the steady-state population equations are given for a generally optically thin gas assumed to be irradiated over 2pi sr by a blackbody spectrum at 6000 K. Specific results are examined for ionization equilibrium, level populations, approximate optical depths of a 1000-km-thick flare layer, line intensities, and upper-level population rates.

  14. Effect of an X-Class Solar Flare on the OI 630 nm Dayglow Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Uma; Pallamraju, Duggirala; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-01-01

    We present a striking event that shows a prompt effect of an X-class solar flare (X6.2/3B) in the neutral optical dayglow emissions. This flare occurred on 13 December 2001 at 1424 UT and peaked at 1430 UT. The peak-to pre-flare X-ray intensity ratio as observed by GOES-10 was greater than 300 and the EUV flux observed by SEM/SOHO was greater by around 60%. As a response to this flare, the daytime redline (OI 630 nm) column integrated emission intensity measured from Carmen Alto (23.16degS, 70.66degW), in Chile, showed a prompt increase of around 50%. Our results show that this prompt enhancement in the thermospheric dayglow seems to be caused mainly due to an increase in photoelectrons due to a sudden increase in the solar EUV flux associated with this flare.

  15. Polarization features of solar radio emission and possible existence of current sheets in active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Zheleznyakov, V. V.; White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    We show that it is possible to account for the polarization features of solar radio emission provided the linear mode coupling theory is properly applied and the presence of current sheets in the corona is taken into account. We present a schematic model, including a current sheet that can explain the polarization features of both the low frequency slowly varying component and the bipolar noise storm radiation; the two radiations face similar propagation conditions through a current sheet and hence display similar polarization behavior. We discuss the applications of the linear mode coupling theory to the following types of solar emission: the slowly varying component, the microwave radio bursts, metric type U bursts, and bipolar noise storms.

  16. Expressions to determine temperatures and emission measures for solar X-ray events from GOES measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Starr, R.; Crannell, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Expressions which give the effective color temperatures and corresponding emission measures for solar X-ray events observed with instruments onboard any of the GOES satellites are developed. Theoretical spectra were used to simulate the solar X-ray input at a variety of plasma temperatures. These spectra were folded through the wavelength dependent transfer functions for the two GOES detectors. The resulting detector responses and their ratio as a function of plasma temperature were then fit with simple analytic curves. Over the entire range between 5 and 30 million degrees, these fits reproduce the calculated color temperatures within 2% and the calculated emission measures within 5%. With the theoretical spectra, similar expressions for any pair of broadband X-ray detectors whose sensitivities are limited to wavelengths between 0.2 and 100 A are calculable.

  17. Quantitative prediction of type II solar radio emission from the Sun to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are frequently associated with shocks and type II solar radio bursts. Despite involving fundamental plasma physics and being the archetype for collective radio emission from shocks, type II bursts have resisted detailed explanation for over 60 years. Between 29 November and 1 December 2013 the two widely separated spacecraft STEREO A and B observed a long lasting, intermittent, type II radio burst from ≈4 MHz to 30 kHz (harmonic), including an intensification when the CME-driven shock reached STEREO A. We demonstrate the first accurate and quantitative simulation of a type II burst from the high corona (near 11 solar radii) to 1 AU for this event with a combination of a data-driven three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation for the CME and plasma background and an analytic quantitative kinetic model for the radio emission.

  18. The X-ray emission of solar flares generated by anisotropic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kelner, S. R.; Kotov, Y. D.

    1987-12-01

    For three types of the initial angle distribution of fast electrons, energy spectra, directivity, and polarization of the bremsstrahlung have been computed with an account for multiple scattering and energy losses. The influence of Compton scattering and of photoabsorption on the observed hard X-ray emission of solar flares has been investigated. It is obtained that the photon spectrum index depends not only on the spectrum of electrons but also on the registered energy range and on the angle of view of the flare. In the 10 - 40 keV range the spectrum is softer at the limb than in the solar disc centre; in the 60 - 360 keV the situation is reverse, the spectrum being softer in the solar disc centre.

  19. Cometary X-Rays: Line Emission Cross Sections for Multiply Charged Solar Wind Ion Charge Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-12-22

    Absolute line emission cross sections are presented for 1 keV/amu charge exchange collisions of multiply charged solar wind ions with H{sub 2}O, H, O, CO{sub 2}, and CO cometary targets. The present calculations are contrasted with available laboratory data. A parameter-free model is used to successfully predict the recently observed x-ray spectra of comet C/LINEAR 1999 S4. We show that the resulting spectrum is extremely sensitive to the time variations of the solar wind composition. Our results suggest that orbiting x-ray satellites may be a viable way to predict the solar wind intensities and composition on the Earth many hours before the ions reach the earth.

  20. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  1. Electron plasma oscillations associated with type 3 radio emissions and solar electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive study of the IMP-6 and IMP-8 plasma and radio wave data was performed to try to find electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio noise bursts and low-energy solar electrons. It is shown that electron plasma oscillations are seldom observed in association with solar electron events and type III radio bursts at 1.0 AU. For the one case in which electron plasma oscillations are definitely produced by the electrons ejected by the solar flare the electric field strength is relatively small. Electromagnetic radiation, believed to be similar to the type III radio emission, is observed coming from the region of the more intense electron plasma oscillations upstream. Quantitative calculations of the rate of conversion of the plasma oscillation energy to electromagnetic radiation are presented for plasma oscillations excited by both solar electrons and electrons from the bow shock. These calculations show that neither the type III radio emissions nor the radiation from upstream of the bow shock can be adequately explained by a current theory for the coupling of electron plasma oscillations to electromagnetic radiation.

  2. Benchmark Test of Differential Emission Measure Codes and Multi-thermal Energies in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry

    2015-10-01

    We compare the ability of 11 differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting and inversion methods to constrain the properties of active regions and solar flares by simulating synthetic data using the instrumental response functions of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) and EUV Variability Experiment (SDO/EVE), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite/ X-ray Sensor (GOES/XRS). The codes include the single-Gaussian DEM, a bi-Gaussian DEM, a fixed-Gaussian DEM, a linear spline DEM, the spatial-synthesis DEM, the Monte-Carlo Markov Chain DEM, the regularized DEM inversion, the Hinode/ X-Ray Telescope (XRT) method, a polynomial spline DEM, an EVE+GOES, and an EVE+RHESSI method. Averaging the results from all 11 DEM methods, we find the following accuracies in the inversion of physical parameters: the EM-weighted temperature Tw^{fit}/Tw^{sim}=0.9±0.1, the peak emission measure EMp^{fit}/EMp^{sim}=0.6±0.2, the total emission measure EMt^{fit}/EMt^{sim}=0.8±0.3, and the multi-thermal energies E_{th}^{fit}/EM_{th}^{approx}=1.2±0.4. We find that the AIA spatial-synthesis, the EVE+GOES, and the EVE+RHESSI method yield the most accurate results.

  3. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) clean combustor test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A component pressure test was conducted on a F101 PFRT combustor to evaluate the emissions levels of this combustor design at selected under the wing and over the wing operating conditions for the quiet clean short haul experimental engine (QCSEE). Emissions reduction techniques were evaluated which included compressor discharge bleed and sector burning in the combustor. The results of this test were utilized to compare the expected QCSEE emissions levels with the emission goals of the QCSEE engine program.

  4. MAGNETIC LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W.; Pillet, V. MartInez; Bonet, J. A.; Domingo, V.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the fine structure of magnetic fields in the atmosphere of the quiet Sun. We use photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX with unprecedented spatial resolution to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field into higher layers of the solar atmosphere with the help of potential and force-free extrapolation techniques. We find that most magnetic loops that reach into the chromosphere or higher have one footpoint in relatively strong magnetic field regions in the photosphere. Ninety-one percent of the magnetic energy in the mid-chromosphere (at a height of 1 Mm) is in field lines, whose stronger footpoint has a strength of more than 300 G, i.e., above the equipartition field strength with convection. The loops reaching into the chromosphere and corona are also found to be asymmetric in the sense that the weaker footpoint has a strength B < 300 G and is located in the internetwork (IN). Such loops are expected to be strongly dynamic and have short lifetimes, as dictated by the properties of the IN fields.

  5. A Quiet Place for Student Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    As electronic gadgets predominate a student's life, there comes a need for silence. A quiet place free of electromagnetic spectrum waves, dirty and stray electricity, and the endless chirps, whistles, beeps, and customized signaling. A quiet place can offer solitude for meditation, inspiration, and spiritual awareness. Student involvement in the…

  6. Studies Highlight Classroom Plight of Quiet Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    Educators often look for ways to bring quiet children out of their shells, but emerging research suggests schools can improve academic outcomes for introverted students by reducing the pressure to be outgoing and giving all students a little more time to reflect. A 2011 study found teachers from across K-12 rated hypothetical quiet children as…

  7. QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Foullon, C.; Inglis, A. R.; Myagkova, I. N.

    2010-01-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of gamma-ray emission with a period of about 40 s are found in a single loop X-class solar flare on 2005 January 1 at photon energies up to 2-6 MeV with the SOlar Neutrons and Gamma-rays (SONG) experiment aboard the CORONAS-F mission. The oscillations are also found to be present in the microwave emission detected with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and in the hard X-ray and low energy gamma-ray channels of RHESSI. Periodogram and correlation analysis shows that the 40 s QPPs of microwave, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray emission are almost synchronous in all observation bands. Analysis of the spatial structure of hard X-ray and low energy (80-225 keV) gamma-ray QPP with RHESSI reveals synchronous while asymmetric QPP at both footpoints of the flaring loop. The difference between the averaged hard X-ray fluxes coming from the two footpoint sources is found to oscillate with a period of about 13 s for five cycles in the highest emission stage of the flare. The proposed mechanism generating the 40 s QPP is a triggering of magnetic reconnection by a kink oscillation in a nearby loop. The 13 s periodicity could be produced by the second harmonics of the sausage mode of the flaring loop.

  8. Modeling the Emission from the 15 February 2011 Solar Flare using Multi-Filamented Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The 15 February 2011 X-class solar flare was observed by numerous instruments in many spectral regimes making it an ideal case for studying the origins of flare emission. We have developed detailed 1D models describing the transport of flare-accelerated electrons and ions through magnetic flux loops in the solar atmosphere, how these particles heat the ambient plasma, and the emission produced from the flaring loops. However, because of their 1D geometry these models do not include important spatial information. For example, the flare impulsive phase may last several hundred seconds, but it is unlikely that flare-accelerated particles precipitate down a single flux loop for the duration of the entire impulsive phase. In fact, from high-resolution spatial observations we know that many filaments are successively heated in the impulsive phase. We will describe a novel approach which uses the timing of pulses in hard and soft X-ray fluxes observed during the 15 February 2011 flare as a proxy for the lifetime of the impulsive phase on individual loops. We will combine many loops simulated with our 1D flare loop model to construct a multi-filamented model of the Sun's atmospheric response and emission produced during this flare. We will compare this predicted emission to observations of obtained by the EVE, AIA and RHESSI instruments.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Fluorescence Emission Energy Dispersion in Luminescent Solar Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lanfang; Sheng, Xing; Rogers, John; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    We present a numerical modeling method and the corresponding experimental results, to address fluorescence emission dispersion for applications such as luminescent solar concentrator and light emitting diode color correction. Previously established modeling methods utilized a statistic-thermodynamic theory (Kenard-Stepnov etc.) that required a thorough understanding of the free energy landscape of the fluorophores. Some more recent work used an empirical approximation of the measured emission energy dispersion profile without considering anti-Stokes shifting during absorption and emission. In this work we present a technique for modeling fluorescence absorption and emission that utilizes the experimentally measured spectrum and approximates the observable Frank-Condon vibronic states as a continuum and takes into account thermodynamic energy relaxation by allowing thermal fluctuations. This new approximation method relaxes the requirement for knowledge of the fluorophore system and reduces demand on computing resources while still capturing the essence of physical process. We present simulation results of the energy distribution of emitted photons and compare them with experimental results with good agreement in terms of peak red-shift and intensity attenuation in a luminescent solar concentrator. This work is supported by the DOE `Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion' Energy Frontier Research Center under grant DE-SC0001293.

  10. Suppression of Hydrogen Emission in an X-class White-light Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Ondřej; Milligan, Ryan O.; Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Kotrč, Pavel; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

    2017-03-01

    We present unique NUV observations of a well-observed X-class flare from NOAA 12087 obtained at the Ondřejov Observatory. The flare shows a strong white-light continuum but no detectable emission in the higher Balmer and Lyman lines. Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Fermi observations indicate an extremely hard X-ray spectrum and γ-ray emission. We use the RADYN radiative hydrodynamic code to perform two types of simulations: one where an energy of 3 × 1011 erg cm‑2 s‑1 is deposited by an electron beam with a spectral index of ≈3, and a second where the same energy is applied directly to the photosphere. The combination of observations and simulations allows us to conclude that the white-light emission and the suppression or complete lack of hydrogen emission lines is best explained by a model where the dominant energy deposition layer is located in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere, rather than the chromosphere.

  11. Soft X-ray emission from electron-beam-heated solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, John T.; Zarro, Dominic M.

    1991-01-01

    Using time-dependent numerical simulations and Solar Maximum Mission observations of a solar flare on 1985 January 23, a study is conducted of the ability of an electron-beam-heating model to reproduce the rise phase of a flare as observed in soft X-ray lines of Ca XIX. The electron beam is parameterized by a peak flux, a low-energy cutoff, and a spectral index, and has a time dependence similar to the observed hard X-ray burst. For a spectral index of 6, only models with a low-energy cutoff of 20 keV reproduce the observed peak emission in the Ca XIX line complex. All models with a low-energy cutoff of 15 keV produce too much emission, while all models with a 25-keV cutoff too little emission. None of the models reproduces the temporal behavior of the soft X-ray emission. The electron-beam-heated component is theorized to only represent a small fraction of the energy released in the impulsive phase of this flare.

  12. On a Flat-shape Emission in the Solar Flare on 7th June 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Kupryakov, Yu. A.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bárta, M.

    We present results of the study of the C1.5 solar flare~(SOL2012-06-07T05:56) which occurred on June 7, 2012. This weak flare showed an extraordinary long flat emission in the X-ray flux curve in the 3-12 keV energy band. Duration of this flat period was about 10 minutes while the duration of the flare was almost 20 minutes. As this particular shape was observed both by RHESSI and FERMI, it could not be caused by an instrumental effect. We analyzed the optical spectra and slit-jaw images from the solar spectrograph in Ondřejov and in the hard X-ray by RHESSI as well as EUV data obtained by SDO and all available microwave data. We found that the "flat emission" period was also observed in microwaves (5-17 GHz). During this period the motion of the flare source from the spot to south direction was revealed. A localized maximum of the chromospheric emission was also shifting in the same direction. Quasi-periodic pulsations with periods of about 5 minutes were detected in evolution of the electron temperature that is an evidence of the energy input during the "flat emission" period.

  13. First results on quiet and magnetic granulation from SOUP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Tarbell, T. D.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.; Ferguson, S. H.; Finch, M.; Frank, Z.; Kelly, G.; Lindgren, R.; Morrill, M.

    1987-01-01

    The flight of Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 allowed the collection of time sequences of diffraction limited (0.5 arc sec) granulation images with excellent pointing (0.003 arc sec) and completely free of the distortion that plagues groundbased images. The p-mode oscillations are clearly seen in the data. Using Fourier transforms in the temporal and spatial domain, it was shown that the p-modes dominate the autocorrelation lifetime in magnetic regions. When these oscillations are removed the autocorrelation lifetime is found to be 500 sec in quiet and 950 sec in magnetic regions. In quiet areas exploding granules are seen to be common. It is speculated that a significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Using local correlation tracking techniques it was able to measure horizontal displacements, and thus transverse velocities, in the magnetic field. In quiet sun it is possible to detect both super and mesogranulation. Horizontal velocities are as great as 1000 m/s and the average velocity is 400 m/s. In magnetic regions horizontal velocities are much less, about 100 m/s.

  14. The Impact of Return-Current Losses on the Observed Emissions from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are expected to drive a co-spatial return current in the ambient plasma when they escape the acceleration region. This return current maintains plasma neutrality and the stability of the beam of streaming electrons. The electric field that drives this return current also decelerates the energetic electrons in the beam. The corresponding energy loss experienced by the accelerated electrons can affect the observed properties of the X-ray and radio emissions from flares and the evolution of the thermal flare plasma. I will discuss the properties of the flare emissions expected in a classical, steady-state model. As part of this discussion, I will examine Gordon Emslie's 1980 conjecture that return-current losses result in a maximum brightness for the hard X-ray emission from flares.

  15. Statistical Characteristics of EMIC Waves Observed at Geosynchronous Orbit during Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, E.; Jin, H.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can be generated under the conditions of anisotropic (T⊥ > T∥) and energetic (larger than a few tens keV) ion population. Such conditions are expected when the magnetospheric convection is enhanced or when the magnetosphere is compressed by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement. Even in the absence of strong magnetospheric convection or strong solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, we have observed EMIC waves at geosynchronous orbit. In this study, we report the GOES observations of the EMIC waves excited during quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≤ 1) in the period from January 2007 to December in 2008. Unlike previous studies, the occurrence rate of quiet time EMIC waves is dominant in morning-to-afternoon sector. We will examine the source of free energy to excite quiet time EMIC waves and also examine wave's characteristics.

  16. Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Oliveros, J. C.; Moradi, H.; Donea, A.-C.

    2008-09-01

    On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond to previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-rays, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential-field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant anti-correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

  17. Magnetospheric convection during quiet or moderately disturbed times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1988-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the large-scale plasma circulation in the earth's environment during quiet times, or during reasonable stable magnetic conditions are reviewed. The various sources of field-aligned current generation in the solar wind and the magnetosphere are presented. The generation of field-aligned currents on open field lines connected to either polar cap and the generation of closed field lines of the inner magnetosphere are examined. Consideration is given to the hypothesis of Caudal (1987) that loss processes of trapped particles are competing with adiabatic motions in the generation of field-aligned currents in the inner magnetosphere.

  18. X-ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2000-01-01

    This LTSA award funded my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the validity of the solar-stellar analogy. This research broadly addresses the relevance of our current understanding of solar X-ray physics to the interpretation of X-ray emission from stars in general. During the past five years the emphasis has been on space-based X-ray observations of very young stars in star-forming regions (T Tauri stars and protostars), cool solar-like G stars, and evolved high-mass Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. These observations were carried out primarily with the ASCA and ROSAT space-based observatories (and most recently with Chandra), supplemented by ground-based observations. This research has focused on the identification of physical processes that are responsible for the high levels of X-ray emission seen in pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, active cool stars, and WR stars. A related issue is how the X-ray emission of such stars changes over time, both on short timescales of days to years and on evolutionary timescales of millions of years. In the case of the Sun it is known that magnetic fields play a key role in the production of X-rays by confining the coronal plasma in loop-like structures where it is heated to temperatures of several million K. The extent to which the magnetically-confined corona interpretation can be applied to other X-ray emitting stars is the key issue that drives the research summarized here.

  19. Solar X-ray Emission Measured by the Vernov Mission During September - October of 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Rozhkov, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    Solar hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions were measured by the Detector of the Roentgen and Gamma-ray Emissions (DRGE) instrument, which is part of the RELEC set of instruments operated onboard the Russian satellite Vernov, from July 8, 2014 until December 10, 2014 (on a solar-synchronous orbit with an apogee of 830 km, perigee of 640 km, and an inclination of 98.4°). RELEC measurements of 18 flares with X-ray energy {>} 30 keV, taken in September - October 2014, were connected with the same active region with the number AR 12172 during the first rotation and AR 12192 during the next one. These measurements were compared to the data obtained with RHESSI, Konus-Wind, Fermi Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Net (RSTN), and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) operating at the same time. Quasi-periodicities with similar periods of 7±2 s were found in about one third of all flares measured by RELEC ( Vernov) from September 24 until October 30, 2014.

  20. Electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio emissions and solar electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an extensive search for electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio noise bursts are presented which were obtained by analyzing 87 type III bursts detected in plasma-wave and charged-particle measurements carried out by IMP 6, 7, and 8. Only one case is found for which plasma oscillations were associated with electrons of solar origin; at least eight events are identified in which no plasma oscillations were detected even though electrons from solar flares were clearly evident. The type III emissions are compared with similar radiation coming from upstream of earth's bow shock at the harmonic of the local electron plasma frequency, and quantitative calculations of the rate of conversion from plasma oscillatory energy to electromagnetic radiation are performed. The results show that electron plasma oscillations are seldom observed in association with solar electron events and type III radio bursts at 1.0 AU and that neither the type III emissions nor the radiation from upstream of the bow shock can be adequately explained by a current model for the coupling of electron plasma oscillations to electromagnetic radiation. Several possible explanations are considered for this discrepancy between theory and observations.

  1. Comparative analysis of theories of zebra-pattern in solar radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E.

    2007-08-01

    Strong and weak aspects of different theories of fine structure on solar radio emission dynamic spectra observed as several or numerous quasi- equidistant bands of enhanced and reduced radiation (zebra-pattern) are discussed. Most of works proposing zebra-pattern interpretation is based on plasma mechanism of radio emission generation which consists of exciting plasma (electrostatic) waves and their succeeding transformation into electromagnetic emission. Plasma waves arise due to kinetic or hydrodynamic instability at the upper hybrid frequencies (at the levels of double plasma resonance in a distributed source) or at the electron gyrofrequency harmonics (Bernstein modes in a compact source with quasi-uniform magnetic field). The reason for the instability is occurrence of a number of electrons with nonequilibrium distribution over velocities perpendicular to magnetic field. Radio emission escaping from the source is a result of nonlinear coalescence of plasma waves with low frequency or high frequency waves which does not break the harmonic character of spectrum. A significant number of works is devoted to considering whistlers as a main reason for occurring stripes in emission and absorption on dynamic spectra. Whistlers are also believed to be excited by a group of nonequilibrium electrons, and then some nonlinear processes including whistler interaction result in specific frequency spectrum with enhanced and reduced radiation stripes. An alternative theory of zebra-pattern origin suggests the presence of a compact source with trapped plasma waves in the corona. The trapped waves in a confined space easily provide discrete spectrum. One more interpretation is based on special effects that may occur when radio waves are propagating through non-uniform coronal plasma: the alternate bright and dark stripes on dynamic spectra are supposed to be a result of radio wave interference or diffraction on some periodical structure in the solar corona. All suggested

  2. SOLAR FLARE CHROMOSPHERIC LINE EMISSION: COMPARISON BETWEEN IBIS HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé; Kleint, Lucia; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation over a broad spectral range and a wide range of heights. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results could be extremely valuable, but has not yet been attempted. In this paper, we present such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope’s Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 which we have modeled using the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN. We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and with RHESSI in X-rays. The latter observations were used to infer the non-thermal electron population, which was passed to RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response to electron collisional heating. We then synthesized spectral lines and compared their shapes and intensities to those observed by IBIS and found a general agreement. In particular, the synthetic Ca ii 8542 Å profile fits well to the observed profile, while the synthetic Hα profile is fainter in the core than for the observation. This indicates that Hα emission is more responsive to the non-thermal electron flux than the Ca ii 8542 Å emission. We suggest that it is necessary to refine the energy input and other processes to resolve this discrepancy.

  3. X-ray emission from the local hot bubble and solar wind charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Youaraj

    DXL (Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission to quantify the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission in the interplanetary medium, and separate its contribution from the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) emission. The first launch of DXL took place in December 2012. This thesis will describe the DXL instrumentation and calibrations, and discuss the results obtained. The mission uses two large area proportional counters to scan through the Helium Focusing Cone (HFC), a high helium density region in the solar system emitting excess X-rays due to SWCX. Using well determined models of the interplanetary neutral distribution and comparing the DXL results with data from the same region obtained by the ROSAT satellite away from the cone, we calculated that SWCX contributes at most 36% to the ¼ keV ROSAT band and 13% to the ¾ keV ROSAT band, in the galactic plane. This provides a firm proof for existence of a LHB which dominates the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) at ¼ keV, while raising new questions on the origin of the ¾ keV emission.

  4. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSIONS ACCOMPANYING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, B. M.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2012-11-20

    We have used Transition Region and Coronal Explorer 1600 A images and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) magnetograms to compare ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the chromosphere to longitudinal magnetic field changes in the photosphere during four X-class solar flares. An abrupt, significant, and persistent change in the magnetic field occurred across more than 10 pixels in the GONG magnetograms for each flare. These magnetic changes lagged the GOES flare start times in all cases, showing that they were consequences and not causes of the flares. Ultraviolet emissions were spatially coincident with the field changes. The UV emissions tended to lag the GOES start times for the flares and led the changes in the magnetic field in all pixels except one. The UV emissions led the photospheric field changes by 4 minutes on average with the longest lead being 9 minutes; however, the UV emissions continued for tens of minutes, and more than an hour in some cases, after the field changes were complete. The observations are consistent with the picture in which an Alfven wave from the field reconnection site in the corona propagates field changes outward in all directions near the onset of the impulsive phase, including downward through the chromosphere and into the photosphere, causing the photospheric field changes, whereas the chromosphere emits in the UV in the form of flare kernels, ribbons, and sequential chromospheric brightenings during all phases of the flare.

  5. Relation between electric current densities and X-ray emissions from particles accelerated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents. This energy is partially transferred to particle acceleration. We studied for several X-class flares located near the solar disk center the relation between the location of the X-ray emissions produced by energetic electrons accelerated in the corona and the magnetic field and vertical component of the electric current density in the photosphere. The study is based on X-ray images with data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and magnetic field maps and current density maps calculated with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes from the spectropolarimetric measurements of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). A comparison between X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) complete the study. We shall present preliminary conclusions on the link between particle acceleration and the presence of electric currents in the active region.

  6. Quiet Supersonic Wind Tunnel Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Lyndell S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The ability to control the extent of laminar flow on swept wings at supersonic speeds may be a critical element in developing the enabling technology for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Laminar boundary layers are less resistive to forward flight than their turbulent counterparts, thus the farther downstream that transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the wing boundary layer is extended can be of significant economic impact. Due to the complex processes involved experimental studies of boundary layer stability and transition are needed, and these are performed in "quiet" wind tunnels capable of simulating the low-disturbance environment of free flight. At Ames, a wind tunnel has been built to operate at flow conditions which match those of the HSCT laminar flow flight demonstration 'aircraft, the F-16XL, i.e. at a Mach number of 1.6 and a Reynolds number range of 1 to 3 million per foot. This will allow detailed studies of the attachment line and crossflow on the leading edge area of the highly swept wing. Also, use of suction as a means of control of transition due to crossflow and attachment line instabilities can be studied. Topics covered include: test operating conditions required; design requirements to efficiently make use of the existing infrastructure; development of an injector drive system using a small pilot facility; plenum chamber design; use of computational tools for tunnel and model design; and early operational results.

  7. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  8. High-torque quiet gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Paul E.

    1995-07-01

    A high-torque quiet gear construction consists of an inner hub having a plurality of circumferentially spaced arms extending radially outwardly therefrom, and an outer ring member having a plurality of circumferentially spaced-teeth extending radially inwardly therefrom. The ring member further includes a plurality of gear formations on an outer surface thereof for intermeshing with other gears. The teeth of the ring member are received in spaced relation in corresponding spaces formed between adjacent arms of the hub. An elastomeric member is received in the space formed between the hub and the ring member to form a resilient correction between the arms of the hub and the teeth of the ring member. The side surfaces of the arms and the teeth extend generally parallel to each other and at least partially overlap in a longitudinal direction. The purpose of this configuration is to place the elastomeric member in compression when torque is applied to the hub. Since elastomeric material is relatively incompressible, the result is low shear loads on the adhesive bonds which hold the elastomeric member to both the hub and outer ring member.

  9. CO sub 2 emissions from coal-fired and solar electric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, F.; Norton, P.; Brown, D.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents estimates of the lifetime carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired, photovoltaic, and solar thermal electric power plants in the United States. These CO{sub 2} estimates are based on a net energy analysis derived from both operational systems and detailed design studies. It appears that energy conservation measures and shifting from fossil to renewable energy sources have significant long-term potential to reduce carbon dioxide production caused by energy generation and thus mitigate global warming. The implications of these results for a national energy policy are discussed. 40 refs., 8 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Quantifying avoided fuel use and emissions from solar photovoltaic generation in the Western United States.

    PubMed

    Denholm, Paul; Margolis, Robert M; Milford, James M

    2009-01-01

    The electric power system in the Western United States was simulated to evaluate the potential of solar photovoltaics (PV) in reducing fossil-fuel use and associated emissions. The simulations used a utility production cost model to evaluate a series of PV penetrations where up to 10% of the region's electricity is derived from PV. The analysis focused on California, which uses gas for a large fraction of its generation and Colorado, which derives most of its electricity from coal. PV displaces gas and electricity imports almost exclusively in California, with a displacement rate of about 6000-9000 kJ per kWh of PV energy generated. In Colorado, PV offsets mostly gas at low penetration, with increasing coal displacement during nonsummer months and at higher penetration. Associated reductions in CO2, NOx, and SO2 emissions are also calculated.

  11. Coronal energy distribution and X-ray activity in the small scale magnetic field of the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The energy distribution in the small-scale magnetic field that pervades the solar surface, and its relationship to X-ray/coronal activity are discussed. The observed emission from the small scale structures, at temperatures characteristic of the chromosphere, transition region and corona, emanates from the boundaries of supergranular cells, within coronal bright points. This emission is characterized by a strong temporal and spatial variability with no definite pattern. The analysis of simultaneous, multiwavelength EUV observations shows that the spatial density of the enhanced as well as variable emission from the small scale structures exhibits a pronounced temperature dependence with significant maxima at 100,000 and 1,000,000 K. Within the limits of the spatial (1-5 arcsec) and temporal (1-5 min) resolution of data available at present, the observed variability in the small scale structure cannot account for the coroal heating of the quiet sun. The characteristics of their emission are more likely to be an indicator of the coronal heating mechanisms.

  12. Radio emission and mass loss rate limits of four young solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtinger, Bibiana; Güdel, Manuel; Mutel, Robert L.; Hallinan, Gregg; Gaidos, Eric; Skinner, Stephen L.; Lynch, Christene; Gayley, Kenneth G.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Observations of free-free continuum radio emission of four young main-sequence solar-type stars (EK Dra, π1 UMa, χ1 Ori, and κ1 Cet) are studied to detect stellar winds or at least to place upper limits on their thermal radio emission, which is dominated by the ionized wind. The stars in our sample are members of The Sun in Time programme and cover ages of 0.1-0.65 Gyr on the main-sequence. They are similar in magnetic activity to the Sun and thus are excellent proxies for representing the young Sun. Upper limits on mass loss rates for this sample of stars are calculated using their observational radio emission. Our aim is to re-examine the faint young Sun paradox by assuming that the young Sun was more massive in its past, and hence to find a possible solution for this famous problem. Methods: The observations of our sample are performed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) with excellent sensitivity, using the C-band receiver from 4-8 GHz and the Ku-band from 12-18 GHz. Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillitmeter Array (ALMA) observations are performed at 100 GHz. The Common Astronomy Software Application (CASA) package is used for the data preparation, reduction, calibration, and imaging. For the estimation of the mass loss limits, spherically symmetric winds and stationary, anisotropic, ionized winds are assumed. We compare our results to 1) mass loss rate estimates of theoretical rotational evolution models; and 2) to results of the indirect technique of determining mass loss rates: Lyman-α absorption. Results: We are able to derive the most stringent direct upper limits on mass loss so far from radio observations. Two objects, EK Dra and χ1 Ori, are detected at 6 and 14 GHz down to an excellent noise level. These stars are very active and additional radio emission identified as non-thermal emission was detected, but limits for the mass loss rates of these objects are still derived. The emission of χ1 Ori does not come from the main target

  13. Space Environment Effects: Model for Emission of Solar Protons (ESP)--Cumulative and Worst-Case Event Fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Barth, J. L.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Burke, Edward A.; Gee, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary and polar orbits and for interplanetary missions. Designers of spacecraft and mission planners are required to assess the performance of microelectronic systems under a variety of conditions. A number of useful approaches exist for predicting information about solar proton event fluences and, to a lesser extent, peak fluxes. This includes the cumulative fluence over the course of a mission, the fluence of a worst-case event during a mission, the frequency distribution of event fluences, and the frequency distribution of large peak fluxes. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the sponsorship of NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program, have developed a new model for predicting cumulative solar proton fluences and worst-case solar proton events as functions of mission duration and user confidence level. This model is called the Emission of Solar Protons (ESP) model.

  14. A SCENARIO FOR THE FINE STRUCTURES OF SOLAR TYPE IIIb RADIO BURSTS BASED ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-10

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb–III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb–IIIb or III–IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  15. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb-III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  16. Airesearch QCGAT program. [quiet clean general aviation turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Norgren, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model TFE731-1 engine was used as a baseline for the NASA quiet clean general aviation turbofan engine and engine/nacelle program designed to demonstrate the applicability of large turbofan engine technology to small general aviation turbofan engines, and to obtain significant reductions in noise and pollutant emissions while reducing or maintaining fuel consumption levels. All new technology design for rotating parts and all items in the engine and nacelle that contributed to the acoustic and pollution characteristics of the engine system were of flight design, weight, and construction. The major noise, emissions, and performance goals were met. Noise levels estimated for the three FAR Part 36 conditions, are 10 t0 15 ENPdB below FAA requirements; emission values are considerably reduced below that of current technology engines; and the engine performance represents a TSFC improvement of approximately 9 percent over other turbofan engines.

  17. Anisotropic emission and photon-recycling in strain-balanced quantum well solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, C. I.; Enciso, A.; Contreras-Solorio, D. A.; Hernandez, L.; Connolly, J. P.

    2014-04-28

    Strain-balanced quantum well solar cells (SB-QWSCs) extend the photon absorption edge beyond that of bulk GaAs by incorporation of quantum wells in the i-region of a p–i–n device. Anisotropy arises from a splitting of the valence band due to compressive strain in the quantum wells, suppressing a transition which contributes to emission from the edge of the quantum wells. We have studied both the emission light polarized in the plane perpendicular (TM) to the quantum well which couples exclusively to the light hole transition and the emission polarized in the plane of the quantum wells (TE) which couples mainly to the heavy hole transition. It was found that the spontaneous emission rates TM and TE increase when the quantum wells are deeper. The addition of a distributed Bragg reflector can substantially increase the photocurrent while decreasing the radiative recombination current. We have examined the impact of the photon recycling effect on SB-QWSC performance. We have optimized SB-QWSC design to achieve single junction efficiencies above 30%.

  18. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  19. The EVE plus RHESSI DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, James; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission in the soft X-ray energy range. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to calculate the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for solar flares. This improvement over the isothermal approximation helps to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. For this current project we are interested in breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. As in our earlier work, thermal emission is modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature. Non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner.For this study, we have examined the DEM and non-thermal resuidual emission for a sample of relatively large (GOES M class and above) solar flares observed from 2011 to 2014. The results for the DEM and non-thermal parameters found using the combined EVE-RHESSI data are compared with those found using only RHESSI data.

  20. Electron cyclotron maser emission in coronal arches and solar radio type V bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Tan, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    Solar radio type V bursts were classified as a special spectral class based on their moderately long duration, wide bandwidth, and sense of polarization opposite of associated type III bursts. However, type V bursts are also closely related to the preceding type III bursts. They have an approximately equal source height and the same dispersion of position with frequency. Electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven by beam electrons has been used to explain type III bursts in recent years. We propose ECM emission as the physical process of type V solar radio bursts. According to the observed properties of type V and III bursts, we propose that energetic electrons in excited type V continuum are trapped in coronal loops, which are adjacent to the open field lines traced by type III electrons. With the proposed magnetic field configuration and the ECM emission mechanism, the observed properties of type V bursts, such as long duration, wide bandwidth, and opposite sense of polarization can be reasonably explained by our model.

  1. A Highly Circularly Polarized Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2006-04-01

    We report here the observation of a rare solar radio event at hectometric wavelengths that was characterized by essentially 100% circularly polarized radiation and that was observed continuously for about six days, from May 17 to 23, 2002. This was the first time that a solar source with significantly polarized radiation was detected by the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft. From May 19 to 22, the intense polarized radio emissions were characterized by quasi-periodic intensity variations with periods from one to two hours and with superposed drifting, narrowband, fine structures. The bandwidth of this radiation extended from about 400 kHz to 7 MHz, and the peak frequency of the frequency spectrum slowly decreased from 2 MHz to about 0.8 MHz over the course of four days. The radio source, at each frequency, was observed to slowly drift from east to west about the Sun, as viewed from the Earth and was estimated to lie between 26 and 82 R ⊙ ( R ⊙ = 696 000 km). We speculate that this unusual event may represent an interplanetary manifestation of a moving type IV burst and discuss possible radio emission mechanisms. The ISEE-3 spacecraft may possibly have detected a similar event some 26 years ago.

  2. 49 CFR 222.42 - How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones? 222.42 Section 222.42 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.42 How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and..., if the public authority provides Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation, in accordance with § 222.43...

  3. Periodicities in the X-ray emission from the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Partha; Jain, Rajmal; Awasthi, Arun K. E-mail: parthares@gmail.com E-mail: awasthi@prl.res.in

    2013-11-20

    We have studied the time series of full disk integrated soft and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona during 2004 January to 2008 December, covering the entire descending phase of solar cycle 23 from a global point of view. We employ the daily X-ray index derived from 1 s cadence X-ray observations from the Si and CZT detectors of the 'Solar X-ray Spectrometer' mission in seven different energy bands ranging between 6 and 56 keV. X-ray data in the energy bands 6-7, 7-10, 10-20, and 4-25 keV from the Si detector are considered, while 10-20, 20-30, and 30-56 keV high energy observations are taken from the CZT detector. The daily time series is subjected to power spectrum analysis after appropriate correction for noise. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram technique has shown prominent periods of ∼13.5 days, ∼27 days, and a near-Rieger period of ∼181 days and ∼1.24 yr in all energy bands. In addition to this, other periods like ∼31, ∼48, ∼57, ∼76, ∼96, ∼130, ∼227, and ∼303 days are also detected in different energy bands. We discuss our results in light of previous observations and existing numerical models.

  4. Effects of Energetic Solar Emissions on the Earth-Ionosphere Cavity of Schumann Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sátori, Gabriella; Williams, Earle; Price, Colin; Boldi, Robert; Koloskov, Alexander; Yampolski, Yuri; Guha, Anirban; Barta, Veronika

    2016-07-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are the electromagnetic oscillations of the spherical cavity bounded by the electrically conductive Earth and the conductive but dissipative lower ionosphere (Schumann in Z Naturforsch A 7:6627-6628, 1952). Energetic emissions from the Sun can exert a varied influence on the various parameters of the Earth's SR: modal frequencies, amplitudes and dissipation parameters. The SR response at multiple receiving stations is considered for two extraordinary solar events from Solar Cycle 23: the Bastille Day event (July 14, 2000) and the Halloween event (October/November 2003). Distinct differences are noted in the ionospheric depths of penetration for X-radiation and solar protons with correspondingly distinct signs of the frequency response. The preferential impact of the protons in the magnetically unshielded polar regions leads to a marked anisotropic frequency response in the two magnetic field components. The general immunity of SR amplitudes to these extreme external perturbations serves to remind us that the amplitude parameter is largely controlled by lightning activity within the Earth-ionosphere cavity.

  5. Publicly Available Numerical Codes for Modeling the X-ray and Microwave Emissions from Solar and Stellar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Mariska, John T.; McTiernan, James M.; Ofman, Leon; Petrosian, Vahe; Ramaty, Reuven; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have posted numerical codes on the Web for modeling the bremsstrahlung x-ray emission and the a gyrosynchrotron radio emission from solar and stellar activity. In addition to radiation codes, steady-state and time-dependent Fokker-Planck codes are provided for computing the distribution and evolution of accelerated electrons. A 1-D hydrodynamics code computes the response of the stellar atmosphere (chromospheric evaporation). A code for modeling gamma-ray line spectra is also available. On-line documentation is provided for each code. These codes have been developed for modeling results from the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) along related microwave observations of solar flares. Comprehensive codes for modeling images and spectra of solar flares are under development. The posted codes can be obtained on NASA/Goddard's HESSI Web Site at http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/hessi/modelware.htm. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  6. The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Ludmila; Leonovich, Vitaly; Tashchilin, Anatoly

    The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure was revealed at mid-latitudes. The paper presents the study results of the dependence of the observed emissions intensity from the sudden variations in the solar wind and the geomagnetic field. These results show a relationship of the emissions disturbance amplitude with the solar wind speed, as well as with the geomagnetic field variations. We used the zenith photometer optical data, the geomagnetic field and the total electron content variations obtained for the Eastern Siberia region (52(°) N, 103(°) E). The investigation was supported by the RFFI grants № 12-05-00024-а, № 13-05-00733.

  7. Beam-plasma instability in the presence of low-frequency turbulence. [during type 3 solar emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Dubois, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    General equations are derived for a linear beam-plasma instability in the presence of low-frequency turbulence. Within a 'quasi-linear' statistical approximation, these equations contain Langmuir wave scattering, diffusion, resonant and nonresonant anomalous absorption, and a 'plasma laser' effect. It is proposed that naturally occurring density irregularities in the solar wind may stabilize the beam-unstable Langmuir waves which occur during type III solar emissions.

  8. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QSCEE). Preliminary analyses and design report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The experimental propulsion systems to be built and tested in the 'quiet, clean, short-haul experimental engine' program are presented. The flight propulsion systems are also presented. The following areas are discussed: acoustic design; emissions control; engine cycle and performance; fan aerodynamic design; variable-pitch actuation systems; fan rotor mechanical design; fan frame mechanical design; and reduction gear design.

  9. Does There Exist a Relationship Between Acoustic and White-Light Emission in Hard-X ray Solar Flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Calvo-Mozo, B.

    2014-12-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed seismicity during some solar flares. One theory associates high-energy electrons and white-light emission with sunquakes. This relationship is based on the back-warming model, where high-energy electrons and their subsequent heating of the photosphere induce acoustic waves in the solar interior. We carried out a correlative study of solar flares with emission in hard-X rays (HXRs) above 50 keV, enhanced white light emission at 6573Å, and acoustic sources. We selected those flares observed by RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) with a considerable flux in the 50-100 and 100-300 keV bands between January 1, 2010 and June 26, 2014. Additionally, we restricted the sample to flares close to disk center where it is observationally easiest to detect a sunquake. We then used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO/HMI) to search for white-light emission and helioseismic signatures. Finally, we calculated a coefficient of correlation for this set of dichotomic observables. We discuss the phenomenological connectivity between these physical quantities and the observational difficulties of detecting seismic signals and white-light radiation with terrestrial and space-borne observations.

  10. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  11. Potential of solar domestic hot water systems in rural areas for greenhouse gas emission reduction in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Skowronski, P.; Wisniewski, G.

    1996-09-01

    Application of solar energy for preparing domestic hot water is one of the easiest methods of utilization of this energy. At least part of the needs for warm tap water could be covered by solar systems. At present, mainly coal is used for water heating at dwellings in rural areas in Poland. Warm tap water consumption will increase significantly in the future as standards of living are improved. This can result in the growth of electricity use and an increase in primary fuel consumption. Present and future methods of warm sanitary water generation in rural areas in Poland is discussed, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are estimated. It is predicted that the emission of CO{sub 2} and NOx will increase. The emission of CO and CH{sub 4} will decrease because of changes in the structure of the final energy carriers used. The economic and market potentials of solar energy for preparing warm water in rural areas are discussed. It is estimated that solar systems can meet 30%-45% of the energy demand for warm water generation in rural areas at a reasonable cost, with a corresponding CO{sub 2} emission reduction. The rate of realization of the economic potential of solar water heaters depends on subsidies for the installation of equipment. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

  12. Spectral characteristics of steady quiet-time EMIC waves observed at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Park, Jong-Sun; Omura, Yoshiharu; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Gi-Jeong; Jin, Ho; Lee, Ensang; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the spectral properties of quiet-time electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves following a steady quiet condition, which is defined with Kp values ≤1 during 12 h, using GOES 10, 11, and 12 magnetometer data for solar minimum years 2007-2008. We identified 6584 steady quiet-time EMIC wave samples using a semiautomated procedure. Approximately 82% of the samples were observed in the morning-to-early afternoon sector (0700-1500 magnetic local time) with a maximum occurrence near noon, and their peak frequencies were mostly in the He band. We found that the occurrence rate of steady quiet-time EMIC waves is higher than that of EMIC waves for all or quiet geomagnetic conditions (Dst > 0 nT or AE < 100 nT) reported in previous studies by a factor of 2 or more. The frequency ratio fpeak (sample's peak frequency)/fH+ (the local proton gyrofrequency) of the He-band waves (˜0.11-0.16) under steady quiet conditions is lower than that (˜0.14-0.24) in previous studies. These results may be due to the fact that the plasmasphere expanded more frequently to the geosynchronous region under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions in 2007-2008 than the periods selected in previous studies. The amplitude and frequency of He-band EMIC waves for nonlinear wave growth are examined as changing cold plasma density at geosynchronous orbit. We confirm that the spectral properties of observed EMIC waves are in good agreement with the nonlinear theory.

  13. Study of the Photospheric Magnetic Field and Coronal Emission from Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Jordan Armando Guerra

    2016-01-01

    Solar explosive phenomena (flares and Coronal Mass Ejections, CMEs) are examples of how the most dynamical processes within the heliosphere are interconnected and powered by the Sun. Solar flares originate in active regions (AR) -- areas of strong magnetic field on the solar surface. The electromagnetic (EM) energy released during flares, along with the often-seen CMEs, propagate through the heliosphere. In the Earth's vicinity, EM radiation and charged particles have the potential to produce unfavorable conditions for humans and technology in space. From many points of view (scientific, operational, economical) it is thus important to understand and try to predict when solar flares and associated eruptive phenomena will occur. This dissertation explores how to best leverage the available observational data to provide predictive information about the future flaring activity. This dissertation consists of two main components: 1) investigation of the photosphere-corona coupling by analyzing photospheric magnetic field and coronal data in search for signals or behaviors that precede eruptions; and 2) the combination of existing flare prediction methods in order to develop a novel ensemble prediction. For the first part, the data employed correspond to line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and EUV intensity maps from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both instruments onboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Photospheric magnetic field and coronal EUV emissions were characterized by measuring the power-law decay of their spatio-temporal spectra and the data statistical associations (auto- and cross-correlations). These measures, calculated with high spatio-temporal resolution, appeared to characterize the AR evolution, provide information about the state of the photospheric plasma, reveal insights into the photospheric conditions for flares, and expose the potential of combining coronal and photospheric

  14. A substantial amount of hidden magnetic energy in the quiet Sun.

    PubMed

    Bueno, J Trujillo; Shchukina, N; Ramos, A Asensio

    2004-07-15

    Deciphering and understanding the small-scale magnetic activity of the quiet solar photosphere should help to solve many of the key problems of solar and stellar physics, such as the magnetic coupling to the outer atmosphere and the coronal heating. At present, we can see only approximately 1 per cent of the complex magnetism of the quiet Sun, which highlights the need to develop a reliable way to investigate the remaining 99 per cent. Here we report three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling of scattering polarization in atomic and molecular lines that indicates the presence of hidden, mixed-polarity fields on subresolution scales. Combining this modelling with recent observational data, we find a ubiquitous tangled magnetic field with an average strength of approximately 130 G, which is much stronger in the intergranular regions of solar surface convection than in the granular regions. So the average magnetic energy density in the quiet solar photosphere is at least two orders of magnitude greater than that derived from simplistic one-dimensional investigations, and sufficient to balance radiative energy losses from the solar chromosphere.

  15. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  16. Relationship of Solar Radio Emission at λ=1.43m and Optical Processes in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makandarashvili, Sh.; Oghrapishvili, N.; Japaridze, D.; Maghradze, D.

    2016-09-01

    Radio frequency observations supplement optical studies and in some cases they are the only way of obtaining information on the physical conditions for radio waves and their propagation. Solar radio emission appears in two forms, "quiescent" and "sporadic." Their distinctive features are well known. Solar radio observations at meter wavelengths (λ = 1.43 m, ν = 210 MHz) have been made at the Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory using a solar radio telescope throughout five solar cycles (since 1957). This article is a study of the long-term observations of solar radio bursts and sunspots. It is found that there is a correlation between the amplitudes of the radio bursts, the number of spots, and the regions of the spots.

  17. Laboratory Studies of the X-ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; May, M.; Thorn, D.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6x6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest arid thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogenlike counter parts interacting with such gases as CO2, N2, and CH4. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  18. Understanding the charge-transfer state and singlet exciton emission from solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ran, Niva A; Kuik, Martijn; Love, John A; Proctor, Christopher M; Nagao, Ikuhiro; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2014-11-19

    Electroluminescence (EL) from the charge-transfer state and singlet excitons is observed at low applied voltages from high-performing small-molecule bulk-heterojunction solar cells. Singlet emission from the blends emerges upon altering the processing conditions, such as thermal annealing and processing with a solvent additive, and correlates with improved photovoltaic performance. Low-temperature EL measurements are utilized to access the physics behind the singlet emission.

  19. First Detection of Thermal Radio Emission from Solar-type Stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  20. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    SciTech Connect

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-06-20

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  1. Properties of solar energetic particle events inferred from their associated radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouloumvakos, A.; Nindos, A.; Valtonen, E.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Malandraki, O.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Moussas, X.; Hillaris, A.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We study selected properties of solar energetic particle (SEP) events as inferred from their associated radio emissions. Methods: We used a catalogue of 115 SEP events, which consists of entries of proton intensity enhancements at one AU, with complete coverage over solar cycle 23 based on high-energy (~68 MeV) protons from SOHO/ERNE. We also calculated the proton release time at the Sun using velocity dispersion analysis (VDA). After an initial rejection of cases with unrealistic VDA path lengths, we assembled composite radio spectra for the remaining events using data from ground-based and space-borne radio spectrographs. We registered the associated radio emissions for every event, and we divided the events in groups according to their associated radio emissions. In cases of type III-associated events, we extended our study to the timings between the type III radio emission, the proton release, and the electron release as inferred from VDA based on Wind/3DP 20-646 keV data. Results: The proton release was found to be most often accompanied by both type III and II radio bursts, but a good association percentage was also registered in cases accompanied by type IIIs only. The worst association was found for the cases only associated with type II. In the type III-associated cases, we usually found systematic delays of both the proton and electron release times as inferred by the particles' VDAs, with respect to the start of the associated type III burst. The comparison of the proton and electron release times revealed that, in more than half of the cases, the protons and electrons were simultaneously released within the statistical uncertainty of our analysis. For the cases with type II radio association, we found that the distribution of the proton release heights had a maximum at ~2.5 R⊙. Most (69%) of the flares associated with our SEP events were located in the western hemisphere, with a peak within the well-connected region of 50°-60° western

  2. Neutron and electromagnetic emissions during the 1990 May 24 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, L. G.; Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Zirin, H.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Pyle, K. R.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we are primarily concerened with the solar neutron emission during the 1990 May 24 flare, utilizing the counting rate of the Climax neutron monitor and the time profiles of hard X-rays and gamma-rays obtained with the GRANAT satellite (Pelaez et al., 1992; Talon et al., 1993; Terekhov et al., 1993). We compare the derived neutron injection function with macroscopic parameters of the flare region as obtained from the H-alpha and microwave observations made at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) respectively. Our results are summarized as folows: (1) to explain the neutron monitor counting rate and 57.5-110 MeV and 2.2 MeV gamma-ray time profiles, we consider a two-component neutron injection function, Q(E, t). (2) From the H-alpha observations, we find a relatively small loop of length approximattely equal to 2 x 10(exp 4) km, which may be regarded as the source for the fast-decaying component of gamma-rays (57.5-110 MeV) and for the first component of neutron emission. From microwave visibility and the microwave total power spectrum we postulate the presence of a rather big loop (approximately equal to 2 x 10(exp 5) km), which we regard as being responsible for the slow-decaying component of the high-energy emission. We show how the neutron and gamma-ray emission data can be explained in terms of the macroscopic parameters derived from the H-alpha and microwave observations. (3) The H-alpha observations also reveal the presence of a fast mode MHD shock (the Moreton wave) which precedes the microwave peak by 20-30 s and the peak of gamma-ray intensity by 40-50 s. From this relative timing and the single-pulsed time profiles of both radiations, we can attribute the whole event as due to a prompt acceleration of both electrons and protons by the shock and subsequent deceleration of the trapped particles while they propagate inside the magnetic loops.

  3. Neutron and electromagnetic emissions during the 1990 May 24 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, L. G.; Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Zirin, H.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Pyle, K. R.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, we are primarily concerened with the solar neutron emission during the 1990 May 24 flare, utilizing the counting rate of the Climax neutron monitor and the time profiles of hard X-rays and gamma-rays obtained with the GRANAT satellite (Pelaez et al., 1992; Talon et al., 1993; Terekhov et al., 1993). We compare the derived neutron injection function with macroscopic parameters of the flare region as obtained from the H-alpha and microwave observations made at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) respectively. Our results are summarized as folows: (1) to explain the neutron monitor counting rate and 57.5-110 MeV and 2.2 MeV gamma-ray time profiles, we consider a two-component neutron injection function, Q(E, t). (2) From the H-alpha observations, we find a relatively small loop of length approximattely equal to 2 x 104 km, which may be regarded as the source for the fast-decaying component of gamma-rays (57.5-110 MeV) and for the first component of neutron emission. From microwave visibility and the microwave total power spectrum we postulate the presence of a rather big loop (approximately equal to 2 x 105 km), which we regard as being responsible for the slow-decaying component of the high-energy emission. We show how the neutron and gamma-ray emission data can be explained in terms of the macroscopic parameters derived from the H-alpha and microwave observations. (3) The H-alpha observations also reveal the presence of a fast mode MHD shock (the Moreton wave) which precedes the microwave peak by 20-30 s and the peak of gamma-ray intensity by 40-50 s. From this relative timing and the single-pulsed time profiles of both radiations, we can attribute the whole event as due to a prompt acceleration of both electrons and protons by the shock and subsequent deceleration of the trapped particles while they propagate inside the magnetic loops.

  4. Lower hybrid resonance acceleration of electrons and ions in solar flares and the associated microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclements, K. G.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Dawson, J. M.; Spicer, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The particle acceleration processes here studied are driven by the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions; these produce strong wave activity at the lower hybrid resonance frequency which collapses, and forms energetic electron and ion tails. The results obtained are applied to the problem posed by the production of energetic particles by solar flares. The numerical simulation results thus obtained by a 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell code show a simultaneous acceleration of electrons to 10-500 keV energies, and of ions to as much as the 1 MeV range; the energy of the latter is still insufficient to account for gamma-ray emission in the 4-6 MeV range, but furnish a seed population for further acceleration.

  5. X-Ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    1998-01-01

    This LTSA award funds my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the solar-stellar analogy. The focus during most of this reporting period continued to be on the reduction and analysis of data acquired with the ASCA observatory (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). During the last few months of this reporting period, considerable time and effort was also devoted to the submission of AXAF observing proposals in preparation for the upcoming AXAF launch. During this reporting period, five papers appeared in refereed journals for which I was either author or co-author, and two additional papers have recently been submitted to ApJ. Also, three conference proceedings papers were submitted. These publications are listed in the attached bibliography.

  6. Highly emissive and low refractive index layers from doped silica nanospheres for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haranath, D.; Gandhi, Namita; Sahai, Sonal; Husain, M.; Shanker, Virendra

    2010-08-01

    Confinement of europium (Eu 3+) ions in silica (SiO 2) nanospheres yields efficient red-emitting nanophosphors when excited via charge transfer states (CTS) absorption in UV (393 nm) radiation. This is explained on the basis of modulation of f-f transition due to quantum confinement of rare-earth ion in a nanosize host. It is also evidenced that the short range crystallanity and confinement effects provided by the nanospheres increases the Eu 3+ emission intensity by almost ten times at the expense of CTS. Coating of organically modified SiO 2 nanospheres resulted in low refractive index layers that are highly useful as cover glazing for solar collectors.

  7. EUVE Spectroscopy of Comet Hyakutake: First Detection of Solar Wind Charge Transfer Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Mumma, M. J.

    2000-10-01

    The ROSAT and EUVE observations of comet Hyakutake in 1996 revealed a puzzling X-ray emission. That comet appeared to be a more efficient emitter of X-rays than the Moon by a factor of 80,000. Currently our EUVE database includes eight observations of comets, and soft X-ray emissions have been detected in five of those observations. The measured soft X-ray luminosities are proportional to r3/2Qgas with the efficiency of (6.4+/- 0.9)10-5 AU3/2 and therefore favor a gas-related mechanism. The observed behavior of the brightness maxima and spatial distributions of soft X-ray emissions indicate charge transfer of solar wind heavy ions as the only viable excitation process. However, a final and crucial test for the X-ray excitation process should be made by spectroscopy. We extracted three spectra from our EUVE observations of comet Hyakutake. These spectra cover the ranges of 80-180, 170-360, and 300-700 Å. Due to the close flyby of the comet at 0.1 AU, (1-3)104 photons were collected in each spectrum, that is, more by two orders of magnitude than in the previously published spectra. Despite very good dispersion of the EUVE spectrometers, the great angular extent of the comet reduced the resolving power to 10 in our spectra. The spectra revealed for the first time emission lines of multiple charged ions which present a direct evidence for solar wind charge transfer excitation. The most prominent lines are O4+ 215 Å, C4+ 249 Å, He+ 304 Å, and Ne7+ 448 Å. Some other lines, which are of comparable strength, are blended. The photon luminosity of charge exchange at energy below 100 eV (124 Å) exceeds that above 100 eV by a factor of 2, and the mean total quantum yield is 4 photons per heavy ion. The detected O+ lines at 538/539, 617, and 430/442 Å are excited by photoionization of atomic oxygen similar to that in Earth's dayglow. The observed depletion of neon by more than a factor 2600 relative to the solar abundance confirm the current view that Oort cloud comets

  8. Solar burst with millimetre-wave emission at high frequency only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Vaz, A. M. Z.; Dennis, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The first high sensitivity and high time-resolution observations of a solar burst taken simultaneously at 90 GHz and at 30 GHz are presented. These identify a unique impulsive burst on May 21, 1984 with fast pulsed emission that was considerably more intense at 90 GHz than at lower frequencies. Hard X-ray time structures at energies above 25 keV were almost identical to the 90 GHz structures to better than 1 s. The structure of the onset of the major 90 GHz burst coincided with the hard X-ray structure to within 128 ms. All 90 GHz major time structures consisted of trains of multiple subsecond pulses with rise times as short as 0.03 s and amplitudes that were large compared with the mean flux. When detectable, the 30 GHz subsecond pulses had smaller relative amplitude and were in phase with the corresponding 90 GHz pulses.

  9. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells for solar rechargeable aircraft and zero emission vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Colella, Nicholas J.; Myers, Blake

    1994-09-01

    A unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) produces power and electrolytically regenerates its reactants using a single stack of reversible cells. URFC'S have been designed for high altitude long endurance (HALE) solar rechargeable aircraft (SRA), zero emission vehicles (ZEV's), hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems for long duration satellites, energy storage for remote (off-grid) power sources, and peak shaving for on-grid applications. URFC's have been considered using hydrogen/oxygen, hydrogen/air, or hydrogen/halogen chemistries. This discussion is limited to the lightweight URFC energy storage system designs for span-loaded HALE SRA using hydrogen/oxygen, and for ZEV's using hydrogen/air with oxygen supercharging. Overlapping and synergistic development and testing opportunities for these two technologies will be highlighted.

  10. LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSIENT QUASI-PERIODIC RADIO EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R.

    2013-09-20

    We report low-frequency observations of quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was ≈5.2 s, and their average degree of circular polarization (dcp) was ≈0.12. We calculated the associated magnetic field B (1) using the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in B ≈ 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance r ≈ 1.3 R{sub ☉}) in the active region corona.

  11. Induced emission of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous streaming plasma: implications for solar corona heating and solar wind acceleration.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, V L; Shevchenko, V I

    2013-07-05

    The results of a self-consistent kinetic model of heating the solar corona and accelerating the fast solar wind are presented for plasma flowing in a nonuniform magnetic field configuration of near-Sun conditions. The model is based on a scale separation between the large transit or inhomogeneity scales and the small dissipation scales. The macroscale instability of the marginally stable particle distribution function compliments the resonant frequency sweeping dissipation of transient Alfvén waves by their induced emission in inhomogeneous streaming plasma that provides enough energy for keeping the plasma temperature decaying not faster than r(-1) in close agreement with in situ heliospheric observations.

  12. Electrostatic Charging of Lunar Dust by UV Photoelectric Emissions and Solar Wind Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James f.; LeClair, Andre C.; Dube, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of dust in the lunar environment with its high adhesive characteristics has been recognized to be a major safety issue that must be addressed in view of its hazardous effects on robotic and human exploration of the Moon. The reported observations of a horizon glow and streamers at the lunar terminator during the Apollo missions are attributed to the sunlight scattered by the levitated lunar dust. The lunar surface and the dust grains are predominantly charged positively by the incident UV solar radiation on the dayside and negatively by the solar wind electrons on the night-side. The charged dust grains are levitated and transported over long distances by the established electric fields. A quantitative understanding of the lunar dust phenomena requires development of global dust distribution models, based on an accurate knowledge of lunar dust charging properties. Currently available data of lunar dust charging is based on bulk materials, although it is well recognized that measurements on individual dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk measurements. In this paper we present laboratory measurements of charging properties of Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains by UV photoelectric emissions and by electron impact. These measurements indicate substantial differences of both qualitative and quantitative nature between dust charging properties of individual micron/submicron sized dust grains and of bulk materials. In addition, there are no viable theoretical models available as yet for calculation of dust charging properties of individual dust grains for both photoelectric emissions and electron impact. It is thus of paramount importance to conduct comprehensive measurements for charging properties of individual dust grains in order to develop realistic models of dust processes in the lunar atmosphere, and address the hazardous issues of dust on lunar robotic and human missions.

  13. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  14. The Multi-Instrument (EVE-RHESSI) DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Non-thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, J. M.; Caspi, A.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of hard X-ray bremmstrahlung from solar flares directly probe the non-thermal electron population. For low energies, however, the spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission and the low energy extent of the non-thermal spectrum can be only loosely quantified. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). For a sample of solar flares, we model the emission using a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for the thermal emission seen with both instruments and a power law fit for the non-thermal emission observed by RHESSI. Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner. This improvement over the traditional isothermal approximation for thermal flare emission is intended to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV for medium to large solar flares. It is expected that a low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electron spectrum is in this energy range, but is obscured by thermal emission. For each flare in the sample we establish limits for the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal spectrum. These limits, in turn, can be used to establish limits on the energy of non-thermal electrons accelerated during the flare. This research is supported by NASA contract NAS5-98033 and NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator Grant NNX12AH48G.

  15. Determination of the radial gradient in the region 0.81-1.0 AU using both high- and low-energy /more than 10-GeV and more than 52-MeV/ detectors for the 1-AU monitor. [solar quiet measurements of alpha particles and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Bukata, R. P.; Rao, U. R.

    1974-01-01

    A determination of the radial gradient for alpha particles (31-46 MeV/nuc) and protons with energies above 7.5 MeV and 44-77 MeV in the region 1.0-0.81 AU is presented for the solar-quiet year 1966. The determinations are based on data from the Pioneer 6 space probe. Two different detectors are used: the Deep River neutron monitor and measurements of low energy protons made on the IMP-C satellite. The average energy response of the Deep River monitor is 16 GeV, whereas the IMP-C data is for protons with energies above 50 MeV. The resulting radial gradient is found to be nearly zero for the alpha particles and slightly negative for the protons. The same qualitative results were found using the IMP-C data and the Deep River neutron monitor to measure the temporal variation in the cosmic ray intensity. The present analysis indicates that detectors over a wide range of energies are suitable for measuring the radial gradient, providing sufficient statistical precision is obtained to evaluate short-term modulation and the azimuthal separation of the detectors is not great.

  16. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  17. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE SPECTRAL HARDENING OF CONTINUUM EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Chen, Y.; Li, G. E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu

    2013-09-10

    The observed hard X-ray and {gamma}-ray continuum in solar flares is interpreted as Bremsstrahlung emission of accelerated non-thermal electrons. It has been noted for a long time that in many flares the energy spectra show hardening at energies around or above 300 keV. In this paper, we first conduct a survey of spectral hardening events that were previously studied in the literature. We then perform a systematic examination of 185 flares from the Solar Maximum Mission. We identify 23 electron-dominated events whose energy spectra show clear double power laws. A statistical study of these events shows that the spectral index below the break ({gamma}{sub 1}) anti-correlates with the break energy ({epsilon}{sub b}). Furthermore, {gamma}{sub 1} also anti-correlates with Fr, the fraction of photons above the break compared to the total photons. A hardening spectrum, as well as the correlations between ({gamma}{sub 1}, {epsilon}{sub b}) and ({gamma}{sub 1}, Fr), provide stringent constraints on the underlying electron acceleration mechanism. Our results support a recent proposal that electrons are being accelerated diffusively at a flare termination shock with a width of the order of an ion inertial length scale.

  18. Solar coronal temperature diagnostics using emission line from multiple stages of ionization of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Thompson, William T.

    1994-01-01

    We obtained spatially resolved extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of AR 6615 on 1991 May 7 with NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS). Included are emission lines from four different stages of ionization of iron: Fe(+15) lambda 335 A, Fe(+14) lambda 327 A, Fe(+13) lambda 334 A, and Fe(+12) lambda 348 A. Using intensity ratios from among these lines, we have calculated the active region coronal temperature along the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) slit. Temperatures derived from line ratios which incorporate adjacent stages of ionization are most sensitive to measurement uncertainties and yield the largest scatter. Temperatures derived from line ratios which incorporate nonadjacent stages of ionization are less sensitive to measurement uncertainties and yield little scatter. The active region temperature derived from these latter ratios has an average value of 2.54 x 10(exp 6) K, with a standard deviation approximately 0.12 x 10(exp 6) K, and shows no significant variation with position along the slit.

  19. Correlation of Hard X-Ray and White Light Emission in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Martínez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  20. Coupling of soil solarization and reduced rate fumigation: Effects on methyl iodide emissions from raised beds under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using field plots, we studied the effect on methyl iodide (MeI) emissions of coupling soil solarization (passive and active) and reduced rate fumigation (70% of a standard fumigation) in raised beds under virtually impermeable film (VIF). The results showed that for the standard fumigation and the p...

  1. Investigation into solar drying of potato: effect of sample geometry on drying kinetics and CO2 emissions mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, P P

    2015-03-01

    Drying experiments have been performed with potato cylinders and slices using a laboratory scale designed natural convection mixed-mode solar dryer. The drying data were fitted to eight different mathematical models to predict the drying kinetics, and the validity of these models were evaluated statistically through coefficient of determination (R(2)), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi-square (χ (2)). The present investigation showed that amongst all the mathematical models studied, the Modified Page model was in good agreement with the experimental drying data for both potato cylinders and slices. A mathematical framework has been proposed to estimate the performance of the food dryer in terms of net CO2 emissions mitigation potential along with unit cost of CO2 mitigation arising because of replacement of different fossil fuels by renewable solar energy. For each fossil fuel replaced, the gross annual amount of CO2 as well as net amount of annual CO2 emissions mitigation potential considering CO2 emissions embodied in the manufacture of mixed-mode solar dryer has been estimated. The CO2 mitigation potential and amount of fossil fuels saved while drying potato samples were found to be the maximum for coal followed by light diesel oil and natural gas. It was inferred from the present study that by the year 2020, 23 % of CO2 emissions can be mitigated by the use of mixed-mode solar dryer for drying of agricultural products.

  2. Moon Farside, Quiet Cone and the "RLI" Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    The Farside of the Moon is a unique place. Radio emissions coming from the Earth, and notably the from Telecommunication Satellites orbiting the Earth, don't get there since shielded by the Moon's spherical body. A radio telescope placed inside Crater Daedalus (just at the center of the Farside) would thus sense no man-made RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) and would be ideal for all radio astronomical and SETI searches. Above the Farside, a conical region extends into space, the ``Quiet Cone'', tangent to the Moon surface and with apex a few thousands of kilometers above the Moon. The size of the Quiet Cone, however, is only vaguely known, and changes in time, because the orbits of secret military satellites around the Earth are of course unknown. The only way to know the current, actual size of the Quiet Cone is to send a radiometer into orbit around the Moon and find out where the RFI coming from the Earth is actually shielded and where it is not. The RLI Experiment (RLI is an acronym for ``Radiometro Lunare Italiano'', i.e. Italian Moon Radiometer), is currently under construction by an Italian team coordinated by this author as Principal Investigator. The RLI is hopefully going to be put into orbit around the Moon before 2007. This will be done by placing the RLI radiometer aboard the ``Trailbalzer'', the first American commercial Moon spacecraft, built by TransOrbital Inc.. The RLI Experiment will take direct measurements of the intensity of man-made RFI around two frequencies: The band in between 10.7 and 11.8 GHz (main frequency band of European TV transmissions and, in part, also of American TV transmissions) and The band in between 10 Hz and 10 kHz, to get a Fourier spectrum of the very thin Moon atmosphere. A scientific and technical description of the RLI mission is given in this paper.

  3. PREDICTION OF TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURSTS BY THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD CORONAL MASS EJECTION AND KINETIC RADIO EMISSION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Hillan, D. S.

    2013-08-20

    Type II solar radio bursts are the primary radio emissions generated by shocks and they are linked with impending space weather events at Earth. We simulate type II bursts by combining elaborate three-dimensional MHD simulations of realistic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Sun with an analytic kinetic radiation theory developed recently. The modeling includes initialization with solar magnetic and active region fields reconstructed from magnetograms of the Sun, a flux rope of the initial CME dimensioned with STEREO spacecraft observations, and a solar wind driven with averaged empirical data. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the CME and type II burst observed on 2011 February 15. This implies real understanding of the physical processes involved regarding the radio emission excitation by shocks and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  4. Solar radio astronomy at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, George A.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of solar radio emissions at decametric to kilometric wavelengths are reviewed. Special attention is given to the radiation of the quiet sun at several metric and decametric wavelengths and to nonthermal radiation from the active sun, including radio bursts of type III (electron beams), type-III bursts from behind the sun, storms of type III bursts, the flare-associated radio bursts, type II bursts (shock waves), and shock-associated bursts. It is pointed out that almost no observations have been made so far of solar radiation between about 20 MHz and about 2 MHz. Below about 2 MHz, dynamic spectra of flux densities of solar burst have been recorded in space and observations were made of the directions of centroids and characteristic sizes of the emitting sources.

  5. Quiet sun magnetic fields vs. polar faculae - local vs. global dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, O. V.; Domínguez Cerdeña, I.; Puschmann, K. G.; Kneer, F.; Sánchez Almeida, J.

    2005-04-01

    Quiet Sun magnetic fields in the internetwork are almost ubiquitous. Simultaneous observations in infra-red and visible lines and high spatial resolution (< 0.5'') data in visible lines show that their field strengths range from below few hundred Gauss to kilo-Gauss. Most of the flux is contained in small-scale, strong-field features located mainly in intergranular lanes. The average unsigned flux density exceeds 20 Gauss. The new detections are confirmed by recent quiet Sun observations in the G band. The generation of the strong fields in the internetwork, which may be due to a local dynamo, poses a challenging problem. - Polar faculae (PFe) are small-scale magnetic features at the polar caps of the Sun. They take part in the solar cycle and are thus likely to be rooted deeply in the solar interior. They are the result of the global dynamo at the solar poles. PFe also possess kilo-Gauss magnetic fields which have the same polarity as the global magnetic field. The rôle of quiet Sun magnetic field structures and of PFe for the dynamics of the corona and for the solar wind are addressed.

  6. Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

    2009-03-18

    Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power

  7. Comparative Study of Non-Thermal Emissions and Electron Transport in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi

    It is well known that a large amount of non-thermal electrons are produced in a solar flare. To understand their acceleration and transport mechanisms, hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave observations are the most powerful means. HXRs are emitted primarily by electrons with energy below several hundred keV via bremsstrahlung (Brown 1971), while microwaves are by electrons with energy above several hundred keV via gyrosynchrotron radiation (e.g., Ramaty 1969). Therefore these two sources of emissions provide information on electrons in two different energy ranges. A comparative study by using both HXR and microwave observations is useful for understanding the physics of electrons over a wide range of energies. We observed a solar flare occurred on 2003 May 29 with HXRs taken by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and microwaves by the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). In particular, we focus on characteristics of higher energy (>100 keV) HXRs. They are emitted from both footpoints of the flare loop in the same manner as the lower energy (<100 keV) HXRs, while microwaves are emitted primarily at the top of the loop. On the other hand, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher energy HXRs is more similar to that of the microwaves than to that of the lower energy HXRs. To understand the observed characteristics in terms of an energy-dependent transport effect of electrons, we develop a more general treatment of trap-plus-precipitation (TPP; Melrose and Brown, 1976) by using the gyro-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. We model the time evolution of the electron phase space distribution under the influence of Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirror, and then calculate the resulting HXR and microwave emissions for comparison with the observation. It is found that the TPP model in the weak diffusion regime well explains the observed characteristics. Further, we conclude from both the

  8. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 3: Photon production evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Lower limits of photon fluxes were evaluated from electron capture during acceleration in solar flares, because the arbitrary q sub c asterisk assumed in this work evolves very slow with velocity, probably much more slowly than the physical actual situation: in fact, more emission is expected toward the IR region. Nevertheless the authors claim to show that the factibility of sounding acceleration processes, charge evolution processes and physical parameters of the source itself, by the observational analysis of this kind of emissions. For instance, it would be interesting to search observationally, for the predicted flux and energy drift of F sub e ions interacting with the atomic 0 and F sub e of the source matter, or, even more feasible for the X-ray lines at 4.2 keV and 2.624 + 0.003 KeV from Fe and S ions in ionized Fe at T = 10 to the 7th power K respectively, the 418 + or - 2 eV and 20 + or - 4 eV lines of Fe and S in ionized Fe at 5 x 10 to the 6th power K, which are predicted from Fermi acceleration.

  9. A mechanism for the Fine Structures of Solar Radio Bursts Based on the Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Tong, Z.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    A scenario based on the electron cyclotron maser emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission in the present discussion. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro-frequency by ultra low frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of the maser instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation of the observed fine-structure components in the solar type IIIb burst is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of the type IIIb bursts are addressed: 1) what is the physical mechanism that results in the intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of type IIIb bursts, 2) what causes the split pair (or double stria) and the triple stria, 3) why in the events of fundamental-harmonic pair emission there is only IIIb-III, but IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb cases are very rarely observed. The application of the scenario to some other type of solar radio bursts and their fine structures are also discussed.

  10. Emission of Volatile OrganoHalogens by Southern African Solar Salt Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotte, Karsten; Weissflog, Ludwig; Lange, Christian Albert; Huber, Stefan; Pienaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds containing halogens - especially chlorine - have been considered for a long time of industrial origin only, and it was assumed that the production and emission of these compounds can easily be controlled by humans in case they will cause a threat for life on Earth. Since the middle of the 80ies of the last century it became clear that the biologically active organohalogens isolated by chemists are purposefully produced by nature as antibiotics or as antifeedant etc. To date more than 3800 organohalogens are known to be naturally produced by bio-geochemical processes. The global budgets of many such species are poorly understood and only now with the emergence of better analytical techniques being discovered. For example the compound chloromethane nature's production (5 GT) outdates the anthropogenic production (50 KT) by a factor of 100. Thus organohalogens are an interesting recent case in point since they can influence the ozone budget of the boundary layer, play a role in the production of aerosols and the climate change discussion. An intriguing observation is that most of the atmospheric CH3Cl and CH3Br are of terrestrial rather than of marine origin and that a number of halogenated small organic molecules are produced in soils. The high concentrations of halides in salt soils point to a possibly higher importance of natural halogenation processes as a source of volatile organohalogens. Terrestrial biota, such as fungi, plants, animals and insects, as well as marine algea, bacteria and archaea are known or suspected to be de-novo producers of volatile organohalogens. In recent years we revealed the possibility for VOX to form actively in water and bottom sediments of hyper-saline environments in the course of studying aridization processes during climatic warming. Due to the nature of their production process solar salt works, as to be found along-side the Southern African coast line but also upcountry, combine a variety of semi- and

  11. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission From Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath 2008 September 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth's magnetosheath. The light curve of the O vii (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.5). In addition, an average value of the SWCX O vii emission from the magnetosheath over the observation of 2.6 +/- 0.5 LU is derived. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  12. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2006-12-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares, and their thermal and nonthermal radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by the RHESSI mission, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of solar flares in various ways. In the X3.9 flare occurring on 11/03/2003, there is a monotonic upward motion of the loop top (LT) source accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the footpoint (FP) sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources. The two sources (with almost identical spectra) show energy-dependent structures, with higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection takes place within the region between the sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the FPs correlates with the mean magnetic field. The two FPs show asymmetric HXR fluxes, which is qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The M1.7 flare on 11/13/2003 reveals evidence of evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time, in which emission from the legs of the loop appears at intermediate energies. The emission centroid moves toward the LT as time proceeds, indicating an increase of density in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by nonthermal electrons. We find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is

  13. MASS COMPOSITION IN PRE-ERUPTION QUIET SUN FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilper, Gary; Gilbert, Holly; Alexander, David

    2009-10-10

    Filament eruptions are extremely important phenomena due to their association with coronal mass ejections and their effects on space weather. Little is known about the filament mass and composition in the eruption process, since most of the related research has concentrated on the evolution and disruption of the magnetic field. Following up on our previous work, we present here an analysis of nineteen quiet Sun filament eruptions observed by Mauna Loa Solar Observatory in Halpha and He I 10830 A that has identified a compositional precursor common to all of these eruptions. There is a combined trend of an apparent increase in the homogenization of the filament mass composition, with concurrent increases in absorption in Halpha and He I and in the level of activity, all starting at least one day prior to eruption. This finding suggests that a prolonged period of mass motions, compositional mixing, and possibly even extensive mass loading is occurring during the build up of these eruptions.

  14. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044solar microflares to protostellar flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  15. 47 CFR 1.924 - Quiet zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... impact on the operations of radio astronomy or other facilities that are highly sensitive to interference. Consent throughout this paragraph means written consent from the quiet zone, radio astronomy, research... Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at Green Bank, Pocahontas County, West Virginia, and at...

  16. 47 CFR 1.924 - Quiet zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... impact on the operations of radio astronomy or other facilities that are highly sensitive to interference. Consent throughout this paragraph means written consent from the quiet zone, radio astronomy, research... Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at Green Bank, Pocahontas County, West Virginia, and at...

  17. Quiet engine program flight engine design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klapproth, J. F.; Neitzel, R. E.; Seeley, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a preliminary flight engine design study based on the Quiet Engine Program high-bypass, low-noise turbofan engines. Engine configurations, weight, noise characteristics, and performance over a range of flight conditions typical of a subsonic transport aircraft were considered. High and low tip speed engines in various acoustically treated nacelle configurations were included.

  18. 76 FR 64353 - Buy Quiet Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... (NORA) activity jointly organized by the NORA Construction Sector and Manufacturing Sector Programs, and... controls on machinery and equipment and to motivate the development and implementation of Buy Quiet programs for the Construction and Manufacturing industries. Date and Time: November 9-10, 2011, 8 a.m.-5...

  19. Measuring Solar Doppler Velocities in the He ii 30.38 nm Emission Using the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has provided unprecedented measurements of the solar EUV irradiance at high temporal cadence with good spectral resolution and range since May 2010. The main purpose of EVE was to connect the Sun to the Earth by providing measurements of the EUV irradiance as a driver for space weather and Living With a Star studies, but after launch the instrument has demonstrated the significance of its measurements in contributing to studies looking at the sources of solar variability for pure solar physics purposes. This paper expands upon previous findings that EVE can in fact measure wavelength shifts during solar eruptive events and therefore provide Doppler velocities for plasma at all temperatures throughout the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to hot flaring temperatures. This process is not straightforward as EVE was not designed or optimized for these types of measurements. In this paper we describe the many detailed instrumental characterizations needed to eliminate the optical effects in order to provide an absolute baseline for the Doppler shift studies. An example is given of a solar eruption on 7 September 2011 (SOL2011-09-07), associated with an X1.2 flare, where EVE Doppler analysis shows plasma ejected from the Sun in the He ii 30.38 nm emission at a velocity of almost 120 km s^{-1} along the line-of-sight.

  20. Limb observations of the 12.32 micron solar emission line during the 1991 July total eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Mccabe, George; Noyes, Robert; Wiedemann, Gunter; Espenak, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The limb profile of the Mg I 12.32-micron emission line is determined by occultation in the July 11, 1991 total solar eclipse over Mauna Kea. It is shown that the emission peaks are very close to the 12-micron continuum limb, as predicted by recent theory for this line as a non-LTE photospheric emission. The increase in optical depth for this extreme limb-viewing situation indicates that most of the observed emission arises from above the chromospheric temperature minimum, and it is found that this emission is extended to heights well in excess of the model predictions. The line emission can be observed as high as 2000 km above the 12-micron continuum limb, whereas theory predicts it to remain observable no higher than about 500 km above the continuum limb. The substantial limb extension observed in this line is quantitatively consistent with limb extensions seen in the far-IR continuum, and it is concluded that it is indicative of departures from gravitational hydrostatic equilibrium, or spatial inhomogeneities, in the upper solar atmosphere.

  1. Comparing Time-Distance Results within a Coronal Hole to the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess Webber, Shea A.; Pesnell, W. Dean; Duvall, Thomas, Jr.; Birch, Aaron; Cameron, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Time-distance helioseismology studies perturbations in solar wave modes. We use these techniques with SDO/HMI time distance velocity-tracked dopplergram data to investigate differences between f-mode wave propagation within a coronal hole feature and without. We use symmetry arguments to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlation results. We then look for phase and amplitude discrepancies between the coronal hole and quiet sun by comparing statistically significant differences between the regions.

  2. Energy Saving and GHG Emission Reduction in a Micro-CCHP System by Use of Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Ion V.; Ciocea, Gheorghe; Popescu, Florin

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the reduction of greenhouse gas emission, and the energy saving by integrating solar collectors and photovoltaic panels in a Stirling engine based microcombined cooling, heating and power (mCCHP) system are studied. The mCCHP system consists of a natural gas Stirling CHP and an adsorber chiller. When the thermal outputs of the Stirling CHP and solar collectors are not sufficient to cover the heat demand for domestic hot water (DHW), heating/cooling, an auxiliary heating boiler starts to operate. The energy saving by using solar energy varies from 13.35% in December to 59.62% in April, in the case of solar collectors usage and from 7.47% in December to 28.27% in July, in the case of photovoltaic panels usage. By using solar energy the annual GHG emission decreases by 31.98% and the fuel cost reduction varies from 12.73% in December to 49.78% in June.

  3. Radiative transfer with scattering for domain-decomposed 3D MHD simulations of cool stellar atmospheres. Numerical methods and application to the quiet, non-magnetic, surface of a solar-type star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.; Carlsson, M.; Trampedach, R.; Collet, R.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; Leenaarts, J.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We present the implementation of a radiative transfer solver with coherent scattering in the new BIFROST code for radiative magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of stellar surface convection. The code is fully parallelized using MPI domain decomposition, which allows for large grid sizes and improved resolution of hydrodynamical structures. We apply the code to simulate the surface granulation in a solar-type star, ignoring magnetic fields, and investigate the importance of coherent scattering for the atmospheric structure. Methods: A scattering term is added to the radiative transfer equation, requiring an iterative computation of the radiation field. We use a short-characteristics-based Gauss-Seidel acceleration scheme to compute radiative flux divergences for the energy equation. The effects of coherent scattering are tested by comparing the temperature stratification of three 3D time-dependent hydrodynamical atmosphere models of a solar-type star: without scattering, with continuum scattering only, and with both continuum and line scattering. Results: We show that continuum scattering does not have a significant impact on the photospheric temperature structure for a star like the Sun. Including scattering in line-blanketing, however, leads to a decrease of temperatures by about 350 K below log10 τ5000 ⪉ -4. The effect is opposite to that of 1D hydrostatic models in radiative equilibrium, where scattering reduces the cooling effect of strong LTE lines in the higher layers of the photosphere. Coherent line scattering also changes the temperature distribution in the high atmosphere, where we observe stronger fluctuations compared to a treatment of lines as true absorbers.

  4. A self-consistent mechanism for electron cyclotron maser emission and its application to type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tang, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts (SRBs) produced by fast electron beams (FEBs) traveling along solar magnetic fields are the best known and the most important kind of SRBs because of their clearest association with FEBs as well as most frequent observations during solar activities. However, the physics of their emitting mechanism has been a controversial issue. Based on the electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven directly by a magnetized FEB, whose physics is fairly well known from the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation, this paper proposes a self-consistent mechanism for type III SRBs, in which the Alfvén wave (AW) produced by the current instability of the beam-return current system associated with the FEB, called the self-generated AW, plays an important and crucial role. Taking into account the return-current effect of the FEB, the growth rate and the saturation intensity of the self-generated AW are estimated. Then the effects of the self-generated AW on the ECM emission via the ECM instability driven by the magnetized FEB are further investigated. The results show that the self-generated AW can significantly influence and change the physical properties of the ECM emission. In particular, this novel ECM emission mechanism can effectively overcome the main difficulties of the conventional ECM emission mechanism in application to type III SRBs and may potentially provide a self-consistent physics scenario for type III SRBs.

  5. Is Cyclotron Maser Emission in Solar Flares Driven by a Horseshoe Distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Since the early 1980s, decimetric spike bursts have been attributed to electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME) by the electrons that produce hard X-ray bursts as they precipitate into the chromosphere in the impulsive phase of a solar flare. Spike bursts are regarded as analogous to the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), which is associated with the precipitation of auroral electrons in a geomagnetic substorm. Originally, a loss-cone-driven version of ECME, developed for AKR, was applied to spike bursts, but it is now widely accepted that the measured distribution function is horseshoe-like (an isotropic distribution with a one-sided loss cone), and that a horseshoe-driven version of ECME applies to AKR. We explore the implications of the assumption that horseshoe-driven ECME also applies to spike bursts. We develop a 1D model for the acceleration of the electrons by a parallel electric field, and show that under plausible assumptions it leads to a horseshoe distribution of electrons in a solar flare. A second requirement for horseshoe-driven ECME is an extremely low plasma density, referred to as a density cavity. We argue that a coronal density cavity should develop in association with a hard X-ray burst, and that such a density cavity can overcome a long-standing problem with the escape of ECME through the second-harmonic absorption layer. Both the horseshoe distribution and the associated coronal density cavity are highly localized, and could not be resolved in the statistically large number of local precipitation regions needed to explain a hard X-ray burst. The model highlights the "number problem" in the supply of the electrons needed to explain a hard X-ray burst.

  6. Intensity thresholds and the statistics of the temporal occurrence of solar flares.

    PubMed

    Baiesi, Marco; Paczuski, Maya; Stella, Attilio L

    2006-02-10

    Introducing thresholds to analyze time series of emission from the Sun enables a new and simple definition of solar flare events and their interoccurrence times. Rescaling time by the rate of events, the waiting and quiet time distributions both conform to scaling functions that are independent of the intensity threshold over a wide range. The scaling functions are well-described by a two-parameter function, with parameters that depend on the phase of the solar cycle. For flares identified according to the current, standard definition, similar behavior is found.

  7. A model of solar flux attenuation during eclipse passage and its effects on photoelectron emission from satellite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Forbes, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The basic theory of solar flux attenuation by the earth's atmosphere is reviewed and a model of the time-varying flux observed by a satellite during eclipse passage developed. The general model is applied to the specific problem of variations in photoelectron flux during penumbral passage and the effects of wavelength, solar activity, and atmospheric constituents on photoelectron emission investigated. Predictions of the photoelectron current expected from tungsten and aluminum surfaces are then successfully compared with actual observations from the ATS-5 and Injun 5 satellites confirming the validity of the model.

  8. 49 CFR 222.35 - What are the minimum requirements for quiet zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Quiet Zone. (iii) New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones established along the same rail line... requirements applicable to New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones. (iii) The deletion of any public... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the minimum requirements for quiet...

  9. 49 CFR 222.35 - What are the minimum requirements for quiet zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Quiet Zone. (iii) New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones established along the same rail line... requirements applicable to New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones. (iii) The deletion of any public... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the minimum requirements for quiet...

  10. 49 CFR 222.35 - What are the minimum requirements for quiet zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Quiet Zone. (iii) New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones established along the same rail line... requirements applicable to New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones. (iii) The deletion of any public... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the minimum requirements for quiet...

  11. 49 CFR 222.35 - What are the minimum requirements for quiet zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Quiet Zone. (iii) New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones established along the same rail line... requirements applicable to New Quiet Zones and New Partial Quiet Zones. (iii) The deletion of any public... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What are the minimum requirements for quiet...

  12. Practicality of Using Oxygen Atom Emissions to Evaluate the Habitability of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been proposed [Akasofu, 1999] that observation of the O(1S - 1D) green line from the atmospheres of extra-solar planets might be a marker for habitability. Guidance on this question is available within our own solar system. The green line is a dominant feature in the visible terrestrial nightglow, and the ultimate origin of its mesospheric emission is the three-body recombination of oxygen atoms. Until recently, it was believed that the green line was not a feature of the nightglows of the CO2 planets, Venus and Mars. It is now known that Venus at times shows green line emission with an intensity equal to terrestrial values [Slanger et al., 2001]. Furthermore, the intensity is quite variable, as is true for the much stronger O2( a-X) 1.27 μ emission. Recent observations of the Mars nightglow [Bertaux et al., 2005] give ambiguous results in the region of the O(1S-3P) line at 297.2 nm, but the same line in the dayglow is very strong, as evidenced in earlier Mariner results [Barth et al., 1971], and from the recent Mars Express data [F. Leblanc, private communication]. The O(1D-3P) 630 nm red line is a feature associated with Io, where dissociation of SO2 is a presumed source [Scherb et al., 1998]. Thus, observation of the oxygen green/red lines in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets provides insufficient information to reach conclusions about a habitable environment. Such detection would only indicate that there are oxygen-containing molecules present. Determination of an O2 column depth, by Fraunhofer A-band absorption, would be much more conclusive. Akasofu, S.-I., EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 80, 397, 1999. Barth, C.A., C.W. Hord, J.B. Pearce, K.K. Kelly, G.P. Anderson, and A.I. Stewart, Mariner 6 and 7 Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment: Upper Atmosphere Data, Journal of Geophysical Research, 76, 2213-2227, 1971. Bertaux, J.-L., F. Leblanc, S. Perrier, E. Quemerais, O. Korablev, E. Dimarellis, A. Reberac, F. Forget, P

  13. Differential emission measure analysis of a limb solar flare on 2012 July 19

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. Q.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D. E-mail: xincheng@nju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    We perform Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis of an M7.7 flare that occurred on 2012 July 19 and was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. Using the observational data with unprecedented high temporal and spatial resolution from six AIA coronal passbands, we calculate the DEM of the flare and derive the time series of maps of DEM-weighted temperature and emission measure (EM). It is found that, during the flare, the highest EM region is located in the flare loop top with a value varying between ∼8.4 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup –5} and ∼2.5 × 10{sup 30} cm{sup –5}. The temperature there rises from ∼8 MK at about 04:40 UT (the initial rise phase) to a maximum value of ∼13 MK at about 05:20 UT (the hard X-ray peak). Moreover, we find a hot region that is above the flare loop top with a temperature even up to ∼16 MK. We also analyze the DEM properties of the reconnection site. The temperature and density there are not as high as that in the loop top and the flux rope, indicating that the main heating may not take place inside the reconnection site. In the end, we examine the dynamic behavior of the flare loops. Along the flare loop, both the temperature and the EM are the highest in the loop top and gradually decrease toward the footpoints. In the northern footpoint, an upward force appears with a biggest value in the impulsive phase, which we conjecture originates from chromospheric evaporation.

  14. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  15. A.t.m. observations on the X u.v. emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes observations of selected solar flares made with a far-UV spectroheliograph (190-465 A) and a UV spectrograph (900-1900 A) aboard Skylab. The emission lines used in the present analysis are identified, and three events are described in detail: the flare of June 15, 1973, a small subflare observed on August 9, 1973, and the flare of January 21, 1974. Ultraviolet images of two other events are also presented in an attempt to sketch a general picture of a flare as seen in this spectral region. It is found that a small kernel seems to be the source of the primary energy release of a flare. The size, electron density, and ion temperature of a typical kernel are estimated, and it is noted that hot clouds of coronal gas at 20 million K surrounded the observed kernels. It is speculated that flare kernels might be very thin channels through which high-energy particles, originating in deep layers, are ejected into the corona.

  16. Strongly emissive perovskite nanocrystal inks for high-voltage solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkerman, Quinten A.; Gandini, Marina; di Stasio, Francesco; Rastogi, Prachi; Palazon, Francisco; Bertoni, Giovanni; Ball, James M.; Prato, Mirko; Petrozza, Annamaria; Manna, Liberato

    2016-12-01

    Lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently gained wide interest following their successful embodiment in solid-state photovoltaic devices with impressive power-conversion efficiencies, while offering a relatively simple and low-cost processability. Although the primary optoelectronic properties of these materials have already met the requirement for high-efficiency optoelectronic technologies, industrial scale-up requires more robust processing methods, as well as solvents that are less toxic than the ones that have been commonly used so successfully on the lab-scale. Here we report a fast, room-temperature synthesis of inks based on CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals using short, low-boiling-point ligands and environmentally friendly solvents. Requiring no lengthy post-synthesis treatments, the inks are directly used to fabricate films of high optoelectronic quality, exhibiting photoluminescence quantum yields higher than 30% and an amplified spontaneous emission threshold as low as 1.5 μJ cm‑2. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of perovskite nanocrystal-based solar cells, with open-circuit voltages as high as 1.5 V.

  17. On the origin of multiply-impulsive emission from solar flares. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    A set of solar hard X-ray bursts observed with the hard X-ray burst spectrometer on board the OSO-5 satellite was analyzed. The multiply-impulsive two stage events were selected on the basis of both morphological characteristics and association with appropriate phenomena at other wavelengths. Coincident radio, soft X-ray, H-alpha interplanetary particle, and magnetographic data were obtained from several observatories, to aid in developing a comprehensive picture of the physical processes underlying these complex bursts. Two classes of multiply impulsive bursts were identified: events whose components spikes apparently originate in one location, and events in which groups of spikes appear to come from separate regions which flare sequentially. The origin of multiplicity in the case of a single source region remains unidentified. Purely impulsive emissions show no sign of betatron acceleration, thus eliminating this mechanisn as a candidate for inducing multiply spiked structure. The majority of the two stage bursts, however, exhibited spectral behavior consistent with the betatron model, for the first few minutes of the second stage. Betatron acceleration thus has been identified as a common second stage phenomenon.

  18. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  19. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S. E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  20. ON POSSIBLE VARIATIONS OF BASAL Ca II K CHROMOSPHERIC LINE PROFILES WITH THE SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Uitenbroek, Han; Bertello, Luca E-mail: huitenbroek@nso.edu

    2013-04-10

    We use daily observations of the Ca II K line profiles of the Sun-as-a-star taken with the Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer from 2006 December through 2011 July to deconvolve the contributions from the quiet (basal) chromosphere and with magnetic network/plage areas. The 0.5 A emission index computed from basal profiles shows a significantly reduced modulation (as compared with one derived from the observed profiles) corresponding to the Sun's rotation. For basal contribution of the Ca II K line, the peak in power spectrum corresponding to solar rotation is broad and not well defined. Power spectra for the plage contribution show two narrow well-defined peaks corresponding to solar rotation at two distinct latitudes, in agreement with the latitudinal distribution of activity on the Sun at the end of Cycle 23 and beginning of Cycle 24. We use the lack of a signature of solar rotation in the basal (quiet Sun) component as an indication of a successful removal of the active Sun (plage) component. Even though the contribution from solar activity is removed from the basal line profiles, we find a weak dependency of intensity in the line core (K3) of basal profiles with the phase of the solar cycle. Such dependency could be the result of changes in thermal properties of basal chromosphere with the solar cycle. As an alternative explanation, we also discuss a possibility that the basal component does not change with the phase of the solar cycle.

  1. THE ION-INDUCED CHARGE-EXCHANGE X-RAY EMISSION OF THE JOVIAN AURORAS: MAGNETOSPHERIC OR SOLAR WIND ORIGIN?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Yawei; Schultz, David R.; Kharchenko, Vasili A.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Lisse, Carey M. E-mail: schultzd@ornl.gov E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu

    2009-09-10

    A new and more comprehensive model of charge-exchange induced X-ray emission, due to ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere near the poles, has been used to analyze spectral observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model includes for the first time carbon ions, in addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions previously considered, in order to account for possible ion origins from both the solar wind and the Jovian magnetosphere. By comparing the model spectra with newly reprocessed Chandra observations, we conclude that carbon ion emission provides a negligible contribution, suggesting that solar wind ions are not responsible for the observed polar X-rays. In addition, results of the model fits to observations support the previously estimated seeding kinetic energies of the precipitating ions ({approx}0.7-2 MeV u{sup -1}), but infer a different relative sulfur-to-oxygen abundance ratio for these Chandra observations.

  2. The Ion-induced Charge-exchange X-ray Emission of the Jovian Auroras: Magnetospheric or Solar Wind Origin?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Yawei; Schultz, David Robert; Kharchenko, Vasili A; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Lisse, Carey M.; Dalgarno, A.

    2009-01-01

    A new and more comprehensive model of charge-exchange induced X-ray emission, due to ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere near the poles, has been used to analyze spectral observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model includes for the first time carbon ions, in addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions previously considered, in order to account for possible ion origins from both the solar wind and the Jovian magnetosphere. By comparing the model spectra with newly reprocessed Chandra observations, we conclude that carbon ion emission provides a negligible contribution, suggesting that solar wind ions are not responsible for the observed polar X-rays. In addition, results of the model fits to observations support the previously estimated seeding kinetic energies of the precipitating ions ( 0.7-2 MeV/u), but infer a different relative sulfur to oxygen abundance ratio for these Chandra observations.

  3. Universality in solar flares, magnetic storms, earthquakes and pre-seismic electromagnetic emissions by means of nonextensivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftaxias, K. A.; Balasis, G.; Papadimitriou, C.; Mandea, M.

    2009-12-01

    The field of study of complex systems holds that the dynamics of complex systems are founded on universal principles that may used to describe disparate problems ranging from particle physics to economies of societies. A corollary is that transferring ideas and results from investigators in hitherto disparate areas will cross-fertilize and lead to important new results. In this contribution we investigate a universal behavior, if any, in solar flares, magnetic storms, earthquakes and pre-seismic electromagnetic (EM) emissions. A common characteristic in the dynamics of the above-mentioned four phenomena is that the energy release is basically fragmentary, the events being composed of elementary building blocks. By analogy with earthquakes, magnitude of the magnetic storms, solar flares and pre-seismic electromagnetic emissions can be appropriately defined. The key-question we can ask in the frame of complexity is whether the magnitude distribution of earthquakes, magnetic storms, solar flares and pre-fracture EM emissions obeys to the same law. A central property of the magnetic storm, solar flare, and earthquake preparation process is the possible occurrence of coherent large-scale collective with a very rich structure resulting from the repeated nonlinear interactions among its constituents. Consequently, the non-extensive statistical mechanics is an appropriate arena to investigate universality, if any, in magnetic storm, solar flare, earthquake and pre-failure electromagnetic emission occurrence. A model for earthquake dynamics consisting of two rough profiles interacting via fragments filling the gap has been recently introduced by Solotongo-Costa and Posadas [2004]. An energy distribution function, which gives the Gutenberg-Richter law as a particular case, is analytically deduced. Therefore, the primary question we can ask in the frame of complexity is whether the aforementioned equation not only successfully describes the magnitude distribution of

  4. The Hidden Gifts of Quiet Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trierweiler, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    The author relates that she was an introvert child. It has always taken her time and energy to find her place in a group. As a grown-up, she still needed quiet time to regroup during a busy day. In this article, the author presents an interview with Marti Olsen Laney, author of "The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child." During the interview,…

  5. Mideast stays quiet but has vigor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    New drilling activity in the Middle East comes in the Egyptian Red Sea and at both Yemen and Qatar. The last in the scene of the giant North Dome gas development. Otherwise the Mideast sector is quiet with hard production ceilings demanded by OPEC and a war on the east coast of the gulf causing more confusion. A review of the current activity is presented.

  6. BUY QUIET INITIATIVE IN THE USA

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Bryan; McCleery, Trudi; Hayden, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is still considered one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States of America. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health launched a national Buy Quiet campaign to raise awareness of the importance of purchasing quieter equipment. Buy Quiet encourages companies to seek out and demand quieter equipment thus driving the market to design and create quieter products. In the long run, investment in noise controls should be more prevalent as the market demands quieter products. This paradigm occurs as the market for quieter products expands both from the supply side (manufacturers) and the demand side (tool and equipment purchasers). The key to experiencing the reduced costs and increased benefits of Buy Quiet will be to develop partnerships between manufacturers and consumers. To this end, the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health continues to work with partners to educate stakeholders about the risks and true costs of noise-induced hearing loss, as well as the economic benefits of buying quieter equipment. PMID:27274613

  7. The Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH,

  8. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Double-annular clean combustor technology development report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, D. W.; Burrus, D. L.; Sabla, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A sector combustor technology development program was conducted to define an advanced double annular dome combustor sized for use in the quiet clean short haul experimental engine (QCSEE). A design which meets the emission goals, and combustor performance goals of the QCSEE engine program was developed. Key design features were identified which resulted in substantial reduction in carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emission levels at ground idle operating conditions, in addition to very low nitric oxide emission levels at high power operating conditions. Their significant results are reported.

  9. Solar Control on Jupiter's Equatorial X-ray Emissions: 26-29 November 2003 XMM-Newton Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Ramsay, G.; Rodriquez, P.; Soria, R.; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    During November 26-29,2003 XMM-Newton observed X-ray emissions from Jupiter for 69 hours. The 0.7-2.0 keV X-ray disk of Jupiter is observed to be brightest at the subsolar point, and limb darkening is seen in the 0.2-2.0 keV and 0.7-2.0 keV images. We present simultaneous lightcurves of Jovian equatorial X-rays and solar X-rays measured by the GOES, SOHO/SEM, and TIMED/SEE satellites. The solar X-ray flares occurring on the Jupiter-facing side of the Sun are matched by corresponding features in the Jovian X- rays. These results support the hypothesis that X-ray emissions from Jovian low-latitudes are solar X-rays scattered and fluoresced from the planet's upper atmosphere, and confirm that the Sun directly controls the non-auroral X-rays fiom Jupiter's disk. Our study suggest that Jovian equatorial X-rays; during certain Jupiter phase, can be used to predict the occurrence of solar flare on the hemisphere of the Sun that is invisible to space weather satellites.

  10. Inference of magnetic fields in the very quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Lagg, A.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Collados, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Balthasar, H.; Berkefeld, T.; Denker, C.; Doerr, H. P.; Feller, A.; Franz, M.; González Manrique, S. J.; Hofmann, A.; Kneer, F.; Kuckein, C.; Louis, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco, D.; Rezaei, R.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Verma, M.; Waldman, T.; Volkmer, R.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Over the past 20 yr, the quietest areas of the solar surface have revealed a weak but extremely dynamic magnetism occurring at small scales (<500 km), which may provide an important contribution to the dynamics and energetics of the outer layers of the atmosphere. Understanding this magnetism requires the inference of physical quantities from high-sensitivity spectro-polarimetric data with high spatio-temporal resolution. Aims: We present high-precision spectro-polarimetric data with high spatial resolution (0.4'') of the very quiet Sun at 1.56 μm obtained with the GREGOR telescope to shed some light on this complex magnetism. Methods: We used inversion techniques in two main approaches. First, we assumed that the observed profiles can be reproduced with a constant magnetic field atmosphere embedded in a field-free medium. Second, we assumed that the resolution element has a substructure with either two constant magnetic atmospheres or a single magnetic atmosphere with gradients of the physical quantities along the optical depth, both coexisting with a global stray-light component. Results: Half of our observed quiet-Sun region is better explained by magnetic substructure within the resolution element. However, we cannot distinguish whether this substructure comes from gradients of the physical parameters along the line of sight or from horizontal gradients (across the surface). In these pixels, a model with two magnetic components is preferred, and we find two distinct magnetic field populations. The population with the larger filling factor has very weak ( 150 G) horizontal fields similar to those obtained in previous works. We demonstrate that the field vector of this population is not constrained by the observations, given the spatial resolution and polarimetric accuracy of our data. The topology of the other component with the smaller filling factor is constrained by the observations for field strengths above 250 G: we infer hG fields with

  11. High energy neutrinos from radio-quiet active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Mészáros, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Most active galactic nuclei (AGN) lack prominent jets, and show modest radio emission and significant x-ray emission which arises mainly from the galactic core, very near the central black hole. We use a quantitative scenario of such core-dominated radio-quiet AGN, which attributes a substantial fraction of the x-ray emission to the presence of abortive jets involving the collision of gas blobs in the core. Here we investigate the consequences of the acceleration of protons in the shocks from such collisions. We find that protons will be accelerated up to energies above the pion photoproduction threshold on both the x rays and the UV photons from the accretion disk. The secondary charged pions decay, producing neutrinos. We predict significant fluxes of TeV-PeV neutrinos, and show that the AMANDA II detector is already constraining several important astrophysical parameters of these sources. Larger cubic kilometer detectors such as IceCube will be able to detect such neutrinos in less than one year of operation, or otherwise rule out this scenario.

  12. QUIET-SUN NETWORK BRIGHT POINT PHENOMENA WITH SIGMOIDAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B.; Champey, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitous solar atmospheric coronal and transition region bright points (BPs) are compact features overlying strong concentrations of magnetic flux. Here, we utilize high-cadence observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to provide the first observations of extreme ultraviolet quiet-Sun (QS) network BP activity associated with sigmoidal structuring. To our knowledge, this previously unresolved fine structure has never been associated with such small-scale QS events. This QS event precedes a bi-directional jet in a compact, low-energy, and low-temperature environment, where evidence is found in support of the typical fan-spine magnetic field topology. As in active regions and micro-sigmoids, the sigmoidal arcade is likely formed via tether-cutting reconnection and precedes peak intensity enhancements and eruptive activity. Our QS BP sigmoid provides a new class of small-scale structuring exhibiting self-organized criticality that highlights a multi-scaled self-similarity between large-scale, high-temperature coronal fields and the small-scale, lower-temperature QS network. Finally, our QS BP sigmoid elevates arguments for coronal heating contributions from cooler atmospheric layers, as this class of structure may provide evidence favoring mass, energy, and helicity injections into the heliosphere.

  13. Quiet-Sun Network Bright Point Phenomena with Sigmoidal Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B.; Champey, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitous solar atmospheric coronal and transition region bright points (BPs) are compact features overlying strong concentrations of magnetic flux. Here, we utilize high-cadence observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to provide the first observations of extreme ultraviolet quiet-Sun (QS) network BP activity associated with sigmoidal structuring. To our knowledge, this previously unresolved fine structure has never been associated with such small-scale QS events. This QS event precedes a bi-directional jet in a compact, low-energy, and low-temperature environment, where evidence is found in support of the typical fan-spine magnetic field topology. As in active regions and micro-sigmoids, the sigmoidal arcade is likely formed via tether-cutting reconnection and precedes peak intensity enhancements and eruptive activity. Our QS BP sigmoid provides a new class of small-scale structuring exhibiting self-organized criticality that highlights a multi-scaled self-similarity between large-scale, high-temperature coronal fields and the small-scale, lower-temperature QS network. Finally, our QS BP sigmoid elevates arguments for coronal heating contributions from cooler atmospheric layers, as this class of structure may provide evidence favoring mass, energy, and helicity injections into the heliosphere.

  14. Imaging the host galaxies of high-redshift radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, James D.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew, D.; Elias, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We present new deep K-band and optical images of four radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 1 and six radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 2.5, as well as optical images only of six more at z approximately = 2.5. We have examined the images carefully for evidence of extended 'fuzz' from any putative QSO host galaxy. None of the z approximately = 2.5 QSOs shows any extended emission, and only two of the z approximately = 1 QSOs show marginal evidence for extended emission. Our 3 sigma detection limits in the K images, m(sub K) approximately = 21 for an isolated source, would correspond approximately to an unevolved L(sup star) elliptical galaxy at z = 2.5 or 2-3 mag fainter than an L(sup star) elliptical at z = 1, although our limits on host galaxy light are weaker than this due to the difficulty of separating galaxy light from QSO light. We simulate simple models of disk and elliptical host galaxies, and find that the marginal emission around the two z approximately = 1 QSOs can be explained by disks or bulges that are approximately 1-2 mag brighter than an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy in one case and approximately 1.5-2.5 mag brighter than L(sub star) in the other. For two other z approximately = 1 QSOs, we have only upper limits (L approximately = L(sup star)). The hosts of the high-redshift sample must be no brighter than about 3 mag above an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy, and are at least 1 magnitude fainter than the hosts of radio-loud QSOs at the same redshift. If the easily detected K-band light surrounding a previous sample of otherwise similar but radio-loud QSOs is starlight, then it must evolve on timescales of greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 8) yr (e.g., Chambers & Charlot 1990); therefore our non-detection of host galaxy fuzz around radio-quiet QSOs supports the view that high-redshift radio-quiet and radio-loud QSOs inhabit different host objects, rather than being single types of objects that turn their radio emission on and off over

  15. Secondary electron emission from lunar soil by solar wind type ion impact: Laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, Catherine; Bu, Caixia; Baragiola, Raul A.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: The lunar surface potential is determined by time-varying fluxes of electrons and ions from the solar wind, photoelectrons ejected by UV photons, cosmic rays, and micrometeorite impacts. Solar wind ions have a dual role in the charging process, adding positive charge to the lunar regolith upon impact and ejecting negative secondary electrons (SE). Electron emission occurs when the energy from the impacting ion is transferred to the solid, ionizing and damaging the material; electrons with kinetic energy greater than the ionization potential (band gap + electron affinity) are ejected from the solid[1].Experiment: We investigate the energy distribution of secondary electrons ejected from Apollo soils of varying maturity and lunar analogs by 4 keV He+. Soils are placed into a shallow Al cup and compressed. In-situ low-energy oxygen plasma is used to clean atmospheric contaminants from the soil before analysis[2]. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ascertains that the sample surface is clean. Experiments are conducted in a PHI 560 system (<10-9 Torr), equipped with a double-pass, cylindrical-mirror electron energy analyzer (CMA) and μ-metal shield. The spectrometer is used to measure SE distributions, as well as for in situ surface characterization. A small negative bias (~5V) with respect to the grounded entrance grid of the CMA may be placed on the sample holder in order to expose the low energy cutoff.To measure SE energy distributions, primary ions rastered over a ~6 x 6 mm2 area are incident on the sample at ~40° relative to the surface normal, while SE emitted with an angle of 42.3°± 3.5° in a cone are analyzed.Results: The energy distribution of SE ejected from 4 keV He ion irradiation of albite with no bias applied shows positive charging of the surface. The general shape and distribution peak (~4 eV) are consistent with spectra for low energy ions on insulating material[1].Acknowledgements: We thank the NASA LASER program for support

  16. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ≈ 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ≈ 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec{sup 2} (2.58 × 10{sup 9} km{sup 2}, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ∼0.076 just outside the AR core and ∼0.59 in the core.

  17. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  18. Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations during intervals of quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp≤1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.-J.; Kim, K.-H.; Jun, C.-W.; Takahashi, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, E.; Jin, H.; Seon, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Hwang, J.

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that Pi2 pulsations can be excited under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp=0). However, there have been few comprehensive reports of Pi2 pulsations in such a near ground state magnetosphere. To understand the characteristics of quiet-time Pi2 pulsations, we statistically examined Pi2 events observed on the nightside between 1800 and 0600 local time at the low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) station in South Korea. We chose year 2008 for analysis because geomagnetic activity was unusually low in that year. A total of 982 Pi2 events were identified when Kp≤1. About 80% of the Pi2 pulsations had a period between 110 and 300 s, which significantly differs from the conventional Pi2 period from 40 to 150 s. Comparing Pi2 periods and solar wind conditions, we found that Pi2 periods decrease with increasing solar wind speed, consistent with the result of Troitskaya (1967). The observed wave properties are discussed in terms of plasmaspheric resonance, which has been proposed for Pi2 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere. We also found that Pi2 pulsations occur quasi-periodically with a repetition period of ˜23-38 min. We will discuss what determines such a recurrence time of Pi2 pulsations under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  19. Seismoacoustic Emission and Lunar-Solar Tidal Deformation Processes in the Geo-Environment Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, E.; Troyanov, A.; Astrakhantsev, Yu.; Nachapkin, N.; Vdovin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation processes in the Earth's crust are various, but the lunar-solar tidal deformation process, which is the most notable and controlled (relative deformations are 10-6 to 10-8), attracts great attention. The investigation of the correlation between the tidal deformation processes and Seismoacoustic response of the geo-environment is a timely problem due to many reasons. Firstly, it is related to the discovery of the modulation effect of the high-frequency noise by the long-period deformation processes including tidal processes [L. N. Rykunov, O. B. Khavroshkin, and V. V. Tsyplakov, 1980]. The possibility appeared to distinguish similar periods in the variations of the amplitude level of the seismic acoustic emission (SAE) based on the known periodicities of the deformation processes. Secondly, the level of the Seismoacoustic response of the geo-environment to the influence of the tidal deformation processes allows us to estimate the physic-mechanical properties of the rocks composing the massif and their variation in time. Thirdly, the dependence of some geodynamic processes on the lunar-solar tides can be used to estimate the dynamic activity of different geo-structures. The investigation of the deformation processes is a complicated problem because the majority of currently applied methods give us information about deformations in the surface layer. In the conditions of the hierarchical block structure of the Earth's crust; such observations do not sufficiently reveal the distribution of deformations related to the accumulation and relaxation of stresses in the internal points of the medium. Therefore, the spatiotemporal distribution of the SAE in the boreholes carries significant information about the deformation processes in the Earth's crust directly reflecting the actual stresses and the structure of the investigated rock massif [B. P. Dyakonov, A. K. Troyanov, A. N. Nazarov, 1989]. The borehole version of the observations as the most noise

  20. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability of Some Chromospheric Emission Lines Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göker, Ü. D.; Gigolashvili, M. Sh.; Kapanadze, N.

    2017-02-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers such as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We reduced these data by using the MATLAB software package. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) spectral lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar activity cycles (SACs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the variations of solar activity indices obtained by the ground-based telescopes. Therefore, we found that plage regions decrease while facular areas are increasing in SAC 23. However, the decrease in plage regions is seen in small sunspot groups (SGs), contrary to this, these regions in large SGs are comparable to previous SACs or even larger as is also seen in facular areas. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these variations are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/SGs, faculae and plage regions. Finally, we applied the time series analysis of spectral lines corresponding to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and made comparisons with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increase in the 298.5 nm line for the Fe II ion. The variability of Fe II ion 298.5 nm line is in close connection with the facular areas and plage regions, and the sizes of these solar surface indices play an important role for the SSI variability, as well. So, we compared the connection between the sizes of faculae and plage regions, sunspots/SGs, chemical elements and SSI variability. Our future work will be the theoretical study of this connection and developing of a corresponding model.

  1. CURRENT SHEET ENERGETICS, FLARE EMISSIONS, AND ENERGY PARTITION IN A SIMULATED SOLAR ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Katharine K.; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Forbes, Terry G. E-mail: linkerj@predsci.co E-mail: terry.forbes@unh.ed

    2010-10-01

    We investigate coronal energy flow during a simulated coronal mass ejection (CME). We model the CME in the context of the global corona using a 2.5D numerical MHD code in spherical coordinates that includes coronal heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling in the energy equation. The simulation domain extends from 1 to 20 R{sub s} . To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to apply detailed energy diagnostics in a flare/CME simulation when these important terms are considered in the context of the MHD equations. We find that the energy conservation properties of the code are quite good, conserving energy to within 4% for the entire simulation (more than 6 days of real time). We examine the energy release in the current sheet as the eruption takes place, and find, as expected, that the Poynting flux is the dominant carrier of energy into the current sheet. However, there is a significant flow of energy out of the sides of the current sheet into the upstream region due to thermal conduction along field lines and viscous drag. This energy outflow is spatially partitioned into three separate components, namely, the energy flux flowing out the sides of the current sheet, the energy flowing out the lower tip of the current sheet, and the energy flowing out the upper tip of the current sheet. The energy flow through the lower tip of the current sheet is the energy available for heating of the flare loops. We examine the simulated flare emissions and energetics due to the modeled CME and find reasonable agreement with flare loop morphologies and energy partitioning in observed solar eruptions. The simulation also provides an explanation for coronal dimming during eruptions and predicts that the structures surrounding the current sheet are visible in X-ray observations.

  2. Observation and Modeling of the Solar Transition Region. 1; A Quasi-Static Loops Model with Implications for Heating the Lower Transition Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Walker, A. B. C., II; Porter, Jason; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    We report on observations of the solar atmosphere in several extreme ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet bandpasses obtained by the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, a rocket borne spectroheliograph, on flights in 1987, 1991, and 1994, spanning the last solar maximum. Quiet sun emission observed in the 171 A - 175 A bandpass, which includes lines of 0Ov, O vi, Fe ix, and Fe x, has been analyzed to test models of the temperatures and geometries of the structures responsible for this emission. Analyses of intensity variations above the solar limb reveal scale heights consistent with a quiet sun plasma temperature of 500 000 K less than or equal to T(sub e) less than or equal to 800 000 K. Intensity modulations in the quiet sun are observed to occur on a scale comparable to the supergranular scale. The structures responsible for the quiet sun EUV emission are modeled as small quasi-static loops. We find that the emission predicted by loop models with maximum temperatures between 700 000 K and 900 000 K are consistent with our observations. We also present a preliminary comparison of the predictions of our models with observations of diagnostic spectral line ratios obtained from previous observers. We discuss the implications a distribution of loops of the type we model here would have for heating the lower transition region. Finally, in fight of the models we calculate here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge concerning the contributions thermal conduction from coronal (T(sub e) greater than or equal to 10(exp 6) K) and upper transition region (10(exp 5) K less than T(sub e) less than 10(esp 6) K) structures make to lower transition region emission. We argue that the evidence which has lead many authors to conclude that the interface of hotter and cooler plasmas makes a negligible contribution to lower transition region emission is much less compelling in light of recent observations and analyses. We further argue that it is the interface of

  3. Coincident bursts of auroral kilometric radiation and VLF emissions associted with a type 3 solar radio noise event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, T. J.; Singh, S.; Wu, C. S.; Labelle, J.; Treumann, R. A.; Inan, U. S.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines an isolated magnetospheric VLF/radio noise event that is highly suggestive of the triggering of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) bu solar type III radio emission and of a close relation between AKR and broadband hiss. The solar type III burst was measured on polar HF riometers and was coincident with local dayside VLF/LF noise emission bursts at South Pole station. It was also coincident with AKR bursts detected onthe AMPTE/IRM satellite, at the same magnetic local time as South Pole. On the basis of the close association of AKR and VLF bursts, and from geometric considerations relating to wave propagation, it is likely that the AKR source was on the dayside and on field lines near South Pole station. The general level of geomagnetic activity was very low. However, an isolated magnetic impulse event (MIE) accompanied by a riometer absorption pulse was in progress when all of the VLF/radio noise bursts occurred. The very close association of the typew III burst at HF with the AKR is consistent with external stimulation of the AKR, is different, more immediate,triggering process than that implied by Calvert (1981) is invoked. It is suggested here that some of the HF solar radiant energy may decay into waves with frequences comparable to those of the AKR by paraetric excitation or some other process, thus providing the few background photons required for the generation of AKR by the WU and Lee (1979) cyclotron maser instability. The AKR, perhaps by modifying the magnetospheric electron velocity distribution, might have produced the observed VLF emissions. Alternatively, the VLF emissions may have arisen from the same anisotropic and unstable electron distribution function responsible for the AKR.

  4. Coincident bursts of auroral kilometric radiation and VLF emissions associated with a type III solar radio noise event

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Singh, S.; Wu, C.S.; LaBelle, J.; Treumann, R.A.; Inan, U.S.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines an isolated magnetospheric VLF/radio noise event that is highly suggestive of the triggering of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) by solar type III radio emission and of a close relation between AKR and broadband hiss. The solar type III burst was measured on polar HF riometers and was coincident with local dayside VLF/LF noise emission bursts at South Pole station. It was also coincident with AKR bursts detected on the AMPTE/IRM satellite, at the same magnetic local time as South Pole. On the basis of the close association of AKR and VLF bursts, and from geometrical considerations relating to wave propagnation, it is likely that the AKR source was on the dayside and on field lines near South Pole station. The general level of geomagnetic activity was very low. However, an isolated magnetic impulse event (MIE) accompanied by a riometer absorption pulse was in progress when all of the VLF/radio noise bursts occurred. The very close association of the type III burst at HF with the AKR is consistent with external stimulation of the AKR, if a different, more immediate, triggering process than that implied by Calvert is invoked. It is suggested here that some of the HF solar radiant energy may decay into waves with frequencies comparable to those of the AKR by parametric excitation or some other process, thus providing the few background photons required for the generation of AKR by the Wu and Lee cyclotron maser instability. The AKR, perhaps by modifying the magnetospheric electron velocity distribution, might have produced the observed VLF emissions. Alternatively, the VLF emissions may have arisen from the same anisotropic and unstable electron distribution function responsible for the AKR. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Design of Quiet Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Burley, Casey L.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A optimization procedure for identifying quiet rotorcraft approach trajectories is proposed and demonstrated. The procedure employs a multi-objective genetic algorithm in order to reduce noise and create approach paths that will be acceptable to pilots and passengers. The concept is demonstrated by application to two different helicopters. The optimized paths are compared with one another and to a standard 6-deg approach path. The two demonstration cases validate the optimization procedure but highlight the need for improved noise prediction techniques and for additional rotorcraft acoustic data sets.

  6. Delayed stochastic differential model for quiet standing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W.; Yu, P.; Essex, C.

    2001-02-01

    A physiological quiet standing model, described by a delayed differential equation, subject to a white noise perturbation, is proposed to study the postural control system of human beings. It has been found that the white noise destabilizes the equilibrium state, and inertia accelerates the destabilizing process, and that the position of a person is detected and processed by the person's nervous system with a delay. This paper focuses on the analysis of Hopf bifurcation and its stability in this context. Based on the analytical predictions confirmed by numerical simulations, it has been shown that the posture of a person is controlled in such a way that possible amplitude oscillations are minimized.

  7. The quiet revolution of numerical weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Peter; Thorpe, Alan; Brunet, Gilbert

    2015-09-01

    Advances in numerical weather prediction represent a quiet revolution because they have resulted from a steady accumulation of scientific knowledge and technological advances over many years that, with only a few exceptions, have not been associated with the aura of fundamental physics breakthroughs. Nonetheless, the impact of numerical weather prediction is among the greatest of any area of physical science. As a computational problem, global weather prediction is comparable to the simulation of the human brain and of the evolution of the early Universe, and it is performed every day at major operational centres across the world.

  8. Flare evolution and polarization changes in fine structures of solar radio emission in the 2013 April 11 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Gennady; Sych, Robert; Tan, Bao-Lin; Yan, Yi-Hua; Tan, Cheng-Ming; Fu, Qi-Jun; Karlický, Marian; Fomichev, Valery

    2016-02-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in observations is important for understanding of the flare evolution. For the first time, solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare that occurred on 2013 April 11 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondřejov Radio Spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondřejov), Badary Broadband Microwave Spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures included microwave zebra patterns (ZPs), fast pulsations and fiber bursts. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade as shown in images taken by the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope onboard NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The flare occurred at 06:58-07:26 UT in solar active region NOAA 11719 located close to the solar disk center. ZPs appeared near high frequency boundaries of the pulsations, and their spectra observed in Huairou and Ondřejov agreed with each other in terms of details. At the beginning of the flare's impulsive phase, a strong narrowband ZP burst occurred with a moderate left-handed circular polarization. Then a series of pulsations and ZPs were observed in almost unpolarized emission. After 07:00 UT a ZP appeared with a moderate right-handed polarization. In the flare decay phase (at about 07:25 UT), ZPs and fiber bursts become strongly right-hand polarized. BMS/Irkutsk spectral observations indicated that the background emission showed a left-handed circular polarization (similar to SBRS/Huairou spectra around 3 GHz). However, the fine structure appeared in the right-handed polarization. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171 Å and 131 Å by the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by

  9. TEC Response to X-ray Solar Emissions Observed in the Equatorial and Low-latitude Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Nicoli Candido, C. M.; de Siqueira, P. M.; Paula, E. R.; Takahashi, H.; De Nardin, C. M.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Some spurious effects affecting radio communications happen when the X-ray solar flux in the interplanetary medium reaches values above a certain threshold. The magnitudes of these effects depend on the X-ray peak brightness and the duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth atmosphere. An important aspect defining the severity of damages to HF radio communications and LF navigation signals in a certain area is the local time when each event takes place. In order to improve the understanding of radio signal loss or degradation in the Brazilian sector due to solar X-ray emissions, we analyze total electron content (TEC) maps and curves at selected sites obtained by a GPS network formed by tents of dual-frequency receivers spread all over Brazilian territory. We observe ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events in the 0.1-0.8 nm range identified by GOES satellite. Considering the duration, peak brightness, and local time of the events, our goal is to understand the degree of changes suffered by the ionosphere after these solar X-ray emissions using GPS receivers, namely in the equatorial region and around the southern crest of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly.

  10. Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.

    2007-03-01

    Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UV spectrum of the quiet Sun above the limb (Warren+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, H. P.; Ugarte-Urra, I.; Landi, E.

    2014-09-01

    First, we compare full-disk mosaics constructed by scanning the EIS slot over the Sun with irradiance observations made by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE; Woods et al. 2012SoPh..275..115W) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. These comparisons provide a means of establishing the absolute calibration for EIS. Second, we combine extended EIS observations from above the limb in the quiet Sun with a simple temperature model to simultaneously determine the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution and the time-dependent changes to the effective areas that best fit all of the available spectral lines. In Figure 2 we show the average spectrum from an observation of seven consecutive runs of ELFULLCCDWSUMER. The observations began on 2007 November 4 19:12 and ended on the same date at 23:51 UT. The EIS field of view was centered at (990", -50") about 22" above the limb of the Sun. The central 129 pixels along the slit have been averaged over 38 exposures (11 exposures were corrupted in transmission to the ground) for a total of 4902 intensity measurements at each wavelength. Since each exposure is 300s, the spectrum represents 1470600 pixels of effective exposure time and allows weak lines at the ends of the detector to be measured. (1 data file).

  12. Driver perceptions of the safety implications of quiet electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Cocron, Peter; Krems, Josef F

    2013-09-01

    Previous research on the safety implications of quiet electric vehicles (EVs) has mostly focused on pedestrians' acoustic perception of EVs, and suggests that EVs are more difficult for pedestrians to hear and, therefore, compromise traffic safety. The two German field studies presented here examine the experiences of 70 drivers with low noise emissions of EVs and the drivers' long-term evaluation of the issue. Participants were surveyed via interviews and questionnaires before driving an EV for the first time, after 3 months of driving, and in the first study, again after 6 months. Based on participants' reports, a catalogue of safety-relevant incidents was composed in Study 1. The catalogue revealed that low noise-related critical incidents only rarely occur, and mostly take place in low-speed environments. The degree of hazard related to these incidents was rated as low to medium. In Study 1, driver concern for vulnerable road users as a result of low noise diminished with increasing driving experience, while perceived comfort due to this feature increased. These results were replicated in Study 2. In the second study, it was additionally examined, if drivers adjust their perceived risk of harming other road users over time. Results show that the affective assessment of risk also decreased with increased driving experience. Based on individual experience, drivers adjust their evaluation of noise-related hazards, suggesting that dangers associated with low noise emissions might be less significant than previously expected.

  13. Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cowlin, S. C.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.

    2008-01-01

    This analysis explores the technical potential of photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) to address energy poverty in Africa through a geographic information system (GIS) screening of solar resource data developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  14. 49 CFR 222.38 - Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region... § 222.38 Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region? Public authorities that are eligible to establish quiet zones under this part may create New Quiet Zones or New Partial Quiet Zones in the...

  15. Microwave properties of a quiet sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J.

    1985-01-01

    The microwave flux responses of a quiet sea are observed at five microwave frequencies and with both horizontal and vertical polarizations at each frequency--a simultaneous 10 channel receiving system. The measurements are taken from Earth orbit with an articulating antenna. The 10 channel responses are taken simultaneously since they share a common articulating collector with a multifrequency feed. The plotted flux responses show: (1) the effects of the relative, on-axis-gain of the collecting aperture for each frequency; (2) the effects of polarization rotation in the output responses of the receive when the collecting aperture mechanically rotates about a feed that is fixed; (3) the difference between the flux magnitudes for the horizontal and vertical channels, at each of the five frequencies, and for each pointing position, over a 44 degree scan angle; and (4) the RMS value of the clutter--as reckoned over the interval of a full swath for each of the 10 channels. The clutter is derived from the standard error of estimate of the plotted swath response for each channel. The expected value of the background temperature is computed for each of the three quiet seas. The background temperature includes contributions from the cosmic background, the downwelling path, the sea surface, and the upwelling path.

  16. Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 March 7 solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is ∼3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from ∼4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index ∼2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  17. Concerning spikes in emission and absorption in the microwave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Gennady P.; Sych, Robert A.; Huang, Guang-Li; Ji, Hai-Sheng; Yan, Yi-Hua; Tan, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    In some events, weak fast solar bursts (near the level of the quiet Sun) were observed in the background of numerous spikes in emission and absorption. In such a case, the background contains the noise signals of the receiver. In events on 2005 September 16 and 2002 April 14, the solar origin of fast bursts was confirmed by simultaneous recording of the bursts at several remote observatories. The noisy background pixels in emission and absorption can be excluded by subtracting a higher level of continuum when constructing the spectra. The wavelet spectrum, noisy profiles in different polarization channels and a spectrum with continuum level greater than zero demonstrates the noisy character of pixels with the lowest levels of emission and absorption. Thus, in each case, in order to judge the solar origin of all spikes, it is necessary to determine the level of continuum against the background of which the solar bursts are observed. Several models of microwave spikes are discussed. The electron cyclotron maser emission mechanism runs into serious problems with the interpretation of microwave millisecond spikes: the main obstacles are too high values of the magnetic field strength in the source (ωPe <= ωBe). The probable mechanism is the interaction of plasma Langmuir waves with ion-sound waves (l + s → t) in a source related to shock fronts in the reconnection region.

  18. A two-component model of variations of Lyman-alpha emission with solar-activity level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiushina, V. V.; Krasinets, M. V.; Nusinov, A. A.; Bart, Ch. A.; Rottman, G. J.

    1991-02-01

    The relationship between the intensity of solar UV radiation in the Lyman-alpha line and the 10.7-cm emission is analyzed on the basis of SME data for 1982-1988. It is shown that the closest correlation between these parameters corresponds to the hypothesis that the Lyman-alpha radiation is a superposition of two components: background and upwelling from active regions. It is pointed out that various characteristics of Lyman-alpha variations in an activity cycle can be explained with the two-component model.

  19. Correlated observations of a spatially resolved type III solar radio burst group and the associated hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Pick, M.; Raoult, A.

    1980-01-01

    The first measurements of the spatial structure of a group of type III solar radio bursts associated with an impulsive hard X-ray burst are presented. At 169 MHz the radio source has been found to consist of two principal regions separated by about 300,000 km. The two regions together produced a total of four component bursts in good time correlation with spikes in the hard X-ray emission. The observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region which covers a wide range of magnetic field lines.

  20. X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR IN CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.; Bignami, G. F.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Kanbach, G.

    2010-12-10

    Prompted by the Fermi-LAT discovery of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar inside the CTA 1 supernova remnant, we obtained a 130 ks XMM-Newton observation to assess the timing behavior of this pulsar. Exploiting both the unprecedented photon harvest and the contemporary Fermi-LAT timing measurements, a 4.7{sigma} single-peak pulsation is detected, making PSR J0007+7303 the second example, after Geminga, of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar also seen to pulsate in X-rays. Phase-resolved spectroscopy shows that the off-pulse portion of the light curve is dominated by a power-law, non-thermal spectrum, while the X-ray peak emission appears to be mainly of thermal origin, probably from a polar cap heated by magnetospheric return currents, pointing to a hot spot varying throughout the pulsar rotation.

  1. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones? 222.41 Section 222.41 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.41 How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule...-Rule Quiet Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51,...

  2. Zeeman-Tomography of a Quiet Sun Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. A.; Kopf, M.

    2009-06-01

    The thermodynamic and magnetic field structure of the solar photosphere is analyzed by means of a novel 3-dimensional spectropolarimetric inversion and reconstruction technique. On the basis of high-resolution, mixed-polarity magnetoconvection simulations we used an artificial neural network (ANN) model to approximate the nonlinear inverse mapping between synthesized Stokes spectra and the underlying stratification of atmospheric parameters like temperature, LOS velocity and LOS magnetic field. This approach not only allows us to incorporate more reliable physics into the inversion process, it also enables the inversion on an absolute geometrical height scale which allows the subsequent combination of individual line-of-sight stratifications to obtain a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction (tomography) of the observed area. The MHD data as well as the ANN inversion have been adopted to Hinode/SP data. For the first time we show a tomographic reconstruction of a quiet sun region observed by Hinode. The reconstructed area covers a field of approximately 12, 000 × 12, 000 km and a height range of 510 km in the photosphere. An enormous variety of small and large scale structures can be identified in the 3-D reconstruction. The low flux region (Bmag = 20 G) we analyzed exhibits several tube like structures with magnetic field strengths of some hundred Gauss. Most of these structures rapidly loose their strength with height and only a few larger structures can retain a higher field strength to the upper layers of the photosphere.

  3. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Klopf, J.; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-08-10

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed 'double spectra'. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  4. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Klopf, J. Michael; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed "double spectra." Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  5. Correlating DMSP and NOAA Ion Precipitation Observations with Low Altitude ENA Emissions During the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J. M.; Perez, J. D.; Pollock, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma sheet particles with sufficiently low mirror points will interact with thermospheric neutrals through charge exchange. The resulting ENAs are no longer magnetically bound and can therefore be detected by remote platforms outside the ionosphere/lower atmosphere. These ENAs closely associated with ion precipitation are termed Low Altitude Emissions (LAEs). They are non-isotropic in velocity space and mimic the corresponding ion pitch angle distribution. In this study we present a statistical correlation between remote observations of the LAE emission characteristics and ion precipitation maps determined in situ over the declining phase of solar cycle 23 (2000-2005). We discuss the strength and derived location (MLT, iMLAT) of LAEs as a function of geomagnetic activity levels in relation to the simultaneously measured strength, location, and spectral characteristics of in situ ion precipitation. These comparisons may allow us to use ENA images to assess where and how much energy is deposited during any type of enhanced geomagnetic activity. The precipitating ion differential directional flux maps are built up from combining NOAA-14/15/16 TED and DMSP-13/14/15 SSJ4 data. Low altitude ENA source locations are identified algorithmically using IMAGE/MENA images. ENA flux maps are derived by computing the LAE source locations assuming an ENA emission altitude (h) of 650 km, then projecting each image pixel onto a sphere with radius Re+h to determine the local time and latitude extent of the ENA source. The IGRF magnetic field model is used in combination with the Solar Magnetic coordinates of LAE pixels to compute the pitch angle of the escaping neutrals (previously ion before charge exchanging). Pitch angles larger than 90° will have a mirror point further into the atmosphere than the assumed emission altitude.

  6. The "Quiet" Troubles of Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissbourd, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Most of the troubles poor at-risk children have are not "loud" problems like disruptive behavior or gang involvement. They are "quiet." The range of these problems is vast. Hunger, dehydration, asthma, obesity, and hearing problems can all insidiously trip children up in school. Some quiet problems are psychological--depression, anxiety, the fear…

  7. Calibrations and observations with the QUIET radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Raul

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is a project aiming to measure the predicted B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation and improve the characterization of the E-mode component. The CMB was generated 380,000 years after the Big Bang during a period known as recombination , once the universe had expanded enough to cool to a temperature of 3,600 K. This relic radiation provides crucial information about the large-scale physical conditions and processes prevailing up to and during that period. The prediction of B-mode polarization arises from cosmological models in which the universe underwent an inflationary phase that occurred 10-35 s after the Big Bang, and lasted 10-32 s. Inflation propagated original quantum fluctuations in space-time to the post-inflationary period in the form of gravitational waves, which produced ripples in space and polarization of the CMB in the form of E- and B-mode patterns. Scalar density perturbations were also propagated by the inflation but derived in the formation of E-modes only. The detection of B-mode polarization would thus provide strong support to the inflationary scenario that considers the existence of primordial gravitational waves. The expected level of this signal is ˜ 10-8 K and its measurement represents an enormous scientific and technical challenge. The QUIET telescope observed the microwave sky with two arrays of polarimeters operating at 43 and 94 GHz. It was located in the Chilean Andes and collected more than 10,000 hours of data between October 2008 and December 2010. The detector elements are based on state-of-the-art Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology and were designed to provide simultaneous measurements of the Q and U Stokes parameters of the sky, improving the efficiency and sensitivity of the instrument. This thesis describes the design of the QUIET telescope, the observations conducted, and the results of the data analysis. The attention

  8. Noontime Latitudinal Behavior of the Ionospheric Peak Parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the Variation of Solar Energy Input for the American Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassa-Miranda, E.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    We are presenting a statistical study of the behavior of the noontime F2 peak parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the variation of solar energy input based on digisonde data and EUV-UV solar emissions registered by SOHO satellite for geomagnetic quiet-to-normal condition. For this, we selected digisonde data from fourteen different stations spread along the American sector (ten of them located above and four below the equator). These registers were collected from 2000 to 2012 and encompass the last unusual super minimum period.

  9. XMM-Newton Observations of MBM 12: More Constraints on the Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Bubble Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Smith, Randall K.; Edgar, Richard J.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the nearby molecular cloud MBM 12. We find that in the direction of MBM 12 the total O VII (0.57 keV) triplet emission is 1.8(+0.5/-0.6) photons/sq cm/s/sr (or Line Units - LU) while for the O VIII (0.65 keV) line emission we find a 3(sigma) upper limit of <1 LU. We also use a heliospheric model to calculate the O VII and O VIII emission generated by Solar Wind Charge-eXchange (SWCX) which we compare to the XMM-Newton observations. This comparison provides new constraints on the relative heliospheric and Local Bubble contributions to the local diffuse X-ray background. The heliospheric SWCX model predicts 0.82 LU for O VII, which accounts for approx. 46+/-15% of the observed value, and 0.33 LU for the O VIII line emission consistent with the XMM-Newton observed value. We discuss our results in combination with previous observations of the MBM 12 with CHANDRA and Suzaku.

  10. Preliminary Results from the QuietSpike Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Cliatt, Larry J., II; Howe, Don; Waithe, Kenrick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the QuietSpike flight test results. It shows the previous tests from Nearfield probes. The presentation then reviews the approach to test the QuietSpike, and shows graphics of the positions of the test vehicles. It also shows the components of the Sonic Boom Probing Noseboom. A graph of the Pressure Over- Under-shoot (Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD)Data) is presented. It reviews the Shock Probing Orientations, explaining that the probing plane is always behind the tail of the QuietSpike jet. Graphs of the Shock Position Geometry (SSBD Data) and the QuietSpike signature as of the test on 12/13/06, Near-Field Probing Directly Under the QuietSpike jet, and Near-Field Probing to Side, Near-Field Probing Above and to Side. Several slides review the Computational Fluid Dynamic models, and results compared to the probe tests.

  11. Radio-loud and Radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, K. I.; Condon, J. J.; Kimball, A. E.; Perley, R. A.; Ivezić, Željko

    2016-11-01

    We discuss 6 GHz JVLA observations covering a volume-limited sample of 178 low-redshift (0.2< z< 0.3) optically selected quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). Our 176 radio detections fall into two clear categories: (1) about 20% are radio-loud QSOs (RLQs) with spectral luminosities of {L}6≳ {10}23.2 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1 that are primarily generated in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) responsible for the excess optical luminosity that defines a bona fide QSO; and (2) the remaining 80% that are radio-quiet QSOs (RQQs) that have {10}21≲ {L}6≲ {10}23.2 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1 and radio sizes ≲ 10 {kpc}, and we suggest that the bulk of their radio emission is powered by star formation in their host galaxies. “Radio-silent” QSOs ({L}6≲ {10}21 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1) are rare, so most RQQ host galaxies form stars faster than the Milky Way; they are not “red and dead” ellipticals. Earlier radio observations did not have the luminosity sensitivity of {L}6≲ {10}21 {{W}} {{Hz}}-1 that is needed to distinguish between such RLQs and RQQs. Strong, generally double-sided radio emission spanning \\gg 10 {kpc} was found to be associated with 13 of the 18 RLQ cores with peak flux densities of {S}{{p}}> 5 {mJy} {{beam}}-1 ({log}(L)≳ 24). The radio luminosity function of optically selected QSOs and the extended radio emission associated with RLQs are both inconsistent with simple “unified” models that invoke relativistic beaming from randomly oriented QSOs to explain the difference between RLQs and RQQs. Some intrinsic property of the AGNs or their host galaxies must also determine whether or not a QSO appears radio-loud.

  12. Quiet(er) marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Clark, Christopher W

    2015-11-15

    A core task in endangered species conservation is identifying important habitats and managing human activities to mitigate threats. Many marine organisms, from invertebrates to fish to marine mammals, use acoustic cues to find food, avoid predators, choose mates, and navigate. Ocean noise can affect animal behavior and disrupt trophic linkages. Substantial potential exists for area-based management to reduce exposure of animals to chronic ocean noise. Incorporating noise into spatial planning (e.g., critical habitat designation or marine protected areas) may improve ecological integrity and promote ecological resilience to withstand additional stressors. Previous work identified areas with high ship noise requiring mitigation. This study introduces the concept of "opportunity sites" - important habitats that experience low ship noise. Working with existing patterns in ocean noise and animal distribution will facilitate conservation gains while minimizing societal costs, by identifying opportunities to protect important wildlife habitats that happen to be quiet.

  13. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Dolla, L.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-04-01

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 {+-} 0.7 G.

  14. Some effects of quiet geomagnetic field changes upon values used for main field modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of three methods of data selection upon the assumed main field levels for geomagnetic observatory records used in main field modeling were investigated for a year of very low solar-terrestrial activity. The first method concerned the differences between the year's average of quiet day field values and the average of all values during the year. For H these differences were 2-3 gammas, for D they were -0.04 to -0.12???, for Z the differences were negligible. The second method of selection concerned the effects of the daytime internal Sq variations upon the daily mean values of field. The midnight field levels when the Sq currents were a minimum deviated from the daily mean levels by as much as 4-7 gammas in H and Z but were negligible for D. The third method of selection was designed to avoid the annual and semi-annual quiet level changes of field caused by the seasonal changes in the magnetosphere. Contributions from these changes were found to be as much as 4-7 gammas in quiet years and expected to be greater than 10 gammas in active years. Suggestions for improved methods of improved data selection in main field modeling are given. ?? 1987.

  15. Thermospheric Response to High-Latitude Energy Sources at Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, M. M.; Moe, K.

    2004-12-01

    Recent results from the CHAMP/STAR accelerometer measurements of thermospheric neutral density have brought back to our attention the existence of important energy sources at high latitudes during geomagnetically quiet times. These energy sources produce a large dayside high-latitude density bulge which is more prominent than the sub-solar density bulge. Evidence for this persistent density enhancement during quiet times has accumulated over the past 35 years. We discuss the numerous measurements of the density bulge made by accelerometers, mass spectrometers, pressure gauges, and satellite orbital decay, as well as the correlation with airglow and ionospheric observations. The energy source for this region of increased neutral density is the solar wind, after it has passed through the Earth's bow shock and magnetosphere. The region of increased density appears on the dayside of both the northern and southern hemispheres, and has a geometrical shape similar to a lunette. The central portion of the arc of the lunette coincides with the downward projection of the magnetospheric dayside cusp. Consequently, the density bulge is best described in solar-geomagnetic coordinates. The wings of the lunette extend far beyond the footprint of the dayside cusp, and are most likely energized by particles that come from other parts of the magnetosphere. The arc of the lunette is clearly displayed by airglow observations and is matched by ionospheric measurements. The corresponding neutral density bulge is much broader in geomagnetic latitude, as one might expect from the longer time constants of neutral processes. We show a Mercator projection of the global density distribution at an altitude of 400 km at 12 hours GMT as an example of the neutral density distribution produced by both the UV and corpuscular energy sources at geomagnetically quiet times.

  16. Study of atomic oxygen greenline dayglow emission in thermosphere during geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, T.; Singh, Vir; Sunil Krishna, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of geomagnetic storms on the atomic oxygen greenline (557.7 nm) dayglow emission in thermosphere is studied during solar active and solar quiet conditions. This study is primarily based on the photochemical model with inputs obtained from experimental observations and empirical models. The updated rate coefficients, quantum yields and related cross-sections have been used from experimental results and theoretical studies. This study is presented for a low latitude station Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E), India. The volume emission rate (VER) has been calculated using densities and temperatures from the empirical models. The modeled VER shows a positive correlation with the Dst index. The VER also shows a negative correlation with the number densities of O, O2, and N2. The VER, calculated at peak emission altitude, exhibits depletion during the main phase of the storm. The altitude of peak emission rate is unaffected by the geomagnetic storm activity. The study also reveals that the peak emission altitude depends on the F10.7 solar index. The peak emission altitude moves upward as the value of F10.7 solar index increases.

  17. Sub-second variations of high energy ( 300 keV) hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1986-01-01

    Subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission from solar flares were first observed with a balloon-borne detector. With the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), it is now well known that subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission occur quite frequently. Such rapid variations give constraints on the modeling of electron energization. Such rapid variations reported until now, however, were observed at relatively low energies. Fast mode data obtained by the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) has time resolution of approximately 1 ms but has no energy resolution. Therefore, rapid fluctuations observed in the fast-mode HXRBS data are dominated by the low energy hard X-rays. It is of interest to know whether rapid fluctuations are observed in high-energy X-rays. The highest energy band at which subsecond variations were observed is 223 to 1057 keV. Subsecond variations observed with HXRBS at energies greater than 300 keV are reported, and the implications discussed.

  18. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

  19. SOHO JOP 078 - variability and properties of the quiet sun supergranular network and internetwork.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, A.; Curdt, W.; Fludra, A.; Rybák, J.; Wöhl, H.

    Study of the variability of the quiet solar atmosphere covering as large as possible range of the temperatures using both the 2D imaging and 1D spectra was the aim of SOHO JOP 78 observations. Supergranular cells were the objects of the authors' main interest. This programme is based on the cooperation of several SOHO instruments (SUMER, CDS, MDI, EIT) and TRACE. Justification of the JOP, cooperation of instruments and specially arranged measurements for the post-facto coalignment of data from different instruments are described in this paper.

  20. Gamma-ray emission from SEP interactions with solar wind ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Ragot, B. R.

    A population of dust grains produced by asteroids and comets is continually orbiting the Sun to within several Rsun. The grains scatter sunlight and make up the solar F corona, which shows only slow variations with time. Grain dynamics are due primarily to interactions with solar photons and the solar wind, but they are also bombarded by the E > 1 MeV energetic particles propagating antisunward after acceleration in CME-driven shocks during SEP events. We consider the effects of the interaction of high energy protons on dust grains during such events. To calculate the maximum expected effects, we calculate the proton energy spectrum of the 20 January 2005 ground level event (GLE) and consider the gamma ray fluxes produced in such an event. The size distribution of the grains in the circumsolar environment is poorly known, so we use several popular models in our calculations.

  1. Coronal O VI emission observed with UVCS/SOHO during solar flares: Comparison with soft X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we derive the O VI 1032 Å luminosity profiles of 58 flares, during their impulsive phase, based on off-limb measurements by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The O VI luminosities from the transition region plasma (here defined as the region with temperatures 5.0 ≤ log T (K) ≤ 6.0) were inferred from the analysis of the resonantly scattered radiation of the O VI coronal ions. The temperature of maximum ionization for O VI is log Tmax (K) = 5.47. By comparison with simultaneous soft X-ray measurements, we investigate the likely source (chromospheric evaporation, footpoint emission, or heated prominence ejecta) for the transition region emission observed during the impulsive phase. In our study, we find evidence of the main characteristics predicted by the evaporation scenario. Specifically, most O VI flares precede the X-ray peaks typically by several minutes with a mean of 3.2 ± 0.1 min, and clear correlations are found between the soft X-ray and transition region luminosities following power laws with indices ~ 0.7 ± 0.3. Overall, the results are consistent with transition region emission originating from chromospheric evaporation; the thermal X-ray emission peaks after the emission from the evaporation flow as the loops fill with hot plasma. Finally, we were able to infer flow speeds in the range ~20-100 km s-1 for one-third of the events, 14 of which showed speeds between 60 and 80 km s-1. These values are compatible with those found through direct spectroscopic observations at transition region temperatures by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode.

  2. Fluorescent excitation of photospheric Fe K-alpha emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    The Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission satellite provides high spectral and temporal resolution observations of the Fe K-alpha lines. Analyses have been conducted of spectra from almost 50 solar flares that occurred during 1980. These data strongly support fluorescent excitation of photospheric iron by photons of E greater than 7.11 keV emitted by the hot coronal plasma produced during the flare. After comparison of the data with a model, the observed K-alpha line widths are discussed along with estimates of the size of the emitting region, the height of the coronal source and the photospheric iron abundance.

  3. CORONAS-F detection of gamma-ray emission from the solar flare on 29 October 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Victoria; Kashapova, Larisa; Yushkov, Boris; Kudela, Karel; Galkin, Vladimir

    Appreciable HXR/gamma-ray emissions in the 0.015-150 MeV energy range associated with the solar flare on 29 October 2003 (X10/3B) were observed at 20:41-20:58 with the SPR-N and SONG instruments onboard the CORONAS-F mission. Two time intervals were identified which showed major changes in the intensity of these emissions. To specify the details of the spectral changes with time, we fitted the SONG energy loss spectra with a three-component model of incident gamma-ray spectrum: (1) a power law in energy, assumed to be due to electron bremsstrahlung; (2) a broad continuum produced by nuclear de-excitation gamma-lines; and (3) a broad gamma-line generated from pion decay. We study the relationship between non-imaging observations, particularly between time of pion-decay emission onset and motions in this solar flare, using HXR foot points (FP) separation and flare shear temporal behavior presented by (Ji et al., 2008). In this work it was shown that significant FP converging and unshearing motion occurred during the first flare interval. During this interval the primary bremsstrahlung extended to tens of MeV and de-excitation gamma-lines dominated. During the second interval after 20:45 the FPs began to move apart. We found out that starting from 20:46, the gamma-emission spectrum revealed a feature attributed to pion-decay. It means that the effective acceleration of protons to energies above 300 MeV (pion-production threshold) occurred coincidently with a change of the flare magnetic structure. The maximum intensity of the pion-decay gamma emission was observed at 20:49 and proved to be 2.0•10-4 photons cm-2 s-1 MeV-1 at 100 MeV. This flare was accompanied by GLE-66. Using the data of the world neutron monitor network, we found its onset as 20:59 which corresponds to a reasonable propagation time of protons with ~ 0.5-2 GeV energy on the assumption that proton acceleration began at 20:46.

  4. Shock-associated kilometric radio emission and solar metric type II bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.

    1989-01-01

    New criteria are used here to select and study the properties of shock-associated (SA) kilometric bursts. Nearly half of all intense metric type II bursts were temporally associated with 1980 kHz emission which was not attributable to metric type III bursts. A quarter of all intense type II bursts are not associated with any significant 1980 kHz emission and another quarter are accompanied by 1980 kHz emission presumed due to type II bursts. The SA bursts are generally not well correlated with microwave flux-density profiles but compare more closely with the most intense and structured parts of the profiles of metric type II bursts. These results imply that the SA emission is due primarily to energetic electrons accelerated at the associated shock.

  5. A Novel Concept to Explore the Coupling of the Solar-Terrestrial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2014-01-01

    A revolutionary opportunity to explore the consequences of reconnection in the ionosphere as never before will be presented. It is a revolutionary opportunity to explore key Aeronomy emissions on a global scale with spatial and temporal resolution not possible today. For example, observations of the signature of dayside merging and nightside reconnection that are reflected in the auroral oval evolution during disturbed periods and quiet times, will be described; observations that will open a window of discovery for coupling phenomena within Geospace and with the solar wind. The description of this new concept will be presented, and its impact and contribution to understanding magnetic merging will be discussed.

  6. A Revolutionary Aeronomy Concept to Explore the Coupling of the Solar-Terrestrial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.

    2014-01-01

    A revolutionary opportunity to explore the consequences of reconnection in the ionosphere as never before will be presented. It is a revolutionary opportunity to explore key Aeronomy emissions on a global scale with spatial and temporal resolution not possible today. For example, observations of the signature of dayside merging and nightside reconnection that are reflected in the auroral oval evolution during disturbed periods and quiet times, will be described; observations that will open a window of discovery for coupling phenomena within Geospace and with the solar wind. The description of this new concept will be presented, and its impact and contribution to understanding magnetic merging will be discussed.

  7. A NUMERICAL METHOD FOR THE VISUALIZATION OF THE Fe XIV EMISSION IN THE SOLAR CORONA USING BROADBAND FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Martisek, K.; Druckmuellerova, H.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this article is to demonstrate how the emission from the Fe XIV 530.3 nm coronal emission line, also known as the green line, can be extracted from images taken during total solar eclipses with commercially available color cameras. This concept is technically feasible because Fe XIV is the brightest optical emission line in the inner corona, and because the sensors of these cameras are retrofitted with a standard Bayer mask, namely, a square grid of spectrally broad (about 100 nm) green, blue, and red filters in the ratio of 2:1:1. The technique presented here, and developed for this purpose, yields qualitatively accurate Fe XIV images, as tested by comparing with Fe XIV eclipse images taken with a 0.15 nm narrow-bandpass filter. While this approach cannot replace narrow-bandpass Fe XIV images for quantitative studies of the corona, it provides a simple and affordable tool for studying the morphology of coronal structures emitting preferentially at the peak ionization temperature of Fe XIV, namely, 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K.

  8. Interplanetary radio storms. 2: Emission levels and solar wind speed in the range 0.05-0.8 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougeret, J. L.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Storms of interplanetary type III radio bursts (IP storms) are commonly observed in the interplanetry medium by the ISEE-3 radio instrument. This instrument has the capability of accurately determining the arrival direction of the radio emission. At each observing frequency, the storm radio sources are tracked as they cross the line-of-sight to the Sun. Usng a simple model, the emission levels are determined at a number of radio frequencies for four separate storms. The IP storm radiation is found to occur in regions of enhanced density at levels of 0.05 to 0.8 AU. The density in these enhancements falls off faster than R(-2). The solar wind speed in the storm region is also measured. The analysis is consistent with steady conditions in the storm region during a few days around the central meridian passage of the storm. The comparison with average in situ density measurements compiled from the HELIOS 1-2 observations favors type III storm burst radio emission at the harmonic of the local plasma frequency.

  9. Applications of UV Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy for High Spectral Resolution Studies of Diffuse Emission Line Sources in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W.; Roesler, F.; Mierkiewicz, E.; Corliss, J.

    2003-05-01

    A Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) instrument combines high etendue and high spectral resolution in a compact package that is very effective for the study of diffuse low surface brightness emissions. SHS instruments require no telescope to achieve high sensitivity on extended sources and may be designed with fields of view exceeding 1 degree and spectral resolutions exceeding 100000. This combination makes them well suited to many solar system targets including comets, the interplanetary medium, and planetary atmospheres/coronas, using platforms from sounding rockets to remote probes. We are currently developing two variations of the SHS. The first of these is a new form of all-reflective, common-path SHS optimized for the study of FUV emission lines where transmitting optics will introduce an unacceptable attenuation of the incident beam. Secondly we are developing a multiorder variation of the SHS, where a customized high order grating is used to overlap integer orders of multiple target emission lines that can then be separated using a transform technique or with order separation filters. In this presentation we will describe the basic SHS technique, the design variations we are pursuing, and their rationale, both technical and scientific.

  10. Near infrared emission of TbAG:Ce3+,Yb3+ phosphor for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshram, N. D.; Yadav, P. J.; Pathak, A. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Luminescent materials doped with rare earth ions are used for many devices such as optical amplifiers in telecommunication, phosphors for white light emitting diodes (LEDs), displays, and so on. Recently, they also have attracted a great interest for photovoltaic applications to improve solar cell efficiency by modifying solar spectrum. Crystal silicon (c-Si) solar cells most effectively convert photons of energy close to the semiconductor band gap. The mis-match between the incident solar spectrum and the spectral response of solar cells is one of the main reasons to limit the cell efficiency. The efficiency limit of the c-Si has been estimated to be 29% by Shockley and Queisser. However, this limit is estimated to be improved up to 38.4% by modifying the solar spectrum by a quantum cutting (down converting) phosphor which converts one photon of high energy into two photons of lower energy. The phenomenon such as the quantum cutting or the down conversion of rare earth ions have been investigated since Dexter reported the possibility of a luminescent quantum yield greater than unity in 1957. In the past, the quantum cutting from a vacuum ultraviolet photon to visible photons for Pr3+, Gd3+,Gd3+-Eu3+, and Er3+-Tb3+ had been studied. Recently, a new quantum cutting phenomenon from visible photon shorter than 500 nm to two infrared photons for Tb3+-Yb3+, Pr3+-Yb3+, and Tm3+-Yb3+ has been reported. The Yb3+ ion is suitable as an acceptor and emitter because luminescent quantum efficiency of Yb3+ is close to 100% and the energy of the only excited level of Yb3+ (1.2 eV) is roughly in accordance with the band gap of Si (1.1 eV). In addition, the Ce3+-doped Tb3Al5O12 (TbAG), used as a phosphor for white LED, has broad absorption bands in the range of 300-500 nm due to strong ligand field and high luminescent quantum efficiency. Therefore, the Ce3+ ions in the TbAG can be suitable as an excellent sensitizing donor for down conversion materials of Si solar cells. In this

  11. Design, construction, and implementation of a ground-based solar spectrograph for the National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, E.; Moen, D.; Peck, C.; Zimny, C.; Repasky, K.

    2012-10-01

    A solar spectrograph is an instrument that takes incoming sunlight over a specified portion of the sun's emitted electromagnetic spectrum and separates the light into its constituent frequency components, or spectrum. The components are then sent to a detector that measures intensity, which reveals the location of spectral properties of the light such as absorption and emission lines. The National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is a Montana Space Grant Consortium sponsored competition where undergraduate student teams from across the country design, build, and implement a ground-based solar spectrograph to perform any solar related task and demonstrate their spectrographs for the competition in May 2012 in Bozeman, MT. Each team is given a 2,000-dollar budget to build their spectrograph, which cannot be exceeded, and all spectrographs must follow regulations in the NSSSC guidelines. This team designed a spectrograph to be capable of imaging the sun across the visible spectrum using spatial filters and a standard photo detector rather than a traditional charge-coupled device due to budget limitations. The spectrograph analyzes the spectrum of small sections of the sun to determine how the spectrum varies across solar features such as the corona, active regions, and quiet regions. In addition to solar imaging, the spectrograph will also analyze atmospheric absorption of the solar spectrum by comparing the measured spectrum to the theoretical spectrum calculated from the blackbody equation.

  12. The Multi-Instrument, Comprehensive Differential Emission Measure (DEM) of the Solar Corona During Flares and Quiescent Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James; Warren, Harry; Woods, Thomas N.

    2014-06-01

    Thermal plasma in the solar corona, while often modeled as isothermal for ease of analysis, is in fact decidedly multi-thermal, ranging from ~1-2 MK in the quiescent corona to ~30-50 MK in intensely flaring loops. It has proven difficult to obtain a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) from a single instrument, as the wavelength ranges of individual instruments, even those with broadband coverage, provide sensitivity to only a limited range of plasma temperatures. Recently, we developed a new technique using combined extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft and hard X-ray (SXR, HXR) data from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), respectively, to obtain a self-consistent DEM that is strongly constrained across the full range of coronal plasma temperatures (<2 to >50 MK). An accurate, precise determination of the plasma temperature distribution enables not only studies of plasma heating and thermal plasma evolution, but can also provide strong constraints on the non-thermal accelerated electron population, including the low-energy cutoff which is typically determined only as a loose upper limit.We present EVE+RHESSI DEM results from selected intense (X-class) flares from solar cycle 24, including determining the non-thermal low-energy cutoff and examining how this evolves with the temperature distribution. We also apply this technique to combine EUV data from EVE with SXR data from the GOES X-ray Sensor (XRS) and the X123, a new SXR spectrometer flown on two recent SDO/EVE calibration sounding rockets, to examine the DEM during quiescent (non-flaring) times with varying activity levels; the X-ray data provide crucial constraints on the high-temperate extent of the DEM and any potential non-thermal emission. We compare these results with those from a parallel technique to derive DEMs from imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA

  13. Day-To Variability of the Quiet-Time Equatorial Electrojet and Post-Sunset Occurrence of Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Archana; Okpala, Kingsley

    Strength of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) derived from measurements of the horizontal component H of the geomagnetic field at an equatorial station, Tirunelveli, and a low-latitude station Alibag, outside the influence of the EEJ, on International quiet (IQ) days of the years 2001-2005, have been subjected to Principal Component Analysis to determine the principal components (PCs) that describe the variability of the quiet-time EEJ. It is found that the first three PCs together account for 94% of the variability of the EEJ observed during the IQ days of this period. PC1 itself represents about 64% of the EEJ variations, while PC2 and PC3 respectively account for 23% and 7% of the quiet-time variability of the EEJ during these years when the daily adjusted 10.7 cm solar flux, Sa, decreased from values exceeding 200 to around 100. The temporal structure of PC1 is such that it contributes only to the variability of the normal electrojet and cannot explain events such as the counter-electrojet (CEJ). A model is constructed for quiet-day PC1 scores as a function of day number and solar activity to describe a major part of the variability of the normal quiet-time EEJ. However, the CEJ and other 'abnormal' variations such as an afternoon enhancement of the EEJ, are only associated with PC2 and PC3. The quiet-day PC2 and PC3 scores obtained in this study, therefore, indicate the influence of forcing of the equatorial ionosphere from below. The day-to-day variability of the quiet-time pre-reversal enhancement of the post-sunset equatorial F region zonal electric field, which plays a crucial role in the occurrence of scintillation-producing equatorial ionospheric irregularities, is also influenced by forcing from below. In this context, occurrence of scintillations on a 251 MHz signal, transmitted from a geostationary satellite, and recorded at Tirunelveli, is studied in relation to the PC scores, which describe the variability of the EEJ, in order to identify a possible

  14. Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

    2011-09-01

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

  15. Statistical comparison of WINDII auroral green line emission rate with DMSP/SSJ4 electron energy input for high and low solar flux years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-S.; Shepherd, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    The atmospheric response to precipitating auroral electrons under varying conditions of solar illumination is investigated using a statistical approach with respect to magnetic local time (MLT), solar zenith angle (χ), and geomagnetic latitude (MLAT) in the northern high-latitude region. Vertical profiles of daytime auroral O(1S) emission rate are obtained from UARS/WINDII measurements by removing the airglow components. These are compared with precipitating electron and proton input observed with DMSP-F10 and -F12 SSJ4 from which total energy and average energy are obtained. In order to investigate the solar flux effect, 2 a of data are examined, 1993 (high solar flux) and 1996 (low solar flux). Total electron energy flux increases with increasing solar zenith angle from 40° to 160° so that the energy flux during nighttime is much greater than in the daytime. During the daytime (χ <= 90°) the auroral atmospheric response correlates well with electron energy input yielding auroral production rates of 1.2 and 1.6 kR erg-1 cm2 s, but this relation breaks down beyond χ = 90°. It is suspected that nighttime thin sheet auroral profiles are not correctly inverted for this limb-viewing imager. A strong anticorrelation is found between the altitude of peak auroral volume emission rate and the average precipitating electron energy with slopes of 12.1 km keV-1 and 5.7 km keV-1 for 1993 and 1996, respectively. The dependence of auroral emission rate on solar illumination conditions is consistent with earlier work by Newell et al. (1996b) and others, but the clear dependence on solar zenith angle has not been demonstrated before.

  16. Nature of the Jurassic Magnetic Quiet Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Tivey, Maurice A.; Sager, William W.

    2015-10-01

    The nature of the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ), a region of low-amplitude oceanic magnetic anomalies, has been a long-standing debate with implications for the history and behavior of the Earth's geomagnetic field and plate tectonics. To understand the origin of the JQZ, we studied high-resolution sea surface magnetic anomalies from the Hawaiian magnetic lineations and correlated them with the Japanese magnetic lineations. The comparison shows the following: (i) excellent correlation of anomaly shapes from M29 to M42; (ii) remarkable similarity of anomaly amplitude envelope, which decreases back in time from M19 to M38, with a minimum at M41, then increases back in time from M42; and (iii) refined locations of pre-M25 lineations in the Hawaiian lineation set. Based on these correlations, our study presents evidence of regionally and possibly globally coherent pre-M29 magnetic anomalies in the JQZ and a robust extension of Hawaiian isochrons back to M42 in the Pacific crust.

  17. Quiet swimming at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Anders; Wadhwa, Navish; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The stresslet provides a simple model of the flow created by a small, freely swimming and neutrally buoyant aquatic organism and shows that the far field fluid disturbance created by such an organism in general decays as one over distance squared. Here we discuss a quieter swimming mode that eliminates the stresslet component of the flow and leads to a faster spatial decay of the fluid disturbance described by a force quadrupole that decays as one over distance cubed. Motivated by recent experimental results on fluid disturbances due to small aquatic organisms, we demonstrate that a three-Stokeslet model of a swimming organism which uses breast stroke type kinematics is an example of such a quiet swimmer. We show that the fluid disturbance in both the near field and the far field is significantly reduced by appropriately arranging the propulsion apparatus, and we find that the far field power laws are valid surprisingly close to the organism. Finally, we discuss point force models as a general framework for hypothesis generation and experimental exploration of fluid mediated predator-prey interactions in the planktonic world.

  18. Overview of the Arizona Quiet Pavement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul; Scofield, Larry

    2005-09-01

    The Arizona Quiet Pavement Pilot Program (QP3) was initially implemented to reduce highway related traffic noise by overlaying most of the Phoenix metropolitan area Portland cement concrete pavement with a one inch thick asphalt rubber friction coarse. With FHWA support, this program represents the first time that pavement surface type has been allowed as a noise mitigation strategy on federally funded projects. As a condition of using pavement type as a noise mitigation strategy, ADOT developed a ten-year, $3.8 million research program to evaluate the noise reduction performance over time. Historically, pavement surface type was not considered a permanent solution. As a result, the research program was designed to specifically address this issue. Noise performance is being evaluated through three means: (1) conventional roadside testing within the roadway corridor (e.g., far field measurements within the right-of-way) (2) the use of near field measurements, both close proximity (CPX) and sound intensity (SI); and (3) far field measurements obtained beyond the noise barriers within the surrounding neighborhoods. This paper provides an overview of the program development, presents the research conducted to support the decision to overlay the urban freeway, and the status of current research.

  19. Prognostic Analysis of the Tactical Quiet Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, Lee M

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Army needs prognostic analysis of mission-critical equipment to enable condition-based maintenance before failure. ORNL has developed and patented prognostic technology that quantifies condition change from noisy, multi-channel, time-serial data. This report describes an initial application of ORNL's prognostic technology to the Army's Tactical Quiet Generator (TQG), which is designed to operate continuously at 10 kW. Less-than-full power operation causes unburned fuel to accumulate on internal components, thereby degrading operation and eventually leading to failure. The first objective of this work was identification of easily-acquired, process-indicative data. Two types of appropriate data were identified, namely output-electrical current and voltage, plus tri-axial acceleration (vibration). The second objective of this work was data quality analysis to avoid the garbage-in-garbage-out syndrome. Quality analysis identified more than 10% of the current data as having consecutive values that are constant, or that saturate at an extreme value. Consequently, the electrical data were not analyzed further. The third objective was condition-change analysis to indicate operational stress under non-ideal operation and machine degradation in proportion to the operational stress. Application of ORNL's novel phase-space dissimilarity measures to the vibration power quantified the rising operational stress in direct proportion to the less-than-full-load power. We conclude that ORNL's technology is an excellent candidate to meet the U.S. Army's need for equipment prognostication.

  20. Origin and Properties of Quiet-time 0.11-1.28 MeV Nucleon-1 Heavy-ion Population near 1 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Ebert, R. W.; Farahat, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Ultra-Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer near 1 au, we surveyed the composition and spectra of heavy ions (He-through-Fe) during quiet times from 1998 January 1 to 2015 December 31 at suprathermal energies between ∼0.11 and ∼1.28 MeV nucleon‑1. The selected time period covers the maxima of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the extended solar minimum in between. We find the following. (1) The number of quiet hours in each year correlates well with the sunspot number, year 2009 was the quietest for about 82% of the time. (2) The composition of the quiet-time suprathermal heavy-ion population (3He, C-through-Fe) correlates well with the level of solar activity, exhibiting SEP-like composition signatures during solar maximum, and CIR- or solar wind-like composition during solar minimum. (3) The heavy-ion (C–Fe) spectra exhibit suprathermal tails at energies of 0.11–0.32 MeV nucleon‑1 with power-law spectral indices ranging from 1.40 to 2.97. Fe spectra soften (steepen, i.e., spectral index increases) smoothly with increasing energies compared with Fe, indicating a rollover behavior of Fe at higher energies (0.45–1.28 MeV nucleon‑1). (4) Spectral indices of Fe and O do not appear to exhibit clear solar cycle dependence. (2) and (3) imply that during IP quiet times and at energies above ∼0.1 MeV nucleon‑1, the IP medium is dominated by material from prior solar and interplanetary events. We discuss the implications of these extended observations in the context of the current understanding of the suprathermal ion population near 1 au.

  1. Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-07-01

    Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

  2. Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

  3. Persistent time intervals between features in solar flare hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Upendra D.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Talon, R.; Vedrenne, G.

    1986-01-01

    Several solar hard X-ray events (greater than 100 keV) were observed simultaneously with identical instruments on the Venera 11, 12, 13, 14, and Prognoz spacecraft. High time resolution (= 2 ms) data were stored in memory when a trigger occurred. The observations of modulation are presented with a period of 1.6 s for the event on December 3, 1978. Evidence is also presented for fast time fluctuations from an event on November 6, 1979, observed from Venera 12 and another on September 6, 1981, observed from the Solar Maximum Mission. Power spectrum analysis, epoch folding, and Monte Carlo simulation were used to evaluate the statistical significance of persistent time delays between features. The results are discussed in light of the MHD model proposed by Zaitsev and Stepanov.

  4. QUIET: The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Laura; QUIET Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET) is a ground-based CMB polarization experiment based on correlation polarimertry using high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. QUIET is designed to measure the CMB polarization on angular scales where the spectrum from inflationary gravity waves is predicted to be maximal. QUIET operates at two frequency bands centered at 40 GHz and 90 GHz. The 40 GHz receiver was deployed in 2008 at 5100m altitude in the Atacama Desert, Chile, and has finished data collection, logging over 3500 hours on the sky and covering 1200 square degrees. The 90 GHz receiver was deployed on the same telescope and started taking data in July 2009. I will present an instrument overview and the status of data analysis from the 40 GHz season. QUIET is supported by NSF grants AST-04-49809 and AST-05-06648.

  5. Beat-type Langmuir wave emissions associated with a type III solar radio burst: Evidence of parametric decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent measurements from the plasma wave instrument on the Galileo spacecraft have shown that Langmuir waves observed in conjunction with a type III solar radio burst contain many beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from about 150 to 650 Hz. Strong evidence exists that the beat pattern is produced by two closely spaced narrowband components. The most likely candidates for these two waves are a beam-generated Langmuir wave and an oppositely propagating Langmuir wave produced by parametric decay. In the parametric decay process, nonlinear interactions cause the beam-driven Langmuir wave to decay into a Langmuir wave and a low-frequency ion sound wave. Comparisons of the observed beat frequency are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a three-wave parametric decay process. Weak low-frequency emissions are also sometimes observed at the predicted frequency of the ion sound wave.

  6. Energy balance in the solar transition region. III - Helium emission in hydrostatic, constant-abundance models with diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1993-01-01

    In our previous papers we described the mathematical formalism and the computed results for energy-balance hydrostatic models of the solar transition region. In this paper we discuss in some detail the limitations of the hydrostatic and one-dimensional assumptions used. Then we analyze the determination of helium emission when diffusion is included. We use transport coefficients estimated from kinetic theory to determine the helium departures from local ionization balance. We calculate the helium spectra for each of our models and evaluate the role of helium in the energy transport. Also, we investigate the effects of coronal illumination on the structure of the transition region and upper chromosphere, and show how coronal illumination affects various EUV lines and the He I 10830 A line. Comparing with both absolute intensities and detailed line profiles, we show that our models are consistent not only with the observed hydrogen spectra but also with the available helium spectra.

  7. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode.

    PubMed

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices-rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ∼ 0.5% and ∼ 0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  8. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M.; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices--rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ~0.5% and ~0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  9. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study of quiet turbofan short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were to: (1) define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs associated with their development, (2) identify critical technology and technology related problems to be resolved in successful introduction of representative short haul aircraft, (3) determine relationships between quiet short takeoff aircraft and the economic and social viability of short haul, and (4) identify high payoff technology areas.

  10. Simultaneous observations of solar sporadic radio emission by the radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA within the frequency range 8-42 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V.; Zarka, P.; Denis, L.; Bulatzen, V.; Frantzusenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.

    2012-09-01

    From 25 June till 12 August 2011 sporadic solar radio emission was observed simultaneously by three separate radio telescopes: UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) and NDA (Nancay, France). During these observations some interesting phenomena were observed. Some of them are discussed in this paper.

  11. Analyzing the effect of the longwave emissivity and solar reflectance of building envelopes on energy-saving in buildings in various climates

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhiyang; Zhang, Xiong

    2011-01-15

    A dynamic computer simulation is carried out in the climates of 35 cities distributed around the world. The variation of the annual air-conditioning energy loads due to changes in the longwave emissivity and the solar reflectance of the building envelopes is studied to find the most appropriate exterior building finishes in various climates (including a tropical climate, a subtropical climate, a mountain plateau climate, a frigid-temperate climate and a temperate climate). Both the longwave emissivity and the solar reflectance are set from 0.1 to 0.9 with an interval of 0.1 in the simulation. The annual air-conditioning energy loads trends of each city are listed in a chart. The results show that both the longwave emissivity and the solar reflectance of building envelopes play significant roles in energy-saving for buildings. In tropical climates, the optical parameters of the building exterior surface affect the building energy-saving most significantly. In the mountain plateau climates and the subarctic climates, the impacts on energy-saving in buildings due to changes in the longwave emissivity and the solar reflectance are still considerable, but in the temperate continental climates and the temperate maritime climates, only limited effects are seen. (author)

  12. Hybrid chromophore/template nanostructures: a customizable platform material for emissions-free solar energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpak, Alexie

    2012-03-01

    By reversibly storing solar energy in the conformations of molecular photo-isomers, solar thermal fuels (STFs) provide a mechanism for emissions-free, renewable energy storage and conversion, all in a single system. Development of STFs as a large-scale clean energy technology, however, has been hampered by a number of technical challenges that beset many of the photo-isomers of interest. These challenges include low energy density, short storage lifetime, and low quantum yield of the photoisomerization reaction; a small overlap with the solar spectrum; and the irreversible degradation of the photo-active molecules upon repeated cycling. In this talk, I will discuss my work using first-principles computations to design new STFs that overcome these technical hurdles. I will present computational results on a range of novel STFs based on our recently proposed photo-isomer/template nanostructure concept [Kolpak and Grossman, Nano Letters 11, 3156 (2011)], illustrating that this approach enables enormous improvements with respect to the potential STFs studied in the past, leading to STFs with energy densities in the range of Li-ion batteries, storage lifetimes of up to a year, and increased quantum yield and absorption efficiency. I will also discuss preliminary experimental results on the synthesis and characterization of one of the predicted STFs based on azobenzene-derivitized carbon nanotubes. With a large range of the photo-isomer/template phase space yet to be explored, there are numerous exciting possibilites for further property enhancement and customization, suggesting that STFs could become a competitive renewable energy technology.

  13. Sky-scattered solar radiation based plume transmissivity measurement to quantify soot emissions from flares.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Devillers, Robin W; Yang, Chen; Thomson, Kevin A

    2010-11-01

    For gas flares typical of the upstream energy industry and similar point sources, most current methods for characterizing soot emissions are based on plume opacity rather than a quantitative measure of mass flux. The absence of more quantitative approaches is indicative of the inherent complexity of soot and the difficulties in characterizing emissions in an unbounded plume. A new experimental approach has been developed for the investigation of soot emissions in industrial plumes. Referred to as sky-LOSA, the diagnostic permits evaluation of 2D spatially resolved monochromatic sky-light transmissivity data over the width of a plume, where sky-light intensities behind the plume are obtained via an interpolation algorithm. By using Rayleigh-Debye-Gans Fractal Aggregate theory to relate transmissivity data to soot concentrations, and with knowledge of the velocity of the plume, it is possible to quantify mass flow rates of soot in a plume. Experiments on an unconfined lab-scale soot plume were used to support a detailed uncertainty analysis under a wide range of conditions and to estimate sensitivity limits of the technique. Results suggest field measurements of soot emission from flare plumes should be possible with overall uncertainties of less than 32%. This represents a significant advancement over existing techniques based on opacity measurements.

  14. New light on the heart of darkness of the solar chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Solanki, S K; Livingston, W; Ayres, T

    1994-01-07

    Solar carbon monoxide spectra indicate the existence of a cool (less than 4000 kelvin) component to the solar chromosphere coexisting with the hot, bright gas at 6000 to 7000 kelvin. However, both the existence and the location of the cool component have been controversial. New high-resolution spectra show that carbon monoxide goes into emission just beyond the limb, allowing it to be probed without photospheric contamination. The cool component has temperatures as low as 3000 to 3500 kelvin and appears to cover 50 to 85 percent of the quiet solar surface. There is a steep temperature rise to normal chromospheric temperatures at a height of 900 to 1100 kilometers. Large horizontal velocities are seen, suggesting that the cool component is maintained by the supersonic adiabatic expansion of upwelling gas in overshooting granules.

  15. Observations of solar X-ray and EUV jets and their related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Bučík, R.; Guo, L.-J.; Nitta, N.

    2016-11-01

    Solar jets are fast-moving, elongated brightenings related to ejections seen in both images and spectra on all scales from barely visible chromospheric jets to coronal jets extending up to a few solar radii. The largest, most powerful jets are the source of type III radio bursts, energetic electrons and ions with greatly enhanced 3He and heavy element abundances. The frequent coronal jets from polar and equatorial coronal holes may contribute to the solar wind. The primary acceleration mechanism for all jets is believed to be release of magnetic stress via reconnection; however the energy buildup depends on the jets' source environment. In this review, we discuss how certain features of X-ray and EUV jets, such as their repetition rate and association with radio emission, depends on their underlying photospheric field configurations (active regions, polar and equatorial coronal holes, and quiet Sun).

  16. A quiet ego quiets death anxiety: humility as an existential anxiety buffer.

    PubMed

    Kesebir, Pelin

    2014-04-01

    Five studies tested the hypothesis that a quiet ego, as exemplified by humility, would buffer death anxiety. Humility is characterized by a willingness to accept the self and life without comforting illusions, and by low levels of self-focus. As a consequence, it was expected to render mortality thoughts less threatening and less likely to evoke potentially destructive behavior patterns. In line with this reasoning, Study 1 found that people high in humility do not engage in self-serving moral disengagement following mortality reminders, whereas people low in humility do. Study 2 showed that only people low in humility respond to death reminders with increased fear of death, and established that this effect was driven uniquely by humility and not by some other related personality trait. In Study 3, a low sense of psychological entitlement decreased cultural worldview defense in response to death thoughts, whereas a high sense of entitlement tended to increase it. Study 4 demonstrated that priming humility reduces self-reported death anxiety relative to both a baseline and a pride priming condition. Finally, in Study 5, experimentally induced feelings of humility prevented mortality reminders from leading to depleted self-control. As a whole, these findings obtained from relatively diverse Internet samples illustrate that the dark side of death anxiety is brought about by a noisy ego only and not by a quiet ego, revealing self-transcendence as a sturdier, healthier anxiety buffer than self-enhancement.

  17. Two-Component Fitting of Coronal-Hole and Quiet-Sun He I 1083 Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Malanushenko, Elena V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present reduction techniques and first results for detailed fitting of solar spectra obtained with the NASA/National Solar Observatory Spectromagnetograph (NASA/NSO SPM over a 2 nm bandpass centered on the He 1 1083 nm line. The observation for this analysis was a spectra-spectroheliogram obtained at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) on 00 Apr 17 at 21:46 UT spanning an area of 512 x 900 arc-seconds; the field of view included a coronal hole near disk center as well as surrounding quiet sun. Since the He I line is very weak and blended with nearby solar and telluric lines, accurate determination of the continuum intensity as a function of wavelength is crucial. We have modified the technique of Malanushenko {\\it et al.) (1992; {\\it AA) (\\bf 259), 567) to tie regions of continuua and the wings of spectral lines which show little variation over the image to standard reference spectra such as the NSO Fourier Transform Spectrometer atlas (Wallace {\\it et al). 1993; NSO Tech Report \\#93-001). We performed detailed least-squares fits of spectra from selected areas, accounting for all the known telluric and solar absorbers in the spectral bandpass. The best physically consistent fits to the Helium lines were obtained with Gaussian profiles from two components (one ''cool'', characteristic of the upper chromosphere; one ''hot'', representing the cool transition region at 2-3 x 10$^{4)$ K). In the coronal hole, the transition-region component, shifted by 6-7 km/s to the blue, is mildly dominant, consistent with mass outflow as suggested by Dupree {\\it et all. (1996; {\\it Ap. J.}-{\\bf 467), 121). In quiet-sun spectra there is less evidence of outward flow, and the chromospheric component is more important. All our fitted spectra show a very weak unidentified absorption feature at 1082.880 nm in the red wing of the nearby Si I line.

  18. A new approach to the maser emission in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régnier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: The electron plasma frequency ωpe and electron gyrofrequency Ωe are two parameters that allow us to describe the properties of a plasma and to constrain the physical phenomena at play, for instance, whether a maser instability develops. In this paper, we aim to show that the maser instability can exist in the solar corona. Methods: We perform an in-depth analysis of the ωpe/Ωe ratio for simple theoretical and complex solar magnetic field configurations. Using the combination of force-free models for the magnetic field and hydrostatic models for the plasma properties, we determine the ratio of the plasma frequency to the gyrofrequency for electrons. For the sake of comparison, we compute the ratio for bipolar magnetic fields containing a twisted flux bundle, and for four different observed active regions. We also study how ωpe/Ωe is affected by the potential and non-linear force-free field models. Results: We demonstrate that the ratio of the plasma frequency to the gyrofrequency for electrons can be estimated by this novel method combining magnetic field extrapolation techniques and hydrodynamic models. Even if statistically not significant, values of ωpe/Ωe≤ 1 are present in all examples, and are located in the low corona near to photosphere below one pressure scale-height and/or in the vicinity of twisted flux bundles. The values of ωpe/Ωe are lower for non-linear force-free fields than potential fields, thus increasing the possibility of maser instability in the corona. Conclusions: From this new approach for estimating ωpe/Ωe, we conclude that the electron maser instability can exist in the solar corona above active regions. The importance of the maser instability in coronal active regions depends on the complexity and topology of the magnetic field configurations.

  19. Origin of Unusual Excitonic Absorption and Emission from Colloidal Ag2S Nanocrystals: Ultrafast Photophysics and Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Mir, Wasim J; Swarnkar, Abhishek; Sharma, Rituraj; Katti, Aditya; Adarsh, K V; Nag, Angshuman

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal Ag2S nanocrystals (NCs) typically do not exhibit sharp excitonic absorption and emission. We first elucidate the reason behind this problem by preparing Ag2S NCs from nearly monodisperse CdS NCs employing cation exchange reaction. It was found that the defect-related midgap transitions overlap with excitonic transition, blurring the absorption spectrum. On the basis of this observation, we prepared nearly defect-free Ag2S NCs using molecular precursors. These defect-free Ag2S NCs exhibit sharp excitonic absorption, emission (quantum yield 20%) in near-infrared (853 nm) region, and improved performance of Ag2S quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). Samples with lower defects exhibit photoconversion efficiencies >1% and open circuit voltage of ∼0.3 V, which are better compared with prior reports of Ag2S QDSSCs. Femtosecond transient absorption shows pump-probe two-photon absorption above 630 nm and slow-decaying excited state absorption below 600 nm. Concomitantly, open-aperture z-scan shows strong two-photon absorption at 532 nm (coefficient 55 ± 3 cm/GW).

  20. Quantum dot cosensitized solar cell based on PMOT@CdSe@ZnO core shell nanostructures with dual emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Preeti; Narula, Anudeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dot sensitized solar cell based on poly(3-methoxythiophene) (PMOT)@CdSe@ZnO core shell nanostructure were synthesized where PMOT serves as hole transport material, CdSe acts as a photosensitizer which enhances visible range absorption and also helps in injection of electrons from PMOT to ZnO where ZnO provides channel for efficient electron transport. The properties of the device were assessed with and without CdSe quantum dots and effect of annealing was also observed on the device. After the addition of CdSe QDs, the visible light absorption of PMOT@ZnO was enhanced due to increase in surface area. PMOT@CdSe@ZnO exhibited dual emission, where CdSe and ZnO exhibited visible and UV emission respectively. The interface formed between PMOT and CdSe improves the charge separation. The better photovoltaic measurement of PMOT@CdSe@ZnO over CdSe@ZnO indicates that PMOT efficiently dissociate excitons at interface and suppress the interfacial charge recombination. A power conversion efficiency of 0.989% was attained for the device PMOT@CdSe@ZnO with Voc=0.56 V and Jsc=2.5 mA/cm2. Upon annealing, the efficiency of the device was enhanced to 1.1609% with Voc=0.58, Jsc=3.2 mA/cm2.

  1. Influence of Solar-Geomagnetic Disturbances on SABER Measurements of 4.3 Micrometer Emission and the Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Picard, Richard H.; Evans, David S.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Xu, Xiaojing; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2008-01-01

    Thermospheric infrared radiance at 4.3 micrometers is susceptible to the influence of solar-geomagnetic disturbances. Ionization processes followed by ion-neutral chemical reactions lead to vibrationally excited NO(+) (i.e., NO(+)(v)) and subsequent 4.3 micrometer emission in the ionospheric E-region. Large enhancements of nighttime 4.3 m emission were observed by the TIMED/SABER instrument during the April 2002 and October-November 2003 solar storms. Global measurements of infrared 4.3 micrometer emission provide an excellent proxy to observe the nighttime E-region response to auroral dosing and to conduct a detailed study of E-region ion-neutral chemistry and energy transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, we find that photoionization processes followed by ion-neutral reactions during quiescent, daytime conditions increase the NO(+) concentration enough to introduce biases in the TIMED/SABER operational processing of kinetic temperature and CO2 data, with the largest effect at summer solstice. In this paper, we discuss solar storm enhancements of 4.3 micrometer emission observed from SABER and assess the impact of NO(+)(v) 4.3 micrometer emission on quiescent, daytime retrievals of Tk/CO2 from the SABER instrument.

  2. HARD X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION DURING THE 2011 JUNE 7 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between X-ray and UV emission during flares, particularly in the context of quasi-periodic pulsations, remains unclear. To address this, we study the impulsive X-ray and UV emission during an eruptive flare on 2011 June 7 utilizing X-ray imaging from RHESSI and UV 1700 Å imaging from SDO/AIA. This event is associated with quasi-periodic pulsations in X-ray and possibly UV emission, as well as substantial parallel and perpendicular motion in the hard X-ray footpoints. The motion of the footpoints parallel to the flare ribbons is unusual; it reverses direction on at least two occasions. However, there is no associated short timescale motion of the UV bright regions. Over the same time interval, the footpoints also gradually move apart at v ≈ 12 km s{sup –1}, consistent with the gradual outward expansion of the UV ribbons and the standard flare model. Additionally, we find that the locations of the brightest X-ray and UV regions are different, particularly during the early portion of the flare impulsive phase, despite their integrated emission being strongly correlated in time. Correlation analysis of measured flare properties, such as the footpoint separation, flare shear, photospheric magnetic field, and coronal reconnection rate, reveals that—in the impulsive phase—the 25-50 keV hard X-ray flux is only weakly correlated with these properties, in contrast with previous studies. We characterize this event in terms of long-term behavior, where the X-ray non-thermal, thermal, and UV emission sources appear temporally and spatially consistent, and short-term behavior, where the emission sources are inconsistent and quasi-periodic pulsations are a dominant feature requiring explanation. We suggest that the short timescale behavior of hard X-ray footpoints and the nature of the observed quasi-periodic pulsations are determined by fundamental, as yet unobserved properties of the reconnection region and particle acceleration sites. This presents a

  3. (C-12)O emission from the envelopes of cool stars in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, M.; Van Blerkom, D. J.; Snell, R. L.; Kleinmann, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on observations of the CO J = 1-0 line emission from all M giants, S stars, and C stars listed in the Two-Micron Sky Survey having strong FIR emission and lying north of delta = -10 deg. The data from this survey and other data for C and S stars show that the line profiles of these stars look like flattened parabolas and have roughly the same shape for different stars. In contrast, the shapes of the spectral lines from giant M stars are diverse, ranging from triangular to spiked and asymmetric, suggesting that the envelopes of M stars have complex kinematics and structure. The outflow velocities inferred from the line profiles of the stars surveyed span a range of more than an order of magnitude, with the velocities of C stars correlating with IR color.

  4. Variable low-frequency radio emission of the solar system and galactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Kolyadin, Vladimir; Rucker, Helmut; Zakharenko, Vyacheslav; Zarka, Philippe; Griessmeier, Jean-M.; Denis, Loran; Melnik, Valentin; Litvinenko, Galina; Zaitsev, Valerij; Falkovich, Igor; Ulyanov, Oleg; Sidorchuk, Mikhail; Stepkin, Sergej; Stanislavskij, Alexander; Kalinichenko, Nikolaj; Boiko, Nastja; Vasiljiva, Iaroslavna; Mukha, Dmytro; Koval, Artem

    2013-04-01

    There are many physical processes and propagation effects for the producing the time variable radio emission just at the low frequencies (at the decameter wavelength). The study of this radio emission is the important part of the modern radio astronomy. Strong progress in the development of the radio telescopes, methods and instrumentation allowed to start the corresponding investigations at new quality and quantity levels. It related to the implementation of the world largest UTR-2 radio telescope (effective area is more than 100 000 sq.m) more high sensitive at frequencies less than 30 MHz. During last years many new observations were carried out with this radio telescope and many new effects have been detected for the Sun, planets, interplanetary medium, exoplanets as well as various kinds of the stars.

  5. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  6. OBSERVING EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING PERIODS OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-20

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  7. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Rast, Mark P.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of "extreme" solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  8. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

    2012-04-01

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

  9. Improving Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell by Multi-Emission Effect of Phosphors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Moon; Kim, Chang Seob; Choi, Hyung Wook

    2015-10-01

    Generally, the N-719 dye, used in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), only absorbs visible light in the wavelength range from 400 to 700 nm. Consequently, most of the ultraviolet and infrared rays from the sun are not utilized by this dye. However, ultraviolet and infrared rays can be converted to visible light by upconversion luminescence. Such visible light can then be reabsorbed by the dye, allowing for a larger range of solar irradiation to be utilized in DSSCs. Phosphor (ZnGa2O4, Y2O3:Er(3+)), acting as a luminescence medium, was added to the TiO2 electrode of DSSCs, and owing to the effect of upconversion, it increased their photocurrent density and efficiency. Phosphor (ZnGa2O4, Y2O3:Er(3+)) co-doped TiO2 electrode cells showed better performance than phosphor-free cells. In fact, the highest efficiency observed for a DSSC containing five phosphor layers was 7.03% with a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 15.62 mA/cm2, an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.661 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 68.17%.

  10. Detection of electron emission as DLTS signal in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y. M.; Cheng, Z.; Tan, X.; Misra, D.; Delahoy, A. E.; Chin, K. K.

    2016-10-01

    This work identifies an incongruity in the detection of the minority carrier signal in CdTe solar cells during the deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurement. Use of quasi-Fermi level instead of Fermi level of majority carriers to estimate the probability of emitting carriers seems to correct the ambiguity. During the experiment, signals from minority carrier traps (electron traps) were detected by using a long filling pulse time instead of an electron injection pulse. The DLTS measurements of CdTe solar cells observed a single electron trap with energy level EE1 = 0.47 eV, and two hole traps with energy levels, EH1 = 0.17 eV and EH2 = 0.27 eV. The possibility of any impact from the back contact was excluded, and the phenomenon was clarified by the simulation. It was further observed that when the condition of quasi-Fermi level is considered, the results of calculated probability were significantly different from that of the results that used only Fermi level of majority carriers. The simulations further aided the explanation of the defect behavior in DLTS measurements and the overlapping phenomenon of the capacitance spectrum of hole and electron traps.

  11. First simultaneous SST/CRISP and IRIS observations of a small-scale quiet Sun vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-H.; Tsiropoula, G.; Kontogiannis, I.; Tziotziou, K.; Scullion, E.; Doyle, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Ubiquitous small-scale vortices have recently been found in the lower atmosphere of the quiet Sun in state-of-the-art solar observations and in numerical simulations. Aims: We investigate the characteristics and temporal evolution of a granular-scale vortex and its associated upflows through the photosphere and chromosphere of a quiet Sun internetwork region. Methods: We analyzed high spatial and temporal resolution ground- and spaced-based observations of a quiet Sun region. The observations consist of high-cadence time series of wideband and narrowband images of both Hα 6563 Å and Ca II 8542 Å lines obtained with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), as well as ultraviolet imaging and spectral data simultaneously obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Results: A small-scale vortex is observed for the first time simultaneously in Hα, Ca II 8542 Å, and Mg II k lines. During the evolution of the vortex, Hα narrowband images at -0.77 Å and Ca II 8542 Å narrowband images at -0.5 Å, and their corresponding Doppler signal maps, clearly show consecutive high-speed upflow events in the vortex region. These high-speed upflows with a size of 0.5-1 Mm appear in the shape of spiral arms and exhibit two distinctive apparent motions in the plane of sky for a few minutes: (1) a swirling motion with an average speed of 13 km s-1 and (2) an expanding motion at a rate of 4-6 km s-1. Furthermore, the spectral analysis of Mg II k and Mg II subordinate lines in the vortex region indicates an upward velocity of up to ~8 km s-1 along with a higher temperature compared to the nearby quiet Sun chromosphere. Conclusions: The consecutive small-scale vortex events can heat the upper chromosphere by driving continuous high-speed upflows through the lower atmosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. The Multi-Instrument (EVE-RHESSI) DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal Soft X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, James M.; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2015-04-01

    In the soft X-ray energy range, solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The improvement over the isothermal approximation is intended to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV for medium to large solar flares.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) has concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. Now we are interested in any breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. Thermal emission is again modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature; the non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner. The results for non-thermal parameters then are compared with those found using RHESSI data alone, with isothermal and double-thermal models.

  13. Energy balance in the solar transition region. II - Effects of pressure and energy input on hydrostatic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation of energy by hydrogen lines and continua in hydrostatic energy-balance models of the transition region between the solar chromosphere and corona is studied using models which assume that mechanical or magnetic energy is dissipated in the hot corona and is then transported toward the chromosphere down the steep temperature gradient of the transition region. These models explain the average quiet sun and also the entire range of variability of the Ly-alpha lines. The relations between the downward energy flux, the pressure of the transition region, and the different hydrogen emission are described.

  14. Photometric observations of facular contrasts near the solar limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Chapman, G. A.

    1988-12-01

    Digital, photometric images of several active regions near the solar limb made with 1.5 A effective bandpass at 6264 A are analyzed. From three to ten images were made per day on several days during 1983, 1984, and 1987 with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph and 512 element Reticon linear diode arrays. Pixel spacing is 0.94 arcsec. Pixels in each image were sorted into quiet sun and facular intensity distributions by mu value, where mu = cos theta and theta is the heliocentric angle between the pixel and the direction of earth. These distributions were converted to overall average values of facular pixel contrast relative to the quiet sun background by mu value, and a center-limb variation of contrast per facular element was derived. If one is careful to distinguish between contrasts per unit projected area (pixel contrasts) and contrasts per facular element or individual flux tube, the results are in reasonable agreement with those of other workers. The center-limb contrast variation resembles a 'hot wall' model of facular emission, with indications of an additional emitting component which protrudes above the photospheric level.

  15. Quasi-similar decameter emission features appearing in the solar and jovian dynamic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, G. V.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Panchenko, M.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Vinogradov, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dynamic spectra of the Sun and jovian decametric radiation obtained by the authors with the radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN-2 (Kharkov, Poltava, Ukraine). We focus on the similar structures that appear on the dynamic spectra of those objects: S-bursts, drifting pairs, absorption bursts and zebra patterns. Similarity in structures allows us to assume that the plasma processes in the solar corona and in the jovian magnetosphere might have similar properties. We analyze and compare the main parameters of those structures and describe briefly some mechanisms of their generation that have already discussed in publications. We selected the mechanisms which, in our opinion, most completely and consistently explain the properties of the structures under consideration.

  16. Three Dimensional Structure and Time Development of Radio Emission from Solar Active Regions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-15

    1950), Contribution a l’tude des emissions radloelectriques solaires , Ann. d’Ap. 13:181-202. 17. Gelfreikh, G., Korol’kov, D., Rishkov, N. and...1959a),Structures et proprit’ts des sources d’activit solaire our ondes centimtriques, Ann. dAp. 22:1-100. 24. Kundu, M.R. (1959b), Etude...interferometrique des sources d’activit solaire sur 3 cm de longueur d’onde, Paris Symposium on Radio Astronomy, R.N. Bracewell, Ed., Stanford University Press

  17. The Development of New Solar Indices for use in Thermospheric Density Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, S. Dave; Bowman, Bruce R.

    2006-01-01

    New solar indices have been developed to improve thermospheric density modeling for research and operational purposes. Out of 11 new and 4 legacy indices and proxies, we have selected three (F10.7, S10.7, and M10.7) for use in the new JB2006 empirical thermospheric density model. In this work, we report on the development of these solar irradiance indices. The rationale for their use, their definitions, and their characteristics, including the ISO 21348 spectral category and sub-category, wavelength range, solar source temperature region, solar source feature, altitude region of terrestrial atmosphere absorption at unit optical depth, and terrestrial atmosphere thermal processes in the region of maximum energy absorption, are described. We also summarize for each solar index, the facility and instrument(s) used to observe the solar emission, the time frame over which the data exist, the measurement cadence, the data latency, and the research as well as operational availability. The new solar indices are provided in forecast (http://SpaceWx.com) as well as real-time and historical (http://sol.spacenvironment.net/jb2006/) time frames. We describe the forecast methodology, compare results with actual data for active and quiet solar conditions, and compare improvements in F10.7 forecasting with legacy High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model (HASDM) and NOAA SEC forecasts.

  18. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  19. The quiet-Sun photosphere and chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Robert J

    2012-07-13

    The overall structure and the fine structure of the solar photosphere outside active regions are largely understood, except possibly the important roles of a turbulent near-surface dynamo at its bottom, internal gravity waves at its top and small-scale vorticity. Classical one-dimensional static radiation-escape modelling has been replaced by three-dimensional time-dependent magento-hydrodynamic simulations that come closer to reality. The solar chromosphere, in contrast, remains little understood, although its pivotal role in coronal mass and energy loading makes it a principal research area. Its fine structure defines its overall structure, so that hard-to-observe and hard-to-model small-scale dynamical processes are key to understanding. However, both chromospheric observation and chromospheric simulation presently mature towards the required sophistication. Open-field features seem of greater interest than easier-to-see closed-field features.

  20. Field Line Resonances in Quiet and Disturbed Time Three-dimensional Magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; S. Zaharia

    2002-05-30

    Numerical solutions for field line resonances (FLR) in the magnetosphere are presented for three-dimensional equilibrium magnetic fields represented by two Euler potentials as B = -j Y -a, where j is the poloidal flux and a is a toroidal angle-like variable. The linearized ideal-MHD equations for FLR harmonics of shear Alfvin waves and slow magnetosonic modes are solved for plasmas with the pressure assumed to be isotropic and constant along a field line. The coupling between the shear Alfvin waves and the slow magnetosonic waves is via the combined effects of geodesic magnetic field curvature and plasma pressure. Numerical solutions of the FLR equations are obtained for a quiet time magnetosphere as well as a disturbed time magnetosphere with a thin current sheet in the near-Earth region. The FLR frequency spectra in the equatorial plane as well as in the auroral latitude are presented. The field line length, magnetic field intensity, plasma beta, geodesic curvature and pressure gradient in the poloidal flux surface are important in determining the FLR frequencies. In general, the computed shear Alfvin FLR frequency based on the full MHD model is larger than that based on the commonly adopted cold plasma model in the beq > 1 region. For the quiet time magnetosphere, the shear Alfvin resonance frequency decreases monotonically with the equatorial field line distance, which reasonably explains the harmonically structured continuous spectrum of the azimuthal magnetic field oscillations as a function of L shell in the L is less than or equal to 9RE region. However, the FLR frequency spectrum for the disturbed time magnetosphere with a near-Earth thin current sheet is substantially different from that for the quiet time magnetosphere for R > 6RE, mainly due to shorter field line length due to magnetic field compression by solar wind, reduced magnetic field intensity in the high-beta current sheet region, azimuthal pressure gradient, and geodesic magnetic field

  1. Probing deep photospheric layers of the quiet Sun with high magnetic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Doerr, H.-P.; Martínez González, M. J.; Riethmüller, T.; Collados Vera, M.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Franz, M.; Feller, A.; Kuckein, C.; Schmidt, W.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Pastor Yabar, A.; von der Lühe, O.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Volkmer, R.; Staude, J.; Hofmann, A.; Strassmeier, K.; Kneer, F.; Waldmann, T.; Borrero, J. M.; Sobotka, M.; Verma, M.; Louis, R. E.; Rezaei, R.; Soltau, D.; Berkefeld, T.; Sigwarth, M.; Schmidt, D.; Kiess, C.; Nicklas, H.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Investigations of the magnetism of the quiet Sun are hindered by extremely weak polarization signals in Fraunhofer spectral lines. Photon noise, straylight, and the systematically different sensitivity of the Zeeman effect to longitudinal and transversal magnetic fields result in controversial results in terms of the strength and angular distribution of the magnetic field vector. Aims: The information content of Stokes measurements close to the diffraction limit of the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope is analyzed. We took the effects of spatial straylight and photon noise into account. Methods: Highly sensitive full Stokes measurements of a quiet-Sun region at disk center in the deep photospheric Fe i lines in the 1.56 μm region were obtained with the infrared spectropolarimeter GRIS at the GREGOR telescope. Noise statistics and Stokes V asymmetries were analyzed and compared to a similar data set of the Hinode spectropolarimeter (SOT/SP). Simple diagnostics based directly on the shape and strength of the profiles were applied to the GRIS data. We made use of the magnetic line ratio technique, which was tested against realistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulations (MURaM). Results: About 80% of the GRIS spectra of a very quiet solar region show polarimetric signals above a 3σ level. Area and amplitude asymmetries agree well with small-scale surface dynamo-magneto hydrodynamic simulations. The magnetic line ratio analysis reveals ubiquitous magnetic regions in the ten to hundred Gauss range with some concentrations of kilo-Gauss fields. Conclusions: The GRIS spectropolarimetric data at a spatial resolution of ≈0.̋4 are so far unique in the combination of high spatial resolution scans and high magnetic field sensitivity. Nevertheless, the unavoidable effect of spatial straylight and the resulting dilution of the weak Stokes profiles means that inversion techniques still bear a high risk of misinterpretating the data.

  2. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Christopher M.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A.; Pratt, Ronald G.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA. PMID:26457072

  3. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Christopher M; Giaquinto, Randy O; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A; Pratt, Ronald G; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Merhar, Stephanie L; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2015-08-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA.

  4. STUDY OF SINGLE-LOBED CIRCULAR POLARIZATION PROFILES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Sainz Dalda, A.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; Title, A.; Bellot Rubio, L. E-mail: asainz@lmsal.com

    2012-03-20

    The existence of asymmetries in the circular polarization (Stokes V) profiles emerging from the solar photosphere has been known since the 1970s. These profiles require the presence of a velocity gradient along the line of sight (LOS), possibly associated with gradients of magnetic field strength, inclination, and/or azimuth. We have focused our study on the Stokes V profiles showing extreme asymmetry in the form of only one lobe. Using Hinode spectropolarimetric measurements, we have performed a statistical study of the properties of these profiles in the quiet Sun. We show their spatial distribution, their main physical properties, how they are related with several physical observables, and their behavior with respect to their position on the solar disk. The single-lobed Stokes V profiles occupy roughly 2% of the solar surface. For the first time, we have observed their temporal evolution and have retrieved the physical conditions of the atmospheres from which they emerged using an inversion code implementing discontinuities of the atmospheric parameters along the LOS. In addition, we use synthetic Stokes profiles from three-dimensional magnetoconvection simulations to complement the results of the inversion. The main features of the synthetic single-lobed profiles are in general agreement with the observed ones, lending support to the magnetic and dynamic topologies inferred from the inversion. The combination of all these different analyses suggests that most of the single-lobed Stokes V profiles are signals coming from the magnetic flux emergence and/or submergence processes taking place in small patches in the photosphere of the quiet Sun.

  5. Comparative study of x ray and microwave emissions during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The work supported by the grant consisted of two projects. The first project involved making detailed case studies of two flares using SMM data in conjunction with ground based observations. The first flare occurred at 1454 UT on June 20, 1989 and involved the eruption of a prominence near the limb. In the study we used data from many wavelength regimes including the radio, H-alpha, hard X-rays, and soft X-rays. We used a full gyrosynchrotron code to model the apparent presence of a 1.4 GHz source early in the flare that was in the form of a large coronal loop. The model results lead us to conclude that the initial acceleration occurs in small, dense loops which also produced the flare's hard X-ray emission. We also found evidence that a source at 1.4 GHz later in the event was due to second harmonic plasma emission. This source was adjacent to a leg of the prominence and comes from a dense column of material in the magnetic structure supporting the prominence. Finally, we investigated a source of microwaves and soft X-rays, occurring approximately 10 min after the hard X-ray peak, and calculate a lower limit for the density of the source. The second flare that was studied occurred at 2156 UT on June 20, 1989 and was observed with the VLA and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) Frequency Agile Array. We have developed a gyrosynchrotron model of the sources at flare peak using a new gyrosynchrotron approximation which is valid at very low harmonics of the gyrofrequency. We found that the accelerated particle densities of the sources decreased much more with radius from the source center than had been supposed in previous work, while the magnetic field varied less. We also used the available data to analyze a highly polarized source which appeared late in the flare. The second project involved compiling a statistical base for the relative timing of the hard X-ray peak, the turbulent and blue-shift velocities inferred from soft X-ray line emissions observed by

  6. A Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation Study of the Dynamic Variations in the Configuration, Convection and Auroral Emissions in Saturn's Magnetosphere Driven by the Observed Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. J.; Fukazawa, K.; Eriksson, S.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous simulations we have used constant and simple solar wind conditions to understand the basic behavior of the Kronian magnetosphere. In this study we used Cassini observations of the solar wind upstream of Saturn to drive a massively parallel simulation. Using these solar wind data we simulated the Kronian magnetosphere from 2008-02-12/14:00:31 to 2008-02-13/01:59:31. During this interval the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observed Kronian UV auroral emissions. For these solar wind conditions there are several enhancements of the solar wind dynamic pressure (shocks) and a polarity reversal in the IMF components. From these simulations we obtained the dynamically changing shape and convection pattern of the Kronian magnetosphere in response to the variations in solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF direction. For instance the magnetopause and bow shock location at the subsolar point changed by 40% during one solar wind pressure increase and 22% during another. After the pressure increases a layered convection pattern formed between the corotation dominated region and the magnetopause. The layers in this convection system interacted with each other, forming large vortices. We calculated the configuration of field aligned currents from the simulation and found layered and patchy distributions in the ionosphere. The pattern of these upward field aligned currents (FACs) in the dawn side ionosphere resembles the configuration of auroral emissions observed by HST well. To confirm the relationship between the layered configuration and upward FACs, we have calculated the footprint of magnetic field lines from the layered convection pattern to the polar region.

  7. Perturbations of gyrosynchrotron emission polarization from solar flares by sausage modes: forward modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    We examined the polarization of the microwave flaring emission and its modulation by the fast sausage standing wave using a linear 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of a plasma cylinder. We analyzed the effects of the line-of-sight angle on the perturbations of the gyrosynchrotron intensity for two models: a base model with strong Razin suppression and a low-density model in which the Razin effect was negligible. The circular polarization (Stokes V) oscillation is in phase with the intensity oscillation, and the polarization degree (Stokes V/I) oscillates in phase with the magnetic field at the examined frequencies in both models. The two quantities experience a periodical reversal of their signs with a period equal to half of the sausage wave period when seen at a 90° viewing angle, in this case, their modulation depth reaches 100%.

  8. Soft X-ray emissions, meter-wavelength radio bursts, and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.

    1988-02-01

    A detailed study of the relationship between metric radio bursts and soft X-ray flares has been made using an extensive data set covering 15 yr. It is found that type IV emission is mainly associated with long-duration 1-8 A events that are known to be well associated with coronal mass ejections. In contrast, type II and type III bursts originate primarily in impulsive soft X-ray events that are not necessarily accompanied by mass ejection. Strong type III bursts, in particular, appear to occur only in association with relatively impulsive flares. It is suggested that coronal shocks responsible for type II bursts are blast waves generated in impulsive energy releases.

  9. Fast polarization changes in mm microwave emission of weak multistructured solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Strauss, F. M.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Circular polarization of weak multistructured solar bursts was measured at mm microwaves with unprecedented sensitivity (0.03 sfu rms) and high time resolution (1ms). It was shown that sudden changes occur in the degree of polarization with time scales of 0.04 to 0.3 s. In most cases the degree of polarization attained maximum values before the maximum flux in both mm microwaves and hard X-rays with time scales of 0.04 to 1.0 s. The timing accuracy in determining the degree of polarization was 40 ms. Physical phenomena are discussed invoking one or a combination of various possible causes for the observed effects. The bursts at mm microwaves were weak compared to the contribution of the preexisting active regions, and therefore the changes in magnetoionic propagation conditions for emerging radiation plays an important role in the observed effects. Composite effects due to more than one polarizing mechanism or more than one polarized spots within the antenna beam are discussed.

  10. Narrow band wave emissions and noise around the plasma frequency in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Yu. V.; Hayosh, M.; Fiala, V.; Soucek, J.; Santolik, O.; Pickett, J.

    2007-08-01

    The wave data obtained with a wide band instrument were recently used for interpretation of both quasi-thermal noise spectra and narrow band signals observed in the near vicinity of the local plasma frequency on CLUSTER II spacecraft in the solar wind, well upstream of the Earth's bow shock [1, 2] This approach is planned to continue with the large Cluster database and will be of use for other space missions such as Stereo and Solar Orbiter. If available, multi-component and/or multi-point measurements are expected to provide even greater insight in the generation of radio waves in the heliosphere in this frequency range. Our approach is based on a novel study of performance of receiving antennas in resonance regions in a streaming plasma. As far as noise spectra is concerned two distinctive features appear: a cutoff shifted down below the plasma frequency by a factor proportional to the ratio of stream velocity to the electron thermal velocity squared. The spectral maximum depends on the orientation of the antenna axis with respect to the stream velocity; it is shifted above the plasma frequency according to the antenna orientation, which is changing with the spacecraft spin. When the time resolution of the instrument is sufficient, it is possible to follow these changes. The overall form of the spectrum depends on the plasma distribution function, but even with a simplified model of two electron populations with largely different temperatures the estimates of the drift velocity and/or the temperature of the hot component can be obtained. In the case of a quasi-harmonic wave (narrow band signal) incident on the antenna, it is the antenna's effective length that allows for conversion of the open circuit voltage induced on its terminals to the electric field of the incoming wave. We show that this effective length grows by more than an order of magnitude under resonance conditions. This was already confirmed for waves propagating close to the lower oblique resonance