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Sample records for quietus-quercus petraea ectomycorrhizas

  1. Effects of ectomycorrhizae removal on survival and growth of loblolly pine seedlings with pisolithus or natural ectomycorrhizae on an upland site in South Carolina. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This study was undertaken to ascertain the significance of mechanical loss of ectomycorrhizae formed by Pisolithus tinctorius or naturally occurring fungi encountered during lifting of nursery seedlings to the capacity of these seedlings to regenerate roots, survive, and grow. Seedlings were planted in January 1981. Seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae formed in the nursery can tolerate more removal of ectomycorrhizae than routine nursery seedlings with natural ectomycorrhizae. However, seedlings in both ectomycorrhizal condition groups were severely impacted by removal of ectomycorrhizae. 1 table.

  2. Synthesis of Pisolithus Ectomycorrhizae on Pecan Seedlings in Fumigated Soil

    Treesearch

    Donald H. Marx

    1979-01-01

    Curtis variety of pecan (Carya illinoensis) seedlings were grown for 8 months in fumigated soil infested at sowing with mycelial inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius. Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae were formed on all inoculated seedlings and significantly improved their growth over control seedlings. Inoculated and control seedlings also formed ectomycorrhizae with naturally...

  3. Drought and air warming affects abundance and exoenzyme profiles of Cenococcum geophilum associated with Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens.

    PubMed

    Herzog, C; Peter, M; Pritsch, K; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Egli, S

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of drought and elevated temperature on relative abundance and functioning of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Cenococcum geophilum on three oak species differing in adaptation to a warm and dry climate. The experiment QUERCO comprised three Quercus species (Q. robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens) grown for 3 years under four treatments: elevated air temperature, drought, a combination of the two, and control. Fine root samples were analysed for relative abundance and potential extracellular enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizae of C. geophilum, a fungal species known to be drought resistant. The relative abundance of C. geophilum on the roots of the oak species was significantly increased by temperature, decreased by drought, but unchanged in the combined treatment compared to the control. Although the extent of treatment effects differed among oak species, no significant influence of tree species on relative abundance of C. geophilum was detected. Exoenzyme activities of C. geophilum on Q. robur and Q. petraea (but not Q. pubescens) significantly increased in the combined treatment, but for all oak species were reduced under drought and air warming alone compared to the control. There was a significant negative correlation between abundance of C. geophilum and its leucine aminopeptidase activity. As this enzyme is not frequent among ectomycorrhizal fungi, this emphasises the functional importance of C. geophilum in the ectomycorrhizal community. Our results indicate that increased temperature and drought will influence the relative abundance and enzyme activity of C. geophilum. However, both the Quercus species and C. geophilum tolerated warming and strong drought.

  4. [Effect of ectomycorrhizae on the growth of Picea koraiensis seedlings].

    PubMed

    Song, Rui-Qing; Wu, Ke

    2005-12-01

    Basidioscarps of Agaricales in different Picea koraiensis forest plantations were collected during August-October, 2000. 36 isolaters of species of Agaricales were obtained by isolating and culturing to the basidioscarps. Through indoor inoculation test on seedlings of Picea koraiensis, 6 ectomycorrhizae fungi cultures were obtained from 36 isolaters. The inoculation results show that the period for ectomycorrhizae inoculation to 1-year seedlings of Picea koraiensis should be about 30 days after seedlings emerging, the suitable temperature for ectomycorrhizae forming is about 20 degrees C. 6 ectomycorrhizae strains all have growth-promoting effect to the seedlings of Picea koraiensis. The contents of chlorophyll a of the seedlings inoculated strains of Agaricus silvaticus, 031 and L15 were significantly higher than other strains and control. The contents of chlorophyll b in the seedlings inoculated strains 009, 004, Agaricus silvaticus and L15 were significantly higher than other strains and control. The weights of seedlings which inoculated strains 009, 025, 031, Agaricus silvaticus and L15 were significantly different to control, the weight of seedlings inoculated strains of Agaricus silvaticus and L15 are 19.23% and 23.08% more than control; The heights of the seedlings inoculated 6 strains all have significant difference to control, the weight of seedlings inoculated strains of Agaricus silvaticus and L15 are 17.83% and 16.37% more than control. The results of outdoor inoculation show that the seedlings inoculated Agaricus silvaticus grow best on height, 9.25% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the seedlings inoculated strain L15 grow best on collar diameter, 9.92% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the lateral root numbers of seedlings inoculated strain 009 is largest, 51.91% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the main roots of seedlings inoculated strain 009 are longest, 3.36% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the

  5. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in ectomycorrhizal fungi and ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Martin, F; Ramstedt, M; Söderhäll, K

    1987-01-01

    The literature concerning the metabolism of carbon and nitrogen compounds in ectomycorrhizal associations of trees is reviewed. The absorption and translocation of mineral ions by the mycelia require an energy source and a reductant which are both supplied by respiratory catabolism of carbohydrates produced by the host plant. Photosynthates are also required to generate the carbon skeletons for amino acid and carbohydrate syntheses during the growth of the mycelia. Competition for photosynthates occurs between the fungal cells and the various vegetative sinks in the host tree. The nature of carbon compounds involved in these processes, their routes of metabolism, the mechanisms of control and the partitioning of metabolites between the various sites of utilization are only poorly understood. Both ascomycetous and basidiomycetous ectomycorrhizal fungi synthesize and some, if not all, accumulate mannitol, trehalose and triglycerides. The fungal strains employ the Embden--Meyerhof pathway of glucose catabolism and the key enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway (6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, transaldolase and transketolase). Anaplerotic CO2 fixation, via pyruvate carboxylase and/or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, provides high pools of amino acids. This process could be important in the recapture and assimilation of respired CO2 in the rhizosphere. The ectomycorrhizas are thought to contain the Embden--Meyerhof pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which provide the carbon skeletons for the assimilation of ammonia into amino acids. The main route of assimilation of ammonia appears to be through the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase cycle in the ectomycorrhizas. Glutamate dehydrogenase plays a minor role in this process. Glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase are present in free-living ectomycorrhizal fungi and they participate in the assimilation of ammonia and the synthesis

  6. Nitrogen Fixation Associated with Suillus tomentosus Tuberculate Ectomycorrhizae on Pinus contorta var. latifolia

    PubMed Central

    Paul, L. R.; Chapman, B. K.; Chanway, C. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Tuberculate ectomycorrhizae are a unique form of ectomycorrhiza where densely packed clusters of mycorrhizal root tips are enveloped by a thick hyphal sheath to form a tubercle. The functional significance of such a unique structure has not previously been established. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and measure the potential nitrogenase activity associated with Suillus tomentosus/Pinus contorta tuberculate ectomycorrhizae in two stand ages, young and old, and across a range of nitrogen-poor soil conditions. Methods Short roots were compared with other mycorrhizae and non-mycorrhizal secondary roots using tuberculate ectomycorrhizae. Assessment of nitrogenase activity was determined and quantitative measurements were taken on tuberculate ectomycorrhizae in situ in a variety of different circumstances, by using an adaptation of the acetylene reduction assay. Key Results Significant nitrogenase activity was measured associated with S. tomentosus/P. contorta tuberculate ectomycorrhizae whereas no nitrogenase activity was measured with non-tuberculate mycorrhizae or secondary roots without mycorrhizae. Average nitrogenase activity ranged from undetectable to 5696·7 nmol C2H4 g−1 tubercle 24 h−1. Maximum nitrogenase activity was 25 098·8 nmol C2H4 g−1 tubercle 24 h−1. Nitrogenase activity was significantly higher in young stands than in old stands of P. contorta. Season or some covariate also seemed to affect nitrogenase activity and there was suggestion of a site effect. Conclusions Suillus tomentosus/P. contorta tuberculate ectomycorrhizae are sites of significant nitrogenase activity. The nitrogenase activity measured could be an important contribution to the nitrogen budget of P. contorta stands. Season and stand age affect levels of nitrogenase activity. PMID:17468111

  7. Increased trehalose biosynthesis in Hartig net hyphae of ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    López, Mónica Fajardo; Männer, Philipp; Willmann, Anita; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    To obtain photoassimilates in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, the fungus has to create a strong sink, for example, by conversion of plant-derived hexoses into fungus-specific compounds. Trehalose is present in large quantities in Amanita muscaria and may thus constitute an important carbon sink. In Amanita muscaria-poplar (Populus tremula x tremuloides) ectomycorrhizas, the transcript abundances of genes encoding key enzymes of fungal trehalose biosynthesis, namely trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) and trehalose phosphorylase (TP), were increased. When mycorrhizas were separated into mantle and Hartig net, TPS, TPP and TP expression was specifically enhanced in Hartig net hyphae. Compared with the extraradical mycelium, TPS and TPP expression was only slightly increased in the fungal sheath, while the increase in the expression of TP was more pronounced. TPS enzyme activity was also elevated in Hartig net hyphae, displaying a direct correlation between transcript abundance and turnover rate. In accordance with enhanced gene expression and TPS activity, trehalose content was 2.7 times higher in the Hartig net. The enhanced trehalose biosynthesis at the plant-fungus interface indicates that trehalose is a relevant carbohydrate sink in symbiosis. As sugar and nitrogen supply affected gene expression only slightly, the strongly increased expression of the investigated genes in mycorrhizas is presumably developmentally regulated.

  8. Enhancing our understanding of anatomical diversity in Tomentella ectomycorrhizas: characterization of six new morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Erős-Honti, Zsolt; Seress, Diána; Kovács, Gábor M

    2015-08-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) formed by Tomentella species (Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) were collected in beech forests of Hungary and studied using anatomical and molecular phylogenetic methods. The mycobionts were identified by analysing the sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions together with sequences obtained from public databases. At the sampling plots, we found the occurrence of 11 Tomentella morphotypes. Among these, six morphotypes (four identified, Tomentella atroarenicolor, Tomentella bryophila, Tomentella lapida, Tomentella subclavigera, and two unidentified) were morpho-anatomically characterized for the first time. Although the six morphotypes differed anatomically from each other and from Tomentella ectomycorrhizas described previously, they shared anatomical features common to tomentelloid ectomycorrhizas fungi. These results expand our understanding of the diversity of this widely distributed ectomycorrhizal genus.

  9. Nutrient amounts of ectomycorrhizae analysed by EDX using ESEM and ICP.

    PubMed

    Rumberger, Michael D; Lentzsch, Peter; Münzenberger, Babette; Hüttl, Reinhard F

    2005-06-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis coupled with an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) was tested as an alternative to the inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) spectrometer method for nutrient analyses of ectomycorrhizae. The results of EDX-ESEM and ICP were compared for 12 ectomycorrhizal morphotypes collected in beech and Scots pine forests in northern Brandenburg. The amounts of Al, Ca, Mg and S analysed in the outer hyphal layers of the sheath with the EDX-ESEM technique correlated well with the amounts of these elements in the whole mycorrhiza as assessed by ICP. For the elements P and K, no such correlation existed, indicating an uneven distribution of these elements in the ectomycorrhiza. It is concluded that the EDX-ESEM technique could be a useful and reliable tool for the analysis of nutrient elements in ectomycorrhizae, especially for studies focussing on small-scale soil heterogeneity or on infrequent morphotypes.

  10. Ectomycorrhizas of Cortinarius helodes and Gyrodon monticola with Alnus acuminata from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Alejandra; Nouhra, Eduardo; Daniele, Graciela; Domínguez, Laura; McKay, Donaraye

    2005-01-01

    Field ectomycorrhizas of Cortinarius helodes Moser, Matheny & Daniele (sp. nov) and Gyrodon monticola Sing. on Alnus acuminata Kunth (Andean alder, aliso del cerro) are described based on morphological and anatomical features. Ectomycorrhizal roots were sampled beneath fruitbodies of C. helodes and G. monticola from two homogeneous A. acuminata forest sites located in Tucuman and Catamarca Provinces in Argentina. C. helodes ectomycorrhizas showed a thick white to beige mantle exuding a milky juice when injured, were bluish toward the apex, and had hyphal strands in the mantle. G. monticola ectomycorrhizas showed some conspicuous features like highly differentiated rhizomorphs, inflated brown cells on the mantle surface, and hyaline and brown emanating hyphae with dolipores. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer provided a distinctive profile for each of the collections of fruitbodies and the mycorrhizal morphotypes.

  11. Ectomycorrhizae of young and mature Scots pine trees in industrial regions in Poland

    Treesearch

    Barbara Kieliszewska-Rokicka; Maria Rudawska; Tomasz Leski

    1998-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees grown in forests influenced by different levels of air pollutants were investigated. Total numbers of mycorrhizal root tips in the soil horizons and the frequency of mycorrhizal morphotypes were compared as indicators of ectomycorrhizal status. The studies were conducted in two comparable...

  12. Morphological and molecular diversity among Italian populations of Quercus petraea (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Piero; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Bussotti, Filippo; Grossoni, Paolo

    2003-05-01

    Quercus petraea (sessile oak) has a scattered distribution in southern and central Italy. The objective of this work was to evaluate the level and distribution of diversity in five Italian populations of Q. petraea by using morphological markers and hypervariable molecular markers such as microsatellites. Forty-eight morphological traits and six nuclear and three plastid loci were scored for each population. Evidence for differentiation in both sets of traits was found, but patterns of differentiation of morphological traits did not coincide with microsatellite differentiation. Morphological variation was correlated with ecological conditions at the site of origin. Analysis of molecular variance revealed significant genetic variation among populations (P < 0.001), both at the nuclear and plastid levels. There was a slight, but significant, correlation between nuclear genetic distance and geographic distance. The relatively high genetic diversity in the populations analysed indicates that the maintenance of their evolutionary potential is possible if population sizes are maintained or increased. Low levels of haplotype diversity found within the small southernmost population (Piano Costantino) indicates that genetic erosion may increase the extinction risk for this population.

  13. Morphological and Molecular Diversity Among Italian Populations of Quercus petraea (Fagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    BRUSCHI, PIERO; VENDRAMIN, GIOVANNI G.; BUSSOTTI, FILIPPO; GROSSONI, PAOLO

    2003-01-01

    Quercus petraea (sessile oak) has a scattered distribution in southern and central Italy. The objective of this work was to evaluate the level and distribution of diversity in five Italian populations of Q. petraea by using morphological markers and hypervariable molecular markers such as microsatellites. Forty‐eight morphological traits and six nuclear and three plastid loci were scored for each population. Evidence for differentiation in both sets of traits was found, but patterns of differentiation of morphological traits did not coincide with microsatellite differentiation. Morphological variation was correlated with ecological conditions at the site of origin. Analysis of molecular variance revealed significant genetic variation among populations (P < 0·001), both at the nuclear and plastid levels. There was a slight, but significant, correlation between nuclear genetic distance and geographic distance. The relatively high genetic diversity in the populations analysed indicates that the maintenance of their evolutionary potential is possible if population sizes are maintained or increased. Low levels of haplotype diversity found within the small southernmost population (Piano Costantino) indicates that genetic erosion may increase the extinction risk for this population. PMID:12714368

  14. Ectomycorrhizae between Alnus acuminata H.B.K. and Naucoria escharoides (Fr.:Fr.) Kummer from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Alejandra; Daniele, Graciela; Domínguez, Laura; Nouhra, Eduardo; Horton, Tom

    2002-04-01

    Field ectomycorrhizae of Naucoria escharoides on Alnus acuminata ("andean alder", "aliso del cerro") are described in detail for the first time. Naturally occurring ectomycorrhizal roots were sampled beneath sporocarps of N. escharoides. The samples were taken from four natural forest plots at two homogeneous A. acuminata sites (Tucumán and Catamarca Provinces, Argentina). The ectomycorrhizae were characterized morphologically and compared by means of PCR/RFLP analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA. The most important morphological features of the ectomycorrhizae are a white to pale yellow mantle, simple to monopodial branches, hyaline emanating hyphae, abundant hyphal bundles emerging more or less perpendicularly from a plectenchymatous mantle, and an acute or rounded apex with or without a mantle. N. escharoides fruitbodies have white basal mycelium with emanating hyphae similar to those of andean alder ectomycorrhizae. The RFLP profiles of sporocarps and mycorrhizae were the same.

  15. Characterization and identification of field ectomycorrhizae of Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer.

    PubMed

    Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; de Miguel, Ana María; Martínez-Peña, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Field ectomycorrhizae sampled under Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer have been characterized and described in detail based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The described ectomycorrhiza has traits typical of Boletales: whitish with three differentiated plectenchymatous layers in the mantle in plan view forming ring-like structures and rhizomorphs with highly differentiated hyphae. The inflated, smooth cystidia-like clavate end cells on the surface of the rhizomorphs and their slightly twisted external hyphae are additional characterizing features. The Hartig net occupies 1 1/2 rows of cortical cells, partly reaching the endodermis. Not all hyphae have clamps. The identification of the fungal symbiont as B. edulis was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequence comparison between mycorrhizas and sporocarps. The singularity of this symbiotic association, as well as its ecological and practical implications, are discussed.

  16. Investigation of horizontal gene transfer in poplar/Amanita muscaria ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Fine roots of forest trees form together with certain soil fungi symbiotic structures (ectomycorrhizas), where fungal hyphae are in intimate contact with plant cells. Due to root cell degeneration, plant DNA is released and could be taken up by the fungus. The possibility that horizontal gene transfer might result in a risk for the environment should be evaluated before a massive release of genetically engineered trees into nature occurs, even though only a few convincing examples of horizontal gene transfer are known. Transgenic poplars containing a construct of the Streptomyces hygroscopicus bar gene under the control of the Cochliobolus heterostrophus GPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) promoter were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The functionality of this construct in the ectomycorrhizal model fungus Amanita muscaria was previously verified by protoplast-based fungal transformation. 35,000 ectomycorrhizas, formed between transgenic poplars and non-transgenic A. muscaria hyphae, were isolated and transferred to selective agar plates. Putative herbicide-resistant fungal colonies were obtained after the first round of selection. However, none of these colonies survived a transfer onto fresh selection medium, nor did they contain the bar gene, indicating that no horizontal gene transfer from poplar to A. muscaria occurred during symbiosis under axenic conditions. However, since ectomycorrhizas are associated under natural conditions with viruses, bacteria and other fungi, these additional associations should be evaluated in future.

  17. Floral and insect-induced volatile formation in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea, a perennial, outcrossing relative of A. thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abel, Christian; Clauss, Maria; Schaub, Andrea; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Tholl, Dorothea

    2009-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds have been reported to serve some important roles in plant communication with other organisms, but little is known about the biological functions of most of these substances. To gain insight into this problem, we have compared differences in floral and vegetative volatiles between two closely related plant species with different life histories. The self-pollinating annual, Arabidopsis thaliana, and its relative, the outcrossing perennial, Arabidopsis lyrata, have markedly divergent life cycles and breeding systems. We show that these differences are in part reflected in the formation of distinct volatile mixtures in flowers and foliage. Volatiles emitted from flowers of a German A. lyrata ssp. petraea population are dominated by benzenoid compounds in contrast to the previously described sesquiterpene-dominated emissions of A. thaliana flowers. Flowers of A. lyrata ssp. petraea release benzenoid volatiles in a diurnal rhythm with highest emission rates at midday coinciding with observed visitations of pollinating insects. Insect feeding on leaves of A. lyrata ssp. petraea causes a variable release of the volatiles methyl salicylate, C11- and C16-homoterpenes, nerolidol, plus the sesquiterpene (E)-beta-caryophyllene, which in A. thaliana is emitted exclusively from flowers. An insect-induced gene (AlCarS) with high sequence similarity to the florally expressed (E)-beta-caryophyllene synthase (AtTPS21) from A. thaliana was identified from individuals of a German A. lyrata ssp. petraea population. Recombinant AlCarS converts the sesquiterpene precursor, farnesyl diphosphate, into (E)-beta-caryophyllene with alpha-humulene and alpha-copaene as minor products indicating its close functional relationship to the A. thaliana AtTPS21. Differential regulation of these genes in flowers and foliage is consistent with the different functions of volatiles in the two Arabidopsis species.

  18. Imprints of natural selection along environmental gradients in phenology-related genes of Quercus petraea.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Florian J; Derory, Jérémy; Boury, Christophe; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Kremer, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    We explored single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in candidate genes for bud burst from Quercus petraea populations sampled along gradients of latitude and altitude in Western Europe. SNP diversity was monitored for 106 candidate genes, in 758 individuals from 32 natural populations. We investigated whether SNP variation reflected the clinal pattern of bud burst observed in common garden experiments. We used different methods to detect imprints of natural selection (FST outlier, clinal variation at allelic frequencies, association tests) and compared the results obtained for the two gradients. FST outlier SNPs were found in 15 genes, 5 of which were common to both gradients. The type of selection differed between the two gradients (directional or balancing) for 3 of these 5. Clinal variations were observed for six SNPs, and one cline was conserved across both gradients. Association tests between the phenotypic or breeding values of trees and SNP genotypes identified 14 significant associations, involving 12 genes. The results of outlier detection on the basis of population differentiation or clinal variation were not very consistent with the results of association tests. The discrepancies between these approaches may reflect the different hierarchical levels of selection considered (inter- and intrapopulation selection). Finally, we obtained evidence for convergent selection (similar for gradients) and clinal variation for a few genes, suggesting that comparisons between parallel gradients could be used to screen for major candidate genes responding to natural selection in trees.

  19. Imprints of Natural Selection Along Environmental Gradients in Phenology-Related Genes of Quercus petraea

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, Florian J.; Derory, Jérémy; Boury, Christophe; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Kremer, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We explored single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in candidate genes for bud burst from Quercus petraea populations sampled along gradients of latitude and altitude in Western Europe. SNP diversity was monitored for 106 candidate genes, in 758 individuals from 32 natural populations. We investigated whether SNP variation reflected the clinal pattern of bud burst observed in common garden experiments. We used different methods to detect imprints of natural selection (FST outlier, clinal variation at allelic frequencies, association tests) and compared the results obtained for the two gradients. FST outlier SNPs were found in 15 genes, 5 of which were common to both gradients. The type of selection differed between the two gradients (directional or balancing) for 3 of these 5. Clinal variations were observed for six SNPs, and one cline was conserved across both gradients. Association tests between the phenotypic or breeding values of trees and SNP genotypes identified 14 significant associations, involving 12 genes. The results of outlier detection on the basis of population differentiation or clinal variation were not very consistent with the results of association tests. The discrepancies between these approaches may reflect the different hierarchical levels of selection considered (inter- and intrapopulation selection). Finally, we obtained evidence for convergent selection (similar for gradients) and clinal variation for a few genes, suggesting that comparisons between parallel gradients could be used to screen for major candidate genes responding to natural selection in trees. PMID:23934884

  20. Geographical variation in the response to nitrogen deposition in Arabidopsis lyrata petraea.

    PubMed

    Vergeer, Philippine; van den Berg, Leon L J; Bulling, Mark T; Ashmore, Mike R; Kunin, William E

    2008-01-01

    The adaptive responses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition for different European accessions of Arabidopsis lyrata petraea were analysed using populations along a strong atmospheric N-deposition gradient. Plants were exposed to three N-deposition rates, reflecting the rates at the different locations, in a full factorial design. Differences between accessions in the response to N were found for important phenological and physiological response variables. For example, plants from low-deposition areas had higher nitrogen-use efficiencies (NUE) and C : N ratios than plants from areas high in N deposition when grown at low N-deposition rates. The NUE decreased in all accessions at higher experimental deposition rates. However, plants from high-deposition areas showed a limited capacity to increase their NUE at lower experimental deposition rates. Plants from low-deposition areas had faster growth rates, higher leaf turnover rates and shorter times to flowering, and showed a greater increase in growth rate in response to N deposition than those from high-deposition areas. Indications for adaptation to N deposition were found, and results suggest that adaptation of plants from areas high in N deposition to increased N deposition has resulted in the loss of plasticity.

  1. Carbon allocation in ectomycorrhizas: identification and expression analysis of an Amanita muscaria monosaccharide transporter.

    PubMed

    Nehls, U; Wiese, J; Guttenberger, M; Hampp, R

    1998-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizas are formed between certain soil fungi and fine roots of predominantly woody plants. An important feature of this symbiosis is the supply of plant-derived carbohydrates to the fungus. As a first step toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of this process, we cloned a monosaccharide transporter from the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed to match conserved regions from known fungal sugar transporters. A cDNA fragment of the transporter was obtained from mycorrhizal mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. This fragment was used to identify a clone (AmMst1) encoding the entire monosaccharide transporter in a Picea abies/A. muscaria mycorrhizal cDNA library. The cDNA codes for an open reading frame of 520 amino acids, showing best homology to a Neurospora crassa monosaccharide transporter. The function of AmMST1 as monosaccharide transporter was confirmed by heterologous expression of the cDNA in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutant lacking a monosaccharide uptake system. AmMst1 was constitutively expressed in fungal hyphae under all growth conditions. Nevertheless, in mycorrhizas as well as in hyphae grown at monosaccharide concentrations above 5 mM, the amount of AmMst1 transcript increased fourfold. We therefore suggest that AmMst1 is upregulated in ectomycorrhizas by a monosaccharide-controlled mechanism.

  2. Types of ectomycorrhiza of mature beech and spruce at ozone-fumigated and control forest plots.

    PubMed

    Grebenc, Tine; Kraigher, Hojka

    2007-05-01

    In the Kranzberg forest near Freising (Germany) a novel "Free-Air Canopy O3 Exposure" system has been employed for analysing O3-induced responses from sub-cellular to ecosystem levels that are relevant for carbon balance and CO2 demand of 60-year-old beech trees. The below-ground ectomycorrhizal community was studied in two-fold ambient O3 concentrations (five cores per sampling) and in a control plot with an ambient O3 concentration (four cores per sampling). Five samplings were taken throughout two vegetation seasons (2003 and 2004). Types of ectomycorrhiza were determined by their morphological, anatomical and molecular characteristics and quantified by counting. The total number of mycorrhizal fine roots was higher at the fumigated plot as compared with the control site. The numbers of ectomycorrhizal types at the fumigated and control plots were 28 and 26, respectively. Cenococcum geophilum was present in all soil cores at all sampling times with a significant increase in abundance under ozone-fumigated trees. Other mycorrhizal types present at higher abundance at the fumigated than at the control plot were identified as Russula densiflora, R. fellea, R. illota, Tuber puberulum, Lactarius sp. 2 and Russula sp. 2. Some mycorrhizal types were present exclusively at the fumigated plot (Fagirhiza fusca, F. setifera, Lactarius acris, Piceirhiza nigra and Russula sp. 1). A possible ecological role for the abundant types of ectomycorrhiza and their putative application in bio-indication is discussed.

  3. Persistence and detection of black truffle ectomycorrhizas in plantations: comparison between two field detection methods.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Sergio; Ágreda, Teresa; Águeda, Beatriz; Martín, María; de Miguel, Ana María; Barriuso, Juan

    2014-04-01

    Owners of black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) plantations are concerned about the persistence of its mycorrhizas and mycelium in the soil, especially until the appearance of the "truffle burn" areas and the triggering of sporocarp production, at least 5-7 years after planting truffle-inoculated seedlings. During this period, the farmer does not know whether his management is promoting black truffle development. To study the presence and abundance of T. melanosporum ectomycorrhizas in plantations, two sampling methods, direct sampling of root tips and soil core collection, are compared by analyzing 48 evergreen oak trees (Quercus ilex) inoculated with truffle. Those trees are grouped by age (<6, 6-9, >9 years old) and presence or absence of truffle production. T. melanosporum was present in 46 out of the 48 studied trees, and its ectomycorrhizas appeared in 65% of the ectomycorrhizal tips. Its abundance is significantly higher with productive trees and young trees. Direct sampling of root tips and soil core collection were equally effective in detecting this species, although soil core collection proved a better method to also evaluate ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity. To detect the presence of T. melanosporum in a given plantation, three samples suffice, with a single sample per random tree. Although the presence of mycorrhizas is not a sure sign of the future success of a black truffle plantation, its absence influences managers as to whether to continue culturing truffles in a plantation.

  4. Cardioprotective and hepatoprotective effects of ellagitannins from European oak bark (Quercus petraea L.) extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Brown, Lindsay

    2013-02-01

    Red wine contains many potentially bioactive polyphenols including resveratrol, catechins, anthocyanins and flavonoids as well as tannins derived from oak during maturation. This study examined the effects of a mixture of ellagitannins from oak bark (Quercus petraea L.) on cardiovascular, metabolic and liver changes in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats and in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR). First, 8-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups and given either cornstarch diet, cornstarch diet + oak bark extract (0.5 mL/kg food), high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet + oak bark extract (0.5 mL/kg food) for 16 weeks. Oak bark extract was added to the diets for last 8 weeks of the feeding period. Secondly, SHR aged 42 weeks fed on standard chow diet were divided into two groups with and without oak bark extract treatment for 12 weeks (0.5 mL/kg food). The high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet induced signs of metabolic syndrome along with cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Oak bark extract attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats and improved the structure and function of the heart and the liver. SHR after oak bark extract treatment for 12 weeks showed lower systolic blood pressure, lower cardiac fibrosis and cardiac stiffness and improved vascular reactivity. Oak bark extract containing ellagitannins improved cardiovascular, metabolic and liver parameters in these rat models of human disease, suggesting that part of the benefits attributed to red wine may be produced by these ellagitannins.

  5. Adaptive and plastic responses of Quercus petraea populations to climate across Europe.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Romero, Cuauhtémoc; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Ducousso, Alexis; Musch, Brigitte; Ehrenmann, François; Delzon, Sylvain; Cavers, Stephen; Chałupka, Władysław; Dağdaş, Said; Hansen, Jon Kehlet; Lee, Steve J; Liesebach, Mirko; Rau, Hans-Martin; Psomas, Achilleas; Schneck, Volker; Steiner, Wilfried; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Kremer, Antoine

    2016-11-25

    How temperate forests will respond to climate change is uncertain; projections range from severe decline to increased growth. We conducted field tests of sessile oak (Quercus petraea), a widespread keystone European forest tree species, including more than 150 000 trees sourced from 116 geographically diverse populations. The tests were planted on 23 field sites in six European countries, in order to expose them to a wide range of climates, including sites reflecting future warmer and drier climates. By assessing tree height and survival, our objectives were twofold: (i) to identify the source of differential population responses to climate (genetic differentiation due to past divergent climatic selection vs. plastic responses to ongoing climate change) and (ii) to explore which climatic variables (temperature or precipitation) trigger the population responses. Tree growth and survival were modeled for contemporary climate and then projected using data from four regional climate models for years 2071-2100, using two greenhouse gas concentration trajectory scenarios each. Overall, results indicated a moderate response of tree height and survival to climate variation, with changes in dryness (either annual or during the growing season) explaining the major part of the response. While, on average, populations exhibited local adaptation, there was significant clinal population differentiation for height growth with winter temperature at the site of origin. The most moderate climate model (HIRHAM5-EC; rcp4.5) predicted minor decreases in height and survival, while the most extreme model (CCLM4-GEM2-ES; rcp8.5) predicted large decreases in survival and growth for southern and southeastern edge populations (Hungary and Turkey). Other nonmarginal populations with continental climates were predicted to be severely and negatively affected (Bercé, France), while populations at the contemporary northern limit (colder and humid maritime regions; Denmark and Norway) will

  6. Seasonal changes in carbon and nitrogen compound concentrations in a Quercus petraea chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Angélique; Barthes, Laure; Delpierre, Nicolas; Dufrêne, Éric; Fresneau, Chantal; Bazot, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Forest productivity declines with tree age. This decline may be due to changes in metabolic functions, resource availability and/or changes in resource allocation (between growth, reproduction and storage) with tree age. Carbon and nitrogen remobilization/storage processes are key to tree growth and survival. However, studies of the effects of tree age on these processes are scarce and have not yet considered seasonal carbon and nitrogen variations in situ. This study was carried out in a chronosequence of sessile oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.) for 1 year to survey the effects of tree age on the seasonal changes of carbon and nitrogen compounds in several tree compartments, focusing on key phenological stages. Our results highlight a general pattern of carbon and nitrogen function at all tree ages, with carbon reserve remobilization at budburst for growth, followed by carbon reserve formation during the leafy season and carbon reserve use during winter for maintenance. The variation in concentrations of nitrogen compounds shows less amplitude than that of carbon compounds. Storage as proteins occurs later, and mainly depends on leaf nitrogen remobilization and root uptake in autumn. We highlight several differences between tree age groups, in particular the loss of carbon storage function of fine and medium-sized roots with tree ageing. Moreover, the pattern of carbon compound accumulation in branches supports the hypothesis of a preferential allocation of carbon towards growth until the end of wood formation in juvenile trees, at the expense of the replenishment of carbon stores, while mature trees start allocating carbon to storage right after budburst. Our results demonstrate that at key phenological stages, physiological and developmental functions differ with tree age, and together with environmental conditions, influence the carbon and nitrogen concentration variations in sessile oaks.

  7. Russulaceae and Thelephoraceae form ectomycorrhizas with members of the Nyctaginaceae (Caryophyllales) in the tropical mountain rain forest of southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Haug, Ingeborg; Weiss, Michael; Homeier, Jürgen; Oberwinkler, Franz; Kottke, Ingrid

    2005-03-01

    * Three members of the Nyctaginaceae, two Neea species and one Guapira species, occurred scattered within a very species-rich neotropical mountain rain forest. The three species were found to form ectomycorrhizas of very distinctive characters, while all other tree species examined formed arbuscular mycorrhizas. * The ectomycorrhizas were structurally typified according to light and transmission electron microscope investigations. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA and part of the nuclear large subunit (LSU, 28S) rDNA of the mycorrhiza forming fungi were amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out. * Neea species 1 was found to form typical ectomycorrhizas with five different fungal species, Russula puiggarii, Lactarius sp., two Tomentella or Thelephora species, and one ascomycete. Neea species 2 and the Guapira species were associated with only one fungus each, a Tomentella/Thelephora species clustering closely together in an ITS-neighbour-joining tree. The long and fine rootlets of the Guapira species showed proximally a hyphal mantle and a Hartig net, but distally intracellular fungal colonization of the epidermis and root hair development. The ectomycorrhizal segments of the long roots of Neea species 2 displayed a hyphal mantle and a Hartig net around alive root-hair-like outgrowths of the epidermal cells. * The distribution and the evolution of ectomycorrhizas in the predominantly neotropic Nyctaginaceae are discussed.

  8. Biosynthesis and Secretion of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Its Morphological Effects on Tricholoma vaccinum-Spruce Ectomycorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Katrin; Henke, Catarina; Asiimwe, Theodore; Ulbricht, Andrea; Klemmer, Sandra; Schachtschabel, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Fungus-derived indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is involved in development of ectomycorrhiza, affects both partners, i.e., the tree and the fungus. The biosynthesis pathway, excretion from fungal hyphae, the induction of branching in fungal cultures, and enhanced Hartig net formation in mycorrhiza were shown. Gene expression studies, incorporation of labeled compounds into IAA, heterologous expression of a transporter, and bioinformatics were applied to study the effect of IAA on fungal morphogenesis and on ectomycorrhiza. Tricholoma vaccinum produces IAA from tryptophan via indole-3-pyruvate, with the last step of this biosynthetic pathway being catalyzed by an aldehyde dehydrogenase. The gene ald1 was found to be highly expressed in ectomycorrhiza and induced by indole-3-acetaldehyde. The export of IAA from fungal cells is supported by the multidrug and toxic extrusion (MATE) transporter Mte1 found in T. vaccinum. The addition of IAA and its precursors induced elongated cells and hyphal ramification of mycorrhizal fungi; in contrast, in saprobic fungi such as Schizophyllum commune, IAA did not induce morphogenetic changes. Mycorrhiza responded by increasing its Hartig net formation. The IAA of fungal origin acts as a diffusible signal, influencing root colonization and increasing Hartig net formation in ectomycorrhiza. PMID:26231639

  9. Ectomycorrhiza-mediated repression of the high-affinity ammonium importer gene AmAMT2 in Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Anita; Weiss, Michael; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-02-01

    A main function of ectomycorrhizas, a symbiosis between certain soil fungi and fine roots of woody plants, is the exchange of plant-derived carbohydrates for fungus-derived nutrients. As it is required in large amounts, nitrogen is of special interest. A gene (AmAMT2) coding for a putative fungal ammonium importer was identified in an EST project of functional Amanita muscaria/poplar ectomycorrhizas. Heterologous expression of the entire AmAMT2 coding region in yeast revealed the corresponding protein to be a high-affinity ammonium importer. In axenically grown Amanita hyphae AmAMT2 expression was strongly repressed by nitrogen, independent of whether the offered nitrogen source was transported by AmAMT2 or not. In functional ectomycorrhizas the AmAMT2 transcript level was further decreased in both hyphal networks (sheath and Hartig net), while extraradical hyphae revealed strong gene expression. Together our data suggest that (1) AmAMT2 expression is regulated by the endogenous nitrogen content of hyphae and (2) fungal hyphae in ectomycorrhizas are well supported with nitrogen even when the extraradical mycelium is nitrogen limited. As a consequence of AmAMT2 repression in mycorrhizas, ammonium can be suggested as a potential nitrogen source delivered by fungal hyphae in symbiosis.

  10. First Report on Rare Unifloral Honey of Endemic Moltkia petraea (Tratt.) Griseb. from Croatia: Detailed Chemical Screening and Antioxidant Capacity.

    PubMed

    Jerković, Igor; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Zekić, Marina; Tuberoso, Carlo I G

    2017-03-01

    Rare Moltkia petraea (Tratt.) Griseb. honey from Croatia was first time characterised. The spectrophotometric assays on CIE L*a*b*Cab *hab ° colour coordinates, total phenol content and antioxidant capacity (FRAP, CUPRAC, DPPH(•) and ABTS(•+) assays) determined higher honey values generally close to dark honeys ranges. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) on two fibres after GC-FID and GC/MS revealed the major compounds 2-phenylacetaldehyde (12.8%; 15.6%), benzaldehyde (11.1%; 10.0%), octane (9.3%; 7.6%), nonane, propan-2-one, pentan-2-one, pentanal and nonanal (4.9%; 14.5%). Ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE) mainly isolated non-specific higher molecular compounds characteristic of the comb environment. Targeted HLPC-DAD analysis of the honey determined higher concentration of phenylalanine (212.08 mg/kg) and lumichrome (16.25 mg/kg) along with tyrosine and kojic acid. The headspace composition (chemical fingerprint) and high concentration of lumichrome can be considered particular for M. petraea honey. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  11. The changes of the forests dendroproduction in the Carpathian basin - case study: Quercus petraea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berki, Imre; Gulyás, Krisztina; Veperdi, Gábor

    2017-04-01

    There are a lot of publications about the accelerated forest growth in West-and North- Europe due to global climate change, elevated atmospheric carbon-dioxide and nitrogen input. However, in Central-Europe the increasing tendency of extremely dry periods caused mass mortality of forest formed tree species, and triggered slower or indefinite growth trends. In this study our scientific questions were the followings: • Which are the characteristic mechanism in the south-east part of Central -Europe: forest decay, accelerated growth or both? • What are the expected impacts of climate change on sessile oak production? • Are there any differences between a humid and an arid landscapes tree height growth? Method for measuring the changes of growth in humid landscapes: Top height of the stands is a good indicator of the site condition with high stand density. So this indicator can be used to measure the changes of growth in humid stands, where the drought periods caused not considerable tree decay. We have been measured a young and old sessile oak stands next to each other along a humid-arid climatic transect in Hungary. The old stands representing the "pre-climate change" conditions, when the annual temperature means, and the frequency of droughts were lower. The young stands have been lived their whole lifetime in changed atmospheric condition. Compared the top height of the young and old stand to the yield tables we can establish a soft accelerated growth in the last decades in the humid landscapes. Method for measuring the changes of growth in dry landscapes: Top height of thinned forests due to tree decay do not indicate the changed atmospheric condition. Although the volume of the survived trees has been increased (compared to yield tables) due to accelerated diameter growth, the production of the thinned Quercus petraea forests have been decreased. Keywords: tree height growth, nitrogen input, humid-arid climatic transect Acknowledgements: Research is

  12. [Two cases of homicide from the pre-ceramic neolithic era of Arabia Petraea].

    PubMed

    Röhrer-Ertl, O; Frey, K W

    1987-01-01

    Human remains from Basta 1 (P PN B, 6. Mill. B.C.) and Sabra 1 (Khiamian, 7. Mill. B.C.) were prepared and studied; the results show that Basta 1 was a permanent settlement and Sabra 1 was a temporary summer camp. Both settlements are located in Arabia Petraea. Basta 1, No. 3477: The calvarium of a boy, aged 8 to 9 a, from Basta 1 was studied. The race can be determined as orientalide, according v. Eickstedt's classification. The boy was killed; as evidence by 2 blows to the skull occurring while he was alive. The cause of death has been reconstructed, using parallels taken from ethnological and forensic medical research. First, the boy received a light blow on the left forehead, with a sharp weapon. The authors present as a working hypothesis that the motivation for the death was rape, taking place as the boy was (probably) in a semi-conscious state. After recovering and rising to his feet, the boy suffered a deadly blow on the back of the skull (rabbit punch). A blunt instrument was used for the second blow. The body lay where it fell over 1 a or more; afterwards it was found by members of his own group. They removed the calvarium and buried it in their permanent settlement. The manner in which burial took place, would seem to indicate, that no further religious or ritual ceremony was involved. This type of crime has been observed e.g. as occurring among purely male groups-such as temporary herdsmen. In case of the boy from Basta 1, this would the earliest evidence for the occurrence of this type of sexual delinquency in prehistoric times. Sabra 1, No. 4088: Skull fragments of 2 individuals were recovered from a camp fire shifted by humans, in Sabra 1. Individual I is a male, aged 25 to 30 a; Individual II is a female of 25 to 30 a (or perhaps even younger). The examination showed that the bone fragments had been subjected to temperatures less than or equal to 200 degrees C (examination of bone material) and around 100 degrees C (evidence of charcoal material

  13. Description and identification of Alnus acuminata ectomycorrhizae from Argentinean alder stands.

    PubMed

    Pritsch, Karin; Becerra, Alejandra; Põlme, Sergei; Tedersoo, Leho; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the morphological and anatomical features of five unidentified ectomycorrhizal types of Alnus acuminata and to complement their identification based on ITS-rDNA sequence analysis. The combined approach of morphotyping and sequence analysis based on ITS sequence comparison with sequences contained in GenBank and the UNITE database let us assign three of the five field-collected ectomycorrhiza morphotypes to the tomentella-thelephora lineage that closely matched European and North American species. The sequencing results within Tomentella point toward alder specific clades within T. sublilacina, T. ellisii and T. stuposa sensu lato. The two other EcM morphotypes matched Lactarius omphaliiformis and a Russula sp. Better focused, concomitant fruit body surveys are needed for accurate identification of South American ectomycorrhizal fungi because of the evidence of cryptic speciation in both agaricoid and resupinate mycobionts.

  14. Identification of a far-red reflectance response to ectomycorrhizae in slash pine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cibula, W. G.; Carter, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral reflectances were measured for the canopies of Pinus elliottii seedlings that were inoculated versus noninoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius. Reflectances of the less vigorous, noninoculated seedlings increased substantially at visible and near-IR wavelengths compared to the more vigorous, inoculated seedlings. An algorithm was developed to indicate the spectral regions in which reflectance was most sensitive to ectomycorrhizae. The reflectance curve of the more vigorous seedlings was used as a standard of comparison. The spectral regions defined by this algorithm are denoted as regions of maximum reflectance sensitivity. Far-red and near-IR photography filtered to the region of maximum sensitivity (700 nm) were used to enable visualization of a 'blue shift' reflectance response to decreased vigor in the noninoculated seedlings in response to these differences of mycorrhizal development.

  15. The ectomycorrhizas of Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae associated with Alnus acuminata in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay-Serrano, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Two pure Alnus acuminata stands established in a montane forest in central Mexico (Puebla State) were monitored between 2010 and 2013 to confirm and recognize the ectomycorrhizal (EcM) systems of A. acuminata with Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae, two recently described species. Through comparison of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizas sampled in the forest stands, we confirmed their ectomycorrhizal association. The phytobiont was corroborated by comparing ITS sequences obtained from EcM root tips and leaves collected in the study site and from other sequences of A. acuminata available in Genbank. Detailed morphological and anatomical descriptions of the ectomycorrhizal systems are presented and complemented with photographs.

  16. Identification of a far-red reflectance response to ectomycorrhizae in slash pine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cibula, W. G.; Carter, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral reflectances were measured for the canopies of Pinus elliottii seedlings that were inoculated versus noninoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius. Reflectances of the less vigorous, noninoculated seedlings increased substantially at visible and near-IR wavelengths compared to the more vigorous, inoculated seedlings. An algorithm was developed to indicate the spectral regions in which reflectance was most sensitive to ectomycorrhizae. The reflectance curve of the more vigorous seedlings was used as a standard of comparison. The spectral regions defined by this algorithm are denoted as regions of maximum reflectance sensitivity. Far-red and near-IR photography filtered to the region of maximum sensitivity (700 nm) were used to enable visualization of a 'blue shift' reflectance response to decreased vigor in the noninoculated seedlings in response to these differences of mycorrhizal development.

  17. UV light impact on ellagitannins and wood surface colour of European oak ( Quercus petraea and Quercus robur)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahri, S.; Belloncle, C.; Charrier, F.; Pardon, P.; Quideau, S.; Charrier, B.

    2007-03-01

    Two European oak species ( Q. petraea and Q. robur) have a high content of phenols which may participate in the alteration of colour upon UV irradiation. To study the photodegradation process of oak surfaces, the two oak species extractives, vescalagin, castalagin, ellagic acid and gallic acid were analysed quantitatively by HPLC before and after UV irradiation. Irradiation time was altered between 3, 24, 72, 96, 120, 144, 192 and 216 h. In parallel, any colour changes of Oak wood surface was followed after 120 h of UV-irradiation by measuring CIELAB parameters (DL*, Da*, Db* and DE*). We observed that 60% of total phenol content of extractives decreased after the maximal exposure time. Our findings also showed that castalagin and gallic acid were destroyed after 216 h and vescalagin and ellagic acid after 72 h. This study proves the photosenibility of oakwood extractives which, supplementary to lignin degradation, would strongly result in the discolouration of oak heartwood.

  18. Comparison of ectomycorrhizas of Quercus garryana (Fagaceae) on serpentine and non-serpentine soils in southwestern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Moser, A Mariah; Petersen, Carolyn A; D'Allura, Jad A; Southworth, Darlene

    2005-02-01

    The diversity of ectomycorrhizal communities associated with Quercus garryana on and off serpentine soils was compared and related to landscape-level diversity. Serpentine soils are high in magnesium, iron, and heavy metals and low in fertility. In plant communities on serpentine soils, a high proportion of flowering plant species are endemic. At three sites with paired serpentine and nonserpentine soils in southwestern Oregon, we sampled Q. garryana roots and categorized ectomycorrhizas by morphotyping and by restriction fragment length patterns. Ectomycorrhizas were abundant at all sites; no single fungal species dominated in the ectomycorrhizas. Of 74 fungal species characterized by morphotype and pattern of restriction fragment length polymorphisms, 46 occurred on serpentine soils, and 32 were unique to serpentine soil. These species are potentially endemic to serpentine soil. Similarities in species composition between paired serpentine and nonserpentine soils were not significantly lower than among three serpentine sites or among three nonserpentine sites. We conclude that mycorrhizal communities associated with oaks on serpentine soil do not differ in species richness or species evenness from those on neighboring nonserpentine soil.

  19. Reciprocal carbon and nitrogen transfer between an ericaceous dwarf shrub and fungi isolated from Piceirhiza bicolorata ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Grelet, Gwen-Aëlle; Johnson, David; Paterson, Eric; Anderson, Ian C; Alexander, Ian J

    2009-01-01

    The overstorey coniferous trees and understorey ericaceous dwarf shrubs of northern temperate and boreal forests have previously been considered to form mycorrhizas with taxonomically and functionally distinct groups of fungi. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Meliniomyces variabilis and Meliniomyces bicolor, isolated from Piceirhiza bicolorata ectomycorrhizas of pine, can function as ericoid mycorrhizal symbionts with Vaccinium vitis-idaea. We used split-compartment microcosms to measure the reciprocal exchange of (13)C and (15)N between V. vitis-idaea and three fungal isolates in the Hymenoscyphus ericae aggregate isolated from Scots pine ectomycorrhizas (M. variabilis and M. bicolor) or Vaccinium roots (M. variabilis). The extramatrical fungal mycelium of labelled mycorrhizal plants was significantly enriched in (13)C, and the leaves were significantly enriched in (15)N, compared with nonmycorrhizal and nonlabelled controls. * These findings show for the first time that fungi in the H. ericae aggregate, isolated from pine ectomycorrhizas, can transfer C and N and can thus form functional ericoid mycorrhizas in an understorey ericaceous shrub.

  20. New data on ectomycorrhizae and soils of the Chinese truffles Tuber pseudoexcavatum and Tuber indicum, and their impact on truffle cultivation.

    PubMed

    García-Montero, Luis G; Di Massimo, Gabriella; Manjón, José L; García-Abril, Antonio

    2008-12-01

    Chinese truffles serve as a good complement to the market for Tuber melanosporum (Périgord black truffle). However, Chinese truffles could be introduced accidentally or fraudulently into the plantations of Mediterranean truffles, and they could have a negative effect on truffle production and natural ecosystems. The study of Tuber species from China which are commercialized in Europe began 14 years ago. Tuber pseudoexcavatum was proposed as a new species, and this has been validated by some authors based on molecular and phylogenetic studies. We synthesize their ectomycorrhizae using samples from the type collection, and we compare T. pseudoexcavatum and Tuber indicum ectomycorrhizae. The ectomycorrhizae of these species have a morphology which is related to the ectomycorrhizae of T. melanosporum. We provide useful information for the rapid screening of the above-mentioned Chinese truffles ectomycorrhizae, for the quality control of commercial plants mycorrhized with Tuber. Moreover, we analyze the soil tolerance and the host plant affinity of T. pseudoexcavatum and T. indicum, in order to assess the capacity of both Chinese truffles to penetrate T. melanosporum plantations and habitats.

  1. Molecular approach to characterize ectomycorrhizae fungi from Mediterranean pine stands in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ragonezi, Carla; Caldeira, A Teresa; Martins, M Rosário; Salvador, Cátia; Santos-Silva, Celeste; Ganhão, Elsa; Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Zavattieri, Amely

    2013-01-01

    Stone pine (Pinus pinea L.), like other conifers, forms ectomycorrhizas (ECM), which have beneficial impact on plant growth in natural environments and forest ecosystems. An in vitro co-culture of stone pine microshoots with pure mycelia of isolated ECM sporocarps was used to overcome the root growth cessation not only in vitro but also to improve root development during acclimation phase. Pisolithus arhizus (Scop.) Rauschert and Lactarius deliciosus (L. ex Fr.) S.F. Gray fungi, were collected, pure cultured and used in in vitro co-culture with stone pine microshoots. Samples of P. arhizus and L. deliciosus for the in vitro co-cultures were collected from the pine stands southwest Portugal. The in situ characterization was based on their morphotypes. To confirm the identity of the collected material, ITS amplification was applied using the pure cultures derived from the sporocarps. Additionally, a molecular profile using PCR based genomic fingerprinting comparison was executed with other genera of Basidiomycetes and Ascomycetes. Our results showed the effectiveness of the techniques used to amplify DNA polymorphic sequences, which enhances the characterization of the genetic profile of ECM fungi and also provides an option to verify the fungus identity at any stage of plant mycorrhization.

  2. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    PubMed

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation.

  3. The role of mycorrhization helper bacteria in the establishment and action of ectomycorrhizae associations

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonte, Tatiana Alves; Pylro, Victor Satler; Duarte, Gabriela Frois

    2010-01-01

    More than 95 % short roots of most terrestrial plants are colonized by mycorrhizal fungi as soon as they emerge in the upper soil profiles. The establishment of mycorrhizal association involves profound morphological and physiological changes in root and fungus. It is affected by other rhizospheric microorganisms, specifically by the bacteria. Bacteria may have developed mechanisms of selective interaction with surrounding microorganisms, with neutral or positive effects on mycorrhizal associations, but negative effect on root pathogens in general. Because of the beneficial effect of bacteria on mycorrhizae, the concept of Mycorrhization Helper Bacteria (MHB) was created. Five main actions of MHB on mycorrhizae were proposed: in the receptivity of root to the mycobiont, in root-fungus recognition, in fungal growth, in the modification of rhizospheric soil and in the germination of fungal propagules. MHB appear to develop a gradation of specificity for the mycobiont, but little or no specificity for the host plant in symbiosis. One of the main groups of MHB is the fluorescent Pseudomonas, well represented in diversity and cell density studies of mycorrhizal associations. This review covers the activity of MHB in the establishment of ectomycorrhizae, taking as model the effects of Pseudomonas sp. described in scientific literature. PMID:24031563

  4. Quantitative assessment of the differential impacts of arbuscular and ectomycorrhiza on soil carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Makarov, Mikhail I; Onipchenko, Vladimir G; Maslov, Mikhail N; Akhmetzhanova, Asem A; van Bodegom, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    A significant fraction of carbon stored in the Earth's soil moves through arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and ectomycorrhiza (EM). The impacts of AM and EM on the soil carbon budget are poorly understood. We propose a method to quantify the mycorrhizal contribution to carbon cycling, explicitly accounting for the abundance of plant-associated and extraradical mycorrhizal mycelium. We discuss the need to acquire additional data to use our method, and present our new global database holding information on plant species-by-site intensity of root colonization by mycorrhizas. We demonstrate that the degree of mycorrhizal fungal colonization has globally consistent patterns across plant species. This suggests that the level of plant species-specific root colonization can be used as a plant trait. To exemplify our method, we assessed the differential impacts of AM : EM ratio and EM shrub encroachment on carbon stocks in sub-arctic tundra. AM and EM affect tundra carbon stocks at different magnitudes, and via partly distinct dominant pathways: via extraradical mycelium (both EM and AM) and via mycorrhizal impacts on above- and belowground biomass carbon (mostly AM). Our method provides a powerful tool for the quantitative assessment of mycorrhizal impact on local and global carbon cycling processes, paving the way towards an improved understanding of the role of mycorrhizas in the Earth's carbon cycle. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Morphological-anatomical characterization and molecular identification of Tomentella stuposa ectomycorrhizae and related anatomotypes.

    PubMed

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Kovács, G M; Agerer, R; Romsics, C; Eros-Honti, Z

    2005-06-01

    Species in the genus Tomentella (Thelephoraceae) belong to the most frequent and widespread ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi found in temperate and boreal forests. Although several unidentified tomentelloid morphotypes have been presented as common members of EM communities in coniferous and broad-leaved forests, few tomentelloid EM have been identified and described in detail. In this study, ten tomentelloid EM isolates collected from Populus alba, Quercus cerris and Picea abies stands in Hungary and Germany are characterized and documented by morphological-anatomical methods using light microscopy. The investigated ectomycorrhizae belong to the same brown-black tomentelloid morphotype but form two different anatomotype groups (At I and At II). Molecular taxonomical identification was accomplished using phylogenetic analysis (neighbor joining method) of 49 Tomentella nrDNA-ITS nucleotide sequences including the 10 new and 39 GenBank sequences. The EM isolates clustered into two adjoining clades identical with the two anatomotypes. At II clustered with Tomentella stuposa while At I could not be identified to species. Based on the morphological similarity and the low genetic difference it must be a closely related taxon. A comparison of the recently known tomentelloid EM to T. stuposa is presented. Ecological questions involving abundance and host relationships are discussed.

  6. Peering into the Mediterranean black box: Lactifluus rugatus ectomycorrhizas on Cistus.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Marco; Comandini, Ornella; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2016-12-01

    We describe the morpho-anatomical features of the ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) formed by Lactifluus rugatus on Cistus, a genus of about 20 species of woody shrubs typical of the Mediterranean maquis. The description of L. rugatus mycorrhizas on Cistus is the first ECM description of a species belonging to Lactifluus subgen. Pseudogymnocarpi. The ECM identity was verified through molecular tools. Anatomically, the characteristic of L. rugatus mycorrhiza is the presence of abundant, long "bottle-shaped" cystidia on mantle surface. Indeed, the overwhelming majority of milkcap mycorrhizas are acystidiate. This is the third Lactarius/Lactifluus mycorrhiza to have been described associated with Cistus, the others being Lactarius cistophilus and L. tesquorum. The phylogenetic distance between all these taxa is reflected by the diversity of the principal features of their ECMs, which share host-depending ECM features known for Cistus, but are otherwise distinguishable on the host roots. Comparison of Lactifluus rugatus ECM with those formed by L. vellereus and L. piperatus on Fagus reveals elevated intrageneric diversity of mycorrhizal structures. Such a diversity is supported by analysis of ITS sequences of relevant species within European Lactifluus species. Our study extends knowledge of Cistus mycorrhizal biology and confirms the informative value of mycorrhizal structures in understanding phylogenetic relationships in ECM fungi.

  7. Detection of summer truffle (Tuber aestivum Vittad.) in ectomycorrhizae and in soil using specific primers.

    PubMed

    Gryndler, Milan; Hršelová, Hana; Soukupová, Lucie; Streiblová, Eva; Valda, Slavomír; Borovička, Jan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Gažo, Ján; Miko, Marián

    2011-05-01

    Tuber aestivum is becoming an important commodity of great economical value in some European countries. At the same time, it is a highly protected organism in other countries, where it needs careful treatment. A reliable method of detection in roots and soil is thus needed for assessment of geographic distribution, ecological studies and inoculation efficiency testing in man-made experiments. A PCR-based method of detection of T. aestivum using specific primers was therefore developed. A pair of PCR primers Tu1sekvF/Tu2sekvR selective for T. aestivum and some genotypes of Tuber mesentericum was designed on the basis of the known internal transcribed spacer T. aestivum sequences. TaiI restriction cleavage was then used to distinguish the two species. The selectivity of the designed primer pair was evaluated using DNA extracted from specimens of a further 13 Tuber spp. Subsequently, the selectivity and robustness to false-positive results with nontarget DNA of the designed primers was compared with two other primer pairs (UncI/UncII and BTAE-F/BTAEMB-R). The occurrence of T. aestivum in soil and ectomycorrhizae collected in its native habitat has been successfully detected using the designed primers and nested PCR. The method is reliable and thus suitable for detection of T. aestivum in the field.

  8. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response1

    PubMed Central

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation. PMID:26084921

  9. The role of ectomycorrhizae of Arolla pine in mediating soil priming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menyailo, Oleg; Matvienko, Anastasia; Cheng, Chih-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Ectomycorhizae is playing a vital role in soil C cycle. However, the role is controversial. Mycorrhizae could be a major source of soil C promoting C sequestration. On the other hand, mycorrhizal fungi could compete with soil free-living microorganisms for resources, accelerating their decomposition of soil organic matter, therefore leading to soil C losses. We studied the contribution of ectomycorrhizae of Arolla pine, a popular tree species in Siberia, in soil priming, a short term changes in decomposition of soil organic matter after addition of glucose. We used in-growth mesh collars where mycorrhizal hyphae could or could not grow in. We applied 13C labeled glucose and measured evolution of CO2 thereafter, and determined 13C-CO2 using Picarro 2131 iCO2 analyzer. The CO2 produced from soil was enriched 13C only during the first 48 hours, thereafter the enrichment declined to the natural abundance level. The maximum δ13C-CO2 was observed during the first 20 min after glucose amendment. It is surprising that not more than 3% of applied C-glucose was recovered as C-CO2 suggesting extremely high C use efficiency (97%). The glucose addition caused CO2 flux to increase by 25-30% during the first two days, the amount of primed C-CO2 was 7 times higher than emitted from applied C. The presence of mycorrhizae shifted both CUE and the priming. Mycorrhizae apparently competed with heterotrophs reducing their CUE by factor of 2, and increasing the priming by factor of 1.5. Overall, mycorrhizae could amplify the priming effect increasing C losses. However, the most part of applied C was incorporated into microbial biomass, resulting at least at the short time scale in net C sequestration. Future studies should be directed to understanding of the long-term fate of C incorporated into microbial biomass.

  10. A fungal conserved gene from the basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum is essential for efficient ectomycorrhiza formation.

    PubMed

    Doré, Jeanne; Marmeisse, Roland; Combier, Jean-Philippe; Gay, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    We used Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis to identify genes in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum that are essential for efficient mycorrhiza formation. One of the mutants presented a dramatically reduced ability to form ectomycorrhizas when grown in the presence of Pinus pinaster. It failed to form mycorrhizas in the presence of glucose at 0.5 g liter(-1), a condition favorable for mycorrhiza formation by the wild-type strain. However, it formed few mycorrhizas when glucose was replaced by fructose or when glucose concentration was increased to 1 g liter(-1). Scanning electron microscopy examination of these mycorrhizas revealed that this mutant was unable to differentiate true fungal sheath and Hartig net. Molecular analyses showed that the single-copy disrupting T-DNA was integrated 6,884 bp downstream from the start codon, of an open reading frame potentially encoding a 3,096-amino-acid-long protein. This gene, which we named HcMycE1, has orthologs in numerous fungi as well as different other eukaryotic microorganisms. RNAi inactivation of HcMycE1 in the wild-type strain also led to a mycorrhizal defect, demonstrating that the nonmycorrhizal phenotype of the mutant was due to mutagenic T-DNA integration in HcMycE1. In the wild-type strain colonizing P. pinaster roots, HcMycE1 was transiently upregulated before symbiotic structure differentiation. Together with the inability of the mutant to differentiate these structures, this suggests that HcMycE1 plays a crucial role upstream of the fungal sheath and Hartig net differentiation. This study provides the first characterization of a fungal mutant altered in mycorrhizal ability.

  11. Ectomycorrhizas naturally established in Nothofagus nervosa seedlings under different cultivation practices in a forest nursery.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Natalia V; Marchelli, Paula; Fontenla, Sonia B

    2013-10-01

    Mycorrhizas are mutualistic associations between soil fungi and plant roots which usually improve water and nutrient uptake, influencing plant fitness. Nothofagus nervosa (Raulí) is an ecologically and economically important species of South American temperate forests. Since this native tree species yields valuable timber, it was overexploited and its natural distribution area was critically reduced, so it is currently included in domestication and conservation programs. Among the factors that should be considered in these programs are the ectomycorrhizas (EcM), which would be important for the successful establishment and survival of outplanted seedlings. The aim of this work was to analyze the abundance and diversity of EcM in N. nervosa nursery-cultivated seedlings assessed by morphotyping, fungal isolation, and DNA sequencing. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) occurrence was also studied. A 2-year trial was conducted following the cultivation conditions used for domestication programs. Seedlings were cultivated under two different cultivation practices (greenhouse and nursery soil) without artificial inoculation of mycorrhizal fungi. Seedlings' roots were examined at different times. It was observed that they developed EcM between 6 and 12 months after germination and AMs were not detected in any plant. The most abundant ectomycorrhizal fungi present in seedlings' roots were Tomentella ellisii (Basidiomycota) and an unidentified fungus named Ascomicetous EcM sp. 1. Abundance and diversity of EcM varied between the two cultivation techniques analyzed in this study, since seedlings that continued growing in the greenhouse had higher colonization values, but those transplanted to the nursery soil were colonized by a higher diversity of fungal taxa.

  12. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals, metalloids, and chlorine in ectomycorrhizae from smelter-polluted area.

    PubMed

    Cejpková, Jaroslava; Gryndler, Milan; Hršelová, Hana; Kotrba, Pavel; Řanda, Zdeněk; Synková, Iva; Borovička, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi contribute to the survival of host trees on metal-rich soils by reducing the transfer of toxic metals into roots. However, little is known about the ability of ECM fungi to accumulate elements in ectomycorrhizae (ECMs). Here we report Ag, As, Cd, Cl, Cu, Sb, V, and Zn contents in wild-grown Norway spruce ECMs collected in a smelter-polluted area at Lhota near Příbram, Czech Republic. The ECMs data were compared with the element concentrations determined in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal fine roots, soils, and soil extracts. Bioaccumulation factors were calculated to differentiate the element accumulation ability of ECMs inhabited by different mycobionts, which were identified by ITS rDNA sequencing. Among the target elements, the highest contents were observed for Ag, Cl, Cd, and Zn; Imleria badia ECMs showed the highest capability to accumulate these elements. ECMs of Amanita muscaria, but not of other species, accumulated V. The analysis of the proportions of I. badia and A. muscaria mycelia in ECMs by using species-specific quantitative real-time PCR revealed variable extent of the colonization of roots, with median values close to 5% (w/w). Calculated Ag, Cd, Zn and Cl concentrations in the mycelium of I. badia ECMs were 1 680, 1 510, 2 670, and 37,100 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively, indicating substantial element accumulation capacity of hyphae of this species in ECMs. Our data strengthen the idea of an active role of ECM fungi in soil-fungal-plant interactions in polluted environments.

  13. Seasonal Changes Affect Root Prunasin Concentration in Prunus serotina and Override Species Interactions between P. serotina and Quercus petraea.

    PubMed

    Robakowski, Piotr; Bielinis, Ernest; Stachowiak, Jerzy; Mejza, Iwona; Bułaj, Bartosz

    2016-03-01

    The allocation of resources to chemical defense can decrease plant growth and photosynthesis. Prunasin is a cyanogenic glycoside known for its role in defense against herbivores and other plants. In the present study, fluctuations of prunasin concentrations in roots of Prunus serotina seedlings were hypothesized to be: (1) dependent on light, air temperature, and humidity; (2) affected by competition between Prunus serotina and Quercus petraea seedlings, with mulching with Prunus serotina leaves; (3) connected with optimal allocation of resources. For the first time, we determined prunasin concentration in roots on several occasions during the vegetative season. The results indicate that seasonal changes have more pronounced effects on prunasin concentration than light regime and interspecific competition. Prunus serotina invested more nitrogen in the synthesis of prunasin under highly restricted light conditions than in higher light environments. In full sun, prunasin in roots of Prunus serotina growing in a monoculture was correlated with growth and photosynthesis, whereas these relationships were not found when interspecific competition with mulching was a factor. The study demonstrates that prunasin concentration in Prunus serotina roots is the result of species-specific adaptation, light and temperature conditions, ontogenetic shift, and, to a lesser extent, interspecific plant-plant interactions.

  14. Linkage maps for Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea combining anonymous and Arabidopsis thaliana-derived markers.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Julien; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2007-02-01

    Arabidopsis lyrata, a close relative of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is 1 of a few plant species for which the genome is to be entirely sequenced, which promises to yield important insights into genome evolution. Only 2 sparse linkage maps have been published, and these were based solely on markers derived from the A. thaliana genome. Because the genome of A. lyrata is practically twice as large as that of A. thaliana, the extent of map coverage of the A. lyrata genome remains uncertain. In this study, a 2-way pseudo-testcross strategy was used to construct genetic linkage maps of A. lyrata subsp. petraea and A. lyrata subsp. lyrata, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers from the A. thaliana genome, and anonymous amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that could potentially uncover regions unique to the A. lyrata genome. The SSR and CAPS markers largely confirmed the relationships between linkage groups in A. lyrata and A. thaliana. AFLP markers slightly increased the coverage of the A. lyrata maps, but mostly increased marker density on the linkage groups. We noted a much lower level of polymorphism and a greater segregation distortion in A. lyrata subsp. lyrata markers. The implications of these findings for the sequencing of the A. lyrata genome are discussed.

  15. Genome scanning for interspecific differentiation between two closely related oak species [Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl.].

    PubMed

    Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Mariette, Stéphanie; Porth, Ilga; Goicoechea, Pablo G; Barreneche, Teresa; Bodénès, Catherine; Burg, Kornel; Kremer, Antoine

    2004-11-01

    Interspecific differentiation values (G(ST)) between two closely related oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) were compiled across different studies with the aim to explore the distribution of differentiation at the genome level. The study was based on a total set of 389 markers (isozymes, AFLPs, SCARs, microsatellites, and SNPs) for which allelic frequencies were estimated in pairs of populations sampled throughout the sympatric distribution of the two species. The overall distribution of G(ST) values followed an L-shaped curve with most markers exhibiting low species differentiation (G(ST) < 0.01) and only a few loci reaching >10% levels. Twelve percent of the loci exhibited significant G(ST) deviations to neutral expectations, suggesting that selection contributed to species divergence. Coding regions expressed higher differentiation than noncoding regions. Among the 389 markers, 158 could be mapped on the 12 linkage groups of the existing Q. robur genetic map. Outlier loci with large G(ST) values were distributed over 9 linkage groups. One cluster of three outlier loci was found within 0.51 cM; but significant autocorrelation of G(ST) was observed at distances <2 cM. The size and distribution of genomic regions involved in species divergence are discussed in reference to hitchhiking effects and disruptive selection.

  16. Genome Scanning for Interspecific Differentiation Between Two Closely Related Oak Species [Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl.

    PubMed Central

    Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Mariette, Stéphanie; Porth, Ilga; Goicoechea, Pablo G.; Barreneche, Teresa; Bodénès, Catherine; Burg, Kornel; Kremer, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Interspecific differentiation values (GST) between two closely related oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) were compiled across different studies with the aim to explore the distribution of differentiation at the genome level. The study was based on a total set of 389 markers (isozymes, AFLPs, SCARs, microsatellites, and SNPs) for which allelic frequencies were estimated in pairs of populations sampled throughout the sympatric distribution of the two species. The overall distribution of GST values followed an L-shaped curve with most markers exhibiting low species differentiation (GST < 0.01) and only a few loci reaching >10% levels. Twelve percent of the loci exhibited significant GST deviations to neutral expectations, suggesting that selection contributed to species divergence. Coding regions expressed higher differentiation than noncoding regions. Among the 389 markers, 158 could be mapped on the 12 linkage groups of the existing Q. robur genetic map. Outlier loci with large GST values were distributed over 9 linkage groups. One cluster of three outlier loci was found within 0.51 cM; but significant autocorrelation of GST was observed at distances <2 cM. The size and distribution of genomic regions involved in species divergence are discussed in reference to hitchhiking effects and disruptive selection. PMID:15579711

  17. Signatures of Demography and Recombination at Coding Genes in Naturally-Distributed Populations of Arabidopsis Lyrata Subsp. Petraea

    PubMed Central

    Vigueira, Cynthia C.; Rauh, Brad; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Lawton-Rauh, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Demography impacts the observed standing level of genetic diversity present in populations. Distinguishing the relative impacts of demography from selection requires a baseline of expressed gene variation in naturally occurring populations. Six nuclear genes were sequenced to estimate the patterns and levels of genetic diversity in natural Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea populations that differ in demographic histories since the Pleistocene. As expected, northern European populations have genetic signatures of a strong population bottleneck likely due to glaciation during the Pleistocene. Levels of diversity in the northern populations are about half of that in central European populations. Bayesian estimates of historical population size changes indicate that central European populations also have signatures of population size change since the last glacial maxima, suggesting that these populations are not as stable as previously thought. Time since divergence amongst northern European populations is higher than amongst central European populations, suggesting that the northern European populations were established before the Pleistocene and survived glaciation in small separated refugia. Estimates of demography based on expressed genes are complementary to estimates based on microsatellites and transposable elements, elucidating temporal shifts in population dynamics and confirming the importance of marker selection for tests of demography. PMID:23554957

  18. Stable isotope signatures confirm carbon and nitrogen gain through ectomycorrhizas in the ghost orchid Epipogium aphyllum Swartz.

    PubMed

    Liebel, H T; Gebauer, G

    2011-03-01

    Epipogium aphyllum is a rare Eurasian achlorophyllous forest orchid known to associate with fungi that form ectomycorrhizas, while closely related orchids of warm humid climates depend on wood- or litter-decomposer fungi. We conducted (13) C and (15) N stable isotope natural abundance analyses to identify the organic nutrient source of E. aphyllum from Central Norway. These data for orchid shoot tissues, in comparison to accompanying autotrophic plants, document C and N flow from ectomycorrhizal fungi to the orchid. DNA data from fungal pelotons in the orchid root cortex confirm the presence of Inocybe and Hebeloma, which are both fungi that form ectomycorrhizas. The enrichment factors for (13) C and (15) N of E. aphyllum are used to calculate a new overall average enrichment factor for mycoheterotrophic plants living in association with ectomycorrhizal fungi (ε(13) C ± 1 SD of 7.2 ± 1.6 ‰ and ε(15) N ± 1 SD of 12.8 ± 3.9 ‰). These can be used to estimate the fungal contribution to organic nutrient uptake by partially mycoheterotrophic plants where fully mycoheterotrophic plants are lacking. N concentrations in orchid tissue were unusually high and significantly higher than in accompanying autotrophic leaf samples. This may be caused by N gain of E. aphyllum from obligate ectomycorrhizal fungi. We show that E. aphyllum is an epiparasitic mycoheterotrophic orchid that depends on ectomycorrhizal Inocybe and Hebeloma to obtain C and N through a tripartite system linking mycoheterotrophic plants through fungi with forest trees.

  19. Regeneration patterns of European oak species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in dependence of environment and neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings.

  20. Contrasting patterns of genetic structuring in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata Subsp. petraea across different regions in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Lundemo, Sverre; Ansell, Stephen W; Stenøien, Hans K

    2014-01-01

    Level and partitioning of genetic diversity is expected to vary between contrasting habitats, reflecting differences in strength of ecological and evolutionary processes. Therefore, it is necessary to consider processes acting on different time scales when trying to explain diversity patterns in different parts of species' distributions. To explore how historical and contemporary factors jointly may influence patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation, we compared genetic composition in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea from the northernmost parts of its distribution range on Iceland to that previously documented in Scandinavia. Leaf tissue and soil were sampled from ten Icelandic populations of A. lyrata. Seedlings were grown from soil samples, and tissue from above-ground and seed bank individuals were genotyped with 21 microsatellite markers. Seed bank density in Icelandic populations was low but not significantly different from that observed in Norwegian populations. While within-population genetic diversity was relatively high on Iceland (H(E) = 0.35), among-population differentiation was low (F(ST) = 0.10) compared to Norwegian and Swedish populations. Population differentiation was positively associated with geographical distance in both Iceland and Scandinavia, but the strength of this relationship varied between regions. Although topography and a larger distribution range may explain the higher differentiation between mountainous Norwegian relative to lowland populations in Sweden, these factors cannot explain the lower differentiation in Icelandic compared to Swedish populations. We propose that low genetic differentiation among Icelandic populations is not caused by differences in connectivity, but is rather due to large historical effective population sizes. Thus, rather than contemporary processes, historical factors such as survival of Icelandic lineages in northern refugia during the last glacial period may have

  1. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    PubMed

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E M; Butlin, Roger K; Burke, Terry; Quick, W Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P

    2016-12-07

    While genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype-environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such as cold response, in

  2. Early Summer Drought Stress During the First Growing Year Stimulates Extra Shoot Growth in Oak Seedlings (Quercus petraea).

    PubMed

    Turcsán, Arion; Steppe, Kathy; Sárközi, Edit; Erdélyi, Éva; Missoorten, Marc; Mees, Ghislain; Mijnsbrugge, Kristine V

    2016-01-01

    More severe summer droughts are predicted for mid-latitudes in Europe. To evaluate the impact on forest ecosystems and more specifically on forest regeneration, we studied the response to summer drought in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea). Acorns were collected from different mother trees in three stands in Belgium, sown in pots and grown in non-heated greenhouse conditions. We imposed drought on the seedlings in early summer by first watering the pots to saturation and then stopping any watering. Weight of the pots and stomatal conductance were regularly measured. Re-watering followed this drought period of 5 weeks. Height of the seedlings and apical bud development were observed. Stomatal resistance increased toward the end of the experiment in the drought-treated group and was restored after re-watering. The seedlings from the drought treatment displayed a higher probability to produce additional shoot growth after re-watering (p ≤ 0.05). A higher competition for water (two plants per pot) increased this chance. Although this chance was also higher for smaller seedlings, the actual length of the extra growth after re-watering was higher for larger seedlings (p ≤ 0.01). Both in the drought-treated and in the control group the autochthonous provenance growing on a xeric site produced less extra shoots compared to the two other provenances. Finally, stressed plants showed less developed apical buds compared to the control group after re-watering, suggesting a phenological effect on the growth cycle of oaks (p ≤ 0.0001). The higher chance for an extra shoot growth after the drought period can be considered as a compensation for the induced growth arrest during the drought period.

  3. Epicormic ontogeny in Quercus petraea constrains the highly plausible control of epicormic sprouting by water and carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Morisset, J. B.; Mothe, F.; Bock, J.; Bréda, N.; Colin, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims There is increasing evidence that suppressed bud burst and thus epicormic shoot emergence (sprouting) are controlled by water–carbohydrate supplies to entire trees and buds. This direct evidence is still lacking for oak. In other respects, recent studies focused on sessile oak, Quercus petraea, have confirmed the important constraints of sprouting by epicormic ontogeny. The main objective of this paper was thus to provide provisional confirmation of the water–carbohydrate control and direct evidence of the ontogenic constraints by bringing together results already published in separate studies on water status and distribution of carbohydrates, and on accompanying vegetation and epicormics, which also quantify epicormic ontogeny. Methods This paper analyses results gained from a sessile oak experiment in which part of the site was free from fairly tall, dense accompanying vegetation. This experiment was initially focused on stand water status and more recently on the carbohydrate distribution of dominant trees. External observations of the epicormic composition and internal observations with X-ray computer tomography were undertaken on 60 and six trees, respectively. Key Results Sprouting was more intense in the part of the stand free from accompanying vegetation and on upper trunk segments. A clear effect of epicormic ontogeny was demonstrated as well: the more epicormics a trunk segment bears, the more chances it had to bear sprouts. Conclusions These results indirectly infer water–carbohydrate control and show direct evidence of constraints by epicormic ontogeny. These results have far-reaching consequences related to the quantification of all functions fulfilled by any type of epicormic structure in any part of the tree. PMID:22147545

  4. Contrasting Patterns of Genetic Structuring in Natural Populations of Arabidopsis lyrata Subsp. petraea across Different Regions in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Lundemo, Sverre; Ansell, Stephen W.; Stenøien, Hans K.

    2014-01-01

    Level and partitioning of genetic diversity is expected to vary between contrasting habitats, reflecting differences in strength of ecological and evolutionary processes. Therefore, it is necessary to consider processes acting on different time scales when trying to explain diversity patterns in different parts of species' distributions. To explore how historical and contemporary factors jointly may influence patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation, we compared genetic composition in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea from the northernmost parts of its distribution range on Iceland to that previously documented in Scandinavia. Leaf tissue and soil were sampled from ten Icelandic populations of A. lyrata. Seedlings were grown from soil samples, and tissue from above-ground and seed bank individuals were genotyped with 21 microsatellite markers. Seed bank density in Icelandic populations was low but not significantly different from that observed in Norwegian populations. While within-population genetic diversity was relatively high on Iceland (HE = 0.35), among-population differentiation was low (FST = 0.10) compared to Norwegian and Swedish populations. Population differentiation was positively associated with geographical distance in both Iceland and Scandinavia, but the strength of this relationship varied between regions. Although topography and a larger distribution range may explain the higher differentiation between mountainous Norwegian relative to lowland populations in Sweden, these factors cannot explain the lower differentiation in Icelandic compared to Swedish populations. We propose that low genetic differentiation among Icelandic populations is not caused by differences in connectivity, but is rather due to large historical effective population sizes. Thus, rather than contemporary processes, historical factors such as survival of Icelandic lineages in northern refugia during the last glacial period may have

  5. Early Summer Drought Stress During the First Growing Year Stimulates Extra Shoot Growth in Oak Seedlings (Quercus petraea)

    PubMed Central

    Turcsán, Arion; Steppe, Kathy; Sárközi, Edit; Erdélyi, Éva; Missoorten, Marc; Mees, Ghislain; Mijnsbrugge, Kristine V.

    2016-01-01

    More severe summer droughts are predicted for mid-latitudes in Europe. To evaluate the impact on forest ecosystems and more specifically on forest regeneration, we studied the response to summer drought in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea). Acorns were collected from different mother trees in three stands in Belgium, sown in pots and grown in non-heated greenhouse conditions. We imposed drought on the seedlings in early summer by first watering the pots to saturation and then stopping any watering. Weight of the pots and stomatal conductance were regularly measured. Re-watering followed this drought period of 5 weeks. Height of the seedlings and apical bud development were observed. Stomatal resistance increased toward the end of the experiment in the drought-treated group and was restored after re-watering. The seedlings from the drought treatment displayed a higher probability to produce additional shoot growth after re-watering (p ≤ 0.05). A higher competition for water (two plants per pot) increased this chance. Although this chance was also higher for smaller seedlings, the actual length of the extra growth after re-watering was higher for larger seedlings (p ≤ 0.01). Both in the drought-treated and in the control group the autochthonous provenance growing on a xeric site produced less extra shoots compared to the two other provenances. Finally, stressed plants showed less developed apical buds compared to the control group after re-watering, suggesting a phenological effect on the growth cycle of oaks (p ≤ 0.0001). The higher chance for an extra shoot growth after the drought period can be considered as a compensation for the induced growth arrest during the drought period. PMID:26941760

  6. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea

    PubMed Central

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E. M.; Butlin, Roger K.; Burke, Terry; Quick, W. Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    While genotype–environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates—a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and “somaclonal” variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea. Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype–environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such

  7. Regeneration Patterns of European Oak Species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in Dependence of Environment and Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings

  8. Anatomical and molecular characterization of Lactarius aff. omphaliformis, Russula alnijorullensis and Cortinarius tucumanensis ectomycorrhizae on Alnus acuminata.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Alejandra; Beenken, Ludwig; Pritsch, Karin; Daniele, Graciela; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) of Lactarius aff. omphaliformis Romagn., Russula alnijorullensis (Sing.) Sing. and Cortinarius tucumanensis Mos. on Andean alder (Alnus acuminata Kunth) were characterized and identified. The identification of the fungal symbionts was achieved by morpho-anatomical observations of mycorrhizae and by comparison of ITS-RFLP patterns obtained from ECM and fruitbodies. L. aff omphaliformis ECM differed in some morphological details such as ramification and mantle type from ECM of the same species on A. glutinosa. L. aff omphaliformis ECM show an orange to ochre mantle containing latex cells, which stain with sulpho-vanillin, emanating hyphae without clamps. R. alnijorullensis ECM represent a typical Russula-type-ECM, light yellow to pinkish, the outer mantle being composed of triangular latex-filled cells staining with sulpho-vanillin, emanating hyphae without clamps. C. tucumanensis ECM exhibit a white (silvery) to yellowish brown mantle covered with soil particles, emanating hyphae with clamps.

  9. Short-term response to waterlogging in Quercus petraea and Quercus robur: A study of the root hydraulic responses and the transcriptional pattern of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Rasheed-Depardieu, Claire; Parelle, Julien; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne; Parent, Claire; Capelli, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the short-term response to waterlogging in Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. and Quercus robur L. as the initial response towards their known long-term differences in tolerance to waterlogging. One-month old seedlings were subjected to hypoxic stress and leaf gas exchange, shoot water potential (Ψs) and root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) were measured. In parallel, the expression of nine aquaporins (AQPs) along the primary root was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed a similar reduction in net assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs) for the two species. Notably, the response of Lpr differed temporally between the two species. Q. robur seedlings exhibited a significant early decline of Lpr within the first 5 h that returned to control levels after 48 h, whereas Q. petraea seedlings showed a delayed response with a significant decrease of Lpr exhibited only after 48 h. Transcriptional profiling revealed that three genes (PIP1;3, TIP2;1 and TIP2;2) were differentially regulated under stress conditions in the two oak species. Taken together, these results suggested species-specific responses to short-term waterlogging in terms of root water transport.

  10. Identification and expression of nine oak aquaporin genes in the primary root axis of two oak species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur.

    PubMed

    Rasheed-Depardieu, Claire; Parent, Claire; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Parelle, Julien; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne; Le Provost, Grégoire; Capelli, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) belong to the Major Intrinsic Protein family that conducts water and other small solutes across biological membranes. This study aimed to identify and characterize AQP genes in the primary root axis of two oak species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. Nine putative AQP genes were cloned, and their expression was profiled in different developmental root zones by real-time PCR. A detailed examination of the predicted amino acid sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolated AQPs could be divided into two subfamilies, which included six plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and three tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs). We characterized the anatomical features of the roots and defined three developmental root zones: the immature, transition and mature zones. Expression analysis of the AQPs was performed according to these root developmental stages. Our results showed that the expression of PIP2;3 and TIP1 was significantly higher in Quercus petraea compared with Quercus robur in the three root zones. However, PIP2;1 and TIP2;1 were found to be differentially expressed in the mature zone of the two oak species. Of the nine AQP genes identified and analyzed, we highlighted four genes that might facilitate a deeper understanding of how these two closely related tree species adapted to different environments.

  11. Identification and Expression of Nine Oak Aquaporin Genes in the Primary Root Axis of Two Oak Species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed-Depardieu, Claire; Parent, Claire; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Parelle, Julien; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne; Le Provost, Grégoire; Capelli, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) belong to the Major Intrinsic Protein family that conducts water and other small solutes across biological membranes. This study aimed to identify and characterize AQP genes in the primary root axis of two oak species, Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. Nine putative AQP genes were cloned, and their expression was profiled in different developmental root zones by real-time PCR. A detailed examination of the predicted amino acid sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolated AQPs could be divided into two subfamilies, which included six plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and three tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs). We characterized the anatomical features of the roots and defined three developmental root zones: the immature, transition and mature zones. Expression analysis of the AQPs was performed according to these root developmental stages. Our results showed that the expression of PIP2;3 and TIP1 was significantly higher in Quercus petraea compared with Quercus robur in the three root zones. However, PIP2;1 and TIP2;1 were found to be differentially expressed in the mature zone of the two oak species. Of the nine AQP genes identified and analyzed, we highlighted four genes that might facilitate a deeper understanding of how these two closely related tree species adapted to different environments. PMID:23284785

  12. Thuja plicata exclusion in ectomycorrhiza-dominated forests: testing the role of inoculum potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Weber, Adrian; Karst, Justine; Gilbert, Benjamin; Kimmins, J P

    2005-03-01

    The ability of trees dependent on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to establish in ectomycorrhizal forests is unknown. On northern Vancouver Island, Canada, there are sharp boundaries between mixed red cedar (Thuja plicata)-hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) (CH) stands, and stands of hemlock and amabilis fir (Abies amabilis) (HA). We tested differences in AM colonization of red cedar between ectomycorrhiza-dominated (HA) stands and stands containing red cedar (CH), across a range of light levels. We used a soil bioassay approach to determine whether there was sufficient AM fungal inoculum in the HA tree stands to colonize red cedar seedlings. Seeds of hemlock and red cedar were sown in forest floor samples collected from the two types of forests, and shade treatments ranging from < 1 to 53% of full sunlight were imposed. After 6 months, seedling survival and root and shoot biomass were quantified, and red cedar seedlings were sampled for AM fungal colonization. Hemlock survival and growth did not differ between soil types, suggesting there was no substrate-associated limitation to its establishment in either forest type. Red cedar colonization by AM fungi was significantly correlated with light levels in CH soils but arbuscular mycorrhizas were absent in roots of red cedar seedlings grown in HA soil. Red cedar survival and relative growth rate were significantly greater in the CH than in HA soil; higher growth was due primarily to greater shoot growth in CH soils at high light levels. The low soil inoculum potential for red cedar in ectomycorrhiza-dominated stands may account for the virtual exclusion of red cedar seedlings from these forests.

  13. Stand density, tree social status and water stress influence allocation in height and diameter growth of Quercus petraea (Liebl.).

    PubMed

    Trouvé, Raphaël; Bontemps, Jean-Daniel; Seynave, Ingrid; Collet, Catherine; Lebourgeois, François

    2015-10-01

    Even-aged forest stands are competitive communities where competition for light gives advantages to tall individuals, thereby inducing a race for height. These same individuals must however balance this competitive advantage with height-related mechanical and hydraulic risks. These phenomena may induce variations in height-diameter growth relationships, with primary dependences on stand density and tree social status as proxies for competition pressure and access to light, and on availability of local environmental resources, including water. We aimed to investigate the effects of stand density, tree social status and water stress on the individual height-circumference growth allocation (Δh-Δc), in even-aged stands of Quercus petraea Liebl. (sessile oak). Within-stand Δc was used as surrogate for tree social status. We used an original long-term experimental plot network, set up in the species production area in France, and designed to explore stand dynamics on a maximum density gradient. Growth allocation was modelled statistically by relating the shape of the Δh-Δc relationship to stand density, stand age and water deficit. The shape of the Δh-Δc relationship shifted from linear with a moderate slope in open-grown stands to concave saturating with an initial steep slope in closed stands. Maximum height growth was found to follow a typical mono-modal response to stand age. In open-grown stands, increasing summer soil water deficit was found to decrease height growth relative to radial growth, suggesting hydraulic constraints on height growth. A similar pattern was found in closed stands, the magnitude of the effect however lowering from suppressed to dominant trees. We highlight the high phenotypic plasticity of growth in sessile oak trees that further adapt their allocation scheme to their environment. Stand density and tree social status were major drivers of growth allocation variations, while water stress had a detrimental effect on height in the

  14. Coincidence of Small-scale Spatial Discontinuities in Leaf Morphology and Nuclear Microsatellite Variation of Quercus petraea and Q. robur in a Mixed Forest

    PubMed Central

    Gugerli, F.; Walser, J.-C.; Dounavi, K.; Holderegger, R.; Finkeldey, R.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxon complex comprising Quercus petraea and Q. robur shows distinct morphologies and ecological preferences, but mostly low differentiation in various types of molecular markers at a broad spatial range. Local, spatially explicit analyses may reveal patterns induced by microevolutionary processes operating mainly over short distances. However, no attempts have been made to date to explore the potential of spatial analyses combining morphological and genetic data of these oaks. Methods A mixed oak stand was studied to elucidate the small-scale population genetic structure. All adult individuals were classified and putative hybrids were identified using multivariate discrimination analysis of leaf morphological characters. Likewise, all trees were genotyped with five nuclear microsatellites, and a Bayesian assignment method was applied based on maximum likelihood of multilocus genotypes for taxon and putative hybrid classification. Key Results Multivariate analyses of leaf morphological data recognized two groups with few individuals as putative hybrids. These groups were significantly differentiated at the five microsatellites, and genetic taxon assignment coincided well with morphological classification. Furthermore, most putative hybrids were assigned to the taxon found in their spatial neighbourhood. When grouping trees into clusters according to their spatial positions, these clusters were clearly dominated by one taxon. Discontinuities in morphological and genetic distance matrices among these clusters showed high congruence. Conclusions The spatial–genetic analyses and the available literature led to the assumption that reproductive barriers, assortative mating, limited seed dispersal and microsite-induced selection in favour of the locally adapted taxon at the juvenile stage may reinforce taxon-specific spatial aggregation that fosters species separation. Thus, the results tend to support the hypothesis that Q. petraea and Q. robur

  15. Tuberculate ectomycorrhizae of angiosperms: The interaction between Boletus rubropunctus (Boletaceae) and Quercus species (Fagaceae) in the United States and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew E; Pfister, Donald H

    2009-09-01

    Tuberculate ectomycorrhizae (TECM) are unique structures in which aggregates of ectomycorrhizal roots are encased in a covering of fungal hyphae. The function of TECM is unknown, but they probably enhance the nitrogen nutrition and disease resistance of host plants. Trees in the Pinaceae form TECM with species of Rhizopogon and Suillus (Suillineae, Boletales). Similar tubercules are found with diverse angiosperms, but their mycobionts have not been phylogenetically characterized. We collected TECM in Mexico and the USA that were similar to TECM in previous reports. We describe these TECM and identify both the plant and fungal symbionts. Plant DNA confirms that TECM hosts are Quercus species. ITS sequences from tubercules and sclerotia (hyphal aggregations that serve as survival structures) matched sporocarps of Boletus rubropunctus. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that this fungus belongs to the suborder Boletineae (Boletales). This is the first published report of TECM formation in the Boletineae and of sclerotia formation by a Boletus species. Our data suggest that the TECM morphology is an adaptive feature that has evolved separately in two suborders of Boletales (Suillineae and Boletineae) and that TECM formation is controlled by the mycobiont because TECM are found on distantly related angiosperm and gymnosperm host plants.

  16. Ectomycorrhiza communities of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) of different age in the Lusatian lignite mining district, East Germany.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, S; Neubert, K; Wöllecke, J; Münzenberger, B; Hüttl, R F

    2007-06-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities were assessed on a 720 m(2) plot along a chronosequence of red oak (Quercus rubra) stands on a forest reclamation site with disturbed soil in the lignite mining area of Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, Germany). Adjacent to the mining area, a red oak reference stand with undisturbed soil was investigated reflecting mycorrhiza diversity of the intact landscape. Aboveground, sporocarp surveys were carried out during the fruiting season in a 2-week interval in the years 2002 and 2003. Belowground, ECM morphotypes were identified by comparing sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions from nuclear rDNA with sequences from the GenBank database. Fifteen ECM fungal species were identified as sporocarps and 61 belowground as determined by morphological/anatomical and molecular analysis of their ectomycorrhizas. The number of ECM morphotypes increased with stand age along the chronosequence. However, the number of morphotypes was lower in stands with disturbed soil than with undisturbed soil. All stands showed site-specific ECM communities with low similarity between the chronosequence stands. The dominant ECM species in nearly all stands was Cenococcum geophilum, which reached an abundance approaching 80% in the 21-year-old chronosequence stand. Colonization rate of red oak was high (>95%) at all stands besides the youngest chronosequence stand where colonization rate was only 15%. This supports our idea that artificial inoculation with site-adapted mycorrhizal fungi would enhance colonization rate of red oak and thus plant growth and survival in the first years after outplanting.

  17. A nitrogen fertilization field study of carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 transfers in ectomycorrhizas of Pinus sabiniana.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, María Victoria; Six, Johan; Houlton, Benjamin Z; Bledsoe, Caroline S

    2013-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi form relationships with higher plants; plants transfer C to fungi, and fungi transfer nutrients to their host. While evidence indicates that this interaction is largely mutualistic, less is known about how nutrient supply and EM associates may alter C and nutrient exchanges, especially in intact plant-soil-microbe systems in the field. In a dual-labeling experiment with N fertilization, we used C and N stable isotopes to examine in situ transfers in EM pine trees in a Pinus sabiniana woodland in northern California. We added (15)NH4SO2 and (13)CO2 to track (13)C transfer from pine needles to EM roots and (15)N transfer from soil to EM roots and pine needles. Transfers of (13)C and (15)N differed with EM morphotype and with N fertilization. The brown morphotype received the least C per unit of N transferred (5:1); in contrast red and gold morphotypes gained more C and transferred less N (17:1 and 25:1, respectively). N fertilization increased N retention by ectomycorrhizas (EMs) but did not increase N transfer from EMs to pine needles. Therefore N fertilization positively affected both nutrient and C gains by EMs, increasing net C flows and N retention in EMs. Our work on intact and native trees/EM associations thereby extends earlier conclusions based on pot studies with young plants and culturable EM fungi; our results support the concept that EM-host relationships depend on species-level differences as well as responses to soil resources such as N.

  18. Patterns in root traits of woody species hosting arbuscular and ectomycorrhizas: implications for the evolution of belowground strategies

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Louise H; Callahan, Hilary S; Midford, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    Root traits vary enormously among plant species but we have little understanding of how this variation affects their functioning. Of central interest is how root traits are related to plant resource acquisition strategies from soil. We examined root traits of 33 woody species from northeastern US forests that form two of the most common types of mutualisms with fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and ectomycorrhizas (EM). We examined root trait distribution with respect to plant phylogeny, quantifying the phylogenetic signal (K statistic) in fine root morphology and architecture, and used phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs) to test whether taxa forming different mycorrhizal associations had different root traits. We found a pattern of species forming roots with thinner diameters as species diversified across time. Given moderate phylogenetic signals (K = 0.44–0.68), we used PICs to examine traits variation among taxa forming AM or EM, revealing that hosts of AM were associated with lower branching intensity (rPIC = −0.77) and thicker root diameter (rPIC = −0.41). Because EM evolved relatively more recently and intermittently across plant phylogenies, significant differences in root traits and colonization between plants forming AM and EM imply linkages between the evolution of these biotic interactions and root traits and suggest a history of selection pressures, with trade-offs for supporting different types of associations. Finally, across plant hosts of both EM and AM, species with thinner root diameters and longer specific root length (SRL) had less colonization (rPIC = 0.85, −0.87), suggesting constraints on colonization linked to the evolution of root morphology. PMID:25247056

  19. Patterns in root traits of woody species hosting arbuscular and ectomycorrhizas: implications for the evolution of belowground strategies.

    PubMed

    Comas, Louise H; Callahan, Hilary S; Midford, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    Root traits vary enormously among plant species but we have little understanding of how this variation affects their functioning. Of central interest is how root traits are related to plant resource acquisition strategies from soil. We examined root traits of 33 woody species from northeastern US forests that form two of the most common types of mutualisms with fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and ectomycorrhizas (EM). We examined root trait distribution with respect to plant phylogeny, quantifying the phylogenetic signal (K statistic) in fine root morphology and architecture, and used phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs) to test whether taxa forming different mycorrhizal associations had different root traits. We found a pattern of species forming roots with thinner diameters as species diversified across time. Given moderate phylogenetic signals (K = 0.44-0.68), we used PICs to examine traits variation among taxa forming AM or EM, revealing that hosts of AM were associated with lower branching intensity (r PIC = -0.77) and thicker root diameter (r PIC = -0.41). Because EM evolved relatively more recently and intermittently across plant phylogenies, significant differences in root traits and colonization between plants forming AM and EM imply linkages between the evolution of these biotic interactions and root traits and suggest a history of selection pressures, with trade-offs for supporting different types of associations. Finally, across plant hosts of both EM and AM, species with thinner root diameters and longer specific root length (SRL) had less colonization (r PIC = 0.85, -0.87), suggesting constraints on colonization linked to the evolution of root morphology.

  20. [Effect of ectomycorrhizae on heavy metals sequestration by thermostable protein in rhizosphere of Pinus tabulaeformis under Cu and Cd stress].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Wei; Chai, Li-Wei; Wang, Dong-Wei; Wang, Jie; Huang, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Copper and cadmium in soil is a severe soil pollution problem in China. It is effective to remediate the soil by sequestrating Cu and Cd with tolerant plant and microorganism. Ectomycorrhizae could exude a large number of organic matter to reduce the biological effectiveness of heavy metals. Therefore, under Cu or Cd stress, thermostable protein in rhizosphere exuded by roots of pine seedling (Pinus tabulaeformis) associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi (Xerocomus chrysenteron) can have the potential of sequestration for heavy metals. The results illustrated that the association didn't impact on exudation of thermostable protein but treated with different concentrations of Cu, the total thermostable protein (TTP) and easily extracted thermostable protein (EETP) in mycorrhizal rhizosphere increased by 2.64 to 11.79 times compared with non-mycorrhizal one. While treated with Cd, it was 1.49 to 7.56 times. Further analysis of metal content in rhizosphere showed that association significantly increased the Cu sequestration in mycorrhizal rhizosphere where relative content of Cu was 1.81 to 2.75 times higher than those in non-mycorrhizal rhizosphere while most of Cu was sequestrated by thermostable protein, 4.19 to 43.00 times higher in protein than in root cell. Meanwhile results of Cd treatments showed a similar trend with Cu treatments. That indicated that under excessive heavy metals stress, ectomycorrhizal association facilitated the exudation of thermostable protein so as to extend the capacity of sequestration for excessive heavy metals and mitigate the phytotoxicity from heavy metals polluted soil.

  1. Seeing the forest through the trees: comprehensive inference on individual mating patterns in a mixed stand of Quercus robur and Q. petraea

    PubMed Central

    Chybicki, Igor J.; Burczyk, Jaroslaw

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Sexual reproduction is one of the most important moments in a life cycle, determining the genetic composition of individual offspring. Controlled pollination experiments often show high variation in the mating system at the individual level, suggesting a persistence of individual variation in natural populations. Individual variation in mating patterns may have significant adaptive implications for a population and for the entire species. Nevertheless, field data rarely address individual differences in mating patterns, focusing rather on averages. This study aimed to quantify individual variation in the different components of mating patterns. Methods Microsatellite data were used from 421 adult trees and 1911 seeds, structured in 72 half-sib families collected in a single mixed stand of Quercus robur and Q. petraea in northern Poland. Using a Bayesian approach, mating patterns were investigated, taking into account pollen dispersal, male fecundity, possible hybridization and heterogeneity in immigrant pollen pools. Key Results Pollen dispersal followed a heavy-tailed distribution (283 m on average). In spite of high pollen mobility, immigrant pollen pools showed strong genetic structuring among mothers. At the individual level, immigrant pollen pools showed highly variable divergence rates, revealing that sources of immigrant pollen can vary greatly among particular trees. Within the stand, the distribution of male fecundity appeared highly skewed, with a small number of dominant males, resulting in a ratio of census to effective density of pollen donors of 5·3. Male fecundity was not correlated with tree diameter but showed strong cline-like spatial variation. This pattern can be attributed to environmental variation. Quercus petraea revealed a greater preference (74 %) towards intraspecific mating than Q. robur (36 %), although mating preferences varied among trees. Conclusions Mating patterns can reveal great variation among individuals

  2. The allotetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana-Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea as an alternative model system for the study of polyploidy in plants.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Julien; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2009-04-01

    Polyploidy is known to be common in plants and recent work has focused on the rapid changes in genome structure and expression that occur upon polyploidization. In Arabidopsis, much of this work has been done on a synthetic allotetraploid obtained by crossing a tetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana (2n = 4x = 20) with A. arenosa (2n = 4x = 32). To explore an alternative route to polyploidy in this model species, we have developed a synthetic allopolyploid by crossing two diploid species: A. thaliana (2n = 2x = 10) and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea (2n = 2x = 16). F(1) hybrids were easy to obtain and phenotypically more similar to A. lyrata. Spontaneous chromosome doubling events occurred in about 25% of the F(1)s, thus restoring fertility. The resulting allotetraploids (2n = 26) exhibited many genomic changes typically reported upon polyploidization. Nucleolar dominance was observed as only the A. lyrata rDNA loci were expressed in the F(1) and allotetraploids. Changes in the degree of methylation were observed at almost 25% of the loci examined by MSAP analysis. Finally, structural genomic alterations did occur as a large deletion covering a significant portion of the upper arm of chromosome II was detected but no evidence of increased mobility of transposons was obtained. Such allotetraploids derived from two parents with sequenced (or soon to be sequenced) genomes offer much promise in elucidating the various changes that occur in newly synthesized polyploids.

  3. Strength, diversity and plasticity of postmating reproductive barriers between two hybridizing oak species (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt) Liebl.).

    PubMed

    Abadie, P; Roussel, G; Dencausse, B; Bonnet, C; Bertocchi, E; Louvet, J-M; Kremer, A; Garnier-Géré, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about the nature and strength of reproductive isolation (RI) in Quercus species, despite extensive research on the estimation and evolutionary significance of hybridization rates. We characterized postmating pre- and postzygotic RI between two hybridizing oak species, Quercus robur and Quercus petraea, using a large set of controlled crosses between different genotypes. Various traits potentially associated with reproductive barriers were quantified at several life history stages, from pollen-pistil interactions to seed set and progeny fitness-related traits. Results indicate strong intrinsic postmating prezygotic barriers, with significant barriers also at the postzygotic level, but relatively weaker extrinsic barriers on early hybrid fitness measures assessed in controlled conditions. Using general linear modelling of common garden data with clonal replicates, we showed that most traits exhibited important genotypic differences, as well as different levels of sensitivity to micro-environmental heterogeneity. These new findings suggest a large potential genetic diversity and plasticity of reproductive barriers and are confronted with hybridization evidence in these oak species.

  4. Light and competition gradients fail to explain the coexistence of shade-tolerant Fagus sylvatica and shade-intermediate Quercus petraea seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Van Couwenberghe, Rosalinde; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Lacombe, Eric; Collet, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The coexistence of forest tree species has often been linked to differences among species in terms of their response to light availability during the regeneration stage. From this perspective, species coexistence results from growth–growth or mortality–growth trade-offs along spatial light gradients. Experimental evidence of growth–growth trade-offs in natural conditions is sparse due to various confounding factors that potentially hinder the relationship. This study examined growth hierarchies along light gradients between two tree species with contrasting shade tolerance by controlling potential confounding factors such as seedling size, seedling status, seedling density and species composition. Methods Natural regenerated shade-tolerant Fagus sylvatica and shade-intermediate Quercus petraea seedlings were used, and growth rankings over a 4-year period were compared in 8- to 10-year-old tree seedlings. Key results No rank reversal occurs between the two species along the light gradient, or along the density, mixture or seedling size gradients. The shade-tolerant species was always the more competitive of the two. Pronounced effects of initial size on seedling growth were observed, whereas the effects of light and competition by neighbours were of secondary importance. The paramount effect of size, which results from the asymmetric nature of interseedling competition, gives a strong advantage to tall seedlings over the long term. Conclusions This study extends previous efforts to identify potential drivers of rank reversals in young tree mixtures. It does not support the classical assumption that spatial heterogeneity in canopy opening explains the coexistence of the two species studied. It suggests that spatial variation in local size hierarchies among seedlings that may be caused by seedling emergence time or seedling initial performance is the main driver of the dynamics of these mixed stands. PMID:24036670

  5. Ectomycorrhizas in vitro between Tricholoma matsutake, a basidiomycete that associates with Pinaceae, and Betula platyphylla var. japonica, an early-successional birch species, in cool-temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hitoshi; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Maruyama, Tsuyoshi; Neda, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Tricholoma matsutake is an ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete that associates with Pinaceae in the Northern Hemisphere and produces prized "matsutake" mushrooms. We questioned whether the symbiont could associate with a birch that is an early-successional species in boreal, cool-temperate, or subalpine forests. In the present study, we demonstrated that T. matsutake can form typical ectomycorrhizas with Betula platyphylla var. japonica; the associations included a Hartig net and a thin but distinct fungal sheath, as well as the rhizospheric mycelial aggregate "shiro" that is required for fruiting in nature. The in vitro shiro also emitted a characteristic aroma. This is the first report of an ectomycorrhizal formation between T. matsutake and a deciduous broad-leaved tree in the boreal or cool-temperate zones that T. matsutake naturally inhabits.

  6. Communities and populations of sebacinoid basidiomycetes associated with the achlorophyllous orchid Neottia nidus-avis (L.) L.C.M. Rich. and neighbouring tree ectomycorrhizae.

    PubMed

    Selosse, Marc-André; WEIss, Michael; Jany, Jean-Luc; Tillier, Annie

    2002-09-01

    Several achlorophyllous orchids associate with ectomycorrhizal hymenomycetes deriving carbon from surrounding trees for the plant. However, this has not been shown for achlorophyllous orchids associating with species of Rhizoctonia, a complex of basal lineages of hymenomycetes that are the most common orchid partners. We analysed Neottia nidus-avis, an achlorophyllous orchid symbiotic with a Rhizoctonia, to identify its symbionts by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Analysis of 61 root systems from 23 French populations showed that N. nidus-avis associates highly specifically with a group of species of Sebacinaceae. Their diversity emphasizes the need for further investigations in the Sebacinaceae systematics. Sebacinoid ITS sequences were often identical within orchid populations and a trend to regional variation in symbionts was observed. Using ITS and intergenic spacer (IGS) polymorphism, we showed that each root system harboured a single species, but that several genets colonized it. However, no polymorphism of these markers was found among portions of each root: this is consistent with the putative mode of entry of the fungus, i.e. from the rhizome into roots but not repeatedly from the soil. In addition, ectomycorrhizae were always found within the N. nidus-avis root systems: 120 of the 144 ectomycorrhizae typed by ITS sequencing were colonized by a sebacinoid fungus identical in ITS sequence to the respective orchid symbiont (even for the IGS polymorphism in some cases). Because sebacinoids were demonstrated recently to be ectomycorrhizal, the orchid is likely to derive its resources from surrounding trees, a mycorrhizal cheating strategy similar to other myco-heterotrophic plants studied to date.

  7. Repeated Summer Drought and Re-watering during the First Growing Year of Oak (Quercus petraea) Delay Autumn Senescence and Bud Burst in the Following Spring

    PubMed Central

    Vander Mijnsbrugge, Kristine; Turcsán, Arion; Maes, Jorne; Duchêne, Nils; Meeus, Steven; Steppe, Kathy; Steenackers, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Climate change predicts harsher summer droughts for mid-latitudes in Europe. To enhance our understanding of the putative impacts on forest regeneration, we studied the response of oak seedlings (Quercus petraea) to water deficit. Potted seedlings originating from three locally sourced provenances were subjected to two successive drought periods during the first growing season each followed by a plentiful re-watering. Here, we describe survival and phenological responses after the second drought treatment, applying general linear mixed modeling. From the 441 drought treated seedlings 189 subsisted with higher chances of survival among smaller plants and among single plants per pot compared to doubles. Remarkably, survival was independent of the provenance, although relatively more plants had died off in two provenances compared to the third one with mean plant height being higher in one provenance and standard deviation of plant height being higher in the other. Timing of leaf senescence was clearly delayed after the severe drought treatment followed by re-watering, with two seedlings per pot showing a lesser retardation compared to single plants. This delay can be interpreted as a compensation time in which plants recover before entering the subsequent developmental process of leaf senescence, although it renders seedlings more vulnerable to early autumn frosts because of the delayed hardening of the shoots. Onset of bud flush in the subsequent spring still showed a significant but small delay in the drought treated group, independent of the number of seedlings per pot, and can be considered as an after effect of the delayed senescence. In both phenological models significant differences among the three provenances were detected independent from the treatment. The only provenance that is believed to be local of origin, displayed the earliest leaf senescence and the latest flushing, suggesting an adaptation to the local maritime climate. This provenance also

  8. Repeated Summer Drought and Re-watering during the First Growing Year of Oak (Quercus petraea) Delay Autumn Senescence and Bud Burst in the Following Spring.

    PubMed

    Vander Mijnsbrugge, Kristine; Turcsán, Arion; Maes, Jorne; Duchêne, Nils; Meeus, Steven; Steppe, Kathy; Steenackers, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Climate change predicts harsher summer droughts for mid-latitudes in Europe. To enhance our understanding of the putative impacts on forest regeneration, we studied the response of oak seedlings (Quercus petraea) to water deficit. Potted seedlings originating from three locally sourced provenances were subjected to two successive drought periods during the first growing season each followed by a plentiful re-watering. Here, we describe survival and phenological responses after the second drought treatment, applying general linear mixed modeling. From the 441 drought treated seedlings 189 subsisted with higher chances of survival among smaller plants and among single plants per pot compared to doubles. Remarkably, survival was independent of the provenance, although relatively more plants had died off in two provenances compared to the third one with mean plant height being higher in one provenance and standard deviation of plant height being higher in the other. Timing of leaf senescence was clearly delayed after the severe drought treatment followed by re-watering, with two seedlings per pot showing a lesser retardation compared to single plants. This delay can be interpreted as a compensation time in which plants recover before entering the subsequent developmental process of leaf senescence, although it renders seedlings more vulnerable to early autumn frosts because of the delayed hardening of the shoots. Onset of bud flush in the subsequent spring still showed a significant but small delay in the drought treated group, independent of the number of seedlings per pot, and can be considered as an after effect of the delayed senescence. In both phenological models significant differences among the three provenances were detected independent from the treatment. The only provenance that is believed to be local of origin, displayed the earliest leaf senescence and the latest flushing, suggesting an adaptation to the local maritime climate. This provenance also

  9. Time and dose of irrigation impact Tuber melanosporum ectomycorrhiza proliferation and growth of Quercus ilex seedling hosts in young black truffle orchards.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Antoni; Bonet, José Antonio; Oliach, Daniel; Colinas, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    In Mediterranean climate, young truffle-oak orchards are subjected to drought episodes that can compromise the development of Tuber melanosporum. We investigated the responses of T. melanosporum to water supply in three periods: May to July, August to October, and May to October. In each period, five water doses were established: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of the reference evapotranspiration (ETo). Five orchards were planted with Quercus ilex inoculated with T. melanosporum, and in each orchard, we arranged a two-factorial design with irrigation period and irrigation dose as main factors to test their combined effects on the development of both T. melanosporum and Q. ilex after 3 years in the field. Irrigation period significantly interacted with irrigation doses for the absolute presence per seedling of T. melanosporum mycorrhizae. Irrigation in May-July increased significantly T. melanosporum colonization in seedlings irrigated with 50% ETo dose compared to the 0% ETo dose. A similar pattern with smaller differences in means was observed in August-October period, but the irrigation doses did not change T. melanosporum colonization when we watered from May to October. We found ectomycorrhizae different from T. melanosporum in 51% of the seedlings studied, but their presence was marginal. Our results suggest that a moderate irrigation dose promotes seedling growth and number of fine root tips per unit of fine root length, which may be potentially colonized by T. melanosporum.

  10. The AD-type ectomycorrhizas, one of the most common morphotypes present in truffle fields, result from fungi belonging to the Trichophaea woolhopeia species complex.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Andrea; Belfiori, Beatrice; Passeri, Valentina; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Arcioni, Sergio; Riccioni, Claudia; Paolocci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Belowground ectomycorrhizal communities are often species rich. Characterization of the ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) underneath native truffle areas and/or cultivation sites is particularly relevant to identifying fungal species that might interfere with or promote truffle propagation and fruiting. Fungal identification at the genus/species level can now be achieved by combining detailed morphological and anatomical descriptions with molecular approaches. In a survey of the mycorrhizal biodiversity of Tuber melanosporum orchards and inoculated host plants in nurseries, we repeatedly sampled ECMs with morphological features resembling those of the ECMs widely known as the AD type. Despite the fact that the AD type is regarded as one of the most competitive fungal species towards Tuber spp., its taxonomical rank has yet to be resolved. By analyzing the 28S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA regions, here, we show that AD-type ECMs result from host plant colonization by the pyronemataceous species Trichophaea woolhopeia. Further to this, the 28S and ITS phylogenetic trees built from the AD-type ECMs analyzed sustain the hypothesis that T. woolhopeia is a species complex.

  11. The architecture of Norway spruce ectomycorrhizae: three-dimensional models of cortical cells, fungal biomass, and interface for potential nutrient exchange.

    PubMed

    Stögmann, Bernhard; Marth, Andreas; Pernfuß, Barbara; Pöder, Reinhold

    2013-08-01

    Gathering realistic data on actual fungal biomass in ectomycorrhized fine root systems is still a matter of concern. Thus far, observations on architecture of ectomycorrhizae (ECMs) have been limited to analyses of two-dimensional (2-D) images of tissue sections. This unavoidably causes stereometrical problems that lead to inadequate assumptions about actual size of cells and their arrangement within ECM's functional compartments. Based on extensive morphological investigations of field samples, we modeled the architectural components of an average-sized Norway spruce ECM. In addition to our comprehensive and detailed quantitative data on cell sizes, we studied actual shape and size, in vivo arrangement, and potential nutrient exchange area of plant cortical cells (CCs) using computer-aided three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions based on semithin serial sections. We extrapolated a factual fungal biomass in ECMs (Hartig net (HN) included) of 1.71 t ha(-1) FW (0.36 t ha(-1) DW) for the top 5 cm of soil for an autochthonous, montane, optimum Norway spruce stand in the Tyrolean Alps. The corresponding potential nutrient exchange area in ECMs including main axes of ECM systems, which is defined as the sum of interfaces between plant CCs and the HN, amounts to at least 3.2 × 10(5) m(2) ha(-1). This is the first study that determines the contribution of the HN to the total fungal biomass in ECMs as well as the quantification of its contact area. Our results may stimulate future research on fungal below-ground processes and their impact on the global carbon cycle.

  12. Promoter-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 under Pi shortage and its spatial localization in ectomycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kevin; Haider, Muhammad Zulqurnain; Delteil, Amandine; Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Conéjero, Geneviève; Tatry, Marie-Violaine; Becquer, Adeline; Amenc, Laurie; Sentenac, Hervé; Plassard, Claude; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal exchange of nutrients between fungi and host plants involves a specialization and polarization of the fungal plasma membrane adapted for the uptake from the soil and for secretion of nutrient ions towards root cells. In addition to the current progress in identification of membrane transport systems of both symbiotic partners, data concerning the transcriptional and translational regulation of these proteins are needed to elucidate their role for symbiotic functions. To answer whether the formerly described Pi-dependent expression of the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 from Hebeloma cylindrosporum is the result of its promoter activity, we introduced promoter-EGFP fusion constructs in the fungus by Agrotransformation. Indeed, HcPT1.1 expression in pure fungal cultures quantified and visualized by EGFP under control of the HcPT1.1 promoter was dependent on external Pi concentrations, low Pi stimulating the expression. Furthermore, to study expression and localization of the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 in symbiotic conditions, presence of transcripts and proteins was analyzed by the in situ hybridization technique as well as by immunostaining of proteins. In ectomycorrhiza, expression of the phosphate transporter was clearly enhanced by Pi-shortage indicating its role in Pi nutrition in the symbiotic association. Transcripts were detected in external hyphae and in the hyphal mantle, proteins in addition also within the Hartig net. Exploiting the transformable fungus H. cylindrosporum, Pi-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 as result from its promoter activity as well as transcript and protein localization in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis are shown.

  13. Strain-specific bioaccumulation and intracellular distribution of Cd²⁺ in bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere, ectomycorrhizae, and fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Złoch, Michał; Kowalkowski, Tomasz; Baum, Christel; Niedojadło, Katarzyna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of Cd(2+) in soil bacteria might represent an important route of metal transfer to associated mycorrhizal fungi and plants and may have potential as a tool to accelerate Cd(2+) extraction in the bioremediation of contaminated soils. The present study examined the bioaccumulation of Cd(2+) in 15 bacterial strains representing three phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) that were isolated from the rhizosphere, ectomycorrhizae, and fruitbody of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The strains Pseudomonas sp. IV-111-14, Variovorax sp. ML3-12, and Luteibacter sp. II-116-7 displayed the highest biomass productivity at the highest tested Cd(2+) concentration (2 mM). Microscopic analysis of the cellular Cd distribution revealed intracellular accumulation by strains Massilia sp. III-116-18, Pseudomonas sp. IV-111-14, and Bacillus sp. ML1-2. The quantities of Cd measured in the interior of the cells ranged from 0.87 to 1.31 weight % Cd. Strains originating from the rhizosphere exhibited higher Cd(2+) accumulation efficiencies than strains from ectomycorrhizal roots or fruitbodies. The high Cd tolerances of Pseudomonas sp. IV-111-16 and Bacillus sp. ML1-2 were attributed to the binding of Cd(2+) as cadmium phosphate. Furthermore, silicate binding of Cd(2+) by Bacillus sp. ML1-2 was observed. The tolerance of Massilia sp. III-116-18 to Cd stress was attributed to a simultaneous increase in K(+) uptake in the presence of Cd(2+) ions. We conclude that highly Cd-tolerant and Cd-accumulating bacterial strains from the genera Massilia sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Bacillus sp. might offer a suitable tool to improve the bioremediation efficiency of contaminated soils.

  14. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in an interspecific F1 poplar cross and differential expression of genes in ectomycorrhizas of the two parents: Populus deltoides and Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Jorge, Veronique; Vion, Patrice; Marcais, Benoit; Bastien, Catherine; Tuskan, Gerald A; Martin, Francis; Le Tacon, F

    2011-01-01

    A Populus deltoides Populus trichocarpa F1 pedigree was analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting ectomycorrhizal development and for microarray characterization of gene networks involved in this symbiosis. A 300 genotype progeny set was evaluated for its ability to form ectomycorrhiza with the basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The percentage of mycorrhizal root tips was determined on the root systems of all 300 progeny and their two parents. QTL analysis identified four significant QTLs, one on the P. deltoides and three on the P. trichocarpa genetic maps. These QTLs were aligned to the P. trichocarpa genome and each contained several megabases and encompass numerous genes. NimbleGen whole-genome microarray, using cDNA from RNA extracts of ectomycorrhizal root tips from the parental genotypes P. trichocarpa and P. deltoides, was used to narrow the candidate gene list. Among the 1,543 differentially expressed genes (p value 0.05; 5.0-fold change in transcript level) having different transcript levels in mycorrhiza of the two parents, 41 transcripts were located in the QTL intervals: 20 in Myc_d1, 14 in Myc_t1, and seven in Myc_t2, while no significant differences among transcripts were found in Myc_t3. Among these 41 transcripts, 25 were overrepresented in P. deltoides relative to P. trichocarpa; 16 were overrepresented in P. trichocarpa. The transcript showing the highest overrepresentation in P. trichocarpa mycorrhiza libraries compared to P. deltoides mycorrhiza codes for an ethylene-sensitive EREBP-4 protein which may repress defense mechanisms in P. trichocarpa while the highest overrepresented transcripts in P. deltoides code for proteins/genes typically associated with pathogen resistance.

  15. Formation of ectomycorrhizae following inoculation of containerized Sitka spruce seedlings.

    Treesearch

    C.G. Shaw; R. Molina

    1980-01-01

    Containerized Sitka spruce, [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] were inoculated at sowing with pure cultures of either Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Berk. & Br., Astraeus pteridis (Shear) Feller, Amanita pantherina...

  16. Variation among matsutake ectomycorrhizae in four clones of Pinus sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Lu, Jinrong; Koistinen, Arto; Tervahauta, Arja; Aronen, Tuija

    2015-04-01

    Tricholoma matsutake is an ectomycorrhizal fungus that forms commercially important mushrooms in coniferous forests. In this study, we explored the ability of T. matsutake to form mycorrhizae with Pinus sylvestris by inoculating emblings produced through somatic embryogenesis (SE) in an aseptic culture system. Two months after inoculation, clones with less phenolic compounds in the tissue culture phase formed mycorrhizae with T. matsutake, while clones containing more phenols did not. Effects of inoculation on embling growth varied among clones; two of the four tested showed a significant increase in biomass and two had a significant increase in root density. In addition, results suggest that clones forming well-developed mycorrhizae absorbed more Al, Fe, Na, P, and Zn after 8 weeks of inoculation. This study illustrates the value of SE materials in experimental work concerning T. matsutake as well as the role played by phenolic compounds in host plant response to infection by mycorrhizal fungi.

  17. Polyphenols in red wine aged in acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) and oak (Quercus petraea) wood barrels.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miriam; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Angel Ma; Cadahía, Estrella; Hernández, Ma Teresa; Estrella, Isabel; Martinez, Juana

    2012-06-30

    Polyphenolic composition of two Syrah wines aged during 6 or 12 months in medium toasting acacia and oak 225L barrels was studied by LC-DAD-ESI/MS. A total of 43 nonanthocyanic phenolic compounds were found in all wines, and other 15 compounds only in the wines from acacia barrels. Thus, the nonanthocyanic phenolic profile could be a useful tool to identify the wines aged in acacia barrels. Among all of them the dihydrorobinetin highlights because of its high levels, but also robinetin, 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, a tetrahydroxydihydroflavonol, fustin, butin, a trihydroxymethoxydihydroflavonol and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected at appreciable levels in wines during aging in acacia barrels, and could be used as phenolic markers for authenticity purposes. Although longer contact time with acacia wood mean higher concentrations of phenolic markers found in wines, the identification of these wines will also be easy after short aging times due the high levels reached by these compounds, even after only 2 months of aging.

  18. Nitrogen transport in the ectomycorrhiza association: the Hebeloma cylindrosporum-Pinus pinaster model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias; Avolio, Meghan; Olivi, Martin; Benjdia, Mariam; Rikirsch, Enno; Kasaras, Alexis; Fitz, Michael; Chalot, Michel; Wipf, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The function of the ectomycorrhizal mutualism depends on the ability of the fungal symbionts to take up nutrients (particularly nitrogen) available in inorganic and/or organic form in the soil and to translocate them (or their metabolites) to the symbiotic roots. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying nutrient exchanges between fungus and plant at the symbiotic interface is necessary to fully understand the function of the mycorrhizal symbioses. The present review reports the characterization of several genes putatively involved in nitrogen uptake and transfer in the Hebeloma cylindrosporum-Pinus pinaster ectomycorrhizal association. Study of this model system will further clarify the symbiotic nutrient exchange which plays a major role in plant nutrition as well as in resistance of plants against pathogens, heavy metals, drought stress, etc. Ultimately, ecological balance is maintained and/or improved with the help of symbiotic associations, and therefore, warrant further understanding.

  19. Abundance and distribution of Corallorhiza odontorhiza reflect variations in climate and ectomycorrhizae

    Treesearch

    Melissa K. McCormick; Dennis F. Whigham; John P. O' Neill; Janie J. Becker; Sarah Werner; Hanne N. Rasmussen; Thomas D. Bruns; D. Lee. Taylor

    2009-01-01

    The abundance and reproductive activity of orchids have been linked to variations in weather conditions, but few investigators have examined the relationships between orchid flowering dynamics and the distribution and abundance of mycorrhizal fungi. We quantified the abundance of flowering individuals of Corallorhiza odontorhiza, a...

  20. Types of ectomycorrhiza as pollution stress indicators: case studies in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Kraigher, Hojka; Al Sayegh Petkovsek, Samar; Grebenc, Tine; Simoncic, Primoz

    2007-05-01

    Mycorrhiza is the main spatial and temporal linkage between different constituents in a forest ecosystem. The functional compatibility and stress tolerance of ectomycorrhizal types is species specific, and therefore the information on the ectomycorrhizal community structure can add to the understanding of processes in forest ecosystems and can also be applied as tools for bioindication of pollution stress in forest soils. We have studied the effects of pollution (N and S) on trees and forest soils by: (1) quantification of ECM types diversity as in situ indicators in forest stands, (2) determination and quantification of pollution-sensitive or -insensitive ECM types as passive monitors, (3) root growth and development of ECM on nonmycorrhizal spruce seedlings, planted at the studied sites (active monitors), and (4) ECM infection (a bioassay based on mycorrhizal inoculum potential) of seedlings in an experimental set-up as ex situ testers. ECM species richness for Norway spruce trees (Picea abies) showed higher values in unpolluted sites than in polluted ones, while the differences were not significant for European beech trees (Fagus sylvatica). As pollution-sensitive or -insensitive ECM species in spruce forests, we suggest Hydnum rufescens (sensitive) and Paxillus involutus (unsensitive). Mycorrhizal potential in Norway spruce seedlings as a bioassay for soil N and S pollution was effective, and is suggested as an additional, standardized and widely comparable system in bioindication of soil pollution.

  1. Suppression of ectomycorrhizae on canopy tree seedlings in Rhododendron maximum (Eriqceae) thickets in the southern Appalachians

    Treesearch

    John F. Walker; Orson K. Miller; Tom Lei; Shawn Semones; Erik Nilsen; B.D. Clinton

    1999-01-01

    Thickets of Rhododendron maximum (Ericaceae) (Rm) is the southern Appalachians severely limit regeneration of hardwood and coniferous seedlings. Experimental blocks were established in and out of Rm thickets in a mature, mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Macon County, N.C. Litter and organic layer substrates were removed, cornposited and...

  2. Final Report: Exudation by Poplar Ectomycorrhizas: Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of C Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, J R

    2012-11-12

    Study 1. We compared mycorrhizal Populus tremuloides inoculated with Laccaria bicolor and nonmycorrhizal (NM) P. tremuloides seedlings grown under different levels of P nutrition. Decreasing concentrations of P significantly increased the activity of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes. In addition, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity increased under P limitation. P deficiency also increased organic acid exudation and total organic carbon exudation. Colonization by L. bicolor reduced the P concentration thresholds where these physiological changes occurred. Study 2. We assessed the influences of ectomycorrhizal colonization on phosphate limitation responses of trembling aspen. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake was reduced in NM poplar, but not in plants colonized by L. bicolor or P. involutus. Reductions in shoot and root biomass in NM plants were substantially greater than reductions in plants colonized by either ectomycorrhizal fungi. Leaf starch and sugar concentrations declined with Pi limitation across mycorrhizal treatments, but were higher in plants colonized by L. bicolor and P. involutus. In roots, starch concentrations were greater in NM plants with Pi limitation. In roots, sugars were significantly higher in NM plants compared to mycorrhizal plants and increased significantly in NM plants under Pi limitation. Concentrations were unaffected by Pi limitation in plants colonized by L. bicolor or P. involutus. Study 3. We analyzed proteins that were differentially expressed during the mycorrhizal association. A comparison of global protein expression elucidated broad differences in protein profiles between NM plants and plants colonized by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi as well as differences between the ECM fungi L. bicolor and P. involutus. Plants colonized by P. involutus and G. intraradices exhibited unique patterns of up/down-regulated proteins compared to NM plants, whereas plants colonized by L. bicolor exhibited patterns of protein expression more aligned with NM plants. The greatest change in protein expression was in the areas of energy production and the TCA cycle. Among these proteins, fructose-bisphosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dedydrogenase were notably up-regulated due to mycorrhizal colonization of aspen by L. bicolor. Pyruvate dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and aconitate hydratase were up-regulated due to mycorrhizal colonized by P. involutus. Malate dehydrogenase, cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, and NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase proteins were up-regulated due to mycorrhizal colonization of aspen by G. intraradices. Study 4. Eight hybrid crosses of P. trichocarpa, P. deltoides and P. nigra were exposed to Al in solution culture. Resistance to Al varied by genotype and hybrid cross, with P. trichocarpa P. deltoides crosses being most resistant, P. trichocarpa P. nigra being intermediate and P. deltoides P. nigra being most sensitive to Al. Total root Al accumulation was not a good indicator of Al resistance/sensitivity. However, differences in sensitivity among genotypes were associated with Al uptake into the symplasm. Aluminum treatment increased callose and pectin concentrations of root tips more prominently in Al sensitive genotypes/hybrids. In Al sensitive genotypes, higher levels of symplastic Al accumulation correlated with elevated concentrations of citrate, malate, succinate or formate in root tips, whereas organic acid accumulation was not as pronounced in Al resistant genotypes. These findings suggest that exclusion of Al from the symplast is associated with Al resistance. Study 5. We assessed patterns of exudation in Al-resistant and Al-sensitive Populus hybrid crosses. Exposure to Al in solution induced the exudation of citrate and malate from the roots of both hybrid genotypes and altered the contributions of other organic acids to the exudation profiles. Citrate exudation was about 8-times greater in DTAC-7 (resistant) than OP-367 (sensitive). The analysis of total and cationic Al in solution indicated that the amount of bound Al in solution was three-times higher in solutions from DTAC-7 compared to OP-367 plants over both Al treatments. Study 6. We explored the growth, comparative physiology and transcriptional changes of poplar origin that were associated with ECM and/or AM colonization with low Pi availability. Microarray analysis revealed that the symbiosis-associated transcriptome of Populus involves a set of highly conserved genes that overlaps expressed ion other species. Pi-dependent changes in transcript levels involved the down-regulation of symbiosis-responsive genes encoding phosphate transporter proteins, pathogenesis-related proteins, and certain proteases. The up-regulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in carotenoid and apocarotenoid biosynthesis in AM colonized roots indicates that these pathways are specific to AM activation.

  3. Ectomycorrhizae of Tuber huidongense and T. liyuanum with Castanea mollissima and Pinus armandii.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shan-Ping; Yu, Fu-Qiang; Tang, Li; Wang, Ran; Wang, Yun; Liu, Pei-Gui; Wang, Xiang-Hua; Zheng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Tuber huidongense and T. liyuanum are common commercial white truffles in China that belong to the Rufum and Puberulum groups of the genus Tuber, respectively. Their mycorrhizae were successfully synthesized with two native trees--Castanea mollissima and Pinus armandii--under greenhouse conditions. The identities of the mycorrhizae were confirmed through internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analyses, and their morphological characteristics were described. All of the obtained mycorrhizae have an interlocking pseudoparenchymatous mantle, which is a typical feature of truffle mycorrhizae. The mycorrhizae of T. huidongense on the two trees have hyaline branched emanating hyphae, similar to the documented mycorrhizae of the Rufum group. The unramified, spiky, and hyaline cystidia on the mycorrhizae of T. liyuanum with both C. mollissima and P. armandii further confirmed that this characteristic is constant for the mycorrhizae of the Puberulum group. The successful mycorrhizal syntheses on the two nut-producing trees will be of economic importance in the cultivation of the two truffles.

  4. Hartig' net formation of Tricholoma vaccinum-spruce ectomycorrhiza in hydroponic cultures.

    PubMed

    Henke, Catarina; Jung, Elke-Martina; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    For re-forestation of metal-contaminated land, ectomycorrhizal trees may provide a solution. Hence, the study of the interaction is necessary to allow for comprehensive understanding of the mutually symbiotic features. On a structural level, hyphal mantle and the Hartig' net formed in the root apoplast are essential for plant protection and mycorrhizal functioning. As a model, we used the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum and its host spruce (Picea abies). Using an optimized hydroponic cultivation system, both features could be visualized and lower stress response of the tree was obtained in non-challenged cultivation. Larger spaces in the apoplasts could be shown with high statistical significance. The easy accessibility will allow to address metal stress or molecular responses in both partners. Additionally, the proposed cultivation system will enable for other experimental applications like addressing flooding, biological interactions with helper bacteria, chemical signaling, or other biotic or abiotic challenges relevant in the natural habitat.

  5. The spatial influence of Pseudotsuga menziesii retention trees on ectomycorrhiza diversity.

    Treesearch

    D.L. Luoma; C.A. Stockdale; R. Molina; J.L. Eberhart

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effect of retained green trees on diversity of mycorrhizal fungi after stand harvest. A significant reduction of mycorrhizal root type richness resulted from the harvest treatment. Samples taken under tree crowns showed no significant decline in the mean number of mycorrhiza types per soil core. In areas well removed from retention trees, there...

  6. Effects of ozone and simulated acid rain on birch seedling growth and formation of ectomycorrhizae.

    PubMed

    Keane, K D; Manning, W J

    1988-01-01

    Four-week-old paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) seedlings, inoculated or non-inoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch and grown in steamed or non-steamed soil, were exposed to ozone (O(3)) and/or simulated acid rain (SAR). Plants were exposed to O(3) for 7 h per day on 5 days per week for 12 weeks. O(3) concentrations were maintained between 0.06 and 0.08 ppm. SAR was applied 10 min per day on 2 days per week. O(3), SAR, soil regime and mycorrhizal treatment did not significantly affect any of the measured variables. Interactions between O(3) and SAR, SAR and mycorrhizal treatment, soil regime and mycorrhizal treatment and ozone and soil regime had significant effects. Treatment of seedlings with pH 3.5 SAR caused increases in growth which were more apparent in birch exposed to O(3). Mucorrhizal treatment caused increased growth in non-steamed soil, while growth appeared to decrease in steamed soil. Birch seedlings grew much better in steamed soil. The implications of increased growth in steamed soil may demonstrate the importance of looking at the secondary effects of pollutants on soil-borne organisms.

  7. Synthesis of ectomycorrhizae on northern red oak seedlings in a Michigan nursery

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.K.; Johnson, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Vegetative inoculum of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Suillus luteus was thoroughly mixed into fumigated nursery soil, and northern red oak seedlings of four families were evaluated one and two years after sowing for ectomycorrhizal development, growth, and nutrition. At the end of year one, treated seedlings were successfully inoculated with S. luteus, but the percentage varied significantly with family. Suillus luteus persisted on lateral roots two years following sowing. Two of four seedling families inoculated with S. luteus were significantly larger in size than control plants. These results suggest that the fungal symbiont S. luteus can be successfully introduced into nurseries and that early ectomycorrhizal development improves the growth of northern red oak seedlings.

  8. Segregation of nitrogen use between ammonium and nitrate of ectomycorrhizas and beech trees.

    PubMed

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Tejedor, Javier; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Polle, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Here, we characterized nitrogen (N) uptake of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and their associated ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities from NH4(+) and NO3(-) . We hypothesized that a proportional fraction of ectomycorrhizal N uptake is transferred to the host, thereby resulting in the same uptake patterns of plants and their associated mycorrhizal communities. (15) N uptake was studied under various field conditions after short-term and long-term exposure to a pulse of equimolar NH4(+) and NO3(-) concentrations, where one compound was replaced by (15) N. In native EM assemblages, long-term and short-term (15) N uptake from NH4(+) was higher than that from NO3(-) , regardless of season, water availability and site exposure, whereas in beech long-term (15) N uptake from NO3(-) was higher than that from NH4(+) . The transfer rates from the EM to beech were lower for (15) N from NH4(+) than from NO3(-) . (15) N content in EM was correlated with (15) N uptake of the host for (15) NH4(+) , but not for (15) NO3(-) -derived N. These findings suggest stronger control of the EM assemblage on N provision to the host from NH4(+) than from NO3(-) . Different host and EM accumulation patterns for inorganic N will result in complementary resource use, which might be advantageous in forest ecosystems with limited N availability.

  9. Effect of garlic mustard invasion on ectomycorrhizae in mature pine trees and pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Lauren A. Carlson; Kelly D. McConnaughay; Sherri J. Morris

    2014-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are mutualistic fungi that colonize the roots of many terrestrial plants. These fungi increase plant vigor by acquiring nutrients from the soil for their hosts in exchange for photosynthates. We studied the effect of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) invasion on the density of ectomycorrhizal symbionts using two approaches. We...

  10. Comparative study and molecular characterization of ectomycorrhizas in Tilia americana and Quercus pubescens with Tuber brumale.

    PubMed

    Giomaro, G; Sisti, D; Zambonelli, A; Amicucci, A; Cecchini, M; Comandini, O; Stocchi, V

    2002-10-29

    Mycorrhizas of Tuber brumale on Quercus pubescens and Tilia americana were obtained in vitro using micropropagated plantlets. Mycelium pure cultures were used for inoculation. Both the mycelium used for the inoculations, as well as the mycorrhizas which were obtained, were identified using several molecular approaches: analysis of the ITS region, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific primers and sequencing. The mycorrhizas were described from a morphological standpoint. Some of their biometric characteristics were different in bass-wood than they were in oak, thus showing the influence of the host plant on several of the morphological features believed to be necessary for the identification of the species. Considering the variability of their morphological characteristics, molecular analysis proved to be a necessary tool for the recognition of the mycorrhizas of Tuber spp.

  11. Endo- and ectomycorrhizas in Quercus agrifolia Nee. (Fagaceae): patterns of root colonization and effects on seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Egerton-Warburton, L; Allen, M F

    2001-12-01

    We documented the patterns of root occupancy by Glomalean and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in Quercus agrifolia, and host plant responses to inoculation with each mycorrhizal type alone or in combination. Glomalean hyphae, coils and vesicles, and EM root tips were recorded. Colonization patterns conformed to a succession from Glomalean and EM fungi in 1-year-old seedlings to predominantly EM in saplings (>11 years old); both mycorrhizal types were rarely detected within the same root segment. Inoculation of Q. agrifolia seedlings with EM or Glomalean fungi (AM) alone or in combination (EM+AM) altered the cost:benefit relationship of mycorrhizas to the host plant. Seedling survival, plant biomass, foliar nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) status were greatest in EM- or AM-only inoculated seedlings. Seedlings inoculated with both mycorrhizal types (AM+EM) exhibited the lowest survival rates, biomass, foliar N, and P levels. Roots of these plants were highly colonized by both EM (38% root length colonized) and Glomalean fungi (34%). Because these levels of colonization were similar to those detected in 1-year-old field seedlings, the presence of both mycorrhizal types may be a carbon cost and, in turn, less beneficial to oaks during establishment in the field. However, the shift to EM colonization in older plants suggests that mycorrhizal effects may become positive with time.

  12. Transfer of (13) C between paired Douglas-fir seedlings reveals plant kinship effects and uptake of exudates by ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Pickles, Brian J; Wilhelm, Roland; Asay, Amanda K; Hahn, Aria S; Simard, Suzanne W; Mohn, William W

    2017-04-01

    Processes governing the fixation, partitioning, and mineralization of carbon in soils are under increasing scrutiny as we develop a more comprehensive understanding of global carbon cycling. Here we examined fixation by Douglas-fir seedlings and transfer to associated ectomycorrhizal fungi, soil microbes, and full-sibling or nonsibling neighbouring seedlings. Stable isotope probing with 99% (13) C-CO2 was applied to trace (13) C-labelled photosynthate throughout plants, fungi, and soil microbes in an experiment designed to assess the effect of relatedness on (13) C transfer between plant pairs. The fixation and transfer of the (13) C label to plant, fungal, and soil microbial tissue was examined in biomass and phospholipid fatty acids. After a 6 d chase period, c. 26.8% of the (13) C remaining in the system was translocated below ground. Enrichment was proportionally greatest in ectomycorrhizal biomass. The presence of mesh barriers (0.5 or 35 μm) between seedlings did not restrict (13) C transfer. Fungi were the primary recipients of (13) C-labelled photosynthate throughout the system, representing 60-70% of total (13) C-enriched phospholipids. Full-sibling pairs exhibited significantly greater (13) C transfer to recipient roots in two of four Douglas-fir families, representing three- and fourfold increases (+ c. 4 μg excess (13) C) compared with nonsibling pairs. The existence of a root/mycorrhizal exudation-hyphal uptake pathway was supported.

  13. Patterns in root traits of woody species hosting arbuscular and ectomycorrhizas: implications for the evolution of belowground strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite large variation in root traits among species, we have limited understanding of how traits are related to diverse soil resource acquisition strategies. We examined root trait variation among 33 species co-existing in Northeastern US forests that form the two most common mutualisms with mycorr...

  14. Douglas-fir ectomycorrhizae in 40- and 400-year-old stands: mycobiont availability to late successional western hemlock.

    PubMed

    Horton, T R; Molina, R; Hood, K

    2005-09-01

    We investigated ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in forest stands containing both early successional Douglas-fir and late successional western hemlock at two points in the typical stand development by identifying EM fungi from roots of Douglas-fir and western hemlock in mixed stands. In an early seral stage forest, EM roots of western hemlock seedlings and intermingling 40-year-old Douglas-fir were sampled. In a late seral stage forest, EM roots of trees of both species were sampled in a 400-year-old stand. We use molecular approaches to identify the symbionts from field samples in this descriptive study. In the early seral stage study, >95% of the western hemlock root tips by biomass were colonized by fungi also colonizing Douglas-fir roots. This result supports the prediction that western hemlock can associate with fungi in Douglas-fir EM networks. In the same study, fungi specific to Douglas-fir colonized 14% of its EM root tips. In the late seral stage study, 14% of the western hemlock root tips were colonized by fungi also observed in association with Douglas-fir, a result strongly influenced by sampling issues and likely represents a conservative estimate of multiple host fungi in this old growth setting. Fungi specific to Douglas-fir colonized 25% of its root tip biomass in the old growth study, in tight coralloid clusters within five of the 24 soil samples. The trends revealed in this study corroborate earlier studies suggesting a predominance of multiple host fungi in mixed communities of EM plants. The role of host-specific fungi in these stands remains unclear.

  15. Douglas-fir ectomycorrhizae in 40- and 400-year-old stands: mycobiont availability to late successional western hemlock.

    Treesearch

    T. R. Horton; R. Molina; K. Hood

    2005-01-01

    We investigated ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in forest stands containing both early successional Douglas-fir and late successional western hemlock at two points in the typical stand development by identifying EM fungi from roots of Douglas-fir and western hemlock in mixed stands. Tn an early seral stage forest, EM roots of western hemlock seedlings and intermingling 40-...

  16. Evolution of ectomycorrhizas as a driver of diversification and biogeographic patterns in the model mycorrhizal mushroom genus Laccaria.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew W; Hosaka, Kentaro; Mueller, Gregory M

    2017-03-01

    A systematic and evolutionary ecology study of the model ectomycorrhizal (ECM) genus Laccaria was performed using herbarium material and field collections from over 30 countries covering its known geographic range. A four-gene (nrITS, 28S, RPB2, EF1α) nucleotide sequence dataset consisting of 232 Laccaria specimens was analyzed phylogenetically. The resulting Global Laccaria dataset was used for molecular dating and estimating diversification rates in the genus. Stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen was used to evaluate the origin of Laccaria's ECM ecology. In all, 116 Laccaria molecular species were identified, resulting in a near 50% increase in its known diversity, including the new species described herein: Laccaria ambigua. Molecular dating indicates that the most recent common ancestor to Laccaria existed in the early Paleocene (56-66 million yr ago), probably in Australasia. At this time, Laccaria split into two lineages: one represented by the new species L. ambigua, and the other reflecting a large shift in diversification that resulted in the remainder of Laccaria. L. ambigua shows a different isotopic profile than all other Laccaria species. Isotopes and diversification results suggest that the evolution of the ECM ecology was a key innovation in the evolution of Laccaria. Diversification shifts associated with Laccaria's dispersal to the northern hemisphere are attributed to adaptations to new ecological niches. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Recovering lost ground: effects of soil burn intensity on nutrients and ectomycorrhiza communities of ponderosa pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Ariel D. Cowan; Jane E. Smith; Stephen A. Fitzgerald

    2016-01-01

    Fuel accumulation and climate shifts are predicted to increase the frequency of high-severity fires in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests of central Oregon. The combustion of fuels containing large downed wood can result in intense soil heating, alteration of soil properties, and mortality of microbes. Previous studies show ectomycorrhizal...

  18. Liming in a beech forest results in more mineral elements stored in the mantle of Lactarius subdulcis ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Rineau, François; Rose, Christophe; Le Thiec, Didier; Garbaye, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Liming is a forest practice used to counteract forest decline induced by soil acidification. It consists of direct Ca and Mg input in forest soil and restores tree mineral nutrition, but also causes drastic changes in nutrient availability in soil. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi significantly contribute in nutrient uptake by trees, and can recover them through organic acid secretion or through enzymatic degradation of organic matter. The symbiotic fungi use their extraradical mycelium for nutrient uptake, and then store them into the ECM mantle. In this study we measured how liming influences element contents in the mantle of Lactarius subdulcis ECMs, an abundant and particularly active in oxalate and laccase secretion in beech stands. For this purpose we used SEM observation coupled with energy- (EDX) and wavelength-dispersive-X-ray microanalyses (WDX). Results showed that ECM mantles of this species presented significantly higher Ca, Mg, Mn, K, Si, Al and Fe contents in limed plots. The nutrient amounts of L. subdulcis ECMs were significantly different between individuals for all the elements, showing a differential storage ability between individuals. The storage role of the ECM mantle can be interpreted in two different ways: i) a detoxification role for Al or heavy metals and ii) an increased potential nutrient resource by the fungus, which can benefit the tree. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitigation of antagonistic effects on plant growth due to root co-colonization by dark septate endophytes and ectomycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N

    2013-12-01

    Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are very common root colonizers of woody plant species. Ascomycetes of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) are the main representatives of DSE fungi in forest ecosystems. PAC and mycorrhizal fungi share the same habitat, but interactions among PAC, mycorrhizal fungi and plants are poorly understood. We compared the effects of single and dual inoculation of Norway spruce seedlings with PAC and the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus Hebeloma crustuliniforme on host growth, degree of mycorrhization and density of endophytic PAC biomass. Single colonization by H. crustuliniforme or PAC significantly reduced plant biomass. Dual colonization reduced or neutralized plant growth depression caused by single fungal colonization. The degree of mycorrhization was independent on PAC colonization, and mycorrhization significantly reduced endophytic PAC biomass. Plant biomass of dually colonized plants positively correlated with PAC biomass. These results demonstrate the ability of dual inoculation of PAC and H. crustuliniforme to neutralize plant growth depression caused by single fungal inoculation. Our explanations of enhanced plant growth in dually inoculated plants are the inhibition of PAC during root colonization by the ECM mantle and ECM-mediated access to plant growth-promoting nutrients resulting from the mineralization of the potting medium by PAC.

  20. Quantitative trait loci analysis of mineral element concentrations in an Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F2 progeny grown on cadmium-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Willems, Glenda; Frérot, Hélène; Gennen, Jérôme; Salis, Pietro; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) accumulation in the pseudometallophyte Arabidopsis halleri under conditions of Cd excess using an interspecific A. halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata F(2) population. *Our data provide evidence for the implication of one major QTL in Cd hyperaccumulation in A. halleri, and suggests that Cd tolerance and accumulation are not independent in A. halleri. Moreover, the major loci responsible for Zn hyperaccumulation in the absence of Cd appear to be the same when Cd is present at high concentrations. *More than twofold higher Fe concentrations were measured in A. halleri shoots than in A. lyrata, suggesting a different regulation of Fe accumulation in the hyperaccumulator. *With the exception of Ca, the accumulation of Cd was significantly correlated with the accumulation of all elements measured in the F(2) progeny, suggesting pleiotropic gene action. However, QTL analysis identified pleiotropic QTLs only for Cd, Zn and Fe. Mg accumulation was negatively correlated with Cd accumulation, as well as with dry shoot biomass, suggesting that it might indicate cellular damage.

  1. Fungal transcript pattern during the preinfection stage (12 h) of ectomycorrhiza formed between Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa roots, identified using cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Sebastiana, Mónica; Pessoa, Fernando; Sousa, Lisete; Figueiredo, Andreia; Fortes, Ana Margarida; Baldé, Aladje; Maia, Leonor C; Pais, Maria S

    2008-12-01

    Transcriptional changes in Pisolithus tinctorius leading to ectomycorrhizal formation in P. tinctorius- Castanea sativa were investigated using a 12-h fungal interaction in vitro system. Using a 3107-cDNA clone microarray, 34 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were found to be differentially expressed. These ESTs represent 14 known genes, 5 upregulated and 9 downregulated, and 20 orphan sequences. Some transcripts of upregulated genes (with unknown function) were previously identified in other mycorrhizal Pisolithus spp. associations. ESTs for S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase and several orphan sequences were identified in our system. The identified transcript of downregulated genes involved hydrophobins, 5S, 18S, and 28S ribosomal RNA genes, large subunits of ribosomal RNA (mitochondrial gene), and two types of heat shock proteins. This study demonstrates the high complexity of molecular events involved in the preinfection steps and suggests the utilization of different fungal gene repertories before ectomycorrhizal formation. These data constitute a first contribution for the molecular understanding of early signaling events between P. tinctorius and C. sativa roots during ectomycorrhizal formation.

  2. Small-scale soil water repellency in pine rizhosphere associated with ectomycorrhiza is affected by nutrient patchiness: a soil microcosms study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Elena; Hallett, Paul; Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Arcenegui, Victoria

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) or hydrophobicity has been commonly related to organic compounds released from the roots or decomposition of different plant species (Doerr et al., 2000). In addition, fungi and microorganisms that are associated with specific plants, could also influence SWR through the production of exudates or cellular material that form hydrophobic coatings on soil surfaces (Feeney et al., 2004; Hallett and Young, 1999) or act as surfactants. Nutrient availability, microbial biomass, organic matter and specific exudates have all been associated with the development of SWR. In terms of plant productivity, these impacts can be significant as their interaction with pore structure changes at the root-soil interface regulates both water transport and storage (Sperry et al., 1998). In boreal forests, basidiomycetous fungi are known to have a large impact on the development of SWR. These fungi are important degraders of organic material and symbionts forming ectomycorrhizal fungi (EF) associations with trees. Although many researchers have suggested a strong positive impact of EF on the ability of plants to capture water from soils, their impact on SWR at the root-soil interface and spatially within soil with a patchy nutrient distribution has not yet been investigated. This study used microcosms with mycelia systems of the EF extending from Pinus sylvestris host plants. Each microcosm was incubated during 15 days and contained plastic cup with 33P under the roots. The transfer of P from the mycelium to the host plant was monitored using a radioactive tracers and a non-destructive electronic autoradiography system in another study (data not published). SWR was measured using different approaches; as repellency index, R using a microinfiltrometer with a contact radius of 0.1 mm (modified from Hallet et al., 2002) and with the water drop penetration time test (WDPT). Sorptivity and SWR were measured between 40-50 points/microcosms. Results obtained with both approaches were correlated (Spearmans' rho correlation coefficient = 0.698*). Most of the points measured along the microcosms showed hydrophobicity. Preliminary results indicate that the presence/absence in each point of visual roots along the microcosms was not related with a higher hydrophobicity (P>0.05). However, the distance from each point to the cups of 33P was significant (P

  3. Carbon cycling and carbon metabolism by soil fungi in a boreal forest: impacts of wildfire and permafrost on functional genes, isotope signatures, and ectomycorrhizae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon within boreal forest ecosystems is of great importance to the global carbon budget. Much is currently known about boreal soil carbon dynamics in relation to biophysical and landscape variables such as temperature, moisture, wildfire intensity, and stand age. We have less information regarding the controls on decomposition at the molecular scale, where interactions between microbial communities, their genetic `potential' for decomposition, functional genes, enzyme synthesis, and organic matter transformations occur. We have entered an age in which these connections can be made at the molecular scale, but what form do they take, and can they scale up to affect carbon dynamics at the level of the ecosystem? We examined these molecular scale processes in mature boreal forest soils and soils that had been impacted by wildfire near Delta Junction, Alaska. We also examined the interactive effect of permafrost presence, which reduces soil drainage, with wildfire. We focused on three themes: linking microbial communities and laccase functional genes to soil laccase enzyme activity and lignin decomposition, assessing substrate availability using the natural abundance δ13C isotope ratios of microbial biomass, and the influence of ectomycorrhizal mats on decomposition. Wildfire reduced fungal biomass, laccase functional gene abundance, laccase activity, and δ13C-lignin decomposition. Relationships between gene abundance and microbial activity were significant and logarithmic in form. Soil drainage, which is mediated by the presence of permafrost, had little effect on the abundance of fungi, functional genes, or potential process rates. Microbial biomass δ13C was always enriched relative to soil organic matter, and this difference was greater in control soils compared to wildfire-affected soils, indicating that ÄΔδ13C MB-SOIL may indicate the level of bioavailability of soil carbon for microbial metabolism. Ectomycorrhizal mats occurred only in control soils and increased fungal biomass, functional gene abundance, enzyme activities and process rates compared to non-mat soils. Taken together these results indicate that linkages can be made between the distribution of soil microbial communities, molecular scale information, and soil carbon dynamics.

  4. LIFETIME AND TEMPORAL OCCURRENCE OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAE ON PONDEROSA PINE (PINUS PONDEROSA LAWS.) SEEDLINGS GROWN UNDER VARIED ATMOSPHERIC CO-2 AND NITROGEN LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change(elevated atmospheric CO-2,and altered air temperatures,precipitation amounts and seasonal patterns)may affect ecosystem processes by altering carbon allocation in plants,and carbon flux from plants to soil.Mycorrhizal fungi,as carbon sinks, are among the first soil...

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas of Uapaca bojeri L. (Euphorbiaceae): sporophore diversity, patterns of root colonization, and effects on seedling growth and soil microbial catabolic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ramanankierana, Naina; Ducousso, Marc; Rakotoarimanga, Nirina; Prin, Yves; Thioulouse, Jean; Randrianjohany, Emile; Ramaroson, Luciano; Kisa, Marija; Galiana, Antoine; Duponnois, Robin

    2007-05-01

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to describe the diversity of mycorrhizal fungal communities associated with Uapaca bojeri, an endemic Euphorbiaceae of Madagascar, and (2) to determine the potential benefits of inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi [ectomycorrhizal and/or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi] on the growth of this tree species and on the functional diversity of soil microflora. Ninety-four sporophores were collected from three survey sites. They were identified as belonging to the ectomycorrhizal genera Afroboletus, Amanita, Boletus, Cantharellus, Lactarius, Leccinum, Rubinoboletus, Scleroderma, Tricholoma, and Xerocomus. Russula was the most frequent ectomycorrhizal genus recorded under U. bojeri. AM structures (vesicles and hyphae) were detected from the roots in all surveyed sites. In addition, this study showed that this tree species is highly dependent on both types of mycorrhiza, and controlled ectomycorrhization of this Uapaca species strongly influences soil microbial catabolic diversity. These results showed that the complex symbiotic status of U. bojeri could be managed to optimize its development in degraded areas. The use of selected mycorrhizal fungi such the Scleroderma Sc1 isolate in nursery conditions could be of great interest as (1) this fungal strain is very competitive against native symbiotic microflora, and (2) the fungal inoculation improves the catabolic potentialities of the soil microflora.

  6. LIFETIME AND TEMPORAL OCCURRENCE OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAE ON PONDEROSA PINE (PINUS PONDEROSA LAWS.) SEEDLINGS GROWN UNDER VARIED ATMOSPHERIC CO-2 AND NITROGEN LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change(elevated atmospheric CO-2,and altered air temperatures,precipitation amounts and seasonal patterns)may affect ecosystem processes by altering carbon allocation in plants,and carbon flux from plants to soil.Mycorrhizal fungi,as carbon sinks, are among the first soil...

  7. The Asian black truffle Tuber indicum can form ectomycorrhizas with North American host plants and complete its life cycle in non-native soils

    Treesearch

    Gregory Bonito; James M. Trappe; Sylvia Donovan; Rytas Vilgalys

    2011-01-01

    The Asian black truffle Tuber indicum is morphologically and phylogenetically similar to the European black truffle Tuber melanosporum. T. indicum is considered a threat to T. melanosporum trufficulture due to its presumed competitiveness and broad host compatibility. Recently, in independent events,

  8. Effects of soil type, fertilization and drought on carbon allocation to root growth and partitioning between secondary metabolism and ectomycorrhizae of Betula papyrifera.

    PubMed

    Kleczewski, Nathan M; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2010-07-01

    Paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh) seedlings were grown in a greenhouse in either subsoil or topsoil in factorial combination with two fertilization and drought regimes to investigate how different soil environments and nutrient availability drive belowground partitioning between growth, secondary metabolism and ectomycorrhizal (EM) associations, and impact drought tolerance of paper birch. Root and total seedling dry biomass, starch, soluble sugars, soluble phenolics, lignin and EM abundance were quantified. In unfertilized topsoil, total plant biomass and root biomass were approximately nine times higher than in unfertilized subsoil, but the root weight ratios did not differ between soils. Root soluble phenolics and lignin were higher in unfertilized subsoil than in unfertilized topsoil, whereas EM abundance was significantly higher in unfertilized topsoil than in unfertilized subsoil. In topsoil, fertilization decreased root biomass and EM abundance and increased root phenolics and lignin. In contrast, fertilization of subsoil increased root biomass but decreased root phenolics and lignin, while EM abundance was unaffected. In both soil types, fertilization reduced root weight ratios. Across soil types, EM abundance was negatively correlated with root soluble sugars, root phenolics and lignin, but this was driven mainly by the responses in the topsoil treatment. Our results show that soil fertility mediates carbon tradeoffs among defense, growth and EM associations.

  9. Global patterns of gene regulation associated with the development of ectomycorrhiza between birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr.

    PubMed

    Le Quéré, Antoine; Wright, Derek P; Söderström, Bengt; Tunlid, Anders; Johansson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The formation of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tissue is characterized by distinct morphological and developmental stages, such as preinfection and adhesion, mantle, and Hartig net formation. The global pattern of gene expression during these stages in the birch (Betula pendula)-Paxillus involutus ECM association was analyzed using cDNA microarrays. In comparison with nonsymbiotic conditions, 251 fungal (from a total of 1,075) and 138 plant (1,074 in total) genes were found to be differentially regulated during the ECM development. For instance, during mantle and Hartig net development, there were several plant genes upregulated that are normally involved in defense responses during pathogenic fungal challenges. These responses were, at later stages of ECM development, found to be repressed. Other birch genes that showed differential regulation involved several homologs that usually are implicated in water permeability (aquaporins) and water stress tolerance (dehydrins). Among fungal genes differentially upregulated during stages of mantle and Hartig net formation were homologs putatively involved in mitochondrial respiration. In fully developed ECM tissue, there was an upregulation of fungal genes related to protein synthesis and the cytoskeleton assembly machinery. This study highlights complex molecular interactions between two symbionts during the development of an ECM association.

  10. Symbiosis-regulated expression of an acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase gene in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor

    Treesearch

    Shiv T. Hiremath; Sujata Balasubramanian; Jun Zheng; Gopi K. Podila

    2006-01-01

    The ectomycorrhiza is a symbiotic organ generated from the intricate association of fungal hyphae and plant root. The establishment of the ectomycorrhiza is a coordinated process of cross-talk between plant and fungus, followed by metabolic, developmental, and structural changes in the fungus, resulting in its growth toward the root. The initial stages of the symbiotic...

  11. Temporal changes of bacterial communities in the Tuber melanosporum ectomycorrhizosphere during ascocarp development.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Aurélie; Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Le Tacon, François; Robin, Christophe; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Uroz, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizae create a multitrophic ecosystem formed by the association between tree roots, mycelium of the ectomycorrhizal fungus, and a complex microbiome. Despite their importance in the host tree's physiology and in the functioning of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, detailed studies on ectomycorrhiza-associated bacterial community composition and their temporal dynamics are rare. Our objective was to investigate the composition and dynamics of Tuber melanosporum ectomycorrhiza-associated bacterial communities from summer to winter seasons in a Corylus avellana tree plantation. We used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-based pyrosequencing to compare the bacterial community structure and the richness in T. melanosporum's ectomycorrhizae with those of the bulk soil. The T. melanosporum ectomycorrhizae harbored distinct bacterial communities from those of the bulk soil, with an enrichment in Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria. In contrast to the bacterial communities of truffle ascocarps that vastly varies in composition and richness during the maturation of the fruiting body and to those from the bulk soil, T. melanosporum ectomycorrhiza-associated bacterial community composition stayed rather stable from September to January. Our results fit with a recent finding from the same experimental site at the same period that a continuous supply of carbohydrates and nitrogen occurs from ectomycorrhizae to the fruiting bodies during the maturation of the ascocarps. We propose that this creates a stable niche in the ectomycorrhizosphere although the phenology of the tree changes.

  12. Mycorrhizal synthesis between Boletus edulis species complex and rockroses (Cistus sp.).

    PubMed

    Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; Fernández-Toirán, Luz Marina; Cisneros, Oscar; de Miguel, Ana María; Modrego, María Pilar; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Pera, Joan

    2008-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizas of Boletus aereus, Boletus edulis, and Boletus reticulatus were synthesized with Cistus sp. under laboratory conditions using synthesis tubes filled with a mixture of sterilized peat-vermiculite and nutrient solution. The fungal strains isolated from sporocarps were identified by molecular techniques. The inoculated seedlings were grown for 4-5 months. The ectomycorrhizas formed were described based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The three ectomycorrhizas described were very similar, with white monopodial-pinnate morphology, a three-layered plectenchymatous mantle on plan view and boletoid rhizomorphs.

  13. Association of Pinus banksiana Lamb. and Populus tremuloides Michx. seedling fine roots with Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina)

    Treesearch

    Lynette R. Potvin; Dana L. Richter; Martin F. Jurgensen; R. Kasten. Dumroese

    2012-01-01

    Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina, Hydanaceae), commonly regarded as a wood decay fungus, was consistently isolated from bareroot nursery Pinus banksiana Lamb. seedlings. S. brinkmannii was found in ectomycorrhizae formed by Thelephora terrestris Ehrh., ...

  14. Identification of adaptation-specific differences in mRNA expression of sessile and pedunculate oak based on osmotic-stress-induced genes.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; Koch, Margit; Berenyi, Maria; Burg, Agnes; Burg, Kornel

    2005-10-01

    Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. and Q. robur L. hybridize frequently and occupy similar, though distinct, ecological niches. So far, genetic discrimination between these species at the molecular level has been based mainly on neutral markers. Because such markers often exhibit low species differentiation because of high genetic compatibility and exchange between Q. robur and Q. petraea at these loci, we used adaptation-related expressed genes as markers. Accordingly, we identified osmotic-stress-induced genes in a Q. petraea cell line grown under moderate osmotic stress conditions. Two subtraction libraries were established from callus cells cultured under hyperosmotic stress for 1 or 48 h. Thirty-three differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (from 70 originally isolated) were classified according to their putative functions. At least five of these gene products may contribute to osmotic-stress tolerance in oak: betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, two trans-acting transcription factors (one abscsic acid (ABA)-responsive, the other ABA-independent), a glutathione-S- transferase and a heat-shock cognate protein. Seven genes were selected based on their putative function and their expression monitored in vivo. Leaf tissue from Q. petraea and Q. robur plantlets grown hydroponically under hyperosmotic conditions was harvested after 0, 1, 6, 24 or 72 h and analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found indications of osmotic stress adaptation in Q. petraea based on up-regulation of genes related to protective functions, whereas down-regulation of these genes was evident in Q. robur. Thus, genetic markers related to adaptive traits may be useful for differentiating Q. petraea and Q. robur genotypes.

  15. Inoculation of containerized Pinus pinea L. seedlings with seven ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Rincón, A; Alvarez, I F; Pera, J

    2001-12-01

    Containerized Pinus pinea L. seedlings are commonly used for reforestation in the Mediterranean area. While there is an increasing knowledge of the potential ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with Pinus pinea, few studies exist of inoculation techniques with selected ectomycorrhizal fungi. We tested seven ectomycorrhizal fungi for their effectiveness with containerized Pinus pinea seedlings. Hebeloma crustuliniforme, Laccaria laccata and Pisolithus tinctorius were applied as vegetative inocula while Melanogaster ambiguus, Pisolithus tinctorius, Rhizopogon luteolus, Rhizopogon roseolus and Scleroderma verrucosum were tested as spore inocula. The inoculum of each fungus was tested at several application rates. Among the fungi tested as vegetative inocula, the highest percentages of ectomycorrhizas were obtained with H. crustuliniforme at all rates tested. The ectomycorrhizas formed by L. laccata varied from 11% to 40% depending on the inoculum rate applied. Vegetative inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius was only effective at the highest inoculum rates and gave mycorrhization percentages around 60%. Pisolithus tinctorius applied as a spore inoculum formed ectomycorrhizas at a frequency of about 50% at the effective inoculum rates. The rest of the fungi applied as spore inocula produced more than 50% of ectomycorrhizas at the effective spore concentrations. These included the highest percentages of ectomycorrhizas (>80%) obtained with both Rhizopogon species. Differences in growth due to inoculation with the different fungi were not detected and in some cases inoculation even reduced the total biomass accumulated by seedlings. All seedlings reached a size suitable for transplantation.

  16. Effects of root dips of benomyl and captan on seedling response and mycorrhizal development of outplanted longleaf, sand, and loblolly pines

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    Longleaf pine seedlings inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pt) on naturally inoculated (NI) were grown at densities of 7-1/2 or 15 per square feet. Seedlings were graded by size and ectomycorrhizal development. The Pt group at 7-1/2 per square feet had 50% ectomycorrhiza with 70% formed by Pt. In the Pt-15 per square foot group, 65% had ectomycorrhiza, 90% of which were Pt. The NI-7-1/2 per square foot group had 20% feeder root with ectomycorrhiza and the NI-15 per square foot had ectomycorrhiza in 30% of the feeder roots. A split-plot design was used to isolate Pt and NI treatments on major plots and 12 minor plots within each were represented by 25 seedlings. One experiment will determine the effect of removal of ectomycorrhiza (stripping) on seedling performance in the field. Preliminary observations indicate that stripping 50% or more of the mycorrhizae substantially reduces survival. Another experiment will test the effects of benomyl and captan as dips of fungicide/clay slurries on mycorrhizal development and seedling response. 2 tables. (MF)

  17. Ecological and evolutionary significance of mycorrhizal symbioses in vascular plants (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Malloch, D. W.; Pirozynski, K. A.; Raven, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Mycorrhizae, the symbioses between fungi and plant roots, are nearly universal in terrestrial plants and can be classified into two major types: endomycorrhizae and ectomycorrhizae. About four-fifths of all land plants form endomycorrhizae, whereas several groups of trees and shrubs, notably Pinaceae, some Cupressaceae, Fagaceae, Betulaceae, Salicaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, and most Myrtaceae form ectomycorrhizae. Among legumes, Papilionoideae and Mimosoideae have endomycorrhizae and usually form bacterial nodules. The members of the third subfamily, Caesalpinioideae, rarely form nodules, and one of the included groups, the two large, pantropical, closely related tribes Amherstieae and Detarieae, regularly form ectomycorrhizae. Nodules and ectomycorrhizae may well be alternative means of supplying organic nitrogen to the plants that form them. Those plants having endomycorrhizae usually occur in forests of high species richness, whereas those with ectomycorrhizae usually occur in forests of low species richness. The roots of ectomycorrhizal trees, however, support a large species richness of fungal symbionts, probably amounting to more than 5000 species worldwide, whereas those of endomycorrhizal trees have low fungal species richness, with only about 30 species of fungi known to be involved worldwide. Ectomycorrhizal forests are generally temperate or occur on infertile soils in the tropics. They apparently have expanded in a series of ecologically important events through the course of time from the Middle Cretaceous onward at the expense of endomycorrhizal forests. PMID:16592806

  18. Analysis of mycorrhizal associations formed by Cistus incanus transformed root clones with Terfezia boudieri isolates.

    PubMed

    Zaretsky, M; Kagan-Zur, V; Mills, D; Roth-Bejerano, N

    2006-02-01

    One clone (M-2), out of several Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed root clones of Cistus incanus, formed ecto- or endomycorrhiza in vitro with two isolates of Terfezia boudieri collected in Israel. All other clone-fungal isolate combinations formed ectomycorrhiza. The endomycorrhiza-forming isolate secreted smaller amounts of auxin than an ectomycorrhiza-forming isolate. Addition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) led to ectomycorrhiza formation by the M-2 clone on low P medium. Endomycorrhizas were formed by both M-2 and a control clone with the same T. boudieri isolates on high P medium with 2,4-D. The M-2 clone of C. incanus exhibited greater sensitivity to exogenous auxins (IAA and 2,4-D) than other clones, and clonal sensitivity to auxin was increased tenfold under low P conditions. Results are discussed in relation to phosphate and auxin influence on T. boudieri-C. incanus interaction.

  19. Abbreviated Environmental Assessment for the Northwest Infrastructure, Phase II Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    iM---/nclucll!np ........... - .J (+•~.t/td; O•no~ ·•1111111-olltct; U• unkno..,-) + 0 . u 7. AIR INSTAU.ATION ~ PI \\ TliiLE USE ZONEAANO USE...petraea Traubeneiche Ses.~i le Oak rubus idaeus Himbeere Red Raspberry salix fragilis Bruchweidc Crack Willow sam bucus nigra Schwarz.~r Holw1der

  20. Literature Review - Vegetation on Levees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Quercus petraea (Mattusch.) Liebl.) in relatively dry, luvisoil on loamy deluvium and weathered granodiorite . We used a pulse EKKO 1000 GPR system, a... granodiorite Observations/Results: Roots were detected down to 1.1 in. (3 cm) diameter and depth to 6.5 ft (2 m). GPR was an efficient method for 3-D

  1. Monitoring for pests and diseases in native oak woodlands: the case of acute oak decline in the United Kingdom

    Treesearch

    Nathan Brown; Stephen Parnell; Frank van den Bosch; Mike Jeger; Sandra Denman

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a novel form of decline has been observed in southern and central England. This syndrome has been termed acute oak decline (AOD) and affects native oak, Quercus petraea and Q. robur. Typical symptoms include bark cracks that weep dark exudates, which are caused by necrotic patches in the...

  2. Potential of ultrasonic pulse velocity for evaluating the dimensional stability of oak and chestnut wood

    Treesearch

    Turker Dundar; Xiping Wang; Nusret As; Erkan Avci

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of ultrasonic velocity as a rapid and nondestructive method to predict the dimensional stability of oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Lieblein) and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) that are commonly used in flooring industry. Ultrasonic velocity, specific gravity, and radial, tangential and volumetric shrinkages...

  3. Comparative Pollen Morphological Analysis and Its Systematic Implications on Three European Oak (Quercus L., Fagaceae) Species and Their Spontaneous Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Danielewicz, Władysław; Bocianowski, Jan; Maliński, Tomasz; Janyszek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Pollen morphology of three parental Quercus species (Q. robur L., Q. petraea (Matt) Liebl, Q. pubescens Willd.) and two spontaneous hybrids of these species (Q. ×calvescens Vuk. = Q. petraea × Q. pubescens and Q. ×rosacea Bechst. = Q. robur × Q. petraea) was investigated in this study. The pollen originated from 18 natural oak sites and 67 individuals (oak trees). Each individual was represented by 30 pollen grains. In total, 2010 pollen grains were measured. They were analysed for nine quantitative and four qualitative features. Pollen size and shape were important features to diagnosing Quercus parental species and hybrids. On the basis of exine ornamentation, it was possible to identify only Q. pubescens, while the remaining species and hybrids did not differ significantly with respect to this feature. The determination of the diagnostic value of endoaperture features requires further palynological studies. On the basis of pollen size and shape Q. robur × Q. petraea was clearly separated. Grouping of 67 oak trees on the basis of pollen grain features has shown that individuals from different as well as same taxa occurred in the same groups. Likewise, with respect to natural sites, oak trees originating from the same places as well as from geographically distant ones, grouped together. Pollen morphological features allow to distinguish a part of the studied Quercus taxa. Therefore, it can be used as an auxiliary feature in the taxonomy. PMID:27564015

  4. Comparative Pollen Morphological Analysis and Its Systematic Implications on Three European Oak (Quercus L., Fagaceae) Species and Their Spontaneous Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wrońska-Pilarek, Dorota; Danielewicz, Władysław; Bocianowski, Jan; Maliński, Tomasz; Janyszek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Pollen morphology of three parental Quercus species (Q. robur L., Q. petraea (Matt) Liebl, Q. pubescens Willd.) and two spontaneous hybrids of these species (Q. ×calvescens Vuk. = Q. petraea × Q. pubescens and Q. ×rosacea Bechst. = Q. robur × Q. petraea) was investigated in this study. The pollen originated from 18 natural oak sites and 67 individuals (oak trees). Each individual was represented by 30 pollen grains. In total, 2010 pollen grains were measured. They were analysed for nine quantitative and four qualitative features. Pollen size and shape were important features to diagnosing Quercus parental species and hybrids. On the basis of exine ornamentation, it was possible to identify only Q. pubescens, while the remaining species and hybrids did not differ significantly with respect to this feature. The determination of the diagnostic value of endoaperture features requires further palynological studies. On the basis of pollen size and shape Q. robur × Q. petraea was clearly separated. Grouping of 67 oak trees on the basis of pollen grain features has shown that individuals from different as well as same taxa occurred in the same groups. Likewise, with respect to natural sites, oak trees originating from the same places as well as from geographically distant ones, grouped together. Pollen morphological features allow to distinguish a part of the studied Quercus taxa. Therefore, it can be used as an auxiliary feature in the taxonomy.

  5. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of pedunculate and sessile oak seedlings from bare-root forest nurseries.

    PubMed

    Leski, Tomasz; Pietras, Marcin; Rudawska, Maria

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we present the detailed molecular investigation of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur seedlings grown in bare-root forest nurseries. In all tested oak samples, mycorrhizal colonization was nearly 100%. Morphological observation and molecular investigations (sequencing of fungal ITS rDNA) revealed a total of 23 mycorrhizal taxa. The most frequent and abundant fungal taxa were Hebeloma sacchariolens, Tuber sp., and Peziza sp.; from the detected fungal taxa, 20 were noted for Q. petraea and 23 for Q. robur. Depending on the nursery, the species richness of identified ECM fungal taxa for both oak species ranged from six to 11 taxa. The mean species richness for all nurseries was 5.36 and 5.82 taxa per Q. petraea and Q. robur sample, respectively. According to the analysis of similarity, ECM fungal communities were similar for Q. petraea and Q. robur (R = 0.019; p = 0.151). On the other hand, detected fungal communities were significantly different between nurseries (R = 0.927; p < 0.0001). Using the Spearman rank correlation, it was determined that the ectomycorrhizal diversity (in terms of richness, the Shannon diversity, evenness, and Simpson dominance indices) is significantly related to the soil parameters of each nursery. We conclude that individual nursery may be considered as separate ecological niches that strongly discriminate diversity of ECM fungi.

  6. PtSRR1, a putative Pisolithus tinctorius symbiosis related receptor gene is expressed during the first hours of mycorrhizal interaction with Castanea sativa roots

    PubMed Central

    Acioli-Santos, B.; Malosso, E.; Calzavara-Silva, C.E.; Lima, C.E.P.; Figueiredo, A.; Sebastiana, M.; Pais, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    PtSRR1 EST was previously identified in the first hours of Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa interaction. QRT-PCR confirmed PtSRR1 early expression and in silico preliminary translated peptide analysis indicated a strong probability that PtSRR1 be a transmembrane protein. These data stimulate the PtSRR1 gene research during ectomycorrhiza formation. PMID:24031360

  7. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Alan E. Harvey; Martin F. Jurgensen; Theresa B. Jain; Jonalea R. Tonn; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    1994-01-01

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of healthy, productive forest soils....

  8. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings

    Treesearch

    Shu-Lan Bai; Guo-Lei Li; Yong Liu; R. Kasten Dumroese; Rui-Heng Lv

    2009-01-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become...

  9. Mycorrhizal associations of trees have different indirect effects on organic matter decomposition

    Treesearch

    Melanie K. Taylor; Richard A. Lankau; Nina Wurzburger; Franciska de Vries

    2016-01-01

    1. Organic matter decomposition is the main process by which carbon (C) is lost from terrestrialecosystems, and mycorrhizal associations of plants (i.e. arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and ectomycorrhizas(ECM)) may have different indirect effects on this loss pathway. AM and ECM plants differin the soil...

  10. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD IS SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED TO ITS-RFLP ANALYSIS OF MYCORRHIZAL ROOT TIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid method for extracting DNA from intact, single root tips using a Xanthine solution was developed to handle very large numbers of analyses of ectomycorrhizas. By using an extraction without grinding we have attempted to bias the extraction towards the fungal DNA in the man...

  11. Piracy in the high trees: ectomycorrhizal fungi from an aerial 'canopy soil' microhabitat.

    PubMed

    Orlovich, David A; Draffin, Suzy J; Daly, Robert A; Stephenson, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    The mantle of dead organic material ("canopy soil") associated with the mats of vascular and nonvascular epiphytes found on the branches of trees in the temperate rainforests along the southwestern coast of the South Island of New Zealand were examined for evidence of ectomycorrhizal fungi. DNA sequencing and cluster analysis were used to identify the taxa of fungi present in 74 root tips collected from the canopy soil microhabitat of three old growth Nothofagus menziesii trees in the South West New Zealand World Heritage Area. A diverse assemblage of ectomycorrhizal fungi was found to infect an extensive network of adventitious canopy roots of Nothofagus menziesii in this forest, including 14 phylotypes from nine genera of putative ectomycorrhizal fungi. Seven of the genera identified previously were known to form ectomycorrhizas with terrestrial roots of Nothofagus: Cortinarius, Russula, Cenococcum, Thelephora/Tomentella, Lactarius and Laccaria; two, Clavulina and Leotia, previously have not been reported forming ectomycorrhizas with Nothofagus. Canopy ectomycorrhizas provide an unexpected means for increased host nutrition that may have functional significance in some forest ecosystems. Presumably, canopy ectomycorrhizas on host adventitious roots circumvent the tree-ground-soil nutrient cycle by accessing a wider range of nutrients directly in the canopy than would be possible for non-mycorrhizal or arbuscular mycorrhizal canopy roots. In this system, both host and epiphytes would seem to be in competition for the same pool of nutrients in canopy soil.

  12. Root hydraulic conductivity and xylem sap levels of zeatin riboside and abscisic acid in ectomycorrhizal Douglas fir seedlings

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; Caroline S. Bledsoe; Barbara A. Smit

    1990-01-01

    Mechanistic hypotheses to explain mycorrhizal enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) suggest that phosphorus (P) nutrition, plant growth substances and/or altered morphology may be responsible. Such ideas are based on work with VA (vesicular-arbuscular) mycorrhizas. Since VA mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas differ in many respects, they...

  13. Isotopic Analysis of Sporocarp Protein and Structural Material Improves Resolution of Fungal Carbon Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Janet; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Hobbie, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal acquisition of resources is difficult to assess in the field. To determine whether fungi received carbon from recent plant photosynthate, litter or soil-derived organic (C:N bonded) nitrogen, we examined differences in δ13C among bulk tissue, structural carbon, and protein extracts of sporocarps of three fungal types: saprotrophic fungi, fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae, or fungi with hydrophilic ectomycorrhizae. Sporocarps were collected from experimental plots of the Duke Free-air CO2 enrichment experiment during and after CO2 enrichment. The differential 13C labeling of ecosystem pools in CO2 enrichment experiments was tracked into fungi and provided novel insights into organic nitrogen use. Specifically, sporocarp δ13C as well as δ15N of protein and structural material indicated that fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae used soil-derived organic nitrogen sources for protein carbon, fungi with hydrophilic ectomycorrhizae used recent plant photosynthates for protein carbon and both fungal groups used photosynthates for structural carbon. Saprotrophic fungi depended on litter produced during fumigation for both protein and structural material. PMID:28082951

  14. Seasonal ectomycorrhizal fungal biomass development on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; L.M. White; D.H. Marx; W.J. Otrosina

    1995-01-01

    Ergosterol, a membrane sterol found in fungi but not in plants, was used to estimate live mycelia biomass in ectomycorrhizae. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seeds were sown in April 1993 and grown with standard nursery culture ractices. Correlations between total seedling ergosterol and visual assessment of mycorrhizal colonization were high during...

  15. Patterns of vegetative growth and gene flow in Rhizopogon vinicolor and R. vesiculosus (Boletales, Basidiomycota).

    Treesearch

    Annette M. Kretzer; Susie Dunham; Randy Molina; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2005-01-01

    We have collected sporocarps and tuberculate ectomycorrhizae of both Rhizopogon vinicolor and Rhizopogon vesiculosus from three 50 x 100 m plots located at Mary's Peak in the Oregon Coast Range (USA); linear map distances between plots ranged from c. 1 km to c. 5.5 km. Six and...

  16. Three-way interactions among ectomycorrhizal mutualists, scale insects, and resistant and susceptible pinyon pines

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, C.A.; Cobb, N.S.; Whitham, T.G.

    1997-05-01

    Herbivores and mycorrhizal fungi are important associates of most plants, but little is known about how these organisms interact. In a 9-yr experiment, we examined how the pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) affects and is affected by the ectomycorrhizal mutualists found on the roots of scale-resistant and -susceptible pinyon pines (Pinus edulis). Three major results emerged. First, removal experiments demonstrated that scales negatively affected ectomycorrhiza. Second, although ectomycorrhiza could either positively or negatively influence scale performance by improving plant vigor or increasing plant investment in antiherbivore defenses, we found no ectomycorrhizal effect on scale mortality when we experimentally enhanced levels of ectomycorrhiza. This represented the first test of whether ectomycorrhiza promote plant resistance and contrasted with studies showing that arbuscular mycorrhiza negatively affected herbivores. Third, pinyon resistance to scales mediated the asymmetrical interaction between fungal mutualists and scale herbivores. High scale densities suppressed ectomycorrhizal colonization, but only on trees susceptible to scales. Similarities between mycorrhiza-herbivore interactions and competitive interactions among herbivores suggest broader generalities in the way aboveground herbivores interact with belowground plant associates. However, because mycorrhiza are mutualists, mycorrhiza-herbivore interactions do not fit within traditional competition paradigms. The widespread occurrence and importance of both herbivores and mycorrhiza argue for incorporating their interactions into ecological theory. 53 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Mycorrhization of pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis) with commercial truffle species: Tuber aestivum Vittad. and Tuber borchii Vittad.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Bonito, Gregory; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Bencivenga, Mattia

    2012-07-01

    Pecan (Carya illinoinensis) is an economically important nut tree native to the Mississippi basin and cultivated worldwide. In North America, species of truffles are regularly found fruiting in productive pecan orchards and the truffle genus Tuber appears to be abundant in pecan ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities. As an initial step to determine the feasibility of co-cropping European truffle species with pecan, we evaluated whether mycorrhizae of highly esteemed European truffle species (Tuber aestivum Vittad. T. borchii and T. macrosporum) could be formed on pecan seedlings. Seedlings were inoculated with truffle spores and were grown in a greenhouse for 10 months. Levels of EM colonization were estimated visually and quantified by counting EM tips. Ectomycorrhizae were identified both morphologically and molecularly with species-specific amplification and by sequencing of the ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA). Both T. borchii and T. aestivum spores produced well-formed ectomycorrhizae on pecan seedlings with average root colonization levels of about 62% and 42%, respectively, whereas no ectomycorrhizae of T. macrosporum were formed. The anatomy and morphology of these truffle ectomycorrhizae on pecan was characterized. The co-cropping of T. aestivum and T. borchii may hold promise as an additional stream of revenue to pecan growers, although, further studies are needed to assess whether this symbiosis is maintained after planting in the field and whether truffle production can be supported by this host species.

  18. Role of mycorrhizae in forestation of surface mines

    Treesearch

    Donald H. Marx

    1980-01-01

    A brief introduction to ecto- and endomycorrhizae and their importance to plants is presented. Recent findings confirm the significance of ectomycorrhizae, particularly those formed by Pisolithus tinctorius in nurseries, to survival and growth of pine seedlings on strip-mined lands. Commercial inoculum of this fungus may be available in 1981. Recent...

  19. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD IS SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED TO ITS-RFLP ANALYSIS OF MYCORRHIZAL ROOT TIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid method for extracting DNA from intact, single root tips using a Xanthine solution was developed to handle very large numbers of analyses of ectomycorrhizas. By using an extraction without grinding we have attempted to bias the extraction towards the fungal DNA in the man...

  20. Trappeindia himalayensis gen. et sp. nov., a sequestrate fungus with potential affinity to Strobilomyces (Basidiomycotina, Boletales)

    Treesearch

    M.A. Castellano; S.L. Miller; L. Singh; T.N. Lakhanpal

    2012-01-01

    An unusual sequestrate fungus forming ectomycorrhizae with Cedrus deodora (Roxb.) Laud. forms sporocarps in the northwestern Himalayas of India during spring. It has a dark brown to black peridium with a solid, white to brown, loculate gleba containing spherical, reticulate spores. It resembles no described genus and is described here as ...

  1. Identification of a small heat-shock protein associated with a ras-mediated signaling pathway in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    Treesearch

    Shiv Hiremath; Kirsten Lehtoma; Gopi K. Podila

    2009-01-01

    Initiation, development, and establishment of a functional ectomycorrhiza involve a series of biochemical events mediated by a number of genes from the fungus as well as the host plant. We have identified a heat shock protein gene from Laccaria bicolor (Lbhsp) that appears to play a role in these events. The size and...

  2. Hypogeous fungi at tree line in the Australian Alps

    Treesearch

    James M. Trappe; Andrew W Claridge

    2006-01-01

    The tree line of the continental Australian Alps yielded eighteen species of hypogeous fungi, all probably . forming ectomycorrhizae with Eucalyptus niphophila, the tree species characteristic of that habitat. Six of the species were undescribed. These collections represented six families and twelve genera: Boletaceae (with Chamonixia), Gallaceaceae...

  3. A quest for indigenous truffle helper prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gryndler, Milan; Soukupová, Lucie; Hršelová, Hana; Gryndlerová, Hana; Borovička, Jan; Streiblová, Eva; Jansa, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Tuber aestivum is the most common European truffle with significant commercial exploitation. Its production originates from natural habitats and from artificially inoculated host tree plantations. Formation of Tuber ectomycorrhizae in host seedling roots is often inefficient. One possible reason is the lack of indigenous associative microbes. Here we aimed at metagenetic characterization and cultivation of indigenous prokaryotes associated with T. aestivum in a field transect cutting through the fungus colony margin. Several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed close association with the T. aestivum in the ectomycorrhizae and in the soil, but there was no overlap between the associative prokaryotes in the two different habitats. Among those positively associated with the ectomycorrhizae, we identified several bacterial genera belonging to Pseudonocardineae. Extensive isolation efforts yielded many cultures of ectomycorrhizae-associative bacteria belonging to Rhizobiales and Streptomycineae, but none belonging to the Pseudonocardineae. The specific unculturable Tuber-associated prokaryotes are likely to play important roles in the biology of these ectomycorrhizal fungi, including modulation of competition with other symbiotic and saprotrophic microbes, facilitation of root penetration and/or accessing mineral nutrients in the soil. However, the ultimate proof of this hypothesis will require isolation of the microbes for metabolic studies, using novel cultivation approaches.

  4. Inoculation of Loblolly Pine Seedlings at Planting with Basidiospores of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in Chip Form

    Treesearch

    Peter R. Beckjord; Marla S. McIntosh; Edward Hacskaylo; John H. Jr. Melhuish; John H. Jr. Melhuish

    1984-01-01

    Basidiospores of the ectomycorrhizae-forming fungi Pisolithus tinctorius and Scleroderma auranteum incorporated into an organic hydrocolloid can be used successfully in field inoculation. Containerized loblolly pine seedlings were inoculated during outplanting by this method. This study showed that basidiospore chips were effective inocula in this investigation.

  5. Short-term effects of seasonal prescribed burning on the ectomycorrhizal fungal community and fine root biomass in ponderosa pine stands in the Blue Mountains of Oregon.

    Treesearch

    J.E. Smith; D. McKay; C.G. Niwa; W.G. Thies; G. Brenner; J.W. Spatafora

    2004-01-01

    The effects of seasonal prescribed fire on the belowground ectomycorrhizal community and live fine root biomass were investigated before, 1 year after, and 2 years after prescribed underburning. Ectomycorrhizas were sampled from four replications of three treatments (fall underburning, spring underburning, and a nonburned.control) in a randomized complete block design...

  6. Oaks belowground: mycorrhizas, truffles, and small mammals

    Treesearch

    Jonathan Frank; Seth Barry; Joseph Madden; Darlene Southworth

    2008-01-01

    Oaks depend on hidden diversity belowground. Oregon white oaks (Quercus garryana) form ectomycorrhizas with more than 40 species of fungi at a 25-ha site. Several of the most common oak mycorrhizal fungi form hypogeous fruiting bodies or truffles in the upper layer of mineral soil. We collected 18 species of truffles associated with Oregon white...

  7. Using 13C and 15N isotopes to study allocation patterns in oak seedlings

    Treesearch

    Laura M. Suz; María V. Albarracín; Caroline S. Bledsoe

    2008-01-01

    In California’s oak woodlands, survival and growth of oaks may depend on a symbiosis between oak roots and fungi that form ectomycorrhizas. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are major players in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization and cycling because they facilitate water and nutrient uptake from the soil into the plant. The ECM fungi also benefit because plants supply...

  8. Four new species of Andricus Hartig oak gallwasp from Turkey (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, Cynipini).

    PubMed

    Mutun, Serap; Dinç, Serdar; Bozsó, Miklós; Melika, George

    2014-01-31

    Four new species of oak gallwasps, Andricus ahmeti, A. anatolicus, A. bakrachus and A. turcicus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae: Cynipini) are described from Turkey. All four species are known only from asexual females and induce galls on twigs and young shoots on Q. infectoria, Q. macranthera and Q. petraea. Data on the diagnosis, distribution and biology of the four new species are given. Andricus stonei and Aphelonyx kordestanica are listed for the first time for the Turkish oak gallwasp fauna.

  9. Volatile compounds in a spanish red wine aged in barrels made of Spanish, French, and American oak wood.

    PubMed

    De Simón, Brígida Fernández; Cadahía, Estrella; Jalocha, Jerzy

    2003-12-17

    A red Rioja wine was aged in barrels made of Spanish oak wood (Quercus robur, Quercus petraea,Quercus pyrenaica, and Quercus faginea) during 21 months. The concentrations of some volatile compounds [syringaldehyde, vanillin, eugenol, maltol, guaiacol, 4-ethylphenol, cis and trans isomers of beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone, 2-furfuraldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furfuraldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfuraldehyde, and furfuryl alcohol] were studied in these wines and compared with those of the same wine aged in barrels made from French oak of Q. robur (Limousin, France) and Q. petraea (Allier, France) and American oak of Quercus alba (Missouri). Similar concentrations of these compounds were found in wines aged in Spanish and French oak wood barrels, and significantly different concentrations were found with respect to wines aged in barrels made of American oak wood, indicating a different behavior. Thus, wines with different characteristics were obtained, depending on the kind of wood. Also, the kind of wood had an important influence on sensory characteristics of wine during the aging process. Spanish oak wood from Q. robur, Q. petraea, and Q. pyrenaica can be considered to be suitable for barrel production for quality wines, because a wine aged in barrels made of these Spanish oak woods showed similar and intermediate characteristics to those of the same wine aged in French and American oak woods usually used in cooperage.

  10. Comparison of water-use efficiency of seedlings from two sympatric oak species: genotype x environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Ponton, Stéphane; Dupouey, Jean-Luc; Bréda, Nathalie; Dreyer, Erwin

    2002-04-01

    Seedlings of two sympatric oak species, Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., were grown in common garden conditions to test for potential interspecific differences in intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUE). Intrinsic water-use efficiency was estimated based on carbon isotope composition of shoots (delta13C) and on gas exchange measurements (ratio of net CO2 assimilation rate to stomatal conductance (A/g(sw))). In addition, genotype x environment interactions were tested by subjecting the seedlings to four irradiance treatments (8, 18, 48 and 100% of incident solar irradiance) imposed by neutral shading nets, and, in the 100% irradiance treatment, two watering regimes. In all treatments, initial growth of Q. robur was faster than that of Q. petraea. In both species, there was a tight correlation between delta13C and A/g(sw). Intrinsic water-use efficiency increased with increasing irradiance (almost doubling from 8 to 100% irradiance), and this effect paralleled the increase in A with increasing irradiance. In full sun, WUE of Q. petraea seedlings was 10-15% higher than in Q. robur seedlings, with the difference attributable to a difference between the species in g(sw). The interspecific difference in WUE was maintained during drought, despite the appreciable increase in WUE and decrease in growth imposed by drought. No interspecific differences in WUE were observed at low irradiances, suggesting a strong genotype x environment interaction for WUE. These findings confirm the existence of interspecific genetic differences in WUE, but also show that there is large intraspecific variability and plasticity in WUE. The initially greater height and biomass increments in Q. robur seedlings illustrate the ability of this species to out-compete Q. petraea in the early stages of forest regeneration. For adult trees growing in closed canopies, the high WUE of Q. petraea may contribute significantly to its survival during dry years, whereas the low WUE of Q. robur

  11. Morphological and molecular characterization of selected Ramaria mycorrhizae.

    PubMed

    Nouhra, Eduardo R; Horton, Thomas R; Cazares, Efren; Castellano, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Ramaria species are conspicuous mycorrhizal symbionts of conifers in the Pacific Northwest. Here we collected and identified sporocarps and associated ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria acrisiccescens Marr & Stuntz, R. cyaneigranosa Marr & Stuntz, R. sandaracina Marr & Stuntz, R. celerivirescens Marr & Stuntz, and R. flavobrunnescens var. aromatica Marr & Stuntz. An internal transcribed spacer (ITS)- restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern was observed for each of the Ramaria species and used as a diagnostic tool to support the identification of mycorrhizae occurring in mats below the sporocarps. We provide a description of ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria, which exhibit similar macro- and microscopic characteristics such as ramification pattern, coloration, abundance of mycelial strands and emanating hyphae, mantle morphology and chemical reactions of mantle and mycelial strands with KOH, FeSO4 and Melzer's reagent. Sequences of the ITS region for each of the species are deposited in the GenBank.

  12. Morphological characterization of mycorrhizae formed between three Terfezia species (desert truffles) and several Cistaceae and Aleppo pine.

    PubMed

    Zitouni-Haouar, Fatima El-Houaria; Fortas, Zohra; Chevalier, Gerard

    2014-07-01

    Six Cistaceae species, Helianthemum ledifolium, Helianthemum lippii, Fumana procumbens, Cistus albidus, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, and Pinus halepensis (Aleppo pine) were inoculated with three mycorrhizal desert truffles, Terfezia leptoderma, Terfezia boudieri, and Terfezia claveryi under greenhouse conditions, on soil originating from desert truffle natural habitat in Algeria. The syntheses have led to the formation of typical endomycorrhizae in annual Cistaceae (H. ledifolium) and perennial ones (H. lippii and F. procumbens) and an ectomycorrhiza with a less developed sheath in Cistus species and Aleppo pine. These results demonstrate the plasticity of Terfezia species to form different mycorrhizal types. The formation of an endomycorrhiza with H. ledifolium and F. procumbens and a sheathing ectomycorrhiza with P. halepensis inoculated by T. leptoderma in in vivo culture conditions was obtained for the first time.

  13. Ectomycorrhizal specificity patterns in a mixed Pinus contorta and Picea engelmannii forest in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, K. W.; Vogler, D. R.; Parker, V. T.; Finley, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    We used molecular genetic methods to test two hypotheses, (i) that host plant specificity among ectomycorrhizal fungi would be common in a closed-canopy, mixed Pinus contorta-Picea engelmannii forest in Yellowstone National Park and (ii) that specificity would be more common in the early successional tree species, P. contorta, than in the invader, P. engelmannii. We identified 28 ectomycorrhizal fungal species collected from 27 soil cores. The proportion of P. engelmannii to P. contorta ectomycorrhizae was nearly equal (52 and 48%, respectively). Of the 28 fungal species, 18 composed greater than 95% of the fungal community. No species was associated exclusively with P. contorta, but four species, each found in only one core, and one species found in two cores were associated exclusively with P. engelmannii. These fungi composed less than 5% of the total ectomycorrhizae. Thus, neither hypothesis was supported, and hypothesized benefits of ectomycorrhizal specificity to both trees and fungi probably do not exist in this system.

  14. Characterization of Tuber borchii and Arbutus unedo mycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Enrico; Iotti, Mirco; Zambonelli, Alessandra; Franceschini, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    For the first time, arbutoid mycorrhizas established between Tuber borchii and Arbutus unedo were described. Analyzed mycorrhizas were from one T. borchii natural truffle ground, dominated by Pinus pinea, as well as synthesized in greenhouse conditions. A. unedo mycorrhizas presented some typical characteristics of ectomycorrhizas of T. borchii. However, as in arbutoid mycorrhizas, ramification was cruciform and intracellular colonization in epidermal cells was present. The ability of T. borchii to form ectomycorrhizas with A. unedo opens up the possibility to also use this fruit plant for truffle cultivation. This represents an important economic opportunity in Mediterranean areas by combining both the cultivation of precious truffles and the production of edible fruits which are used fresh or in food delicacies.

  15. Association of Pinus banksiana Lamb. and Populus tremuloides Michx. seedling fine roots with Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina).

    PubMed

    Potvin, Lynette R; Richter, Dana L; Jurgensen, Martin F; Dumroese, R Kasten

    2012-11-01

    Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina, Hydanaceae), commonly regarded as a wood decay fungus, was consistently isolated from bareroot nursery Pinus banksiana Lamb. seedlings. S. brinkmannii was found in ectomycorrhizae formed by Thelephora terrestris Ehrh., Laccaria laccata (Scop.) Cooke, and Suillus luteus (L.) Roussel. In pure culture combinations with sterile P. banksiana and Populus tremuloides Michx. seedlings, S. brinkmannii colonized root cortical cells while not killing seedlings. Colonization by S. brinkmannii appeared to be intracellular but typical endo- or ectomycorrhizae were not formed. The fungus did not decay roots, although it was shown to produce cellulase in enzyme tests. Results suggest a unique association between S. brinkmannii and seedling roots that is neither mycorrhizal nor detrimental; its exact function remains to be elucidated.

  16. Characterisation of seven Inocybe ectomycorrhizal morphotypes from a semiarid woody steppe.

    PubMed

    Seress, Diána; Dima, Bálint; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-04-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) of Inocybe species (Inocybaceae, Basidiomycota) formed by three host plant species (Populus alba, Salix rosmarinifolia and Pinus nigra) in a semiarid woody steppe of Hungary were studied. To identify the fungal partners, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences for the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear DNA (nrDNA ITS) together with sequences gained from public databases. Seven Inocybe ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were morpho-anatomically characterised. Five morphotypes were identified (I. phaeoleuca, I. psammophila, I. semifulva, I. splendens and I. subporospora), whereas two morphotypes represented unidentified Inocybe species. Differences were discernible among the morphotypes, and they showed general anatomical characteristics of Inocybe ECM, such as the slightly organised plectenchymatic mantle (types A, B and E and the gelatinous C). The ECM of I. subporospora and I. phaeoleuca were detected from the introduced Pinus nigra. These two fungi are probably native to the area but capable of forming a novel ectomycorrhizal association with the invasive host.

  17. Ectomycorrhizal specificity patterns in a mixed Pinus contorta and Picea engelmannii forest in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, K. W.; Vogler, D. R.; Parker, V. T.; Finley, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    We used molecular genetic methods to test two hypotheses, (i) that host plant specificity among ectomycorrhizal fungi would be common in a closed-canopy, mixed Pinus contorta-Picea engelmannii forest in Yellowstone National Park and (ii) that specificity would be more common in the early successional tree species, P. contorta, than in the invader, P. engelmannii. We identified 28 ectomycorrhizal fungal species collected from 27 soil cores. The proportion of P. engelmannii to P. contorta ectomycorrhizae was nearly equal (52 and 48%, respectively). Of the 28 fungal species, 18 composed greater than 95% of the fungal community. No species was associated exclusively with P. contorta, but four species, each found in only one core, and one species found in two cores were associated exclusively with P. engelmannii. These fungi composed less than 5% of the total ectomycorrhizae. Thus, neither hypothesis was supported, and hypothesized benefits of ectomycorrhizal specificity to both trees and fungi probably do not exist in this system.

  18. A 5.8S nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequence database: applications to ecology and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, K. W.; Vogler, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    We complied a 5.8S nuclear ribosomal gene sequence database for animals, plants, and fungi using both newly generated and GenBank sequences. We demonstrate the utility of this database as an internal check to determine whether the target organism and not a contaminant has been sequenced, as a diagnostic tool for ecologists and evolutionary biologists to determine the placement of asexual fungi within larger taxonomic groups, and as a tool to help identify fungi that form ectomycorrhizae.

  19. New species of Tomentella (Thelephorales) from the Patagonian Andes forests.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Francisco; Barroetaveña, Carolina; Rajchenberg, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The genus Tomentella forms abundant ectomycorrhizae in coniferous and deciduous forests worldwide. Molecular identification of root tips suggests undescribed species in the Nothofagus forests of Patagonia, Argentina. Tomentella tenuissima, T. pulvinulata and T. patagonica are described here as new to science based on morphological and molecular analyses. Their host range is addressed using available soil sequences. The identity of previous records of T. galzinii and T. radiosa are discussed with morphological and molecular evidence. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  20. Effects of root dips of benomyl and captan on seedling response and mycorrhizal development of outplanted longleaf, sand, and loblolly pines. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The longleaf pine study evaluating the effects of root-stripping treatments, ectomycorrhizal condition, and seedling density in the nursery bed was terminated after collection of survival and growth data at the end of the second growing season. The striking effect of root stripping (simulating removal of short roots and ectomycorrhizae by lifting machines) that was reported after the first growing season was evident after the second growing season in terms of survival and root-collar diameters.

  1. Growth, nutrient absorption, and moisture status of selected woody species in coal-mine spoil in response to an induced infection by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F.; West, D.C.; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1982-09-01

    In this study, nursery grown loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings infected with Pisolithus and control seedlings were outplanted on a coal mine spoil in Tennessee which had been previously hydroseeded. Granular fertilizer was applied by broadcasting to one-half of the seedlings of each ectomycorrhizal treatment at the rate of 112 kg/ha NPK. After 3 years, the survival and growth of loblolly pine infected with Pisolithus were superior to that of the control seedlings, and chemical analyses of foliar samples revealed that the seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae had a higher foliar concentration of NO/sub 3/ and a lower concentration of Zn than the control seedlings. The survival, growth, and nutrient absorption of Virginia pine were not significantly affected by the infection with Pisolithus after 2 years, but both loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae exhibited an enhanced ability to absorb water during periods of high moisture stress, as determined by the pressure chamber technique. Fertilization substantially reduced the survival of the seedlings of both species. Sweet birch and European alder were grown under high, intermediate, and low fertility regimes in sand culture containing a mycelial inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius for 5 months and then transplanted to coal mine spoil containing an identical Pisolithus inoculum. Control seedlings of each species were similarly grown except that no inoculum was incorporated into the potting media. The nutrient treatments initiated in the sand culture were continued throughout the study. Examinations of the roots of the sweet birch seedlings revealed that high fertility significantly reduced the development of Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae, but Pisolithus formed abundant ectomycorrhizae on the roots of sweet birch grown under the intermediate and low fertility regimes and these seedlings were significantly larger than comparable control seedlings.

  2. Association of ectomycorrhizal fungi with Picea crassifolia (Pinaceae, Piceoidae) from high-altitude stands in Mount Helan Nature Reserve, China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y J; Grebenc, T; Wei, J; Zhao, Y L; Yan, W; Wang, L B

    2016-09-02

    We investigated the diversity of ectomycorrhiza associated with the endemic Picea crassifolia in Mount Helan National Nature Reserve in Inner Mongolia, China. Toward this objective, we conducted morphological and molecular identification of ectomycorrhizae in soil cubes taken from pure P. crassifolia stands. Eleven types of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) organisms were separated, briefly described, and identified. Nine morphotypes belonged to the phylum Basidiomycotina [Amphinema byssoides, Cortinarius sp (cf. limonius), Cortinarius vernus, Inocybe cf. nitidiscula, Inocybe sp 1, Sebacina incrustans, Sebacina sp, Suillus luteus, and Piceirhiza tuberculata x Picea crassifolia (comb. Nov.)], and two morphotypes to the phylum Ascomycotina (Cenococcum geophilum and Helvella sp). The diversity of ECM organisms in P. crassifolia was lower than that reported by other studies on spruce or pine forests, or on sporocarp diversity in the high-mountain forests of China. Most of the fungi in the rhizosphere did not correspond to species previously recorded as sporocarps above ground. Here, several new ectomycorrhiza morphotypes are proposed and described. We also confirmed the ectomycorrhizal status of the genus Sebacina (order Sebacinales).

  3. Molecular and morphological analyses confirm Rhizopogon verii as a widely distributed ectomycorrhizal false truffle in Europe, and its presence in South America.

    PubMed

    Sulzbacher, Marcelo A; Grebenc, Tine; García, Miguel Á; Silva, Bianca D; Silveira, Andressa; Antoniolli, Zaida I; Marinho, Paulo; Münzenberger, Babette; Telleria, M Teresa; Baseia, Iuri G; Martín, María P

    2016-07-01

    The genus Rhizopogon includes species with hypogeous or subepigeus habit, forming ectomycorrhizae with naturally occurring or planted pines (Pinaceae). Species of the genus Rhizopogon can be distinguished easily from the other hypogeous basidiomycetes by their lacunose gleba without columella and their smooth elliptical spores; however, the limit between species is not always easy to establish. Rhizopogon luteolus, the type species of the genus, has been considered one of the species that are more abundant in Europe, as well as it has been cited in pine plantation of North and South America, different parts of Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. However, in this study, based on molecular analyses of the ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) sequences (19 new sequences; 37 sequences from GenBank/UNITE, including those from type specimens), we prove that many GenBank sequences under R. luteolus were misidentified and correspond to Rhizopogon verii, a species described from Tunisia. Also, we confirm that basidiomes and ectomycorrhizae recently collected in Germany under Pinus sylvestris, as well as specimens from South of Brazil under Pinus taeda belong to R. verii. Thanks to the numerous ectomycorrhizal tips collected in Germany, a complete description of R. verii/P. sylvestris ectomycorrhiza is provided. Moreover, since in this paper the presence of R. verii in South America is here reported for the first time, a short description of basidiomes collected in Brazil, compared with collections located in different European herbaria, is included.

  4. Molecular and morpho-anatomical description of mycorrhizas of Lactarius rimosellus on Quercus sp., with ethnomycological notes on Lactarius in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Comandini, Ornella; Erős-Honti, Zsolt; Jakucs, Erzsébet; Arzú, Roberto Flores; Leonardi, Marco; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2012-05-01

    Guatemala is one of the richest biodiversity hotspots worldwide, bursting a wild array of ecosystems that range from pine and mixed forests in the highlands to tropical rain forests in the extensive El Petén area, bordering Belize and Mexico. Despite this biological wealth, however, current knowledge on the Guatemalan mycobiota is particularly scant, in part because of the prolonged civil war that has prevented exploration of many ecological niches. In the present paper, we report on the occurrence of Lactarius rimosellus Peck-a rarely discussed species-in oak-pine mixed forests in the Guatemalan highlands and describe the relevant ectomycorrhizae formed with Quercus sp. by means of molecular and morpho-anatomical tools. On the phylogenetic trees constructed on the basis of the partial LSU sequence, sporocarp- and ectomycorrhizae-derived sequences formed a common, statistically supported clade. The structural features of the ectomycorrhizae of L. rimosellus were generally found to match those described on various hosts for other Lactarius species belonging to the subgenus Russularia, where L. rimosellus has been traditionally assigned. These mycorrhizae are characterized by a pseudoparenchymatous outer mantle layer, with epidermoid or angular hyphal cells, and a plectenchymatous inner mantle layer; lactifers are embedded either in the middle and/or inner mantle layer. In the framework of a more general, ongoing study of the ethnomycology of the Maya populations in the Guatemalan highlands, we also report on the traditional knowledge about Lactarius mushrooms and their uses among native people.

  5. Using isotopic patterns of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi to elucidate fungal sources of carbon and nitrogen in a Norway spruce stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Janet; Rinne-Garmston, Katja; Penttilä, Reijo; Hobbie, Erik; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    To predict effects of global change on fungal community structure and the consequential effects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, we first need to understand different fungal sources of C and N. We determined sources of C and N by measuring δ15N and δ13C of an extensive collection of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic sporocarps and their potential substrates from Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in southern Finland. The substrates included organic soil, roots in organic soil, mineral soil, roots in mineral soil, moss, needles, needles in litter, branches, twigs in litter, wood and decay wood from stages I-V. Notably, δ15N and δ13C analysis of wood in decay stages I-V was a novel measurement, as were our associations between wood decay fungi and the decay stage of trees. Decay stage of wood significantly correlated with the δ15N and δ13C of associated saprotrophic wood decay fungi species. Fungi were lower in δ15N by 0.3-0.7‰ when associated with decay wood in stages II and III compared to I and IV and higher in δ13C by 0.9-1.2‰ when associated with decay stage I compared to decay stages II-IV. The ectomycorrhizal fungi, Piloderma fallax, was significantly correlated with 15N enrichment of decay wood upon its introduction in decay stages III and IV that continued to the later decay stage V, with δ15N of decay stage V 1.5‰ higher than decay stage IV. These results indicate that wood decay fungi rely on C and N from various wood decay stages and influence C and N pools of wood as well. Litter decay fungi were lower in δ13C than wood decay fungi by 1.9‰ and higher in δ15N by 3‰ and isotopically tracked their C and N sources. Calocera viscosa, Gymnopus acervatus, and Leotia lubrica were highly 15N-enriched compared to other saprotrophic fungi and they had δ15N values similar to fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae indicating function more similar to ectomycorrhizal fungi or N sources similar to this functional group. Similar to other

  6. Responses of leaf nitrogen and mobile carbohydrates in different Quercus species/provenances to moderate climate changes.

    PubMed

    Li, M-H; Cherubini, P; Dobbertin, M; Arend, M; Xiao, W-F; Rigling, A

    2013-01-01

    Global warming and shortage of water have been evidenced in the recent past and are predicted for the future. Climate change will inevitably have considerable impact on plant physiology, growth, productivity and forest ecosystem functions. The present study determined the effects of simulated daytime air warming (+1 to 1.5 °C during the growing season), drought (-40% and -57% of mean precipitation of 728 mm during the 2007 and 2008 growing season, respectively) and their combination, on leaf nitrogen (N) and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) of two Quercus species (Q. robur and Q. petraea) and provenances (two provenances for each species) grown in two soil types in Switzerland across two treatment years, to test the hypothesis that leaf N and NSC in the more water-sensitive species (Q. robur) and provenances (originating from water-rich locations) will more strongly respond to global warming and water deficit, compared to those in the more drought-tolerant species (Q. petraea) or provenances. No species- and provenance-specific responses in leaf N and NSC to the climate treatment were found, indicating that the results failed to support our hypothesis. The between-species variation of leaf N and NSC concentrations mainly reflected differences in biology of the two species, and the between-provenance variation of N and NSC concentrations apparently mirrored the climate of their origins. Hence, we conclude that (i) the two Quercus species studied are somewhat insensitive, due to their distribution covering a wide geographical and climate range, to moderate climate change within Switzerland, and (ii) a moderate global warming of B1 scenario (IPCC 2007) will not, or at least less, negatively affect the N and carbon physiology in Q. robur and Q. petraea.

  7. Tree litter and forest understorey vegetation: a conceptual framework to understand the effects of tree litter on a perennial geophyte, Anemone nemorosa.

    PubMed

    Baltzinger, Marie; Archaux, Frédéric; Dumas, Yann

    2012-05-01

    Litter is a key factor in structuring plant populations, through positive or negative interactions. The litter layer forms a mechanical barrier that is often strongly selective against individuals lacking hypocotyle plasticity. Litter composition also interacts with plant growth by providing beneficial nutrients or, inversely, by allowing harmful allelopathic leaching. As conspicuous litter fall accumulation is often observed under deciduous forests, interactions between tree litter and understorey plant populations are worthy of study. In a 1-year ex-situ experiment, the effects of tree litter on the growth of Anemone nemorosa, a small perennial forest geophyte, were investigated. Three 'litter quantity' treatments were defined, representative of forest floor litter (199, 356·5 and 514 g m(-2)), which were crossed with five 'litter composition' treatments (Quercus petraea, Fagus sylvatica, Carpinus betulus, Q. petraea + F. sylvatica and Q. petraea + C. betulus), plus a no-litter control. Path analysis was then used to investigate the pathways linking litter characteristics and components of adult plant growth. As expected, the heavier the litter, the longer the petiole; rhizome growth, however, was not depreciated by the litter-induced petiole lengthening. Both rhizome mass increment and number of initiated buds marginally increased with the amount of litter. Rhizome mass increment was in fact determined primarily by leaf area and leaf life span, neither of which was unequivocally correlated with any litter characteristics. However, the presence of litter significantly increased leafing success: following a late frost event, control rhizomes growing in the absence of litter experienced higher leaf mortality before leaf unfolding. The study questions the role of litter as a physical or chemical barrier to ground vegetation; to better understand this role, there is a need for ex-situ, longer-term experiments coupled with in-situ observations in the forest.

  8. Inter- and intra-specific variability in isoprene production and photosynthesis of Central European oak species.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, R; Contran, N; Gugerli, F; Schnitzler, J-P; Zimmer, I; Menard, T; Günthardt-Goerg, M S

    2013-01-01

    European deciduous oaks are closely related and are known for their strong emission of volatile isoprenoids. They are chemo-taxonomically diverse, but hybridise frequently. Four-year-old oak seedlings growing together in a model ecosystem facility under near-natural conditions were studied. The leaves were morphologically classified in the three oak species Quercus robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petraea (with four provenances each) and further investigated by a molecular-genetic approach. Q. robur was morphologically and genetically clearly different from Q. pubescens and Q. petraea, whereas Q. pubescens and Q. petraea individuals used in this study were morphologically and genetically more similar. There was a minor impact of among and within species variability on isoprene synthesis, isoprene emission and photosynthesis. Isoprene emission rates normalised to 25 °C leaf temperature ranged from 5.78 to 10.66 nmol m(-2)  s(-1) , whereas photosynthesis ranged from 12.8 to 17.6 μmol m(-2)  s(-1) . On cloudy days, among the provenances of each species, only net photosynthesis of the Q. robur provenance Hünenberg was reduced and isoprene synthase activity of the Q. pubescens provenance Promotogno increased. On sunny days, photosynthesis did not differ among the provenances. Over all provenances, gas exchange on cloudy days did not differ significantly from sunny days. In the combined data of cloudy and sunny days, no differences between the studied provenances and oak species were detected in isoprene emission and photosynthesis. Thus, isoprene emission and photosynthesis rates were remarkably stable among oak species and provenances. The results indicate that taxonomic differences in the studied oak species are not reflected in isoprene emission and photosynthesis, probably because of the high plasticity of gene expression resulting in high phenotypic flexibility.

  9. Osmotic stress responses of individual white oak (Quercus section, Quercus subgenus) genotypes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Zita; Kanalas, Péter; Máthé, Csaba; Cseke, Klára; Szőllősi, Erzsébet; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jámbrik, Katalin; Kiss, Zoltán; Mészáros, Ilona

    2014-01-15

    White oaks (Quercus section, Quercus subgenus) are widely distributed in Europe. Quercus petraea (sessile oak), an economically important species is predicted to be affected by climate change. Q. pubescens (pubescent oak) and Q. virgiliana (Italian pubescent oak) are economically less important, drought tolerant species. Frequent hybridization of white oaks was observed and currently the introgression of Q. pubescens and Q. virgiliana in non-mediterranean regions of Europe has been reported. Our goal was to use tissue cultures established from individual trees of the above taxa and their putative hybrids, all present in the forest stand of Síkfőkút LTER Research Area (NE Hungary) as simple experimental model systems for studying drought/osmotic stress tolerance. Tissue cultures are more suitable models for such studies, than seedlings, because they are genetically identical to the parent plants. Polyethylene glycol (PEG6000) treatments were used for this purpose. The identification of taxa was based on leaf morphological traits and microsatellite analysis and showed that Q. petraea is genetically distinct to all other taxa examined. We established six callus lines of Quercus. As expected, in Q. petraea cultures PEG6000 induced severe loss of fresh weight and the ability to recover after removal of the osmoticum, which was not characteristic for Q. pubescens and Q. virgiliana. Putative hybrids exhibited an intermediate response to osmotic stress. Activity gels showed the increase of single-strand preferring (SSP) nuclease and no significant change of guaiacol-peroxidase activities in drought-sensitive genotypes/cultures and no significant increase of SSP nuclease activities accompanied with increases of guaiacol-peroxidase activities in drought-tolerant ones. This indicates that drought/osmotic stress tolerance is associated to increased capacity of scavenging reactive oxygen species and hence less susceptibility to DNA damage. Our results confirm that tissue

  10. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation are genetically independent characters.

    PubMed

    Macnair, M R; Bert, V; Huitson, S B; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Petit, D

    1999-11-07

    The hyperaccumulation of metals by a rare class of plants is a fascinating and little understood phenomenon. No genetic analysis has been possible since no intraspecific variation is known for this character. Here, we report on crosses between the zinc-hyperaccumulating and -tolerant species Arabidopsis halleri and the non-hyperaccumulating, non-tolerant species Arabidopsis petraea. The F2 segregates for both characters and it appears that the two characters are genetically independent. The data for tolerance are consistent with a single major gene for this character (although the number of genes for hyperaccumulation cannot be determined), and is probably not very large.

  11. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation are genetically independent characters.

    PubMed Central

    Macnair, M R; Bert, V; Huitson, S B; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Petit, D

    1999-01-01

    The hyperaccumulation of metals by a rare class of plants is a fascinating and little understood phenomenon. No genetic analysis has been possible since no intraspecific variation is known for this character. Here, we report on crosses between the zinc-hyperaccumulating and -tolerant species Arabidopsis halleri and the non-hyperaccumulating, non-tolerant species Arabidopsis petraea. The F2 segregates for both characters and it appears that the two characters are genetically independent. The data for tolerance are consistent with a single major gene for this character (although the number of genes for hyperaccumulation cannot be determined), and is probably not very large. PMID:10649632

  12. The usability of tree barks as long term biomonitors of atmospheric radionuclide deposition.

    PubMed

    Belivermiş, Murat; Kiliç, Onder; Cotuk, Yavuz; Topcuoğlu, Sayhan; Kalayci, Gülşah; Peştreli, Didem

    2010-12-01

    In view of the lower radionuclide activities of moss and lichen, tree barks can be used as biomonitors of radioactive contamination, regardless of the contribution of soil uptake. The present study was conducted to determine the activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U in the barks of pine (Pinus nigra) and oak (Quercus petraea) trees collected from the Thrace region in Turkey. By considering the previous studies carried out in the same region, it is noticed that among lichen, moss, oak bark and pine bark, oak bark is the best accumulator of (137)Cs and natural radionuclides.

  13. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  14. The Potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to Form Root Symbioses with Ectomycorrhizal and Ericoid Mycorrhizal Middle European Forest Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lukešová, Tereza; Kohout, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš; Vohník, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.—Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch) with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs) with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE colonization without

  15. The Genome of Laccaria Bi color Provides Insights into Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D; Brun, A; Duchaussoy, F; Gibon, J; Kohler, A; Lindquist, E; Pereda, V; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, HJ; Wuyts, J; Blaudez, D; Buee, M; Brokstein, P; Canbeck, B; Cohen, D; Courty, PE; Coutinho, PM; Danchin, E; Delaruelle, C; Detter, J C; Deveau, A; DiFazio, Stephen P; Duplessis, S; Fraissinet-Tachet, L; Lucic, E; Frey-Klett, P; Fourrey, C; Feussner, I; Gay, G; Grimwood, Jane; Hoegger, P J; Jain, P; Kilaru, S; Labbe, J; Lin, Y C; Legue, V; Le Tacon, F; Marmeisse, R; Melayah, D; Montanini, B; Muratet, M; Nehls, U; Niculita-Hirzel, H; Oudot-Le Secq, M P; Peter, M; Quesneville, H; Rajashekar, B; Reich, M; Rouhler, N; Schmutz, Jeremy; Yin, Tongming; Chalot, M; Henrissat, B; Kues, U; Lucas, S; Van de Peer, Y; Podila, G; Polle, A; Pukkila, P J; Richardson, P M; Rouze, P; Sanders, I R; Stajich, J E; Tunlid, A; Tuskan, Gerald A; Grigoriev, I.

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and

  16. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D; Brun, A; Danchin, E; Duchaussoy, F; Gibon, J; Kohler, A; Lindquist, E; Pereda, V; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, HJ; Wuyts, J; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M; Brokstein, P; Canbeck, B; Cohen, D; Courty, PE; Coutinho, PM; Delaruelle, C; Detter, J C; Deveau, A; DiFazio, Stephen P; Duplessis, S; Fraissinet-Tachet, L; Lucic, E; Frey-Klett, P; Fourrey, C; Feussner, I; Gay, G; Grimwood, Jane; Hoegger, P J; Jain, P; Kilaru, S; Labbe, J; Lin, Y C; Legue, V; Le Tacon, F; Marmeisse, R; Melayah, D; Montanini, B; Muratet, M; Nehls, U; Niculita-Hirzel, H; Oudot-Le Secq, M P; Peter, M; Quesneville, H; Rajashekar, B; Reich, M; Rouhler, N; Schmutz, Jeremy; Yin, Tongming; Tuskan, Gerald A; Chalot, M; Henrissat, B; Kues, U; Lucas, S; Van de Peer, Y; Podila, G; Polle, A; Pukkila, P J; Richardson, P M; Rouze, P; Sanders, I R; Stajich, J E; Tunlid, A; Grigoriev, I.

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  17. The potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to form root symbioses with ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal middle European forest plants.

    PubMed

    Lukešová, Tereza; Kohout, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš; Vohník, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.--Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch) with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs) with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE colonization without

  18. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  19. Ectomycorrhizal association of three Lactarius species with Carpinus and Quercus trees in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Lamus, Valentina; Montoya, Leticia; Aguilar, Carlos J; Bandala, Victor M; Ramos, David

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are being monitored in the Santuario del Bosque de Niebla in the central region of Veracruz (eastern Mexico). Based on the comparison of DNA sequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips, we discovered the EM symbiosis of Lactarius indigo, L. areolatus and L. strigosipes with Carpinus caroliniana, Quercus xalapensis and Quercus spp. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). Descriptions coupled with photographs of ectomycorrhizas and basidiomes are presented.

  20. Changes in the Dynamics of Foliar N Metabolites in Oak Saplings by Drought and Air Warming Depend on Species and Soil Type

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Simon, Judy; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S.; Arend, Matthias; Kuster, Thomas M.; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Climate change poses direct or indirect influences on physiological mechanisms in plants. In particular, long living plants like trees have to cope with the predicted climate changes (i.e. drought and air warming) during their life span. The present study aimed to quantify the consequences of simulated climate change for foliar N metabolites over a drought-rewetting-drought course. Saplings of three Central European oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens) were tested on two different soil types (i.e. acidic and calcareous). Consecutive drought periods increased foliar amino acid-N and soluble protein-N concentrations at the expense of structural N in all three oak species. In addition, transient effects on foliar metabolite dynamics were observed over the drought-rewetting-drought course. The lowest levels of foliar soluble protein-N, amino acid-N and potassium cation with a minor response to drought and air warming were found in the oak species originating from the driest/warmest habitat (Q. pubescens) compared to Q. robur and Q. petraea. Higher foliar osmolyte-N and potassium under drought and air warming were observed in all oak species when grown on calcareous versus acidic soil. These results indicate that species-specific differences in physiological mechanisms to compensate drought and elevated temperature are modified by soil acidity. PMID:25961713

  1. Reconstruction of palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities of various beech plants (Fagaceae): testing and application of a mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, M.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Konrad, W.

    2006-12-01

    A mechanistic model (Konrad &Roth-Nebelsick a, in prep.) was applied for the reconstruction of atmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities and photosynthesis parameters of extant and fossil Fagaceae. The model is based on an approach which couples diffusion and the biochemical process of photosynthesis. Atmospheric CO2 is calculated on the basis of stomatal diffusion and photosynthesis parameters of the considered taxa. The considered species include the castanoid Castanea sativa, two quercoids Quercus petraea and Quercus rhenana and an intermediate species Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis. In the case of Quercus petraea literature data were used. Stomatal data of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis, Quercus rhenana and Castanea sativa were determined by the authors. Data of the extant Castanea sativa were collected by applying a peeling method and by counting of stomatal densities on the digitalized images of the peels. Additionally, isotope data of leaf samples of Castanea sativa were determined to estimate the ratio of intercellular to ambient carbon dioxide. The CO2 values calculated by the model (on the basis of stomatal data and measured or estimated biochemical parameters) are in good agreement with literature data, with the exception of the Late Eocene. The results thus demonstrate that the applied approach is principally suitable for reconstructing palaeoatmospheric CO2.

  2. Irradiance-induced plasticity in the hydraulic properties of saplings of different temperate broad-leaved forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Barigah, Têtè S; Ibrahim, Tharwat; Bogard, Aurore; Faivre-Vuillin, Benjamin; Lagneau, Louis André; Montpied, Pierre; Dreyer, Erwin

    2006-12-01

    We assessed the irradiance-related plasticity of hydraulic architecture in saplings of Betula pendula Roth., a pioneer species; Acer pseudoplatanus L., Fraxinus excelsior L. and Quercus robur L., which are post-pioneer light-requiring species; and Quercus petraea Matt. Liebl. and Fagus sylvatica L. Plants were grown in pots in 36%, 16% and 4% of full sunlight. Hydraulic conductance was measured with a high-pressure flow-meter in entire, in situ root systems and in excised shoots. Leaf-specific whole-plant conductance (LSC) increased with irradiance, due, in part, to an effect of irradiance on plant size. In addition, there was a size-independent effect of irradiance on LSC due, in part, to an increase in root hydraulic conductance paralleled by an increase in root biomass scaled to leaf area. Changes in shoot conductivity also contributed to the size-independent plasticity of LSC. Vulnerability to cavitation measured in current-year twigs was much larger in shade-grown plants. Betula pendula had the highest whole-plant, root and shoot conductances and also the greatest vulnerability to cavitation. The other species were similar in LSC, but showed some variation in root conductance scaled to biomass, with Q. robur, Q. petraea and F. sylvatica having the lowest root conductance and susceptibility to cavitation. All species showed a similar irradiance-related plasticity in LSC.

  3. Natural forest expansion on reclaimed coal mines in Northern Spain: the role of native shrubs as suitable microsites.

    PubMed

    Alday, Josu G; Zaldívar, Pilar; Torroba-Balmori, Paloma; Fernández-Santos, Belén; Martínez-Ruiz, Carolina

    2016-07-01

    The characterization of suitable microsites for tree seedling establishment and growth is one of the most important tasks to achieve the restoration of native forest using natural processes in disturbed sites. For that, we assessed the natural Quercus petraea forest expansion in a 20-year-old reclaimed open-cast mine under sub-Mediterranean climate in northern Spain, monitoring seedling survival, growth, and recruitment during 5 years in three contrasting environments (undisturbed forest, mine edge, and mine center). Seedling density and proportion of dead branches decreased greatly from undisturbed forest towards the center of the mine. There was a positive effect of shrubs on Q. petraea seedling establishment in both mine environments, which increase as the environment undergoes more stress (from the mine edge to the center of the mine), and it was produced by different shrub structural features in each mine environment. Seedling survival reduction through time in three environments did not lead to a density reduction because there was a yearly recruitment of new seedlings. Seedling survival, annual growth, and height through time were greater in mine sites than in the undisturbed forest. The successful colonization patterns and positive neighbor effect of shrubs on natural seedlings establishment found in this study during the first years support the use of shrubs as ecosystem engineers to increase heterogeneity in micro-environmental conditions on reclaimed mine sites, which improves late-successional Quercus species establishment.

  4. Growth reduction after defoliation is independent of CO2 supply in deciduous and evergreen young oaks.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sandra; Palacio, Sara; Hoch, Günter

    2017-02-27

    Reduced productivity of trees after defoliation might be caused by limited carbon (C) availability. We investigated the combined effect of different atmospheric CO2 concentrations (160, 280 and 560 ppm) and early season defoliation on the growth and C reserves (nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC)) of saplings of two oak species with different leaf habits (deciduous Quercus petraea and evergreen Quercus ilex). In both species, higher CO2 supply significantly enhanced growth. Defoliation had a strong negative impact on growth (stronger for Q. ilex), but the relative reduction of growth caused by defoliation within each CO2 treatment was very similar across all three CO2 concentrations. Low CO2 and defoliation led to decreased NSC tissue concentrations mainly in the middle of the growing season in Q. ilex, but not in Q. petraea. However, also in Q. ilex, NSC increased in woody tissues in defoliated and low-CO2 saplings towards the end of the growing season. Although the saplings were C limited under these specific experimental conditions, growth reduction after defoliation was not directly caused by C limitation. Rather, growth of trees followed a strong allometric relationship between total leaf area and conductive woody tissue, which did not change across species, CO2 concentrations and defoliation treatments.

  5. First Approach to the Analytical Characterization of
Barrel-Aged Grape Marc Distillates Using Phenolic Compounds and Colour Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Solana, Raquel; Salgado, José Manuel; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Phenolic compounds (benzoic and cinnamic acid derivatives) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with multiple wavelength detector (HPLC- -MWD) in grape marc distillates aged in Quercus petraea, Quercus robur and Quercus alba wooden barrels. In addition to colour indices and evaluable polyphenols, all samples were described by sensorial analysis. There were significant differences in the mean concentrations of the majority of phenolic compounds among the samples. Gallic and benzoic acids were the most abundant and samples aged in Q. robur from Galicia (NW of Spain) had the highest concentration of most of the determined phenols. Grape marc distillates aged in Q. robur obtained the highest values of all sensorial attributes, whereas samples aged in Q. petraea and Q. alba obtained similar scores. Principal component analysis accounted for 88.32% of total variance, showing a good separation of aged distillates in terms of phenolic compounds and colour characteristics, according to the species and origin of the oak wood used in the ageing process. PMID:27904312

  6. Evolution of ellagitannins in Spanish, French, and American oak woods during natural seasoning and toasting.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, E; Varea, S; Muñoz, L; Fernández De Simón, B; García-Vallejo, M C

    2001-08-01

    The evolution of tannins in Spanish oak heartwood of Quercus robur L., Quercus petraea Liebl.,Quercus pyrenaica Wild., and Quercus faginea Lam. was studied in relation to the processing of wood in barrel cooperage. Their evolution was compared with that of French oak of Q. robur (Limousin, France) and Q. petraea (Allier, France) and American oak of Quercus alba L. (Missouri), which are habitually used in cooperage. Two stages of process were researched: the seasoning of woods during 3 years in natural conditions and toasting. Total phenol and total ellagitannin contents and optical density at 420 nm of wood extracts were determined. The ellagitannins roburins A-E, grandinin, vescalagin, and castalagin were identified and quantified by HPLC, and the molecular weight distribution of ellagitannins was calculated by GPC. During the seasoning process the different ellagitannin concentrations decreased according to the duration of this process and in the same way as those in French and American woods. The toasting process also had an important influence on the ellagitannin composition of wood. Roburins A-E, grandinin, vescalagin, and castalagin decreased during this process in the Spanish wood species, in the same proportion as in the French and American ones. Also, the seasoning and toasting processes lead to qualitative variations in the structure of ellagitannins, especially in the molecular weight distribution, as was evidenced by GPC analysis of their acetylated derivatives.

  7. Volatile compounds in Spanish, French, and American oak woods after natural seasoning and toasting.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, Estrella; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Jalocha, Jerzy

    2003-09-24

    The volatile composition (volatile phenols, phenolic aldehydes, furanic compounds, lactones, phenyl ketones, and other related compounds) of Spanish oak heartwood of Quercus robur, Quercus petraea,Quercus pyrenaica, and Quercus faginea was studied by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, in relation to the processing in barrels cooperage and in relation to the French oak of Quercus robur (Limousin) and Quercus petraea (Allier) and American oak of Quercus alba (Missouri), which are habitually used in cooperage. The volatile composition of seasoned oak woods varied according to individual trees, species, and origins, and the differences were more significant in Spanish species with respect to American species than with respect to French species. The toasting process influenced the volatile composition of wood. It led to high increases in the concentration of volatile phenols, furanic aldehydes, phenyl ketones, and other related structures, but the effect on w-lactones levels depended on species and origin. The volatile composition in Spanish oak species evolved during toasting like in French and American oak, but quantitative differences were found, especially important in American species with respect to European species.

  8. Changes in low molecular weight phenolic compounds in Spanish, French, and American oak woods during natural seasoning and toasting.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, E; Muñoz, L; Fernández de Simón, B; García-Vallejo, M C

    2001-04-01

    The evolution of low molecular weight polyphenols in Spanish oak heartwood of Quercus robur,Quercus petraea, Quercus pyrenaica, and Quercus faginea was studied by HPLC, in relation to the processing of wood in barrel cooperage. The polyphenolic composition of Spanish woods subjected to natural seasoning for 3 years and to the toasting process was studied in relation to those of French oak of Q. robur (Limousin) and Q. petraea (Allier) and American oak of Q. alba (Missouri), which are habitually used in cooperage. The concentrations of benzoic and cinnamic acids and aldehydes of Spanish woods increased during seasoning depending on the duration of this process and in the same way as those of French and American woods. The process having the main influence on the phenolic composition of wood was the toasting. It led to high increases in the concentration of phenolic aldehydes and acids, especially cinnamic aldehydes (sinapic and coniferylic aldehydes), followed by benzoic aldehydes (syringaldehyde and vanillin) and benzoic acids (syringic and vanillic acids). This polyphenolic composition in Spanish oak species evolved during toasting as in French and American oak, but quantitative differences were found, which were especially important in American species with respect to the others.

  9. First Approach to the Analytical Characterization of
Barrel-Aged Grape Marc Distillates Using Phenolic Compounds and Colour Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Solana, Raquel; Salgado, José Manuel; Domínguez, José Manuel; Cortés-Diéguez, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Phenolic compounds (benzoic and cinnamic acid derivatives) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with multiple wavelength detector (HPLC- -MWD) in grape marc distillates aged in Quercus petraea, Quercus robur and Quercus alba wooden barrels. In addition to colour indices and evaluable polyphenols, all samples were described by sensorial analysis. There were significant differences in the mean concentrations of the majority of phenolic compounds among the samples. Gallic and benzoic acids were the most abundant and samples aged in Q. robur from Galicia (NW of Spain) had the highest concentration of most of the determined phenols. Grape marc distillates aged in Q. robur obtained the highest values of all sensorial attributes, whereas samples aged in Q. petraea and Q. alba obtained similar scores. Principal component analysis accounted for 88.32% of total variance, showing a good separation of aged distillates in terms of phenolic compounds and colour characteristics, according to the species and origin of the oak wood used in the ageing process.

  10. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  11. Increasing Spring temperature favors oak seed production in temperate areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caignard, Thomas; Kremer, Antoine; Firmat, Cyril; Nicolas, Manuel; Venner, Samuel; Delzon, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Although changes in vegetative phenology have considerable consequences for ecosystem functioning, little is known about how tree reproduction responds to climate change, while reproductive traits are key determinants of plant fitness. Assessing the response of tree reproduction to climate variations is needed for understanding tree and forest adaptation to environmental changes. We analyzed an extensive dataset of tree reproduction in 28 temperate oak forests distributed throughout France and examined how seed production responded to temperature variations over 14 years In addition, a "space-for-time" substitution experiment has been used to quantify the temperature sensitivity of acorn production. The amount of acorn produced in 10 Q. petraea populations along two parallel elevation gradients in Southern France were quantified from 2012 to 2015. During the past two decades, we observed a significant increase in reproductive effort for Q. petraea that correlates with a rise in spring temperature. Although no significant trend over time has been observed for Q. robur, a significant increase in seed production was also found with spring temperature. Such sensitivity to temperature of seed production has been confirmed along the elevational gradients. Our findings show that increasing spring temperature favors oak reproductive effort in temperate ecosystems. Nevertheless, while fitness can be enhanced by higher seed production, it also depends on the frequency and on the synchronization of mast seeding production that climate change may influence too.

  12. Genome-wide quantification of homeolog expression ratio revealed nonstochastic gene regulation in synthetic allopolyploid Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Akama, Satoru; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Shimizu, Kentaro K.; Sese, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Genome duplication with hybridization, or allopolyploidization, occurs commonly in plants, and is considered to be a strong force for generating new species. However, genome-wide quantification of homeolog expression ratios was technically hindered because of the high homology between homeologous gene pairs. To quantify the homeolog expression ratio using RNA-seq obtained from polyploids, a new method named HomeoRoq was developed, in which the genomic origin of sequencing reads was estimated using mismatches between the read and each parental genome. To verify this method, we first assembled the two diploid parental genomes of Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea (Arabidopsis petraea subsp. umbrosa), then generated a synthetic allotetraploid, mimicking the natural allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica. The quantified ratios corresponded well to those obtained by Pyrosequencing. We found that the ratios of homeologs before and after cold stress treatment were highly correlated (r = 0.870). This highlights the presence of nonstochastic polyploid gene regulation despite previous research identifying stochastic variation in expression. Moreover, our new statistical test incorporating overdispersion identified 226 homeologs (1.11% of 20 369 expressed homeologs) with significant ratio changes, many of which were related to stress responses. HomeoRoq would contribute to the study of the genes responsible for polyploid-specific environmental responses. PMID:24423873

  13. Micro-oxygenation strategy depends on origin and size of oak chips or staves during accelerated red wine aging.

    PubMed

    Del Alamo, María; Nevares, Ignacio; Gallego, Laura; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Cadahía, Estrella

    2010-02-15

    The practice of wine aging in stainless steel tank involves storing wine in contact with wood and dosing it with small oxygen quantities in order to obtain a final wine more stable in time and with the same characteristics of barrel-aged wines. Oxygen dosing is a key factor and, to achieve a correct development of wine, needs to be applied according to wine necessities and to the kind of wood chosen. This paper shows the results obtained from the study of oxygen required by a same wine aged in tanks with different alternative products (chips and staves) made of American (Q. alba), French (Q. petraea) and Spanish oak (Q. pyrenaica), with a strategy of micro-oxygenation as required. The results indicate that the size and origin of the wood used determine the oxygen management during the process. In fact, wine treated with big pieces (staves) consumes more oxygen and, with regard to wood origin, wine aged with French oak (Q. petraea) products needs of a higher oxygen dosage.

  14. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shu-Lan; Li, Guo-Lei; Liu, Yong; Kasten Dumroese, R; Lv, Rui-Heng

    2009-08-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become mycorrhizal and survival and growth are enhanced; without O. davidiana, pines often remain without mycorrhizae and performance is poorer. To better understand this relationship, we initiated an experiment using rhizoboxes that restricted root and tested the hypothesis that O. davidiana seedlings facilitated ectomycorrhizae formation on P. tabulaeformis seedlings through hyphal contact. We found that without O. davidiana seedlings, inocula of five indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi were unable to grow and associate with P. tabulaeformis seedlings. Inocula placed alongside O. davidiana seedlings, however, resulted in enhanced growth and nutritional status of O. davidiana and P. tabulaeformis seedlings, and also altered rhizosphere pH and phosphatase activity. We speculate that these species form a common mycorrhizal network and this association enhances outplanting performance of P. tabulaeformis seedlings used for forest restoration.

  15. Ericaceous dwarf shrubs affect ectomycorrhizal fungal community of the invasive Pinus strobus and native Pinus sylvestris in a pot experiment.

    PubMed

    Kohout, Petr; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Bahram, Mohammad; Hadincová, Věroslava; Albrechtová, Jana; Tedersoo, Leho; Vohník, Martin

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between ericaceous understorey shrubs and the diversity and abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcMF) associated with the invasive Pinus strobus and native Pinus sylvestris. Seedlings of both pines were grown in mesocosms and subjected to three treatments simulating different forest microhabitats: (a) grown in isolation and grown with (b) Vaccinium myrtillus or (c) Vaccinium vitis-idaea. Ericaceous plants did not act as a species pool of pine mycobionts and inhibited the ability of the potentially shared species Meliniomyces bicolor to form ectomycorrhizae. Similarly, Ericaceae significantly reduced the formation of Thelephora terrestris ectomycorrhizae in P. sylvestris. EcMF species composition in the mesocosms was strongly affected by both the host species and the presence of an ericaceous neighbour. When grown in isolation, P. strobus root tips were predominantly colonised by Wilcoxina mikolae, whereas those of P. sylvestris were more commonly colonised by Suillus and Rhizopogon spp. Interestingly, these differences were less evident (Suillus + Rhizopogon spp.) or absent (W. mikolae) when the pines were grown with Ericaceae. P. strobus exclusively associated with Rhizopogon salebrosus s.l., suggesting the presence of host specificity at the intrageneric level. Ericaceous plants had a positive effect on colonisation of P. strobus root tips by R. salebrosus s.l. This study demonstrates that the interaction of selective factors such as host species and presence of ericaceous plants may affect the realised niche of the ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  16. Metatranscriptomic Study of Common and Host-Specific Patterns of Gene Expression between Pines and Their Symbiotic Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in the Genus Suillus

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Chen, Yuan; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2016-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) represent one of the major guilds of symbiotic fungi associated with roots of forest trees, where they function to improve plant nutrition and fitness in exchange for plant carbon. Many groups of EMF exhibit preference or specificity for different plant host genera; a good example is the genus Suillus, which grows in association with the conifer family Pinaceae. We investigated genetics of EMF host-specificity by cross-inoculating basidiospores of five species of Suillus onto ten species of Pinus, and screened them for their ability to form ectomycorrhizae. Several Suillus spp. including S. granulatus, S. spraguei, and S. americanus readily formed ectomycorrhizae (compatible reaction) with white pine hosts (subgenus Strobus), but were incompatible with other pine hosts (subgenus Pinus). Metatranscriptomic analysis of inoculated roots reveals that plant and fungus each express unique gene sets during incompatible vs. compatible pairings. The Suillus-Pinus metatranscriptomes utilize highly conserved gene regulatory pathways, including fungal G-protein signaling, secretory pathways, leucine-rich repeat and pathogen resistance proteins that are similar to those associated with host-pathogen interactions in other plant-fungal systems. Metatranscriptomic study of the combined Suillus-Pinus transcriptome has provided new insight into mechanisms of adaptation and coevolution of forest trees with their microbial community, and revealed that genetic regulation of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis utilizes universal gene regulatory pathways used by other types of fungal-plant interactions including pathogenic fungal-host interactions. PMID:27736883

  17. Ectomycorrhizal Influence on Particle Size, Surface Structure, Mineral Crystallinity, Functional Groups, and Elemental Composition of Soil Colloids from Different Soil Origins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus) and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam) and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil), we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P > 0.05). These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O–H stretching and bending, C–H stretching, C=O stretching, etc.) by 3–26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz) by 40–300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12–35% decreases in most functional groups, 15–55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P < 0.05). These different responses sharply decreased element ratios (C : O, C : N, and C : Si) in soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil. PMID:23766704

  18. Ectomycorrhizal influence on particle size, surface structure, mineral crystallinity, functional groups, and elemental composition of soil colloids from different soil origins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus) and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam) and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil), we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P > 0.05). These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O-H stretching and bending, C-H stretching, C=O stretching, etc.) by 3-26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz) by 40-300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12-35% decreases in most functional groups, 15-55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P < 0.05). These different responses sharply decreased element ratios (C:O, C:N, and C:Si) in soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  19. Identification of genes differentially expressed in ectomycorrhizal roots during the Pinus pinaster-Laccaria bicolor interaction.

    PubMed

    Flores-Monterroso, Aranzazu; Canales, Javier; de la Torre, Fernando; Ávila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2013-06-01

    Ectomycorrhizal associations are of major ecological importance in temperate and boreal forests. The development of a functional ectomycorrhiza requires many genetic and biochemical changes. In this study, suppressive subtraction hybridization was used to identify differentially expressed genes in the roots of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) inoculated with Laccaria bicolor, a mycorrhizal fungus. A total number of 200 unigenes were identified as being differentially regulated in maritime pine roots during the development of mycorrhiza. These unigenes were classified into 10 categories according to the function of their homologues in the GenBank database. Approximately, 40 % of the differentially expressed transcripts were genes that coded for unknown proteins in the databases or that had no homology to known genes. A group of these differentially expressed genes was selected to validate the results using quantitative real-time PCR. The transcript levels of the representative genes were compared between the non-inoculated and inoculated plants at 1, 5, 15 and 30 days after inoculation. The observed expression patterns indicate (1) changes in the composition of the wall cell, (2) tight regulation of defence genes during the development of mycorrhiza and (3) changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Ammonium excess or deficiency dramatically affected the stability of ectomycorrhiza and altered gene expression in maritime pine roots.

  20. No significant contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to transfer of radiocesium from soil to plants.

    PubMed

    Joner, E J; Roos, P; Jansa, J; Frossard, E; Leyval, C; Jakobsen, I

    2004-11-01

    The diffuse pollution by fission and activation products following nuclear accidents and weapons testing is of major public concern. Among the nuclides that pose a serious risk if they enter the human food chain are the cesium isotopes 137Cs and 134Cs (with half-lives of 30 and 2 years, respectively). The biogeochemical cycling of these isotopes in forest ecosystems is strongly affected by their preferential absorption in a range of ectomycorrhiza-forming basidiomycetes. An even more widely distributed group of symbiotic fungi are the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which colonize most herbaceous plants, including many agricultural crops. These fungi are known to be more efficient than ectomycorrhizas in transporting mineral elements from soil to plants. Their role in the biogeochemical cycling of Cs is poorly known, in spite of the consequences that fungal Cs transport may have for transfer of Cs into the human food chain. This report presents the first data on transport of Cs by these fungi by use of radiotracers and compartmented growth systems where uptake by roots and mycorrhizal hyphae is distinguished. Independent experiments in three laboratories that used different combinations of fungi and host plants all demonstrated that these fungi do not contribute significantly to plant uptake of Cs. The implications of these findings for the bioavailability of radiocesium in different terrestrial ecosystems are discussed.

  1. Independent, specialized invasions of ectomycorrhizal mutualism by two nonphotosynthetic orchids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D. Lee; Bruns, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the mycorrhizal associations of two nonphotosynthetic orchids from distant tribes within the Orchidaceae. The two orchids were found to associate exclusively with two distinct clades of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous fungi over wide geographic ranges. Yet both orchids retained the internal mycorrhizal structure typical of photosynthetic orchids that do not associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of two ribosomal regions along with fungal isolation provided congruent, independent evidence for the identities of the fungal symbionts. All 14 fungal entities that were associated with the orchid Cephalanthera austinae belonged to a clade within the Thelephoraceae, and all 18 fungal entities that were associated with the orchid Corallorhiza maculata fell within the Russulaceae. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of ectomycorrhizal tree roots collected adjacent to Cephalanthera showed that (i) the fungi associated internally with Cephalanthera also form typical external ectomycorrhizae and that (ii) ectomycorrhizae formed by other Basidiomycetes were abundant where the orchid grows but these fungi did not associate with the orchid. This is the first proof of ectomycorrhizal epiparasitism in nature by an orchid. We argue that these orchids are cheaters because they do not provide fixed carbon to associated fungi. This view suggests that mycorrhizae, like other ancient mutualisms, are susceptible to cheating. The extreme specificity in these orchids relative to other ectomycorrhizal plants agrees with trends seen in more conventional parasites. PMID:9114020

  2. Identity and specificity of the fungi forming mycorrhizas with the rare mycoheterotrophic orchid Rhizanthella gardneri.

    PubMed

    Bougoure, Jeremy; Ludwig, Martha; Brundrett, Mark; Grierson, Pauline

    2009-10-01

    Fully subterranean Rhizanthella gardneri (Orchidaceae) is obligately mycoheterotrophic meaning it is nutritionally dependent on the fungus it forms mycorrhizas with. Furthermore, R. gardneri purportedly participates in a nutrient sharing tripartite relationship where its mycorrhizal fungus simultaneously forms ectomycorrhizas with species of Melaleuca uncinata s.l. Although the mycorrhizal fungus of R. gardneri has been morphologically identified as Thanatephorus gardneri (from a single isolate), this identification has been recently questioned. We sought to clarify the identification of the mycorrhizal fungus of R. gardneri, using molecular methods, and to identify how specific its mycorrhizal relationship is. Fungal isolates taken from all sites where R. gardneri is known to occur shared almost identical ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. The fungal isolate rDNA most closely matched that of other Ceratobasidiales species, particularly within the Ceratobasidium genus. However, interpretation of results was difficult as we found two distinct ITS sequences within all mycorrhizal fungal isolates of R. gardneri that we assessed. All mycorrhizal fungal isolates of R. gardneri readily formed ectomycorrhizas with a range of M. uncinata s.l. species. Consequently, it is likely that R. gardneri can form a nutrient sharing tripartite relationship where R. gardneri is connected to autotrophic M. uncinata s.l. by a common mycorrhizal fungus. These findings have implications for better understanding R. gardneri distribution, evolution and the ecological significance of its mycorrhizal fungus, particularly in relation to nutrient acquisition.

  3. Profiling functions of ectomycorrhizal diversity and root structuring in seedlings of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Rajala, Tiina; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Taylor, Andy F S; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of taxonomical and functional ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal diversity in root formation and nutrient uptake by Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes. Seedlings were grown with an increasing ECM fungal diversity gradient from one to four species and sampled before aboveground growth differences between the two phenotypes were apparent. ECM fungal colonization patterns were determined and functional diversity was assayed via measurements of potential enzyme activities of eight exoenzymes probably involved in nutrient mobilization. Phenotypes did not vary in their receptiveness to different ECM fungal species. However, seedlings of slow-growing phenotypes had higher fine-root density and thus more condensed root systems than fast-growing seedlings, but the potential enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizas did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively. ECM species richness increased host nutrient acquisition potential by diversifying the exoenzyme palette. Needle nitrogen content correlated positively with high chitinase activity of ectomycorrhizas. Rather than fast- and slow-growing phenotypes exhibiting differing receptiveness to ECM fungi, our results suggest that distinctions in fine-root structuring and in the belowground growth strategy already apparent at early stages of seedling development may explain later growth differences between fast- and slow-growing families.

  4. Ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity in orchards of cultivated pecan (Carya illinoinensis; Juglandaceae).

    PubMed

    Bonito, Gregory; Brenneman, Timothy; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2011-10-01

    Carya illinoinensis (pecan) belongs to the Juglandaceae (walnut family) and is a major economic nut crop in the southern USA. Although evidence suggests that some species in the Juglandaceae are ectomycorrhizal, investigations on their ectomycorrhizal fungal symbionts are quite limited. Here we assessed the ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity in cultivated orchards of C. illinoinensis. Five pecan orchards in southern Georgia, USA, were studied, three of which were known to fruit the native edible truffle species Tuber lyonii. We sequenced rDNA from single ectomycorrhizal root tips sampled from a total of 50 individual trees. Mycorrhizae were identified by ITS and LSU rDNA sequence-based methods. Forty-four distinct ectomycorrhizal taxa were detected. Sequestrate taxa including Tuber and Scleroderma were particularly abundant. The two most abundant sequence types belonged to T. lyonii (17%) and an undescribed Tuber species (~20%). Because of our interest in the ecology of T. lyonii, we also conducted greenhouse studies to determine whether this species would colonize and form ectomycorrhizae on roots of pecan, oak, or pine species endemic to the region. T. lyonii ectomycorrhizae were formed on pecan and oak seedlings, but not pine, when these were inoculated with spores. That oak and pecan seedling roots were receptive to truffle spores indicates that spore slurry inoculation could be a suitable method for commercial use and that, ecologically, T. lyonii may function as a pioneer ectomycorrhizal species for these hosts. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  5. Understanding plant cell-wall remodelling during the symbiotic interaction between Tuber melanosporum and Corylus avellana using a carbohydrate microarray.

    PubMed

    Sillo, Fabiano; Fangel, Jonatan U; Henrissat, Bernard; Faccio, Antonella; Bonfante, Paola; Martin, Francis; Willats, William G T; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    A combined approach, using a carbohydrate microarray as a support for genomic data, has revealed subtle plant cell-wall remodelling during Tuber melanosporum and Corylus avellana interaction. Cell walls are involved, to a great extent, in mediating plant-microbe interactions. An important feature of these interactions concerns changes in the cell-wall composition during interaction with other organisms. In ectomycorrhizae, plant and fungal cell walls come into direct contact, and represent the interface between the two partners. However, very little information is available on the re-arrangement that could occur within the plant and fungal cell walls during ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Taking advantage of the Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP) technology, the current study has had the aim of monitoring the changes that take place in the plant cell wall in Corylus avellana roots during colonization by the ascomycetous ectomycorrhizal fungus T. melanosporum. Additionally, genes encoding putative plant cell-wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) have been identified in the T. melanosporum genome, and RT-qPCRs have been performed to verify the expression of selected genes in fully developed C. avellana/T. melanosporum ectomycorrhizae. A localized degradation of pectin seems to occur during fungal colonization, in agreement with the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus through the middle lamella and with the fungal gene expression of genes acting on these polysaccharides.

  6. The alpha-tubulin gene AmTuba1: a marker for rapid mycelial growth in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Tarkka, Mika T; Schrey, Silvia; Nehls, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The apical extension of hyphae is of central importance for extensive spread of fungal mycelium in forest soils and for effective ectomycorrhiza development. Since the tubulin cytoskeleton is known to be important for fungal tip growth, we have investigated the expression of an alpha-tubulin gene from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Amanita muscaria (AmTuba1). The phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences revealed the existence of two subgroups of alpha-tubulins in homobasidiomycetes, clearly distinguishable by defined amino acids. AmTuba1 belongs to subgroup1. The AmTuba1 transcript level is related to mycelial growth rate. Growth induction of carbohydrate starved (non-growing) hyphae resulted in an enhanced AmTuba1 expression as soon as hyphal growth started, reaching a maximum at highest mycelial growth rate. Bacterium-induced hyphal elongation also leads to increased AmTuba1 transcript levels. In mature A. muscaria/P. abies ectomycorrhizas, where fungal hyphae are highly branched, and slowly growing, AmTuba1 expression were even lower than in carbohydrate-starved mycelium, indicating a further down-regulation of gene expression in symbiosis. In conclusion, our analyses show that the AmTuba1 gene can be used as a marker for active apical extension in fly agaric, and that alpha-tubulin proteins are promising tools for the classification of fungi.

  7. Metatranscriptomic Study of Common and Host-Specific Patterns of Gene Expression between Pines and Their Symbiotic Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in the Genus Suillus.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Chen, Yuan; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2016-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) represent one of the major guilds of symbiotic fungi associated with roots of forest trees, where they function to improve plant nutrition and fitness in exchange for plant carbon. Many groups of EMF exhibit preference or specificity for different plant host genera; a good example is the genus Suillus, which grows in association with the conifer family Pinaceae. We investigated genetics of EMF host-specificity by cross-inoculating basidiospores of five species of Suillus onto ten species of Pinus, and screened them for their ability to form ectomycorrhizae. Several Suillus spp. including S. granulatus, S. spraguei, and S. americanus readily formed ectomycorrhizae (compatible reaction) with white pine hosts (subgenus Strobus), but were incompatible with other pine hosts (subgenus Pinus). Metatranscriptomic analysis of inoculated roots reveals that plant and fungus each express unique gene sets during incompatible vs. compatible pairings. The Suillus-Pinus metatranscriptomes utilize highly conserved gene regulatory pathways, including fungal G-protein signaling, secretory pathways, leucine-rich repeat and pathogen resistance proteins that are similar to those associated with host-pathogen interactions in other plant-fungal systems. Metatranscriptomic study of the combined Suillus-Pinus transcriptome has provided new insight into mechanisms of adaptation and coevolution of forest trees with their microbial community, and revealed that genetic regulation of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis utilizes universal gene regulatory pathways used by other types of fungal-plant interactions including pathogenic fungal-host interactions.

  8. The aquaporin gene family of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor: lessons for symbiotic functions.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Sandra; von Bülow, Julia; Beitz, Eric; Nehls, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    Soil humidity and bulk water transport are essential for nutrient mobilization. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, bridging soil and fine roots of woody plants, are capable of modulating both by being integrated into water movement driven by plant transpiration and the nocturnal hydraulic lift. Aquaporins are integral membrane proteins that function as gradient-driven water and/or solute channels. Seven aquaporins were identified in the genome of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor and their role in fungal transfer processes was analyzed. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed relevant water permeabilities for three aquaporins. In fungal mycelia, expression of the corresponding genes was high compared with other members of the gene family, indicating the significance of the respective proteins for plasma membrane water permeability. As growth temperature and ectomycorrhiza formation modified gene expression profiles of these water-conducting aquaporins, specific roles in those aspects of fungal physiology are suggested. Two aquaporins, which were highly expressed in ectomycorrhizas, conferred plasma membrane ammonia permeability in yeast. This indicates that these proteins are an integral part of ectomycorrhizal fungus-based plant nitrogen nutrition in symbiosis.

  9. An overview of Cistus ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Comandini, O; Contu, M; Rinaldi, A C

    2006-09-01

    The genus Cistus comprises a group of about 20 shrub species found in wide areas throughout the whole Mediterranean region to the Caucasus. Being one of the main constituents of the Mediterranean-type maquis, this plant genus is peculiar in that it has developed a range of specific adaptations to resist summer drought and frequent disturbance events, such as fire and grazing. In addition, it can form both ectomycorrhizas and arbuscular mycorrhizas. In this paper, we review the information available on the ectomycorrhizal fungi of Cistus across its entire geographic range, as gathered and critically sifted from both published literature sources and personal observations. Although the resulting data matrix was based primarily on accounts of sporocarp inventories in the field, existing knowledge on the features of Cistus natural and synthesized ectomycorrhizas was also included and discussed. In total, more than 200 fungal species belonging to 40 genera have been reported so far to be associated with Cistus. An analysis of the pattern of ectomycorrhizal diversity and host specificity revealed that members of the Cortinariaceae and Russulaceae make the most of both Cistus-aspecific and Cistus-specific mycobionts. Further studies are needed to expand our preliminary knowledge of the mycorrhizal ecology and biology of Cistus and its fungal associates, focusing on topics such as mycobiont diversity, host specificity, fungal succession, mycorrhizal influence on stress tolerance, and impact of disturbances, while comparing the findings with those from other ecosystems.

  10. Mycorrhizal symbionts of Pisonia grandis and P. sechellarum in Seychelles: identification of mycorrhizal fungi and description of new Tomentella species.

    PubMed

    Suvi, Triin; Tedersoo, Leho; Abarenkov, Kessy; Beaver, Katy; Gerlach, Justin; Kõljalg, Urmas

    2010-01-01

    Nyctaginaceae includes species that are predominantly non-mycorrhizal or form arbuscular or ectomycorrhiza. Root-associated fungi were studied from P. grandis and P. sechellarum roots collected respectively on the islands of Cousin and Silhouette in Seychelles. In addition fungal sporocarps were collected from the sampling area. Fungal symbionts were identified from the roots by anatomotyping and rDNA sequencing; sporocarps collected were examined microscopically and sequenced. Three distantly related ectomycorrhizal fungal species belonging to Thelephoraceae were identified from the roots of P. grandis. Sporocarps also were found for two symbionts and described as new Tomentella species. In addition Tomentella species collected from other Seychelles islands were studied and described as new species if there was no close resemblance to previously established species. P. sechellarum was determined to be an arbuscular mycorrhizal plant; three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species were detected from the roots. P. grandis is probably associated only with species of Thelephoraceae throughout its area. Only five Tomentella species are known to form ectomycorrhiza with P. grandis and they never have been found to be associated with another host, suggesting adaptation of these fungi to extreme environmental conditions in host's habitat.

  11. Belowground legacies of Pinus contorta invasion and removal result in multiple mechanisms of invasional meltdown

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, Ian A.; St John, Mark G.; Yeates, Gregor W.; Morse, Chris W.; Bonner, Karen I.; Orwin, Kate; Peltzer, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant invasions can change soil biota and nutrients in ways that drive subsequent plant communities, particularly when co-invading with belowground mutualists such as ectomycorrhizal fungi. These effects can persist following removal of the invasive plant and, combined with effects of removal per se, influence subsequent plant communities and ecosystem functioning. We used field observations and a soil bioassay with multiple plant species to determine the belowground effects and post-removal legacy caused by invasion of the non-native tree Pinus contorta into a native plant community. Pinus facilitated ectomycorrhizal infection of the co-occurring invasive tree, Pseudotsuga menziesii, but not conspecific Pinus (which always had ectomycorrhizas) nor the native pioneer Kunzea ericoides (which never had ectomycorrhizas). Pinus also caused a major shift in soil nutrient cycling as indicated by increased bacterial dominance, NO3-N (17-fold increase) and available phosphorus (3.2-fold increase) in soils, which in turn promoted increased growth of graminoids. These results parallel field observations, where Pinus removal is associated with invasion by non-native grasses and herbs, and suggest that legacies of Pinus on soil nutrient cycling thus indirectly promote invasion of other non-native plant species. Our findings demonstrate that multi-trophic belowground legacies are an important but hitherto largely unconsidered factor in plant community reassembly following invasive plant removal. PMID:25228312

  12. Media formulation influences in vitro ectomycorrhizal synthesis on the European aspen Populus tremula L.

    PubMed

    Langer, Ingrid; Krpata, Doris; Peintner, Ursula; Wenzel, Walter W; Schweiger, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The effect of various media formulations on in vitro ectomycorrhizal synthesis of identified fungal strains with European aspen (Populus tremula L.) was tested in Petri dishes. Pre-grown seedlings were transferred to various nutrient media and inoculated with Paxillus involutus isolates using modified sandwich techniques. Mycorrhiza formation was evaluated macroscopically and further confirmed by microscopic examination of semi-thin sections for anatomical features of the mantle and the Hartig net. Standard media formulations did not support successful ectomycorrhiza formation because of either very poor plant survival (below 20%) or impaired fungal growth. The inclusion of micronutrients and vitamins in a Melin Norkrans (MMN)-based medium increased plant survival rate to above 60% and supported successful mycorrhizal synthesis. P. involutus isolates formed mycorrhizas with a characteristic Hartig net restricted to the epidermis. Mantle density and thickness varied depending on the isolate. In a follow-up experiment, the adapted medium supported successful ectomycorrhiza formation by various Laccaria and Hebeloma isolates. Our results show that an exogenous supply of vitamins and micronutrients in the medium was a prerequisite for successful mycorrhization of P. tremula in vitro in Petri dishes.

  13. Fine-scale diversity and distribution of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelium in a Scots pine forest.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ian C; Genney, David R; Alexander, Ian J

    2014-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) mycelium is a key component of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, yet we know little regarding the fine-scale diversity and distribution of mycelium in ECM fungal communities. We collected four 20 × 20 × 2-cm(3) (800-cm(3)) slices of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest soil and divided each into 100 2 × 2 × 2-cm(3) (8-cm(3)) cubes. The presence of mycelium of ECM fungi was determined using an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) database terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) approach. As expected, many more ECM fungi were detected as mycelium than as ectomycorrhizas in a cube or slice. More surprisingly, up to one-quarter of the 43 species previously detected as ectomycorrhizas over an area of 400 m(2) could be detected in a single 8-cm(3) cube, and up to three-quarters in a single 800-cm(3) slice. ECM mycelium frequency decreased markedly with depth and there were distinct 'hotspots' of mycelium in the moss/F1 layer. Our data demonstrate a high diversity of ECM mycelium in a small (8-cm(3) ) volume of substrate, and indicate that the spatial scale at which ECM species are distributed as mycelium may be very different from the spatial scale at which they are distributed as tips.

  14. Tree diversity and the role of non-host neighbour tree species in reducing fungal pathogen infestation.

    PubMed

    Hantsch, Lydia; Bien, Steffen; Radatz, Stine; Braun, Uwe; Auge, Harald; Bruelheide, Helge

    2014-11-01

    The degree to which plant pathogen infestation occurs in a host plant is expected to be strongly influenced by the level of species diversity among neighbouring host and non-host plant species. Since pathogen infestation can negatively affect host plant performance, it can mediate the effects of local biodiversity on ecosystem functioning.We tested the effects of tree diversity and the proportion of neighbouring host and non-host species with respect to the foliar fungal pathogens of Tilia cordata and Quercus petraea in the Kreinitz tree diversity experiment in Germany. We hypothesized that fungal pathogen richness increases while infestation decreases with increasing local tree diversity. In addition, we tested whether fungal pathogen richness and infestation are dependent on the proportion of host plant species present or on the proportion of particular non-host neighbouring tree species.Leaves of the two target species were sampled across three consecutive years with visible foliar fungal pathogens on the leaf surface being identified macro- and microscopically. Effects of diversity among neighbouring trees were analysed: (i) for total fungal species richness and fungal infestation on host trees and (ii) for infestation by individual fungal species.We detected four and five fungal species on T. cordata and Q. petraea, respectively. High local tree diversity reduced (i) total fungal species richness and infestation of T. cordata and fungal infestation of Q. petraea and (ii) infestation by three host-specialized fungal pathogen species. These effects were brought about by local tree diversity and were independent of host species proportion. In general, host species proportion had almost no effect on fungal species richness and infestation. Strong effects associated with the proportion of particular non-host neighbouring tree species on fungal species richness and infestation were, however, recorded.Synthesis. For the first time, we experimentally demonstrated

  15. Tree diversity and the role of non-host neighbour tree species in reducing fungal pathogen infestation

    PubMed Central

    Hantsch, Lydia; Bien, Steffen; Radatz, Stine; Braun, Uwe; Auge, Harald; Bruelheide, Helge

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which plant pathogen infestation occurs in a host plant is expected to be strongly influenced by the level of species diversity among neighbouring host and non-host plant species. Since pathogen infestation can negatively affect host plant performance, it can mediate the effects of local biodiversity on ecosystem functioning. We tested the effects of tree diversity and the proportion of neighbouring host and non-host species with respect to the foliar fungal pathogens of Tilia cordata and Quercus petraea in the Kreinitz tree diversity experiment in Germany. We hypothesized that fungal pathogen richness increases while infestation decreases with increasing local tree diversity. In addition, we tested whether fungal pathogen richness and infestation are dependent on the proportion of host plant species present or on the proportion of particular non-host neighbouring tree species. Leaves of the two target species were sampled across three consecutive years with visible foliar fungal pathogens on the leaf surface being identified macro- and microscopically. Effects of diversity among neighbouring trees were analysed: (i) for total fungal species richness and fungal infestation on host trees and (ii) for infestation by individual fungal species. We detected four and five fungal species on T. cordata and Q. petraea, respectively. High local tree diversity reduced (i) total fungal species richness and infestation of T. cordata and fungal infestation of Q. petraea and (ii) infestation by three host-specialized fungal pathogen species. These effects were brought about by local tree diversity and were independent of host species proportion. In general, host species proportion had almost no effect on fungal species richness and infestation. Strong effects associated with the proportion of particular non-host neighbouring tree species on fungal species richness and infestation were, however, recorded. Synthesis. For the first time, we experimentally

  16. Drought and air warming affect the species-specific levels of stress-related foliar metabolites of three oak species on acidic and calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    Climate change as projected for Central Europe will lead to prolonged periods of summer drought and enhanced air temperature. Thus, forest management practices are required to take into account how species performance is adapted to cope with these climate changes. Oak trees may play a major role in future forests because of their relative drought-tolerance compared with other species like beech. Therefore, this study investigated the stress responses (i.e., anti-oxidants, free amino acids) in the leaves of three widely distributed oak species in Central Europe (i.e., Quercus robur L., Q. petraea [Matt.] Libel., Q. pubescens Willd.) to drought, air warming and the combination of drought plus air warming under controlled conditions after periods of spring drought, a short rewetting and summer drought. We quantified foliar levels of thiols, ascorbate, and free amino compounds in Q robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens. Our study showed that oak saplings had increased levels of γ-glutamylcysteine and total glutathione and proline with drought and air warming. Foliar ascorbate, glutathione disulfide and dehydroascorbic acid levels were not affected. The comparison of stress responses to drought and/or air warming between the three species showed higher foliar thiol levels in Q. robur and Q. pubescens compared with Q. petraea. For total and reduced ascorbic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid, the highest levels were found in Q. robur. In conclusion, our study showed that foliar anti-oxidant and free amino acid levels were significantly affected by drought plus air warming; however, this effect was species-dependent with the drought-tolerant species of Q. pubescens having the highest reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity among three tested oak species. Furthermore, stress responses as shown by increased levels of foliar anti-oxidants and free amino acids differ between calcareous and acidic soil indicating that the capacities of anti-oxidative defense and osmotic stress

  17. New Approach for Differentiating Sessile and Pedunculate Oak: Development of a LC-HRMS Method To Quantitate Triterpenoids in Wood.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Axel; Prida, Andréi; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2016-01-27

    Oak aging is a crucial step in winemaking during which the organoleptic properties of wine are modified. Various parameters affect the chemical composition of oak wood including botanical origin, which has been previously shown to be a determinant factor. This study focused on the development of a LC-HRMS method to assay four recently discovered taste-active triterpenes (three sweet and one bitter). The method was applied to evaluate the effect of oak species (Quercus petraea and Quercus robur) on the concentration of these molecules in wood. The results showed that sessile oak was richer in sweet triterpenes and poorer in the bitter one than pedunculate oak, with high interindividual variations within species. Furthermore, a triterpenoid index was calculated to reveal the triterpenoid composition of oak wood. This index appears to be a promising tool for the unambiguous discrimination of oak species and could offer new insights into oak wood selection by coopers and the monitoring of oak aging by winemakers.

  18. The influence of nitrogen in stemflow and precipitation on epiphytic bryophytes, Isothecium myosuroides Brid., Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp of Atlantic oakwoods.

    PubMed

    Leith, I D; Mitchell, R J; Truscott, A-M; Cape, J N; van Dijk, N; Smith, R I; Fowler, D; Sutton, M A

    2008-09-01

    The spatial relationship between the concentration and deposition of the major ions in precipitation and stemflow and their influence on the tissue nitrogen concentration of three epiphytic bryophytes on Quercus petraea (Matt) Liebl. and Q. robur L. was investigated at seven UK Atlantic oak woodland sites with a range of total N deposition of 55-250 mmol m(-2). The main driver of change in tissue N concentrations of three epiphytic bryophytes (Isothecium myosuroides Brid. (Eurhynchium myosuroides (Brid.) Schp.), Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp.) was total N deposition in stemflow, dominated by ammonium deposition. The three epiphytic species also showed strong relationships between tissue N concentration and total N deposition in rainfall but a poor correlation with total N ion concentration in rainfall. This study shows that epiphytic bryophytes utilise stemflow N and thus increase their risk from inputs of total N deposition compared to terricolous species at the same site.

  19. Antioxidant Characterization of Oak Extracts Combining Spectrophotometric Assays and Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Boris M.; Štajner, Dubravka; Orlović, Saša; Galić, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant characteristics of leaves, twigs, and acorns from two Serbian oak species Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea L. from Vojvodina province (northern Serbia) were investigated. 80% ethanol (in water) extracts were used for antiradical power (ARP) determinations against DPPH•, •NO, and O2•− radicals, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), total phenol, tannin, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents. Permanganate reducing antioxidant capacity (PRAC) was determined using water extracts. Beside, mentioned parameters, soluble proteins, lipid peroxidation (LP), pigments and proline contents were also determined. The data of different procedures were compared and analyzed by multivariate techniques (correlation matrix calculation and principal component analysis (PCA)). PCA found that investigated organs of two different oak tree species possess similar antioxidant characteristics. The superior antioxidant characteristics showed oak leaves over twigs and acorns and seem to be promising source of antioxidants with possible use in industry and pharmacy. PMID:24453789

  20. Physiological responses of beech and sessile oak in a natural mixed stand during a dry summer.

    PubMed

    Raftoyannis, Yannis; Radoglou, Kalliopi

    2002-06-01

    Responses of CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance to decreasing leaf water potential, and to environmental factors, were analysed in a mixed natural stand of sessile oak (Quercus petraea ssp. medwediewii) and beech (Fagus svlvatica L.) in Greece during the exceptionally dry summer of 1998. Seasonal courses of leaf water potential were similar for both species, whereas mean net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were always higher in sessile oak than in beech. The relationship between net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was strong for both species. Sessile oak had high rates of photosynthesis even under very low leaf water potentials and high air temperatures, whereas the photosynthetic rate of beech decreased at low water potentials. Diurnal patterns were similar in both species but sessile oak had higher rates of CO2 assimilation than beech. Our results indicate that sessile oak is more tolerant of drought than beech, due, in part, to its maintenance of photosynthesis at low water potential.

  1. Physiological Responses of Beech and Sessile Oak in a Natural Mixed Stand During a Dry Summer

    PubMed Central

    RAFTOYANNIS, YANNIS; RADOGLOU, KALLIOPI

    2002-01-01

    Responses of CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance to decreasing leaf water potential, and to environmental factors, were analysed in a mixed natural stand of sessile oak (Quercus petraea ssp. medwediewii) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Greece during the exceptionally dry summer of 1998. Seasonal courses of leaf water potential were similar for both species, whereas mean net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were always higher in sessile oak than in beech. The relationship between net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was strong for both species. Sessile oak had high rates of photosynthesis even under very low leaf water potentials and high air temperatures, whereas the photosynthetic rate of beech decreased at low water potentials. Diurnal patterns were similar in both species but sessile oak had higher rates of CO2 assimilation than beech. Our results indicate that sessile oak is more tolerant of drought than beech, due, in part, to its maintenance of photosynthesis at low water potential. PMID:12102528

  2. High-density linkage mapping and distribution of segregation distortion regions in the oak genome

    PubMed Central

    Bodénès, Catherine; Chancerel, Emilie; Ehrenmann, François; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We developed the densest single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage genetic map to date for the genus Quercus. An 8k gene-based SNP array was used to genotype more than 1,000 full-sibs from two intraspecific and two interspecific full-sib families of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. A high degree of collinearity was observed between the eight parental maps of the two species. A composite map was then established with 4,261 SNP markers spanning 742 cM over the 12 linkage groups (LGs) of the oak genome. Nine genomic regions from six LGs displayed highly significant distortions of segregation. Two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying segregation distortion are discussed: genetic load vs. reproductive barriers. Our findings suggest a predominance of pre-zygotic to post-zygotic barriers. PMID:27013549

  3. Leaflet anatomy verifies relationships within Syagrus (Arecaceae) and aids in identification

    PubMed Central

    Noblick, Larry R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The current investigation was carried out to examine how palm anatomy may coincide with the current molecular analysis including the three recognized clades of Syagrus Mart. and to justify the splitting of acaulescent Syagrus species (e.g. Syagrus petraea (Mart.) Becc.) into several species. Free-hand cross-sections of leaflets were made and the comparison of these verifies the relationships suggested by the molecular data. Free-hand leaflet sections were also found to be useful in the identification of otherwise difficult-to-identify acaulescent Syagrus species. The result and conclusion is that anatomical data is valuable in helping to verify molecular data and that splitting the acaulescent species of Syagrus is justified by the differences discovered in their field habit and anatomy. These differences were used to produce an identification key that is based on the anatomy. PMID:24194671

  4. Characterization of the Oxygen Transmission Rate of Oak Wood Species Used in Cooperage.

    PubMed

    Del Alamo-Sanza, María; Cárcel, Luis Miguel; Nevares, Ignacio

    2017-01-25

    The oxygen that wine receives while aged in barrels is of interest because it defines the reactions that occur during aging and, therefore, the final properties of the wine. This study is intended to make up for the lack of information concerning the oxygen permeability of eight different woods of Quercus alba L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. commonly used. In addition, it shows how oxygen transfer evolves with the liquid contact time during testing under similar aging conditions to those in wine barrels. French oak woods permitted a higher oxygenation rate than American ones in all cases. A decrease in the oxygen entry caused by impregnation of the wood during the process was observed in all of the species studied. This process is determined by the thickness of the flooded wood layer containing free water, although differently in the two species, possibly due to the anatomical structure and the logging process for each.

  5. Evolution of phenolic compounds of spanish oak wood during natural seasoning. First results.

    PubMed

    Fernández De Simón, B; Cadahía, E; Conde, E; García-Vallejo, M C

    1999-04-01

    Low molecular weight polyphenols and ellagitannins were analyzed by HPLC, and the molecular weight distribution of ellagitannins was calculated by GPC, in oak heartwood of Quercus robur L., Quercus petraea Liebl., Quercus pyrenaica Wild., and Quercus faginea Lam., grown in Spain, before and after 1 year of seasoning, in Bordeaux, France. During this process, the concentrations of low molecular weight polyphenols (acids and aldehydes, benzoic and cinnamic, and coumarins) increased, and those of ellagitannins (castalagin, vescalagin, and roburins A-E) decreased. A similar behavior for the A and B compounds in all species was not found. This modification in the chemical composition was similar in the four Spanish species of Quercus studied and allowed the differentiation between the unseasoned wood and the wood after the first year of seasoning.

  6. Planting sentinel European trees in eastern Asia as a novel method to identify potential insect pest invaders.

    PubMed

    Roques, Alain; Fan, Jian-Ting; Courtial, Béatrice; Zhang, Yan-Zhuo; Yart, Annie; Auger-Rozenberg, Marie-Anne; Denux, Olivier; Kenis, Marc; Baker, Richard; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Quarantine measures to prevent insect invasions tend to focus on well-known pests but a large proportion of the recent invaders were not known to cause significant damage in their native range, or were not even known to science before their introduction. A novel method is proposed to detect new potential pests of woody plants in their region of origin before they are introduced to a new continent. Since Asia is currently considered to be the main supplier of insect invaders to Europe, sentinel trees were planted in China during 2007-2011 as an early warning tool to identify the potential for additional Asian insect species to colonize European trees. Seedlings (1-1.5 m tall) of five broadleaved (Quercus petraea, Q. suber, Q. ilex, Fagus sylvatica, and Carpinus betulus) and two conifer species (Abies alba and Cupressus sempervirens) were planted in blocks of 100 seedlings at two widely separated sites (one in a nursery near Beijing and the other in a forest environment near Fuyang in eastern China), and then regularly surveyed for colonization by insects. A total of 104 insect species, mostly defoliators, were observed on these new hosts, and at least six species were capable of larval development. Although a number of the insects observed were probably incidental feeders, 38 species had more than five colonization events, mostly infesting Q. petraea, and could be considered as being capable of switching to European trees if introduced to Europe. Three years was shown to be an appropriate duration for the experiment, since the rate of colonization then tended to plateau. A majority of the identified species appeared to have switched from agricultural crops and fruit trees rather than from forest trees. Although these results are promising, the method is not appropriate for xylophagous pests and other groups developing on larger trees. Apart from the logistical problems, the identification to species level of the specimens collected was a major difficulty. This

  7. Tree mineral nutrition is deteriorating in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jonard, Mathieu; Fürst, Alfred; Verstraeten, Arne; Thimonier, Anne; Timmermann, Volkmar; Potočić, Nenad; Waldner, Peter; Benham, Sue; Hansen, Karin; Merilä, Päivi; Ponette, Quentin; de la Cruz, Ana C; Roskams, Peter; Nicolas, Manuel; Croisé, Luc; Ingerslev, Morten; Matteucci, Giorgio; Decinti, Bruno; Bascietto, Marco; Rautio, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    The response of forest ecosystems to increased atmospheric CO2 is constrained by nutrient availability. It is thus crucial to account for nutrient limitation when studying the forest response to climate change. The objectives of this study were to describe the nutritional status of the main European tree species, to identify growth-limiting nutrients and to assess changes in tree nutrition during the past two decades. We analysed the foliar nutrition data collected during 1992-2009 on the intensive forest monitoring plots of the ICP Forests programme. Of the 22 significant temporal trends that were observed in foliar nutrient concentrations, 20 were decreasing and two were increasing. Some of these trends were alarming, among which the foliar P concentration in F. sylvatica, Q. Petraea and P. sylvestris that significantly deteriorated during 1992-2009. In Q. Petraea and P. sylvestris, the decrease in foliar P concentration was more pronounced on plots with low foliar P status, meaning that trees with latent P deficiency could become deficient in the near future. Increased tree productivity, possibly resulting from high N deposition and from the global increase in atmospheric CO2, has led to higher nutrient demand by trees. As the soil nutrient supply was not always sufficient to meet the demands of faster growing trees, this could partly explain the deterioration of tree mineral nutrition. The results suggest that when evaluating forest carbon storage capacity and when planning to reduce CO2 emissions by increasing use of wood biomass for bioenergy, it is crucial that nutrient limitations for forest growth are considered. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Foliage response of young central European oaks to air warming, drought and soil type.

    PubMed

    Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Kuster, T M; Arend, M; Vollenweider, P

    2013-01-01

    Three Central European oak species, with four provenances each, were experimentally tested in 16 large model ecosystem chambers for their response to passive air warming (AW, ambient +1-2 °C), drought (D, -43 to -60% irrigation) and their combination (AWD) for 3 years on two forest soil types of pH 4 or 7. Throughout the entire experiment, the influence of the different ambient and experimental climates on the oak trees was strong. The morphological traits of the Quercus species were affected in opposing ways in AW and D treatments, with a neutral effect in the AWD treatment. Biochemical parameters and LMA showed low relative plasticity compared to the morphological and growth parameters. The high plasticity in physiologically important parameters of the three species, such as number of intercalary veins or leaf size, indicated good drought acclimation properties. The soil type influenced leaf chlorophyll concentration, C/N and area more than drought, whereas foliage mass was more dependent on drought than on soil type. Through comparison of visible symptom development with the water deficits, a drought tolerance threshold of -1.3 MPa was determined. Although Q. pubescens had xeromorphic leaf characteristics (small leaf size, lower leaf water content, high LMA, pilosity, more chlorophyll, higher C/N) and less response to the treatments than Q. petraea and Q. robur, it suffered more leaf drought injury and shedding of leaves than Q. petraea. However, if foliage mass were used as the criterion for sustainable performance under a future climate, Q. robur would be the most appropriate species.

  9. Expanding leaves of mature deciduous forest trees rapidly become autotrophic.

    PubMed

    Keel, Sonja G; Schädel, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Emerging leaves in evergreen tree species are supplied with carbon (C) from the previous year's foliage. In deciduous trees, no older leaves are present, and the early phase of leaf development must rely on C reserves from other tissues. How soon developing leaves become autotrophic and switch from being C sinks to sources has rarely been studied in mature forest trees, and simultaneous comparisons of species are scarce. Using a canopy crane and a simple (13)CO(2)-pulse-labelling technique, we demonstrate that young leaves of mature trees in three European deciduous species (Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Tilia platyphyllos Scop.) start assimilating CO(2) at a very early stage of development (10-50% expanded). One month after labelling, all leaves were still strongly (13)C enriched, suggesting that recent photosynthates had been incorporated into slow turnover pools such as cellulose or lignin and thus had contributed to leaf growth. In line with previous studies performed at the same site, we found stronger incorporation of recent photosynthates into growing tissues of T. platyphyllos compared with F. sylvatica and Q. petraea. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations analysed for one of the three study species (F. sylvatica) showed that sugar and starch pools rapidly increased during leaf development, suggesting that newly developed leaves soon produce more NSC than can be used for growth. In conclusion, our findings indicate that expanding leaves of mature deciduous trees become C autonomous at an early stage of development despite the presence of vast amounts of mobile carbohydrate reserves.

  10. Wood anatomical responses of oak saplings exposed to air warming and soil drought.

    PubMed

    Fonti, P; Heller, O; Cherubini, P; Rigling, A; Arend, M

    2013-01-01

    Water is vital for plant performance and survival. Its scarcity, induced by a seasonal decline in soil water availability or an increase of evaporative demand, can cause failures of the water conducting system. An adequate tolerance to drought and the ability to acclimate to changing hydraulic conditions are important features for the survival of long-lived woody plants in dry environments. In this study we examine secondary growth and xylem anatomical acclimation of 6 year old saplings of three European oak species (Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens) during the third consecutive year of exposure to soil drought and/or air warming (from 2007 to 2009). Intra-annual pinning was applied to mark the development of the formation of the annual ring 2009. Vessel size, parenchyma cell density and fiber size produced at different time of the growing season 2009 were compared between drought and warming treatments and species. Drought reduced secondary growth and induced changes in xylem structure while air warming had little effect on wood anatomical traits. Results indicate that drought-exposed saplings adjust their xylem structure to improve resistance and repairing abilities after cavitation. All species show a significant radial growth reduction, a reduced vessel size with diminished conductivity and a slightly increased density of parenchyma cells. Comparisons between species fostered our understanding of the relationship between the inter-specific xylem hydraulic plasticity and the ecological response to drought. The stronger changes observed for Q. robur and Q. petraea indicate a lower drought tolerance than Q. pubescens. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. The (oxalato)aluminate complex as an antimicrobial substance protecting the "shiro" of Tricholoma matsutake from soil micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Shiro, Misao; Okura, Ryuki; Oizumi, Kazuya; Fujita, Toru; Sasamori, Takahiro; Tokitoh, Norihiro; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Muneyoshi; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Hirai, Nobuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, a basidiomycete, forms ectomycorrhizas with Pinus densiflora as the host tree. Its fruiting body, "matsutake" in Japanese, is an edible and highly prized mushroom, and it grows in a circle called a fairy ring. Beneath the fairy ring of T. matsutake, a whitish mycelium-soil aggregated zone, called "shiro" in Japanese, develops. The front of the shiro, an active mycorrhizal zone, functions to gather nutrients from the soil and roots to nourish the fairy ring. Bacteria and sporulating fungi decrease from the shiro front, whereas they increase inside and outside the shiro front. Ohara demonstrated that the shiro front exhibited antimicrobial activity, but the antimicrobial substance has remained unidentified for 50 years. We have identified the antimicrobial substance as the (oxalato)aluminate complex, known as a reaction product of oxalic acid and aluminum phosphate to release soluble phosphorus. The complex protects the shiro from micro-organisms, and contributes to its development.

  12. Evolution of tree nutrition.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Andrews, Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Using a broad definition of trees, the evolutionary origins of trees in a nutritional context is considered using data from the fossil record and molecular phylogeny. Trees are first known from the Late Devonian about 380 million years ago, originated polyphyletically at the pteridophyte grade of organization; the earliest gymnosperms were trees, and trees are polyphyletic in the angiosperms. Nutrient transporters, assimilatory pathways, homoiohydry (cuticle, intercellular gas spaces, stomata, endohydric water transport systems including xylem and phloem-like tissue) and arbuscular mycorrhizas preceded the origin of trees. Nutritional innovations that began uniquely in trees were the seed habit and, certainly (but not necessarily uniquely) in trees, ectomycorrhizas, cyanobacterial, actinorhizal and rhizobial (Parasponia, some legumes) diazotrophic symbioses and cluster roots.

  13. Uniting Tricholoma sulphureum and T. bufonium.

    PubMed

    Comandini, Ornella; Haug, Ingeborg; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Kuyper, Thomas W

    2004-10-01

    The taxonomic status and relationship of Tricholoma sulphureum and the similar T. bufonium were investigated using different sets of characters. These included morphological data on fruit bodies, ecological and chorological data, and analysis of the sequence data obtained for the ITS of basidiomes of different ecological and geographic origin. Moreover, the ectomycorrhizas formed by T. bufonium on Abies alba and Quercus sp. were characterised, and anatomical features compared with those of T. sulphureum mycorrhizas on coniferous and broad-leaved host trees. Our results revealed extensive ITS variation in members of the T. sulphureum group, but this variation was not correlated with morphology, ecology, or geographical distribution. We conclude that T. bufonium cannot be maintained as an autonomous taxon and should be treated as an infraspecific variant of T. sulphureum.

  14. Mycorrhizal synthesis of Lactarius indigo (Schw.) Fr. with five Neotropical pine species.

    PubMed

    Flores, R; Díaz, G; Honrubia, M

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes for the first time the ectomycorrhiza synthesized between two Guatemalan strains of Lactarius indigo (Schw.) Fr. and the Neotropical species Pinus ayacahuite var. ayacahuite Ehren, P. hartwegii Lindl., P. oocarpa Schiede ex Schltdl. var oocarpa, P. pseudostrobus Lindl. and P. rudis Endl. The synthesis was carried out in a controlled growth chamber using plastic containers with peat moss-vermiculite substrate and mycelial inoculum. Mycorrhiza were obtained 25 days after inoculation. A description of the morphology, appearance and structure of mantle and Hartig net is given for each combination. Mycorrhiza were saffron to cinnamon greenish with age, with a net of saffron laticifers visible through outer mantle; orange latex secreted when injured. Cystidia-like emanating hyphae were observed on the mantle surface of young mycorrhiza. Plectenchymatous mantle with abundant interhyphal gelatinous material.

  15. Guyanagarika, a new ectomycorrhizal genus of Agaricales from the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Marisol; Henkel, Terry W; Aime, Mary Catherine; Smith, Matthew E; Matheny, Patrick Brandon

    2016-12-01

    A new genus and three new species of Agaricales are described from the Pakaraima Mountains of Guyana in the central Guiana Shield. All three of these new species fruit on the ground in association with species of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) tree genus Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae) and one species has been shown to form ectomycorrhizas. Multi-locus molecular phylogenetic analyses place Guyanagarika gen. nov. within the Catathelasma clade, a lineage in the suborder Tricholomatineae of the Agaricales. We formally recognize this 'Catathelasma clade' as an expanded family Catathelasmataceae that includes the genera Callistosporium, Catathelasma, Guyanagarika, Macrocybe, Pleurocollybia, and Pseudolaccaria. Within the Catathelasmataceae, Catathelasma and Guyanagarika represent independent origins of the ectomycorrhizal habit. Guyanagarika is the first documented case of an ECM Agaricales genus known only from the Neotropics. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Linking mycorrhizas to sporocarps: a new species, Geopora cercocarpi, on Cercocarpus ledifolius (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Southworth, Darlene; Frank, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Mycorrhizal assemblages characterized by molecular data frequently differ from collections of mycorrhizal sporocarps at the same site. Geopora species are frequent mycobionts of ectomycorrhizal roots, but except for G. cooperi they are rarely identified to species by molecular methods. Among the mycobionts of ectomycorrhizas with Cercocarpus ledifolius (Rosaceae) was a fungal species with a 91% BLAST match to G. arenicola. To determine the species of Geopora we surveyed for hypogeous sporocarps under C. ledifolius at sites in southern Oregon where the Geopora mycorrhizas had been collected and identified by DNA sequences of the ITS region. We found sporocarps of a Geopora species with 100% BLAST match to the mycorrhizas. Morphological characters of a white hymenium, inrolled entire margin and large spores, along with a hypogeous habit and a mycorrhizal host of C. ledifolius, distinguished these specimens from previously described species. Here we describe a new species, Geopora cercocarpi.

  17. Heavy metal distribution in Suillus luteus mycorrhizas - as revealed by micro-PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnau, K.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.

    2001-07-01

    Suillus luteus/Pinus sylvestris mycorrhizas, collected from zinc wastes in Southern Poland, were selected as potential biofilters on the basis of earlier studies carried out with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) microanalytical system coupled to scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Using the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) nuclear microprobe, elemental concentrations in the ectomycorrhiza parts were for the first time estimated quantitatively. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) true elemental maps from freeze-dried and chemically fixed mycorrhizas revealed strong accumulation of Ca, Fe, Zn and Pb within the fungal mantle and in the rhizomorph. Vascular tissue was enriched with P, S and K, while high concentrations of Si and Cl were present in the endodermis. Cu was the only element showing elevated concentrations in the cortex region. Elemental losses and redistributions were found in mycorrhizas prepared by chemical fixation. Some problems related to elemental imaging are discussed.

  18. Nitrogen availability is a primary determinant of conifer mycorrhizas across complex environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Cox, Filipa; Barsoum, Nadia; Lilleskov, Erik A; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2010-09-01

    Global environmental change has serious implications for functional biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests. Trees depend on mycorrhizal fungi for nutrient uptake, but predicted increases in nitrogen availability may alter fungal communities. To address a knowledge gap regarding the effects of nitrogen availability on mycorrhizal communities at large scales, we examine the relationship between nitrogen and ectomycorrhizas in part of a European biomonitoring network of pine forest plots. Our analyses show that increased nitrogen reduces fungal diversity and causes shifts in mycorrhizal community composition across plots, but we do not find strong evidence that within-plot differences in nitrogen availability affect ectomycorrhizal communities. We also carry out exploratory analyses to determine the relative importance of other environmental variables in structuring mycorrhizal communities, and discuss the potential use of indicator species to predict nitrogen-induced shifts in fungal communities.

  19. Evolution of mycorrhiza systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairney, J. W. G.

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. Fossil records and molecular clock dating suggest that all extant land plants have arisen from an ancestral arbuscular mycorrhizal condition. Arbuscular mycorrhizas evolved concurrently with the first colonisation of land by plants some 450-500 million years ago and persist in most extant plant taxa. Ectomycorrhizas (about 200million years ago) and ericoid mycorrhizas (about 100million years ago) evolved subsequently as the organic matter content of some ancient soils increased and sclerophyllous vegetation arose as a response to nutrient-poor soils respectively. Mycorrhizal associations appear to be the result of relatively diffuse coevolutionary processes. While early events in the evolution of mycorrhizal symbioses may have involved reciprocal genetic changes in ancestral plants and free-living fungi, available evidence points largely to ongoing parallel evolution of the partners in response to environmental change.

  20. Characterisation of ectomycorrhizal formation by the exotic fungus Amanita muscaria with Nothofagus cunninghamii in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Dunk, Christopher William; Lebel, Teresa; Keane, Philip J

    2012-02-01

    The occurrence of the exotic ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria in a mixed Nothofagus-Eucalyptus native forest was investigated to determine if A. muscaria has switched hosts to form a successful association with a native tree species in a natural environment. A mycorrhizal morphotype consistently found beneath A. muscaria sporocarps was examined, and a range of morphological and anatomical characteristics in common with those described for ectomycorrhizae formed by A. muscaria on a broad range of hosts were observed. A full description is provided. The likely plant associate was determined to be Nothofagus cunninghamii based upon anatomy of the roots. Analysis of ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences confirmed the identities of both fungal and plant associates. These findings represent conclusive evidence of the invasion of a non-indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungus into native forest and highlight the ecological implications of this discovery.

  1. Belowground carbon trade among tall trees in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Körner, Christian

    2016-04-15

    Forest trees compete for light and soil resources, but photoassimilates, once produced in the foliage, are not considered to be exchanged between individuals. Applying stable carbon isotope labeling at the canopy scale, we show that carbon assimilated by 40-meter-tall spruce is traded over to neighboring beech, larch, and pine via overlapping root spheres. Isotope mixing signals indicate that the interspecific, bidirectional transfer, assisted by common ectomycorrhiza networks, accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon (about 280 kilograms per hectare per year tree-to-tree transfer). Although competition for resources is commonly considered as the dominant tree-to-tree interaction in forests, trees may interact in more complex ways, including substantial carbon exchange. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Pairwise transcriptomic analysis of the interactions between the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and three beneficial, neutral and antagonistic soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Aurélie; Barret, Matthieu; Diedhiou, Abdala G; Leveau, Johan; de Boer, Wietse; Martin, Francis; Sarniguet, Alain; Frey-Klett, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by bacterial communities with which they interact physically and metabolically during their life cycle. These bacteria can have positive or negative effects on the formation and the functioning of ectomycorrhizae. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated bacteria interact. To understand how ectomycorrhizal fungi perceive their biotic environment and the mechanisms supporting interactions between ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria, we analysed the pairwise transcriptomic responses of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor (Basidiomycota: Agaricales) when confronted with beneficial, neutral or detrimental soil bacteria. Comparative analyses of the three transcriptomes indicated that the fungus reacted differently to each bacterial strain. Similarly, each bacterial strain produced a specific and distinct response to the presence of the fungus. Despite these differences in responses observed at the gene level, we found common classes of genes linked to cell-cell interaction, stress response and metabolic processes to be involved in the interaction of the four microorganisms.

  3. Mycorrhization of pecan (Carya illinoinensis) with black truffles: Tuber melanosporum and Tuber brumale.

    PubMed

    Marozzi, Giorgio; Sánchez, Sergio; Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Bonito, Gregory; Falini, Leonardo Baciarelli; Albertini, Emidio; Donnini, Domizia

    2017-04-01

    Pecan, Carya illinoinensis, is an economically important nut producing tree that can establish ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with a high diversity of fungi. In the southern USA, truffles (Tuber spp.) sometimes fruit prolifically in cultivated pecan orchards and regularly associate with pecan roots as ectomycorrhizae (ECMs). It has been demonstrated that some valuable European truffle species (e.g., Tuber borchii and Tuber aestivum) can form ECMs with pecan seedlings in nursery conditions. Thus, pecan may represent an attractive alternative host to forest trees for truffle growers given the potential for co-cropping truffles and pecans. To further explore the capacity of pecan to host truffle symbionts, pecan seedlings were inoculated with species of black truffles that are economically important in Europe, T. melanosporum and T. brumale. Ectomycorrhizae were characterized molecularly and their morphology was described in detail. Mycorrhization rates on pecan roots were assessed over a 2-year period. Tuber melanosporum and T. brumale produced well-formed ECMs with a level of root colonization in the first year of 37.3 and 34.5%, respectively. After 24 months, the level of mycorrhization increased for T. brumale (49.4%) and decreased for T. melanosporum (10.5%) inversely to that of non-target ECM greenhouse contaminants (e.g., Sphaerosporella brunnea, Trichophaea woolhopeia, Pulvinula constellatio). To assess whether mating types segregated in T. melanosporum as been reported for other host species, we amplified the mating-type locus from single T. melanosporum ECM belonging to different seedlings over a 2-year period. The two mating idiomorphs were nearly equally represented along the 2-year time span: MAT 1-1-1 decreased from 59.4% in the first year to 48.5% in the second year after inoculation. Data reported in this study add to knowledge on the mycorrhization of pecan trees with commercial truffles and has application to truffle and nut co-cropping systems.

  4. Effect of raw humus under two adult Scots pine stands on ectomycorrhization, nutritional status, nitrogen uptake, phosphorus uptake and growth of Pinus sylvestris seedlings.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Horst; Schäfer, Tina; Storbeck, Veronika; Härtling, Sigrid; Rudloff, Renate; Köck, Margret; Buscot, François

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation improves tree growth and nutrient acquisition, particularly that of nitrogen (N). Few studies have coupled the effects of naturally occurring EM morphotypes to the nutrition of host trees. To investigate this, pine seedlings were grown on raw humus substrates collected at two forest sites, R2 and R3. Ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were identified, and their respective N uptake rates from organic (2-(13)C, (15)N-glycine) and inorganic ((15)NH(4)Cl, Na(15)NO(3), (15)NH(4)NO(3), NH(4)(15)NO(3)) sources as well as their phosphate uptake rates were determined. Subsequently, the growth and nutritional status of the seedlings were analyzed. Two dominant EM morphotypes displayed significantly different mycorrhization rates in the two substrates. Rhizopogon luteolus Fr. (RL) was dominant in R2 and Suillus bovinus (Pers.) Kuntze (SB) was dominant in R3. (15)N uptake of RL EM was at all times higher than that of SB EM. Phosphate uptake rates by the EM morphotypes did not differ significantly. The number of RL EM correlated negatively and the number of SB EM correlated positively with pine growth rate. Increased arginine concentrations and critical P/N ratios in needles indicated nutrient imbalances of pine seedlings from humus R2, predominantly mycorrhizal with RL. We conclude that different N supply in raw humus under Scots pine stands can induce shifts in the EM frequency of pine seedlings, and this may lead to EM formation by fungal strains with different ability to support tree growth.

  5. Tracking mycorrhizas and extraradical mycelium of the edible fungus Lactarius deliciosus under field competition with Rhizopogon spp.

    PubMed

    Hortal, Sara; Pera, Joan; Parladé, Javier

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the field persistence of the edible ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius deliciosus in competition with two ubiquitous soil fungi. Couples of plants inoculated with either L. deliciosus, Rhizopogon roseolus, or R. luteolus were transplanted, 10 cm apart, in two different sites at the following combinations: L. deliciosus-R. roseolus, L. deliciosus-R. luteolus, L. deliciosus-control (non-inoculated), control-R. roseolus, control-R. luteolus, and control-control. Eight months after transplantation, root colonization and extraradical soil mycelium for each fungal species were quantified. For mycelium quantification, soil cores equidistant to the two plants in each couple were taken, and total deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed using specific primers and TaqMan Minor groove binding (MGB) probes designed in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region of each fungal species. Field site significantly influenced persistence of both mycorrhizas and extraradical mycelium of L. deliciosus. Extraradical mycelium quantity was positively correlated with the final percentage of ectomycorrhizas for the three fungal species. Different competitive pressure between the two Rhizopogon species on L. deliciosus persistence was observed, with R. luteolus having no effect on L. deliciosus survival. Negative correlation between the final percentage of mycorrhizas of L. deliciosus and R. roseolus was observed. However, no relationship was determined between extraradical mycelia of both fungal species. The results obtained suggest that competition between L. deliciosus and R. roseolus takes place in the root system, for ectomycorrhiza formation in available roots, rather than in the extraradical phase.

  6. Ectomycorrhizal fungus diversity and community structure with natural and cultivated truffle hosts: applying lessons learned to future truffle culture.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Ana María; Águeda, Beatriz; Sánchez, Sergio; Parladé, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Since the first truffle plantations were established in France, Italy and other parts in the world, many studies have been carried out to improve their productivity and sustainability. Success of plantations is clearly related to the mycorrhizal status of the host trees over the years, from inoculated seedlings to truffle-producing trees. The experience gained in monitoring the ectomycorrhizal fungus status in cultivated truffle grounds has allowed us to develop an extensive catalogue of the ectomycorrhizal fungi present in truffle plantations. Herein, we summarize fungal community data from 85 references that represent different truffle studies in natural habitats and plantations. Approximately 25% of the ectomycorrhizae reported in the 85 references are common to most of the studies. In general, more fungal species are detected in productive plantations than in the non-productive ones. Truffle plantations display a diverse ectomycorrhizal fungal community, in which species of the genus Tuber are well represented. Tuber rufum and some members of Boletales are typically restricted to productive truffle plots. On the other hand, Hebeloma, Laccaria and Russula species are mostly associated with unproductive plots. Ectomycorrhizae belonging to Thelephoraceae are frequently found in mature truffle orchards but do not seem to affect sporocarp production. Several biotic and abiotic factors affect the ectomycorrhizal fungus communities associated with truffle orchards. Among them are plantation age, host species and its growth, the surrounding environment (particularly the presence of other ectomycorrhizal hosts), and plantation management. Understanding the ectomycorrhizal fungal communities inhabiting different plantations may give us clues about the dynamics of the targeted truffles and the possibility of identifying mycorrhizal fungal species that are good indicators of successful truffle plantations.

  7. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of native and non-native Pinus and Quercus species in a common garden of 35-year-old trees.

    PubMed

    Trocha, Lidia K; Kałucka, Izabela; Stasińska, Małgorzata; Nowak, Witold; Dabert, Mirosława; Leski, Tomasz; Rudawska, Maria; Oleksyn, Jacek

    2012-02-01

    Non-native tree species have been widely planted or have become naturalized in most forested landscapes. It is not clear if native trees species collectively differ in ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) diversity and communities from that of non-native tree species. Alternatively, EMF species community similarity may be more determined by host plant phylogeny than by whether the plant is native or non-native. We examined these unknowns by comparing two genera, native and non-native Quercus robur and Quercus rubra and native and non-native Pinus sylvestris and Pinus nigra in a 35-year-old common garden in Poland. Using molecular and morphological approaches, we identified EMF species from ectomycorrhizal root tips and sporocarps collected in the monoculture tree plots. A total of 69 EMF species were found, with 38 species collected only as sporocarps, 18 only as ectomycorrhizas, and 13 both as ectomycorrhizas and sporocarps. The EMF species observed were all native and commonly associated with a Holarctic range in distribution. We found that native Q. robur had ca. 120% higher total EMF species richness than the non-native Q. rubra, while native P. sylvestris had ca. 25% lower total EMF species richness than non-native P. nigra. Thus, across genera, there was no evidence that native species have higher EMF species diversity than exotic species. In addition, we found a higher similarity in EMF communities between the two Pinus species than between the two Quercus species. These results support the naturalization of non-native trees by means of mutualistic associations with cosmopolitan and novel fungi.

  8. Comparison of the carbon stock in forest soil of sessile oak and beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bene, Zsolt; Bidló, András

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important carbon sinks. The forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle, because the global climate change or the increase of atmospheric CO2 level. We do not have enough data about the carbon stock of soils and its change due to human activities, which have similar value to carbon content of biomass. In our investigation we measured the carbon stock of soil in 10 stands of Quercus petraea and Fagus sylvatica. We took a 1.1 m soil column with soil borer and divided to 11 samples each column. The course organic and root residues were moved. After evaluation, we compared our results with other studies and the carbon stock of forests to each other. Naturally, the amount of SOC was the highest in the topsoil layers. However, we found significant difference between forest stands which stayed on the same homogenous bedrock, but very close to each other (e.g. distance was 1 or 2 km). We detected that different forest utilizations and tree species have an effect on the forest carbon as the litter as well (amount, composition). In summary, we found larger amount (99.1 C t/ha on average) of SOC in soil of stands, where sessile oak were the main stand-forming tree species. The amount of carbon was the least in turkey oak-sessile oak stands (85.4 C t/ha on average). We found the highest SOC (118.3 C t/ha) in the most mixed stand (silver lime-beech-red oak). In the future, it will be very important: How does climate change affect the spread of tree species or on carbon storage? Beech is more sensitive, but even sessile oak. These species are expected to replace with turkey oak, which is less sensitive to drought. Thus, it is possible in the future that we can expect to decrease of forest soil carbon stock capacity, which was confirmed by our experiment. Keywords: carbon sequestration, mitigation, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, litter Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU

  9. Planting Sentinel European Trees in Eastern Asia as a Novel Method to Identify Potential Insect Pest Invaders

    PubMed Central

    Roques, Alain; Fan, Jian-ting; Courtial, Béatrice; Zhang, Yan-zhuo; Yart, Annie; Auger-Rozenberg, Marie-Anne; Denux, Olivier; Kenis, Marc; Baker, Richard; Sun, Jiang-hua

    2015-01-01

    Quarantine measures to prevent insect invasions tend to focus on well-known pests but a large proportion of the recent invaders were not known to cause significant damage in their native range, or were not even known to science before their introduction. A novel method is proposed to detect new potential pests of woody plants in their region of origin before they are introduced to a new continent. Since Asia is currently considered to be the main supplier of insect invaders to Europe, sentinel trees were planted in China during 2007-2011 as an early warning tool to identify the potential for additional Asian insect species to colonize European trees. Seedlings (1-1.5 m tall) of five broadleaved (Quercus petraea, Q. suber, Q. ilex, Fagus sylvatica, and Carpinus betulus) and two conifer species (Abies alba and Cupressus sempervirens) were planted in blocks of 100 seedlings at two widely separated sites (one in a nursery near Beijing and the other in a forest environment near Fuyang in eastern China), and then regularly surveyed for colonization by insects. A total of 104 insect species, mostly defoliators, were observed on these new hosts, and at least six species were capable of larval development. Although a number of the insects observed were probably incidental feeders, 38 species had more than five colonization events, mostly infesting Q. petraea, and could be considered as being capable of switching to European trees if introduced to Europe. Three years was shown to be an appropriate duration for the experiment, since the rate of colonization then tended to plateau. A majority of the identified species appeared to have switched from agricultural crops and fruit trees rather than from forest trees. Although these results are promising, the method is not appropriate for xylophagous pests and other groups developing on larger trees. Apart from the logistical problems, the identification to species level of the specimens collected was a major difficulty. This

  10. Towards a common methodology for developing logistic tree mortality models based on ring-width data.

    PubMed

    Cailleret, Maxime; Bigler, Christof; Bugmann, Harald; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Cˇufar, Katarina; Davi, Hendrik; Mészáros, Ilona; Minunno, Francesco; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Robert, Elisabeth M R; Suarez, María Laura; Tognetti, Roberto; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Tree mortality is a key process shaping forest dynamics. Thus, there is a growing need for indicators of the likelihood of tree death. During the last decades, an increasing number of tree-ring based studies have aimed to derive growth-mortality functions, mostly using logistic models. The results of these studies, however, are difficult to compare and synthesize due to the diversity of approaches used for the sampling strategy (number and characteristics of alive and death observations), the type of explanatory growth variables included (level, trend, etc.), and the length of the time window (number of years preceding the alive/death observation) that maximized the discrimination ability of each growth variable. We assess the implications of key methodological decisions when developing tree-ring based growth-mortality relationships using logistic mixed-effects regression models. As examples, we use published tree-ring datasets from Abies alba (13 different sites), Nothofagus dombeyi (one site), and Quercus petraea (one site). Our approach is based on a constant sampling size and aims at (1) assessing the dependency of growth-mortality relationships on the statistical sampling scheme used, (2) determining the type of explanatory growth variables that should be considered, and (3) identifying the best length of the time window used to calculate them. The performance of tree-ring-based mortality models was reasonably high for all three species (area under the receiving operator characteristics curve, AUC > 0.7). Growth level variables were the most important predictors of mortality probability for two species (A. alba, N. dombeyi), while growth-trend variables need to be considered for Q. petraea. In addition, the length of the time window used to calculate each growth variable was highly uncertain and depended on the sampling scheme, as some growth-mortality relationships varied with tree age. The present study accounts for the main sampling-related biases to

  11. Is growth reduction in defoliated trees a consequence of prioritized carbon allocation to reserves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Guenter; Schmid, Sandra; Palacio, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Tissue concentrations of carbon reserve compounds are frequently used as proxies for the carbon balance of trees, but the mechanisms regulating the formation of carbon reserves are still under debate. It is often assumed that carbon storage in trees is largely a consequence of surplus carbon supply (reserve accumulation). In contrast, carbon storage might also occur against prevailing carbon demand from other sink activities, like growth (reserve formation), in which case carbon reserve pools might increase even at carbon limitation, and thus, cannot be used as indicators for a tree's carbon supply status. Such a situation might be severe defoliation by herbivores. Especially in evergreen tree species, it has been shown that natural and experimental defoliation leads to a reduction of growth that is proportional to the lost leaf area. Compared to this strong effect on growth, carbon reserve pools (i.e. sugars, starch and storage lipids) of defoliated trees often exert only a temporary decrease immediately after defoliation, while tissue concentrations of carbon reserves return to those of undefoliated trees by the end of the growing season. Within a recent experiment, we investigated, if the growth decline in trees following early season defoliation is the consequence of prioritized carbon allocation to carbon reserves over growth. To test this hypothesis we grew seedlings of evergreen Quecus ilex and deciduous Quercus petraea trees under low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) and high (560 ppm) CO2 concentrations and completely defoliated half of the seedlings in each CO2 treatment at the beginning of the growing season. In undefoliated control trees, CO2 had a significant positive effect on the seasonal growth in both species. Defoliation had a strong negative impact on growth in the evergreen Q. illex, but less in the deciduous Q. petraea. In both species, the growth reduction after defoliation relative to undefoliated controls was very similar at all three CO2

  12. Biofilm supported increase of chemical weathering and decrease of chemical denudation in pine growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Z.; Keller, C.; Gill, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Vascular plants and associated microbial communities produced biofilm coatings increase weathering by extending contact periods of minerals with low pH liquids. We performed an experiment to isolate the effects of ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi and ectomycorrhiza- helper bacteria on chemical weathering and chemical denudation (i.e. chemical erosion), and their effects on these fluxes in association with red pine as a host. The study was conducted in a growth chamber using sandy growth medium in replicated flow-through columns. Biotite and anorthite supplied Ca, Mg and K. Concentrations of these cations were measured in input and output solutions, in tree biomass and on exchangeable cation sites of the growth medium; then weathering and denudation fluxes were estimated by mass-balance. In addition, mineral surface changes, biofilm cover and microbial attachment to surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The column experiment demonstrated that both bacteria and fungi had a large weathering potential for Ca- bearing minerals, but the microbial communities were not able to regulate denudation losses without a vascular host. Chemical weathering and denudation were about equal in each microbe-only treatment. By the second 6 months of the experiment treatment effects became significant for the seedling systems (p<0.005). The ectomycorrhizal treatments produced the greatest weathering and least denudation, but non- ectomycorrhizal seedlings lowered denudation as well. The differences between the fluxes were significant in both ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal treatments, but the ectomycorrhizal treatment difference was larger, while abiotic weathering was less and equaled the abiotic denudation flux. The ability to retard denudation in both ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal treatment was linked to biofilm formation on mineral surfaces. An ectomycorrhizal hyphal network, as part of the biofilm or covered by the biofilm, was apparently able

  13. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  14. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions.

  15. The oak gene expression atlas: insights into Fagaceae genome evolution and the discovery of genes regulated during bud dormancy release.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Isabelle; Le Provost, Grégoire; Bento, Pascal; Da Silva, Corinne; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Murat, Florent; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Bartholomé, Jerôme; Lalanne, Céline; Ehrenmann, François; Noirot, Céline; Burban, Christian; Léger, Valérie; Amselem, Joelle; Belser, Caroline; Quesneville, Hadi; Stierschneider, Michael; Fluch, Silvia; Feldhahn, Lasse; Tarkka, Mika; Herrmann, Sylvie; Buscot, François; Klopp, Christophe; Kremer, Antoine; Salse, Jérôme; Aury, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-02-21

    Many northern-hemisphere forests are dominated by oaks. These species extend over diverse environmental conditions and are thus interesting models for studies of plant adaptation and speciation. The genomic toolbox is an important asset for exploring the functional variation associated with natural selection. The assembly of previously available and newly developed long and short sequence reads for two sympatric oak species, Quercus robur and Quercus petraea, generated a comprehensive catalog of transcripts for oak. The functional annotation of 91 k contigs demonstrated the presence of a large proportion of plant genes in this unigene set. Comparisons with SwissProt accessions and five plant gene models revealed orthologous relationships, making it possible to decipher the evolution of the oak genome. In particular, it was possible to align 9.5 thousand oak coding sequences with the equivalent sequences on peach chromosomes. Finally, RNA-seq data shed new light on the gene networks underlying vegetative bud dormancy release, a key stage in development allowing plants to adapt their phenology to the environment. In addition to providing a vast array of expressed genes, this study generated essential information about oak genome evolution and the regulation of genes associated with vegetative bud phenology, an important adaptive traits in trees. This resource contributes to the annotation of the oak genome sequence and will provide support for forward genetics approaches aiming to link genotypes with adaptive phenotypes.

  16. The influence of mature oak stands and spruce plantations on soil-dwelling click beetles in lowland plantation forests.

    PubMed

    Loskotová, Tereza; Horák, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Most European forests have been converted into forest plantations that are managed for timber production. The main goal of this paper was to determine the difference between mature native sessile oak (Quercus petraea) stands and non-indigenous Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantations, with respect to communities of Athous click beetles in approximately 6,500 ha of lowland plantation forest area in the Czech Republic. Athous subfuscus was the most abundant and widespread species, followed by A. zebei and A. haemorrhoidalis, while A. vittatus was considered rare. Spatial analysis of environmental variables inside studied patches showed that the species composition of Athous beetles best responded to a 20 m radius surrounding traps. The species' responses to the environment showed that A. vittatus and A. haemorrhoidalis preferred oak stands, while A. zebei and A. subfuscus were associated with spruce plantations. In addition, oak stands showed higher diversity of beetle communities. The studied species are important for their ecosystem services (e.g. predation on pests or bioturbation) and seem to tolerate certain degrees of human disturbances, which is especially beneficial for forest plantations managed for timber production.

  17. Multilocus sequence typing provides insights into the population structure and evolutionary potential of Brenneria goodwinii, associated with acute oak decline.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Maciej; Mullett, Martin S; McDonald, James E; Denman, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Brenneria goodwinii is one of the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacteria from native oak species, Quercus robur and Q. petraea, affected by acute oak decline (AOD) in the UK. We investigated the population biology of this bacterial species using a multilocus sequence analysis to determine the population structure and evolutionary potential. Seven partial housekeeping genes were used in the analyses. Amongst 44 bacterial strains from seven different locations, we identified 22 unique sequence types [STs]; only one ST was found at two separate locations. Phylogenetic and cluster-based analyses suggested that B. goodwinii STs form two main distinct groups; however, no geographical pattern of their distribution could be observed. Clonality and recombination tests demonstrated that the studied population is primarily clonal, however both mutation and recombination processes play a role in shaping the genetic structure and evolution of the population. Our study suggests that the B. goodwinii population on oak in the UK has an endemic form, with background recombination appearing to generate new alleles more frequently than mutation, despite the introduction of nucleotide substitutions being approximately twice less likely than mutation. The newly emerged STs subsequently undergo clonal expansion to become dominant genotypes within their specific geographical locations and even within the individual host oak trees.

  18. Extensive recent secondary contacts between four European white oak species.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Thibault; Roux, Camille; Villate, Laure; Bodénès, Catherine; Romiguier, Jonathan; Paiva, Jorge A P; Dossat, Carole; Aury, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe; Kremer, Antoine

    2017-01-13

    Historical trajectories of tree species during the late Quaternary have been well reconstructed through genetic and palaeobotanical studies. However, many congeneric tree species are interfertile, and the timing and contribution of introgression to species divergence during their evolutionary history remains largely unknown. We quantified past and current gene flow events between four morphologically divergent oak species (Quercus petraea, Q. robur, Q. pyrenaica, Q. pubescens), by two independent inference methods: diffusion approximation to the joint frequency spectrum (∂a∂i) and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). For each pair of species, alternative scenarios of speciation allowing gene flow over different timescales were evaluated. Analyses of 3524 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) randomly distributed in the genome, showed that these species evolved in complete isolation for most of their history, but recently came into secondary contact, probably facilitated by the most recent period of postglacial warming. We demonstrated that: there was sufficient genetic differentiation before secondary contact for the accumulation of barriers to gene flow; and current European white oak genomes are a mosaic of genes that have crossed species boundaries and genes impermeable to gene flow.

  19. Genetic architecture of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri: the essential role of QTL x environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Frérot, Hélène; Faucon, Michel-Pierre; Willems, Glenda; Godé, Cécile; Courseaux, Adeline; Darracq, Aude; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to determine the main genomic regions that control zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri and to examine genotype x environment effects on phenotypic variance. To do so, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using an interspecific A. halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F(2) population. *The F(2) progeny as well as representatives of the parental populations were cultivated on soils at two different Zn concentrations. A linkage map was constructed using 70 markers. *In both low and high pollution treatments, zinc hyperaccumulation showed high broad-sense heritability (81.9 and 74.7%, respectively). Five significant QTLs were detected: two QTLs specific to the low pollution treatment (chromosomes 1 and 4), and three QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3, 6 and 7). These QTLs explained 50.1 and 36.5% of the phenotypic variance in low and high pollution treatments, respectively. Two QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3 and 6) showed significant QTL x environment interactions. *The QTL on chromosome 3 largely colocalized with a major QTL previously identified for Zn and cadmium (Cd) tolerance. This suggests that Zn tolerance and hyperaccumulation share, at least partially, a common genetic basis and may have simultaneously evolved on heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  20. A quantitative trait loci analysis of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of metal hyperaccumulation are still not understood, so we conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, in a cross between this and its sister species, A. petraea, in order to determine the number and approximate location of the genomic regions significantly contributing to this adaptation. An F2 cross between the two species was made, and the leaf Zn concentration of 92 individuals was measured at both low (10 microm) and high (100 microm) Zn concentrations. Twenty-five markers were established that were distributed on all of the eight chromosomes. Mapping of the markers established that they were essentially collinear with previous studies. QTLs exceeding a logarithm to the base 10 of the odds (LOD) value of 3 were found on chromosomes 4 (low Zn), 6 (high Zn) and 7 (both high and low Zn). Evidence for a QTL on chromosome 3 (low Zn) was also found. This analysis validates a previously used method of QTL analysis, based on microarray analysis of segregating families. Genes that have altered during the evolution of this character should also be QTL: this analysis calls into question a number of candidate genes from consideration as such primary genes because they do not appear to be associated with QTLs.

  1. Paternal effects on seed germination: a barrier to the genetic assimilation of an endemic plant taxon?

    PubMed

    Andersson, S; Månsby, E; Prentice, H C

    2008-09-01

    We used a crossing experiment to investigate post-zygotic barriers that might limit introgression between a pair of closely-related, gynodioecious plant species--the widespread weed Silene vulgaris and the local Swedish endemic S. uniflora ssp. petraea. The study not only considered the effects of hybridization on conventionally-used (primary) fitness components such as seed set and progeny survival, but also provided a test for the effects of interspecific hybridization on characters with more subtle or habitat-specific effects on fitness. We detected highly significant paternal effects on seed germination properties, with the germination characteristics of hybrid seed resembling those of the species that served as the pollen donor. These paternal effects on germination represent a potentially strong barrier to interspecific introgression in the two species' natural habitats, where an inappropriate germination response in the habitat of the maternal parent may lead to the failure of seedling establishment. Interspecific crosses had weak or variable effects on progeny survival, flowering and sex ratio, but these effects could not be interpreted in terms of barriers to introgression. Our results indicate that nuclear restorers in S. vulgaris have the capacity to suppress cytoplasmic male-sterility genes in its endemic congener.

  2. Growth Inhibition of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Produced Water from the Petroleum Industry Using Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Souza, Pamella Macedo de; Goulart, Fátima Regina de Vasconcelos; Marques, Joana Montezano; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Groposo, Claudia; Sousa, Maíra Paula de; Vólaro, Vanessa; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Seldin, Lucy

    2017-04-19

    Strategies for the control of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the oil industry involve the use of high concentrations of biocides, but these may induce bacterial resistance and/or be harmful to public health and the environment. Essential oils (EO) produced by plants inhibit the growth of different microorganisms and are a possible alternative for controlling SRB. We aimed to characterize the bacterial community of produced water obtained from a Brazilian petroleum facility using molecular methods, as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EO from different plants and their major components against Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 and against SRB growth directly in the produced water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of the genera Pelobacter and Marinobacterium, Geotoga petraea, and the SRB Desulfoplanes formicivorans in our produced water samples. Sequencing of dsrA insert-containing clones confirmed the presence of sequences related to D. formicivorans. EO obtained from Citrus aurantifolia, Lippia alba LA44 and Cymbopogon citratus, as well as citral, linalool, eugenol and geraniol, greatly inhibited (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 78 µg/mL) the growth of D. alaskensis in a liquid medium. The same MIC was obtained directly in the produced water with EO from L. alba LA44 (containing 82% citral) and with pure citral. These findings may help to control detrimental bacteria in the oil industry.

  3. Diversity and structure of ectomycorrhizal and co-associated fungal communities in a serpentine soil.

    PubMed

    Urban, Alexander; Puschenreiter, Markus; Strauss, Joseph; Gorfer, Markus

    2008-09-01

    The community of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and co-associated fungi from a serpentine site forested with Pinus sylvestris and Quercus petraea was explored, to improve the understanding of ECM diversity in naturally metalliferous soils. ECM fungi were identified by a combination of morphotyping and direct sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2 and of a part of the large-subunit region. Co-associated fungi from selected ECM were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing of representative clones from libraries. Polymerase chain reaction with species-specific primers was applied to assess patterns of association of ECM and co-associated fungi. Twenty ECM species were differentiated. Aphyllophoralean fungi representing several basidiomycete orders and Russulaceae were dominant. Phialocephala fortinii was the most frequently encountered taxon from the diverse assemblage of ECM co-associated fungi. A ribotype representing a deeply branching ascomycete lineage known from ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid sequences only was detected in some ECM samples. A broad taxonomic range of fungi have the potential to successfully colonise tree roots under the extreme edaphic conditions of serpentine soils. Distribution patterns of ECM-co-associated fungi hint at the importance of specific inter-fungal interactions, which are hypothesised to be a relevant factor for the maintenance of ECM diversity.

  4. Xylem adjustment of sessile oak at its southern distribution limits.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sancho, Elisabet; Dorado-Liñán, Isabel; Heinrich, Ingo; Helle, Gerhard; Menzel, Annette

    2017-07-01

    Drought is a key limiting factor for tree growth in the Mediterranean Basin. However, the variability in acclimation via xylem traits is largely unknown. We studied tree growth and vessel features of Quercus petraea (Matt.) Lieb. in five marginal stands across southern Europe. Tree-ring width (TRW), mean earlywood vessel area (MVA) and number of earlywood vessels (NV) as well as theoretical hydraulic conductivity (Kh) chronologies were developed for the period 1963-2012. Summer drought signals were consistent among TRW chronologies; however, climatic responses of vessel features differed considerably among sites. At the three xeric sites, previous year's summer drought had a negative effect on MVA and a positive effect on NV. In contrast, at the two mesic sites, current year's spring drought negatively affected NV, while exerting a positive influence on MVA. In both cases, Kh was not altered by this xylem adjustment. All variables revealed identical east-west geographical patterns in growth and anatomical features. Sessile oak copes with drought in different ways: at xeric sites and after unfavourable previous summer conditions more but smaller vessels are built, lowering vulnerability to cavitation, whereas at mesic sites, dry springs partly lead to tree-rings with wider but fewer vessels. The variability of vessel-related features displays a similar geographical dipole in the Mediterranean Basin previously described for tree growth by other studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Comparison of seasonal variations in water-use efficiency calculated from the carbon isotope composition of tree rings and flux data in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Michelot, Alice; Eglin, Thomas; Dufrêne, Eric; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Damesin, Claire

    2011-02-01

    Tree-ring δ(13) C is often interpreted in terms of intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUE) using a carbon isotope discrimination model established at the leaf level. We examined whether intra-ring δ(13) C could be used to assess variations in intrinsic WUE (W(g), the ratio of carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance to water) and variations in ecosystem WUE (W(t) , the ratio of C assimilation and transpiration) at a seasonal scale. Intra-ring δ(13) C was measured in 30- to 60-µm-thick slices in eight oak trees (Quercus petraea). Canopy W(g) was simulated using a physiologically process-based model. High between-tree variability was observed in the seasonal variations of intra-ring δ(13) C. Six trees showed significant positive correlations between W(g) calculated from intra-ring δ(13) C and canopy W(g) averaged over several days during latewood formation. These results suggest that latewood is a seasonal recorder of W(g) trends, with a temporal lag corresponding to the mixing time of sugars in the phloem. These six trees also showed significant negative correlations between photosynthetic discrimination Δ calculated from intra-ring δ(13) C, and ecosystem W(t), during latewood formation. Despite the observed between-tree variability, these results indicate that intra-ring δ(13) C can be used to access seasonal variations in past W(t).

  6. Nitrogen dynamics in oak model ecosystems subjected to air warming and drought on two different soils.

    PubMed

    Kuster, T M; Schleppi, P; Hu, B; Schulin, R; Günthardt-Goerg, M S

    2013-01-01

    Being tolerant to heat and drought, oaks are promising candidates for future forestry in view of climate change in Central Europe. Air warming is expected to increase, and drought decrease soil N availability and thus N supply to trees. Here, we conducted a model ecosystem experiment, in which mixed stands of young oaks (Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) were grown on two different soils and subjected to four climate treatments during three growing seasons: air warming by 1-2 °C, drought periods (average precipitation reduction of 43-60%), a combination of these two treatments, and a control. In contrast to our hypotheses, neither air warming nor drought significantly affected N availability, whereas total amounts, vertical distribution and availability of soil N showed substantial differences between the two soils. While air warming had no effect on tree growth and N accumulation, the drought treatment reduced tree growth and increased, or tended to increase, N accumulation in the reduced biomass, indicating that growth was not limited by N. Furthermore, (15) N-labelling revealed that this accumulation was associated with an increased uptake of nitrate. On the basis of our results, climate change effects on N dynamics are expected to be less important in oak stands than reduced soil water availability. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. Isoprenoid emission of oak species typical for the Mediterranean area: Source strength and controlling variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hauff, Karin; Rabong, Richard; Steinbrecher, Jutta

    Measurements of isoprenoid emission on five Mediterranean oak species in the field revealed that Quercus frainetto, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens are strong emitters of isoprene. In contrast Quercus cerris and Quercus suber emitted no significant amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes. For Q. pubenscens and Q. frainetto median emission factors of 16.68 nmol m -2 s -1 (86.06 μg g -1 dw h -1) and 30.72 nmol m -2 s -1 (133.95 μg g -1 dw h -1 were calculated, respectively. The 25 to 75 percentiles span of the emission factor data sets ranged from - 53% to + 56% of the median values. Light and temperature are the main controlling factors for isoprene emission. The influence of other environmental and plant physiological parameters on the isoprene emission is discussed. The "Guenther" emission algorithm is able to predict the daily maximum of the isoprene emission within the plant specific uncertainty range. However, the morning increase and the afternoon drop in the isoprene emission is not well parameterized. On the basis of process oriented models for the synthesis of isoprene in plants, a further reduction in the uncertainty may be achieved resulting in a more reliable prediction of short-time variation in isoprene emission.

  8. Frequent cytoplasmic exchanges between oak species that are not closely related: Quercus suber and Q. ilex in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Belahbib, N; Pemonge, M H; Ouassou, A; Sbay, H; Kremer, A; Petit, R J

    2001-08-01

    Chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA variation were studied in 97 populations of cork oak (Quercus suber) in Morocco; in 31 of these populations, holm oak (Quercus ilex), a clearly distinct species, also occurred and was compared with Q. suber. Three cpDNA and one mtDNA primer pairs were used in the survey, each in combination with one restriction enzyme. Six haplotypes belonging to two very divergent lineages were detected; one lineage predominates in each species, and is probably ancestral, as inferred from comparisons with other oak species. In the mixed-species populations, cytoplasmic genomes were frequently shared across species, as indicated by an introgression ratio of 0.63. This index is a new measure of the propensity of species to share locally genetic markers, varying from zero (complete differentiation) to one (no differentiation). By contrast, more closely related deciduous oak species (Q. robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) have introgression ratios varying from 0.82 to 0.97. The introgression events appear to have been more frequent in the direction Q. ilex (female) x Q. suber (male), a finding which seems attributable to the flowering phenology of these two species. This asymmetry may have favoured immigration of Q. suber beyond its main range, in regions already colonized by Q. ilex. There, rare hybridization and further introgression through long distance pollen flow have established populations that are morphologically indistinguishable from Q. suber but that have cytoplasmic genomes originating from the local Q. ilex populations.

  9. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L.

    2008-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp. PMID:23997626

  10. Potential of ultrasonic pulse velocity for evaluating the dimensional stability of oak and chestnut wood.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Türker; Wang, Xiping; As, Nusret; Avcı, Erkan

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of ultrasonic velocity as a rapid and nondestructive method to predict the dimensional stability of oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Lieblein) and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) that are commonly used in flooring industry. Ultrasonic velocity, specific gravity, and radial, tangential and volumetric shrinkages were measured on seventy-four 20×20×30-mm(3) specimens obtained from freshly cut oak and chestnut stems. The ultrasonic velocities of the specimens decreased with increasing moisture content (MC). We found that specific gravity was not a good predictor of the transverse shrinkages as indicated by relatively weak correlations. Ultrasonic velocity, on the other hand, was found to be a significant predictor of the transverse shrinkages for both oak and chestnut. The best results for prediction of shrinkages of oak and chestnut were obtained when the ultrasonic velocity and specific gravity were used together. The multiple regression models we developed in this study explained 77% of volumetric shrinkages in oak and 72% of volumetric shrinkages in chestnut. It is concluded that ultrasonic velocity coupled with specific gravity can be employed as predicting parameters to evaluate the dimensional stability of oak and chestnut wood during manufacturing process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impacts of local adaptation of forest trees on associations with herbivorous insects: implications for adaptive forest management

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Frazer H; Stone, Graham N; Nicholls, James A; Cavers, Stephen; Gibbs, Melanie; Butterill, Philip; Wagner, Stefanie; Ducousso, Alexis; Gerber, Sophie; Petit, Rémy J; Kremer, Antoine; Schönrogge, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of species interactions is a key issue in climate change biology. Interactions involving forest trees may be particularly vulnerable due to evolutionary rate limitations imposed by long generation times. One mitigation strategy for such impacts is Climate matching – the augmentation of local native tree populations by input from nonlocal populations currently experiencing predicted future climates. This strategy is controversial because of potential cascading impacts on locally adapted animal communities. We explored these impacts using abundance data for local native gallwasp herbivores sampled from 20 provenances of sessile oak (Quercus petraea) planted in a common garden trial. We hypothesized that non-native provenances would show (i) declining growth performance with increasing distance between provenance origin and trial site, and (ii) phenological differences to local oaks that increased with latitudinal differences between origin and trial site. Under a local adaptation hypothesis, we predicted declining gallwasp abundance with increasing phenological mismatch between native and climate-matched trees. Both hypotheses for oaks were supported. Provenance explained significant variation in gallwasp abundance, but no gall type showed the relationship between abundance and phenological mismatch predicted by a local adaptation hypothesis. Our results show that climate matching would have complex and variable impacts on oak gall communities. PMID:26640522

  12. The effects of gap size on some microclimate variables during late summer and autumn in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackburn, George Alan

    2010-03-01

    The creation of gaps can strongly influence forest regeneration and habitat diversity within forest ecosystems. However, the precise characteristics of such effects depend, to a large extent, upon the way in which gaps modify microclimate and soil water content. Hence, the aim of this study was to understand the effects of gap creation and variations in gap size on forest microclimate and soil water content. The study site, in North West England, was a mixed temperate broadleaved deciduous forest dominated by mature sessile oak (Quercus petraea), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) with some representatives of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus). Solar radiation (I), air temperature (T(A)), soil temperature (T(S)), relative humidity (h), wind speed (v) and soil water content (Psi) were measured at four natural treefall gaps created after a severe storm in 2006 and adjacent sub-canopy sites. I, T(A), T(S), and Psi increased significantly with gap size; h was consistently lower in gaps than the sub-canopy but did not vary with gap size, while the variability of v could not be explained by the presence or size of gaps. There were systematic diurnal patterns in all microclimate variables in response to gaps, but no such patterns existed for Psi. These results further our understanding of the abiotic and consequent biotic responses to gaps in broadleaved deciduous forests created by natural treefalls, and provide a useful basis for evaluating the implications of forest management practices.

  13. Seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in a temperate oak forest soil.

    PubMed

    Voříšková, Jana; Brabcová, Vendula; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are the agents primarily responsible for the transformation of plant-derived carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known of their responses to the seasonal changes in resource availability in deciduous forests, including photosynthate allocation below ground and seasonal inputs of fresh litter. Vertical stratification of and seasonal changes in fungal abundance, activity and community composition were investigated in the litter, organic and upper mineral soils of a temperate Quercus petraea forest using ergosterol and extracellular enzyme assays and amplicon 454-pyrosequencing of the rDNA-ITS region. Fungal activity, biomass and diversity decreased substantially with soil depth. The highest enzyme activities were detected in winter, especially in litter, where these activities were followed by a peak in fungal biomass during spring. The litter community exhibited more profound seasonal changes than did the community in the deeper horizons. In the litter, saprotrophic genera reached their seasonal maxima in autumn, but summer typically saw the highest abundance of ectomycorrhizal taxa. Although the composition of the litter community changes over the course of the year, the mineral soil shows changes in biomass. The fungal community is affected by season. Litter decomposition and phytosynthate allocation represent important factors contributing to the observed variations.

  14. Influence of geographical origin and botanical species on the content of extractives in American, French, and East European oak woods.

    PubMed

    Prida, Andrei; Puech, Jean-Louis

    2006-10-18

    The chemical composition of East European (Republic of Moldova, Ukraine, and Romania) oaks was investigated profoundly for the first time in the present study and compared with American and French counterparts. Taking into account the high natural variability of oak extractives contents, the wide-ranging sampling was performed for all oak origins: 276 French oaks, 102 East European oaks of both species (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea Liebl.), and 56 American oaks (Quercus alba). These oaks were compared with great attention paid to the extractives, which are most important for sensorial impact in wine or spirit maturation, such as ellagitannins and principal odorant substances (aromatic aldehydes, lactones and phenols). The substances in question were studied by application of HPLC and GC-MS techniques. The pattern of all studied extractive contents allowed adequate separation of oak samples according to their geographical origin or botanical species. The highest separation rate was for American and French oaks, whereas East European samples could be partially misclassified in two sets mentioned above. The most important variables for species discrimination were whiskey lactone related variables and ellagitannins, whereas the most important features for distinguishing the origin were eugenol, 2-phenylethanol, vanillin, and syringaldehyde. These substances allowed the distinction of French and East European woods of the same species. With regard to chemical composition, East European wood held the intermediary place between American and French oaks according to their ellagitannin and whiskey lactone levels; nevertheless, it was characterized by specific high values of eugenol, aromatic aldehydes, and 2-phenylethanol.

  15. Volatile compounds of red wines macerated with Spanish, American, and French oak chips.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Ortega-Heras, Miriam; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; González-Huerta, Carlos

    2009-07-22

    The volatile composition of a red wine aged for 2 months with three different Spanish oak chips (Quercus pyrenaica and Quercus petraea) from different regions of Castilla y León was compared with that of wines aged with American and French chips. In general, the extraction kinetics showed that the maximum concentration of the volatile compounds extracted from wood can be reached in only 1 month. In the final wines, the levels of furanic aldehydes and eugenol were higher in the wines macerated with Spanish chips, whereas cis-whiskey-lactone, vanillin, and methyl vanillate showed higher levels in wines treated with American chips. Among the wines treated with the different Spanish chips, the differences observed in the volatile composition were more related to the geographical origin of the forest than to the botanical species. In general, the wines macerated with Spanish chips showed levels of oak-related volatile compounds that were more similar to those macerated with French chips than to those macerated with American chips.

  16. Influence of light and plant size on the reproduction and growth of small palm tree species: Comparing two methods for measuring canopy openness.

    PubMed

    Amadeu, Luã S N; Sampaio, Mauricio B; Dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2016-09-01

    The reproduction and growth of large palms are influenced by many factors, including light and plant size, but few studies have examined smaller species (up to 2 m tall). We examined the effect of incident light and individual size on growth rates, the probability of reproduction, and the number of inflorescences of three small palm species and compared two methods for estimating canopy openness. We measured canopy openness above the crowns of 132 adult plants and in the centers of 72 subplots (10 × 10 m) where individuals were sampled. We also recorded individual size and the number of leaves and inflorescences produced in two years. Reproductive individuals of Butia paraguayensis tend to occur in illuminated microhabitats. Reproduction of Acrocomia emensis was correlated with stem diameter, but not with light. Reproduction was inversely related to individual size and light in Syagrus petraea, probably because this clonal palm invests heavily in sexual reproduction during its younger stages and clonal activity in older stages and may be adapted to the low-light conditions of the woodland understory. Growth was not predicted by light or individual size. Stronger correlations were found when incident light was measured directly above the crown, as opposed to the subplot center. The influences of light on reproduction are dependent on plant life histories, even among related and sympatric species. Light measurements directly above individual crowns provide better understanding of the reproductive effort rather than in subplot center. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  17. The role of seed bank in the dynamics of understorey in an oak forest in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Koncz, G; Papp, Mária; Török, P; Kotroczó, Zs; Krakomperger, Zs; Matus, G; Tóthmérész, B

    2010-01-01

    We studied the potential role of seed bank in the dynamics of the understorey in a turkey oak-sessile oak forest (Querceteum petraeae-cerris) in Hungary. We used long-term records of the herb layer (1973-2006) and the seed bank composition of 2006 to assess the role of seed bank in the regeneration of herb layer. The total cover of herb layer decreased from 22% (1973) to 6% (1988), and remained low (<10%) till 2006; coinciding with the increasing cover of secondary canopy dominated by Acer campestre. We found a low density seed bank (ca. 1300 seeds/m2). Altogether 33 species were germinated from the soil samples. A few generalist weed species composed the majority of seed bank. It was possible to assign a seed bank type for 19 species; 14 species out of 19 was long-term persistent. We found that the characteristic perennial forest herbs and grasses had only sparse seed bank. The Jaccard similarity between vegetation and seed bank was low (<30%). Our results suggest that the continuous establishment of forest herbs are not based on local persistent seed bank; it should be based on vegetative spreading and/or seed rain.

  18. Tree height growth indicating drought and nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyás, Krisztina; Berki, Imre

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have been reported the increasing trends of forest growth in Europe in the last decades. Sites, where the water is not limiting factor, the increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and high nitrogen deposition influenced accelerated tree height growth. However few researches show that the drying climate conditions and water deficit cause slow/not definite trend of tree height growth in forests. The aim of our study presents the effects of drying climate and surplus nitrogen on height growth of sessile oak (Quercus petraea). Almost 50 sessile oak stands (with zonal site condition) have been measured along a humid-arid climatic transect in Hungary. Top heights of the trees are the best dendrometric parameter for indicating the changing site conditions. Observed top heights dates were compared with 50-years climate condition along the humid-arid climatic transect. Tree height growth in the dry and mesic section of climatic gradient slowed at the last 4 decades, because of the increasing frequency of dry periods. Accelerated height growth were measured in the mesic and humid section of transect, where the nitrogen deposition due to local air pollution were higher than the background deposition. These results draw attention to the importance of the drying climate and surplus nitrogen in the global changes. Keywords: climate change impacts, drought periods, surplus deposition, tree height growth Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU-national joint funded research project.

  19. Phenolic compounds and sensorial characterization of wines aged with alternative to barrel products made of Spanish oak wood (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.).

    PubMed

    Gallego, L; Del Alamo, M; Nevares, I; Fernández, J A; Fernández de Simón, B; Cadahía, E

    2012-04-01

    Wood of Quercus pyrenaica has suitable properties for the wine ageing process. However, the forest available for the barrel making from this particular type of tree is very limited. Nevertheless, it is highly advisable to use this kind of wood in order to manufacture alternative oak products. This study presents the results of ageing the same red wine using different pieces of wood (chips and staves) of Spanish oak (Q. pyrenaica), American oak (Quercus alba) and French oak (Quercus petraea) in conjunction with small, controlled amounts of oxygen. In addition, the phenolic parameters, colour and sensory analysis point out that wines aged with Q. pyrenaica pieces have similar enological characteristics to those aged with American or French oak pieces of wood (chips and staves). Furthermore, the total oxygen consumed and its relation with sensory properties also has been studied in this article in order to know how the oxygen behaves in these processes. Besides, it is going to put forward the fact that chips and staves from Q. pyrenaica oak are suitable for the ageing of red wines and better considered than American or French ones, showing higher aromatic intensity, complexity, woody, balsamic and cocoa. Finally, the tasters valued highly the wines with staves, pointing out its flavour and roundness in mouth.

  20. The Effects of Pre-Fermentative Addition of Oenological Tannins on Wine Components and Sensorial Qualities of Red Wine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Escott, Carlos; Loira, Iris; Del Fresno, Juan Manuel; Morata, Antonio; Tesfaye, Wendu; Calderon, Fernando; Benito, Santiago; Suárez-Lepe, Jose Antonio

    2016-10-31

    Today in the wine industry, oenological tannins are widely used to improve wine quality and prevent oxidation in wine aging. With the development of tannin products, new oenological tannins are developed with many specific functions, such as modifying antioxidant effect, colour stabilization and aroma modifications. The aim of this work is to investigate effects of pre-fermentative addition of oenological tannins on wine colour, anthocyanins, volatile compounds and sensorial properties. In this case, Syrah juice was extracted with classic flash thermovinification from fresh must in order to release more colour and tannins. Three types of oenological tannins, which are, respectively, derived from grape skin, seed (Vitis vinifera) and French oak (Quercus robur and Querrus petraea), were selected to carry out the experiments with seven treatments. Results indicated that tannin treatments significantly improved wine aroma complexity and sensorial properties. However, the concentration of some stable pigments such as Vitisin A, Vitisin A-Ac and Vitisin B was negatively affected by tannin additions. Nevertheless, by means of cluster analysis and principal component analysis, it was observed that higher alcohols were significantly promoted by grape seed tannin while most anthocyanins can be improved by addition of grape tannins. In conclusion, low amount of oenological tannin derived from grape seed is a promising method to be applied especially for young red wine making.

  1. A Phenological Timetable of Oak Growth under Experimental Drought and Air Warming

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Thomas M.; Dobbertin, Matthias; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S.; Schaub, Marcus; Arend, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase temperature and decrease summer precipitation in Central Europe. Little is known about how warming and drought will affect phenological patterns of oaks, which are considered to possess excellent adaptability to these climatic changes. Here, we investigated bud burst and intra-annual shoot growth of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens grown on two different forest soils and exposed to air warming and drought. Phenological development was assessed over the course of three growing seasons. Warming advanced bud burst by 1–3 days °C−1 and led to an earlier start of intra-annual shoot growth. Despite this phenological shift, total time span of annual growth and shoot biomass were not affected. Drought changed the frequency and intensity of intra-annual shoot growth and advanced bud burst in the subsequent spring of a severe summer drought by 1–2 days. After re-wetting, shoot growth recovered within a few days, demonstrating the superior drought tolerance of this tree genus. Our findings show that phenological patterns of oaks are modified by warming and drought but also suggest that ontogenetic factors and/or limitations of water and nutrients counteract warming effects on the biomass and the entire span of annual shoot growth. PMID:24586988

  2. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus)

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Hilke; Cronn, Richard; Yanbaev, Yulai; Jennings, Tara; Mader, Malte; Degen, Bernd; Kersten, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 189 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism) from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America), and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites) and Q. robur (346 variant sites). Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose) electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber. PMID:27352242

  3. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus).

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Hilke; Cronn, Richard; Yanbaev, Yulai; Jennings, Tara; Mader, Malte; Degen, Bernd; Kersten, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 189 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism) from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America), and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites) and Q. robur (346 variant sites). Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose) electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber.

  4. Chemical characterization of oak heartwood from Spanish forests of Quercus pyrenaica (Wild.). Ellagitannins, low molecular weight phenolic, and volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Fernandez de Simón, Brígida; Sanz, Miriam; Cadahía, Estrella; Poveda, Pilar; Broto, Miguel

    2006-10-18

    The need for new sources of quality wood supply for cooperage has led to looking into the possibility of utilizing Quercus pyrenaica Wild. oak, a species native to the Iberian peninsula, as an alternative to other European (Quercus robur and Qurecus petraea) and American (Quercus alba) oaks. The low molecular weight phenolic composition, ellagitannins, and volatile compounds (including a wide range of compound families such as volatile phenols, furanic compounds, lactones, phenyl ketones, other lignin-derived compounds, and volatile compounds related to off-flavors) of green heartwood from Spanish forest regions were studied by HPLC and GC, in order to know its enological characteristics. The chemical composition of Q. pyrenaica is similar to that of other species commonly used in cooperage to make barrels, showing only quantitative differences that were more significant with respect to American than to French species. The four provenance regions studied showed similar chemical composition, with high variability among individuals, often higher than the variability among regions of provenance, but in line with that described in other European and American oak woods. Therefore, this species must be considered to be suitable for aging wine.

  5. Effect of the seasoning method on the chemical composition of oak heartwood to cooperage.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Juana; Cadahía, Estrella; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Ojeda, Sonia; Rubio, Pilar

    2008-05-14

    The effect of various oak wood seasoning methods, natural seasoning in open air, artificial seasoning in a kiln, and a mixed method that combines open air and kiln drying, on the chemical composition in American ( Quercus alba) and French ( Quercus petraea) oak was studied. The results confirm the evolution of ellagitannins in wood, low molecular polyphenols, and volatile compounds in relation to oak species and seasoning method. Natural seasoning in open air can be considered a superior method to mixed or artificial drying for wood seasoning in cooperage. It was more effective in reducing the excess of ellagitannins, especially in French oak wood. Moreover, the evolution of wood volatile compounds was more positive in the natural seasoning than mixed or artificial drying, since it led to woods with higher aromatic potential (larger concentrations of compounds such as volatile phenols, phenolic aldehydes, furanic compounds, and cis- and trans-beta-methyl-gamma-octalactones) than mixed or artificial methods. However, the three seasoning methods showed similar effectiveness regarding the desired reduction of off-flavors compounds.

  6. Forest defoliator pests alter carbon and nitrogen cycles

    PubMed Central

    Grüning, Maren; Simon, Judy; Reinhardt, Annett-Barbara; Lamersdorf, Norbert; Thies, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may foster pest epidemics in forests, and thereby the fluxes of elements that are indicators of ecosystem functioning. We examined compounds of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in insect faeces, leaf litter, throughfall and analysed the soils of deciduous oak forests (Quercus petraea L.) that were heavily infested by the leaf herbivores winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.) and mottled umber (Erannis defoliaria L.). In infested forests, total net canopy-to-soil fluxes of C and N deriving from insect faeces, leaf litter and throughfall were 30- and 18-fold higher compared with uninfested oak forests, with 4333 kg C ha−1 and 319 kg N ha−1, respectively, during a pest outbreak over 3 years. In infested forests, C and N levels in soil solutions were enhanced and C/N ratios in humus layers were reduced indicating an extended canopy-to-soil element pathway compared with the non-infested forests. In a microcosm incubation experiment, soil treatments with insect faeces showed 16-fold higher fluxes of carbon dioxide and 10-fold higher fluxes of dissolved organic carbon compared with soil treatments without added insect faeces (control). Thus, the deposition of high rates of nitrogen and rapidly decomposable carbon compounds in the course of forest pest epidemics appears to stimulate soil microbial activity (i.e. heterotrophic respiration), and therefore, may represent an important mechanism by which climate change can initiate a carbon cycle feedback. PMID:27853551

  7. Strong inbreeding depression in two Scandinavian populations of the self-incompatible perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed

    Sletvold, Nina; Mousset, Mathilde; Hagenblad, Jenny; Hansson, Bengt; Agren, Jon

    2013-10-01

    Inbreeding depression is a key factor influencing mating system evolution in plants, but current understanding of its relationship with selfing rate is limited by a sampling bias with few estimates for self-incompatible species. We quantified inbreeding depression (δ) over two growing seasons in two populations of the self-incompatible perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea in Scandinavia. Inbreeding depression was strong and of similar magnitude in both populations. Inbreeding depression for overall fitness across two seasons (the product of number of seeds, offspring viability, and offspring biomass) was 81% and 78% in the two populations. Chlorophyll deficiency accounted for 81% of seedling mortality in the selfing treatment, and was not observed among offspring resulting from outcrossing. The strong reduction in both early viability and late quantitative traits suggests that inbreeding depression is due to deleterious alleles of both large and small effect, and that both populations experience strong selection against the loss of self-incompatibility. A review of available estimates suggested that inbreeding depression tends to be stronger in self-incompatible than in self-compatible highly outcrossing species, implying that undersampling of self-incompatible taxa may bias estimates of the relationship between mating system and inbreeding depression.

  8. In situ assessment of the velocity of carbon transfer by tracing 13 C in trunk CO2 efflux after pulse labelling: variations among tree species and seasons.

    PubMed

    Dannoura, Masako; Maillard, Pascale; Fresneau, Chantal; Plain, Caroline; Berveiller, Daniel; Gerant, Dominique; Chipeaux, Christophe; Bosc, Alexandre; Ngao, Jérôme; Damesin, Claire; Loustau, Denis; Epron, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthates belowground. In situ(13) C pulse labelling of trees 8-10 m tall was conducted in the field on 10 beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees, six sessile oak (Quercus petraea) trees and 10 maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) trees throughout the growing season. Respired (13) CO2 from trunks was tracked at different heights using tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags and the velocity of carbon transfer (V). The isotope composition of phloem extracts was measured on several occasions after labelling and used to estimate the rate constant of phloem sap outflux (kP ). Pulse labelling together with high-frequency measurement of the isotope composition of trunk CO2 efflux is a promising tool for studying phloem transport in the field. Seasonal variability in V was predicted in pine and oak by bivariate linear regressions with air temperature and soil water content. V differed among the three species consistently with known differences in phloem anatomy between broadleaf and coniferous trees. V increased with tree diameter in oak and beech, reflecting a nonlinear increase in volumetric flow with increasing bark cross-sectional area, which suggests changes in allocation pattern with tree diameter in broadleaf species. Discrepancies between V and kP indicate vertical changes in functional phloem properties.

  9. Multilocus and Multitrait Measures of Differentiation for Gene Markers and Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A.; Zanetto, A.; Ducousso, A.

    1997-01-01

    Multilocus measures of differentiation taking into account gametic disequilibrium are developed. Even if coupling and repulsion heterozygotes cannot be separated at the multilocus level, a method is given to calculate a composite measure of differentiation (CF(st)) at the zygotic level, which accounts for allelic associations combining both gametic and nongametic effects. Mean and maximum differentiations may be relevant when multilocus measures are computed. Maximum differentiation is the highest eigenvalue of the F(st) matrix, whereas mean differentiation corresponds to the mean value of all eigenvalues of the F(st) matrix. Gametic disequilibrium has a stronger effect on maximum differentiation than on mean differentiation and takes into account the anisotropy that may exist between within- and between-population components of disequilibria. Multilocus mean and maximum differentiation are calculated for a set of 81 Quercus petraea (sessile oak) populations assessed with eight allozyme loci and two phenotypic traits (bud burst and height growth). The results indicate that maximum differentiation increases as more loci (traits) are considered whereas mean differentiation remains constant or decreases. Phenotypic traits exhibit higher population differentiation than allozymes. The applications and uses of mean and maximum differentiations are further discussed. PMID:9093871

  10. Comparison of Different EO Sensors for Mapping Tree Species- A Case Study in Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enβle, Fabian; Kattenborn, Teja; Koch, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    The variety of different remote sensing sensors and thus the types of data specifications which are available is increasing continuously. Especially the differences in geometric, radiometric and temporal resolutions of different platforms affect their ability for the mapping of forests. These differences hinder the comparability and application of uniform methods of different remotely sensed data across the same region of interest. The quality and quantity of retrieved forest parameters is directly dependent on the data source, and therefore the objective of this project is to analyse the relationship between the data source and its derived parameters. A comparison of different optical EO-data (e.g. spatial resolution and spectral resolution of specific bands) will help to define the optimum data sets to produce a reproducible method to provide additional inputs to the Dragon cooperative project, specifically to method development for woody biomass estimation and biodiversity assessment services. This poster presents the first results on tree species mapping in a mixed temperate forest by satellite imagery taken from four different sensors. Tree species addressed in this pilot study are: Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), sessile oak (Quercus petraea) and red oak (Quercus rubra). The spatial resolution varies from 2m to 30m and the spectral resolutions range from 8bands up to 155bands.

  11. Comparison of Different EO Sensors for Mapping Tree Species- A Case Study in Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßle, Fabian; Kattenborn, Teja; Koch, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    The variety of different remote sensing sensors and thus the types of data specifications which are available is increasing continuously. Especially the differences in geometric, radiometric and temporal resolutions of different platforms affect their ability for the mapping of forests. These differences hinder the comparability and application of uniform methods of different remotely sensed data across the same region of interest. The quality and quantity of retrieved forest parameters is directly dependent on the data source, and therefore the objective of this project is to analyse the relationship between the data source and its derived parameters. A comparison of different optical EO-data (e.g. spatial resolution and spectral resolution of specific bands) will help to define the optimum data sets to produce a reproducible method to provide additional inputs to the Dragon cooperative project, specifically to method development for woody biomass estimation and biodiversity assessment services. This poster presents the first results on tree species mapping in a mixed temperate forest by satellite imagery taken from four different sensors. Tree species addressed in this pilot study are Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), sessile oak (Quercus petraea) and red oak (Quercus rubra). The spatial resolution varies from 2m to 30m and the spectral resolutions range from 8bands up to 155bands.

  12. Mapping tree root systems with ground-penetrating radar.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Jiri; Cermák, Jan; Sustek, Svatopluk

    1999-02-01

    A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technique was used to study the three-dimensional distribution of root systems of large (DBH = 14 to 35 cm) oak trees (Quercus petraea (Mattusch.) Liebl.) in relatively dry, luvisoil on loamy deluvium and weathered granodiorite. We used a pulse EKKO 1000 GPR system, a profile grid of 0.25 x 0.25 meters, at 0.05 m intervals, and a signal frequency of 450 MHz, to assure resolution of about 3 cm in both directions (further increases in resolution up to 1 cm are possible with the system). Coarse root density was 6.5 m m(-2) of stand area and 3.3 m m(-3) of soil volume. Maximum rooting depth of the experimental oaks was 2 m, and the root ground plan was significantly larger (about 1.5 times) than the crown ground plan. Based on earlier studies of Quercus robur L. from floodplain forests, where the extent of the root systems was much smaller (root ground plan:crown ground plan ratio of 0.6), we conclude that the high root ground plan:crown ground plan ratio indicates less favorable conditions of water supply at the experimental site than in the floodplain forest. The ground-penetrating radar system is noninvasive and allows relatively rapid and repeated measurements of the distribution of coarse root systems of trees.

  13. A phenological timetable of oak growth under experimental drought and air warming.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Thomas M; Dobbertin, Matthias; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S; Schaub, Marcus; Arend, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase temperature and decrease summer precipitation in Central Europe. Little is known about how warming and drought will affect phenological patterns of oaks, which are considered to possess excellent adaptability to these climatic changes. Here, we investigated bud burst and intra-annual shoot growth of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens grown on two different forest soils and exposed to air warming and drought. Phenological development was assessed over the course of three growing seasons. Warming advanced bud burst by 1-3 days °C⁻¹ and led to an earlier start of intra-annual shoot growth. Despite this phenological shift, total time span of annual growth and shoot biomass were not affected. Drought changed the frequency and intensity of intra-annual shoot growth and advanced bud burst in the subsequent spring of a severe summer drought by 1-2 days. After re-wetting, shoot growth recovered within a few days, demonstrating the superior drought tolerance of this tree genus. Our findings show that phenological patterns of oaks are modified by warming and drought but also suggest that ontogenetic factors and/or limitations of water and nutrients counteract warming effects on the biomass and the entire span of annual shoot growth.

  14. Growth cessation uncouples isotopic signals in leaves and tree rings of drought-exposed oak trees.

    PubMed

    Pflug, Ellen E; Siegwolf, R; Buchmann, N; Dobbertin, M; Kuster, T M; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Arend, M

    2015-10-01

    An increase in temperature along with a decrease in summer precipitation in Central Europe will result in an increased frequency of drought events and gradually lead to a change in species composition in forest ecosystems. In the present study, young oaks (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) were transplanted into large mesocosms and exposed for 3 years to experimental warming and a drought treatment with yearly increasing intensities. Carbon and oxygen isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) patterns were analysed in leaf tissue and tree-ring cellulose and linked to leaf physiological measures and tree-ring growth. Warming had no effect on the isotopic patterns in leaves and tree rings, while drought increased δ(18)O and δ(13)C. Under severe drought, an unexpected isotopic pattern, with a decrease in δ(18)O, was observed in tree rings but not in leaves. This decrease in δ(18)O could not be explained by concurrent physiological analyses and is not supported by current physiological knowledge. Analysis of intra-annual tree-ring growth revealed a drought-induced growth cessation that interfered with the record of isotopic signals imprinted on recently formed leaf carbohydrates. This missing record indicates isotopic uncoupling of leaves and tree rings, which may have serious implications for the interpretation of tree-ring isotopes, particularly from trees that experienced growth-limiting stresses.

  15. Coordination between growth, phenology and carbon storage in three coexisting deciduous tree species in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tamir; Vitasse, Yann; Hoch, Günter

    2016-07-01

    In deciduous trees growing in temperate forests, bud break and growth in spring must rely on intrinsic carbon (C) reserves. Yet it is unclear whether growth and C storage occur simultaneously, and whether starch C in branches is sufficient for refoliation. To test in situ the relationships between growth, phenology and C utilization, we monitored stem growth, leaf phenology and stem and branch nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) dynamics in three deciduous species: Carpinus betulus L., Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. To quantify the role of NSC in C investment into growth, a C balance approach was applied. Across the three species, >95% of branchlet starch was consumed during bud break, confirming the importance of C reserves for refoliation in spring. The C balance calculation showed that 90% of the C investment in foliage (7.0-10.5 kg tree(-1) and 5-17 times the C needed for annual stem growth) was explained by simultaneous branchlet starch degradation. Carbon reserves were recovered sooner than expected, after leaf expansion, in parallel with stem growth. Carpinus had earlier leaf phenology (by ∼25 days) but delayed cambial growth (by ∼15 days) than Fagus and Quercus, the result of a competitive strategy to flush early, while having lower NSC levels. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Forest defoliator pests alter carbon and nitrogen cycles.

    PubMed

    L-M-Arnold, Anne; Grüning, Maren; Simon, Judy; Reinhardt, Annett-Barbara; Lamersdorf, Norbert; Thies, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    Climate change may foster pest epidemics in forests, and thereby the fluxes of elements that are indicators of ecosystem functioning. We examined compounds of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in insect faeces, leaf litter, throughfall and analysed the soils of deciduous oak forests (Quercus petraea L.) that were heavily infested by the leaf herbivores winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.) and mottled umber (Erannis defoliaria L.). In infested forests, total net canopy-to-soil fluxes of C and N deriving from insect faeces, leaf litter and throughfall were 30- and 18-fold higher compared with uninfested oak forests, with 4333 kg C ha(-1) and 319 kg N ha(-1), respectively, during a pest outbreak over 3 years. In infested forests, C and N levels in soil solutions were enhanced and C/N ratios in humus layers were reduced indicating an extended canopy-to-soil element pathway compared with the non-infested forests. In a microcosm incubation experiment, soil treatments with insect faeces showed 16-fold higher fluxes of carbon dioxide and 10-fold higher fluxes of dissolved organic carbon compared with soil treatments without added insect faeces (control). Thus, the deposition of high rates of nitrogen and rapidly decomposable carbon compounds in the course of forest pest epidemics appears to stimulate soil microbial activity (i.e. heterotrophic respiration), and therefore, may represent an important mechanism by which climate change can initiate a carbon cycle feedback.

  17. A field-to-desktop toolchain for X-ray CT densitometry enables tree ring analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Mil, Tom; Vannoppen, Astrid; Beeckman, Hans; Van Acker, Joris; Van den Bulcke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Disentangling tree growth requires more than ring width data only. Densitometry is considered a valuable proxy, yet laborious wood sample preparation and lack of dedicated software limit the widespread use of density profiling for tree ring analysis. An X-ray computed tomography-based toolchain of tree increment cores is presented, which results in profile data sets suitable for visual exploration as well as density-based pattern matching. Methods Two temperate (Quercus petraea, Fagus sylvatica) and one tropical species (Terminalia superba) were used for density profiling using an X-ray computed tomography facility with custom-made sample holders and dedicated processing software. Key Results Density-based pattern matching is developed and able to detect anomalies in ring series that can be corrected via interactive software. Conclusions A digital workflow allows generation of structure-corrected profiles of large sets of cores in a short time span that provide sufficient intra-annual density information for tree ring analysis. Furthermore, visual exploration of such data sets is of high value. The dated profiles can be used for high-resolution chronologies and also offer opportunities for fast screening of lesser studied tropical tree species. PMID:27107414

  18. A stable-isotope tree-ring timescale of the Late Glacial/Holocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Bernd; Kromer, Bernd; Trimborn, Peter

    1991-10-01

    LATE Glacial and Holocene tree-ring chronologies, like deep-sea sediments or polar ice cores, contain information about past environments. Changes in tree-ring growth rates can be related to past climate anomalies and changes in the isotope composition of tree-ring cellulose reflect changes in the composition of the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. We have established a 9,928-year absolutely dated dendrochronological record of Holocene oak (Quercus robur, Quercus petraea)-and a 1,604-year floating Late Glacial and Early Holocene chronology of pine (Pinus sylvestris) from subfossil tree remnants deposited in alluvial terraces of south central European rivers. The pine sequence provides records of dendro-dated 14C, 13C and 2H patterns for the late Younger Dryas and the entire Preboreal (10,100-9,000 yr BP). Through the use of dendrochronology, radiocarbon age calibration and stable isotope analysis, we suggest that the Late Glacial/Holocene transition may be identified and dated by 13C and 2H tree-ring chronologies.

  19. A field-to-desktop toolchain for X-ray CT densitometry enables tree ring analysis.

    PubMed

    De Mil, Tom; Vannoppen, Astrid; Beeckman, Hans; Van Acker, Joris; Van den Bulcke, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Disentangling tree growth requires more than ring width data only. Densitometry is considered a valuable proxy, yet laborious wood sample preparation and lack of dedicated software limit the widespread use of density profiling for tree ring analysis. An X-ray computed tomography-based toolchain of tree increment cores is presented, which results in profile data sets suitable for visual exploration as well as density-based pattern matching. Two temperate (Quercus petraea, Fagus sylvatica) and one tropical species (Terminalia superba) were used for density profiling using an X-ray computed tomography facility with custom-made sample holders and dedicated processing software. Density-based pattern matching is developed and able to detect anomalies in ring series that can be corrected via interactive software. A digital workflow allows generation of structure-corrected profiles of large sets of cores in a short time span that provide sufficient intra-annual density information for tree ring analysis. Furthermore, visual exploration of such data sets is of high value. The dated profiles can be used for high-resolution chronologies and also offer opportunities for fast screening of lesser studied tropical tree species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The influence of mature oak stands and spruce plantations on soil-dwelling click beetles in lowland plantation forests

    PubMed Central

    Loskotová, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    Most European forests have been converted into forest plantations that are managed for timber production. The main goal of this paper was to determine the difference between mature native sessile oak (Quercus petraea) stands and non-indigenous Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantations, with respect to communities of Athous click beetles in approximately 6,500 ha of lowland plantation forest area in the Czech Republic. Athous subfuscus was the most abundant and widespread species, followed by A. zebei and A. haemorrhoidalis, while A. vittatus was considered rare. Spatial analysis of environmental variables inside studied patches showed that the species composition of Athous beetles best responded to a 20 m radius surrounding traps. The species’ responses to the environment showed that A. vittatus and A. haemorrhoidalis preferred oak stands, while A. zebei and A. subfuscus were associated with spruce plantations. In addition, oak stands showed higher diversity of beetle communities. The studied species are important for their ecosystem services (e.g. predation on pests or bioturbation) and seem to tolerate certain degrees of human disturbances, which is especially beneficial for forest plantations managed for timber production. PMID:26793425

  1. The effects of gap size on some microclimate variables during late summer and autumn in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackburn, George Alan

    2010-03-01

    The creation of gaps can strongly influence forest regeneration and habitat diversity within forest ecosystems. However, the precise characteristics of such effects depend, to a large extent, upon the way in which gaps modify microclimate and soil water content. Hence, the aim of this study was to understand the effects of gap creation and variations in gap size on forest microclimate and soil water content. The study site, in North West England, was a mixed temperate broadleaved deciduous forest dominated by mature sessile oak ( Quercus petraea), beech ( Fagus sylvatica) and ash ( Fraxinus excelsior) with some representatives of sycamore ( Acer pseudoplatanus). Solar radiation ( I), air temperature ( T A), soil temperature ( T S), relative humidity ( h), wind speed ( v) and soil water content (Ψ) were measured at four natural treefall gaps created after a severe storm in 2006 and adjacent sub-canopy sites. I, T A, T S, and Ψ increased significantly with gap size; h was consistently lower in gaps than the sub-canopy but did not vary with gap size, while the variability of v could not be explained by the presence or size of gaps. There were systematic diurnal patterns in all microclimate variables in response to gaps, but no such patterns existed for Ψ. These results further our understanding of the abiotic and consequent biotic responses to gaps in broadleaved deciduous forests created by natural treefalls, and provide a useful basis for evaluating the implications of forest management practices.

  2. Stem CO2 efflux in six co-occurring tree species: underlying factors and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; López, Rosana; Salomón, Roberto; Gordaliza, Guillermo G; Valbuena-Carabaña, María; Oleksyn, Jacek; Gil, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Stem respiration plays a role in species coexistence and forest dynamics. Here we examined the intra- and inter-specific variability of stem CO2 efflux (E) in dominant and suppressed trees of six deciduous species in a mixed forest stand: Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl, Quercus pyrenaica Willd., Prunus avium L., Sorbus aucuparia L. and Crataegus monogyna Jacq. We conducted measurements in late autumn. Within species, dominants had higher E per unit stem surface area (Es ) mainly because sapwood depth was higher than in suppressed trees. Across species, however, differences in Es corresponded with differences in the proportion of living parenchyma in sapwood and concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC). Across species, Es was strongly and NSC marginally positively related with an index of drought tolerance, suggesting that slow growth of drought-tolerant trees is related to higher NSC concentration and Es . We conclude that, during the leafless period, E is indicative of maintenance respiration and is related with some ecological characteristics of the species, such as drought resistance; that sapwood depth is the main factor explaining variability in Es within species; and that the proportion of NSC in the sapwood is the main factor behind variability in Es among species.

  3. Effects of drought on mesophyll conductance and photosynthetic limitations at different tree canopy layers.

    PubMed

    Cano, F Javier; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; Warren, Charles R; Gil, Luis; Aranda, Ismael

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, many studies have focused on the limiting role of mesophyll conductance (gm ) to photosynthesis (An ) under water stress, but no studies have examined the effect of drought on gm through the forest canopy. We investigated limitations to An on leaves at different heights in a mixed adult stand of sessile oak (Quercus petraea) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees during a moderately dry summer. Moderate drought decreased An of top and lowest beech canopy leaves much more than in leaves located in the mid canopy; whereas in oak, An of the lower canopy was decreased more than in sunlit leaves. The decrease of An was probably not due to leaf-level biochemistry given that VCmax was generally unaffected by drought. The reduction in An was instead associated with reduction in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. Drought-induced increases in stomatal limitations were largest in leaves from the top canopy, whereas drought-induced increases in mesophyll limitations were largest in leaves from the lowest canopy. Sensitivity analysis highlighted the need to decompose the canopy into different leaf layers and to incorporate the limitation imposed by gm when assessing the impact of drought on the gas exchange of tree canopies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nitrogen partitioning in oak leaves depends on species, provenance, climate conditions and soil type.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Simon, J; Kuster, T M; Arend, M; Siegwolf, R; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    Climate-tolerant tree species and/or provenances have to be selected to ensure the high productivity of managed forests in Central Europe under the prognosticated climate changes. For this purpose, we studied the responses of saplings from three oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) and provenances of different climatic origin (i.e. low or high rainfall, low or high temperature habitats) with regard to leaf nitrogen (N) composition as a measure of N nutrition. Saplings were grown in model ecosystems on either calcareous or acidic soil and subjected to one of four treatments (control, drought, air warming or a combination of drought and air warming). Across species, oak N metabolism responded to the influence of drought and/or air warming with an increase in leaf amino acid N concentration at the expense of structural N. Moreover, provenances or species from drier habitats were more tolerant to the climate conditions applied, as indicated by an increase in amino acid N (comparing species) or soluble protein N (comparing provenances within a species). Furthermore, amino acid N concentrations of oak leaves were significantly higher on calcareous compared to acidic soil. From these results, it can be concluded that seeds from provenances or species originating from drier habitats and - if available - from calcareous soil types may provide a superior seed source for future forest establishment.

  5. R-gene variation across Arabidopsis lyrata subspecies: effects of population structure, selection and mating system.

    PubMed

    Buckley, James; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Cevik, Volkan; Vicente, Joana G; Holub, Eric B; Mable, Barbara K

    2016-05-05

    Examining allelic variation of R-genes in closely related perennial species of Arabidopsis thaliana is critical to understanding how population structure and ecology interact with selection to shape the evolution of innate immunity in plants. We finely sampled natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata from the Great Lakes region of North America (A. l. lyrata) and broadly sampled six European countries (A. l. petraea) to investigate allelic variation of two R-genes (RPM1 and WRR4) and neutral genetic markers (Restriction Associated DNA sequences and microsatellites) in relation to mating system, phylogeographic structure and subspecies divergence. Fine-scale sampling of populations revealed strong effects of mating system and population structure on patterns of polymorphism for both neutral loci and R-genes, with no strong evidence for selection. Broad geographic sampling revealed evidence of balancing selection maintaining polymorphism in R-genes, with elevated heterozygosity and diversity compared to neutral expectations and sharing of alleles among diverged subspecies. Codon-based tests detected both positive and purifying selection for both R-genes, as commonly found for animal immune genes. Our results highlight that combining fine and broad-scale sampling strategies can reveal the multiple factors influencing polymorphism and divergence at potentially adaptive genes such as R-genes.

  6. A nonnative and a native fungal plant pathogen similarly stimulate ectomycorrhizal development but are perceived differently by a fungal symbiont.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Elisa; Giordano, Luana; Lione, Guglielmo; Vizzini, Alfredo; Sillo, Fabiano; Balestrini, Raffaella; Gonthier, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The effects of plant symbionts on host defence responses against pathogens have been extensively documented, but little is known about the impact of pathogens on the symbiosis and if such an impact may differ for nonnative and native pathogens. Here, this issue was addressed in a study of the model system comprising Pinus pinea, its ectomycorrhizal symbiont Tuber borchii, and the nonnative and native pathogens Heterobasidion irregulare and Heterobasidion annosum, respectively. In a 6-month inoculation experiment and using both in planta and gene expression analyses, we tested the hypothesis that H. irregulare has greater effects on the symbiosis than H. annosum. Although the two pathogens induced the same morphological reaction in the plant-symbiont complex, with mycorrhizal density increasing exponentially with pathogen colonization of the host, the number of target genes regulated in T. borchii in plants inoculated with the native pathogen (i.e. 67% of tested genes) was more than twice that in plants inoculated with the nonnative pathogen (i.e. 27% of genes). Although the two fungal pathogens did not differentially affect the amount of ectomycorrhizas, the fungal symbiont perceived their presence differently. The results may suggest that the symbiont has the ability to recognize a self/native and a nonself/nonnative pathogen, probably through host plant-mediated signal transduction.

  7. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons.

    PubMed

    Barry, Karen M; Janos, David P; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M J S

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations.

  8. The Role of the Microbiome of Truffles in Aroma Formation: a Meta-Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatzadeh, Maryam; Deveau, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    Truffles (Tuber spp.) are ascomycete subterraneous fungi that form ectomycorrhizas in a symbiotic relationship with plant roots. Their fruiting bodies are appreciated for their distinctive aroma, which might be partially derived from microbes. Indeed, truffle fruiting bodies are colonized by a diverse microbial community made up of bacteria, yeasts, guest filamentous fungi, and viruses. The aim of this minireview is two-fold. First, the current knowledge on the microbial community composition of truffles has been synthesized to highlight similarities and differences among four truffle (Tuber) species (T. magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. aestivum, and T. borchii) at various stages of their life cycle. Second, the potential role of the microbiome in truffle aroma formation has been addressed for the same four species. Our results suggest that on one hand, odorants, which are common to many truffle species, might be of mixed truffle and microbial origin, while on the other hand, less common odorants might be derived from microbes only. They also highlight that bacteria, the dominant group in the microbiome of the truffle, might also be the most important contributors to truffle aroma not only in T. borchii, as already demonstrated, but also in T. magnatum, T. aestivum, and T. melanosporum. PMID:26187969

  9. The spatial distribution of acid phosphatase activity in ectomycorrhizal tissues depends on soil fertility and morphotype, and relates to host plant phosphorus uptake.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Díaz, Leila Milena; Villanueva, Claudia Añazco; Heyser, Wolfgang; Boeckx, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Acid phosphatase (ACP) enzymes are involved in the mobilization of soil phosphorus (P) and polyphosphate accumulated in the fungal tissues of ectomycorrhizal roots, thereby influencing the amounts of P that are stored in the fungus and transferred to the host plant. This study evaluated the effects of ectomycorrhizal morphotype and soil fertility on ACP activity in the extraradical mycelium (ACP(myc)), the mantle (ACP(mantle)) and the Hartig net region (ACP(Hartig)) of ectomycorrhizal Nothofagus obliqua seedlings. ACP activity was quantified in vivo using enzyme-labelled fluorescence-97 (ELF-97) substrate, confocal laser microscopy and digital image processing routines. There was a significant effect of ectomycorrhizal morphotype on ACP(myc), ACP(mantle) and ACP(Hartig), while soil fertility had a significant effect on ACP(myc) and ACP(Hartig). The relative contribution of the mantle and the Hartig net region to the ACP activity on the ectomycorrhizal root was significantly affected by ectomycorrhizal morphotype and soil fertility. A positive correlation between ACP(Hartig) and the shoot P concentration was found, providing evidence that ACP activity at the fungus:root interface is involved in P transfer from the fungus to the host. It is concluded that the spatial distribution of ACP in ectomycorrhizas varies as a function of soil fertility and colonizing fungus.

  10. Phenolic compounds in ectomycorrhizal interaction of lignin modified silver birch

    PubMed Central

    Sutela, Suvi; Niemi, Karoliina; Edesi, Jaanika; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka; Vuosku, Jaana; Mäkelä, Riina; Tiimonen, Heidi; Chiang, Vincent L; Koskimäki, Janne; Suorsa, Marja; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Häggman, Hely

    2009-01-01

    Background The monolignol biosynthetic pathway interconnects with the biosynthesis of other secondary phenolic metabolites, such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and condensed tannins. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether genetic modification of the monolignol pathway in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) would alter the metabolism of these phenolic compounds and how such alterations, if exist, would affect the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Results Silver birch lines expressing quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides L.) caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase (PtCOMT) under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter showed a reduction in the relative expression of a putative silver birch COMT (BpCOMT) gene and, consequently, a decrease in the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl composition ratio. Alterations were also detected in concentrations of certain phenolic compounds. All PtCOMT silver birch lines produced normal ectomycorrhizas with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus (Batsch: Fr.), and the formation of symbiosis enhanced the growth of the transgenic plants. Conclusion The down-regulation of BpCOMT in the 35S-PtCOMT lines caused a reduction in the syringyl/guaiacyl ratio of lignin, but no significant effect was seen in the composition or quantity of phenolic compounds that would have been caused by the expression of PtCOMT under the 35S or UbB1 promoter. Moreover, the detected alterations in the composition of lignin and secondary phenolic compounds had no effect on the interaction between silver birch and P. involutus. PMID:19788757

  11. Oak protein profile alterations upon root colonization by an ectomycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Sebastiana, Mónica; Martins, Joana; Figueiredo, Andreia; Monteiro, Filipa; Sardans, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Silva, Anabela; Roepstorff, Peter; Pais, Maria Salomé; Coelho, Ana Varela

    2017-02-01

    An increased knowledge on the real impacts of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in forest species is needed to optimize forest sustainable productivity and thus to improve forest services and their capacity to act as carbon sinks. In this study, we investigated the response of an oak species to ectomycorrhizae formation using a proteomics approach complemented by biochemical analysis of carbohydrate levels. Comparative proteome analysis between mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal cork oak plants revealed no differences at the foliar level. However, the protein profile of 34 unique oak proteins was altered in the roots. Consistent with the results of the biochemical analysis, the proteome analysis of the mycorrhizal roots suggests a decreasing utilization of sucrose for the metabolic activity of mycorrhizal roots which is consistent with an increased allocation of carbohydrates from the plant to the fungus in order to sustain the symbiosis. In addition, a promotion of protein unfolding mechanisms, attenuation of defense reactions, increased nutrient mobilization from the plant-fungus interface (N and P), as well as cytoskeleton rearrangements and induction of plant cell wall loosening for fungal root accommodation in colonized roots are also suggested by the results. The suggested improvement in root capacity to take up nutrients accompanied by an increase of root biomass without apparent changes in aboveground biomass strongly re-enforces the potential of mycorrhizal inoculation to improve cork oak forest resistance capacity to cope with coming climate change.

  12. Sebacinales form ectendomycorrhizas with Cavendishia nobilis, a member of the Andean clade of Ericaceae, in the mountain rain forest of southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Setaro, Sabrina; Weiss, Michael; Oberwinkler, Franz; Kottke, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    Cavendishia nobilis var. capitata is an endemic member of the Ericaceae growing as a hemiepiphyte in the tropical mountain rain forest of southern Ecuador. Mycorrhizas were collected from 20 individuals along an altitudinal gradient between 1850 and 2300 m. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the symbiotic association in detail, and phylogenetic analyses based on nuclear rDNA coding for the ribosomal large subunit (nucLSU) were carried out to identify the associated mycorrhizal fungi. Microscopic and ultrastructural investigations showed the formation of a hyphal sheath, intercellular penetration of fine hyphae and colonization of the cortical cells by swollen hyphae of the same fungus. These structures were formed by hymenomycetes and ascomycetes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis detected seven groups of mycorrhizal fungi belonging to the Sebacinales. This is the first study to obtain evidence of ectendomycorrhizas in the Vaccinioideae. The ascomycetous nucLSU sequences belonged to members of the Leotiomycetes. The ectendomycorrhiza of C. nobilis with Sebacinales is discussed as a specific, hitherto undescribed mycorrhizal subcategory of ectomycorrhizas. We propose the term 'cavendishioid mycorrhiza'. This subcategory is most likely specific for the Andean clade of Ericaceae.

  13. Similar biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in set-aside plantations and ancient old-growth broadleaved forests

    PubMed Central

    Spake, Rebecca; van der Linde, Sietse; Newton, Adrian C.; Suz, Laura M.; Bidartondo, Martin I.; Doncaster, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Setting aside overmature planted forests is currently seen as an option for preserving species associated with old-growth forests, such as those with dispersal limitation. Few data exist, however, on the utility of set-aside plantations for this purpose, or the value of this habitat type for biodiversity relative to old-growth semi-natural ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the contribution of forest type relative to habitat characteristics in determining species richness and composition in seven forest blocks, each containing an ancient old-growth stand (> 1000 yrs) paired with a set-aside even-aged planted stand (ca. 180 yrs). We investigated the functionally important yet relatively neglected ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), a group for which the importance of forest age has not been assessed in broadleaved forests. We found that forest type was not an important determinant of EMF species richness or composition, demonstrating that set-aside can be an effective option for conserving ancient EMF communities. Species richness of above-ground EMF fruiting bodies was principally related to the basal area of the stand (a correlate of canopy cover) and tree species diversity, whilst richness of below-ground ectomycorrhizae was driven only by tree diversity. Our results suggest that overmature planted forest stands, particularly those that are mixed-woods with high basal area, are an effective means to connect and expand ecological networks of ancient old-growth forests in historically deforested and fragmented landscapes for ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:26917858

  14. Identification of differentially expressed genes of the fungus Hydnangium sp. during the pre-symbiotic phase of the ectomycorrhizal association with Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Coelho, Irene; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; Costa, Maurício Dutra; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes

    2010-11-01

    The pre-symbiotic phase that precedes physical contact between symbionts is a crucial phase in determining their compatibility, allowing the formation of the ectomycorrhiza. A subtractive cDNA library representing the differentially expressed genes of the fungus Hydnangium sp. in the pre-symbiotic phase was constructed using fungal mycelia obtained through the in vitro mycorrhization technique. The fungus was cultured in the presence of Eucalyptus grandis roots, but with no contact between the hyphae and the root system of the host plant. Genes that code for proteins related to carbohydrate, amino acid, and energy metabolisms, transcription, and protein synthesis, cellular communication, signal transduction, stress response, transposons, and proteins related to the biogenesis of cell components were identified among the 131 expressed sequence tags. Expression of the genes that code for acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, a voltage-dependent protein from the selective ion channel, and hydrophobin was evaluated by the RT-qPCR technique, confirming the activation of these genes in this phase of the association.

  15. Mast fruiting and seedling survival of the ectomycorrhizal, monodominant Dicymbe corymbosa (Caesalpiniaceae) in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Terry W; Mayor, Jordan R; Woolley, Lance P

    2005-08-01

    In Guyana, we investigated seed output, and resulting seedling establishment and survival, during a 'mast' year, by the ectomycorrhizal, monodominant rainforest canopy tree Dicymbe corymbosa (Caesalpiniaceae), a species with high, synchronous seed production at intermittent years. By utilizing seed traps, the mast seed output, predation, carbon and mineral investment, and masting synchrony were quantified in 2003 in primary D. corymbosa forests. Establishment of seedling cohorts was monitored, and climatic conditions associated with masting were assessed. During 2003, D. corymbosa in the Pakaraima Mountains exhibited high, synchronous seed production with low dispersal and predation. Investment in reproductive biomass was large relative to that in other tropical forests. Recent D. corymbosa reproductive events followed El Nino-induced droughts, with little intervening seed production. Over 12 months, 40% of the 2003 seedling cohort survived. Our results suggest that D. corymbosa has a strongly bimodal fruiting pattern that allows the establishment of a large seedling bank, facilitating persistent monodominance. Resource investment in large seed crops may depend on mineral recycling via ectomycorrhizas, coupled with the reallocation of carbon from vegetative maintenance.

  16. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in three types of plantations in southern subtropical area of China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Xia; Shi, Zuo-Min; Luo, Da; Liu, Shi-Rong; Lu, Li-Hua

    2013-07-01

    By using fumigation-extraction method and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, this paper studied the characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in the Erythrophleum fordii, Castanopsis hystrix, and Pinus massoniana plantations in south subtropical China. The soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, bacterial PLFAs, and fungal PLFAs in the plantations were significantly affected by the plantation type and season, and the soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, and individual PLFA signatures were higher in dry season than in rainy season. The C. hystrix plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass carbon and total PLFAs, while the E. fordii plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass nitrogen. There was a significant positive correlation between the soil pH and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) PLFA (16:1omega5c). The soil total PLFAs, gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, saprophytic fungal PLFA (18:2omega6,9c), and the ratio of gram-positive to gram-negative bacterial PLFAs were significantly positively correlated with soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus, suggesting that the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus contents were the most important nutrient factors affecting the numbers and types of the soil microorganisms. In addition, the ectomycorrhizae fungal PLFA (18:1omega9c) and AMF PLFA were significantly correlated with the soil C/N ratio.

  17. Ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Alnus acuminata from Calilegua National Park (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Alejandra; Zak, Marcelo R; Horton, Thomas R; Micolini, Jorge

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine patterns of ectomycorrhizas (ECM) and arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) colonization associated with Alnus acuminata (Andean alder), in relation to soil parameters (electrical conductivity, field H(2)O holding capacity, pH, available P, organic matter, and total N) at two different seasons (autumn and spring). The study was conducted in natural forests of A. acuminata situated in Calilegua National Park (Jujuy, Argentina). Nine ECM morphotypes were found on A. acuminata roots. The ECM colonization was affected by seasonality and associated positively with field H(2)O holding capacity, pH, and total N and negatively associated with organic matter. Two morphotypes (Russula alnijorullensis and Tomentella sp. 3) showed significant differences between seasons. Positive and negative correlations were found between five morphotypes (Alnirhiza silkacea, Lactarius omphaliformis, Tomentella sp. 1, Tomentella sp. 3, and Lactarius sp.) and soil parameters (total N, pH, and P). A significant negative correlation was found between field H(2)O holding capacity and organic matter with AM colonization. Results of this study provide evidence that ECM and AM colonization of A. acuminata can be affected by some soil chemical edaphic parameters and indicate that some ECM morphotypes are sensitive to changes in seasonality and soil parameters.

  18. Two differentially regulated phosphate transporters from the symbiotic fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum and phosphorus acquisition by ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Tatry, Marie-Violaine; El Kassis, Elie; Lambilliotte, Raphaël; Corratgé, Claire; van Aarle, Ingrid; Amenc, Laurie K; Alary, Rémi; Zimmermann, Sabine; Sentenac, Hervé; Plassard, Claude

    2009-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis markedly improves plant phosphate uptake, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this benefit are still poorly understood. We identified two ESTs in a cDNA library prepared from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum with significant similarities to phosphate transporters from the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus versiforme and from non-mycorrhizal fungi. The full-length cDNAs corresponding to these two ESTs complemented a yeast phosphate transport mutant (Deltapho84). Measurements of (33)P-phosphate influx into yeast expressing either cDNA demonstrated that the encoded proteins, named HcPT1 and HcPT2, were able to mediate Pi:H(+) symport with different affinities for Pi (K(m) values of 55 and 4 mum, respectively). Real-time RT-PCR showed that Pi starvation increased the levels of HcPT1 transcripts in H. cylindrosporum hyphae grown in pure culture. Transcript levels of HcPT2 were less dependent on Pi availability. The two transporters were expressed in H. cylindrosporum associated with its natural host plant, Pinus pinaster, grown under low or high P conditions. The presence of ectomycorrhizae increased net Pi uptake rates into intact Pinus pinaster roots at low or high soil P levels. The expression patterns of HcPT1 and HcPT2 indicate that the two fungal phosphate transporters may be involved in uptake of phosphate from the soil solution under the two soil P availability conditions used.

  19. Characterization of juvenile maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) ectomycorrhizal fungal community using morphotyping, direct sequencing and fruitbodies sampling.

    PubMed

    Pestaña Nieto, Montserrat; Santolamazza Carbone, Serena

    2009-02-01

    Using ectomycorrhizal root tip morphotyping (anatomical and morphological identification), molecular analysis (internal transcribed spacer region amplification and sequencing), and fruitbody sampling, we assessed diversity and composition of the ectomycorrhizal fungal community colonizing juvenile Pinus pinaster Ait. under natural conditions in NW Spain. Overall, we found 15 Basidiomycetes and two Ascomycetes. Members of the family Thelephoraceae represented up to 59.4% of the samples. The most frequent species was Tomentella sublilacina followed by Thelephora terrestris, Russula drimeia, Suillus bovinus, and Paxillus involutus, while the less frequent were Pseudotomentella tristis, Lactarius subdulcis, Russula ochroleuca, and Entoloma conferendum. From October 2007 to June 2008, we sampled 208 sporocarps belonging to seven genera and nine species: Thelephora terrestris, Paxillus involutus, Suillus bovinus, Xerocomus badius, Scleroderma verrucosum, Amanita gemmata, A. rubescens, Amanita sp., and Russula sp. The species belonging to the genus Amanita, X. badius and S. verrucosum were not found on root samples. By comparing our results with a bibliographic review of papers published from 1922 to 2006, we found five genera and six species which have not been previously reported in symbiosis with P. pinaster. This is the first time that the diversity of the ectomycorrhizal fungal community associated with P. pinaster was investigated using molecular techniques. Considering that only 38% of the genera found by sequencing were found as fruitbodies, we conclude that integrating morphotyping and sporocarps surveys with molecular analysis of ectomycorrhizas is important to documenting the ectomycorrhizal fungus community.

  20. Conservative ecological and evolutionary patterns in liverwort–fungal symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Bidartondo, Martin I.; Duckett, Jeffrey G.

    2010-01-01

    Liverworts, the most ancient group of land plants, form a range of intimate associations with fungi that may be analogous to the mycorrhizas of vascular plants. Most thalloid liverworts contain arbuscular mycorrhizal glomeromycete fungi similar to most vascular plants. In contrast, a range of leafy liverwort genera and one simple thalloid liverwort family (the Aneuraceae) have switched to basidiomycete fungi. These liverwort switches away from glomeromycete fungi may be expected to parallel switches undergone by vascular plants that target diverse lineages of basidiomycete fungi to form ectomycorrhizas. To test this hypothesis, we used a cultivation-independent approach to examine the basidiomycete fungi associated with liverworts in varied worldwide locations by generating fungal DNA sequence data from over 200 field collections of over 30 species. Here we show that eight leafy liverwort genera predominantly and consistently associate with members of the Sebacina vermifera species complex and that Aneuraceae thalloid liverworts associate nearly exclusively with Tulasnella species. Furthermore, within sites where multiple liverwort species co-occur, they almost never share the same fungi. Our analyses reveal a strikingly conservative ecological and evolutionary pattern of liverwort symbioses with basidiomycete fungi that is unlike that of vascular plant mycorrhizas. PMID:19812075

  1. Mycorrhizal Associations and Trophic Modes in Coexisting Orchids: An Ecological Continuum between Auto- and Mixotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Brys, Rein; Lallemand, Félix; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Robionek, Alicja; Selosse, Marc-André

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct nutritional syndromes have been described in temperate green orchids. Most orchids form mycorrhizas with rhizoctonia fungi and are considered autotrophic. Some orchids, however, associate with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with surrounding trees and derive their carbon from these fungi. This evolutionarily derived condition has been called mixotrophy or partial mycoheterotrophy and is characterized by 13C enrichment and high N content. Although it has been suggested that the two major nutritional syndromes are clearly distinct and tightly linked to the composition of mycorrhizal communities, recent studies have challenged this assumption. Here, we investigated whether mycorrhizal communities and nutritional syndromes differed between seven green orchid species that co-occur under similar ecological conditions (coastal dune slacks). Our results showed that mycorrhizal communities differed significantly between orchid species. Rhizoctonia fungi dominated in Dactylorhiza sp., Herminium monorchis, and Epipactis palustris, which were autotrophic based on 13C and N content. Conversely, Liparis loeselii and Epipactis neerlandica associated primarily with ectomycorrhizal fungi but surprisingly, 13C and N content supported mixotrophy only in E. neerlandica. This, together with the finding of some ectomycorrhizal fungi in rhizoctonia-associated orchids, suggests that there exists an ecological continuum between the two syndromes. The presence of a large number of indicator species associating with individual orchid species further confirms previous findings that mycorrhizal fungi may be important factors driving niche-partitioning in terrestrial orchids and therefore contribute to orchid coexistence. PMID:28912791

  2. Mycorrhizal detection of native and non-native truffles in a historic arboretum and the discovery of a new North American species, Tuber arnoldianum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Healy, Rosanne A; Zurier, Hannah; Bonito, Gregory; Smith, Matthew E; Pfister, Donald H

    2016-10-01

    During a study comparing the ectomycorrhizal root communities in a native forest with those at the Arnold Arboretum in Massachusetts (USA), the European species Tuber borchii was detected on the roots of a native red oak in the arboretum over two successive years. Since T. borchii is an economically important edible truffle native to Europe, we conducted a search of other roots in the arboretum to determine the extent of colonization. We also wanted to determine whether other non-native Tuber species had been inadvertently introduced into this 140-year-old Arboretum because many trees were imported into the site with intact soil and roots prior to the 1921 USDA ban on these horticultural practices in the USA. While T. borchii was not found on other trees, seven other native and exotic Tuber species were detected. Among the North American Tuber species detected from ectomycorrhizae, we also collected ascomata of a previously unknown species described here as Tuber arnoldianum. This new species was found colonizing both native and non-native tree roots. Other ectomycorrhizal taxa that were detected included basidiomycetes in the genera Amanita, Russula, Tomentella, and ascomycetes belonging to Pachyphlodes, Helvella, Genea, and Trichophaea. We clarify the phylogenetic relationships of each of the Tuber species detected in this study, and we discuss their distribution on both native and non-native host trees.

  3. Post-fire, seasonal and annual dynamics of the ectomycorrhizal community in a Quercus ilex L. forest over a 3-year period.

    PubMed

    de Román, Miriam; de Miguel, Ana María

    2005-09-01

    Two study plots, burned and control, were established in autumn 1998 in a Quercus ilex forest located in northern Spain, part of which had been affected by a low intensity fire in 1994. Soil samples for ectomycorrhizae (ECM) were taken over a 3-year period in each study plot in spring, summer, autumn and winter. ECM morphotypes were identified and the relative abundance of each morphotype in each soil sample calculated, along with species richness, Shannon diversity index and percentage of mycorrhization in each soil sample. The relative abundance of certain ECM morphotypes differed between burned and control plots, and the percentage of mycorrhizal tips was significantly lower in the burned than in the control plot. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences in the diversity, species richness or species composition of the ECM community in the burned and control plots. The dominant ECM morphotypes in both stands were Cenococcum geophilum and several thelephoroid fungi. Sphaerosporella brunnea and Pisolithus tinctorius thrived especially in the burned plot, whereas three ectomycorrhizal morphotypes assigned to the genus Hebeloma were especially abundant in the control plot. There was no significant variation in the relative abundance of the ECM morphotypes between seasons, but ECM community species richness was highest in autumn and lowest in summer. The percentage of mycorrhizal tips reached a maximum in winter, with its minimum in autumn. Collection of samples over the 3-year period also enabled us to detect a significant increase in percentage of ECM colonisation in the burned stand over time.

  4. Potassium nutrition of ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster: overexpression of the Hebeloma cylindrosporum HcTrk1 transporter affects the translocation of both K(+) and phosphorus in the host plant.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kevin; Delteil, Amandine; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Becquer, Adeline; Plassard, Claude; Sentenac, Hervé; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Mycorrhizal associations are known to improve the hydro-mineral nutrition of their host plants. However, the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis for plant potassium nutrition has so far been poorly studied. We therefore investigated the impact of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum on the potassium nutrition of Pinus pinaster and examined the involvement of the fungal potassium transporter HcTrk1. HcTrk1 transcripts and proteins were localized in ectomycorrhizas using in situ hybridization and EGFP translational fusion constructs. Importantly, an overexpression strategy was performed on a H. cylindrosporum endogenous gene in order to dissect the role of this transporter. The potassium nutrition of mycorrhizal pine plants was significantly improved under potassium-limiting conditions. Fungal strains overexpressing HcTrk1 reduced the translocation of potassium and phosphorus from the roots to the shoots of inoculated plants in mycorrhizal experiments. Furthermore, expression of HcTrk1 and the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 were reciprocally linked to the external inorganic phosphate and potassium availability. The development of these approaches provides a deeper insight into the role of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis on host plant K(+) nutrition and in particular, the K(+) transporter HcTrk1. The work augments our knowledge of the link between potassium and phosphorus nutrition via the mycorrhizal pathway.

  5. Mastering ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: the impact of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhiza formation is the consequence of a mutualistic interaction between certain soil fungi and plant roots that helps to overcome nutritional limitations faced by the respective partners. In symbiosis, fungi contribute to tree nutrition by means of mineral weathering and mobilization of nutrients from organic matter, and obtain plant-derived carbohydrates as a response. Support with easily degradable carbohydrates seems to be the driving force for fungi to undergo this type of interaction. As a consequence, the fungal hexose uptake capacity is strongly increased in Hartig net hyphae of the model fungi Amanita muscaria and Laccaria bicolor. Next to fast carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, storage carbohydrates are of special interest. In functional A. muscaria ectomycorrhizas, expression and activity of proteins involved in trehalose biosynthesis is mainly localized in hyphae of the Hartig net, indicating an important function of trehalose in generation of a strong carbon sink by fungal hyphae. In symbiosis, fungal partners receive up to approximately 19 times more carbohydrates from their hosts than normal leakage of the root system would cause, resulting in a strong carbohydrate demand of infected roots and, as a consequence, a more efficient plant photosynthesis. To avoid fungal parasitism, the plant seems to have developed mechanisms to control carbohydrate drain towards the fungal partner and link it to the fungus-derived mineral nutrition. In this contribution, current knowledge on fungal strategies to obtain carbohydrates from its host and plant strategies to enable, but also to control and restrict (under certain conditions), carbon transfer are summarized.

  6. Ectomycorrhizal ecology is imprinted in the genome of the dominant symbiotic fungus Cenococcum geophilum

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Martina; Kohler, Annegret; Ohm, Robin A.; Kuo, Alan; Krützmann, Jennifer; Morin, Emmanuelle; Arend, Matthias; Barry, Kerrie W.; Binder, Manfred; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Grisel, Nadine; Haridas, Sajeet; Kipfer, Tabea; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Maire, Renaud; Meier, Barbara; Mihaltcheva, Sirma; Molinier, Virginie; Murat, Claude; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Quandt, C. Alisha; Sperisen, Christoph; Tritt, Andrew; Tisserant, Emilie; Crous, Pedro W.; Henrissat, Bernard; Nehls, Uwe; Egli, Simon; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Martin, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently encountered symbiont on tree roots is the ascomycete Cenococcum geophilum, the only mycorrhizal species within the largest fungal class Dothideomycetes, a class known for devastating plant pathogens. Here we show that the symbiotic genomic idiosyncrasies of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes are also present in C. geophilum with symbiosis-induced, taxon-specific genes of unknown function and reduced numbers of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. C. geophilum still holds a significant set of genes in categories known to be involved in pathogenesis and shows an increased genome size due to transposable elements proliferation. Transcript profiling revealed a striking upregulation of membrane transporters, including aquaporin water channels and sugar transporters, and mycorrhiza-induced small secreted proteins (MiSSPs) in ectomycorrhiza compared with free-living mycelium. The frequency with which this symbiont is found on tree roots and its possible role in water and nutrient transport in symbiosis calls for further studies on mechanisms of host and environmental adaptation. PMID:27601008

  7. Effects of warming on ectomycorrhizal colonization and nitrogen nutrition of Picea asperata seedlings grown in two contrasting forest ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuejiao; Sun, Didi; Li, Dandan; Xu, Zhenfeng; Zhao, Chunzhang; Lin, Honghui; Liu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (ECM) plays an important role in plant nitrogen (N) nutrition and regulates plant responded to climate warming. We conducted a field experiment in a natural forest and a plantation in the eastern Tibetan Plateau to estimate the warming effects of open-top chambers (OTC) on ECM and N nutrition of Picea asperata seedlings. Four-year warming significantly decreased ECM colonization, ECM fungal biomass, fine root vigor, and the N concentration of leaf, stem and coarse root, but significantly increased fine root N concentration and N content of leaf, stem, fine root and whole plant in natural forest. Contrarily, warming induced no obvious change in most of these parameters in plantation. Moreover, warming decreased rhizospheric soil inorganic N content in both forests. Our results showed that four-year warming was not beneficial for ECM colonization of P. asperata seedlings in the two forests, and the seedlings in natural forest were more sensitive and flexible to experimental warming than in plantation. The changes of ECM colonization and fine root biomass for effective N uptake would be good for plant growth and remit N leaching under future warming in natural forest. PMID:26655633

  8. Performance of ectomycorrhizal alders exposed to specific Canadian oil sands tailing stressors under in vivo bipartite symbiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Nadeau, Martin; Gagné, André; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Fortin, J André; Roy, Sébastien; Greer, Charles W; Khasa, Damase P

    2016-07-01

    Canadian oil sands tailings are predominately sodic residues contaminated by hydrocarbons such as naphthenic acids. These conditions are harsh for plant development. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inoculating roots of Alnus viridis ssp. crispa and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa with ectomycorrhizal fungi in the presence of tailings compounds. Seedlings were inoculated with 7 different strains of Paxillus involutus and Alpova diplophloeus and were grown under different treatments of NaCl, Na2SO4, and naphthenic acids in a growth chamber. Afterwards, seedling survival, height, dry biomass, leaf necrosis, and root mycorrhization rate were measured. Paxillus involutus Mai was the most successful strain in enhancing alder survival, health, and growth. Seedlings inoculated with this strain displayed a 25% increase in survival rate, 2-fold greater biomass, and 2-fold less leaf necrosis compared with controls. Contrary to our expectations, A. diplophloeus was not as effective as P. involutus in improving seedling fitness, likely because it did not form ectomycorrhizae on roots of either alder species. High intraspecific variation characterized strains of P. involutus in their ability to stimulate alder height and growth and to minimize leaf necrosis. We conclude that in vivo selection under bipartite symbiotic conditions is essential to select effective strains that will be of use for the revegetation and reclamation of derelict lands.

  9. Pseudotsuga menziesii invasion in native forests of Patagonia, Argentina: What about mycorrhizas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado Salomón, María Eugenia; Barroetaveña, Carolina; Rajchenberg, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Pseudotsuga menziesii is one of the most widely planted conifers in the Patagonian Andes of Argentina, with invading characteristics that are widely reported. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of its obligate mycorrhizal associations in limiting or fostering the establishment of invading seedlings. We studied the richness and abundance of endo- (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (EM) present in P. menziesii seedlings growing in six Nothofagus forests invaded by P. menziesii seedlings (Nothofagus + P. menziesii) matrices. One transect along the maximum effective recruitment distance (ERA) was established at each site in order to wrench seedlings and sample soils. P. menziesii showed effective associations with a wide range of mycorrhizal symbionts: AM (ranging between 13.21 and 37.11%), EM (ranging between 79.91 and 89.14%) and Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE). Seedlings' mycorrhization percentages were always high, suggesting a good nursery effect provided by neighboring plantations. Mycorrhizal abundance (AM% and EM%), EM morphotypes richness and evenness showed significant differences between sites, indicating that P. menziesii displays a high plasticity being capable to select the more convenient mycorrhizal arrangement at each invaded site.

  10. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands: Final report, September 1, 1976 to December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1976, the five scientists in the Institute for Mycorrhizal Research and Development (IMRD) have outplanted and maintained over 80,000 experimental tree seedlings in 27 different field experiments. Information resulting from this research has immediate value in the management of forest stands and soils at the Savannah River Forest Station. Important points include dried municipal sewage sludge at a broadcast rate of 1/2 to 1 inch disked into subsoiled borrow pits will support growth of loblolly pine (container- and bare-root nursery-grown), sweetgum, yellow poplar, green ash, sycamore, sawtooth oak, and black walnut that is 3 to 5 times greater after 4 to 12 years than fertilizer plus lime treatments; sweetgum, an economically important eastern hardwood, can be artificially regenerated successfully by selection of proper seed source and by manipulation of certain nursery procedures, such as available phosphorus levels and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of feeder roots needed to produce quality seedlings; the number of first order lateral roots on sweetgum, oak, walnut, loblolly pine, and longleaf pine appear to be under strong genetic control; and the quality and quantity of ectomycorrhizae on container-grown or bare-root seedlings of loblolly and longleaf pines have a highly significant effect on their field performance. 17 refs.

  11. Studies on the ectomycorrhizal community in a declining Quercus suber L. stand.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Enrico; Franceschini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    This survey was carried out in a Quercus suber L. stand with many trees affected by the disease "oak decline". Its aim was to obtain information about both the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal community in a declining Q. suber stand as a whole, and the ectomycorrhizal fungal community of individual tree (EFT) detected in healthy and diseased plants. To this end, we first categorized the trees into four different decline classes (one for healthy plants and three for diseased plants) and then, by using morphological and molecular tools, we identified the ectomycorrhizas isolated from samples collected near the trees with different declining classes. The ectomycorrhizal community as a whole was seen to be composed of numerous ectomycorrhizal fungal species, only some of which appeared to be dominant (Cenococcum geophilum, Lactarius chrysorrheus, and some species of Tomentella genus), while most occurred sporadically. Results show that all root tips observed are mycorrhized and that decline class does not influence the number of ectomycorrhizal root tips found in the EFTs, thus oak decline does not impact the investment in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. However, some statistical differences can be observed in the values of evenness and taxonomic distinctness in the EFT associated with trees with different states of health. Finally, both the analysis of similarity test and the ordination technique highlight a compositional difference between the EFT associated with trees in different health conditions, but also suggest that other factors may play a role in causing these differences.

  12. Effects of mycorrhizas and pH on nitrogen and potassium fluxes in Pacific Northwest coniferous roots

    SciTech Connect

    Rygiewicz, P.T.

    1983-01-01

    This dissertation research studied mechanisms by which mycorrhizal tree roots take up ammonium and nitrate over a range of solution pH. Using mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal Douglas-fir, Sitka spruce and western hemlock seedlings, fluxes of N, H/sup +/, OH/sup -/, K/sup +/ and Ca/sup + +/ were measured. As pH increased, ammonium uptake rates increased and mycorrhizas significantly increased uptake for all three tree species. Surprisingly, nitrate uptake rates also increased with increasing pH, although not as dramatically as for ammonium. Even though mycorrhizas increased nitrate uptake rates, the effect was observed only to a small extent for Douglas-fir. Ammonium rates were substantially greater than nitrate rates for all coniferous seedlings. Calcium fluxes increased with increasing pH and ranged from efflux at low pH to uptake at high pH. Potassium was consistently released and these dynamic fluxes were the largest measured. Bicarbonate was also released during ammonium uptake and in significantly greater amounts by mycorrhizal roots. Total cation fluxes were much faster than anion fluxes and may have resulted in increased organic acid synthesis. This relative importance of cation flux was particularly significant for these coniferous seedlings, because cation fluxes were tenfold greater than comparable fluxes reported for agricultural species. In conclusion, this research suggests that ectomycorrhizas can significantly improve nutrient acquisition and have particular importance for nitrogen, the major nutrient limitation in Pacific Northwest forests.

  13. Scale-dependent variation in nitrogen cycling and soil fungal communities along gradients of forest composition and age in regenerating tropical dry forests.

    PubMed

    Waring, Bonnie G; Adams, Rachel; Branco, Sara; Powers, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Rates of ecosystem nitrogen (N) cycling may be mediated by the presence of ectomycorrhizal fungi, which compete directly with free-living microbes for N. In the regenerating tropical dry forests of Central America, the distribution of ectomycorrhizal trees is affected by succession and soil parent material, both of which may exert independent influence over soil N fluxes. In order to quantify these interacting controls, we used a scale-explicit sampling strategy to examine soil N cycling at scales ranging from the microsite to ecosystem level. We measured fungal community composition, total and inorganic N pools, gross proteolytic rate, net N mineralization and microbial extracellular enzyme activity at multiple locations within 18 permanent plots that span dramatic gradients of soil N concentration, stand age and forest composition. The ratio of inorganic to organic N cycling was correlated with variation in fungal community structure, consistent with a strong influence of ectomycorrhiza on ecosystem-scale N cycling. However, on average, > 61% of the variation in soil biogeochemistry occurred within plots, and the effects of forest composition were mediated by this local-scale heterogeneity in total soil N concentrations. These cross-scale interactions demonstrate the importance of a spatially explicit approach towards an understanding of controls on element cycling. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Is nitrogen transfer among plants enhanced by contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies?

    PubMed

    Teste, François P; Veneklaas, Erik J; Dixon, Kingsley W; Lambers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) transfer among plants has been found where at least one plant can fix N2 . In nutrient-poor soils, where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies (without N2 fixation) co-occur, it is unclear if N transfer exists and what promotes it. A novel multi-species microcosm pot experiment was conducted to quantify N transfer between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM), ectomycorrhizal (EM), dual AM/EM, and non-mycorrhizal cluster-rooted plants in nutrient-poor soils with mycorrhizal mesh barriers. We foliar-fed plants with a K(15) NO3 solution to quantify one-way N transfer from 'donor' to 'receiver' plants. We also quantified mycorrhizal colonization and root intermingling. Transfer of N between plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies occurred at both low and high soil nutrient levels with or without root intermingling. The magnitude of N transfer was relatively high (representing 4% of donor plant N) given the lack of N2 fixation. Receiver plants forming ectomycorrhizas or cluster roots were more enriched compared with AM-only plants. We demonstrate N transfer between plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, and a preferential enrichment of cluster-rooted and EM plants compared with AM plants. Nutrient exchanges among plants are potentially important in promoting plant coexistence in nutrient-poor soils.

  15. Ectomycorrhizal Inocybe species associate with the mycoheterotrophic orchid Epipogium aphyllum but not its asexual propagules

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Melanie; Yagame, Takahiro; Yamato, Masahide; Iwase, Koji; Heinz, Christine; Faccio, Antonella; Bonfante, Paola; Selosse, Marc-Andre

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Epipogium aphyllum is a Eurasian achlorophyllous, mycoheterotrophic forest orchid. Due to its rarity, it is often protected, and its biology is poorly known. The identity and pattern of colonization of fungal associates providing carbon to this orchid have not been studied previously. Methods Using samples from 34 individuals from 18 populations in Japan, Russia and France, the following were investigated: (a) colonization patterns of fungal associates of E. aphyllum by microscopy; (b) their identity by PCR amplification of nuclear ribosomal ITS carried out on rhizome fragments and hyphal pelotons. Results and Conclusions Microscopic investigations revealed that thick rhizomes were densely colonized by fungi bearing clamp-connections and dolipores, i.e. basidiomycetes. Molecular analysis identified Inocybe species as exclusive symbionts of 75 % of the plants investigated and, more rarely, other basidiomycetes (Hebeloma, Xerocomus, Lactarius, Thelephora species). Additionally, ascomycetes, probably endophytes or parasites, were sometimes present. Although E. aphyllum associates with diverse species from Inocybe subgenera Mallocybe and Inocybe sensu stricto, no evidence for cryptic speciation in E. aphyllum was found. Since basidiomycetes colonizing the orchid are ectomycorrhizal, surrounding trees are probably the ultimate carbon source. Accordingly, in one population, ectomycorrhizae sampled around an individual orchid revealed the same fungus on 11·2 % of tree roots investigated. Conversely, long, thin stolons bearing bulbils indicated active asexual multiplication, but these propagules were not colonized by fungi. These findings are discussed in the framework of ecology and evolution of mycoheterotrophy. PMID:19155220

  16. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Karen M.; Janos, David P.; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations. PMID:25750650

  17. Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae).

    PubMed

    Kühdorf, Katja; Münzenberger, B; Begerow, D; Gómez-Laurito, J; Hüttl, R F

    2015-02-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where this plant species grows together with Quercus costaricensis. We provide here the first evidence of mycorrhizal status for the Ascomycete Leotia cf. lubrica (Helotiales) that was so far under discussion as saprophyte or mycorrhizal. This fungus formed arbutoid mycorrhiza with C. arbutoides. The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically. Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses. Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

  18. Inhibitory potential of naphthoquinones leached from leaves and exuded from roots of the invasive plant Impatiens glandulifera.

    PubMed

    Ruckli, Regina; Hesse, Katharina; Glauser, Gaetan; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter; Baur, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    Exploring the effects of allelopathic plant chemicals on the growth of native vegetation is essential to understand their ecological roles and importance in exotic plant invasion. Naphthoquinones have been identified as potential growth inhibitors produced by Impatiens glandulifera, an exotic annual plant that recently invaded temperate forests in Europe. However, naphthoquinone release and inhibitory potential have not been examined. We quantified the naphthoquinone content in cotyledons, leaves, stems, and roots from plants of different ages of both the invasive I. glandulifera and native Impatiens noli-tangere as well as in soil extracts and rainwater rinsed from leaves of either plant species by using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). We identified the compound 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-MNQ) exclusively in plant organs of I. glandulifera, in resin bags buried into the soil of patches invaded by I. glandulifera, and in rainwater rinsed from its leaves. This indicates that 2-MNQ is released from the roots of I. glandulifera and leached from its leaves by rain. Specific bioassays using aqueous shoot and root extracts revealed a strong inhibitory effect on the germination of two native forest herbs and on the mycelium growth of three ectomycorrhiza fungi. These findings suggest that the release of 2-MNQ may contribute to the invasion success of I. glandulifera and support the novel weapons hypothesis.

  19. Degradation of Root Community Traits as Indicator for Transformation of Tropical Lowland Rain Forests into Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations

    PubMed Central

    Edy, Nur; Meyer, Marike; Corre, Marife D.; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of tropical forests into intensely managed plantations is a threat to ecosystem functions. On Sumatra, Indonesia, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantations are rapidly expanding, displacing rain forests and extensively used rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) agro-forests. Here, we tested the influence of land use systems on root traits including chemical traits (carbon, nitrogen, mineral nutrients, potentially toxic elements [aluminium, iron] and performance traits (root mass, vitality, mycorrhizal colonization). Traits were measured as root community-weighed traits (RCWTs) in lowland rain forests, in rubber agro-forests mixed with rain forest trees, in rubber and oil palm plantations in two landscapes (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan, Sumatra). We hypothesized that RCWTs vary with land use system indicating increasing transformation intensity and loss of ecosystem functions. The main factors found to be related to increasing transformation intensity were declining root vitality and root sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, manganese concentrations and increasing root aluminium and iron concentrations as well as increasing spore densities of arbuscular mycorrhizas. Mycorrhizal abundance was high for arbuscular and low for ectomycorrhizas and unrelated to changes in RCWTs. The decline in RCWTs showed significant correlations with soil nitrogen, soil pH and litter carbon. Thus, our study uncovered a relationship between deteriorating root community traits and loss of ecosystem functionality and showed that increasing transformation intensity resulted in decreasing root nutrition and health. Based on these results we suggest that land management that improves root vitality may enhance the ecological functions of intense tropical production systems. PMID:26366576

  20. The importance of associations with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi among fully mycoheterotrophic orchids is currently under-estimated: novel evidence from sub-tropical Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chih-Kai; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Most fully mycoheterotrophic (MH) orchids investigated to date are mycorrhizal with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. Only a few MH orchids are currently known to be mycorrhizal with saprotrophic, mostly wood-decomposing, fungi instead of ectomycorrhizal fungi. This study provides evidence that the importance of associations between MH orchids and saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi is currently under-estimated. Methods Using microscopic techniques and molecular approaches, mycorrhizal fungi were localized and identified for seven MH orchid species from four genera and two subfamilies, Vanilloideae and Epidendroideae, growing in four humid and warm sub-tropical forests in Taiwan. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope natural abundances of MH orchids and autotrophic reference plants were used in order to elucidate the nutritional resources utilized by the orchids. Key Results Six out of the seven MH orchid species were mycorrhizal with either wood- or litter-decaying saprotrophic fungi. Only one orchid species was associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Stable isotope abundance patterns showed significant distinctions between orchids mycorrhizal with the three groups of fungal hosts. Conclusions Mycoheterotrophic orchids utilizing saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi as a carbon and nutrient source are clearly more frequent than hitherto assumed. On the basis of this kind of nutrition, orchids can thrive in deeply shaded, light-limiting forest understoreys even without support from ectomycorrhizal fungi. Sub-tropical East Asia appears to be a hotspot for orchids mycorrhizal with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi. PMID:26113634

  1. Sporocarps of Pisolithus albus as an ecological niche for fluorescent pseudomonads involved in Acacia mangium Wild - Pisolithus albus ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Duponnois, Robin; Lesueur, Didier

    2004-09-01

    Fresh sporocarps and root and soil samples were collected under a monospecific forest plantation of Acacia mangium in Dagana in Northern Senegal and checked for the presence of fluorescent pseudomonads. No bacteria were detected except from sporocarps collected with adhering soil and hyphal strands. Pisolithus sporocarps were dried at 30 degrees C for 2 weeks, ground, passed through a 2-mm sieve and mixed together. This dry sporocarp powder (DSP) was used to inoculate and form mycorrhizas on A. mangium seedlings in a glasshouse experiment. After 3 months culture, plant growth was increased in the DSP treatment but no ectomycorrhizas were present on the A. mangium root systems; however fluorescent pseudomonads were recorded in the cultural soil. The stimulatory effects on the plant growth were maintained for 6 months. However, fluorescent pseudomonads were no longer detected and 35% of the short roots were ectomycorrhizal. Some of the fluorescent pseudomonad isolates detected after 3 months stimulated the radial fungal growth in axenic conditions. These observations suggest that these bacteria are closely associated with the Pisolithus fructifications and could interact with the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis establishment.

  2. Belowground carbon trade among tall forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf; Koerner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Just imagine one tree could hand over large quantities of carbon to another tree. How would that change our thinking about carbon relations of forests, the single biggest biological C reservoir on earth? If such a tree-to-tree C shuttle would exist, it required a demand-supply gradient and a pipeline. Here we show that exactly this unthinkable does occur in overlapping root spheres of tall trees in a mixed temperate forest. Using canopy scale stable carbon isotope labelling applied from a construction crane, we demonstrate that carbon assimilated by spruce is traded over to neighbouring beech, larch, and pine in amounts so large that fine roots almost equilibrate the carbon source signature. The isotope mixing ratio indicated that the interspecific transfer accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon, which is ca. 280 kg ha-1 a-1. This is the first forest scale evidence of a large flux of carbon among mature trees from evolutionary distant taxa. Carbon transfer most likely occurred through common ectomycorrhiza networks, which also exhibited the labelled carbon signal. These observations indicate that while competition for resources (e.g. light, water, nutrients) is often considered the dominant tree-tree interaction in a forest, trees actually interact in more complex pathways including a massive carbon exchange.

  3. In situ and in vitro colonization of Cathaya argyrophylla (Pinaceae) by ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Xing, Shu-Tang; Xie, Zong-Qiang; Lun, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Xue; Li, Yu Hua

    2006-03-01

    Cathaya argyrophylla, a critically endangered conifer, is found to grow at four isolated areas located in subtropical mountains of China. To examine the involvement and usefulness of mycorrhizas for sustaining the population of this tree, we compared the root system, morphology, and structure of mycorrhizal roots of C. argyrophylla, which were collected from a natural stand and an artificial stand, each grown at a different location. More mycorrhizal roots were found for trees from an artificial stand. The presence of extramatrical mycelium, mantle, and Hartig net revealed that C. argyrophylla formed an ectomycorrhizal association in both sampling sites. Starch granules were found in mycorrhizal roots collected only from a natural stand. The aseptic synthesis of C. argyrophylla and Cenococcum geophilum was established for the first time in vitro. Typical ectomycorrhizas formed on seedlings on RM medium containing 0.1 g/l glucose, 5 weeks after inoculation. By light microscopy, the synthesized mycorrhizas showed a thin mantle from which emanated extramatrical hyphae and highly branched Hartig net. A simple, rapid, and convenient mycorrhiza synthesis system was developed, which facilitates further studies on ectomycorrhizal development of C. argyrophylla.

  4. In vitro ectomycorrhizal specificity between the Asian red pine Pinus densiflora and Tricholoma matsutake and allied species from worldwide Pinaceae and Fagaceae forests.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akiyoshi; Kobayashi, Hisayasu; Murata, Hitoshi; Kalmiş, Erbil; Kalyoncu, Fatih; Fukuda, Masaki

    2010-06-01

    Tricholoma matsutake produces commercially valuable, yet uncultivable, mushrooms (matsutake) in association with pines in the Far East and Scandinavia and with both pines and oaks in the foothills of Tibet. Other matsutake mushrooms, such as Tricholoma anatolicum from the Mediterranean regions and Tricholoma magnivelare and Tricholoma sp. from the North Pacific Coast area of Canada and North America as well as Mexico, respectively, are associated with pines or oaks in their natural habitats. Tricholoma bakamatsutake and Tricholoma fulvocastaneum from Asia produce moderately valuable matsutake mushrooms and are solely associated with Fagaceae in nature. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that matsutake mushrooms from Scandinavia, Mediterranean regions, North America, and Tibet form ectomycorrhizae with Pinus densiflora similar to the Far East T. matsutake. In general, worldwide T. matsutake and the symbionts of Pinaceae colonize the rhizospheres of P. densiflora as well as T. matsutake isolated from the host plant. However, T. fulvocastaneum and T. bakamatsutake formed a discontinuous Hartig net and no Hartig net, respectively, and colonized to a lesser extent as compared to T. matsutake. The data suggest that conifer-associated matsutake mushrooms in their native habitat will associate symbiotically with the Asian red pine.

  5. Ectomycorrhizal fungal community structure of pinyon pines growing in two environmental extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, C.A.; Theimer, T.C.; Whitham, T.G.; Keim, P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors used molecular techniques to examine the ectomycorrhizal fungal community associated with pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) growing in two soil types in a semiarid region of northern Arizona. Pinyon performance (e.g., growth, reproduction, water stress) has been shown to be markedly lower in cinder than in sandy-loam environments. Fungal community composition and richness were determined using RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis of ectomycorrhizal root tips collected from three sites within each soil type. Several patterns emerged from these analyses. First, communities in both cinder and sandy-loam soils were dominated by one or a few abundant ectomytcorrhizal types, a species abundance pattern common to many plant and animal communities. Second, unlike the pattern for many other organisms, ectomycorrhizal fungal type richness was not correlated with measures of ecosystem productivity such as soil nutrient and moisture levels; cinder and sandy-loam soils had similar numbers of ectomycorrhizal fungal types. Third, soil type and fungal community composition were linked, as cluster analysis demonstrated greater similarity of fungal communities from sites within soil types than between them. Fourth, a preliminary survey of 14--45 ectomycorrhizal root tips from each of 20 trees at one cinder site indicated that trees were dominated by one or a few ectomycorrhizal RFLP types. Fifth, the RFLP patterns of some fungal sporocarps matched those of ectomycorrhizal root tips, but many did not, indicating that many of the ectomycorrhizal fungi at these sites fruit infrequently, whereas other fungi with more abundant sporocarps may not form ectomycorrhiza.

  6. Year-round monitoring of diversity and potential metabolic activity of the ectomycorrhizal community in a beech (Fagus silvatica) forest subjected to two thinning regimes.

    PubMed

    Buée, Marc; Vairelles, Dominique; Garbaye, Jean

    2005-06-01

    This work was aimed at understanding how the functional diversity of ectomycorrhizas (ECM) is driven by environmental factors and how it adapts to the structure of the forest stand. Superficial fine roots were sampled 21 times during an entire year in two adjacent plots (no thinning and strong thinning) of a mature beech (Fagus silvatica) forest. Individual ectomycorrhizal root tips were morphologically characterised and the symbiotic fungi were molecularly identified. ECM were also tested for dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase activities, and soil moisture and temperature were recorded. The results provide a description of ECM community dynamics over a whole year in the two stands. The main conclusions are threefold: (1) the species structure of the ECM community and metabolic activity of each morphotype change depending on the season, temperature and soil moisture, and a number of morphotypes are more abundant and active in winter than in summer, (2) the silviculture treatment (strong thinning) modifies the ectomycorrhizal community structure, and (3) the overall function of the ECM community results from the individual time pattern and specialisation of each morphotype.

  7. An ectomycorrhizal nitrogen economy facilitates monodominance in a neotropical forest.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Adriana; Mangan, Scott A; Turner, Benjamin L; Dalling, James W

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are renowned for their high diversity, yet in many sites a single tree species accounts for the majority of the individuals in a stand. An explanation for these monodominant forests remains elusive, but may be linked to mycorrhizal symbioses. We tested three hypotheses by which ectomycorrhizas might facilitate the dominance of the tree, Oreomunnea mexicana, in montane tropical forest in Panama. We tested whether access to ectomycorrhizal networks improved growth and survival of seedlings, evaluated whether ectomycorrhizal fungi promote seedling growth via positive plant-soil feedback, and measured whether Oreomunnea reduced inorganic nitrogen availability. We found no evidence that Oreomunnea benefits from ectomycorrhizal networks or plant-soil feedback. However, we found three-fold higher soil nitrate and ammonium concentrations outside than inside Oreomunnea-dominated forest and a correlation between soil nitrate and Oreomunnea abundance in plots. Ectomycorrhizal effects on nitrogen cycling might therefore provide an explanation for the monodominance of ectomycorrhizal tree species worldwide. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  8. Soil analysis reveals the presence of an extended mycelial network in a Tuber magnatum truffle-ground.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Elisa; Murat, Claude; Cagnasso, Matteo; Bonfante, Paola; Mello, Antonietta

    2010-01-01

    Truffles are hypogeous ectomycorrhizal fungi. They belong to the genus Tuber and are currently considered a hot spot in fungal biology due to their ecological and economic relevance. Among all the species, Tuber magnatum is the most appreciated because of its special taste and aroma. The aim of this work was to set up a protocol to detect T. magnatum in soil and to assess its distribution in a natural truffle-ground. We used the beta-tubulin gene as a marker to identify T. magnatum in the soil. This gene allowed us to trace the distribution of the fungus over the entire truffle-ground. Tuber magnatum was found, in one case, 100 m from the productive host plant. This study highlights that T. magnatum mycelium is more widespread than can be inferred from the distribution of truffles and ectomycorrhizas. Interestingly, a new haplotype - never described from fruiting body material - was identified. The specific detection of T. magnatum in the soil will allow to unravel the ecology of this fungus, following its mycelial network. Moreover, this new tool may have practical importance in projects aimed to increase large-scale truffle production, checking for T. magnatum persistence in plantations.

  9. Degradation of Root Community Traits as Indicator for Transformation of Tropical Lowland Rain Forests into Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations.

    PubMed

    Sahner, Josephine; Budi, Sri Wilarso; Barus, Henry; Edy, Nur; Meyer, Marike; Corre, Marife D; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of tropical forests into intensely managed plantations is a threat to ecosystem functions. On Sumatra, Indonesia, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantations are rapidly expanding, displacing rain forests and extensively used rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) agro-forests. Here, we tested the influence of land use systems on root traits including chemical traits (carbon, nitrogen, mineral nutrients, potentially toxic elements [aluminium, iron] and performance traits (root mass, vitality, mycorrhizal colonization). Traits were measured as root community-weighed traits (RCWTs) in lowland rain forests, in rubber agro-forests mixed with rain forest trees, in rubber and oil palm plantations in two landscapes (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan, Sumatra). We hypothesized that RCWTs vary with land use system indicating increasing transformation intensity and loss of ecosystem functions. The main factors found to be related to increasing transformation intensity were declining root vitality and root sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, manganese concentrations and increasing root aluminium and iron concentrations as well as increasing spore densities of arbuscular mycorrhizas. Mycorrhizal abundance was high for arbuscular and low for ectomycorrhizas and unrelated to changes in RCWTs. The decline in RCWTs showed significant correlations with soil nitrogen, soil pH and litter carbon. Thus, our study uncovered a relationship between deteriorating root community traits and loss of ecosystem functionality and showed that increasing transformation intensity resulted in decreasing root nutrition and health. Based on these results we suggest that land management that improves root vitality may enhance the ecological functions of intense tropical production systems.

  10. Modulation of ethanol stress tolerance by aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma vaccinum.

    PubMed

    Asiimwe, Theodore; Krause, Katrin; Schlunk, Ines; Kothe, Erika

    2012-08-01

    We report the first mycorrhizal fungal aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, ald1, which was isolated from the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum. The gene, encoding a protein Ald1 of 502 amino acids, is up-regulated in ectomycorrhiza. Phylogenetic analyses using 53 specific fungal aldehyde dehydrogenases from all major phyla in the kingdom of fungi including Ald1 and two partial sequences of T. vaccinum were performed to get an insight in the evolution of the aldehyde dehydrogenase family. By using competitive and real-time RT-PCR, ald1 is up-regulated in response to alcohol and aldehyde-related stress. Furthermore, heterologous expression of ald1 in Escherichia coli and subsequent in vitro enzyme activity assay demonstrated the oxidation of propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde with different kinetics using either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as cofactors. In addition, overexpression of ald1 in T. vaccinum after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation increased ethanol stress tolerance. These results demonstrate the ability of Ald1 to circumvent ethanol stress, a critical function in mycorrhizal habitats.

  11. ASSOCIATED BACTERIA INCREASE THE PHYTOEXTRACTION OF CADMIUM AND ZINC FROM A METAL-CONTAMINATED SOIL BY MYCORRHIZAL WILLOWS.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Dana; Baum, Christel; Leinweber, Peter; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Meissner, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    In order to enhance phytoremediation efficiency, we investigated the effects of dual inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi and the ectomycorrhiza associated bacteria Micrococcus luteus and Sphingomonas sp. on the growth and metal accumulation of willows (Salix viminalis x caprea) on contaminated soil. The bacterial strains were previously collected from sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The bacteria increased plant growth and the mycorrhizal dependency of willows colonized with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma crustuliniforme. The total cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation in the shoot biomass was increased after inoculation with the fungal strain Hebeloma crustuliniforme in combination with Micrococcus luteus up to 53% and in combination with Sphingomonas sp. up to 62%, respectively. The dual inoculation in combination with Laccaria laccata did not increase the accumulation of Cd and Zn in the willows. We conclude that associated bacteria can enhance the ectomyorrhiza formation and growth of willows and, thereby, the Cd and Zn accumulation in the plant biomass. The results suggest that bacterial support of root growth promoting ectomycorrhizal fungi may be a promising approach to improve the remediation of metal-contaminated soils by using willows.

  12. Aquaporins in poplar: what a difference a symbiont makes!

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Zaklina; Uehlein, Norbert; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Weiss, Michael; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    The formation of ectomycorrhizas, a tight association between fine roots of trees and certain soil fungi, improves plant nutrition in a nutrient-limited environment and may increase plant survival under water stress conditions. To investigate the impact of mycorrhiza formation on plant water uptake, seven genes coding for putative water channel proteins (aquaporins) were isolated from a poplar ectomycorrhizal cDNA library. Four out of the seven genes were preferentially expressed in roots. Mycorrhiza formation resulted in an increased transcript level for three of these genes, two of which are the most prominently expressed aquaporins in roots. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the corresponding proteins of both genes were able to transport water. Together, these data indicate, that the water transport capacity of the plasma membrane of root cells is strongly increased in mycorrhized plants. Measurements of the hydraulic conductance of intact root systems revealed an increased water transport capacity of mycorrhized poplar roots. These data, however, also indicate that changes in the properties of the plasma membrane as well as those of the apoplast are responsible for the increased root hydraulic conductance in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

  13. Giving and receiving: measuring the carbon cost of mycorrhizas in the green orchid, Goodyera repens.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duncan D; Johnson, Irene; Read, David J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2008-01-01

    Direct measurement of the carbon (C) 'cost' of mycorrhizas is problematic. Although estimates have been made for arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal symbioses, these are based on incomplete budgets or indirect measurements. Furthermore, the conventional model of unidirectional plant-to-fungus C flux is too simplistic. Net fungus-to-plant C transfer supports seedling establishment in c. 10% of plant species, including most orchids, and bidirectional C flows occur in ectomycorrhiza utilizing soil amino acids. Here, the C cost of mycorrhizas to the green orchid Goodyera repens was determined by measurement of simultaneous bidirectional fluxes of 14C labelled sources using a monoxenic system with the fungus Ceratobasidium cornigerum. Transfer of C from fungus to plant ('up-flow') occurs in the photosynthesizing orchid G. repens (max. 0.06 microg) whereas over five times more current assimilate (min. 0.355 microg) is simultaneously allocated in the reverse direction to the mycorrhizal fungus ('down-flow') after 8 d. Carbon is transferred rapidly, being detected in plant-fungal respiration within 31 h of labelling. This study provides the most complete C budget for an orchid-mycorrhizal symbiosis, and clearly shows net plant-to-fungus C flux. The rapidity of bidirectional C flux is indicative of dynamic transfer at an interfacial apoplast as opposed to reliance on digestion of fungal pelotons.

  14. Phylogenetic distribution and evolution of mycorrhizas in land plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Qiu, Y-L

    2006-07-01

    A survey of 659 papers mostly published since 1987 was conducted to compile a checklist of mycorrhizal occurrence among 3,617 species (263 families) of land plants. A plant phylogeny was then used to map the mycorrhizal information to examine evolutionary patterns. Several findings from this survey enhance our understanding of the roles of mycorrhizas in the origin and subsequent diversification of land plants. First, 80 and 92% of surveyed land plant species and families are mycorrhizal. Second, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is the predominant and ancestral type of mycorrhiza in land plants. Its occurrence in a vast majority of land plants and early-diverging lineages of liverworts suggests that the origin of AM probably coincided with the origin of land plants. Third, ectomycorrhiza (ECM) and its derived types independently evolved from AM many times through parallel evolution. Coevolution between plant and fungal partners in ECM and its derived types has probably contributed to diversification of both plant hosts and fungal symbionts. Fourth, mycoheterotrophy and loss of the mycorrhizal condition also evolved many times independently in land plants through parallel evolution.

  15. Mycorrhizas and soil ecosystem function of co-existing woody vegetation islands at the alpine tree line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Otgonsuren, Burenjargal; Godbold, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Rhododendron ferrugineum co-exist at the alpine tree line, and can have different mycorrhizal communities. The activity and diversity of mycorrhizal fungi are considered to be important factors in regulation of soil function. At a tree line site and a lower elevation site in the Austrian Alps, the community structure of ectomycorrhiza on Picea abies and Pinus mugo was determined. The activity of surface enzymes was determined on ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal roots. In soils, the activity of a range of enzymes, nitrogen (N) mineralization and biomass decomposition were determined. The community structure of the ectomycorrhizal community of Picea abies and Pinus mugo differed strongly, but the average activity of surface enzymes of the ectomycorrhizal communities was similar. A lower root surface enzyme activity was determined on Rhododendron ferrugineum. Soil N-mineralization under Rhododendron ferrugineum was significantly lower than under Picea abies and Pinus mugo. In soil, the activity of a range of enzymes did not differ at the tree line but differed between the tree line and the lower elevation sites. The different ectomycorrhizal communities on Picea abies and Pinus mugo and ericoid mycorrhizas on Rhododendron ferrugineum support similar ecosystem functions in soil.

  16. Morphological characterization of the mycorrhiza formed by Helianthemum almeriense Pau with Terfezia claveryi Chatin and Picoa lefebvrei (Pat.) Maire.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, A; Morte, A; Honrubia, M

    2003-12-01

    This work presents the first anatomical description of the mycorrhizal systems of Helianthemum almeriense, and of the structure and ultrastructure of the mycorrhizae formed by this plant species with the ascomycetes Terfezia claveryi and Picoa lefebvrei. Four different mycorrhizal systems are described, the club-shaped mycorrhiza being the most abundant. The type of mycorrhiza formed depended on the mycorrhiza culture conditions, but not on the fungal species. For both fungal species, H. almeriense formed an endomycorrhiza in natural field conditions, an ecto- and ectendomycorrhiza without a sheath in pot cultures, and an ectomycorrhiza with a characteristic sheath and Hartig net in in vitro cultures. This is the first report of a typical sheath in Helianthemum-desert truffle mycorrhizal associations. The results support the idea that culture conditions can induce changes in mycorrhiza morphology and that there is no clear barrier between the two main types of mycorrhiza organization in Helianthemum species. The ultrastructural study confirmed the regular presence of T. claveryi intracellular hyphae in direct contact with the host wall, a localization which seems to be a characteristic of the T. claveryi mycorrhiza organization. The P. lefebvrei mycorrhiza organization was characterized by intracellular hyphae with large amounts of electron-dense globules, probably with a lipidic content, and a warty ornamentation on the wall of the root external hyphae.

  17. Mycorrhiza of the host-specific Lactarius deterrimus on the roots of Picea abies and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi.

    PubMed

    Mühlmann, O; Göbl, F

    2006-06-01

    The ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete species Lactarius deterrimus Gröger is considered to be a strictly host-specific mycobiont of Picea abies (L.) Karst. However, we identified arbutoid mycorrhiza formed by this fungus on the roots of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng. in a mixed stand at the alpine timberline; typical ectomycorrhiza of P. abies were found in close relation. A. uva-ursi is known as an extremely unspecific phytobiont. The mycorrhizae of both associations are described and compared morphologically. The mycorrhiza formed by L. deterrimus on both A. uva-ursi and P. abies show typical ectomycorrhizal features such as a hyphal mantle and a Hartig net. The main difference between the mycorrhizal symbioses with the different phytobionts is the occurrence of intracellular hyphae in the epidermal cells of A. uva-ursi. This emphasizes the importance of the plant partner for mycorrhizal anatomy. This is the first report of a previously considered host-specific ectomycorrhizal fungus in association with A. uva-ursi under natural conditions. The advantages of this loose specificity between the fungus and plant species is discussed.

  18. Rapid nitrogen transfer from ectomycorrhizal pines to adjacent ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants in a California oak woodland.

    PubMed

    He, Xinhua; Bledsoe, Caroline S; Zasoski, Robert J; Southworth, Darlene; Horwath, William R

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen transfer among plants in a California oak woodland was examined in a pulse-labeling study using 15N. The study was designed to examine N movement among plants that were mycorrhizal with ectomycorrhizas (EM), arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), or both. Isotopically enriched N (K15NO3-) was applied to gray pine (Pinus sabiniana) foliage (donor) and traced to neighboring gray pine, blue oak (Quercus douglasii), buckbrush (Ceanothus cuneatus) and herbaceous annuals (Cynosurus echinatus, Torilis arvensis and Trifolium hirtum). After 2 wk, needles of 15N-treated pines and foliage from nearby annuals were similarly enriched, but little 15N had appeared in nontreated (receiver) pine needles, oak leaves or buckbrush foliage. After 4 wk foliar and root samples from pine, oak, buckbrush and annuals were significantly 15N-enriched, regardless of the type of mycorrhizal association. The rate of transfer during the first and second 2-wk periods was similar, and suggests that 15N could continue to be mobilized over longer times.

  19. Ectomycorrhizal characterization of an American chestnut (Castanea dentata)-dominated community in Western Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jonathan M; Lindner, Daniel L; Volk, Thomas J

    2008-12-01

    Circa 1900, a farmer from the eastern US planted 11 American chestnut (Castanea dentata) seeds on a newly established farm near West Salem in western Wisconsin. These trees were very successful, producing a large stand of over 6,000 trees. Since this area is well outside the natural range of chestnut, these trees remained free from chestnut blight until 1987. In the West Salem stand, chestnuts are the dominant species of a mixed forest community, reminiscent of the chestnut-oak ecosystems of pre-1900 Appalachia. To identify putative mycorrhizal associates of chestnut in this unique forest, our approach was twofold: (1) an extensive fruiting body survey was conducted for four seasons that yielded approximately 100 putative mycorrhizal species and (2) a belowground molecular approach was used to generate DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region from ectomycorrhizae. Unexpectedly, chestnut did not appear to be the dominant underground ectomycorrhizal-forming plant species. This study highlights the need to identify the plant host species when conducting belowground molecular-based surveys and provides preliminary identification of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with a disjunct stand of American chestnut.

  20. Two Lactarius species associated with a relict Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana population in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Montoya, L; Haug, I; Bandala, V M

    2010-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fleshy fungi are being monitored in a population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana persisting in a montane cloud forest refuge on a volcano in a subtropical region of central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). The population of Fagus studied represents one of the 10 recognized forest fragments still housing this tree genus in Mexico. This is the first attempt to document EM fungi associated with this tree species in Mexico. We present evidence of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis for Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus with this endemic tree. Species identification of Lactarius on Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana was based on the comparison of DNAsequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). The occurrence of Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus populations in the area of study represent the southernmost record known to date of these two species in North America and are new for the Neotropical Lactarius mycota. Descriptions coupled with illustrations of macro- and micromorphological features of basidiomes as well as photographs of ectomycorrhizas are presented.

  1. Auxofuran, a novel metabolite that stimulates the growth of fly agaric, is produced by the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505.

    PubMed

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D; Tarkka, Mika T; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-05-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 microM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 microM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce.

  2. Mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces AcH 505 induces differential gene expression in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Silvia D; Schellhammer, Michael; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger; Tarkka, Mika T

    2005-10-01

    The interaction between the mycorrhiza helper bacteria Streptomyces nov. sp. 505 (AcH 505) and Streptomyces annulatus 1003 (AcH 1003) with fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and spruce (Picea abies) was investigated. The effects of both bacteria on the mycelial growth of different ectomycorrhizal fungi, on ectomycorrhiza formation, and on fungal gene expression in dual culture with AcH 505 were determined. The fungus specificities of the streptomycetes were similar. Both bacterial species showed the strongest effect on the growth of mycelia at 9 wk of dual culture. The effect of AcH 505 on gene expression of A. muscaria was examined using the suppressive subtractive hybridization approach. The responsive fungal genes included those involved in signalling pathways, metabolism, cell structure, and the cell growth response. These results suggest that AcH 505 and AcH 1003 enhance mycorrhiza formation mainly as a result of promotion of fungal growth, leading to changes in fungal gene expression. Differential A. muscaria transcript accumulation in dual culture may result from a direct response to bacterial substances.

  3. Spatio-Temporal Dynamic of Tuber magnatum Mycelium in Natural Truffle Grounds

    PubMed Central

    Iotti, Mirco; Leonardi, Marco; Lancellotti, Enrico; Salerni, Elena; Oddis, Marilena; Leonardi, Pamela; Perini, Claudia; Pacioni, Giovanni; Zambonelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A “real-time” PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. magnatum truffle grounds located in different Italian regions. During the fruiting seasons, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher around the fruiting points and decreased going farther away from them. Moreover, T. magnatum mycelium inside the productive patches underwent seasonal fluctuations. In early spring, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher than in summer. In summer, probably due to the hot and dry season, T. magnatum mycelium significantly decreased, whereas in autumn it increased again and was concentrated at the putative fruiting points. These results give new insights on T. magnatum ecology and are useful to plan the most appropriate sampling strategy for evaluating the management of a truffle ground. PMID:25535741

  4. Five years investigation of female and male genotypes in périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) revealed contrasted reproduction strategies.

    PubMed

    De la Varga, Herminia; Le Tacon, François; Lagoguet, Mélanie; Todesco, Flora; Varga, Torda; Miquel, Igor; Barry-Etienne, Dominique; Robin, Christophe; Halkett, Fabien; Martin, Francis; Murat, Claude

    2017-07-01

    The Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) is a heterothallic ascomycete that establishes ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with trees and shrubs. Small-scale genetic structures of female genotypes in truffle orchards are known, but it has not yet been studied in male genotypes. In this study, our aim was to characterize the small-scale genetic structure of both male and female genotypes over five years in an orchard to better understand the T. melanosporum sexual reproduction strategy, male genotype dynamics, and origins. Two-hundred forty-one ascocarps, 475 ectomycorrhizas, and 20 soil cores were harvested and genotyped using microsatellites and mating type genes. Isolation by distance analysis revealed pronounced small-scale genetic structures for both female and male genotypes. The genotypic diversity was higher for male than female genotypes with numerous small size genotypes suggesting an important turnover due to ascospore recruitment. Larger and perennial female and male genotypes were also detected. Only three genotypes (1.5%) were found as both female and male genotypes (hermaphrodites) while most were detected only as female or male genotype (dioecy). Our results suggest that germinating ascospores act as male genotypes, but we also proposed that soil mycelium could be a reservoir of male genotypes. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Environmental drivers of ectomycorrhizal communities in Europe's temperate oak forests.

    PubMed

    Suz, Laura M; Barsoum, Nadia; Benham, Sue; Dietrich, Hans-Peter; Fetzer, Karl Dieter; Fischer, Richard; García, Paloma; Gehrman, Joachim; Kristöfel, Ferdinand; Manninger, Miklós; Neagu, Stefan; Nicolas, Manuel; Oldenburger, Jan; Raspe, Stephan; Sánchez, Gerardo; Schröck, Hans Werner; Schubert, Alfred; Verheyen, Kris; Verstraeten, Arne; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2014-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are major ecological players in temperate forests, but they are rarely used in measures of forest condition because large-scale, high-resolution, standardized and replicated belowground data are scarce. We carried out an analysis of ectomycorrhizas at 22 intensively monitored long-term oak plots, across nine European countries, covering complex natural and anthropogenic environmental gradients. We found that at large scales, mycorrhizal richness and evenness declined with decreasing soil pH and root density, and with increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Shifts in mycorrhizas with different functional traits were detected; mycorrhizas with structures specialized for long-distance transport related differently to most environmental variables than those without. The dominant oak-specialist Lactarius quietus, with limited soil exploration abilities, responds positively to increasing nitrogen inputs and decreasing pH. In contrast, Tricholoma, Cortinarius and Piloderma species, with medium-distance soil exploration abilities, show a consistently negative response. We also determined nitrogen critical loads for moderate (9.5-13.5 kg N/ha/year) and drastic (17 kg N/ha/year) changes in belowground mycorrhizal root communities in temperate oak forests. Overall, we generated the first baseline data for ectomycorrhizal fungi in the oak forests sampled, identified nitrogen pollution as one of their major drivers at large scales and revealed fungi that individually and/or in combination with others can be used as belowground indicators of environmental characteristics.

  6. Understanding spatial heterogeneity in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling in regenerating tropical dry forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, B. G.; Powers, J. S.; Branco, S.; Adams, R.; Schilling, E.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) currently store significant amounts of carbon in their biomass and soils, but these highly seasonal ecosystems may be uniquely sensitive to altered climates. The ability to quantitatively predict C cycling in TDFs under global change is constrained by tremendous spatial heterogeneity in soil parent material, land-use history, and plant community composition. To explore this variation, we examined soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in 18 permanent plots spanning orthogonal gradients of stand age and soil fertility. Soil C and N pools, microbial biomass, and microbial extracellular enzyme activities were most variable at small (m2) spatial scales. However, the ratio of organic vs. inorganic N cycling was consistently higher in forest stands dominated by slow-growing, evergreen trees that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Similarly, although bulk litter stocks and turnover rates varied greatly among plots, litter decomposition tended to be slower in ectomycorrhizae-dominated stands. Soil N cycling tended to be more conservative in older plots, although the relationship between stand age and element cycling was weak. Our results emphasize that microscale processes, particularly interactions between mycorrhizal fungi and free-living decomposers, are important controls on ecosystem-scale element cycling.

  7. Specialized cheating of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis by an epiparasitic liverwort.

    PubMed Central

    Bidartondo, Martin I; Bruns, Thomas D; Weiss, Michael; Sérgio, Cecília; Read, David J

    2003-01-01

    Many non-photosynthetic vascular plants in 10 diverse families obtain all of their carbon from fungi, but in most cases the fungi and the ultimate sources of carbon are unknown. In a few cases, such plants have been shown to be epiparasitic because they obtain carbon from neighbouring green plants through shared mycorrhizal fungi. In all such cases, the epiparasitic plants have been found to specialize upon narrow lineages of ecto- or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Here we show that a non-vascular plant, the non-photosynthetic liverwort Cryptothallus mirabilis, is epiparasitic and is specialized on Tulasnella species that form ectomycorrhizae with surrounding trees at four locations in England, France and Portugal. By using microcosm experiments we show that the interaction with Tulasnella is necessary for growth of Cryptothallus, and by using labelling experiments we show that (14)CO(2) provided to birch seedlings is transferred to Cryptothallus by Tulasnella. This is one of the first documented cases of epiparasitism by a non-vascular plant and of ectomycorrhizal formation by Tulasnella. These results broaden the emerging association between epiparasitism and mycorrhizal specialization into a new class of plants and a new order of fungi. PMID:12737662

  8. Do Sebacinales commonly associate with plant roots as endophytes?

    PubMed

    Selosse, Marc-André; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Alvarez, Nadir

    2009-10-01

    Sebacinales are basal Hymenomycetes with diverse mycorrhizal abilities, ranging from ectomycorrhizae to ericoid and orchid mycorrhizae. Several previous PCR or isolation works raised the possibility that Sebacinales are endophytes in plant roots. We tested this hypothesis in an isolation-independent approach by using specific PCR primers for ribosomal DNA of Sebacinales on AM mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal roots. Thirty-nine plant species were sampled on a Caribbean and two European sites (3 repetition per species and site), covering 25 families in monocots and eudicots. PCR signals were obtained from 40 samples (28.9%) from 27 species (69.2%) and all sites. Whenever sequencing was successful, a sequence belonging to Sebacinales was recovered. A phylogenetic approach revealed that 13 of them belonged to clade B (encompassing ericoid and orchid mycorrhizal species) and 4 to clade A (usually encompassing only ectomycorrhizal species). These data suggest that Sebacinales may be endophytic in many angiosperm roots, and that this condition is plesiomorphic in Sebacinales. They bridge the gap between physiological studies, inoculating Sebacinales (Piriformospora indica or Sebacina vermifera) on diverse plants and molecular ecology, hitherto restricting Sebacinales to mycorrhizal interactions. Structural and functional aspects of the interaction deserve further studies.

  9. Implication of evolution and diversity in arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Buscot, François

    2015-01-01

    Being highly sensitive to ecological variations, symbiotic associations should inherently have a limited occurrence in nature. To circumvent this sensitivity and reach their universal distribution, symbioses used three strategies during their evolution, which all generated high biodiversity levels: (i) specialization to a specific environment, (ii) protection of one partner via its internalization into the other, (iii) frequent partner exchange. Mycorrhizal associations follow the 3rd strategy, but also present traits of internalization. As most ancient type, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formed by a monophyletic fungal group with reduced species richness did constantly support the mineral nutrition of terrestrial plants and enabled their ecological radiation and actual biodiversity level. In contrast ectomycorrhiza (EM) evolved later and independently within different taxa of fungi able to degrade complex organic plant residues, and the diversity levels of EM fungal and tree partners are balanced. Despite their different origins and diversity levels, AM and EM fungi display similar patterns of diversity dynamics in ecosystems. At each time or succession interval, a few dominant and many rare fungi are recruited by plants roots from a wide reservoir of propagules. However, the dominant fungal partners are frequently replaced in relation to changes in the vegetation or ecological conditions. While the initial establishment of AM and EM fungal communities corresponds to a neutral recruitment, their further succession is rather driven by niche differentiation dynamics.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of toxic metal mineral transformations by fungi.

    PubMed

    Fomina, Marina; Charnock, John; Bowen, Andrew D; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2007-02-01

    Fungi can be highly efficient biogeochemical agents and accumulators of soluble and particulate forms of metals. This work aims to understand some of the physico-chemical mechanisms involved in toxic metal transformations focusing on the speciation of metals accumulated by fungi and mycorrhizal associations. The amorphous state or poor crystallinity of metal complexes within biomass and relatively low metal concentrations make the determination of metal speciation in biological systems a challenging problem but this can be overcome by using synchrotron-based element-specific X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. In this research, we have exposed fungi and ectomycorrhizas to a variety of copper-, zinc- and lead-containing minerals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies revealed that oxygen ligands (phosphate, carboxylate) played a major role in toxic metal coordination within the fungal and ectomycorrhizal biomass during the accumulation of mobilized toxic metals. Coordination of toxic metals within biomass depended on the fungal species, initial mineral composition, the nitrogen source, and the physiological state/age of the fungal mycelium.

  11. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure of the black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) investigated with neutral microsatellites and functional mating type genes.

    PubMed

    Murat, Claude; Rubini, Andrea; Riccioni, Claudia; De la Varga, Herminia; Akroume, Emila; Belfiori, Beatrice; Guaragno, Marco; Le Tacon, François; Robin, Christophe; Halkett, Fabien; Martin, Francis; Paolocci, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    The genetic structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal populations results from both vegetative and sexual propagation. In this study, we have analysed the spatial genetic structure of Tuber melanosporum populations, a heterothallic ascomycete that produces edible fruit bodies. Ectomycorrhizas from oaks and hazels from two orchards were mapped and genotyped using simple sequence repeat markers and the mating type locus. The distribution of the two T. melanosporum mating types was also monitored in the soil. In one orchard, the genetic profiles of the ascocarps were compared with those of the underlying mycorrhizas. A pronounced spatial genetic structure was found. The maximum genet sizes were 2.35 and 4.70 m in the two orchards, with most manifesting a size < 1 m. Few genets persisted throughout two seasons. A nonrandom distribution pattern of the T. melanosporum was observed, resulting in field patches colonized by genets that shared the same mating types. Our findings suggest that competition occurs between genets and provide basic information on T. melanosporum propagation patterns that are relevant for the management of productive truffle orchards.

  12. Spatio-temporal dynamic of Tuber magnatum mycelium in natural truffle grounds.

    PubMed

    Iotti, Mirco; Leonardi, Marco; Lancellotti, Enrico; Salerni, Elena; Oddis, Marilena; Leonardi, Pamela; Perini, Claudia; Pacioni, Giovanni; Zambonelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A "real-time" PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. magnatum truffle grounds located in different Italian regions. During the fruiting seasons, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher around the fruiting points and decreased going farther away from them. Moreover, T. magnatum mycelium inside the productive patches underwent seasonal fluctuations. In early spring, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher than in summer. In summer, probably due to the hot and dry season, T. magnatum mycelium significantly decreased, whereas in autumn it increased again and was concentrated at the putative fruiting points. These results give new insights on T. magnatum ecology and are useful to plan the most appropriate sampling strategy for evaluating the management of a truffle ground.

  13. Comparison of ectomycorrhizal communities in natural and cultivated Tuber melanosporum truffle grounds.

    PubMed

    Belfiori, Beatrice; Riccioni, Claudia; Tempesta, Sabrina; Pasqualetti, Marcella; Paolocci, Francesco; Rubini, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Truffles are hypogeous ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi belonging to the genus Tuber. Although outplanting of truffle-inoculated host plants has enabled the realization of productive orchards, truffle cultivation is not yet standardized. Therefore, monitoring the distribution of fungal species in different truffle fields may help us to elucidate the factors that shape microbial communities and influence the propagation and fruiting of Tuber spp. In this study, we compared the fungal biodiversity in cultivated and natural Tuber melanosporum truffle fields located in Central Italy. To this end, ectomycorrhizas (ECM) and soil samples were molecularly analyzed, and an inventory of the fungi associated with Quercus pubescens plants colonized by T. melanosporum, Tuber aestivum or Tuber brumale was compiled. T. melanosporum and T. aestivum were dominant on the cultivated plants, and the number of EM species was markedly lower in the cultivated sites than in the natural sites. However, in the same site, EM biodiversity was higher in T. brumale-colonized plants than in T. melanosporum-colonized plants. These results suggest that different Tuber spp. may have different competitive effects on the other mycobionts. Additionally, in keeping with our previous findings, we found that the number of T. melanosporum genotypes recovered from the soil samples was higher than that of the underlying ECM.

  14. Soil physical properties influence "black truffle" fructification in plantations.

    PubMed

    Alonso Ponce, Rafael; Ágreda, Teresa; Águeda, Beatriz; Aldea, Jorge; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Modrego, María Pilar

    2014-04-01

    Although the important effects of pH and carbonate content of soils on "black truffle" (Tuber melanosporum) production are well known, we poorly understand the influence of soil physical properties. This study focuses on physical soil characteristics that drive successful production of black truffles in plantations. Seventy-eight Quercus ilex ssp. ballota plantations older than 10 years were studied in the province of Teruel (eastern Spain). Soil samples were analyzed for various edaphic characteristics and to locate T. melanosporum ectomycorrhizae. The influence of cultivation practices, climatic features, and soil properties on sporocarp production was assessed using multivariate analyses. Low contents of fine earth and silt and high levels of bulk density, clay content, and water-holding capacity appear to promote fructification. Watering is also highly positive for truffle fructification. We develop and discuss a logistic model to predict the probability of truffle fructification in field sites under consideration for truffle plantation establishment. The balance between water availability and aeration plays a crucial role in achieving success in black truffle plantations.

  15. Sugar transporters in the black truffle Tuber melanosporum: from gene prediction to functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Ceccaroli, Paola; Saltarelli, Roberta; Polidori, Emanuela; Barbieri, Elena; Guescini, Michele; Ciacci, Caterina; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2015-08-01

    In a natural forest ecosystem, ectomycorrhiza formation is a way for soil fungi to obtain carbohydrates from their host plants. However, our knowledge of sugar transporters in ectomycorrhizal ascomycetous fungi is limited. To bridge this gap we used data obtained from the sequenced genome of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber melanosporum Vittad. to search for sugar transporters. Twenty-three potential hexose transporters were found, and three of them (Tmelhxt1, Tmel2281 and Tmel131), differentially expressed during the fungus life cycle, were investigated. The heterologous expression of Tmelhxt1 and Tmel2281 in an hxt-null Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain restores the growth in glucose and fructose. The functional characterization and expression profiles of Tmelhxt1 and Tmel2281 in the symbiotic phase suggest that they are high affinity hexose transporters at the plant-fungus interface. On the contrary, Tmel131 is preferentially expressed in the fruiting body and its inability to restore the S. cerevisiae mutant strain growth led us to hypothesize that it could be involved in the transport of alternative carbon sources important for a hypothetical saprophytic strategy for the complete maturation of the carpophore.

  16. Multi-host ectomycorrhizal fungi are predominant in a Guinean tropical rainforest and shared between canopy trees and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Diédhiou, Abdala Gamby; Selosse, Marc-André; Galiana, Antoine; Diabaté, Moussa; Dreyfus, Bernard; Bâ, Amadou Moustapha; De Faria, Sergio Miana; Béna, Gilles

    2010-08-01

    The diversity of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi on adult trees and seedlings of five species, Anthonotha fragrans, Anthonotha macrophylla, Cryptosepalum tetraphyllum, Paramacrolobium coeruleum and Uapaca esculenta, was determined in a tropical rain forest of Guinea. Ectomycorrhizae were sampled within a surface area of 1600 m(2), and fungal taxa were identified by sequencing the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Thirty-nine ECM fungal taxa were determined, of which 19 multi-hosts, 9 single-hosts and 11 singletons. The multi-host fungi represented 92% (89% when including the singletons in the analysis) of the total abundance. Except for A. fragrans, the adults of the host species displayed significant differentiation for their fungal communities, but their seedlings harboured a similar fungal community. These findings suggest that there was a potential for the formation of common mycorrhizal networks in close vicinity. However, no significant difference was detected for the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values between seedlings and adults of each ECM plant, and no ECM species exhibited signatures of mixotrophy. Our results revealed (i) variation in ECM fungal diversity according to the seedling versus adult development stage of trees and (ii) low host specificity of ECM fungi, and indicated that multi-host fungi are more abundant than single-host fungi in this forest stand. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Effects of warming on ectomycorrhizal colonization and nitrogen nutrition of Picea asperata seedlings grown in two contrasting forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuejiao; Sun, Didi; Li, Dandan; Xu, Zhenfeng; Zhao, Chunzhang; Lin, Honghui; Liu, Qing

    2015-12-10

    Ectomycorrhiza (ECM) plays an important role in plant nitrogen (N) nutrition and regulates plant responded to climate warming. We conducted a field experiment in a natural forest and a plantation in the eastern Tibetan Plateau to estimate the warming effects of open-top chambers (OTC) on ECM and N nutrition of Picea asperata seedlings. Four-year warming significantly decreased ECM colonization, ECM fungal biomass, fine root vigor, and the N concentration of leaf, stem and coarse root, but significantly increased fine root N concentration and N content of leaf, stem, fine root and whole plant in natural forest. Contrarily, warming induced no obvious change in most of these parameters in plantation. Moreover, warming decreased rhizospheric soil inorganic N content in both forests. Our results showed that four-year warming was not beneficial for ECM colonization of P. asperata seedlings in the two forests, and the seedlings in natural forest were more sensitive and flexible to experimental warming than in plantation. The changes of ECM colonization and fine root biomass for effective N uptake would be good for plant growth and remit N leaching under future warming in natural forest.

  18. Identification of Genes Differentially Expressed in Extraradical Mycelium and Ectomycorrhizal Roots during Paxillus involutus-Betula pendula Ectomycorrhizal Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Mélanie; Jacob, Christophe; Kohler, Annegret; Johansson, Tomas; Martin, Francis; Chalot, Michel; Brun, Annick

    2005-01-01

    The development of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis leads to drastic changes in gene expression in both partners. However, little is known about the spatial regulation of symbiosis-regulated genes. Using cDNA array profiling, we compared the levels of expression of fungal genes corresponding to approximately 1,200 expressed sequenced tags in the ectomycorrhizal root tips (ECM) and the connected extraradical mycelium (EM) for the Paxillus involutus-Betula pendula ectomycorrhizal association grown on peat in a microcosm system. Sixty-five unique genes were found to be differentially expressed in these two fungal compartments. In ECM, a gene coding for a putative phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (Psd) was up-regulated by 24-fold, while genes coding for urea (Dur3) and spermine (Tpo3) transporters were up-regulated 4.1- and 6.2-fold in EM. Moreover, urea was the major nitrogen compound found in EM by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that (i) there is a spatial difference in the patterns of fungal gene expression between ECM and EM, (ii) urea and polyamine transporters could facilitate the translocation of nitrogen compounds within the EM network, and (iii) fungal Psd may contribute to membrane remodeling during ectomycorrhiza formation. PMID:15640212

  19. Parallel evolutionary paths to mycoheterotrophy in understorey Ericaceae and Orchidaceae: ecological evidence for mixotrophy in Pyroleae.

    PubMed

    Tedersoo, Leho; Pellet, Prune; Kõljalg, Urmas; Selosse, Marc-André

    2007-03-01

    Several forest understorey achlorophyllous plants, termed mycoheterotrophs (MHs), obtain C from their mycorrhizal fungi. The latter in turn form ectomycorrhizas with trees, the ultimate C source of the entire system. A similar nutritional strategy occurs in some green forest orchids, phylogenetically close to MH species, that gain their C via a combination of MH and photosynthesis (mixotrophy). In orchid evolution, mixotrophy evolved in shaded habitats and preceded MH nutrition. By generalizing and applying this to Ericaceae, we hypothesized that green forest species phylogenetically close to MHs are mixotrophic. Using stable C isotope analysis with fungi, autotrophic, mixotrophic and MH plants as comparisons, we found the first quantitative evidence for substantial fungi-mediated mixotrophy in the Pyroleae, common ericaceous shrubs from boreal forests close to the MH Monotropoideae. Orthilia secunda, Pyrola chlorantha, Pyrola rotundifolia and Chimaphila umbellata acquired between 10.3 and 67.5% of their C from fungi. High N and 15N contents also suggest that Pyroleae nutrition partly rely on fungi. Examination of root fungal internal transcribed spacer sequences at one site revealed that 39 species of mostly endophytic or ectomycorrhizal fungi, including abundant Tricholoma spp., were associated with O. secunda, P. chlorantha and C. umbellata. These fungi, particularly ectomycorrhizal associates, could thus link mixotrophic Pyroleae spp. to surrounding trees, allowing the C flows deduced from isotopic evidence. These data suggest that we need to reconsider ecological roles of understorey plants, which could influence the dynamics and composition of forest communities.

  20. A.B. Frank and mycorrhizae: the challenge to evolutionary and ecologic theory.

    PubMed

    Trappe, James M

    2005-06-01

    A. B. Frank's observations and hypotheses about mycorrhizae in 1885 flew in the face of conventional thinking of the time. He reported that what we now term ectomycorrhizae were widespread on root systems of many woody plant species in a great diversity of habitats and soils. He hypothesized that mycorrhizae represent a pervasive mutualistic symbiosis in which fungus and host nutritionally rely on each other; that the fungus extracts nutrients from both mineral soil and humus and translocates them to the tree host; and that the tree, in turn, nourishes the fungus. Initially opposed by much of the scientific community, nearly all of Frank's major hypotheses have since been unequivocally demonstrated, although many decades were required to achieve conclusive evidence. Nonetheless, the revolution in thinking about plant and fungal evolution, ecology and physiology generated by Frank is still in the process of acceptance by much of the scientific community, 120 years and tens of thousands of scientific papers since he coined the term "mycorrhiza". The reasons for this extraordinary lag time in themselves present an intriguing research subject.

  1. Simultaneous specific in planta visualization of root-colonizing fungi using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Vági, Pál; Knapp, Dániel G; Kósa, Annamária; Seress, Diána; Horváth, Áron N; Kovács, Gábor M

    2014-05-01

    In planta detection of mutualistic, endophytic, and pathogenic fungi commonly colonizing roots and other plant organs is not a routine task. We aimed to use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for simultaneous specific detection of different fungi colonizing the same tissue. We have adapted ribosomal RNA (rRNA) FISH for visualization of common mycorrhizal (arbuscular- and ectomycorrhiza) and endophytic fungi within roots of different plant species. Beside general probes, we designed and used specific ones hybridizing to the large subunit of rRNA with fluorescent dyes chosen to avoid or reduce the interference with the autofluorescence of plant tissues. We report here an optimized efficient protocol of rRNA FISH and the use of both epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for simultaneous specific differential detection of those fungi colonizing the same root. The method could be applied for the characterization of other plant-fungal interactions, too. In planta FISH with specific probes labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes could be used not only in basic research but to detect plant colonizing pathogenic fungi in their latent life-period.

  2. In vitro mycorrhization and acclimatization of Amanita caesareoides and its relatives on Pinus densiflora.

    PubMed

    Endo, Naoki; Gisusi, Seiki; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Akiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Amanita caesareoides is a sister species of Amanita caesarea, also known as Caesar's mushroom and one of the most desirable edible mycorrhizal mushrooms. However, cultivation of Caesar's mushrooms has not yet been successful due to the difficulties involved in establishing pure cultures. In this study, we established pure cultures of four Asian Caesar's mushroom species, i.e., A. caesareoides, Amanita javanica, Amanita esculenta, and Amanita similis, which were identified by sequence analysis of their rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Five selected isolates in A. caesareoides, A. javanica, and A. esculenta were tested for ectomycorrhizal syntheses with axenic Pinus densiflora seedlings in vitro. Ectomycorrhizal tips of each fungal isolate tested were observed on pine lateral roots within 5 months of inoculation. Seventeen pine seedlings that formed ectomycorrhizas in vitro with these three Amanita species were acclimatized under non-sterile conditions. Seven months following acclimatization, ectomycorrhizal colonization by A. caesareoides was observed on newly grown root tips, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the fungal rDNA ITS region. Two other Amanita species also survived during ectomycorrhizal acclimatization. These results suggest that the cultivation of A. caesareoides and its relatives can be attempted through mycorrhizal synthesis using P. densiflora as a host. This is the first report of in vitro mycorrhization of Asian Caesar's mushrooms and their acclimatization under non-sterile conditions.

  3. Availability of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi to Black Spruce above the Present Treeline in Eastern Labrador

    PubMed Central

    Reithmeier, Laura; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECMF) are an important biotic factor in the survival of conifer seedlings under stressful conditions and therefore have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment into alpine and tundra habitats. In order to assess patterns of ectomycorrhizal availability and community structure above treeline, we conducted soil bioassays in which Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were grown in field-collected soils under controlled conditions. Soils were collected from distinct alpine habitats, each dominated by a different ectomycorrhizal host shrub: Betula glandulosa, Arctostaphylos alpina or Salix herbacaea. Within each habitat, half of the soils collected contained roots of ectomycorrhizal shrubs (host+) and the other half were free of host plants (host−). Forest and glacial moraine soils were also included for comparison. Fungi forming ectomycorrhizae during the bioassays were identified by DNA sequencing. Our results indicate that ECMF capable of colonizing black spruce are widespread above the current tree line in Eastern Labrador and that the level of available inoculum has a significant influence on the growth of seedlings under controlled conditions. Many of the host− soils possessed appreciable levels of ectomycorrhizal inoculum, likely in the form of spore banks. Inoculum levels in these soils may be influenced by spore production from neighboring soils where ectomycorrhizal shrubs are present. Under predicted temperature increases, ectomycorrhizal inoculum in soils with host shrubs as well as in nearby soils without host shrubs have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment above the present tree line. PMID:24204858

  4. No globally consistent effect of ectomycorrhizal status on foliar traits.

    PubMed

    Koele, Nina; Dickie, Ian A; Oleksyn, Jacek; Richardson, Sarah J; Reich, Peter B

    2012-11-01

    The concept that ectomycorrhizal plants have a particular foliar trait suite characterized by low foliar nutrients and high leaf mass per unit area (LMA) is widely accepted, but whether this trait suite can be generalized to all ectomycorrhizal clades is unclear. We identified 19 evolutionary clades of ectomycorrhizal plants and used a global leaf traits dataset comprising 11,466 samples across c. 3000 species to test whether there were consistent shifts in leaf nutrients or LMA with the evolution of ectomycorrhiza. There were no consistent effects of ectomycorrhizal status on foliar nutrients or LMA in the 17 ectomycorrhizal/non-ectomycorrhizal pairs for which we had sufficient data, with some ectomycorrhizal groups having higher and other groups lower nutrient status than non-ectomycorrhizal contrasts. Controlling for the woodiness of host species did not alter the results. Our findings suggest that the concepts of ectomycorrhizal plant trait suites should be re-examined to ensure that they are broadly reflective of mycorrhizal status across all evolutionary clades, rather than reflecting the traits of a few commonly studied groups, such as the Pinaceae and Fagales.

  5. Evidences on the Ability of Mycorrhizal Genus Piloderma to Use Organic Nitrogen and Deliver It to Scots Pine

    PubMed Central

    Heinonsalo, Jussi; Sun, Hui; Santalahti, Minna; Bäcklund, Kirsi; Hari, Pertti; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis has been proposed to link plant photosynthesis and soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition through the production of fungal enzymes which promote SOM degradation and nitrogen (N) uptake. However, laboratory and field evidence for the existence of these processes are rare. Piloderma sp., a common ECM genus in boreal forest soil, was chosen as model mycorrhiza for this study. The abundance of Piloderma sp. was studied in root tips and soil over one growing season and in winter. Protease production was measured from ectomycorrhiza and soil solution in the field and pure fungal cultures. We also tested the effect of Piloderma olivaceum on host plant organic N nutrition in the laboratory. The results showed that Piloderma sp. was highly abundant in the field and produced extracellular proteases, which correlated positively with the gross primary production, temperature and soil respiration. In the laboratory, Piloderma olivaceum could improve the ability of Pinus sylvestris L. to utilize N from extragenous proteins. We suggest that ECM fungi, although potentially retaining N in their hyphae, are important in forest C and N cycling due to their ability to access proteinaeous N. As Piloderma sp. abundance appeared to be seasonally highly variable, recycling of fungal-bound N after hyphal death may therefore be of primary importance for the N cycling in boreal ecosystems. PMID:26132469

  6. Conservative ecological and evolutionary patterns in liverwort-fungal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Bidartondo, Martin I; Duckett, Jeffrey G

    2010-02-07

    Liverworts, the most ancient group of land plants, form a range of intimate associations with fungi that may be analogous to the mycorrhizas of vascular plants. Most thalloid liverworts contain arbuscular mycorrhizal glomeromycete fungi similar to most vascular plants. In contrast, a range of leafy liverwort genera and one simple thalloid liverwort family (the Aneuraceae) have switched to basidiomycete fungi. These liverwort switches away from glomeromycete fungi may be expected to parallel switches undergone by vascular plants that target diverse lineages of basidiomycete fungi to form ectomycorrhizas. To test this hypothesis, we used a cultivation-independent approach to examine the basidiomycete fungi associated with liverworts in varied worldwide locations by generating fungal DNA sequence data from over 200 field collections of over 30 species. Here we show that eight leafy liverwort genera predominantly and consistently associate with members of the Sebacina vermifera species complex and that Aneuraceae thalloid liverworts associate nearly exclusively with Tulasnella species. Furthermore, within sites where multiple liverwort species co-occur, they almost never share the same fungi. Our analyses reveal a strikingly conservative ecological and evolutionary pattern of liverwort symbioses with basidiomycete fungi that is unlike that of vascular plant mycorrhizas.

  7. Mycorrhization of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. seedlings with Tuber macrosporum Vittad.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Gógán Csorbai, Andrea; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Bencivenga, Mattia; Di Massimo, Gabriella; Donnini, Domizia

    2012-11-01

    Tuber macrosporum Vittad. is not a common truffle species, but with remarkable organoleptic qualities and much economic interest. After the addition of truffle spore slurry, 30 seedlings of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. were grown inside a greenhouse for 11 months before evaluation of the mycorrhizal level. Two different potting mixes were used: a natural soil-based potting mix for Q. robur, Q. cerris and C. avellana and a peat-based potting mix for Q. robur. Quercus robur planted in soil potting mix was the most receptive towards the truffle spore inoculum, with a level of formation of T. macrosporum ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) of approximately 14 %, ranging from a minimum of ∼4 % to a maximum of ∼44 % in different seedlings. No T. macrosporum ECMs developed on Q. cerris (soil potting mix) or on Q. robur (peat potting mix), whereas a low percentage of ECMs was detected on only three C. avellana (soil potting mix) seedlings. The fungus Sphaerosporella brunnea (Alb. & Schwein.) Svrček & Kubička was also detected as a contaminant on almost half the truffle-inoculated seedlings. A new detailed description of the morphological and anatomical characteristics of T. macrosporum ECMs and their DNA-based verification with species-specific markers were also reported.

  8. Identification of genes differentially expressed in extraradical mycelium and ectomycorrhizal roots during Paxillus involutus-Betula pendula ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Morel, Mélanie; Jacob, Christophe; Kohler, Annegret; Johansson, Tomas; Martin, Francis; Chalot, Michel; Brun, Annick

    2005-01-01

    The development of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis leads to drastic changes in gene expression in both partners. However, little is known about the spatial regulation of symbiosis-regulated genes. Using cDNA array profiling, we compared the levels of expression of fungal genes corresponding to approximately 1,200 expressed sequenced tags in the ectomycorrhizal root tips (ECM) and the connected extraradical mycelium (EM) for the Paxillus involutus-Betula pendula ectomycorrhizal association grown on peat in a microcosm system. Sixty-five unique genes were found to be differentially expressed in these two fungal compartments. In ECM, a gene coding for a putative phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (Psd) was up-regulated by 24-fold, while genes coding for urea (Dur3) and spermine (Tpo3) transporters were up-regulated 4.1- and 6.2-fold in EM. Moreover, urea was the major nitrogen compound found in EM by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that (i) there is a spatial difference in the patterns of fungal gene expression between ECM and EM, (ii) urea and polyamine transporters could facilitate the translocation of nitrogen compounds within the EM network, and (iii) fungal Psd may contribute to membrane remodeling during ectomycorrhiza formation.

  9. Mycorrhizal diversity and specificity in Lecanorchis (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Okayama, Masanari; Yamato, Masahide; Yagame, Takahiro; Iwase, Koji

    2012-10-01

    Lecanorchis is a nonphotosynthetic plant genus in Vanilloideae, Orchidaceae. Because of the distribution of many Lecanorchis taxa in various climate conditions, we hypothesized that mycorrhizal diversity and specificity are different among the different taxa of Lecanorchis. In the present study, identities of mycorrhizal fungi were examined for 90 individuals of 10 Lecanorchis taxa at 26 sites from Niigata to Okinawa Prefectures in Japan. Phylogenetic analyses of Lecanorchis taxa based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) divided the examined Lecanorchis taxa into three groups, groups A, B, and C. ITS rDNA sequences suggested that fungi associating with Lecanorchis were ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi in Lactarius, Russula, Atheliaceae, and Sebacina, with Lactarius and Russula dominant. Our results suggested some degree of mycorrhizal specialization among Lecanorchis taxa. Interestingly, the Lecanorchis group C had some specific relationships with Lactarius, whereas less specificity was found in the relationships with Russula. However, observed specificity results may be biased by geographic opportunity, and we suggest further research to assess whether Lecanorchis species are limited to the associations we observed.

  10. Tilia platyphyllos Scop.-Tuber brumale Vittad. vs. T. platyphyllos Scop.-T. borchii Vittad. ectomycorrhizal systems: a comparison of structural and functional traits.

    PubMed

    Zeppa, Sabrina; Sisti, Davide; Pierleoni, Raffaella; Potenza, Lucia; Guescini, Michele; Vallorani, Luciana; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2005-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizae are mutualistic associations of several species of fungi with higher plants. Their formation involves alterations in the morphology and cell structure of the plant root and fungal mycelium. These modifications are correlated with mRNA and protein synthesis in the two symbionts. To gain more information about structural and functional traits involved in ectomycorrhizal formation, two "in vitro" ectomycorrhizal systems, set up by the inoculation of Tilia platyphyllos Scop. roots with either Tuber brumale Vittad. or T. borchii Vittad. mycelia, were investigated. Different parameters such as, fungal volume ratio, fungal biomass, plant and fungal transcript levels, specific enzymes activity and protein patterns were evaluated. In T. platyphyllos-T. brumale ectomycorrhizal tissue all the molecular and morphometrical approaches revealed a higher fungal biomass, volume and transcript as well as higher fungal protein levels respect to the host plant, suggesting that the fungal genes and proteins are up regulated after the establishment of symbiosis. These results are completely divergent from that obtained in T. platyphyllos Scop.-T. borchii Vittad. ectomycorrhizal system, leading us to hypothesise a different role of the fungal partner in the mycorrhization process according to the species it belongs to.

  11. Implication of the suberin pathway in adaptation to waterlogging and hypertrophied lenticels formation in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.).

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Gregoire; Lesur, Isabelle; Lalanne, Celine; Da Silva, Corinne; Labadie, Karine; Aury, Jean Marc; Leple, Jean Charles; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Waterlogging causes stressful conditions for perennial species. The temporary overabundance of water in waterlogged soil can induce hypoxia in the rhizosphere, leading to root death, tree decline and even dieback. Two closely related members of the European white oak complex, pedunculate (Quercus robur L.) and sessile (Quercus petraea Matt. Liebl.) oaks, have different ecological characteristics, especially regarding their adaptation to soil waterlogging. The tolerance of waterlogging observed in pedunculate oak is driven principally by its ability to produce adaptive structures, hypertrophied lenticels and adventitious roots, and to switch rapidly its metabolism to the fermentative pathway. This study had two objectives: (i) to identify genes important for adaptation to waterlogging and (ii) to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in hypertrophied lenticel formation in pedunculate oak. We subjected seedlings of the two species to hypoxia by maintaining the water level 2 cm above the collar. The immersed part of the stem (i.e., containing hypertrophied lenticels in pedunculate oak) was sampled after 9 days of waterlogging stress and its gene expression was investigated by RNA-seq. Genes displaying differential expression between the two species were identified with the DESeq R package and a false discovery rate of 0.001. We found that 3705 contigs were differentially regulated between the two species. Twenty-two differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The suberin biosynthesis pathway was found to be upregulated in pedunculate oak, consistent with molecular mechanisms analogous to those operating in the radial oxygen loss barrier in waterlogging-tolerant species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Climate response of oak (Quercus spp.), an evidence of a bioclimatic boundary induced by the Carpathians.

    PubMed

    Nechita, Constantin; Popa, Ionel; Eggertsson, Ólafur

    2017-12-01

    Tree-ring information and climate response data were applied to investigate the potential of the Carpathian Mountains to influence tree-growth patterns. Recent studies reveal the importance of constructing a dense spatial network of oak tree-ring chronologies in this area, which may be the key to linking the North Central European and East Mediterranean tree records. We establish sixteen oak (Quercus robur L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) site chronologies along a longitudinal gradient (from 22.47 to 26.58 E) in Northern Romania in an attempt to elucidate the impact of climate on oak growth. Even with differences generated by interspecific features, habitats and climatic regimes, a common macroclimatic marker for the NW and NE sites was established by comparing two groups of chronologies separated by the Carpathian chain. We found that precipitation in April (P4) and June (P6) were the primary climate factors that affected tree growth in the NW region. For the NE region, the temperature in January (T1) and March (T3) and precipitation in May (P5) were revealed to be the major limiting climatic factors. The spatial variability of the correlation coefficients indicates a decreasing trend in correlation intensity with precipitation from NW to NE, particularly during the current growing season (March-July). Oak trees from the NW and NE regions have adapted to different local climatic conditions and only respond uniformly to severe climate events (e.g., the 1904 drought). The higher occurrence of extreme years during the 20th century, particularly in the NE region, was in accordance with the rise of precipitation variability in the current growing season. The changes in the tree-growth pattern and climatic response of the chronologies of the studied sites in the NW and NE regions were linked to the local climates induced by the Carpathian Mountains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of gene expression in segregating families identifies genes and genomic regions involved in a novel adaptation, zinc hyperaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    One of the challenges of comparative genomics is to identify specific genetic changes associated with the evolution of a novel adaptation or trait. We need to be able to disassociate the genes involved with a particular character from all the other genetic changes that take place as lineages diverge. Here we show that by comparing the transcriptional profile of segregating families with that of parent species differing in a novel trait, it is possible to narrow down substantially the list of potential target genes. In addition, by assuming synteny with a related model organism for which the complete genome sequence is available, it is possible to use the cosegregation of markers differing in transcription level to identify regions of the genome which probably contain quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the character. This novel combination of genomics and classical genetics provides a very powerful tool to identify candidate genes. We use this methodology to investigate zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, the sister species to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare the transcriptional profile of A. halleri with that of its sister nonaccumulator species, Arabidopsis petraea, and between accumulator and nonaccumulator F(3)s derived from the cross between the two species. We identify eight genes which consistently show greater expression in accumulator phenotypes in both roots and shoots, including two metal transporter genes (NRAMP3 and ZIP6), and cytoplasmic aconitase, a gene involved in iron homeostasis in mammals. We also show that there appear to be two QTLs for zinc accumulation, on chromosomes 3 and 7.

  14. The importance of biotic factors in predicting global change effects on decomposition of temperate forest leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Rouifed, Soraya; Handa, I Tanya; David, Jean-François; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO(2) and temperature are predicted to alter litter decomposition via changes in litter chemistry and environmental conditions. The extent to which these predictions are influenced by biotic factors such as litter species composition or decomposer activity, and in particular how these different factors interact, is not well understood. In a 5-week laboratory experiment we compared the decomposition of leaf litter from four temperate tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Carpinus betulus and Tilia platyphyllos) in response to four interacting factors: elevated CO(2)-induced changes in litter quality, a 3 degrees C warmer environment during decomposition, changes in litter species composition, and presence/absence of a litter-feeding millipede (Glomeris marginata). Elevated CO(2) and temperature had much weaker effects on decomposition than litter species composition and the presence of Glomeris. Mass loss of elevated CO(2)-grown leaf litter was reduced in Fagus and increased in Fagus/Tilia mixtures, but was not affected in any other leaf litter treatment. Warming increased litter mass loss in Carpinus and Tilia, but not in the other two litter species and in none of the mixtures. The CO(2)- and temperature-related differences in decomposition disappeared completely when Glomeris was present. Overall, fauna activity stimulated litter mass loss, but to different degrees depending on litter species composition, with a particularly strong effect on Fagus/Tilia mixtures (+58%). Higher fauna-driven mass loss was not followed by higher C mineralization over the relatively short experimental period. Apart from a strong interaction between litter species composition and fauna, the tested factors had little or no interactive effects on decomposition. We conclude that if global change were to result in substantial shifts in plant community composition and macrofauna abundance in forest ecosystems, these interacting biotic factors could have

  15. Disparity in elevational shifts of European trees in response to recent climate warming.

    PubMed

    Rabasa, Sonia G; Granda, Elena; Benavides, Raquel; Kunstler, Georges; Espelta, Josep M; Ogaya, Romá; Peñuelas, Josep; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Gil, Wojciech; Grodzki, Wojciech; Ambrozy, Slawomir; Bergh, Johan; Hódar, José A; Zamora, Regino; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Predicting climate-driven changes in plant distribution is crucial for biodiversity conservation and management under recent climate change. Climate warming is expected to induce movement of species upslope and towards higher latitudes. However, the mechanisms and physiological processes behind the altitudinal and latitudinal distribution range of a tree species are complex and depend on each tree species features and vary over ontogenetic stages. We investigated the altitudinal distribution differences between juvenile and adult individuals of seven major European tree species along elevational transects covering a wide latitudinal range from southern Spain (37°N) to northern Sweden (67°N). By comparing juvenile and adult distributions (shifts on the optimum position and the range limits) we assessed the response of species to present climate conditions in relation to previous conditions that prevailed when adults were established. Mean temperature increased by 0.86 °C on average at our sites during the last decade compared with previous 30-year period. Only one of the species studied, Abies alba, matched the expected predictions under the observed warming, with a maximum abundance of juveniles at higher altitudes than adults. Three species, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris, showed an opposite pattern while for other three species, such as Quercus ilex, Acer pseudoplatanus and Q. petraea, we were no able to detect changes in distribution. These findings are in contrast with theoretical predictions and show that tree responses to climate change are complex and are obscured not only by other environmental factors but also by internal processes related to ontogeny and demography.

  16. Comparative mapping in the Fagaceae and beyond with EST-SSRs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic markers and linkage mapping are basic prerequisites for comparative genetic analyses, QTL detection and map-based cloning. A large number of mapping populations have been developed for oak, but few gene-based markers are available for constructing integrated genetic linkage maps and comparing gene order and QTL location across related species. Results We developed a set of 573 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) and located 397 markers (EST-SSRs and genomic SSRs) on the 12 oak chromosomes (2n = 2x = 24) on the basis of Mendelian segregation patterns in 5 full-sib mapping pedigrees of two species: Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (sessile oak). Consensus maps for the two species were constructed and aligned. They showed a high degree of macrosynteny between these two sympatric European oaks. We assessed the transferability of EST-SSRs to other Fagaceae genera and a subset of these markers was mapped in Castanea sativa, the European chestnut. Reasonably high levels of macrosynteny were observed between oak and chestnut. We also obtained diversity statistics for a subset of EST-SSRs, to support further population genetic analyses with gene-based markers. Finally, based on the orthologous relationships between the oak, Arabidopsis, grape, poplar, Medicago, and soybean genomes and the paralogous relationships between the 12 oak chromosomes, we propose an evolutionary scenario of the 12 oak chromosomes from the eudicot ancestral karyotype. Conclusions This study provides map locations for a large set of EST-SSRs in two oak species of recognized biological importance in natural ecosystems. This first step toward the construction of a gene-based linkage map will facilitate the assignment of future genome scaffolds to pseudo-chromosomes. This study also provides an indication of the potential utility of new gene-based markers for population genetics and comparative mapping within and beyond the

  17. Decrease in Available Soil Water Storage Capacity Reduces Vitality of Young Understorey European Beeches (Fagus sylvatica L.)—A Case Study from the Black Forest, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Tamalika; Saha, Somidh; Reif, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Growth and survival of young European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is largely dependent on water availability. We quantified the influence of water stress (measured as Available Soil Water Storage Capacity or ASWSC) on vitality of young beech plants at a dry site. The study site was located in a semi-natural sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.) stand adjacent to beech stands on a rocky gneiss outcrop in southwestern Germany. Plant vitality was measured as crown dieback and estimated by the percentage of dead above ground biomass. The magnitude of crown dieback was recorded in different vertical parts of the crown. Biomass was calculated from the harvested plants following allometric regression equations specifically developed for our study site. Stem discs from harvested plants were used for growth analysis. We found that soil depth up to bedrock and skeleton content significantly influenced ASWSC at the study site. A significant negative correlation between ASWSC and crown dieback was found. Highest rates of crown dieback were noticed in the middle and lower crown. The threshold of crown dieback as a function of drought stress for young beech plants was calculated for the first time in this study. This threshold of crown dieback was found to be 40% of above ground biomass. Beyond 40% crown dieback, plants eventually experienced complete mortality. In addition, we found that the extremely dry year of 2003 significantly hampered growth (basal area increment) of plants in dry plots (ASWSC < 61 mm) in the study area. Recovery in the plants’ radial growth after that drought year was significantly higher in less dry plots (ASWSC > 61 mm) than in dry plots. We concluded that a decrease in ASWSC impeded the vitality of young beech causing partial up to complete crown dieback in the study site. PMID:27137398

  18. Temporal variation of competition and facilitation in mixed species forests in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    del Río, M; Schütze, G; Pretzsch, H

    2014-01-01

    Facilitation, reduced competition or increased competition can arise in mixed stands and become essential to the performance of these stands when compared to pure stands. Facilitation and over-yielding are widely held to prevail on poor sites, whereas neutral interactions or competition, leading to under-yielding of mixed versus pure stands, can occur on fertile sites. While previous studies have focused on the spatial variation of mixing effects, we examine the temporal variation of facilitation and competition and its effect on growth. The study is based on tree ring measurement on cores from increment borings from 559 trees of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.), European beech (Fagus sylvatica [L.]) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) in southern Germany, half of which were in pure stands and half in adjacent mixed stands. Mean basal area growth indices were calculated from tree ring measurements for pure and mixed stands for every species and site. The temporal variation, with positive correlations between species-specific growth indices during periods of low growth and neutral or negative correlations during periods of high growth, is more distinct in mixed than in neighbouring pure stands. We provide evidence that years with low growth trigger over-yielding of trees in mixed as opposed to pure stands, while years with high growth lead to under-yielding. We discuss the relevance of the results in terms of advancing our understanding and modelling of mixed stands, extension of the stress gradient hypothesis, and the performance of mixed versus pure stands in the face of climate change. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Phytophthora pseudosyringae sp. nov., a new species causing root and collar rot of deciduous tree species in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jung, Thomas; Nechwatal, Jan; Cooke, David E L; Hartmann, Günther; Blaschke, Markus; Osswald, Wolfgang F; Duncan, James M; Delatour, Claude

    2003-07-01

    In several studies of oak decline in Europe, a semi-papillate homothallic Phytophthora taxon was consistently isolated, together with other Phytophthora species, from rhizosphere soil samples. It was also found associated with necrotic fine roots and stem necroses of Fagus sylvatica and Alnus glutinosa. Due to morphological and physiological similarities, the semi-papillate isolates were previously identified as P. syringae by various authors. The morphology, physiology and pathogenicity against fine roots of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and F. sylvatica, bark of A. glutinosa, leaves of Ilex aquifolium and apple fruits of this Phytophthora species are described and compared with those of related and similar Phytophthora species, namely P. ilicis, P. psychrophila, P. quercina, P. citricola and P. syringae. The phylogenetic placement on the basis of ITS and mtDNA sequence data was also examined. Isolates of this taxon produce colonies with stellate to rosaceous growth patterns and limited aerial mycelium on various agar media. Antheridia are predominantly paragynous. In water culture catenulate hyphal swellings and semi-papillate caducous sporangia, that are usually limoniform, ellipsoid or ovoid, are formed abundandly, mostly in lax or dense sympodia. This taxon is a moderately slow growing, low temperature species with optimum and maximum temperatures around 20 and 25 degrees C, respectively. Tested isolates are moderately aggressive to fine roots of oaks and beech, highly aggressive to holly leaves and apple fruits, and slightly pathogenic to alder bark. Thirteen tested isolates had an identical and distinct ITS sequence which was more similar to that of P. ilicis and P. psychrophila than any other known taxa. On the basis of their unique combination of morphological characters, colony growth patterns, cardinal temperatures for growth, growth rates, pathogenicity to oaks, beech, alder, apple and holly, their host range, and ITS and mtDNA sequences the semi

  20. Browsing affects intra-ring carbon allocation in species with contrasting wood anatomy.

    PubMed

    Palacio, S; Paterson, E; Sim, A; Hester, A J; Millard, P

    2011-02-01

    Current knowledge on tree carbon (C) allocation to wood is particularly scarce in plants subjected to disturbance factors, such as browsing, which affects forest regeneration worldwide and has an impact on the C balance of trees. Furthermore, quantifying the degree to which tree rings are formed from freshly assimilated vs. stored carbohydrates is highly relevant for our understanding of tree C allocation. We used (13)C labelling to quantify seasonal allocation of stored C to wood formation in two species with contrasting wood anatomy: Betula pubescens Ehrh. (diffuse-porous) and Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl. (ring-porous). Clipping treatments (66% shoot removal, and unclipped) were applied to analyse the effect of browsing on C allocation into tree rings, plus the effects on tree growth, architecture, ring width and non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs). The relative contribution of stored C to wood formation was greater in the ring-porous (55-70%) than in the diffuse-porous species (35-60%), although each species followed different seasonal trends. Clipping did not cause a significant depletion of C stores in either species. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the proportion of stored C allocated to earlywood growth was observed in clipped birches, and this could be explained through changes in tree architecture after clipping. The size of C pools across tree species seems to be important in determining the variability of seasonal C allocation patterns to wood and their sensibility to disturbances such as browsing. Our results indicate that the observed changes in C allocation to earlywood in birch were not related to variations in the amount or concentration of NSC stores, but to changes in the seasonal availability of recently assimilated C caused by modifications in tree architecture after browsing.

  1. A short-term mineral amendment impacts the mineral weathering bacterial communities in an acidic forest soil.

    PubMed

    Lepleux, C; Uroz, S; Collignon, C; Churin, J-L; Turpault, M-P; Frey-Klett, P

    2013-09-01

    Mineral amendment (i.e. calcium, phosphorous, potassium and/or magnesium) is a management practice used in forestry to improve nutrient availability and recover soil fertility, especially in nutrient-poor forest ecosystems. However, whether this amendment can lead to modifications of the soil characteristics and an improvement in tree growth, and its impact on the soil bacterial communities, especially the mineral weathering bacterial communities, remains poorly documented. In this study, we investigated the short-term impact of a mineral amendment on the taxonomic and functional structure of the mineral weathering bacterial communities. To do this, a plantation of four-year old oak (Quercus petraea) trees amended with or without dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] was established in the experimental forest site of Breuil-Chenue, which is characterized by an acidic soil and a low availability of calcium and magnesium. Three years after amendment, soil samples were used to isolate bacteria as well as to determine the soil characteristics and the metabolic potentials of these soil microbial communities. Based on a bioassay for quantifying the solubilisation of inorganic phosphorous, we demonstrate that the bacterial isolates coming from the non-amended bulk soil were significantly more efficient than those from the amended bulk soil. No difference was observed between the bacterial isolates coming from the amended and non-amended rhizospheres. Notably, the taxonomic analyses revealed a dominance of bacterial isolates belonging to the Burkholderia genus in both samples. Overall, our results suggest that the bioavailability of nutritive cations into soil impacts the distribution and the efficacy of mineral weathering bacterial communities coming from the soil but not those coming from the rhizosphere.

  2. A 430 year record of hydroclimate variability for NE-Germany based on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes from pine and oak tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, Gerhard; Baschek, Heiko; Heinrich, Ingo; Navabzadeh, Nadia; Riedel, Frank; Wilmking, Martin; Heußner, Karl-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    European lowlands experience many direct and indirect influences of global warming, particularly related to the hydrological cycle which lately faces increasing flood and drought events. Although important for humans and the ecosystems in which they live, little is known about the long-term spatiotemporal hydrological changes in various European regions. Here we present the first 430-year stable carbon and oxygen chronologies from tree ring cellulose in lowland oak and pine trees (P. sylvestris, Q. petraea) for the region of NE-Germany and provide annually resolved high quality hydroclimatic reconstructions. When compared to ring width data isotope data can be used with only minor adjustments to their means (besides correction of short juvenile trends) and sample depths of 4-5 trees are normally enough for a significant expressed population signal being representative for a site. For this study more than 20 individual tree ring sub-samples for isotopic analyses were obtained from well replicated tree ring chronologies built using living trees as well as historical timber originating from four different lowland sites (50-90m asl.). By a calibration and verification approach we have evaluated the response to instrumental climate and trends of atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (13C, only) data. While ring widths shows strong correlation to winter temperature, highly significant correlations with summer (JJA) hydroclimate conditions were found for both tree ring 13C and 18O. Strongest relationships were found with summer water vapour pressure deficit (13C and 18O) and Tmax (JJA). Although significant, relationships between 13C and climate data were found considerably weaker than climate/18O relations. On the other hand, the 13C record reveals high similarity with solar irradiance, whereas 18O does not. Based on this profound calibration the presentation will show and discuss annually resolved hydroclimatic variability of the region from our multi-centennial isotope

  3. Photoperiod and temperature responses of bud swelling and bud burst in four temperate forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Basler, David; Körner, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Spring phenology of temperate forest trees is optimized to maximize the length of the growing season while minimizing the risk of freezing damage. The release from winter dormancy is environmentally mediated by species-specific responses to temperature and photoperiod. We investigated the response of early spring phenology to temperature and photoperiod at different stages of dormancy release in cuttings from four temperate tree species in controlled environments. By tracking bud development, we were able to identify the onset of bud swelling and bud growth in Acer pseudoplatanus L., Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. At a given early stage of dormancy release, the onset and duration of the bud swelling prior to bud burst are driven by concurrent temperature and photoperiod, while the maximum growth rate is temperature dependent only, except for Fagus, where long photoperiods also increased bud growth rates. Similarly, the later bud burst was controlled by temperature and photoperiod (in the photoperiod sensitive species Fagus, Quercus and Picea). We conclude that photoperiod is involved in the release of dormancy during the ecodormancy phase and may influence bud burst in trees that have experienced sufficient chilling. This study explored and documented the early bud swelling period that precedes and defines later phenological stages such as canopy greening in conventional phenological works. It is the early bud growth resumption that needs to be understood in order to arrive at a causal interpretation and modelling of tree phenology at a large scale. Classic spring phenology events mark visible endpoints of a cascade of processes as evidenced here.

  4. Possible diversifying selection in the imprinted gene, MEDEA, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Takashi; Takebayashi, Naoki; Wolf, Diana E

    2009-04-01

    Coevolutionary conflict among imprinted genes that influence traits such as offspring growth may arise when maternal and paternal genomes have different evolutionary optima. This conflict is expected in outcrossing taxa with multiple paternity, but not self-fertilizing taxa. MEDEA (MEA) is an imprinted plant gene that influences seed growth. Disagreement exists regarding the type of selection acting on this gene. We present new data and analyses of sequence diversity of MEA in self-fertilizing and outcrossing Arabidopsis and its relatives, to help clarify the form of selection acting on this gene. Codon-based branch analysis among taxa (PAML) suggests that selection on the coding region is changing over time, and nonsynonymous substitution is elevated in at least one outcrossing branch. Codon-based analysis of diversity within outcrossing Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea (OmegaMap) suggests that diversifying selection is acting on a portion of the gene, to cause elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism. Providing further support for balancing selection in A. lyrata, Hudson, Kreitman and Aguadé analysis indicates that diversity/divergence at silent sites in the MEA promoter and genic region is elevated relative to reference genes, and there are deviations from the neutral frequency spectrum. This combination of positive selection as well as balancing and diversifying selection in outcrossing lineages is consistent with other genes influence by evolutionary conflict, such as disease resistance genes. Consistent with predictions that conflict would be eliminated in self-fertilizing taxa, we found no evidence of positive, balancing, or diversifying selection in A. thaliana promoter or genic region.

  5. Integrating inter- and intra-annual tree-ring width, carbon isotopes and anatomy: responses to climate variability in a temperate oak forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, Elena; Bazot, Stéphane; Fresneau, Chantal; Boura, Anaïs; Faccioni, Georgia; Damesin, Claire

    2015-04-01

    While many forests are experiencing strong tree declines due to climate change in temperate ecosystems, others nearby to those declining show no apparent signs of decline. This could be due to particular microsite conditions or, for instance, to a higher plasticity of given traits that allow a better performance under stressful conditions. We studied oak functional mechanisms (Quercus petraea) leading to the apparently healthy status of the forest and their relation to the observed climatic variability. This study was conducted in the Barbeau Forest (northern France), where cores from mature trees were collected. Three types of functional traits (secondary growth, physiological variables - δ13C and derived Δ13C and iWUE- and several anatomical ones -e.g. vessel area, density-) were recorded for each ring for the 1991-2011 period, distinguishing EW from LW in all measured traits. Among the three types of functional traits, those related to growth experienced the highest variability both between years and between individuals, followed by anatomical and physiological ones. Secondary growth maintained a constant trend during the study period. Instead, ring, EW and LW δ13C slightly declined from 1991 to 2011. Additional intra-ring δ13C analyses allowed for a more detailed understanding of the seasonal dynamics within each year. In particular, the year 2007 (an especially favorable climatic year during the growing season) showed the lowest δ13C values during the EW-LW transition for the whole study period. Inter-annual anatomical traits varied in their responses, but in general, no temporal trends were found. The results from structural equation modeling (SEM) showed direct relationships of seasonal climate and growth, as well as indirect relationships mediated by anatomical and physiological traits. We further discuss the implications of these results on future forest responses to ongoing climate changes.

  6. Determination of genetic stability in long-term somatic embryogenic cultures and derived plantlets of cork oak using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Tina; Pinto, Glória; Loureiro, João; Costa, Armando; Santos, Conceição

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites were used to test genetic stability in somatic embryos (SE) of Quercus suber L. The SE were obtained by a simple somatic embryogenesis protocol: leaf explants from two adult plants (QsG0, QsG5) and from two juvenile plants (QsGM1, QsGM2) were inoculated on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and zeatin. Calluses with primary embryogenic structures were transferred to MSWH (MS medium without growth regulators) and SE proliferated by secondary somatic embryogenesis. High morphological heterogeneity was found among cotyledonary SE. However, converted plants looked morphologically normal with well-developed rooting systems and shoots. The genetic stability of the plant material during the somatic embryogenesis process was evaluated by using six to eight nuclear microsatellites transferred from Q. myrsinifolia Blume, Q. petraea (Matts.) Liebl. and Q. robur L. Five of eight microsatellites distinguished among the genotypes analyzed, and for QsG0, QsGM1 and QsGM2, uniform microsatellite patterns were generally observed within and between SE and the respective donor genotypes. For genotype QsG5, the same pattern was observed in all samples analyzed except one, where the mutation percentage was 2.5%. We conclude that microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic stability of clonal materials and to determine genetic stability throughout the process of somatic embryogenesis. The simple somatic embryogenesis protocol described has potential for the commercial propagation of Q. suber because it results in a low percentage of mutations.

  7. Masting in wind-pollinated trees: system-specific roles of weather and pollination dynamics in driving seed production.

    PubMed

    Bogdziewicz, Michał; Szymkowiak, Jakub; Kasprzyk, Idalia; Grewling, Łukasz; Borowski, Zbigniew; Borycka, Katarzyna; Kantorowicz, Władysław; Myszkowska, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Katarzyna; Ziemianin, Monika; Pesendorfer, Mario B

    2017-10-01

    Masting, the highly variable production of synchronized large seed crops, is a common reproductive strategy in plant populations. In wind-pollinated trees, flowering and pollination dynamics are hypothesized to provide the mechanistic link for the well-known relationship between weather and population-level seed production. Several hypotheses make predictions about the effect of weather on annual pollination success. The pollen coupling hypothesis predicts that weather and plant resources drive the flowering effort of trees, which directly translates into the size of seed crops through efficient pollination. In contrast, the pollination Moran effect hypothesis predicts that weather affects pollination efficiency, leading to occasional bumper crops. Furthermore, the recently formulated phenology synchrony hypothesis predicts that Moran effects can arise because of weather effects on flowering synchrony, which, in turn, drives pollination efficiency. We investigated the relationship between weather, airborne pollen, and seed production in common European trees, two oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) with a 19-yr data set from three sites in Poland. Our results show that warm summers preceding flowering correlated with high pollen abundance and warm springs resulted in short pollen seasons (i.e., high flowering synchrony) for all three species. Pollen abundance was the best predictor for seed crops in beech, as predicted under pollen coupling. In oaks, short pollen seasons, rather than pollen abundance, correlated with large seed crops, providing support for the pollination Moran effect and phenology synchrony hypotheses. Fundamentally different mechanisms may therefore drive masting in species of the family Fagacae. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Climatically sensitive tree-ring chronologies from Crimea, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomina, O.; Davi, N.; D Arrigo, R.

    2003-04-01

    Several tree species in Crimea can reach ages of 1000 years or more (Crimea..., 1999), including Taxus baccata L., Arbutus andrachne L., Quercus pubescens Willd, Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl., Quercus robur L., Juniperus excelsa M.B., and Pistacia mutica Fisch.et Mey. In September 2002, we collected samples from several long-lived tree sites described in the literature (Vulf, 1948, Ivanenko, 1951, Ena, 1983, Podgorniy, 1990), located in the mountains of Central Crimea (Sokolinoye, Chufut-Kale, Chelter) and on the coast of the Black Sea (Ai-Todor, Kharaks, Ai-Petri). The trees sampled generally had 300-350 rings. At Ai-Todor, most oaks, junipers, and pistachio showed decay. However, enough samples of oak, juniper and pine were collected to build three chronologies with good replication over the last 350 years. Long meteorological records (for Sevastopol since 1821, Ai-Petri and Yalta since the 1880's) as well as detailed historical data on extreme climatic events since 1687 (summarized by Borisov 1956) are available for this area and can be used to calibrate and verify the tree growth/climate models. Resulting dendroclimatic reconstructions will be the first from this region. The tree-ring time-series may also be used for archaeological dating of historical wood from several medieval fortresses, towns and palaces. In turn, the archaeological wood could be used to extend the tree-ring time series. Stalactites and stalagmites (Dubliansky, 1977) found in numerous caves, as well as 4000-years old laminated lake sediments (Shostakovich, 1934) are also potentially important sources of paleoclimatic information in the area.

  9. An investigation of the common signal in tree ring stable isotope chronologies at temperate sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurer, M.; Cherubini, P.; Reynolds-Henne, C. E.; Treydte, K. S.; Anderson, W. T.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.

    2008-12-01

    It is currently not well known how coherent carbon and oxygen isotope chronologies from different species and sites are under temperate climate conditions. Here we investigated nine chronologies from Switzerland covering the last two centuries, including three deciduous species (Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, and Quercus petraea) and three conifer species (Abies alba, Picea abies, and Pinus sylvestris) from sites neither strongly limited by temperature nor precipitation. All of the chronologies except Fraxinus were significantly correlated to at least one other chronology. Correlations between different species of the same site were of similar strength to correlations between the sites. We observed a strong common high-frequency (interannual) signal for the δ13C chronologies, whereas the low-frequency (decadal-scale) signal was more similar among the δ18O chronologies. For both carbon and oxygen isotopes, we found significant positive relationships with annual and growing season temperatures and negative relationships with precipitation, again of similar magnitude for all species except for Fraxinus, which contained only minor climatic information. Averaging of all chronologies resulted in an increase in the climatic signal of the mean chronology. The combined δ18O record reflected decadal-scale temperature variations remarkably well (r = 0.72). However, the relationship between climate and carbon isotopes declined over the last 3 decades of the 20th century, probably related to the steep increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, resulting in strongly diverging δ13C trends of the different chronologies. Our study indicates that combining chronologies from different species enhances the potential of isotope studies for extending climate reconstructions into areas of temperate climate.

  10. Volatile compounds in acacia, chestnut, cherry, ash, and oak woods, with a view to their use in cooperage.

    PubMed

    de Simón, Brígida Fernández; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Angel M; Cadahía, Estrella; Sanz, Miriam

    2009-04-22

    Extracts of wood from acacia, European ash, American ash, chestnut, cherry, and three oak species (Quercus pyrenaica, Quercus alba and Quercus petraea) before and after toasting in cooperage were studied by GC-MS. 110 compounds were detected, and 97 of them were identified. In general, all studied woods showed more lignin derivatives than lipid and carbohydrate derivatives, with a higher variety of compounds detected and abundance of them. The toasting led to an increase in the concentrations of most of these compounds, and this increase is especially important in acacia, chestnut and ash woods. The cis and trans isomers of beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone and isobutyrovanillone were only detected in oak wood, 3,4-dimethoxyphenol and 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde only in acacia wood, and p-anisaldehyde and benzylsalicylate only in cherry wood, before and after toasting, and these compounds could be considered chemical markers for each one of these woods. Moreover, each wood has a characteristic volatile composition, from a quantitative point of view, and therefore we can expect a characteristic sensorial profile. The oak wood turned out to be the most balanced, since although it provides a lot of volatile compounds to the aroma and flavor of aged wine, it can do so without masking their primary and secondary aroma. On the whole, toasted acacia and chestnut woods showed a very high richness of studied compounds, as lignin as lipid and carbohydrate derivatives, while cherry and ash were much richer than toasted oak wood in lignin derivatives, but much poorer in lipid and carbohydrate derivatives.

  11. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Didier; Lasnier, Jean-Baptiste; Capdevielle, Xavier; Dugravot, Aline; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001–2005). Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area) at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70–90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60%) than in less heavily infected trees (85%). Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production. PMID:27177029

  12. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species.

    PubMed

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role ('trait portfolio') that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide further

  13. An empirical study of the wound effect on sap flux density measured with thermal dissipation probes.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Andreas; Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Rebmann, Corinna; Herbst, Mathias; Cuntz, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The insertion of thermal dissipation (TD) sensors on tree stems for sap flux density (SFD) measurements can lead to SFD underestimations due to a wound formation close to the drill hole. However, the wound effect has not been assessed experimentally for this method yet. Here, we propose an empirical approach to investigate the effect of the wound healing on measured sap flux with TD probes. The approach was performed for both, diffuse-porous (Fagus sylvatica (Linnaeus)) and ring-porous (Quercus petraea (Lieblein)) species. Thermal dissipation probes were installed on different dates along the growing season to document the effects of the dynamic wound formation. The trees were cut in autumn and additional sensors were installed in the cut stems, therefore, without potential effects of wound development. A range of water pressures was applied to the stem segments and SFDs were simultaneously measured by TD sensors as well as gravimetrically in the laboratory. The formation of wounds around sensors installed in living tree stems led to underestimation of SFD by 21.4 ± 3 and 47.5 ± 3.8% in beech and oak, respectively. The differences between SFD underestimations of diffuse-porous beech and ring-porous oak were, however, not statistically significant. Sensors with 5-, 11- and 22-week-old wounds also showed no significant differences, which implies that the influence of wound formation on SFD estimates was completed within the first few weeks after perforation. These results were confirmed by time courses of SFD measurements in the field. Field SFD values decreased immediately after sensor installation and reached stable values after ~2 weeks with similar underestimations to the ones observed in the laboratory. We therefore propose a feasible approach to correct directly field observations of SFD for potential underestimations due to the wound effect. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  14. High Rates of Gene Flow by Pollen and Seed in Oak Populations across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Sophie; Chadœuf, Joël; Gugerli, Felix; Lascoux, Martin; Buiteveld, Joukje; Cottrell, Joan; Dounavi, Aikaterini; Fineschi, Silvia; Forrest, Laura L.; Fogelqvist, Johan; Goicoechea, Pablo G.; Jensen, Jan Svejgaard; Salvini, Daniela; Vendramin, Giovanni G.; Kremer, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Gene flow is a key factor in the evolution of species, influencing effective population size, hybridisation and local adaptation. We analysed local gene flow in eight stands of white oak (mostly Quercus petraea and Q. robur, but also Q. pubescens and Q. faginea) distributed across Europe. Adult trees within a given area in each stand were exhaustively sampled (range [239, 754], mean 423), mapped, and acorns were collected ([17,147], 51) from several mother trees ([3], [47], 23). Seedlings ([65,387], 178) were harvested and geo-referenced in six of the eight stands. Genetic information was obtained from screening distinct molecular markers spread across the genome, genotyping each tree, acorn or seedling. All samples were thus genotyped at 5–8 nuclear microsatellite loci. Fathers/parents were assigned to acorns and seedlings using likelihood methods. Mating success of male and female parents, pollen and seed dispersal curves, and also hybridisation rates were estimated in each stand and compared on a continental scale. On average, the percentage of the wind-borne pollen from outside the stand was 60%, with large variation among stands (21–88%). Mean seed immigration into the stand was 40%, a high value for oaks that are generally considered to have limited seed dispersal. However, this estimate varied greatly among stands (20–66%). Gene flow was mostly intraspecific, with large variation, as some trees and stands showed particularly high rates of hybridisation. Our results show that mating success was unevenly distributed among trees. The high levels of gene flow suggest that geographically remote oak stands are unlikely to be genetically isolated, questioning the static definition of gene reserves and seed stands. PMID:24454802

  15. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years.

    PubMed

    Bert, Didier; Lasnier, Jean-Baptiste; Capdevielle, Xavier; Dugravot, Aline; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001-2005). Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area) at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70-90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60%) than in less heavily infected trees (85%). Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production.

  16. Forest floor leachate fluxes under six different tree species on a metal contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Van Nevel, Lotte; Mertens, Jan; De Schrijver, An; Baeten, Lander; De Neve, Stefaan; Tack, Filip M G; Meers, Erik; Verheyen, Kris

    2013-03-01

    Trees play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of metals, although the influence of different tree species on the mobilization of metals is not yet clear. This study examined effects of six tree species on fluxes of Cd, Zn, DOC, H(+) and base cations in forest floor leachates on a metal polluted site in Belgium. Forest floor leachates were sampled with zero-tension lysimeters in a 12-year-old post-agricultural forest on a sandy soil. The tree species included were silver birch (Betula pendula), oak (Quercus robur and Q. petraea), black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), aspen (Populus tremula), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). We show that total Cd fluxes in forest floor leachate under aspen were slightly higher than those in the other species' leachates, yet the relative differences between the species were considerably smaller when looking at dissolved Cd fluxes. The latter was probably caused by extremely low H(+) amounts leaching from aspen's forest floor. No tree species effect was found for Zn leachate fluxes. We expected higher metal leachate fluxes under aspen as its leaf litter was significantly contaminated with Cd and Zn. We propose that the low amounts of Cd and Zn leaching under aspen's forest floor were possibly caused by high activity of soil biota, for example burrowing earthworms. Furthermore, our results reveal that Scots pine and oak were characterized by high H(+) and DOC fluxes as well as low base cation fluxes in their forest floor leachates, implying that those species might enhance metal mobilization in the soil profile and thus bear a potential risk for belowground metal dispersion.

  17. Crown condition dynamics of oak in southern Sweden 1988-1999.

    PubMed

    Drobyshev, Igor; Anderson, Stefan; Sonesson, Kerstin

    2007-11-01

    Crown defoliation of oak (Quercus robur and Q. petraea) was analysed in 808 trees during three forest condition surveys (1988, 1993, and 1999) in the southern Sweden. From 1988 to 1999 crown defoliation increased by more than 20%. Changes in crown defoliation were related to the pH in the upper 20-30 cm of the mineral soils, which was closely connected to other measures of soil fertility (cation exchange capacity, CEC and C/N ratio). Trees growing on soils with a high pH (> or =4.00, in BaCl2 filtrate), high CEC and low C/N ratio had significantly lower crown defoliation than trees growing on more acid soils (pH <4.00), indicating that less favourable soil conditions may further enhance oak decline. Age did not differentiate trees with respect to crown defoliation, indicating that decline in crown condition was not due to an age-related increase in crown transparency. Considering only trees younger than 100 years, a significant interaction was observed between changes in crown defoliation and soil pH. Trees younger than 100 years old growing on more acidic soils had a greater increase in crown transparency than trees on more basic soils between 1988 and 1999. Trees > or =100 years old had significantly higher defoliation on more acidic than on more basic soils, however defoliation dynamics of these trees over 1988-99 was not related to soil acidity. Two biotic agents (insect and fungal leaf infections) evaluated in this study did not prove to be important drivers of defoliation dynamics.

  18. Fruit production in three masting tree species does not rely on stored carbon reserves.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Günter; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Keel, Sonja G; Körner, Christian; Han, Qingmin

    2013-03-01

    Fruiting is typically considered to massively burden the seasonal carbon budget of trees. The cost of reproduction has therefore been suggested as a proximate factor explaining observed mast-fruiting patterns. Here, we used a large-scale, continuous (13)C labeling of mature, deciduous trees in a temperate Swiss forest to investigate to what extent fruit formation in three species with masting reproduction behavior (Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea) relies on the import of stored carbon reserves. Using a free-air CO2 enrichment system, we exposed trees to (13)C-depleted CO2 during 8 consecutive years. By the end of this experiment, carbon reserve pools had significantly lower δ(13)C values compared to control trees. δ(13)C analysis of new biomass during the first season after termination of the CO2 enrichment allowed us to distinguish the sources of built-in carbon (old carbon reserves vs. current assimilates). Flowers and expanding leaves carried a significant (13)C label from old carbon stores. In contrast, fruits and vegetative infructescence tissues were exclusively produced from current, unlabeled photoassimilates in all three species, including F. sylvatica, which had a strong masting season. Analyses of δ(13)C in purified starch from xylem of fruit-bearing shoots revealed a complete turn-over of starch during the season, likely due to its usage for bud break. This study is the first to directly demonstrate that fruiting is independent from old carbon reserves in masting trees, with significant implications for mechanistic models that explain mast seeding.

  19. Species-specific allometric scaling under self-thinning: evidence from long-term plots in forest stands.

    PubMed

    Pretzsch, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Experimental plots covering a 120 years' observation period in unthinned, even-aged pure stands of common beech (Fagus sylvatica), Norway spruce (Picea abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and common oak (Quercus Petraea) are used to scrutinize Reineke's (1933) empirically derived stand density rule [see text], N=tree number per unit area, [see text]=mean stem diameter), Yoda's (1963) self-thinning law based on Euclidian geometry ([see text] [see text]=mean biomass per tree), and basic assumptions of West, Brown and Enquist's (1997, 1999) fractal scaling rules ([see text] [see text] w=biomass per tree, d=stem diameter). RMA and OLS regression provides observed allometric exponents, which are tested against the exponents, expected by the considered rules. Hope for a consistent scaling law fades away, as observed exponents significantly correspond with the considered rules only in a minority of cases: (1) exponent r of [see text] varies around Reineke's constant -1.605, but is significantly different from r=-2, supposed by Euclidian or fractal scaling, (2) Exponent c of the self-thinning line [see text] roams roughly about the Euclidian scaling constant -3/2, (3) Exponent a of [see text] tends to follow fractal scaling 8/3. The unique dataset's evaluation displays that (4) scaling exponents and their oscillation are species-specific, (5) Euclidian scaling of one relation and fractal scaling of another are coupled, depending on species. Ecological implications of the results in respect to self-tolerance (common oak>Norway spruce>Scots pine>common beech) and efficiency of space occupation (common beech>Scots pine>Norway spruce>common oak) are stressed and severe consequences for assessing, regulating and scheduling stand density are discussed.

  20. Responses of canopy duration to temperature changes in four temperate tree species: relative contributions of spring and autumn leaf phenology.

    PubMed

    Vitasse, Yann; Porté, Annabel Josée; Kremer, Antoine; Michalet, Richard; Delzon, Sylvain

    2009-08-01

    While changes in spring phenological events due to global warming have been widely documented, changes in autumn phenology, and therefore in growing season length, are less studied and poorly understood. However, it may be helpful to assess the potential lengthening of the growing season under climate warming in order to determine its further impact on forest productivity and C balance. The present study aimed to: (1) characterise the sensitivity of leaf phenological events to temperature, and (2) quantify the relative contributions of leaf unfolding and senescence to the extension of canopy duration with increasing temperature, in four deciduous tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior and Quercus petraea). For 3 consecutive years, we monitored the spring and autumn phenology of 41 populations at elevations ranging from 100 to 1,600 m. Overall, we found significant altitudinal trends in leaf phenology and species-specific differences in temperature sensitivity. With increasing temperature, we recorded an advance in flushing from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 6.6 +/- 0.4 days degrees C(-1) (mean +/- SD) and a 0 to 5.6 +/- 0.6 days degrees C(-1) delay in leaf senescence. Together both changes resulted in a 6.9 +/- 1.0 to 13.0 +/- 0.7 days degrees C(-1) lengthening of canopy duration depending on species. For three of the four studied species, advances in flushing were the main factor responsible for lengthening canopy duration with increasing temperature, leading to a potentially larger gain in solar radiation than delays in leaf senescence. In contrast, for beech, we found a higher sensitivity to temperature in leaf senescence than in flushing, resulting in an equivalent contribution in solar radiation gain. These results suggest that climate warming will alter the C uptake period and forest productivity by lengthening canopy duration. Moreover, the between-species differences in phenological responses to temperature evidenced here could affect

  1. The dynamic of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrêne, E.; François, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-02-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will condition the response of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), we assessed the stand biomass growth dependences at both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Specifically, the relative influence of forest C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. We provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex control including both source and sink limitations. The relative influences of the different growth drivers strongly vary across years and spatial ecological gradients. We suggest a

  2. Fungal community on decomposing leaf litter undergoes rapid successional changes

    PubMed Central

    Voříšková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are considered the primary decomposers of dead plant biomass in terrestrial ecosystems. However, current knowledge regarding the successive changes in fungal communities during litter decomposition is limited. Here we explored the development of the fungal community over 24 months of litter decomposition in a temperate forest with dominant Quercus petraea using 454-pyrosequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and cellobiohydrolase I (cbhI) genes, which encode exocellulases, to specifically address cellulose decomposers. To quantify the involvement of phyllosphere fungi in litter decomposition, the fungal communities in live leaves and leaves immediately before abscission were also analysed. The results showed rapid succession of fungi with dramatic changes in the composition of the fungal community. Furthermore, most of the abundant taxa only temporarily dominated in the substrate. Fungal diversity was lowest at leaf senescence, increased until month 4 and did not significantly change during subsequent decomposition. Highly diverse community of phyllosphere fungi inhabits live oak leaves 2 months before abscission, and these phyllosphere taxa comprise a significant share of the fungal community during early decomposition up to the fourth month. Sequences assigned to the Ascomycota showed highest relative abundances in live leaves and during the early stages of decomposition. In contrast, the relative abundance of sequences assigned to the Basidiomycota phylum, particularly basidiomycetous yeasts, increased with time. Although cellulose was available in the litter during all stages of decomposition, the community of cellulolytic fungi changed substantially over time. The results indicate that litter decomposition is a highly complex process mediated by various fungal taxa. PMID:23051693

  3. Within-stand variability of leaf phenology in deciduous tree species: characterization and ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, N.; Cecchini, S.; Dufrêne, E.; Guillemot, J.; Nicolas, M.

    2014-12-01

    The vast majority of phenological studies address questions relative to the spatial or temporal variability of phenological timings integrated at the forest stand (i.e. tree population) scale. Within a forest stand, the inter-individual variability of phenological timings is expected to affect a range of tree functions among which the access to light, the use of carbon and nitrogen reserves, the absorption of minerals and the sensitivity to pathogens. Hence the individual's phenological traits are likely to be strongly selected, resulting in an adaptation of the population to local conditions, as evidenced by latitudinal and altitudinal clines observed in common garden experiments. Studies dedicated to the within-stand variability of the timing of phenophases have to date been mostly designed for contrasting the behaviours of understory versus overstory species or seedlings compared to their adult conspecifics. The few published papers studying the phenological timings among adult conspecifics revealed unclear patterns. We aimed at clarifying the understanding of the within-stand variability of tree phenology of three of the main European deciduous species (Quercus petraea, Quercus robur and Fagus sylvatica) through the analysis of a unique phenological database collected over 44 (28 Oak sites, 16 Beech stands) forest stands at the tree level for 4 years over France. We show that within a forest stand, individual trees have a distinct "phenological identity" resulting in a year to year conservation of (a) the individuals' spring and autumn phenological rankings and (b) the individuals' critical temperature sums required for budburst and senescence. The individual's spring "phenological identity" affects its functioning and, ultimately, its competitive ability: big trees burst earlier. Acknowledging that Angiosperms show low genetic diversity between populations, we show that the between-site variability of critical temperature sums needed for budburst or senescence

  4. Modeling the carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: Mycorrhizal trade-offs and multipath resistance uptake improve predictions of retranslocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Phillips, Richard P.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate projections of the future land carbon (C) sink by terrestrial biosphere models depend on how nutrient constraints on net primary production are represented. While nutrient limitation is nearly universal, current models do not have a C cost for plant nutrient acquisition. Also missing are symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, which can consume up to 20% of net primary production and supply up to 50% of a plant's nitrogen (N) uptake. Here we integrate simultaneous uptake and mycorrhizae into a cutting-edge plant N model—Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN)—that can be coupled into terrestrial biosphere models. The C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type, with plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae benefiting when N is relatively abundant and plants that support ectomycorrhizae benefiting when N is strongly limiting. Across six temperate forested sites (representing arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated stands and 176 site years), including multipath resistance improved the partitioning of N uptake between aboveground and belowground sources. Integrating mycorrhizae led to further improvements in predictions of N uptake from soil (R2 = 0.69 increased to R2 = 0.96) and from senescing leaves (R2 = 0.29 increased to R2 = 0.73) relative to the original model. On average, 5% and 9% of net primary production in arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated forests, respectively, was needed to support mycorrhizal-mediated acquisition of N. To the extent that resource constraints to net primary production are governed by similar trade-offs across all terrestrial ecosystems, integrating these improvements to FUN into terrestrial biosphere models should enhance predictions of the future land C sink.

  5. Mycorrhizal fungi and global land surface models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Fisher, J. B.; Shi, M.; Phillips, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the current generation of Land Surface Models (LSMs), the representation of coupled carbon (C) and nutrient cycles does not account for allocation of C by plants to mycorrhizal fungi in exchange for limiting nutrients. Given that the amount of C transferred to mycorrhizae can exceed 20% of net primary production (NPP), mycorrhizae can supply over half of the nitrogen (N) needed to support NPP, and that large majority of plants form associations with mycorrhizae; integrating these mechanisms into LSMs may significantly alter our understanding of the role of the terrestrial biosphere in mitigating climate change. Here, we present results from the integration of a mycorrhizal framework into a cutting-edge global plant nitrogen model -- Fixation & Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN; Fisher et al., 2010) -- that can be coupled into existing LSMs. In this mycorrhizal framework, the C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type with: (1) plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) benefiting when N is plentiful and (2) plants that support ectomycorrhizae (ECM) benefiting when N is limiting. At the plot scale (15 x 15m), the My-FUN model improved predictions of retranslocation, N uptake, and the amount of C transferred into the soil relative to the base model across 45 plots that vary in mycorrhizal type in Indiana, USA. At the ecosystem scale, when we coupled this new framework into the Community Land Model (CLM-CN), the model estimated lower C uptake than the base model and more accurately predicted C uptake at the Morgan Monroe State Forest AmeriFlux site. These results suggest that the inclusion of a mycorrhizal framework into LSMs will enhance our ability to predict feedbacks between global change and the terrestrial biosphere.

  6. The role of mycorrhizal fungi in integrated carbon and nitrogen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, Karin; Phillips, Rich; Fransson, Petra; Brzostek, Eddie; Wassen, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere remains one of the fundamental challenges to predicting future changes in the Earth's climate. Will forests continue to sequester carbon (C) under rising atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition, or will the capacity of trees to build new biomass be constrained by lack of nutrients? Recent research shows that not all tree species react similarly to N-deposition; differences are found in growth rates, survival and C-storage. Mycorrhizal fungi are an important link in coupling the C and N cycles and are critical for tree growth. Mycorrhizal fungi form mutualistic relationships, receiving carbohydrates from their plant hosts and in return enhancing the supply of critical nutrients. The two most abundant mycorrhizal associations are arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (EM), both having different mechanisms of N acquisition, which may explain observed differences in tree species response to N-deposition. Changing environmental variables influence mycorrhizal fungi. Increasing CO2 concentration increases mycorrhizal abundance, growth and plant C allocation belowground. However, the effect of N-deposition on mycorrhizae is less clear. N-deposition can have positive, neutral or negative effects on mycorrhizal abundance and growth. It has been hypothesized that the effect of N-deposition on mycorrhizal growth depends on initial soil nutrient status. This soil nutrient status may also determine the nature of the mycorrhizal relationship to the tree, where in nutrient poor conditions, they could be more beneficial than in nutrient rich conditions. In this research, we extend the hypothesis to include growth of trees associated with either EM or AM, as a function of increasing nitrogen deposition and soil nutrient status. Therefore, we take into account the C-cost and the N-gain of the mycorrhizal fungi for the tree in the different nutrient stages.

  7. Mycorrhiza reduces adverse effects of dark septate endophytes (DSE) on growth of conifers.

    PubMed

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and pathogens.

  8. Mycorrhiza Reduces Adverse Effects of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) on Growth of Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and

  9. Fertility-dependent effects of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities on white spruce seedling nutrition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alistair J H; Potvin, Lynette R; Lilleskov, Erik A

    2015-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcMF) typically colonize nursery seedlings, but nutritional and growth effects of these communities are only partly understood. To examine these effects, Picea glauca seedlings collected from a tree nursery naturally colonized by three dominant EcMF were divided between fertilized and unfertilized treatments. After one growing season seedlings were harvested, ectomycorrhizas identified using DNA sequencing, and seedlings analyzed for leaf nutrient concentration and content, and biomass parameters. EcMF community structure-nutrient interactions were tested using nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) combined with vector analysis of foliar nutrients and biomass. We identified three dominant species: Amphinema sp., Atheliaceae sp., and Thelephora terrestris. NMDS + envfit revealed significant community effects on seedling nutrition that differed with fertilization treatment. PERMANOVA and regression analyses uncovered significant species effects on host nutrient concentration, content, and stoichiometry. Amphinema sp. had a significant positive effect on phosphorus (P), calcium and zinc concentration, and P content; in contrast, T. terrestris had a negative effect on P concentration. In the unfertilized treatment, percent abundance of the Amphinema sp. negatively affected foliar nitrogen (N) concentration but not content, and reduced foliar N/P. In fertilized seedlings, Amphinema sp. was positively related to foliar concentrations of N, magnesium, and boron, and both concentration and content of manganese, and Atheliaceae sp. had a negative relationship with P content. Findings shed light on the community and species effects on seedling condition, revealing clear functional differences among dominants. The approach used should be scalable to explore function in more complex communities composed of unculturable EcMF.

  10. Stochastic distribution of small soil eukaryotes resulting from high dispersal and drift in a local environment

    PubMed Central

    Bahram, Mohammad; Kohout, Petr; Anslan, Sten; Harend, Helery; Abarenkov, Kessy; Tedersoo, Leho

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in ecology is to understand the relative importance of processes that shape diversity patterns. Compared with aboveground biota, little is known about spatial patterns and processes in soil organisms. Here we examine the spatial structure of communities of small soil eukaryotes to elucidate the underlying stochastic and deterministic processes in the absence of environmental gradients at a local scale. Specifically, we focus on the fine-scale spatial autocorrelation of prominent taxonomic and functional groups of eukaryotic microbes. We collected 123 soil samples in a nested design at distances ranging from 0.01 to 64 m from three boreal forest sites and used 454 pyrosequencing analysis of Internal Transcribed Spacer for detecting Operational Taxonomic Units of major eukaryotic groups simultaneously. Among the main taxonomic groups, we found significant but weak spatial variability only in the communities of Fungi and Rhizaria. Within Fungi, ectomycorrhizas and pathogens exhibited stronger spatial structure compared with saprotrophs and corresponded to vegetation. For the groups with significant spatial structure, autocorrelation occurred at a very fine scale (<2 m). Both dispersal limitation and environmental selection had a weak effect on communities as reflected in negative or null deviation of communities, which was also supported by multivariate analysis, that is, environment, spatial processes and their shared effects explained on average <10% of variance. Taken together, these results indicate a random distribution of soil eukaryotes with respect to space and environment in the absence of environmental gradients at the local scale, reflecting the dominant role of drift and homogenizing dispersal. PMID:26394006

  11. Pinus pinaster seedlings and their fungal symbionts show high plasticity in phosphorus acquisition in acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; Louche, J; Legname, E; Duchemin, M; Plassard, C

    2009-12-01

    Young seedlings of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Soland in Aït.) were grown in rhizoboxes using intact spodosol soil samples from the southwest of France, in Landes of Gascogne, presenting a large variation of phosphorus (P) availability. Soils were collected from a 93-year-old unfertilized stand and a 13-year-old P. pinaster stand with regular annual fertilization of either only P or P and nitrogen (N). After 6 months of culture in controlled conditions, different morphotypes of ectomycorrhiza (ECM) were used for the measurements of acid phosphatase activity and molecular identification of fungal species using amplification of the ITS region. Total biomass, N and P contents were measured in roots and shoots of plants. Bicarbonate- and NaOH-available inorganic P (Pi), organic P (Po) and ergosterol concentrations were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The results showed that bulk soil from the 93-year-old forest stand presented the highest Po levels, but relatively higher bicarbonate-extractable Pi levels compared to 13-year-old unfertilized stand. Fertilizers significantly increased the concentrations of inorganic P fractions in bulk soil. Ergosterol contents in rhizosphere soil were increased by fertilizer application. The dominant fungal species was Rhizopogon luteolus forming 66.6% of analysed ECM tips. Acid phosphatase activity was highly variable and varied inversely with bicarbonate-extractable Pi levels in the rhizosphere soil. Total P or total N in plants was linearly correlated with total plant biomass, but the slope was steep only between total P and biomass in fertilized soil samples. In spite of high phosphatase activity in ECM tips, P availability remained a limiting nutrient in soil samples from unfertilized stands. Nevertheless young P. pinaster seedlings showed a high plasticity for biomass production at low P availability in soils.

  12. [Nutrient transfer and growth of Pinus greggii Engelm. inoculated with edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in two substrates].

    PubMed

    Rentería-Chávez, María C; Pérez-Moreno, Jesús; Cetina-Alcalá, Víctor M; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    An ectomycorrhiza is a mutualistic symbiosis of paramount importance in forestry and tree production. One of the selection criteria of ectomycorrhizal fungi that has currently gained importance is their edibility due to the economic, ecological and cultural relevance of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms as a non-timber forest product. The effect of the inoculation with three edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms: Laccaria laccata, Laccaria bicolor y Hebeloma leucosarx, which are widely sold in Mexico, on the growth and nutrient contents of Pinus greggii grown in an experimental substrate and a commercial substrate enriched with a slow-release fertilizer, was evaluated. Two years after sowing, differences in terms of shoot and root biomass and macro and micronutrient contents between inoculated and non-inoculated plants, were recorded independently of the fungal species and the substrate. Despite the fact that plants grown in the commercial substrate had higher growth and nutrient contents, their ectomycorrhizal colonization percentages were smaller than those of the plants grown in the experimental substrate. The differences in the nutrient transfer to the inoculated plant shoots among the evaluated fungal species were recorded. Ca mobilization by L. laccata, Na by L. bicolor and Mn by H. leucosarx were observed in the plants growing in the experimental substrate. It has been demonstrated that the selection of substrates constitutes an important factor in the production of ectomycorrhizal plants and that the three evaluated species of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms have an enormous potential in the controlled mycorrhization of P. greggii. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Janos, David P; Scott, John; Aristizábal, Catalina; Bowman, David M J S

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta) host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments) separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  14. Instrumental monitoring of the birth and development of truffles in a Tuber melanosporum orchard.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, G; Leonardi, M; Di Carlo, P; Ranalli, D; Zinni, A; De Laurentiis, G

    2014-04-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiotic plants, soil suitability, temperature, and humidity are, by general consensus, considered decisive factors in truffle production. However, experimental approaches to define the environmental conditions that stimulate formation of truffle primordia and promote their growth to maturity have been lacking. By analysis of data of many atmospheric and soil parameters collected since 2009 within a Tuber melanosporum orchard, the trends of metabolic activity, detected as CO2 production in the soil, have been identified as the most reliable parameter to indicate the 'birth' of the truffle primordia. They seem to be produced when mycelial activity is intense and undergoes water stress, after which it resumes. About 6-18 days after recovery of metabolic activity, we could collect primordia of T. melanosporum. Many die or develop too early and consequently rot or are eaten by insect larvae. These events occur several times during summer and autumn, those that 'sprout' in late summer or later grow steadily and reach maturity. Using a particular ground-penetrating radar (GPR) setup to discriminate truffles, we could identify individual truffles in the soil after they have enlarged to at least 6 mm in diameter and follow their growth in volume and diameter over time. These two instrumental methods (CO2 sensor and GPR), although yet to be improved, open new important perspectives to better understand truffle biology and manage truffle orchards to support the newly acquired demonstration of the fundamental role of host plants for the nutrient transfer to the ectomycorrhiza-mycelium-fruiting body complex of T. melanosporum.

  15. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  16. Spatial Patterns of Ectomycorrhizal Assemblages in a Monospecific Forest in Relation to Host Tree Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christa; Finkeldey, Reiner; Polle, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (EcM) are important for soil exploration and thereby may shape belowground interactions of roots. We investigated the composition and spatial structures of EcM assemblages in relation to host genotype in an old-growth, monospecific beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We hypothesized that neighboring roots of different beech individuals are colonized by similar EcM assemblages if host genotype had no influence on the fungal colonization and that the similarity would decrease with increasing distance of the sampling points. The alternative was that the EcM species showed preferences for distinct beech genotypes resulting in intraspecific variation of EcM-host assemblages. EcM species identities, abundance and exploration type as well as the genotypes of the colonized roots were determined in each sampling unit of a 1 L soil core (r = 0.04 m, depth 0.2 m). The Morisita-Horn similarity indices (MHSI) based on EcM species abundance and multiple community comparisons were calculated. No pronounced variation of MHSI with increasing distances of the sampling points within a plot was found, but variations between plots. Very high similarities and no between plot variation were found for MHSI based on EcM exploration types suggesting homogenous soil foraging in this ecosystem. The EcM community on different root genotypes in the same soil core exhibited high similarity, whereas the EcM communities on the root of the same tree genotype in different soil cores were significantly dissimilar. This finding suggests that spatial structuring of EcM assemblages occurs within the root system of an individual. This may constitute a novel, yet unknown mechanism ensuring colonization by a diverse EcM community of the roots of a given host individual. PMID:23630537

  17. Root systems of successional and old-growth forest species and its role on nutrient dynamics within a tropical rainforest in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Soedjito, H.

    1990-01-01

    Most studies of nutrient dynamics in tropical rainforest have focused on the above ground portion of forest trees. However, the aim of this dissertation is to demonstrate the root systems also play an important role in nutrient dynamics. Nutrient dynamics, in general, are likely to differ between successional forest and old-growth forest. To test for differences in nutrient uptake between trees of successional and old-growth forests, the author experimentally compared seedlings of six different species by measuring biomass allocation and nutrient concentrations as well as determining spatial patterns of root distribution and the absorption ability of the root systems by usign the [sup 32]P radiotracer technique. Young saplings of ten species from natural habitats were also examined for the same parameters, and the results to determine whether results of the laboratory experiments were consistent with field results. It was found that as seedlings, roots of successional forest species penetrate deeper into the soil and have longer lateral roots than old-growth forest species. Successional forest species also had greater biomass accumulation rates, higher ability to absorb [sup 32]P, and contained higher levels of nutrients than species of old-growth forest. Mycorrhizal associations are suspected to be responsible for the high nutrient concentrations, primarily of P and N, within successional species. Successional forest tree species had more cases of infection by vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM), while old-growth forest species were infected by both VAM and ectomycorrhizas. Therefore, successional seedlings can play an important role in conserving released nutrients after disturbance. At the landscape level, successional species together with old-growth species can maintain sustainable nutrient cycling within tropical rainforests.

  18. Characterization of Aluminum-Binding Ligands in Pisolithus tinctorius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Cumming, J.

    2009-12-01

    Highly abundant in soil, Al is found in non-toxic forms under neutral pH conditions. However, when the pH of the soil decreases, the presence of cationic Al increases, creating a toxic environment for plants and fungi. Certain plants and their ectomycorrhizal symbiotic fungi have higher tolerance for Al in the soil and surrounding media. A particular fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, has been found to produce Al-binding pigments which chelate and detoxify cationic Al in the environment. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine the resistance of different ectomycorrhizal fungi species to Al, 2) characterize the production of Al binding compounds by fungi, and 3) quantify Al partitioning between free and bound forms in the environment. Pisolithus tinctorius, Amanita muscaria, Lacaria bicolor, and Rhizopogon rubescens were grown under varying Al concentration in vitro (0 and 200 µM for all species; 0, 100, 200, and 400 µM for P. tinctorius). Biomass was measured and media was analyzed for Al speciation and organic acid profiles post experiment. The Al-binding exudates of P. tinctorius were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and further separated with reverse phase HPLC (UV). All fungi were resistant to Al at the concentrations tested. Pisolithus was found to have a significantly higher mass than other ectomycorrhizae studied. Organic Al levels were found to increase with an increase in Al treatment for P. tinctorius. These techniques revealed at least eleven compounds active in the Al-binding IMAC fraction with seven peaks having brown pigmentation. These compounds may assist in Al detoxification by P. tinctorius.

  19. Structure and Expression Profile of the Phosphate Pht1 Transporter Gene Family in Mycorrhizal Populus trichocarpa1[W

    PubMed Central

    Loth-Pereda, Verónica; Orsini, Elena; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lota, Frédéric; Kohler, Annegret; Diss, Loic; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel; Nehls, Uwe; Bucher, Marcel; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Gene networks involved in inorganic phosphate (Pi) acquisition and homeostasis in woody perennial species able to form mycorrhizal symbioses are poorly known. Here, we describe the features of the 12 genes coding for Pi transporters of the Pht1 family in poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Individual Pht1 transporters play distinct roles in acquiring and translocating Pi in different tissues of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal poplar during different growth conditions and developmental stages. Pi starvation triggered the up-regulation of most members of the Pht1 family, especially PtPT9 and PtPT11. PtPT9 and PtPT12 showed a striking up-regulation in ectomycorrhizas and endomycorrhizas, whereas PtPT1 and PtPT11 were strongly down-regulated. PtPT10 transcripts were highly abundant in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) roots only. PtPT8 and PtPT10 are phylogenetically associated to the AM-inducible Pht1 subfamily I. The analysis of promoter sequences revealed conserved motifs similar to other AM-inducible orthologs in PtPT10 only. To gain more insight into gene regulatory mechanisms governing the AM symbiosis in woody plant species, the activation of the poplar PtPT10 promoter was investigated and detected in AM of potato (Solanum tuberosum) roots. These results indicated that the regulation of AM-inducible Pi transporter genes is conserved between perennial woody and herbaceous plant species. Moreover, poplar has developed an alternative Pi uptake pathway distinct from AM plants, allowing ectomycorrhizal poplar to recruit PtPT9 and PtPT12 to cope with limiting Pi concentrations in forest soils. PMID:21705655

  20. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metablome.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, P. E.; Sreedasyam, A.; Trivedi, G; Podila, G. K.; Cseke, L. J.; Collart, F. R.

    2011-05-13

    Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides) roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  1. Revisiting phylogenetic diversity and cryptic species of Cenococcum geophilum sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Obase, Keisuke; Douhan, Greg W; Matsuda, Yosuke; Smith, Matthew E

    2016-08-01

    The fungus Cenococcum geophilum Fr. (Dothideomycetes, Ascomycota) is one of the most common ectomycorrhizal fungi in boreal to temperate regions. A series of molecular studies has demonstrated that C. geophilum is monophyletic but a heterogeneous species or a species complex. Here, we revisit the phylogenetic diversity of C. geophilum sensu lato from a regional to intercontinental scale by using new data from Florida (USA) along with existing data in GenBank from Japan, Europe, and North America. The combination of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene resolved six well-supported lineages (87-100 % bootstrap values) that are closely related to each other and a seventh lineage that is phylogenetically distinct. A multi-locus analysis (small subunit (SSU), large subunit (LSU), translational elongation factor (TEF), and the largest and second-largest subunits of RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2)) revealed that the divergent lineage is the sister group to all other known Cenococcum isolates. Isolates of the divergent lineage grow fast on nutrient media and do not form ectomycorrhizas on seedlings of several pine and oak species. Our results indicate that C. geophilum sensu lato includes more phylogenetically distinct cryptic species than have previously been reported. Furthermore, the divergent lineage appears to be a non-mycorrhizal sister group. We discuss the phylogenetic diversity of C. geophilum sensu lato and argue in favor of species recognition based on phylogenetic and ecological information in addition to morphological characteristics. A new genus and species (Pseudocenococcum floridanum gen. et sp. nov.) is proposed to accommodate a divergent and putatively non-mycorrhizal lineage.

  2. The relative ages of ectomycorrhizal mushrooms and their plant hosts estimated using Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hibbett, David S; Matheny, P Brandon

    2009-01-01

    Background Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) are symbioses formed by polyphyletic assemblages of fungi (mostly Agaricomycetes) and plants (mostly Pinaceae and angiosperms in the rosid clade). Efforts to reconstruct the evolution of the ECM habit in Agaricomycetes have yielded vastly different results, ranging from scenarios with many relatively recent origins of the symbiosis and no reversals to the free-living condition; a single ancient origin of ECM and many subsequent transitions to the free-living condition; or multiple gains and losses of the association. To test the plausibility of these scenarios, we performed Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses including fungi, plants, and other eukaryotes, based on the principle that a symbiosis cannot evolve prior to the origin of both partners. As we were primarily interested in the relative ages of the plants and fungi, we did not attempt to calibrate the molecular clock using the very limited fossil record of Agaricomycetes. Results Topologically constrained and unconstrained analyses suggest that the root node of the Agaricomycetes is much older than either the rosids or Pinaceae. The Agaricomycetidae, a large clade containing the Agaricales and Boletales (collectively representing 70% of Agaricomycetes), is also significantly older than the rosids. The relative age of Agaricomycetidae and Pinaceae, however, is sensitive to tree topology, and the inclusion or exclusion of the gnetophyte Welwitschia mirabilis. Conclusion The ancestor of the Agaricomycetes could not have been an ECM species because it existed long before any of its potential hosts. Within more derived clades of Agaricomycetes, there have been at least eight independent origins of ECM associations involving angiosperms, and at least six to eight origins of associations with gymnosperms. The first ECM symbioses may have involved Pinaceae, which are older than rosids, but several major clades of Agaricomycetes, such as the Boletales and Russulales, are young

  3. The relative ages of ectomycorrhizal mushrooms and their plant hosts estimated using Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses.

    PubMed

    Hibbett, David S; Matheny, P Brandon

    2009-03-10

    Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) are symbioses formed by polyphyletic assemblages of fungi (mostly Agaricomycetes) and plants (mostly Pinaceae and angiosperms in the rosid clade). Efforts to reconstruct the evolution of the ECM habit in Agaricomycetes have yielded vastly different results, ranging from scenarios with many relatively recent origins of the symbiosis and no reversals to the free-living condition; a single ancient origin of ECM and many subsequent transitions to the free-living condition; or multiple gains and losses of the association. To test the plausibility of these scenarios, we performed Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses including fungi, plants, and other eukaryotes, based on the principle that a symbiosis cannot evolve prior to the origin of both partners. As we were primarily interested in the relative ages of the plants and fungi, we did not attempt to calibrate the molecular clock using the very limited fossil record of Agaricomycetes. Topologically constrained and unconstrained analyses suggest that the root node of the Agaricomycetes is much older than either the rosids or Pinaceae. The Agaricomycetidae, a large clade containing the Agaricales and Boletales (collectively representing 70% of Agaricomycetes), is also significantly older than the rosids. The relative age of Agaricomycetidae and Pinaceae, however, is sensitive to tree topology, and the inclusion or exclusion of the gnetophyte Welwitschia mirabilis. The ancestor of the Agaricomycetes could not have been an ECM species because it existed long before any of its potential hosts. Within more derived clades of Agaricomycetes, there have been at least eight independent origins of ECM associations involving angiosperms, and at least six to eight origins of associations with gymnosperms. The first ECM symbioses may have involved Pinaceae, which are older than rosids, but several major clades of Agaricomycetes, such as the Boletales and Russulales, are young enough to have been

  4. Long-term dynamics of mycorrhizal root tips in a loblolly pine forest grown with free-air CO2 enrichment and soil N fertilization for 6 years.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Seth G; Taylor, Benton N; Cooper, Emily R; Beidler, Katilyn V; Strand, Allan E; McCormack, M Luke; Zhang, Siyao

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale, long-term FACE (Free-Air CO2 enrichment) experiments indicate that increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations will influence forest C cycling in unpredictable ways. It has been recently suggested that responses of mycorrhizal fungi could determine whether forest net primary productivity (NPP) is increased by elevated CO2 over long time periods and if forests soils will function as sources or sinks of C in the future. We studied the dynamic responses of ectomycorrhizae to N fertilization and atmospheric CO2 enrichment at the Duke FACE experiment using minirhizotrons over a 6 year period (2005-2010). Stimulation of mycorrhizal production by elevated CO2 was observed during only 1 (2007) of 6 years. This increased the standing crop of mycorrhizal tips during 2007 and 2008; during 2008, significantly higher mortality returned standing crop to ambient levels for the remainder of the experiment. It is therefore unlikely that increased production of mycorrhizal tips can explain the lack of progressive nitrogen limitations and associated increases in N uptake observed in CO2 -enriched plots at this site. Fertilization generally decreased tree reliance on mycorrhizae as tip production declined with the addition of nitrogen as has been shown in many other studies. Annual NPP of mycorrhizal tips was greatest during years with warm January temperatures and during years with cool spring temperatures. A 2 °C increase in average late spring temperatures (May and June) decreased annual production of mycorrhizal root tip length by 50%. This has important implications for ecosystem function in a warmer world in addition to potential for forest soils to sequester atmospheric C.

  5. Impact of ectomycorrhizal colonization and rust infection on the secondary metabolism of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides).

    PubMed

    Pfabel, Cornelia; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Baum, Christel; Struck, Christine; Frey, Pascal; Weih, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Fungal colonization can significantly affect the secondary metabolism of the host plants. We tested the impact of a common below-ground symbiosis, i.e., ectomycorrhiza formation, on poplar leaf chemical components that are involved in the defence against a common disease, i.e., rust fungi, in N-deficient soil. A rust-susceptible poplar clone (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides 'Beaupré') was (a) non-associated with ectomycorrhizal fungus (EM) Hebeloma mesophaeum (Pers.) Quélet MÜN and non-infected with rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina Kleb. (isolate 98AG31), (b) associated with EM, (c) inoculated with rust fungus and (d) associated with EM and inoculated with rust fungus. Poplar leaves were analysed by photometric and mass spectrometric techniques (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS)). Both rust infection and mycorrhiza formation led to increased proportions of condensed tannins in relation to total phenolics (13% in the control, 18-19% in the fungal treatments). In contrast, salicylic acid concentration (6.8 µg g(-1) in the control) was higher only in the rust treatments (17.9 and 25.4 µg g(-1) with rust infection). The Py-FIMS analysis revealed that the rust-infected treatments were significantly separated from the non-rust-infected treatments on the basis of six flavonoids and one lipid. The relative abundance of these components, which have known functions in plant defence, was decreased after rust infection of non-mycorrhizal plants, but not in mycorrhizal plants. The results indicate that the ectomycorrhizal formation compensated the rust infection by a decrease in the flavonoid syntheses. The study provides new evidence for an interactive response of mycorrhizal colonization and infection with rust fungi in the metabolism of poplar.

  6. Mycorrhiza-plant colonization patterns on a subalpine glacier forefront as a model system of primary succession.

    PubMed

    Cázares, Efrén; Trappe, James M; Jumpponen, Ari

    2005-09-01

    Lyman glacier in the North Cascades Mountains of Washington has a subalpine forefront characterized by a well-developed terminal moraine, inconspicuous successional moraines, fluting, and outwash. These deposits were depleted of symbiotic fungi when first exposed but colonized by them over time after exposure. Four major groups of plant species in this system are (1) mycorrhiza-independent or facultative mycotrophic, (2) dependent on arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) (3) dependent on ericoid mycorrhiza (ERM) or ectomycorrhizae (EM), and (4) colonized by dark-septate (DS) endophytes. We hypothesized that availability of mycorrhizal propagules was related to the success of mycorrhiza-dependent plants in colonizing new substrates in naturally evolved ecosystems. To test this hypothesis roots samples of 66 plant species were examined for mycorrhizal colonization. The plants were sampled from communities at increasing distances from the glacier terminus to compare the newest communities with successively older ones. Long established, secondary successional dry meadow communities adjacent to the glacier forefront, and nearby high alpine communities were sampled for comparison. DS were common on most plant species on the forefront. Nonmycorrhizal plants predominated in the earlier successional sites, whereas the proportion of mycorrhizal plants generally increased with age of community. AM were present, mostly at low levels, and nearly absent in two sites of the forefront. ERM were present in all species of Ericaceae sampled, and EM in all species of Pinaceae and Salicaceae. Roots of plants in the long established meadow and heath communities adjacent to the forefront and the high alpine community all had one or another of the colonization types, with DS and AM predominating.

  7. The ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Lactarius deliciosus and Pinus sylvestris in forest soil samples: symbiotic efficiency and development on roots of a rDNA internal transcribed spacer-selected isolate of L. deliciosus.

    PubMed

    Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Conventi, Serge; Ruiz, Guy; Plassard, Claude; Mousain, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    The effect on plant growth of pre-inoculation of Pinus sylvestris with the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) edible basidiomycete Lactarius deliciosus (isolate D45) under controlled conditions, and the development on roots of this basidiomycete, were investigated in gamma-irradiated and unsterilized containers containing different forest soil cores or a perlite-vermiculite mixture. Five months after planting, L. deliciosus mycorrhizal plants exhibited greater growth than the non-mycorrhizal ones in all soil types, i.e. up to a 325% increase in shoot height in the sterilized soils. The experiment demonstrated the dependency of P. sylvestris seedlings upon ECM symbiosis for their survival in gamma-irradiated, microbiologically disturbed soil samples. Furthermore, in two soils, the growth of L. deliciosus-inoculated seedlings was greater in the sterilized soil samples than in the non-sterilized ones, i.e. 46% and 132% increase in shoot height under sterilized soil conditions. In containers randomly sampled from each soil type, the degree of root colonization by the inoculated isolate, calculated as the number of mycorrhizal root tips divided by the total number of root tips x100, ranged from 80% to 35%. Within the short term, the inoculated isolate developed rapidly on roots, dominated, and hampered ectomycorrhiza formation by various unidentified (but not Lactarius) resident ECM fungi in unsterilized soil types. Results indicate that the ECM species L. deliciosus is worth investigating to ascertain if other isolates benefit pine growth like the isolate D45, and are therefore also attractive candidates for forestry applications in the Mediterranean area.

  8. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Murat, Claude; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbe, Jessy L; Morin, Emmanuelle; Tisserant, Emilie; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  9. Early-successional ectomycorrhizal fungi effectively support extracellular enzyme activities and seedling nitrogen accumulation in mature forests.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Bailey A; Jones, Melanie D

    2017-04-01

    After stand-replacing disturbance, regenerating conifer seedlings become colonized by different ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) than the locally adapted EMF communities present on seedlings in mature forests. We studied whether EMF species that colonized subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) seedlings in clearcuts differed from those that colonized seedlings in adjacent mature forests with respect to mycorrhizoplane extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) and N status of the seedlings. We tested two alternate hypotheses: (1) that EEAs would differ between the two EMF communities, with higher activities associated with forest-origin communities, and (2) that acclimation to soil environment was considerable enough that EEAs would be determined primarily by the soil type in which the ectomycorrhizas were growing. Naturally colonized fir seedlings were reciprocally transplanted between clearcuts and forests, carrying different EMF communities with them. EEAs were influenced more by destination environment than by EMF community. EEAs were as high in early-successional as in late-successional communities in both destination environments. Buds of clearcut-origin seedlings had the same or higher N contents as forest seedlings after a growing season in either environment. These results indicate that (i) symbiotic EMF and/or their associated microbial communities demonstrate substantial ability to acclimate to new field environments; (ii) the ability to produce organic matter-degrading enzymes is not a trait that necessarily distinguishes early- and late-successional EMF communities in symbiosis; (iii) early-successional EMF are as capable of supporting seedling N accumulation in forest soils as late-successional EMF; and (iv) disturbed ecosystems where early-successional EMF are present should have high resilience for organic matter degradation.

  10. Truffles Regulate Plant Root Morphogenesis via the Production of Auxin and Ethylene1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Splivallo, Richard; Fischer, Urs; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Truffles are symbiotic fungi that form ectomycorrhizas with plant roots. Here we present evidence that at an early stage of the interaction, i.e. prior to physical contact, mycelia of the white truffle Tuber borchii and the black truffle Tuber melanopsorum induce alterations in root morphology of the host Cistus incanus and the nonhost Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; i.e. primary root shortening, lateral root formation, root hair stimulation). This was most likely due to the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ethylene by the mycelium. Application of a mixture of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and IAA fully mimicked the root morphology induced by the mycelium for both host and nonhost plants. Application of the single hormones only partially mimicked it. Furthermore, primary root growth was not inhibited in the Arabidopsis auxin transport mutant aux1-7 by truffle metabolites while root branching was less effected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-LH. The double mutant aux1-7;ein2-LH displayed reduced sensitivity to fungus-induced primary root shortening and branching. In agreement with the signaling nature of truffle metabolites, increased expression of the auxin response reporter DR5∷GFP in Arabidopsis root meristems subjected to the mycelium could be observed, confirming that truffles modify the endogenous hormonal balance of plants. Last, we demonstrate that truffles synthesize ethylene from l-methionine probably through the α-keto-γ-(methylthio)butyric acid pathway. Taken together, these results establish the central role of IAA and ethylene as signal molecules in truffle/plant interactions. PMID:19535471